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Sample records for reducing peginterferon alfa-2a

  1. Peginterferon Alfa-2a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... interferons. Peginterferon is a combination of interferon and polyethylene glycol, which helps the interferon stay active in ... alpha interferons, any other medications, benzyl alcohol, or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Ask your doctor if you are ...

  2. Peginterferon alfa-2a for AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma: experience with 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Rokx, Casper; van der Ende, Marchina E; Verbon, Annelies; Rijnders, Bart J A

    2013-11-01

    In this observational cohort study, 10 patients with extensive or treatment-refractory AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma were treated with peginterferon alfa-2a. Tumor responses were observed in 9 patients with a median progression-free survival of 645 days. Peginterferon alfa-2a could be an effective therapy for extensive or treatment-resistant Kaposi sarcoma.

  3. Balapiravir plus peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD)/ribavirin in a randomized trial of hepatitis C genotype 1 patients(◆)

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David R.; Zeuzem, Stefan; Andreone, Pietro; Ferenci, Peter; Herring, Robert; Jensen, Donald M.; Marcellin, Patrick; Pockros, Paul J.; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Rustgi, Vinod K.; Sepe, Thomas; Sulkowski, Mark; Thomason, Isaac R.; Yoshida, Eric M.; Chan, Anna; Hill, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Balapiravir (R1626, RG1626) is the prodrug of a nucleoside analogue inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (R1479, RG1479). This phase 2, double-blind international trial evaluated the optimal treatment regimen of balapiravir plus peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD)/ribavirin. Material and methods Treatment-naive genotype 1 patients (N = 516) were randomized to one of seven treatment groups in which they received balapiravir 500, 1,000, or 1,500 mg twice daily, peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD) 180 or 90 μg/week and ribavirin 1,000/1,200 mg/day or peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD)/ribavirin. The planned treatment duration with balapiravir was reduced from 24 to 12 weeks due to safety concerns. Results The percentage of patients with undetectable HCV RNA was consistently higher in all balapiravir groups from week 2 to 12. However, high rates of dose modifications and discontinuations of one/all study drugs compromised the efficacy assessment and resulted in similar sustained virological response rates in the balapiravir groups (range 32-50%) and the peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD)/ribavirin group (43%). Balapiravir was discontinued for safety reasons in 28-36% of patients (most often for lymphopenia) and the percentage of patients with serious adverse events (especially hematological, infection, ocular events) was dose related. Serious hematological adverse events (particularly neutropenia, lymphopenia) were more common in balapiravir recipients. Two deaths in the balapiravir/peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin combination groups were considered possibly related to study medication. Conclusion Further development of balapiravir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C has been halted because of the unacceptable benefit to risk ratio revealed in this study (www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00517439). PMID:22166557

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatment with peginterferon-alfa-2a versus peginterferon-alfa-2b for patients with chronic hepatitis C under the public payer perspective in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C affects approximately 170 million people worldwide, and thus being one of the main causes of chronic liver disease. About 20% of patients with chronic hepatitis C will develop cirrhosis over 20 years, and present an increased risk of developing hepatic complications. Sustained virological response (SVR) is associated with a better prognosis compared to untreated patients and treatment failures. The objective of this analysis was to compare treatment costs and outcomes of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a versus pegylated interferon-alfa-2b, both associated with ribavirin, in the therapeutic scheme of 24 weeks and 48 week for hepatitis C genotypes 2/3 and genotype 1, respectively, under the Brazilian Public Health System (SUS) scenario. Methods To project disease progression, a Markov model was built based on clinical stages of chronic disease. A Delphi panel was conducted to evaluate medical resources related to each stage, followed by costing of related materials, services, procedures and pharmaceutical products. The evaluation was made from a public payer perspective. The source used for costing was government reimbursement procedures list (SAI/SIH–SUS). Drug acquisition costs were obtained from the Brazilian Official Gazette and “Banco de Preços em Saúde” (government official source). It was assumed a mean patient weight of 70 kg. Costs were reported in 2011 Brazilian Reais (US$1 ≈ $Brz1.80). A systematic review followed by a meta-analysis of the 7 identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which compared pegylated interferons, was conducted for obtaining relative efficacy of both drugs: for genotype 2/3, mean rate of SVR was 79.2% for peginterferon-alfa-2a and 73.8% for peginterferon-alfa-2b. For genotype 1, SVR mean rate was 42.09% versus 33.44% (peginterferon-alfa-2a and peginterferon-alfa-2b respectively). Time horizon considered was lifetime. Discount rate for costs and outcomes was 5%, according to Brazilian

  5. EFFECT OF HCV RNA SUPPRESSION DURING PEGINTERFERON ALFA-2A MAINTENANCE THERAPY ON CLINICAL OUTCOMES IN THE HALT-C TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Mitchell L; Morishima, Chihiro; Dienstag, Jules L; Lindsay, Karen L; Hoefs, John C; Lee, William M; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Naishadham, Deepa; Everson, Gregory T; Lok, Anna S; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Ghany, Marc G

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The HALT-C trial demonstrated that low-dose peginterferon maintenance therapy was ineffective in preventing clinical outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis C, advanced fibrosis and failure to achieve a sustained virologic response during lead-in phase treatment with standard dose peginterferon/ribavirin. This analysis was performed to determine if suppressing HCV RNA during the trial was associated with a reduction in clinical outcomes. Methods 764 patients treated during the lead-in phase of HALT-C were randomized to either peginterferon alfa-2a (90 mcg/week) maintenance therapy or no treatment (control) for 3.5 years. Clinical outcomes included an increase in Child-Turcotte-Pugh score, ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal hemorrhage, hepatocellular carcinoma and mortality. Results During the lead-in, ≥4 log10 decline in serum HCV RNA occurred in 178 patients; 82% of whom lost detectable HCV RNA and later broke through or relapsed. These patients had significantly (p=0.003) fewer clinical outcomes whether randomized to maintenance therapy or control. Following randomization serum HCV RNA increased significantly in all 90 control patients and 58/88 receiving maintenance therapy. Only 30 patients had persistent suppression of HCV RNA by ≥4 log10 during maintenance therapy. No significant reduction in clinical outcomes was observed in these patients. Conclusions Viral suppression by ≥4 log10 with full dose peginterferon/ribavirin is associated with a significant reduction in clinical outcomes. Continuing low dose peginterferon maintenance therapy, even in patients with persistent viral suppression, does not lead to a further decline in clinical outcomes. PMID:19747918

  6. [A case of Bell's palsy associated with peginterferon Alfa-2a and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Lee, Moo Yeol; Cho, Hoon; Kim, Yeong Muk; Lee, Joon Sang

    2006-09-01

    Pegylated interferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin combination therapy is the first line treatment for chronic HCV infection. There are four reports of Bell's palsy associated with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and ribavirin therapy. We report here a case of Bell's palsy that occurred in a patient with chronic HCV infection during combination PEG-IFN and ribavirin therapy. The patient was 49-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C for 2 years. The liver biopsy showed grade 1 and stage 1. Therapy with PEG-IFN (Pegasys) 180 microgram/week and ribavirin 1200 mg/day was initiated. After 3 weeks of treatment, the patient showed a loss of muscular tone on the left side of his face. A diagnosis of Bell's palsy was made, and the PEG-IFN and ribavirin therapy was stopped. Prednisolone 45 mg/d was given and then tapered for 8 weeks. His palsy improved over 6 weeks.

  7. Sustained Virologic Response to a Dual Peginterferon alfa-2a and Ribavirin in Treating Chronic hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Sitt, Than; Aung, Aye TD; Aung, Kyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In Myanmar, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection prevalence is 2%. A combination therapy of pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin (PEG-IFNa/RBV) is a standard treatment, but the effect of this antiviral therapy needs evaluation as to determine the efficacy and safety of dual PEG-IFNa/RBV therapy in treating patients infected with HCV in Myanmar. This was a retrospective analysis of data from a single clinic exclusively for gastrointestinal diseases in Yangon, Myanmar. We assessed treatment responses at the defined time points and stratified by genotypes of HCV. We also determined incidences of adverse events (AEs). We investigated independent predictors of sustained virologic response (SVR) in the participants. A total of 362 HCV-infected cases were included in this study. The majority were females (51.7%) with mean age of 47.12 years (±11.6) and noncirrhosis patients (82%). Rapid virologic response (RVR), early virologic response (EVR), end of treatment response (ETR), and SVR 24 weeks after completion of the dual treatment were 50.3% (178/362), 88% (314/357), 80.1% (286/357), and 85.6% (167/195), respectively. The most frequently reported AEs were nausea/anorexia (72.8%) and flu-like symptoms (62.4%). In multivariate analysis, 4 factors were independently associated with SVR; SVR to genotype 3 (odds ratio [OR] 2.4, 95% CI: 1.24–4.62), EVR (OR 0.54, 95% CI: 0.3–0.95), and duration of treatment (OR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.18–1.98). Study limitations were acknowledged. The efficacy and safety of the dual therapy in treating HCV-infected patient in Myanmar was acceptable. We recommend a prospective randomized control trial looking at duration of therapy and rates of achieving SVR, which could significantly impact the care of HCV-infected patients in Myanmar and perhaps other countries as well. PMID:26222859

  8. Peginterferon alfa-2a plus Weight-Based or Flat-Dose Ribavirin for Treatment-Naïve Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 2 Rapid Responders: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Hua; Huang, Chung-Feng; Liu, Chun-Jen; Dai, Chia-Yen; Huang, Jee-Fu; Lin, Jou-Wei; Liang, Cheng-Chao; Yang, Sheng-Shun; Lin, Chih-Lin; Su, Tung-Hung; Yang, Hung-Chih; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chuang, Wan-Long; Kao, Jia-Horng; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2015-01-01

    The impact of ribavirin (RBV) dosage on sustained virologic response (SVR) rates remains elusive in hepatitis C virus genotype 2 (HCV-2) rapid responders receiving 16 weeks of peginterferon (Peg-IFN) plus RBV. Treatment-naïve HCV-2 patients with rapid virologic response (RVR) received Peg-IFN alfa-2a 180 μg/week plus weight-based RBV (1,000 or 1,200 mg/day; cut-off body weight: 75 kg) for 6 weeks, and then randomly received Peg-IFN alfa-2a 180 μg/week plus weight-based (1,000 or 1,200 mg/day; n = 247) or flat-dose (800 mg/day; n = 246) RBV for additional 10 weeks. The primary endpoint was SVR24. Patients receiving weight-based and flat-dose RBV therapies had comparable SVR24 rates (93.5% versus 91.9%, P = 0.49). The risk differences (RDs) of SVR24 receiving weight-based and flat-dose RBV arms were 7.1% [95% CI: 0.7% to 13.6%] in males, and −5.8% [95% CI: −12.1% to 0.5%] in females (interaction P = 0.01). The SVR24 rate was higher in males receiving ≥13 mg/kg/day than those receiving <13 mg/kg/day (96.3% versus 85.1%, P = 0.001). In conclusion, Peg-IFN alfa-2a plus weight-based or flat-dose RBV for 16 weeks provides comparable SVR24 rates in treatment-naïve HCV-2 rapid responders. However, males should receive weight-based RBV to achieve a high SVR24 rate. PMID:26469083

  9. Randomised clinical trial: escitalopram for the prevention of psychiatric adverse events during treatment with peginterferon-alfa-2a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    de Knegt, R J; Bezemer, G; Van Gool, A R; Drenth, J P H; Hansen, B E; Droogleever Fortuyn, H A; Weegink, C J; Hengeveld, M W; Janssen, H L A

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND  Treatment of hepatitis C with peginterferon and ribavirin is associated with psychiatric side-effects, frequently necessitating dose reduction or therapy cessation. AIM  To assess the efficacy of prophylactic escitalopram to prevent psychiatric side-effects during peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS  Seventy-nine hepatitis C patients were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin. Patients received escitalopram (n = 40, 10 mg) or placebo (n = 39), which was initiated together with peginterferon and ribavirin. Primary outcomes were an increase of two points or more on the items reported sadness, inner tension and impaired concentration of the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and hostile feelings of the Brief Anxiety Scale. Secondary outcome was the development of depression diagnosed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Measurements were performed at baseline, week 4, 12 and 24 during anti-viral treatment, and 24 weeks thereafter. RESULTS  The incidence of psychiatric side-effects was significantly lower in patients treated with escitalopram compared with placebo for all primary and secondary outcomes, except for impaired concentration: reported sadness 27.5 vs. 48.7% (P = 0.052), inner tension 17.5 vs. 38.5% (P = 0.038), impaired concentration 55.0 vs. 66.7% (P = 0.288) and hostile feelings 22.5 vs. 43.6% (P = 0.046) (escitalopram vs. placebo, Chi-squared test). The sum scores of all four endpoints showed an overall beneficial effect of escitalopram (P = 0.009, Mann-Whitney U-test). Depression occurred in 12.5% of the patients in the escitalopram-group vs. 35.9% in the placebo-group (P = 0.015, Chi-squared test). CONCLUSIONS  Prophylactic treatment with escitalopram is effective in the prevention of psychiatric side-effects during interferon-based treatment of hepatitis C.

  10. Quantification of hepatitis C virus in patients treated with peginterferon-alfa 2a plus ribavirin treatment by COBAS TaqMan HCV test.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Imazeki, F; Yonemitsu, Y; Mikami, S; Takada, N; Nishino, T; Takashi, M; Tsubota, A; Kato, K; Sugiura, N; Tawada, A; Wu, S; Tanaka, T; Nakamoto, S; Mikata, R; Tada, M; Chiba, T; Kurihara, T; Arai, M; Fujiwara, K; Kanai, F; Yokosuka, O

    2011-07-01

    Extremely low levels of serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA can be detected by COBAS TaqMan HCV test. To investigate whether the COBAS TaqMan HCV test is useful for measuring rapid virological response (RVR) and early virological response (EVR) to predict sustained virological response (SVR), we compared the virological response to PEG-IFN-alfa 2a plus RBV in 76 patients infected with HCV genotype 1 when undetectable HCV RNA by the COBAS TaqMan HCV test was used, with those when below 1.7 log IU/mL HCV RNA by COBAS TaqMan HCV test was used, which corresponded to the use of traditional methods. Among the 76 patients, 28 (36.8%) had SVR, 13 (17.1%) relapsed, 19 (25.0%) did not respond, and 16 (21.0%) discontinued the treatment due to side effects. The positive predictive values for SVR based on undetectable HCV RNA by COBAS TaqMan HCV test at 24 weeks after the end of treatment [10/10 (100%) at week 4, 21/23 (91.3%) at week 8 and 26/33 (78.7%) at week 12] were superior to those based on <1.7 log IU/mL HCV RNA [17/19 (89.4%) at week 4, 27/38 (71.0%) at week 8, and 27/43 (62.7%) at week 12]. The negative predictive values for SVR based on <1.7 log IU/mL HCV RNA by COBAS TaqMan HCV test [46/57 (80.7%) at week 4, 37/38 (97.3%) at week 8, and 32/33 (96.9%) at week 12] were superior to those based on undetectable HCV RNA [48/66 (72.7%) at week 4, 46/53 (86.7%) at week 8, and 41/43 (95.3%) at week 12]. The utilization of both undetectable RNA and <1.7 log IU/mL HCV RNA by COBAS TaqMan HCV test is useful and could predict SVR and non-SVR patients with greater accuracy.

  11. Interferon alfa-2a versus combination therapy with interferon alfa-2a, interleukin-2, and fluorouracil in patients with untreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRC RE04/EORTC GU 30012): an open-label randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Martin E; Griffin, Clare L; Hancock, Barry; Patel, Poulam M; Pyle, Lynda; Aitchison, Michael; James, Nicholas; Oliver, Roderick TD; Mardiak, Jozef; Hussain, Tahera; Sylvester, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh KB; Royston, Patrick; Mulders, Peter FA

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background In metastatic renal cell carcinoma combinations of interferon alfa-2a, interleukin-2, and fluorouracil produce higher response rates and longer progression-free survival than do single agents. We aimed to compare overall survival in patients receiving combination treatment or interferon alfa-2a. Methods RE04/30012 was an open-label randomised trial undertaken in 50 centres across eight countries. 1006 treatment-naive patients diagnosed with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma were randomly allocated (1 to 1) by minimisation to receive interferon alfa-2a alone or combination therapy with interferon alfa-2a, interleukin-2, and fluorouracil. Treatment was not masked. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Treatment groups were compared with a non-stratified log-rank test. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered, number ISRCTN 46518965. Findings 502 patients were randomly assigned to receive interferon alfa-2a and 504 to receive combined treatment. Median follow-up was 37·2 months (24·8–52·3). Median overall survival was 18·8 months (17·0–23·2) for patients receiving interferon alfa-2a versus 18·6 months (16·5–20·6) for those receiving combination therapy. Overall survival did not differ between the two groups (hazard ratio 1·05 [95% CI 0·90–1·21], p=0·55; absolute difference 0·3% (−5·1 to 5·6) at 1 year and 2·7% (−8·2 to 2·9) at 3 years). Serious adverse events were reported in 113 (23%) patients receiving interferon alfa-2a and 131 (26%) of those receiving combined treatment. Interpretation Although combination therapy does not improve overall or progression-free survival compared with interferon alfa-2a alone, immunotherapy might still have a role because it can produce remissions that are of clinically relevant length in some patients. Identification of patients who will benefit from immunotherapy is crucial. Funding UK Medical Research Council. PMID:20153039

  12. Coffee Consumption is Associated with Response to Peginterferon and Ribavirin Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Neal D.; Curto, Teresa M.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Sinha, Rashmi; Everhart, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims High level coffee consumption has been associated with reduced progression of pre-existing liver diseases and lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. However, its relationship with therapy for Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has not been evaluated. Methods Patients (n=885) from the lead-in phase of the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment Against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial recorded coffee intake before re-treatment with peginterferon alfa-2a (180 μg/wk) and ribavirin (1000–1200 mg/day). We assessed patients for early virologic response (EVR, 2 log10 reduction in level of HCV RNA at week 12; n=466) and undetectable HCV RNA at week 20 (W20VR; n=320), week 48 (end of treatment, EOT; n=284), and week 72 (sustained virologic response, SVR; n=157). Results The median log10 drop from baseline to week 20 was 2.0 (interquartile range: 0.6–3.9) among non-drinkers and 4.0 (2.1–4.7) among patients that drank ≥3 cup/day of coffee (P-trend <0.0001). In unadjusted models, the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for drinking ≥3 cups/day vs non-drinking were 3.2 (1.9–5.3) for EVR, 3.1 (1.8–5.1) for W20VR, 3.5 (2.0–5.9) for EOT, and 2.7 (1.4–5.3) for SVR (P-trend<0.0001 for all). After adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, sex, alcohol, cirrhosis, ratio of aspartate aminotransferase:alanine aminotransferase, the IL28B polymorphism rs12979860, dose reduction of peginterferon, and other covariates, the OR (95% CI) for EVR was 2.0 (1.1–3.6; P-trend = 0.004); for W20VR was 2.1 (1.1–3.9; p-trend=0.005); for EOT was 2.4 (1.3–4.6; P-trend=0.001), and for SVR was 1.8 (0.8–3.9; P-trend=0.034). Conclusion High-level consumption of coffee (more than 3 cups per day) is an independent predictor of improved virologic response to peginterferon plus ribavirin in patients with Hepatitis C. PMID:21376050

  13. Extended duration versus standard duration of peginterferon alfa-2a in treatment of chronic hepatitis B: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengyan; Sun, Ling; Wu, Yuwan; Xia, Qing

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, PEG-IFNa-2a has been widely used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The current standard duration is 48 weeks; however, several studies based on small sample sizes have indicated that treatment extended beyond 48 weeks improved clinical outcomes than standard 48 weeks of therapy. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of extended duration versus standard duration treatment with PEG-IFNa-2a monotherapy for patients with CHB. Four studies comprising of 350 patients were included in our study. Our analysis showed that extended treatment resulted in a higher HBsAg clearance rate compared with the standard treatment at the end of treatment, 24 and 48 weeks post-treatment [odds ratio (OR)=2.45, 95% confidence intervals (CI) (1.17-5.11), P=0.02; OR=3.17, 95% CI (1.62-6.21), P<0.01; OR=5.02, 95% CI (1.63-15.45), P<0.01, respectively]. Higher HBeAg seroconversion rates were also obtained in the extended treatment group than the standard treatment group at the end of treatment and 48 weeks post-treatment [OR=2.09, 95% CI (1.10-3.98), P=0.02, and OR=2.67, 95% CI (1.39-5.13), P<0.01, respectively]. In addition, extended treatment was superior to standard treatment in HBV-DNA inhibition rate at 48 weeks post-treatment [OR=3.15, 95% CI (1.51-6.57), P<0.01]. Therefore, extended treatment with PEG-IFNa-2a beyond 48 weeks may be a promising strategy to achieve higher rates of sustained HBV-DNA inhibition, HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg clearance off-therapy for patients with CHB.

  14. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... peginterferon beta-1a injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  15. Extensive Psoriasis Induced by Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a and Ribavirin in the Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun-Wook; Jwa, Seung-Wook; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C was treated with pegylated interferon alfa-2a in combination with ribavirin. However, psoriatic lesions appeared and worsened dramatically during therapy. Because of the extensive skin eruptions, he stopped therapy for chronic hepatitis C and subsequently started narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy and topical calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate ointment. After this, the psoriasis improved in a slow but comprehensive manner. Our case suggests that physicians should keep in mind the possibility of psoriasis as a side effect of interferon treatment for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:24371397

  16. Clinical Experience of Interferon Alfa-2a Treatment for Refractory Uveitis in Behçet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Youn; Chung, Yoo-Ri; Lee, Kihwang; Song, Ji Hun; Lee, Eun-So

    2015-07-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) involves multisystem vasculitis of unknown origin. Ocular manifestations of BD mostly include bilateral panuveitis and retinal vasculitis, which are very challenging to treat. Interferon alfa-2a (IFN) has been recently introduced for treating refractory Behçet uveitis, mainly in Germany and Turkey. Nonetheless, there is so far no consensus about the ideal treatment regimen of IFN for Behçet uveitis. We report our experience of IFN treatment in five Korean BD patients with refractory uveitis. All patients complained of oral ulcers; one patient had a positive pathergy test and 2 showed the presence of HLA-B51. Immunosuppressive agents used prior to IFN treatment included cyclosporine and methotrexate. The IFN treatment was commenced with a dose of 6-9 MIU/day for 7 days, adjusted according to individual ocular manifestations, tapered down to 3 MIU three times in a week, and then discontinued. All patients showed positive response to IFN treatment; 50% of them showed complete response without additional major ocular inflammation during the follow-up period. Other BD symptoms also improved after IFN treatment in most cases. After treatment, the relapse rate and the required dose of oral corticosteroid were decreased in most cases, showing a significant steroid-sparing effect. However, the visual acuity was not improved in most cases due to irreversible macular sequelae. Despite the small sample size of this study, we suggest that, in Korean patients, IFN is an effective treatment modality for BD uveitis as was observed in German and Turkish patients.

  17. Changes in quality of life and sexual health are associated with low-dose peginterferon therapy and disease progression in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Kristin K.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Fontana, Robert J.; Kim, Hae-Young; Sterling, Richard K.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Ghany, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim We assessed the effects of long-term peginterferon therapy and disease progression on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), symptoms, and sexual health in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. Methods 517 HALT-C Trial patients received peginterferon alfa-2a (90 μg/week); 532 received no additional treatment for 3.5 years. Patients were followed for outcomes of death, hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic decompensation. Sexual health, SF-36 scores, and symptoms were serially assessed by repeated measures analyses of covariance. Results Patients with cirrhosis (n=427) reported lower general well-being and more fatigue (p<0.001) than patients with fibrosis (n=622). Physical scores declined significantly over time, independent of treatment, and patients with cirrhosis reported lower scores. Vitality scores were lower in those with cirrhosis, and treated patients experienced a greater decline over time than untreated patients; HRQOL rebounded after treatment ended. Patients with a clinical outcome had significantly greater declines in all SF-36 and symptom scores. Among men, sexual health scores were significantly worse in treated patients and in those with a clinical outcome. Conclusions Clinical progression of CHC and maintenance peginterferon therapy led to worsening of symptoms, HRQOL, and, in men, sexual health in a large patient cohort followed over 4 years. PMID:20070284

  18. Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a Monotherapy Results in Suppression of HIV Type 1 Replication and Decreased Cell-Associated HIV DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    Azzoni, Livio; Foulkes, Andrea S.; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Mexas, Angela M.; Lynn, Kenneth M.; Mounzer, Karam; Tebas, Pablo; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Frank, Ian; Busch, Michael P.; Deeks, Steven G.; Carrington, Mary; O'Doherty, Una; Kostman, Jay; Montaner, Luis J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)–mediated immune reconstitution fails to restore the capacity of the immune system to spontaneously control human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication. Methods. A total of 23 HIV type 1 (HIV-1)–infected, virologically suppressed subjects receiving ART (CD4+ T-cell count, >450 cells/μL) were randomly assigned to have 180 μg/week (for arm A) or 90 μg/week (for arm B) of pegylated (Peg) interferon alfa-2a added to their current ART regimen. After 5 weeks, ART was interrupted, and Peg–interferon alfa-2a was continued for up to 12 weeks (the primary end point), with an option to continue to 24 weeks. End points included virologic failure (viral load, ≥400 copies/mL) and adverse events. Residual viral load and HIV-1 DNA integration were also assessed. Results. At week 12 of Peg–interferon alfa-2a monotherapy, viral suppression was observed in 9 of 20 subjects (45%), a significantly greater proportion than expected (arm A, P = .0088; arm B, P = .0010; combined arms, P < .0001). Over 24 weeks, both arms had lower proportions of subjects who had viral load, compared with the proportion of subjects in a historical control group (arm A, P = .0046; arm B, P = .0011). Subjects who had a sustained viral load of <400 copies/mL had decreased levels of integrated HIV DNA (P = .0313) but increased residual viral loads (P = .0078), compared with subjects who experienced end-point failure. Conclusions. Peg–interferon alfa-2a immunotherapy resulted in control of HIV replication and decreased HIV-1 integration, supporting a role for immunomediated approaches in HIV suppression and/or eradication. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00594880. PMID:23105144

  19. Cost effectiveness of peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin versus interferon α-2b plus ribavirin for initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, U; Sroczynski, G; Rossol, S; Wasem, J; Ravens-Sieberer, U; Kurth, B M; Manns, M P; McHutchison, J G; Wong, J B

    2003-01-01

    Background: Peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin therapy in previously untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C yields the highest sustained virological response rates of any treatment strategy but is expensive. Aims: To estimate the cost effectiveness of treatment with peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin compared with interferon α-2b plus ribavirin for initial treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Methods: Individual patient level data from a randomised clinical trial with peginterferon plus ribavirin were applied to a previously published and validated Markov model to project lifelong clinical outcomes. Quality of life and economic estimates were based on German patient data. We used a societal perspective and applied a 3% annual discount rate. Results: Compared with no antiviral therapy, peginterferon plus fixed or weight based dosing of ribavirin increased life expectancy by 4.2 and 4.7 years, respectively. Compared with standard interferon α-2b plus ribavirin, peginterferon plus fixed or weight based dosing of ribavirin increased life expectancy by 0.5 and by 1.0 years with incremental cost effectiveness ratios of €11 800 and €6600 per quality adjusted life year (QALY), respectively. Subgroup analyses by genotype, viral load, sex, and histology showed that peginterferon plus weight based ribavirin remained cost effective compared with other well accepted medical treatments. Conclusions: Peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin should reduce the incidence of liver complications, prolong life, improve quality of life, and be cost effective for the initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C. PMID:12584228

  20. Maintenance Peginterferon Therapy and Other Factors Associated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Advanced Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Anna S.; Everhart, James E.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Kim, Hae-Young; Sterling, Richard K.; Everson, Gregory T.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Lee, William M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Ghany, Marc G.; Morishima, Chihiro; Morgan, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Interferon reportedly decreases the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The Hepatitis C anti-viral long-term treatment against cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial showed that 4 years of maintenance therapy with peginterferon does not reduce liver disease progression. We investigated whether peginterferon decreases the incidence of HCC in the HALT-C cohort over a longer post-treatment follow-up period. Methods The study included 1,048 patients with chronic Hepatitis C (Ishak fibrosis scores ≥3) who did not have a sustained virological response (SVR) to therapy. They were randomly assigned to groups given a half-dose of peginterferon or no treatment (controls) for 3.5 years and followed for a median 6.1 (maximum 8.7) years. Results Eighty-eight patients developed HCC (68 definite, 20 presumed): 37/515 that were given peginterferon (7.2%) and 51/533 controls (9.6%; P=0.24). There was a significantly lower incidence of HCC among patients given peginterferon therapy who had cirrhosis, but not fibrosis, based on analysis of baseline biopsy samples. After 7 years, the cumulative incidences of HCC in treated and control patients with cirrhosis were 7.8% and 24.2%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR]=0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.24–0.83); in treated and control patients with fibrosis they were 8.3% and 6.8%, respectively (HR=1.44; 95% CI: 0.77–2.69). Treated patients with a ≥2-point decrease in the histologic activity index, based on a follow-up biopsy, had a lower incidence of HCC than those with unchanged or increased scores (2.9% vs. 9.4%; P=0.03). Conclusions Extended analysis of the HALT-C cohort showed that long-term peginterferon therapy does not reduce the incidence of HCC among patients with advanced hepatitis C who did not achieve SVRs. Patients with cirrhosis who received peginterferon treatment had a lower risk for HCC than controls. PMID:21129375

  1. Biological activity of EDQM CRS for Interferon alfa-2a and Interferon alfa-2b - assessment in two in vitro bioassays.

    PubMed

    Silva, M M C G; Gaines-Das, R E; Jones, C; Robinson, C J

    2007-12-01

    The European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines (EDQM) supplies Chemical Reference Substances (CRS) for Interferon (IFN) alfa-2a (CRS I0320300) and for IFN alfa-2b (CRS I0320301) for specified physicochemical tests. However, no information is provided as to their biological activity. In contrast, the World Health Organization (WHO) provides the 2nd International Standards (IS) for IFN alfa-2a (code 95/650) and for IFN alfa-2b (code 95/566), with activity defined in International Units (IU) for calibration of biological activity of preparations of IFN. We have compared the EDQM CRSs with the WHO ISs in two bioassay systems, one measuring the anti-proliferative activity in the Daudi cell line and the other measuring a reporter gene activation in an A549 cell line. In each of these assay systems, the CRSs gave dose - response relations, which were similar to those for the WHO ISs. Estimates of relative activity for each CRS, in terms of the respective IS, showed specific biological activity for the CRSs of the same order as the nominal specific activity for the ISs. However, the estimates of relative activity were not consistent between the two assays systems, emphasizing the need for calibration within each system, if the CRS were to be used as a working standard for bioassays. For structure-activity studies, both physicochemical and biological activity characterisation are required for the same biopharmaceutical preparation. CRS I0320300 and CRS I0320301 may prove useful as working standards for some bioassay systems.

  2. Efficacy and safety of peginterferon alpha-2a/ribavirin in treatment-naive Cameroonian patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Njouom, Richard; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Timba, Isabelle; Nerrienet, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Pasquier, Christophe; Rousset, Dominique

    2008-12-01

    Data were examined from a day-to-day clinical practice in Yaounde, Cameroon to evaluate the efficacy and safety of peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in treatment-naive Cameroonian patients with chronic hepatitis C. Ninety adults with chronic hepatitis C (mean age, 53 +/- 8 years; 79% males; 37.8% genotype 1; 23.3% genotype 2; and 38.9% genotype 4) were given at least 12 weeks of combination therapy between February 2003 and August 2007. Of these, 54 completed the treatment and the 24-week follow up. Subsequently, 18 continued treatment and 18 (20%) discontinued the treatment, 6 (6.7%) due to adverse effects. An intention-to-treat analysis showed that 38 (52.8%) had an end-of-treatment virologic response and 34 (47.2%) had a sustained virologic response. Sustained virologic response were significantly higher among patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2 (83.4%) than in those with genotype 1 (31%) or genotype 4 (42.3%) (P < 0.05). Non HCV-2 genotype, pretreatment fibrosis score >2, HCV RNA level >8.0 x 10(5) IU/ml and a non-virologic response at 12 weeks of treatment were associated with poor sustained virologic response (P < 0.05). Thus, HCV can be treated in a Sub-Saharan African country. It indicates that Cameroonian HCV-1 and -4 patients have a poorer sustained virologic response than the published results for Western and Middle-East countries. Virus subtype may influence the treatment outcome, since there is a great genetic diversity within Cameroonian HCV-1 and -4 genotypes.

  3. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2b injection is used in people with malignant melanoma (a life-threatening cancer that begins in certain ... is used to reduce the chance that malignant melanoma will come back and must be started within ...

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Adding Ribavirin to Interferon or Peginterferon in Treatment of Hepatitis C Infection in Patients With Thalassemia: A Systematic Review on Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Aminizadeh, Ehsan; Alavian, Seyed Moayyed; Akbari Sari, Ali; Ebrahimi Daryani, Nasser; Behnava, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Context Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver-morbidity and mortality among patients with thalassemia. Peginterferon plus ribavirin is currently the recommended therapy for hepatitis C infection in patients do not have thalassemia, but using ribavirin in patients with thalassemia is restricted due to its hemolytic effect. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding ribavirin to peginterferon or interferon, authors performed a systematic review on the available literatures. Evidence Acquisition Trials were identified through electronic database, manual searches of journals and bibliographies and approaching authors of trials. Randomized trials that enrolled patients with a diagnosis of thalassemia and chronic hepatitis C infection treated with interferon or peginterferon with or without ribavirin were included. Two investigators independently evaluated the trials for inclusion criteria, risk of bias and data extraction. The primary outcomes were sustained virological response (SVR), liver-related morbidity, mortality and adverse events. The odds ratios from each trial were calculated individually and in the subgroup analysis of trials. Data were analyzed with fixed-effect model. Results Three randomized clinical trials with 92 patients were included. All three trials had unclear risk of bias. Compared with peginterferon monotherapy, adding ribavirin to peginterferon had significant beneficial effect on sustained virological response (OR = 3.44, 95% CI: 1.18 - 10.06). There was no significant difference between combination therapy and monotherapy in the end of treatment achievement response. Other than about 30% increase in blood transfusion due to anemia that returned to normal level 2 - 3 months after treatment, there was no significant increase in side effects followed by adding ribavirin to pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN). Data were insufficient to determine the impact of genotype, viral load and age on the response to treatment

  5. Daclatasvir vs telaprevir plus peginterferon alfa/ribavirin for hepatitis C virus genotype 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Ira; Zeuzem, Stefan; Flisiak, Robert; Knysz, Brygida; Lueth, Stefan; Zarebska-Michaluk, Dorota; Janczewska, Ewa; Ferenci, Peter; Diago, Moises; Zignego, Anna Linda; Safadi, Rifaat; Baruch, Yaacov; Abdurakhmanov, Dzhamal; Shafran, Stephen; Thabut, Dominique; Bruck, Rafael; Gadano, Adrian; Thompson, Alexander James; Kopit, Justin; McPhee, Fiona; Michener, Tracy; Hughes, Eric A; Yin, Philip D; Noviello, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate daclatasvir vs telaprevir, each combined with peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin (pegIFN/RBV), in treatment-naive hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (GT) 1-infected patients. METHODS: In this phase 3, randomized, open-label, noninferiority study, 602 patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to daclatasvir vs telaprevir, stratified by IL28B rs12979860 host genotype (CC vs non-CC), cirrhosis status (compensated cirrhosis vs no cirrhosis), and HCV GT1 subtype (GT1a vs GT1b). Patients were selected by study inclusion criteria from a total of 793 enrolled patients. Patients received daclatasvir 60 mg once daily or telaprevir 750 mg 3 times daily plus pegIFN/RBV. Daclatasvir recipients received 24 wk of daclatasvir plus pegIFN/RBV; those without an extended rapid virologic response (eRVR; undetectable HCV-RNA at weeks 4 and 12) received an additional 24 wk of pegIFN/RBV. Telaprevir-treated patients received 12 wk of telaprevir plus pegIFN/RBV followed by 12 (with eRVR) or 36 (no eRVR) wk of pegIFN/RBV. The primary objective was to compare for noninferiority of sustained virologic response rates at posttreatment week 12 (SVR12) in GT1b-infected patients. Key secondary objectives were to demonstrate that the rates of anemia (hemoglobin < 10 g/dL) and rash-related events, through week 12, were lower with daclatasvir + pegIFN/RBV than with telaprevir + pegIFN/RBV among GT1b-infected patients. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing of the NS5A region for all patients at baseline, and for patients with virologic failure or relapse and HCV-RNA ≥ 1000 IU/mL, to investigate any link between NS5A polymorphisms associated with daclatasvir resistance and virologic outcome. RESULTS: Patient demographics and disease characteristics were generally balanced across treatment arms; however, there was a higher proportion of black/African Americans in the daclatasvir groups (6.0% and 8.2% in the GT1b and GT1a groups, respectively) than in the

  6. The effectiveness of retreatment with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C genotype 2 and 3: a prospective cohort study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 50% of patients infected with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) do not respond to treatment with conventional interferon (IFN) combined with ribavirin (RBV). The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of retreatment with peginterferon alfa-2a or 2b (PEG-IFN 2a or 2b) concomitantly with RBV in patients with HCV genotype 2 and 3, which were non-responders or relapsers to initial treatment with IFN / RBV and to identify possible predictors of sustained virological response (SVR). Methods From September 2003 to March 2009 a cohort of 216 patients who had previously failed therapy with a regimen of standard interferon and ribavirin, were followed in a specialized service implemented in the Brazilian Unified Health System, Rio Grande do Sul. All patients were retreated with PEG-IFN 2a or 2b per week, associated with RBV, through oral route, with doses determined according to weight (1,000 mg if weight ≤ 75 Kg and 1,250 mg if ≥ 75 Kg) per day for 48 weeks. The HCV-RNA was tested by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Virological Response (VR) within 48 weeks and SVR in the 72 weeks was considered for evaluation of treatment efficacy. Analyses were performed in patients who received at least one dose of PEG-IFN. Results The SVR rate for non-responders to previous treatment was 34.4% and for relapsers was 50% (p = 0.031). As predictive factors that contribute to improve SVR, were identified the age (p = 0.005), to be relapsers to previous treatment (p = 0.023) and present liver biopsy examination Metavir F0-F2 (p = 0.004). In assessing the safety profile, 51 patients (23.6%) discontinued treatment prematurely. Conclusions This alternative retreatment for patients who have failed prior therapies for anti-HCV, has demonstrated promising SVR rate, provided that it includes a careful selection of patients with predictors of response and adverse events monitored. PMID:23270376

  7. EXCESS MORTALITY IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CHRONIC HEPATITIS C TREATED WITH LONG-TERM PEGINTERFERON

    PubMed Central

    Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Stoddard, Anne M.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Seeff, Leonard B.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Morishima, Chihiro; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Snow, Kristin K.; Lee, William M.; Fontana, Robert J.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Ghany, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic hepatitis C virus infection can cause chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and liver cancer. The HALT-C Trial was a prospective, randomized controlled study of long-term, low-dose peginterferon therapy in patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C who had failed to respond to a previous course of optimal antiviral therapy. The aim of this follow-up analysis was to describe the frequency and causes of death among this cohort of patients. Methods Deaths occurring during and after the HALT-C Trial were reviewed by a committee of investigators to determine the cause of death and to categorize each death as liver- or non-liver-related and as related or not to complications of peginterferon. Rates of liver transplantation were also assessed. Results Over a median of 5.7 years, 122 deaths occurred among 1,050 randomized patients (12%) of which 76 were considered liver-related (62%) and 46 non-liver-related (38%); 74 patients (7%) underwent liver transplantation. At 7 years, the cumulative mortality rate was higher in the treatment compared to the control group (20% versus 15%, p=0.049); the primary difference in mortality was in patients in the fibrosis compared to the cirrhosis stratum (14% versus 7%, p=0.01); comparable differences were observed when liver transplantation was included. Excess mortality, emerging after 3 years of treatment, was related largely to non-liver-related death; liver-related mortality was similar in the treatment and control groups. No specific cause of death accounted for the excess mortality, and only one death was suspected to be a direct complication of peginterferon. Conclusions Long-term maintenance peginterferon in patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C is associated with an excess overall mortality, which was primarily due to non-liver-related causes among patients with bridging fibrosis. PMID:21480316

  8. Virology analyses of HCV genotype 4 isolates from patients treated with simeprevir and peginterferon/ribavirin in the Phase III RESTORE study.

    PubMed

    Fevery, B; Verbinnen, T; Peeters, M; Janssen, K; Witek, J; Jessner, W; De Meyer, S; Lenz, O

    2017-01-01

    Simeprevir is a hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibitor. Hepatitis C virus baseline NS3/4A polymorphisms and emerging mutations were characterized in treatment-naїve and treatment-experienced genotype 4-infected patients treated with simeprevir+peginterferon/ribavirin in the RESTORE study. Population sequencing of the NS3/4A region was performed and in vitro simeprevir activity against site-directed mutants or chimeric replicons with patient-derived NS3 protease sequences was assessed in a transient replicon assay. Simeprevir remained active against most (83/91 [91%]) baseline isolates tested in the chimeric replicon assay. Eight baseline isolates reduced simeprevir activity; these carried I132L or D168E substitutions reducing simeprevir median activity by 4.6- and 39-fold, respectively. Six of these eight isolates were from patients achieving sustained virologic response. Baseline NS3 Q80K polymorphism was not observed in the genotype 4-infected patients. Of the 107 simeprevir-treated patients, 37 did not achieve sustained virologic response for any reason. Of the 32 patients who failed treatment and had sequencing information, 28 (88%) had emerging mutations at NS3 positions 80, 122, 155, 156 and/or 168 at time of failure, similar to those in genotype 1. Emerging mutations were mainly D168V and D168E alone or combined with mutations at position 80. In general, isolates obtained at time of failure displayed high-level in vitro resistance to simeprevir (fold change ≥50) in a chimeric replicon assay with a median simeprevir fold change value of 440, consistent with observed mutations. In conclusion, emerging mutations in genotype 4 patients failing simeprevir+peginterferon/ribavirin treatment were similar to those in genotype 1 and conferred high-level resistance to simeprevir.

  9. Bell's palsy and choreiform movements during peginterferon alpha and ribavirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Barut, Sener; Karaer, Hatice; Oksuz, Erol; Eken, Asli Gündoğdu; Basak, Ayse Nazli

    2009-08-07

    Neuropsychiatric side effects of long-term recombinant interferon-alpha therapy consist of a large spectrum of symptoms. In the literature, cranial neuropathy, especially Bell's palsy, and movement disorders, have been reported much less often than other neurotoxic effects. We report a case of Bell's palsy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C during peginterferon-alpha and ribavirin therapy. The patient subsequently developed clinically inapparent facial nerve involvement on the contralateral side and showed an increase in choreic movements related to Huntington's disease during treatment.

  10. Peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin in thalassaemia/chronic hepatitis C virus-co-infected non-responder to standard interferon-based.

    PubMed

    Hamidah, A; Thambidorai, C R; Jamal, R

    2005-10-01

    We describe a patient with HbE-beta thalassaemia and chronic hepatitis C virus infection (genotype 1a) who was treated successfully with peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin, following failure to respond to standard interferon and ribavirin therapy. She had sustained virological response for nearly 24 months after completing peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin therapy. Transfusion requirements were significantly increased during combination therapy due to ribavirin-induced haemolysis. The adverse effects of interferon were well tolerated. Combination therapy with peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin maybe a feasible treatment option for a subset of thalassaemia/HCV infected non-responders to standard interferon-based therapy.

  11. The pharmacokinetics of peginterferon lambda-1a following single dose administration to subjects with impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Matthew W; Adamczyk, Robert; Colston, Elizabeth; Hesney, Michael; Stonier, Michele; Myler, Heather; Bertz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aims This open label study was conducted to assess the effect of renal impairment (RI) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda). Methods Subjects (age 18–75 years, BMI 18–35 kg m–2) were enrolled into one of five renal function groups: normal (n = 12), mild RI (n = 8), moderate RI (n = 8), severe RI (n = 7), end-stage renal disease (ESRD, n = 8) based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation. Subjects received a single dose of Lambda (180 µg) subcutaneously on day 1 followed by PK serum sample collections through day 29. Safety, tolerability and immunogenicity data were collected through day 43. PK parameters were estimated and summarized by group. Geometric mean ratios (GMR) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between normal and RI groups. Results With decreasing eGFR, Lambda exposure (Cmax, AUC) increased while apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution (V/F) decreased. Relative to subjects with normal renal function (geometric mean AUC = 99.5 ng ml–1 h), Lambda exposure estimates (AUC) were slightly increased in the mild RI group (geometric mean [90% CI]: 1.20 [0.82, 1.77]) and greater in the moderate (1.95 [1.35, 2.83]), severe RI (1.95 [1.30, 2.93]) and ESRD (1.88 [1.30, 2.73]) groups. Lambda was generally well tolerated. Conclusions The results demonstrated that RI reduces the clearance of Lambda and suggests that dose modifications may not be required in patients with mild RI but may be required in patients with moderate to severe RI or ESRD. PMID:25807956

  12. Randomized trial of combined triple therapy comprising two types of peginterferon with simeprevir in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b.

    PubMed

    Tamori, Akihiro; Yoshida, Kanako; Kurai, Osamu; Kioka, Kiyohide; Hai, Hoang; Kozuka, Ritsuzo; Motoyama, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Etsushi; Hagihara, Atsushi; Uchida-Kobayashi, Sawako; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Enomoto, Masaru; Murakami, Yoshiki; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-12-01

    Simeprevir (SMV) is a potent, macrocyclic hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural 3/4 A protease inhibitor. This prospective study compared the efficacy and safety of SMV in combination with peginterferon α2a + ribavirin (P2aR) and with peginterferon α2b + ribavirin (P2bR) in Japanese patients with HCV genotype 1b infection.

  13. Pre-existence and Persistence of Resistant Minority Hepatitis C Virus Variants in Genotype 1-Infected Patients Treated With Simeprevir/Peginterferon/Ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Fevery, Bart; Thys, Kim; Van Eygen, Veerle; Verbinnen, Thierry; Van Rossem, Elizabeth; Buelens, Annemie; Aerssens, Jeroen; Witek, James; Picchio, Gaston; De Meyer, Sandra; Lenz, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Background.  The pre-existence of minority hepatitis C virus (HCV) variants and their impact on treatment outcome, as well as the persistence of emerging resistant variants posttreatment in patients failing treatment with simeprevir/peginterferon/ribavirin (SMV/PR), were assessed by deep sequencing (DS). Methods.  Population sequencing (PS) and Illumina DS were performed on HCV genotype 1 isolates from patients treated with SMV/PR in Phase 2b (PILLAR [NCT00882908] and ASPIRE [NCT00980330]) and Phase 3 (QUEST-1 [NCT01289782], QUEST-2 [NCT01290679], and PROMISE [NCT01281839]) trials. Results.  Minority polymorphisms (ie, detected pretreatment by DS only) reducing SMV activity in vitro were uncommon (3.6%, 19 of 534 patients). These SMV-resistant minority polymorphisms were detected in similar proportions of patients achieving (3.7%) and not achieving (3.3%) sustained virologic response with SMV/PR and generally did not emerge as major variants at time of failure. SMV-resistant variants emerging at time of failure were no longer detected at end of study in 69.3% and 52.0% of the patients by PS and DS, respectively. Conclusions.  Minority polymorphisms did not impact outcome of SMV/PR treatment. The majority of emerging variants that became undetectable at end of study by PS were also undetectable by DS. These results suggest no added value of DS for clinical usage of SMV.

  14. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Graham R.; Coppola, Carmine; Derbala, Moutaz; Ferenci, Peter; Orlandini, Alessandra; Reddy, K. Rajender; Tallarico, Ludovico; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Ahlers, Silke; Bakalos, Georgios; Hassanein, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD) and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR) in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice. Methods A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12). Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL) were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G)1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0–9 points) on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively. Results SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634), 77.1% (279/362), 68.0% (514/756), and 51.3% (203/396), respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046) and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016); sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5. Conclusions In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with

  15. Regional differences in hepatitis C treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin in Japan: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Kazuki; Kawasaki, Yohei; Yamada, Hiroshi; Masaki, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate regional differences in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin in Japan and to develop and validate statistical models for analysis of regional differences, using generalized linear mixed models. Methods Individuals with chronic HCV infection were identified from the Japanese Interferon Database (registered from December 2009 to April 2013). The total sustained virologic response rate and the rate in each prefecture were calculated. In the analysis using generalized linear mixed models, the following four models were constructed: 1) prefecture as a fixed effect, 2) prefecture and other confounding variables as fixed effects, 3) prefecture as a random effect, and 4) prefecture as a random effect and other confounding variables as fixed effects. The quality of the model fit was assessed using the Akaike information criterion and the Bayesian information criterion. All statistical analyses were performed using SAS Version 9.4 for Windows. Results From 36 prefectures, 16,349 cases were recorded in the study period. Of these, 4,677 were excluded according to certain criteria. The total sustained virologic response rate was 59.9% (range, 43.9%–71.6%). The statistical model including prefecture as a random effect and other confounding variables as fixed effects showed the best fit based on the Akaike information criterion (13,830.92) and Bayesian information criterion (13,845.17). Conclusion Regional differences may exist in HCV infection treatment in Japan. The model including prefecture as a random effect and other confounding variables as fixed effects was appropriate for analysis of such regional differences. Additional studies considering the medical situations of each patient would provide useful information that could contribute to improve and standardize HCV infection treatment. PMID:27042013

  16. Patterns of longitudinal change in hepatitis C virus neutralization titers correlate with the outcome of peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianguo; Wang, Weihua; Xu, Yanjuan; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Fan, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, combination therapy of peginterferon and ribavirin does not guarantee viral eradication. Among factors relevant to therapeutic efficacy, the role of humoral immunity has not been examined thoroughly. In the current study, HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) were first generated with 80 patient-derived full-length HCV envelope clones, followed by detailed characterization with regard to virus productivity, infectivity and neutralizing activity. Selective HCVpp were used to measure HCV neutralization titers in two independent patient cohorts consisting of 102 patients undergoing antiviral therapy. The HCV neutralization titers at the baseline fitted with a power-law distribution among patients. Pretreatment neutralization titers in both patient cohorts were not correlated with treatment outcomes. In the patient cohort 2 (n = 28) that had samples available at multiple time points, however, HCV neutralization titers displayed clearly distinct patterns over therapeutic course and follow-up. No virological responders (n = 10) had neutralization titers stabilized at low level while it was increased significantly in both sustained virological responders (n = 10) and relapsers (n = 8). High HCV neutralization titers were maintained only in sustained virological responders but not in relapsers after treatment cessation. Therefore, patterns of longitudinal change of HCV neutralization titers, but not pretreatment titers, correlate with the treatment outcome in patients undergoing peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

  17. Twenty four-week peginterferon plus ribavirin after interferon-β induction for genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Okushin, Hiroaki; Morii, Kazuhiko; Uesaka, Koichi; Yuasa, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possibility of shortening the duration of peginterferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) combination therapy by incorporating interferon-β (IFN-β) induction therapy. METHODS: A one treatment arm, cohort prospective study was conducted on seventy one patients. The patients were Japanese adults with genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C, HCV-RNA levels of ≥ 5.0 Log IU/mL or 100 KIU/mL, and platelet counts of ≥ 90 000/μL. The treatment regimen consisted of a 2 wk course of twice-daily administration of IFN-β followed by 24 wk Peg-IFN plus RBV combination therapy. We prolonged the duration of the Peg-IFN plus RBV therapy to 48 wk if the patient requested it. RESULTS: The patients, including 44% males, were characterized by an median age of 63 years (range: 32-78 years), an median platelet count of 13.9 (range: 9.1-30.6) × 104/μL, 62% IFN-naïve, and median HCV-RNA of 6.1 (range: 5.1-7.2) Log IU/mL. The sustained virologic response (SVR) rates were 34% (Peg-IFN: 1-24 wk, n = 61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 24%-47%) and 55% (Peg-IFN: 20-24 wk, n = 31, 95% CI: 38%-71%, P < 0.001; vs Peg-IFN: 1-19 wk). The SVR rate when the administration was discontinued early was 13% (Peg-IFN: 1-19 wk, n = 30, 95% CI: 5%-30%), and that when the administration was prolonged was 50% (Peg-IFN: 25-48 wk, n = 10, 95% CI: 24%-76%, P < 0.05; vs Peg-IFN: 1-19 wk). In the patients who received 20-24 wk of Peg-IFN plus RBV, only the higher platelet count (≥ 130 000/μL) was significantly correlated with the SVR (odds ratio: 11.680, 95% CI: 2.3064-79.474, P = 0.0024). In 45% (14/31) of the patients with a higher platelet count (≥ 130 000/μL) before therapy, the HCV-RNA level decreased to below 3.3 Log IU/mL at the completion of IFN-β, and their SVR rate was 93% (13/14) after 20-24 wk administration of Peg-IFN plus RBV. CONCLUSION: These results suggest the possibilities of shortening the duration of Peg-IFN plus RBV combination therapy by actively reducing HCV

  18. Cryoglobulinemia-related vasculitis during effective anti-HCV treatment with PEG-interferon alfa-2b.

    PubMed

    De Blasi, T; Aguilar Marucco, D; Cariti, G; Maiello, A; De Rosa, F G; Di Perri, G

    2008-06-01

    HCV infection may be related to many extrahepatic manifestations including mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC). Clinical manifestations commonly associated to MC include arthralgia, purpura, vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy and renal function abnormalities. Treatment with interferon often leads to remission, especially in virological responders, or to disappearance of MC-related clinical manifestations. We report on a patient with chronic hepatitis C, deficit of G6P-DH, type II MC, who developed a cryoglobulinemic vasculitis with purpura, renal impairment and arterial hypertension, during treatment with PEG-interferon a-2b plus amantadine. The occurrence of purpuric lesions and MC-related nephropathy with increased cryocrit despite negative viremia, in a patient previously asymptomatic, during interferon treatment, is unusual.

  19. Tongue hyperpigmentation resulting from peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin treatment in a patient with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Duseja, Ajay; Dhiman, Radha Krishan; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been associated with several cutaneous diseases such as lichen planus, porphyria cutanea tarda, chronic pruritus, and cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (Doutre, Arch Dermatol 135:1401-1403, 1999). The antiviral treatment for chronic HCV with interferon alfa (INF) or peginterferon alfa (PEG-INF) combined with rivabirin also leads to many skin side effects including injection site reaction, generalized skin rashes, pruritus, dry skin, alopecia, and exacerbation of autoimmune processes, particularly psoriasis, lichen planus or vitiligo (Dalekos et al., Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 10:933-939, 1998; Sookoian et al., Arch Dermatol 135:1000-1000, 1999). There are case reports of tongue hyperpigmentation during combination therapy of PEG IFN and RBV in chronic hepatitis C both in dark-skined as well as Caucasian. We report the first case of tongue hyperpigmentation associated with PEG-INF-2b plus ribavirin administration in a non-Caucasian patient with genotype 4.

  20. Dynamics of PBMC gene expression in hepatitis C virus genotype 1-infected patients during combined peginterferon/ribavirin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Ying; Huang, Ching-I; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Hsieh, Tusty-Juan; Hsi, Edward; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Tsai, Yi-Shan; Lin, Ching-Chih; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Liang, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Hung; Hou, Nai-Jen; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Dai, Chia-Yen; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which can produce interferon to defend against virus infection. We hypothesized that dynamic gene expression in PBMCs might impact the treatment efficacy of peginterferon/ribavirin in HCV patients. PBMCs were collected at baseline, 1st week and 4th week of treatment from 27 chronic HCV-1 patients with 48-week peginterferon/ribavirin therapy (screening dataset n = 7; validation dataset n = 20). A sustained virologic response (SVR) was defined as undetectable HCV RNA throughout the 24 weeks after end-of-treatment. A complete early virologic response (cEVR) was defined as negative HCV RNA at treatment week 12. Forty-three differentially expressed genes identified by Affymetrix microarray were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Thirteen genes at week 1 and 24 genes at week 4 were upregulated in the SVR group compared with the non-SVR group. We selected 8 target genes (RSAD2, LOC26010, HERC5, HERC6, IFI44, SERPING1, IFITM3, and DDX60) at week 1 as the major components of the predictive model. This predictive model reliably stratified the responders and non-responders at week 1 (AUC = 0.89, p = 0.007 for SVR; AUC = 0.95, p = 0.003 for cEVR), especially among patients carrying the IL28B rs8099917 TT genotype (AUC = 0.89, p = 0.02 for SVR; AUC = 1.0, p = 0.008 for cEVR). The performance of this predictive model was superior to traditional predictors, including the rapid virologic response, viral load and IL28B genotype. PMID:27542257

  1. Biochemical surrogate markers of liver fibrosis and activity in a randomized trial of peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Poynard, Thierry; McHutchison, John; Manns, Michael; Myers, Rob P; Albrecht, Janice

    2003-08-01

    Liver fibrosis and activity indexes were validated in patients infected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) nontreated and treated by interferon. The aim was to validate their usefulness as surrogate markers of histologic features using the data of a randomized trial of combination peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. Three hundred fifty-two patients who had had 2 interpretable liver biopsies and stored serum sample before and after treatment were selected. Two hundred eight patients received peginterferon alfa-2b 1.5 mcg per kg and ribavirin and 144 patients interferon alfa-2b 3 MU three times a week and ribavirin for 48 weeks. A fibrosis and an activity index combining 5 and 6 biochemical markers were assessed at baseline and at end of follow-up (24 weeks after treatment). The biochemical markers have significant predictive values both for the diagnosis of fibrosis and for activity. For the diagnosis of bridging fibrosis and/or moderate necroinflammatory activity, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the activity index was 0.76 +/- 0.03 at baseline and 0.82 +/- 0.02 at end of follow-up. A cutoff of activity index at 0.30 (range, 0.00-1.00) had 90% sensitivity and 88% positive predictive value for the diagnosis of bridging fibrosis or moderate necroinflammatory activity. Sensitivity analyses with biopsy specimens of size greater than 15 mm suggest that a part of discordances between biochemical markers and histology were due to biopsy specimen sampling error. In conclusion, these biochemical markers of fibrosis and activity could be used as surrogate markers for liver biopsy in patients with chronic hepatitis C, both for the initial evaluation and for follow-up.

  2. Patient education improves adherence to peg-interferon and ribavirin in chronic genotype 2 or 3 hepatitis C virus infection: A prospective, real-life, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cacoub, Patrice; Ouzan, Denis; Melin, Pascal; Lang, Jean-Philippe; Rotily, Michel; Fontanges, Thierry; Varastet, Marina; Chousterman, Michel; Marcellin, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of therapeutic education on adherence to antiviral treatment and sustained virological response (SVR) in a real-life setting in genotype 2/3 hepatitis C, as there are few adherence data in genotype 2/3 infection, even from randomized trials. METHODS: This prospective survey included genotype 2/3 patients who received peg-interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. There was no intervention. Adherence was self-reported over the past 4 wk (peg-interferon) or 7 d (ribavirin). Adherence to bitherapy was defined as adherence to the two drugs for ≥ 20 wk. SVR was defined as undetectable RNA ≥ 12wk after the end of treatment. RESULTS: 370/674 patients received education during the first 3 mo of treatment. After 6 mo, adherence to bitherapy was higher in educated patients (61% vs 47%, P = 0.01). Adherence to peg-interferon was 78% vs 69% (P = 0.06). Adherence to ribavirin was 70% vs 56% (P = 0.006). The SVR (77% vs 70%, P = 0.05) and relapse (10% vs 16%, P = 0.09) rates tended to be improved. After adjustment for baseline differences, education improved adherence [Odds ratio (OR) 1.58, P = 0.04] but not the SVR (OR 1.54, P = 0.06). CONCLUSION: In genotype 2/3 patients, therapeutic education helped maintain real-life adherence to bitherapy. PMID:18985810

  3. Factors associated with early virological response to peginterferon-α-2a/ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    García-Samaniego, Javier; Romero, Miriam; Granados, Rafael; Alemán, Remedios; Jorge Juan, Miguel; Suárez, Dolores; Pérez, Ramón; Castellano, Gregorio; González-Portela, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of sociodemographic/clinical factors on early virological response (EVR) to peginterferon/ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in clinical practice. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study in Hepatology Units of 91 Spanish hospitals. CHC patients treated with peginterferon α-2a plus ribavirin were included. EVR was defined as undetectable hepatitis C virus (HCV)-ribonucleic acid (RNA) or ≥ 2 log HCV-RNA decrease after 12 wk of treatment. A bivariate analysis of sociodemographic and clinical variables associated with EVR was carried out. Independent factors associated with an EVR were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis that included the following baseline demographic and clinical variables: age (≤ 40 years vs > 40 years), gender, race, educational level, marital status and family status, weight, alcohol and tobacco consumption, source of HCV infection, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) (≤ 85 IU/mL vs > 85 IU/mL), serum ferritin, serum HCV-RNA concentration (< 400 000 vs ≥ 400 000), genotype (1/4 vs 3/4), cirrhotic status and ribavirin dose (800/1000/1200 mg/d). RESULTS: A total of 1014 patients were included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 44.3 ± 9.8 years, 70% were male, and 97% were Caucasian. The main sources of HCV infection were intravenous drug abuse (25%) and blood transfusion (23%). Seventy-eight percent were infected with HCV genotype 1/4 (68% had genotype 1) and 22% with genotypes 2/3. The HCV-RNA level was > 400 000 IU/mL in 74% of patients. The mean ALT and AST levels were 88.4 ± 69.7 IU/mL and 73.9 ± 64.4 IU/mL, respectively, and mean GGT level was 82 ± 91.6 IU/mL. The mean ferritin level was 266 ± 284.8 μg/L. Only 6.2% of patients presented with cirrhosis. All patients received 180 mg of peginterferon α-2a. The most frequently used ribavirin doses were 1000 mg/d (41

  4. Changes in liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients following different outcomes with peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Labarga, P; Fernandez-Montero, J V; Barreiro, P; Pinilla, J; Vispo, E; de Mendoza, C; Plaza, Z; Soriano, V

    2014-07-01

    There is scarce information about the impact of antiviral treatment on subsequent progression of liver fibrosis in HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis C who experience different outcomes following peginterferon-ribavirin therapy. We conducted a retrospective study of a cohort of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with longitudinal assessment of liver fibrosis using elastometry. Patients were split out into four groups according to the prior peginterferon-ribavirin response: sustained virological response (SVR), relapse (R), partial response (PR) and null response (NR). A group of untreated, coinfected patients was taken as control. Significant liver fibrosis progression (sLFP) was defined as a shift from baseline Metavir estimates ≤ F2 to F3-F4, or by >30% increase in liver stiffness in patients with baseline F3-F4. Conversely, significant liver fibrosis regression (sLFR) was defined as a shift from baseline Metavir estimates F3-F4 to ≤ F2, or by >30% reduction in liver stiffness in patients that kept on F3-F4. A total of 498 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients were examined. They were classified as follows: 138 (27.7%) SVR, 40 (8%) R, 61 (12.2%) PR, 71 (14.3%) NR and 188 (37.8%) naive. After a mean follow-up of 53.3 months, sLFP occurred less frequently in patients with SVR (7.2%) compared with R (25%; P = 0.002), PR (23%; P = 0.002), NR (29.6%; P < 0.001) and naïve (19.7%; P = 0.002). Conversely, sLFR was 26.1% in SVR compared with 10% in R (P = 0.03), 14.8% in PR (P = 0.06), 16.9% in NR (P = 0.07) and 10.6% in naïve (P < 0.001). Sustained clearance of serum HCV-RNA following a course of antiviral treatment is the major determinant of liver fibrosis regression in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients.

  5. Aplastic anemia and severe pancytopenia during treatment with peg-interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Sabela; Calleja, Jose L; Campillo, Ana; Carrión, Jose A; Broquetas, Teresa; Perello, Christie; de la Revilla, Juan; Mariño, Zoe; Londoño, María-Carlota; Sánchez-Tapias, Jose M; Urbano-Ispizua, Álvaro; Forns, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Telaprevir and Boceprevir are the first direct acting antivirals approved for chronic hepatitis C in combination with peg-interferon alfa and ribavirin. Pancytopenia due to myelotoxicity caused by these drugs may occur, but severe hematological abnormalities or aplastic anemia (AA) have not been described. We collected all cases of severe pancytopenia observed during triple therapy with telaprevir in four Spanish centers since approval of the drug in 2011. Among 142 cirrhotic patients receiving treatment, 7 cases of severe pancytopenia (5%) were identified and three were consistent with the diagnosis of AA. Mean age was 59 years, five patients had compensated cirrhosis and two patients had severe hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation. Severe pancytopenia was diagnosed a median of 10 wk after the initiation of therapy. Three patients had pre-treatment hematological abnormalities related to splenomegaly. In six patients, antiviral treatment was interrupted at the onset of hematological abnormalities. Two patients died due to septic complications and one patient due to acute alveolar hemorrhage. The remaining patients recovered. Severe pancytopenia and especially AA, are not rare during triple therapy with telaprevir in patients with advanced liver disease. Close monitoring is imperative in this setting to promptly detect serious hematological disorders and to prevent further complications. PMID:25954117

  6. Aplastic anemia and severe pancytopenia during treatment with peg-interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Lens, Sabela; Calleja, Jose L; Campillo, Ana; Carrión, Jose A; Broquetas, Teresa; Perello, Christie; de la Revilla, Juan; Mariño, Zoe; Londoño, María-Carlota; Sánchez-Tapias, Jose M; Urbano-Ispizua, Álvaro; Forns, Xavier

    2015-05-07

    Telaprevir and Boceprevir are the first direct acting antivirals approved for chronic hepatitis C in combination with peg-interferon alfa and ribavirin. Pancytopenia due to myelotoxicity caused by these drugs may occur, but severe hematological abnormalities or aplastic anemia (AA) have not been described. We collected all cases of severe pancytopenia observed during triple therapy with telaprevir in four Spanish centers since approval of the drug in 2011. Among 142 cirrhotic patients receiving treatment, 7 cases of severe pancytopenia (5%) were identified and three were consistent with the diagnosis of AA. Mean age was 59 years, five patients had compensated cirrhosis and two patients had severe hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation. Severe pancytopenia was diagnosed a median of 10 wk after the initiation of therapy. Three patients had pre-treatment hematological abnormalities related to splenomegaly. In six patients, antiviral treatment was interrupted at the onset of hematological abnormalities. Two patients died due to septic complications and one patient due to acute alveolar hemorrhage. The remaining patients recovered. Severe pancytopenia and especially AA, are not rare during triple therapy with telaprevir in patients with advanced liver disease. Close monitoring is imperative in this setting to promptly detect serious hematological disorders and to prevent further complications.

  7. Hepatitis C virus therapy with peg-interferon and ribavirin in Myanmar: A resource-constrained country

    PubMed Central

    Hlaing, Naomi Khaing Than; Banerjee, Debolina; Mitrani, Robert; Arker, Soe Htet; Win, Kyaw San; Tun, Nyan Lin; Thant, Zaw; Win, Khin Maung; Reddy, K Rajender

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate peg-interferon (peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy in Myanmar and to predict sustained virologic response (SVR). METHODS This single-center, open-label, study was conducted in Myanmar between 2009 and 2014. A total of 288 patients infected with HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 6 were treated with peg-IFN alpha-2a (180 μg/wk) or alpha-2b (50 to 100 μg as a weight-based dose) and RBV as a weight-based dose (15 mg/kg/d). Treatment duration was 48 wk for genotypes 1 and 6, 24 wk for genotype 2, and 24 or 48 wk for genotype 3 based on rapid virologic response (RVR). Those co-infected with hepatitis B received 48 wk of therapy. RESULTS Overall, SVR was achieved for 82% of patients and the therapy was well tolerated. All patients achieved SVR at equivalent rates regardless of HCV genotype (P = 0.314). Low fibrosis scores (P < 0.001), high baseline albumin levels (P = 0.028) and low baseline viral loads (P = 0.029) all independently predicted SVR. On the other hand, IL-28B TT and CC genotypes were not found to significantly predict SVR (P = 0.634; P = 0.618). Among those who completed treatment, the occurrence of RVR showed a > 96% positive predictive value for achieving SVR. Treatment duration did not significantly impact the likelihood of achieving SVR for patients infected with genotype 3 HCV (P = 0.371). The most common adverse events were fatigue (71%) and poor appetite (60%). Among patients with genotype 3 HCV, more patients in the 48-wk treatment group required erythropoietin than in the 24-wk treatment group (61.1% vs 49.2%). CONCLUSION SVR rates were high with peg-IFN and RBV therapy in Myanmar. Fibrosis scores, baseline albumin, HCV RNA levels and RVR independently predicted SVR. PMID:27920482

  8. Does Epoetin Beta Still Have a Place in Peginterferon Alpha-2a Plus Ribavirin Treatment Strategies for Chronic Hepatitis C?

    PubMed

    Veillon, Pascal; Fouchard-Hubert, Isabelle; Larrey, Dominique; Dao, Manh Thông; D'alteroche, Louis; Boyer-Darrigand, Nathalie; Picard, Nicolas; Le Guillou-Guillemette, Hélène; Saulnier, Patrick; Ducancelle, Alexandra; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Lunel-Fabiani, Françoise

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the impact of epoetin beta (EPO) on sustained virological response (SVR) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients treated with peginterferon-ribavirin (RBV). Controlled, randomized, pragmatic multicenter study to assess 2 strategies, ie, the use (EPO group) or nonuse (control group) of EPO in terms of achieving SVR in treatment-naive, genotype non-2/non-3 HCV-infected patients receiving a 48-week treatment regimen of pegylated interferon α-2a (peg-IFN) plus RBV (randomization 2:1). The single-nucleotide polymorphisms of interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3) (rs12979860 and rs8099917), interferon lambda 4 (IFNL4) (ss469415590), and inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) (rs1127354 and rs7270101) were determined retrospectively. Two hundred twenty-seven patients were included in the study. In the global population (n = 227), the overall SVR rate was 52% (118/227). Nonresponse and relapse occurred in respectively 46/227 (20.3%) and 42/227 (18.5%) patients. In the intention-to-treat analysis, 55.5% of patients with anemia (n = 164) had a SVR, specifically 57.4% in the EPO group versus 52.4% in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. In the anemic population, independent factors associated with SVR were IFNL3 and IFNL4 polymorphisms, pretreatment HCV RNA level, iron level, and aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio. EPO has little impact on SVR in patients treated with peg-IFN+RBV and should be recommended only for patients with severe anemia.

  9. Management Strategies for Flu-Like Symptoms and Injection-Site Reactions Associated with Peginterferon Beta-1a

    PubMed Central

    Centonze, Diego; Newsome, Scott D.; Huang, DeRen; Robertson, Christopher; You, Xiaojun; Sabatella, Guido; Evilevitch, Vladimir; Leahy, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Flu-like symptoms (FLSs) and injection-site reactions (ISRs) have been reported with interferon beta treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS). We sought to obtain consensus on the characteristics/management of FLSs/ISRs in patients with relapsing-remitting MS based on experiences from the randomized, placebo-controlled ADVANCE study of peginterferon beta-1a. Methods: ADVANCE investigators with a predefined number of enrolled patients were eligible to participate in a consensus-generating exercise using a modified Delphi method. An independent steering committee oversaw the development of two sequential Delphi questionnaires. An average rating (AR) of 2.7 or more was defined as consensus a priori. Results: Thirty and 29 investigators (ie, responders) completed questionnaires 1 and 2, respectively, representing 374 patients from ADVANCE. Responders reported that the incidence/duration of FLSs/ISRs in their typical patient generally declined after 3 months of treatment. Responders reached consensus that FLSs typically last up to 24 hours (AR = 3.17) and have mild/moderate effects on activities of daily living (AR = 3.34). Patients should initiate acetaminophen/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment on a scheduled basis (AR = 3.31) and change the timing of injection (AR = 3.28) to manage FLSs. Injection-site rotation/cooling and drug administration at room temperature (all AR ≥ 3.10) were recommended for managing ISRs. Patient education on FLSs/ISRs was advocated before treatment initiation. Conclusions: Delphi responders agreed on the management strategies for FLSs/ISRs and agreed that patient education is critical to set treatment expectations and promote adherence. PMID:27551246

  10. Delayed Viral Clearance after 6-Week Treatment with Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin in a Patient with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akira; Ishii, Toshiya; Adachi, Kayo; Takahashi, Hideaki; Sano, Fumiaki; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Following interferon-based therapy for chronic hepatitis C, the negativity of hepatitis C virus RNA is essential to achieve viral clearance at the end of treatment. We report a case of clearance of chronic hepatitis C virus infection following early discontinuation (at 6 weeks) of peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy, without negativity for hepatitis C virus RNA during the treatment period. The patient was a 76-year-old Japanese male infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and TT of IL28B rs8099917. Hepatitis C virus RNA remained positive at persistently low levels for more than 2 months after the cessation of therapy and became negative at 7 months after the discontinuation of therapy. Spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus RNA can occur following antiviral failure in patients with persistently low viral loads, and virological follow-up is therefore necessary in chronic hepatitis C virus infection, even after antiviral failure. PMID:27721727

  11. Drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome by triple therapy of peginterferon alpha2b, ribavirin and telaprevir in patient with double positive for HBV and HCV.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi; Hoshino, Takashi; Naganuma, Atsushi; Koitabashi, Eri; Uehara, Sanae; Sakamoto, Naomi; Kudo, Tomohiro; Ryusaki, Keiichirou; Kakizaki, Satoru; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2013-10-01

    Sixty year-old male positive for both HCV-RNA and HBsAg was treated by triple therapy of peginterferon alpha2b, ribavirin and telaprevir. Eight weeks after the beginning of the therapy, the patient developed drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) with general erythema multiforme and 64 times anti-HHV6 antibody elevation. Sixty milligram of prednisolone was administered with gradual dose reduction and the skin lesion was improved. HBV-DNA and transaminase elevated one week after the steroid induction and entecavir improved them. DIHS itself and the aggravation of hepatitis B by corticosteroid should be kept in mind in cases with dual infection of HBV and HCV treated by antivirals including telaprevir.

  12. Effect of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b Core and NS5A Mutations on Response to Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Shingo; Imazeki, Fumio; Arai, Makoto; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-09-07

    We examined whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core- and NS5A-region mutations are associated with response to peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin combination therapy. A total of 103 patients with high HCV genotype 1b viral loads (≥ 100 KIU/mL) were treated with the combination therapy. Pretreatment mutations in the core region and interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR) in the NS5A region were analyzed. In univariate analysis, arginine and leucine at positions 70 and 91 in the core region, defined as double wild (DW)-type, were associated with early virologic response (p = 0.002), sustained virologic response (SVR) (p = 0.004), and non-response (p = 0.005). Non-threonine at position 110 was associated with SVR (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed the following pretreatment predictors of SVR: hemoglobin level ≥ 14 g/dL (odds ratio (OR) 6.2, p = 0.04); platelet count ≥ 14 × 10⁴/mm³ (OR 5.2, p = 0.04); aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio < 0.9 (OR 6.17, p = 0.009); DW-type (OR 6.8, p = 0.02); non-threonine at position 110 (OR 14.5, p = 0.03); and ≥ 2 mutations in the ISDR (OR 12.3, p = 0.02). Patients with non-DW-type, non-threonine at position 110, and < 2 ISDR mutations showed significantly lower SVR rates than others (11/45 (24.4%) vs. 27/37 (73.0%), respectively; p < 0.001). SVR can be predicted through core and NS5A region mutations and host factors like hemoglobin, platelet count, and AST/ALT ratio in HCV genotype 1b-infected patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

  13. Sustained Virologic Response at 24 Weeks after the End of Treatment Is a Better Predictor for Treatment Outcome in Real-World HCV-Infected Patients Treated by HCV NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors with Peginterferon plus Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Haga, Yuki; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Tawada, Akinobu; Arai, Makoto; Mikami, Shigeru; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct-acting antiviral agents against HCV with or without peginterferon plus ribavirin result in higher eradication rates of HCV and shorter treatment duration. We examined which is better for predicting persistent virologic response, the assessment of serum HCV RNA at 12 or 24 weeks after the end of treatment for predicting sustained virologic response (SVR12 or SVR24, respectively) in patients treated by HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors with peginterferon plus ribavirin. Methods. In all, 149 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1b treated by peginterferon plus ribavirin with telaprevir or simeprevir were retrospectively analyzed: 59 and 90 patients were treated with telaprevir- and simeprevir-including regimens, respectively. HCV RNA was measured by TaqMan HCV Test, version 2.0, real-time PCR assay. SVR12 or SVR24, respectively, was defined as HCV RNA negativity at 12 or 24 weeks after ending treatment. Results. Total SVR rates were 78.0% and 66.7% in the telaprevir and simeprevir groups, respectively. In the telaprevir group, all 46 patients with SVR12 finally achieved SVR24. In the simeprevir group, 60 (93.8%) of the total 64 patients with SVR12 achieved SVR24, with the other 4 patients all being previous-treatment relapsers. Conclusions. SVR12 was suitable for predicting persistent virologic response in almost all cases. In simeprevir-including regimens, SVR12 could not always predict persistent virologic response. Clinicians should use SVR24 for predicting treatment outcome in the use of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors with peginterferon plus ribavirin for any group of real-world patients chronically infected with HCV. PMID:27076789

  14. Early prediction of major depression in chronic hepatitis C patients during peg-interferon α-2b treatment by assessment of vegetative-depressive symptoms after four weeks

    PubMed Central

    Robaeys, Geert; De Bie, Jozef; Wichers, Marieke C; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Nevens, Frederik; Michielsen, Peter; Van Ranst, Marc; Buntinx, Frank

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the predictive value of the vegetative-depressive symptoms of the Zung Depression Rating Scale for the occurrence of depression during treatment with peg-interferon α-2b of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. METHODS: The predictive value of vegetative-depressive symptoms at 4 wk of treatment for the occurrence of a subsequent diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) was studied in CHC patients infected after substance use in a prospective, multi-center treatment trial in Belgium. The presence of vegetative-depressive symptoms was assessed using the Zung Scale before and 4 wk after the start of antiviral treatment. RESULTS: Out of 49 eligible patients, 19 (39%) developed MDD. The area under the ROC curve of the vegetative Zung subscale was 0.73, P = 0.004. The sensitivity at a cut-point of > 15/35 was 95% (95% CI: 74-100). The positive predictive value equalled 44% (95% CI: 29-60). CONCLUSION: In this group of Belgian CHC patients infected after substance use, antiviral treatment caused a considerable risk of depression. Seven vegetative-depressive symptoms of the Zung scale at wk 4 of treatment predicted 95% of all emerging depressions, at a price of 56% false positive test results. PMID:17963300

  15. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Outcome of Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin in Patients Infected with Genotype 6 Hepatitis C Virus in Korea: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Rin; Kim, Young Seok; Lim, Young-Seok; Lee, June Sung; Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Sun Myung; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Lee, Myung Seok; Park, Sang Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Because of the limited geographic distribution, there have been insufficient data regarding hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 6 in Korea. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and available treatment outcomes of patients with genotype 6 HCV in Korea. Methods From 2004 to 2014, data were collected from Korean patients infected with genotype 6 HCV in eight hospitals. Results Thirty-two patients had genotype 6 HCV. The median age was 44 years, and 6c was the most common subtype. The baseline median alanine transaminase level was 88 (21 to 1,019) IU/mL, and the HCV RNA level was 1,405,000 (96,500 to 28,844,529) IU/mL. Twenty-five patients were treated with peginterferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin. Three follow-up losses occurred. Additionally, 13 patients attained a sustained virologic response (SVR), seven patients relapsed, and two patients exhibited a null response. The SVR rates were 40% and 75% for the 24- and more than 48-week treatments, respectively, and five of the six patients who achieved a rapid virologic response (RVR) attained a SVR. Conclusions Korean patients infected with genotype 6 HCV are relatively young, and 6c is the most common subtype. When treated with PEG-IFN and ribavirin, the SVR rate was 52%. Similar to other genotypes, a longer duration of treatment and attainment of RVR are important for SVR. PMID:27728965

  16. Assessment of hepatocellular carcinoma risk based on peg-interferon plus ribavirin treatment experience in this new era of highly effective oral antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Ho; Jin, Young-Joo; Shin, Jun Young; Lee, Jin-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this new era of highly effective oral antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), indications for antiviral treatment may be extendable. This study undertaken to identify suitable candidates for peg-interferon plus ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) treatment by evaluating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk in patients with chronic HCV treated or not with PEG-IFN/RBV. This large-scale retrospective study was conducted on 1176 patients with chronic HCV without a history of HCC (treatment group [n = 489] and no-treatment group [n = 687]). In the treatment group, patients treated with PEG-IFN/RBV were dichotomized based on the achievement of sustained virologic response (SVR) into SVR (+) and SVR (−) groups. Median follow-up for all study subjects was 31 months (range 6–144 months). Three-year cumulative HCC development rates in the SVR (+) (1.1%) and SVR (−) (8.6%) subgroups were significantly lower than in the no-treatment group (13.5%) (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). In all study subjects, presence of cirrhosis (hazard ratio [HR], 9.92, P < 0.01), age (HR 1.03, P < 0.01), SVR (−) (HR 7.02, P < 0.01), and no-treatment (HR 6.76, P < 0.01) were found to be independent risk factors of HCC development. In the treatment group, age, the presence of cirrhosis, and SVR (−) were predictors of HCC development. In the no-treatment group, age, male, and the presence of cirrhosis were independent predictors for HCC development. HCC risk increased in patients with chronic HCV with older age, cirrhosis, SVR (−) after PEG-IFN/RBV treatment, and no PEG-IFN/RBV treatment. Active antiviral therapy based on highly effective oral drugs needs to be considered in these patients. PMID:28072684

  17. ECOG Phase II trial of graded-dose peginterferon α-2b in patients with metastatic melanoma over-expressing basic fibroblast growth factor (E2602)

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ronald S.; Lee, Sandra J.; Shin, Donghoon; Callister, Steven M.; Jobe, Dean A.; Conry, Robert M.; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated use of graded-dose peginterferon α-2b (Peg-IFN) in patients with stage IV melanoma overexpressing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The primary objective was suppression of plasma FGF-2 to within normal range (≤7.5 pg/mL). Experimental Design Plasma FGF-2 was measured at baseline (Step 1), and patients with concentrations ≥15 pg/mL were eligible for study treatment (Step 2). Peg-IFN was given weekly at starting dose of 0.5 μg/kg/wk with increment every 3 weeks based on serial FGF-2 concentrations. Results Two hundred seven patients entered Step 1; 45 (22%) overexpressed FGF-2 (median=22 pg/dL). Twenty-nine eligible patients entered Step 2 and received treatment. Patients’ median age was 64 years (range, 29–84 years). Most had >2 prior therapies. FGF-2 decreased in 28 (97%) patients, with suppression to normal range in 10 (35%). Median time to FGF-2 suppression was 30 days. The best clinical responses were partial response (7%) and stable disease (17%). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 2.0 and 9.7 months, respectively. Patients who achieved FGF-2 suppression were more likely than those who did not to have a response or stable disease (P = 0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations decreased in 27 patients (93%) during treatment and paralleled those of FGF-2 over time. We found no compensatory rise in VEGF among those with FGF-2 suppression. Conclusions Graded-dose Peg-IFN suppresses FGF-2 in patients with metastatic melanoma who overexpress FGF-2. Over a third of patients had complete suppression of plasma FGF-2, which correlated with clinical response to this therapy. PMID:24122792

  18. Peginterferon add-on results in more HBsAg decline compared to monotherapy in HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, W P; Sonneveld, M J; Xie, Q; Guo, S; Zhang, N; Zeuzem, S; Tabak, F; Zhang, Q; Simon, K; Akarca, U S; Streinu-Cercel, A; Hansen, B E; Janssen, H L A

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether peginterferon (PEG-IFN) add-on to entecavir (ETV) leads to more HBsAg decline compared to PEG-IFN monotherapy or combination therapy, and whether ETV therapy may prevent HBsAg increase after PEG-IFN cessation. We performed a post hoc analysis of 396 HBeAg-positive patients treated for 72 weeks with ETV + 24 weeks PEG-IFN add-on from week 24 to 48 (add-on, n = 85), 72 weeks with ETV monotherapy (n = 90), 52 weeks with PEG-IFN monotherapy (n = 111) and 52 weeks PEG-IFN + lamivudine (combination, n = 110) within 2 randomized trials. HBsAg decline was assessed at the end of PEG-IFN (EOP) and 6 months after PEG-IFN (EOF) discontinuation. Differences in baseline characteristics were accounted for using inversed probability of treatment weights. At EOP, a HBsAg reduction of ≥1log10 IU/mL was more frequently achieved for patients in the add-on or combination therapy arms (both 36%), compared to PEG-IFN mono (20%) or ETV (8%) (add-on vs PEG-IFN mono P = 0.050). At EOF, the HBsAg reduction ≥1log10 IU/mL was only sustained in patients treated with ETV consolidation (add-on vs combination and PEG-IFN mono: 40% vs 23% and 18%, P = 0.029 and P = 0.003, respectively). For add-on, combination, PEG-IFN mono and ETV, the mean HBsAg-level change at EOF was -0.84, -0.81, -0.68 and -0.33 log10 IU/mL, respectively (P > 0.05 for PEG-IFN arms). HBeAg loss at EOF was 36%, 31%, 33% and 20%, respectively (P > 0.05). PEG-IFN add-on for 24 weeks results in more on-treatment HBsAg decline than does 52 weeks of PEG-IFN monotherapy. ETV therapy may maintain the HBsAg reduction achieved with PEG-IFN.

  19. [Study of the transplacental transfer of interferon alfa-2a on the model of isolated perfused cotyledon].

    PubMed

    Dumas, J C; Giroux, M; Teixeira, M G; Puel, J; Waysbort, A; Berrebi, A; Houin, G; Grandjean, H

    1993-01-01

    Interferon can be used for VIH+ pregnant women, to decrease materno-fetal contamination. Added to maternal circulation, its behaviour was studied by human placental cotyledon ex vivo perfusion. Human recombinant IFN 2a and reference substance 3H2O were injected in intervillous chamber and their behaviours in venous fetal and maternal circulations was followed. At steady state, in fetal circulation 3H2O concentration was 37% of injected rate whereas no IFN transfer rate was observed. In both venous circulations IFN amounts were lower than injected ones 56% versus of 82% for water (p < 0.05). IFN didn't cross placental filter and disappeared partially during placental contact.

  20. Pilot Study of Pioglitazone Prior to HCV Re-treatment in HIV/HCV Genotype 1-Infected Subjects with Insulin Resistance and Prior Nonresponse to Peginterferon and Ribavirin Therapy: A5239

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Kristen; Kitch, Douglas; Chung, Raymond T.; Hadigan, Colleen; Andersen, Janet; Tien, Phyllis; Luetkemeyer, Annie; Alston-Smith, Beverly; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with nonresponse to HCV treatment. In this multicenter, single-arm pilot study, adult, HIV/HCV genotype 1 coinfected prior nonresponders to peginterferon/ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV) with homeostatic model assessment-IR >2.5 were treated with pioglitazone(PIO) for 24 weeks followed by PegIFN/RBV/PIO. 3/19 subjects (15.8%) achieved undetectable HCV RNA at week 24 of PegIFN/RBV/PIO which was not significantly different than the historical null rate of 10% (p=0.29, lower limit of the exact 1-sided 90% confidence interval 5.9%). Over the 24 weeks of PIO monotherapy, ALT and AST declined significantly and correlated with improved metabolic parameters. PMID:24525470

  1. REDUCTION IN HEPATIC INFLAMMATION IS ASSOCIATED WITH LESS FIBROSIS PROGRESSION AND FEWER CLINICAL OUTCOMES IN ADVANCED HEPATITIS C

    PubMed Central

    Morishima, Chihiro; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Lindsay, Karen L; Szabo, Gyongyi; Everson, Gregory T.; Lok, Anna S.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Ghany, Marc G.; Naishadham, Deepa; Morgan, Timothy R.; Wright, Elizabeth C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective During the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis Trial, 3.5 years of maintenance peginterferon-alfa-2a therapy did not affect liver fibrosis progression or clinical outcomes among 1,050 prior interferon nonresponders with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. We investigated whether reduced hepatic inflammation was associated with clinical benefit in 834 patients with a baseline and follow-up biopsy 1.5 years after randomization to peginterferon or observation. Methods Relationships between change in hepatic inflammation (Ishak HAI) and serum ALT, fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes after randomization, and HCV RNA decline before and after randomization were evaluated. Histologic change was defined as a ≥2-point difference in HAI or Ishak fibrosis score between biopsies. Results Among 657 patients who received full-dose peginterferon/ribavirin “lead-in” therapy before randomization, year-1.5 HAI improvement was associated with lead-in HCV RNA suppression in both randomized treated (P <0.0001) and control (P = 0.0001) groups, even in the presence of recurrent viremia. This relationship persisted at year 3.5 in both treated (P = 0.001) and control (P = 0.01) groups. Among 834 patients followed for a median of 6 years, fewer clinical outcomes occurred in patients with improved HAI at year 1.5 compared to those without such improvement in both treated (P = 0.03) and control (P = 0.05) groups. Among patients with Ishak 3–4 fibrosis at baseline, those with improved HAI at year 1.5 had less fibrosis progression at year 1.5 in both treated (P = 0.0003) and control (P = 0.02) groups. Conclusion Reduced hepatic inflammation (measured 1.5 and 3.5 years after randomization) was associated with profound virological suppression during lead-in treatment with full-dose peginterferon/ribavirin and with decreased fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes, independent of randomized treatment. PMID:22688849

  2. Alisporivir with peginterferon/ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection who failed to respond to or relapsed after prior interferon-based therapy: FUNDAMENTAL, a Phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Buti, M; Flisiak, R; Kao, J-H; Chuang, W-L; Streinu-Cercel, A; Tabak, F; Calistru, P; Goeser, T; Rasenack, J; Horban, A; Davis, G L; Alberti, A; Mazzella, G; Pol, S; Orsenigo, R; Brass, C

    2015-07-01

    Alisporivir (ALV) is an oral, investigational host-targeting agent, with pangenotypic activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase II study explored the efficacy and safety of ALV with peginterferon-α2a/ribavirin (PR) in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection in whom prior PR had failed (43% relapsers, 34% null responders and 23% partial responders). Four-hundred-and-fifty-nine patients were randomized (1:1:1:1) to ALV 600 mg once daily (QD), ALV 800 mg QD, ALV 400 twice daily (BID) or placebo plus PR for 48 weeks. When the global ALV trial programme was put on clinical hold, all patients in this study had received ≥31 weeks of randomized treatment; patients completed 48 weeks on PR alone. All ALV groups demonstrated superior rates of complete early virologic response (cEVR; primary endpoint) vs PR alone (P ≤ 0.0131), with highest cEVR rate seen with ALV 400 mg BID (74% vs 36% with PR alone; P < 0.0001). Respective SVR12 rates (key secondary endpoint) were 65% vs 26% in prior relapsers, 63% vs 5% in partial responders and 68% vs 3% in null responders. In patients who received >40 weeks of randomized treatment, the SVR12 rate was 89% for ALV 400 mg BID vs 30% for PR alone (P = 0.0053). Rates of viral breakthrough and relapse were lowest with ALV 400 mg BID. One case of pancreatitis (fully recovered) occurred with ALV/PR. Common AEs were headache, fatigue, anaemia, neutropenia and nausea. Hypertension was infrequent, but more common with ALV. ALV merits further investigation in interferon-free regimens in combination with direct-acting antiviral agents.

  3. Cost Effectiveness of Daclatasvir/Asunaprevir Versus Peginterferon/Ribavirin and Protease Inhibitors for the Treatment of Hepatitis c Genotype 1b Naïve Patients in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Giglio, Andrés; Soza, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir (DCV/ASV) have recently been approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. In association, they are more effective and safer than previous available treatments, but more expensive. It is unclear if paying for the additional costs is an efficient strategy considering limited resources. Methods A Markov model was built to estimate the expected costs in Chilean pesos (CL$) and converted to US dollars (US$) and benefits in quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in a hypothetic cohort of naive patients receiving DCV/ASV compared to protease inhibitors (PIs) and Peginterferon plus Ribavirin (PR). Efficacy was obtained from a mixed-treatment comparison study and costs were estimated from local sources. Utilities were obtained applying the EQ-5D survey to local patients and then valued with the Chilean tariff. A time horizon of 46 years and a discount rate of 3% for costs and outcomes was considered. The ICERs were estimated for a range of DCV/ASV prices. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results PIs were extendedly dominated by DCV/ASV. The ICER of DCV/ASV compared to PR was US$ 16,635/QALY at a total treatment price of US$ 77,419; US$11,581 /QALY at a price of US$ 58,065; US$ 6,375/QALY at a price of US$ 38,710; and US$ 1,364 /QALY at a price of US$ 19,355. The probability of cost-effectiveness at a price of US$ 38,710 was 91.6% while there is a 21.43% probability that DCV/ASV dominates PR if the total treatment price was US$ 19,355. Although the results are sensitive to certain parameters, the ICER did not increase above the suggested threshold of 1 GDP per capita. Conclusions DCV/ASV can be considered cost-effective at any price of the range studied. These results provide decision makers useful information about the value of incorporating these drugs into the public Chilean healthcare system. PMID:26544203

  4. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... alpha-2b is a combination of interferon and polyethylene glycol, which helps the interferon stay active in ... 2b, other alpha interferons, any other medications, or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Ask your doctor if you are ...

  5. Work productivity among treatment-naïve patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C infection receiving telaprevir combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, J; Vera-Llonch, M; Donepudi, M; Suthoff, E; Younossi, Z; Goss, T F

    2015-01-01

    Work productivity is impacted in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients and has been linked to treatment. In two Phase 3 trials, ADVANCE and ILLUMINATE, treatment-naïve genotype 1 chronic HCV-infected patients received 12-week telaprevir (T) with 24 (T12PR24)- or 48 (T12PR48)-week peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin. The objective of this analysis was to examine the impact of chronic HCV infection and its treatment with combination therapy on work productivity. The 5-item, self-reported work productivity questionnaire (WPQ) was administered in Phase 3 trials to assess unemployment status, days unable to work due to HCV/treatment, reduced hours worked and impact on productivity in prior 4 weeks. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses were employed in analyses of pooled trial data. About 1147 patients were included; 22% (n = 255) were unemployed at baseline, with 8% being unemployed due to health reasons. At week 12, there were no differences by treatment regimen in the number of days unable to work. At week 48, improvements were observed earlier among patients receiving the shorter duration of T combination treatment. Mean (95% CI) change from baseline in days unable to work was -0.48 (-0.85, -0.11) days for T12PR24, 1.43 (0.63, 2.24) days for T12PR48 and 1.24 (0.18, 2.30) days for PR48 with placebo. Predictors of days unable to work were identified and include demographic characteristics, pretreatment and on-treatment levels of fatigue, as well regional variation. In post hoc analyses of the ADVANCE and ILLUMINATE trials, work productivity decreased during the initial 12 weeks regardless of treatment group.

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-11-01

    1-Octanol, 9vPnC-MnCc; Abiraterone acetate, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, ARRY-520, AS-1404, Asimadoline, Atazanavir sulfate, AVE-0277, Azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Boceprevir, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B; Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Clevudine, Contusugene ladenovec, CP-751871, Crofelemer, Cypher, CYT006-AngQb; Darbepoetin alfa, Desmopressin, Dexlansoprazole, DG-041; E-5555, Ecogramostim, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Falecalcitriol, Fampridine, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fingolimod hydrochloride; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GS-7904L, GV-1001; HT-1001; Insulin detemir, ISIS-112989, Istradefylline; Laquinimod sodium, Latanoprost/timolol maleate, Lenalidomide, Levobetaxolol hydrochloride, Liposomal doxorubicin, Liposomal morphine sulfate, Lubiprostone, Lumiracoxib, LY-518674; MEM-1003, Mesna disulfide, Mipomersen sodium, MM-093, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naptumomab estafenatox, Natalizumab; Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Pasireotide, Pazufloxacin mesilate, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimagedine, Pimecrolimus, Pramlintide acetate, Prasterone, Pregabalin, Prulifloxacin; QAE-397; Rec-15/2615, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhGAD65, Roflumilast, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine, Rupatadine fumarate; Safinamide mesilate, SIR-Spheres, Sitagliptin phosphate, Sodium phenylacetate, Sodium phenylacetate/Sodium benzoate, Sorafenib, SSR-244738; Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Teduglutide, Tegaserod maleate, Telaprevir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tigecycline, Tiotropium bromide, Trabectedin, Travoprost

  7. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... incidence could be reduced if people changed their sexual behaviors. Our research has demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV risk-associated sexual behaviors among African American adolescents and adults." Spring 2008 ...

  8. Reducing Teacher Incompetence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, John Martin

    1988-01-01

    Suggests how administrators may reduce teacher incompetence. Teacher incompetence can be reduced if administrators fully understand and undertake appropriate preventive and remedial measures. Two sections comprise this article. First, a taxonomy of teacher incompetence reveals the magnitude of the problem. Second, preventive and remedial measures…

  9. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  10. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Reducing Childhood Obesity Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... page please turn Javascript on. The We Can! childhood obesity-prevention program involves parents, caregivers, and community leaders ...

  11. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  12. Reduced Magmatic Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Ardia, P.; Stanley, B. D.; Foley, N.

    2012-12-01

    Volatiles in Earth's upper mantle are dominated by H2O and CO2, but under more reduced conditions likely deeper in the mantle, other volatile species may be important or dominant. However, the speciation, solubilities, and effect on physical properties of reduced magmatic volatiles are poorly constrained. Here we summarize results from an experimental campaign to better understand reduced volatiles in magmas. Experiments emphasize spectroscopic and SIMS characterization of dissolved species in experiments for which fluid fugacities are known, thereby facilitating thermodynamic parameterization. Experimental determinations of molecular H2 solubility in basaltic and andesitic liquids show concentrations that are proportional to H2 fugacity. Because H2 increases with fH2 whereas dissolved H2O increases with fH2O1/2, the relative importance of H2 increases with pressure and for more hydrous magmas. At 1 GPa and IW-1, solubility in basalt reaches 0.3 wt.% (equivalent to 2.7 wt.% H2O). Solubilities at pressures of the deep upper mantle have not been explored experimentally (as is also true for H2O and CO2), but H2 could become the dominant hydrous species at 400 km and deeper, and so deep hydrous melts may have chiefly H2 rather than H2O or OH. Experiments suggest an extremely low partial specific density (0.18 kg/m3) for dissolved H2 at low pressure, and so appreciable dissolved H2 in melt atop the 410 km discontinuity or in the lower mantle may promote positive buoyancy. Solubilities of reduced C-species remain poorly known. In contrast to results in Na2O-SiO2 liquids (Mysen et al., 2009), experiments with a haplobasaltic liquid at controlled CH4 fugacities indicated very small (<0.05 wt.%) CH4 solubilities even at very reduced conditions (reduced conditions and in

  13. Tank closure reducing grout

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  14. Reducing Behavior through Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deitz, Diane E. D.; Repp, Alan C.

    1983-01-01

    The use of reinforcement to reduce inappropriate behaviors of mentally retarded and emotionally disturbed students may involve the following procedures: differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL), the differential reinforcement of response omission (DRO), and the differential reinforcement of incompatible (DRI) or alternative…

  15. Please Reduce Cycle Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Defense AT&L: November–December 2014 4 Please Reduce Cycle Time Brian Schultz “Time is what we want most but what we use worst.” — William Penn ...Schultz is a professor of program management at the Defense Acquisition University’s Mid-Atlantic Region in California, Md. As William Penn noted

  16. Reduced Braginskii equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Horton, W. )

    1994-07-01

    A set of reduced Braginskii equations is derived without assuming flute ordering and the Boussinesq approximation. These model equations conserve the physical energy. It is crucial at finite [beta] that the perpendicular component of Ohm's law be solved to ensure [del][center dot][bold j]=0 for energy conservation.

  17. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  18. Reducing float coal dust

    PubMed Central

    Patts, J.R.; Colinet, J.F.; Janisko, S.J.; Barone, T.L.; Patts, L.D.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling float coal dust in underground coal mines before dispersal into the general airstream can reduce the risk of mine explosions while potentially achieving a more effective and efficient use of rock dust. A prototype flooded-bed scrubber was evaluated for float coal dust control in the return of a continuous miner section. The scrubber was installed inline between the face ventilation tubing and an exhausting auxiliary fan. Airborne and deposited dust mass measurements were collected over three days at set distances from the fan exhaust to assess changes in float coal dust levels in the return due to operation of the scrubber. Mass-based measurements were collected on a per-cut basis and normalized on the basis of per ton mined by the continuous miner. The results show that average float coal dust levels measured under baseline conditions were reduced by more than 90 percent when operating the scrubber. PMID:28018004

  19. Reducing rotor weight

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-09-01

    Aclidinium bromide, AE-37, Alemtuzumab, AMA1-C1/ISA 720, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Arachidonic acid, Arbaclofen placarbil, Aripiprazole, ARQ-621, Azelnidipine, Azilsartan medoxomil potassium; Bevacizumab, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib; Choriogonadotropin alfa, CTS-1027; Dapagliflozin, Dasatinib, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denufosol tetrasodium, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dronedarone hydrochloride, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Etaracizumab, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Ferric carboxymaltose, Fludarabine, Foretinib; Gefitinib, GFT-505, GSK-256066; HPV-6/11/16/18, HuM195/rGel, HyperAcute-Lung cancer vaccine; I5NP, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ivabradine hydrochloride; L2G7, Lacosamide, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Lidocaine/prilocaine, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide, Lixivaptan; Meningococcal (groups A, C, Y and W-135) oligosaccharide diphtheria CRM197 conjugate vaccine, Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-β, Mirabegron, Morphine/oxycodone, MR Vaccine, MSC-1936369B, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Narlaprevir, N-Desmethylclozapine; Ocriplasmin, Olaparib, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/azelnidipine, ONO-5334, ONO-8539; Palifermin, Panitumumab, Pardoprunox hydrochloride, PCV7, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pexelizumab, PF-337210, Pitavastatin calcium; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant interleukin-7, Regadenoson, Reniale, Roflumilast, Rosuvastatin calcium; Safinamide mesilate, SB-1518, SCH-527123, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talaporfin sodium, Tanespimycin, Technosphere/Insulin, Telaprevir, Telatinib, Telcagepant, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Teriparatide, Testosterone transdermal gel, TH-302, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Trabedersen, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Visilizumab, Voreloxin, Vorinostat.

  1. Reducing teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Debbie

    2011-03-01

    The Teenage Pregnancy Independent Advisory Group (TPIAG) was established in 2000 to advise the government about reducing teenage pregnancy rates and supporting teenage parents to continue with their education. The group reached the end of its tenure in December 2010. This short article highlights some of the key issues from the final report and provides some insights into past achievements and future directions from an interview with Gill Frances, TPIAG's chair.

  2. Gradual extinction reduces reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Shiban, Youssef; Wittmann, Jasmin; Weißinger, Mara; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether gradually reducing the frequency of aversive stimuli during extinction can prevent the return of fear. Thirty-one participants of a three-stage procedure (acquisition, extinction and a reinstatement test on day 2) were randomly assigned to a standard extinction (SE) and gradual extinction (GE) procedure. The two groups differed only in the extinction procedure. While the SE group ran through a regular extinction process without any negative events, the frequency of the aversive stimuli during the extinction phase was gradually reduced for the GE group. The unconditioned stimulus (US) was an air blast (5 bar, 10 ms). A spider and a scorpion were used as conditioned stimuli (CS). The outcome variables were contingency ratings and physiological measures (skin conductance response, SCR and startle response). There were no differences found between the two groups for the acquisition and extinction phases concerning contingency ratings, SCR, or startle response. GE compared to SE significantly reduced the return of fear in the reinstatement test for the startle response but not for SCR or contingency ratings. This study was successful in translating the findings in rodent to humans. The results suggest that the GE process is suitable for increasing the efficacy of fear extinction. PMID:26441581

  3. Reducing Iatrogenic Risks

    PubMed Central

    Ely, E. Wesley; Speroff, Theodore; Pun, Brenda T.; Boehm, Leanne; Dittus, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    ICUs are experiencing an epidemic of patients with acute brain dysfunction (delirium) and weakness, both associated with increased mortality and long-term disability. These conditions are commonly acquired in the ICU and are often initiated or exacerbated by sedation and ventilation decisions and management. Despite > 10 years of evidence revealing the hazards of delirium, the quality chasm between current and ideal processes of care continues to exist. Monitoring of delirium and sedation levels remains inconsistent. In addition, sedation, ventilation, and physical therapy practices proven successful at reducing the frequency and severity of adverse outcomes are not routinely practiced. In this article, we advocate for the adoption and implementation of a standard bundle of ICU measures with great potential to reduce the burden of ICU-acquired delirium and weakness. Individual components of this bundle are evidence based and can help standardize communication, improve interdisciplinary care, reduce mortality, and improve cognitive and functional outcomes. We refer to this as the “ABCDE bundle,” for awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring, and exercise/early mobility. This evidence-based bundle of practices will build a bridge across the current quality chasm from the “front end” to the “back end” of critical care and toward improved cognitive and functional outcomes for ICU survivors. PMID:21051398

  4. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Howard L.

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  5. Reducing Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2006-06-05

    This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

  6. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  7. Modelling reduced sparse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozera, Ryszard; Noakes, Lyle

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of fitting to an ordered collection of points in arbitary Euclidean space called reduced data. We are not given here the corresponding interpolation knots. Instead, these are estimated by new knots upon minimizing a relevant highly nonlinear optimization scheme based on natural spline interpolation. The existence of a global minimizer (i.e. the collection of interpolation knots in ascending order) is also addressed in this paper. Finally, Leap-Frog optimization tool is used to compute these knots approximating the unknown interpolation knots. This numerical scheme is subsequently compared with the Secant Method. Two illustrative examples are given.

  8. Nonlinearity-reduced interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chien-ming

    2007-12-01

    Periodic nonlinearity is a systematic error limiting the accuracy of displacement measurements at the nanometer level. It results from many causes such as the frequency mixing, polarization mixing, polarization-frequency mixing, and the ghost reflections. An interferometer having accuracy in displacement measurement of less than one-nanometer is necessary in nanometrology. To meet the requirement, the periodic nonlinearity should be less than deep sub-nanometer. In this paper, a nonlinearity-reduced interferometry has been proposed. Both the linear- and straightness-interferometer were tested. The developed interferometer demonstrated of a residual nonlinearity less than 25 pm.

  9. Embodied intervention reduce depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong-Qing; Bi, Xin; Fu, Ying

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the difference of the selected-rate of undergraduates' depression with respect to time, gender and scales and the intervention effect of embodied exercise, 201 Undergraduates were measured with Self-Rating Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI).The result shows there are significant difference of the selected-rates of undergraduates' depression resulted from long-time interval rather than from short-time interval and gender. After the intervention, the selected-rates are decreased and no significant difference has been found between the embodied groups and the controlled group. Only the embodied groups maintain the better effects of the intervention in the tracking. Also the result shows that only the participants of embodied groups obtain more positive emotional experience. We conclude that there is significant difference of selected-rate of undergraduates' depression on scales, and the embodied exercise can effectively reduce undergraduate's depression.

  10. Reducing GWAS Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Hazelett, Dennis J.; Conti, David V.; Han, Ying; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Easton, Doug; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Haiman, Christopher A.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed numerous genomic 'hits' associated with complex phenotypes. In most cases these hits, along with surrogate genetic variation as measure by numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are in linkage disequilibrium, are not in coding genes making assignment of functionality or causality intractable. Here we propose that fine-mapping along with the matching of risk SNPs at chromatin biofeatures lessen this complexity by reducing the number of candidate functional/causal SNPs. For example, we show here that only on average 2 SNPs per prostate cancer risk locus are likely candidates for functionality/causality; we further propose that this manageable number should be taken forward in mechanistic studies. The candidate SNPs can be looked up for each prostate cancer risk region in 2 recent publications in 20151,2 from our groups. PMID:26771711

  11. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  12. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  13. Reduced Order Podolsky Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibes, Ronaldo

    2017-02-01

    We perform the canonical and path integral quantizations of a lower-order derivatives model describing Podolsky's generalized electrodynamics. The physical content of the model shows an auxiliary massive vector field coupled to the usual electromagnetic field. The equivalence with Podolsky's original model is studied at classical and quantum levels. Concerning the dynamical time evolution, we obtain a theory with two first-class and two second-class constraints in phase space. We calculate explicitly the corresponding Dirac brackets involving both vector fields. We use the Senjanovic procedure to implement the second-class constraints and the Batalin-Fradkin-Vilkovisky path integral quantization scheme to deal with the symmetries generated by the first-class constraints. The physical interpretation of the results turns out to be simpler due to the reduced derivatives order permeating the equations of motion, Dirac brackets and effective action.

  14. Reducing medical waste.

    PubMed

    Conrardy, Julie; Hillanbrand, Mary; Myers, Sandra; Nussbaum, George F

    2010-06-01

    Medical waste is a necessary by-product of any hospital environment; however, the majority of regulated medical waste is produced in the OR from the use of disposable surgical supplies (eg, drapes, gowns, basins, gloves, sponges). We conducted a concept comparison project in the ORs of two large medical centers in Bethesda, Maryland, and Washington, DC, to evaluate the effects of using reusable surgical basins, gowns, and table and Mayo stand covers in place of disposable products. Survey results indicated that surgeons and surgical technologists found the reusable products to be preferable to the disposable products currently in use. In addition, using reusable products provided a means to decrease regulated medical waste generated in the OR by an average of 65% as well as reduce the cost of waste disposal. AORN recommends evaluating the environmental effects of using reusable, reposable, and disposable products; our findings provide evidence that may be useful to surgical facilities that seek to adopt a "green" approach.

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-03-01

    ABT-869, Acadesine, Acetylsalicylic acid/omeprazole, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, AEG-35156, Agatolimod sodium, Albiglutide, Alemtuzumab, Alipogene tiparvovec, Alogliptin benzoate, AMG-386, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Apremilast, Aripiprazole, Asoprisnil, Atorvastatin/fenofibrate, AVN-944, Axitinib; Belinostat, Bevacizumab, BHT-3021, BI-2536, Biapenem, Bilastine, Biphasic insulin aspart, Blinatumomab, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, CD-NP, Cediranib, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, Ciclesonide, CK-1827452,Clevudine, Clofarabine, CSL-360, CYT-997; Dapagliflozin, Darinaparsin, Denosumab, Densiron 68, Desloratadine, Dulanermin; Edoxaban tosilate, Emtricitabine, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fidaxomicintiacumiv, Fulvestrant; G-207, GCR-8015, Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), Glufosfamide; HPV16L1E7CVLP; Ibutamoren mesilate, Imatinib mesylate, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Iodine (I131) tositumomab, Istaroxime, ITMN-191, Ixabepilone; JZP-4, Lenalidomide; Levetiracetam, Linaclotide acetate, Liposomal cytarabine/daunorubicin, Liposomal doxorubicin, Liraglutide, LY-518674; Milatuzumab, MMR-V, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Niacin/simvastatin; Obatoclax mesylate, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pazufloxacin, PBT-2, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Perampanel, PfCP2.9, Pitavastatin calcium, Poly I:CLC, Pomalidomide, Pralatrexate, Pramlintide acetate, Prucalopride; rhGAD65, Roflumilast; RTS,S/AS02D; SCH-530348, Semagacestat, Sirolimus-eluting coronary stent, Sirolimus-Eluting Stent, SIR-Spheres, Sivelestat sodium hydrate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tafluprost, Tanespimycin, Teduglutide, Telaprevir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tiotropium bromide, TMC-435350, Tositumomab/iodine (I131) tositumomab, Travoprost/timolol, Triciribine

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  18. Measuring the reduced shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Neglecting the second order corrections in weak lensing measurements can lead to a few percent uncertainties on cosmic shears, and becomes more important for cluster lensing mass reconstructions. Existing methods which claim to measure the reduced shears are not necessarily accurate to the second order when a point spread function (PSF) is present. We show that the method of Zhang (2008) exactly measures the reduced shears at the second order level in the presence of PSF. A simple theorem is provided for further confirming our calculation, and for judging the accuracy of any shear measurement method at the second order based on its properties at the first order. The method of Zhang (2008) is well defined mathematically. It does not require assumptions on the morphologies of galaxies and the PSF. To reach a sub-percent level accuracy, the CCD pixel size is required to be not larger than 1/3 of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF, regardless of whether the PSF has a power-law or exponential profile at large distances. Using a large ensemble (gtrsim107) of mock galaxies of unrestricted morphologies, we study the shear recovery accuracy under different noise conditions. We find that contaminations to the shear signals from the noise of background photons can be removed in a well defined way because they are not correlated with the source shapes. The residual shear measurement errors due to background noise are consistent with zero at the sub-percent level even when the amplitude of such noise reaches about 1/10 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source. This limit can in principle be extended further with a larger galaxy ensemble in our simulations. On the other hand, the source Poisson noise remains to be a cause of systematic errors. For a sub-percent level accuracy, our method requires the amplitude of the source Poisson noise to be less than 1/80 ~ 1/100 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source, corresponding to

  19. Measuring the reduced shear

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Neglecting the second order corrections in weak lensing measurements can lead to a few percent uncertainties on cosmic shears, and becomes more important for cluster lensing mass reconstructions. Existing methods which claim to measure the reduced shears are not necessarily accurate to the second order when a point spread function (PSF) is present. We show that the method of Zhang (2008) exactly measures the reduced shears at the second order level in the presence of PSF. A simple theorem is provided for further confirming our calculation, and for judging the accuracy of any shear measurement method at the second order based on its properties at the first order. The method of Zhang (2008) is well defined mathematically. It does not require assumptions on the morphologies of galaxies and the PSF. To reach a sub-percent level accuracy, the CCD pixel size is required to be not larger than 1/3 of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF, regardless of whether the PSF has a power-law or exponential profile at large distances. Using a large ensemble (∼>10{sup 7}) of mock galaxies of unrestricted morphologies, we study the shear recovery accuracy under different noise conditions. We find that contaminations to the shear signals from the noise of background photons can be removed in a well defined way because they are not correlated with the source shapes. The residual shear measurement errors due to background noise are consistent with zero at the sub-percent level even when the amplitude of such noise reaches about 1/10 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source. This limit can in principle be extended further with a larger galaxy ensemble in our simulations. On the other hand, the source Poisson noise remains to be a cause of systematic errors. For a sub-percent level accuracy, our method requires the amplitude of the source Poisson noise to be less than 1/80 ∼ 1/100 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source

  20. Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

    2008-04-18

    The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

  1. Reducing miner absenteeism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.H.; Clingan, M.R.; Randolph, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The U. S. Bureau of Mines has prepared this report on strategies for maintaining high job attendance among underground coal miners because high absenteeism is a threat to miners' safety and seriously hampers productivity. A substantial number of research studies on the effectiveness of various strategies for reducing absenteeism among the employees of nonmining industries have been reported in the literature. These strategies have aimed at improving job attendance through one or more of the following: (1) improving employment procedures, (2) overcoming problems that adversely affect one's ability to attend work, and (3) increasing miners' motivation to attend work. Many of these strategies appear applicable to the mining industry, and are reviewed in the first half of this report. The second half of this report describes how one could develop and implement a program for maintaining high attendance at underground coal mines. The steps include measuring and evaluating attendance levels, formulating attendance goals and an absenteeism policy, developing and implementing an attendance promotion program and periodically going through the preceding steps (known as recycling).

  2. Pollution reducing aircraft propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, R.

    1980-07-29

    An aircraft pollution reducing propulsion airfoil system comprising a wing having upper and lower surfaces comprising wing skin plates extending longitudinally on the wing and being spaced one from another in chordwise directions, spars extending into the wing between the surfaces, stringer ducts extending along internal sides of the wing surfaces, the stringers having relatively rigid surface-supporting structure and having outward directed openings extending across the wing surfaces, interrupting the wing surfaces between edges of the wing skin plates, the ducts thereby forming stringer structural elements supporting the wing skin plates, the outward directed openings of the stringer ducts being arranged perpendicularly to the wing surfaces in a leading portion of the wing and tangential to the wing surfaces in a trailing portion of the wing surfaces, suction means connected to the stringer ducts with perpendicular opening for drawing gas into the ducts through those openings and blowing means connected to the ducts with tangential openings for flowing gas out of the tangential openings, combustion means connected to the suction means and to the blowing meanas for accelerating gas through the means.

  3. Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    A test subject being suited up for studies on the Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator located in the hanger at Langley Research Center. The initial version of this simulator was located inside the hanger. Later a larger version would be located at the Lunar Landing Facility. The purpose of this simulator was to study the subject while walking, jumping or running. Researchers conducted studies of various factors such as fatigue limit, energy expenditure, and speed of locomotion. Francis B. Smith wrote in his paper 'Simulators For Manned Space Research,' 'I would like to conclude this talk with a discussion of a device for simulating lunar gravity which is very effective and yet which is so simple that its cost is in the order of a few thousand dollars at most, rather than hundreds of thousands. With a little ingenuity, one could almost build this type simulator in his backyard for children to play on. The principle is ...if a test subject is suspended in a sling so that his body axis makes an angle of 9 1/2 degrees with the horizontal and if he then 'stands' on a platform perpendicular to his body axis, the component of the earth's gravity forcing him toward the platform is one times the sine of 9 1/2 degrees or approximately 1/6 of the earth's normal gravity field. That is, a 180 pound astronaut 'standing' on the platform would exert a force of only 30 pounds - the same as if he were standing upright on the lunar surface.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308; Francis B. Smith, 'Simulators For Manned Space Research,' Paper for 1966 IEEE International Convention, New York, NY, March 21-25, 1966.

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir Plus Dasabuvir With or Without Ribavirin in HCV-Infected Patients Taking Concomitant Acid-Reducing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Mitchell L; Rustgi, Vinod; Bennett, Michael; Forns, Xavier; Asselah, Tarik; Planas Vila, Ramon; Liu, Li; Pedrosa, Marcos; Moller, Jonathan; Reau, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acid-reducing agents (ARAs) and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) that increase gastric pH can alter the bioavailability of antiviral drugs, particularly relevant in patients with advanced liver disease caused by chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection seeking therapy. Using integrated data from six phase 3 studies, we report the safety and efficacy of the 3-direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimen containing ombitasvir (OBV, an NS5A inhibitor), ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir (PTV/r, an NS3/4A protease inhibitor), and dasabuvir (DSV, an NS5B polymerase inhibitor) with or without ribavirin (RBV) for HCV genotype 1 patients taking concomitant ARAs and PPIs. METHODS: Treatment-naïve or peginterferon/RBV treatment-experienced patients with or without compensated cirrhosis received OBV/PTV/r and DSV with or without weight-based RBV. Rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), defined as HCV RNA below the lower limit of quantification, 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) and safety were evaluated in patients who were receiving concomitant ARAs. RESULTS: Among 2,053 patients enrolled and dosed with study drug, 410 (20%) were receiving concomitant ARAs; of these, 308 (15%) were taking concomitant PPIs. Rates of SVR12 were 95.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 93.5–97.4%) among patients receiving an ARA, and 96.3% (95% CI 95.3–97.2%) in patients not receiving a concomitant ARA. Similarly, among patients receiving a PPI or not, SVR12 was achieved in 95.1% (95% CI 92.1–97.0%) and 96.4% (95% CI 95.5–97.2%), respectively. Response rates were high regardless of treatment regimen (with or without RBV), and among patients receiving a standard or high dose of PPIs. Regarding safety, adverse events and serious adverse events were more frequently reported in patients taking concomitant ARAs, though baseline population differences may have played a role. CONCLUSIONS: In phase 3 trials of OBV/PTV/r plus DSV and RBV in HCV genotype 1-infected patients, SVR12 rates were high

  5. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    DOEpatents

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  6. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... this reduced potency is due to changes in binding to the receptor or to changes in the ... the body’s natural opioids, β-endorphin. Because this binding reduces the number of receptors required to achieve ...

  7. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  8. Reduced Gravity Zblan Optical Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    2000-01-01

    Two optical fiber pullers have been designed for pulling ZBLAN optical fiber in reduced gravity. One fiber puller was designed, built and flown on board NASA's KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. A second fiber puller has been designed for use on board the International Space Station.

  9. Reducing crosstalk between stereoscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, James S.; Wooten, Wayne L.

    1994-04-01

    Crosstalk between the left and right eyes consists of the one eye's image seen faintly by the other. Image processing can reduce this. The technique is effective, but there are costs of course, and some surprises.

  10. Reducing Cancer Patients' Painful Treatment

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA light technology originally developed to aid plant growth experiments in space has proved to reduce the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marro...

  11. Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA'€™s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program gives students and educators the opportunity to design, build and fly an experiment in microgravity and get a look at what it takes to be a NASA en...

  12. ISS Update: Reduced Gravity Education

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot interviews Veronica Seyl, Acting Manager for Reduced Gravity Education. NASA works with students and educators to design experiments for flight testing aboard t...

  13. How to Reduce Solid Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, George; Clapp, Leallyn B.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the problem of solid waste disposal in the United States, suggests ways in which solid wastes might be reduced, and proposes a number of related topics for student debate in classes or in science clubs. (JR)

  14. Learning to REDUCE: A Reduced Electricity Consumption Prediction Ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, Saima; Chelmis, Charalampos; Prasanna, Viktor

    2016-02-12

    Utilities use Demand Response (DR) to balance supply and demand in the electric grid by involving customers in efforts to reduce electricity consumption during peak periods. To implement and adapt DR under dynamically changing conditions of the grid, reliable prediction of reduced consumption is critical. However, despite the wealth of research on electricity consumption prediction and DR being long in practice, the problem of reduced consumption prediction remains largely un-addressed. In this paper, we identify unique computational challenges associated with the prediction of reduced consumption and contrast this to that of normal consumption and DR baseline prediction.We propose a novel ensemble model that leverages different sequences of daily electricity consumption on DR event days as well as contextual attributes for reduced consumption prediction. We demonstrate the success of our model on a large, real-world, high resolution dataset from a university microgrid comprising of over 950 DR events across a diverse set of 32 buildings. Our model achieves an average error of 13.5%, an 8.8% improvement over the baseline. Our work is particularly relevant for buildings where electricity consumption is not tied to strict schedules. Our results and insights should prove useful to the researchers and practitioners working in the sustainable energy domain.

  15. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bonney, Matthew S.; Brake, Matthew R.W.

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  16. Strategies to Reduce Indoor Tanning

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Dawn M.; Fox, Kathleen A.; Glenn, Jeffrey D.; Guy, Gery P.; Watson, Meg; Baker, Katie; Cokkinides, Vilma; Gottlieb, Mark; Lazovich, DeAnn; Perna, Frank M.; Sampson, Blake P.; Seidenberg, Andrew B.; Sinclair, Craig; Geller, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning device use is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer, including risk of malignant melanoma, and is an urgent public health problem. By reducing indoor tanning, future cases of skin cancer could be prevented, along with the associated morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. On August 20, 2012, the CDC hosted a meeting to discuss the current body of evidence on strategies to reduce indoor tanning as well as research gaps. Using the Action Model to Achieve Healthy People 2020 Overarching Goals as a framework, the current paper provides highlights on the topics that were discussed, including (1) the state of the evidence on strategies to reduce indoor tanning; (2) the tools necessary to effectively assess, monitor, and evaluate the short- and long-term impact of interventions designed to reduce indoor tanning; and (3) strategies to align efforts at the national, state, and local levels through transdisciplinary collaboration and coordination across multiple sectors. Although many challenges and barriers exist, a coordinated, multilevel, transdisciplinary approach has the potential to reduce indoor tanning and prevent future cases of skin cancer. PMID:23683986

  17. Sleep can reduce proactive interference.

    PubMed

    Abel, Magdalena; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has repeatedly been connected to processes of memory consolidation. While extensive research indeed documents beneficial effects of sleep on memory, little is yet known about the role of sleep for interference effects in episodic memory. Although two prior studies reported sleep to reduce retroactive interference, no sleep effect has previously been found for proactive interference. Here we applied a study format differing from that employed by the prior studies to induce a high degree of proactive interference, and asked participants to encode a single list or two interfering lists of paired associates via pure study cycles. Testing occurred after 12 hours of diurnal wakefulness or nocturnal sleep. Consistent with the prior work, we found sleep in comparison to wake did not affect memory for the single list, but reduced retroactive interference. In addition we found sleep reduced proactive interference, and reduced retroactive and proactive interference to the same extent. The finding is consistent with the view that arising benefits of sleep are caused by the reactivation of memory contents during sleep, which has been suggested to strengthen and stabilise memories. Such stabilisation may make memories less susceptible to competition from interfering memories at test and thus reduce interference effects.

  18. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, F.

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  19. Power and reduced temporal discounting.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Priyanka D; Fast, Nathanael J

    2013-04-01

    Decision makers generally feel disconnected from their future selves, an experience that leads them to prefer smaller immediate gains to larger future gains. This pervasive tendency is known as temporal discounting, and researchers across disciplines are interested in understanding how to overcome it. Following recent advances in the power literature, we suggest that the experience of power enhances one's connection with the future self, which in turn results in reduced temporal discounting. In Study 1, we found that participants assigned to high-power roles were less likely than participants assigned to low-power roles to display temporal discounting. In Studies 2 and 3, priming power reduced temporal discounting in monetary and nonmonetary tasks, and, further, connection with the future self mediated the relation between power and reduced discounting. In Study 4, experiencing a general sense of power in the workplace predicted actual lifetime savings. These results have important implications for future research.

  20. Microbial methods of reducing technetium

    DOEpatents

    Wildung, Raymond E [Richland, WA; Garland, Thomas R [Greybull, WY; Gorby, Yuri A [Richland, WA; Hess, Nancy J [Benton City, WA; Li, Shu-Mei W [Richland, WA; Plymale, Andrew E [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a method for microbial reduction of a technetium compound to form other compounds of value in medical imaging. The technetium compound is combined in a mixture with non-growing microbial cells which contain a technetium-reducing enzyme system, a stabilizing agent and an electron donor in a saline solution under anaerobic conditions. The mixture is substantially free of an inorganic technetium reducing agent and its reduction products. The resulting product is Tc of lower oxidation states, the form of which can be partially controlled by the stabilizing agent. It has been discovered that the microorganisms Shewanella alga, strain Bry and Shewanelia putrifacians, strain CN-32 contain the necessary enzyme systems for technetium reduction and can form both mono nuclear and polynuclear reduced Tc species depending on the stabilizing agent.

  1. Contrasting reduced overshadowing and blocking.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2007-07-01

    Preexposure of a cue without an outcome (X-) prior to compound pairings with the outcome (XZ-->O) can reduce overshadowing of a target cue (Z). Moreover, pairing a cue with an outcome (X-->O) before compound training can enhance its ability to compete with another cue (i.e., blocking). Four experiments were conducted in a conditioned bar-press suppression preparation with rats to determine whether spacing of the X- or X-->O trials would differentially affect reduced overshadowing and blocking. Experiment 1a showed that reduced overshadowing was larger with massed trials than with spaced trials. Experiment 1b found that blocking was larger with spaced trials than with massed trials. Experiments 2a and 2b indicated that these effects of trial spacing were both mediated by the associative status of the context at test. The results are interpreted in the framework of contemporary learning theories.

  2. Six ways to reduce inventory.

    PubMed

    Lunn, T

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to help you reduce the inventory in your operation. We will accomplish that task by discussing six specific methods that companies have used successfully to reduce their inventory. One common attribute of these successes is that they also build teamwork among the people. Every business operation today is concerned with methods to improve customer service. The real trick is to accomplish that task without increasing inventory. We are all concerned with improving our skills at keeping inventory low.

  3. Flexure Bearing Reduces Startup Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. Dean

    1991-01-01

    Design concept for ball bearing incorporates small pieces of shim stock, wire spokes like those in bicycle wheels, or other flexing elements to reduce both stiction and friction slope. In flexure bearing, flexing elements placed between outer race of ball bearing and outer ring. Elements flex when ball bearings encounter small frictional-torque "bumps" or even larger ones when bearing balls encounter buildups of grease on inner or outer race. Flexure of elements reduce high friction slopes of "bumps", helping to keep torque between outer ring and inner race low and more nearly constant. Concept intended for bearings in gimbals on laser and/or antenna mirrors.

  4. Reducing Life-Cycle Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roodvoets, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Presents factors to consider when determining roofing life-cycle costs, explaining that costs do not tell the whole story; discussing components that should go into the decision (cost, maintenance, energy use, and environmental costs); and concluding that important elements in reducing life-cycle costs include energy savings through increased…

  5. METHOD OF REDUCING PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Johns, I.B.

    1958-06-01

    A method is described for reducing plutonium compounds in aqueous solution from a higher to a lower valence state. This reduction of valence is achieved by treating the aqueous solution of higher valence plutonium compounds with hydrogen in contact with an activated platinum catalyst.

  6. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  7. Reducing Crime by Eliminating Cash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, David R.

    Ending the use of cash in the United States can provide substantial social and economic gain while requiring only modest levels of investment. One primary benefit is the reduction of cash-related crimes. Because most street crime is committed to obtain cash or uses cash as a transaction medium, elimination of cash will dramatically reduce crime.…

  8. Reduce Waste for Greener Holidays

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Dec. 15, 2015) Friends, family, parties, and travel are what make the holiday season great. You can make it even better by reducing waste as often as possible during your celebrations. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants t

  9. Reference Works in Reduced Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessey, David

    1977-01-01

    Lower cost and less shelf space requirements have made major reference works in miniaturized print editions attractive to small libraries. The major disadvantage is the necessity of a magnifying glass for reading entries. A bibliography of reduced-size editions is included. (JAB)

  10. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  11. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  12. Reducing Poverty through Preschool Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J.; Ludwig, Jens; Magnuson, Katherine A.

    2007-01-01

    Greg Duncan, Jens Ludwig, and Katherine Magnuson explain how providing high-quality care to disadvantaged preschool children can help reduce poverty. In early childhood, they note, children's cognitive and socioemotional skills develop rapidly and are sensitive to "inputs" from parents, home learning environments, child care settings, and the…

  13. Do Rewards Reduce Student Motivation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malouf, David

    1983-01-01

    The reduced continuing motivation effect is examined with regard to research, theory, and implications for practice. The description of research focuses primarily on studies conducted with preschool-aged or school-aged subjects. Explanations based on self-perception or attributional theory and learning theory are examined. (Author/PN)

  14. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOEpatents

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  15. Pressure Reducer for Coal Gasifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, James M., Sr.

    1983-01-01

    Quasi-porous-plug pressure reducer is designed for gases containing abrasive particles. Gas used to generate high pressure steam to drive electric power generators. In giving up heat to steam, gas drops in temperature. Device used for coal gasification plants.

  16. Distinguishing iron-reducing from sulfate-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Thomas, M.A.; McMahon, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground water systems dominated by iron- or sulfate-reducing conditions may be distinguished by observing concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe2+) and sulfide (sum of H2S, HS-, and S= species and denoted here as "H2S"). This approach is based on the observation that concentrations of Fe2+ and H2S in ground water systems tend to be inversely related according to a hyperbolic function. That is, when Fe2+ concentrations are high, H2S concentrations tend to be low and vice versa. This relation partly reflects the rapid reaction kinetics of Fe2+ with H2S to produce relatively insoluble ferrous sulfides (FeS). This relation also reflects competition for organic substrates between the iron- and the sulfate-reducing microorganisms that catalyze the production of Fe2+ and H 2S. These solubility and microbial constraints operate in tandem, resulting in the observed hyperbolic relation between Fe2+ and H 2S concentrations. Concentrations of redox indicators, including dissolved hydrogen (H2) measured in a shallow aquifer in Hanahan, South Carolina, suggest that if the Fe2+/H2S mass ratio (units of mg/L) exceeded 10, the screened interval being tapped was consistently iron reducing (H2 ???0.2 to 0.8 nM). Conversely, if the Fe 2+/H2S ratio was less than 0.30, consistent sulfate-reducing (H2 ???1 to 5 nM) conditions were observed over time. Concomitantly high Fe2+ and H2S concentrations were associated with H2 concentrations that varied between 0.2 and 5.0 nM over time, suggesting mixing of water from adjacent iron- and sulfate-reducing zones or concomitant iron and sulfate reduction under nonelectron donor-limited conditions. These observations suggest that Fe2+/H2S mass ratios may provide useful information concerning the occurrence and distribution of iron and sulfate reduction in ground water systems. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  17. Structural reducibility of multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Domenico, Manlio; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Arenas, Alexandre; Latora, Vito

    2015-04-01

    Many complex systems can be represented as networks consisting of distinct types of interactions, which can be categorized as links belonging to different layers. For example, a good description of the full protein-protein interactome requires, for some organisms, up to seven distinct network layers, accounting for different genetic and physical interactions, each containing thousands of protein-protein relationships. A fundamental open question is then how many layers are indeed necessary to accurately represent the structure of a multilayered complex system. Here we introduce a method based on quantum theory to reduce the number of layers to a minimum while maximizing the distinguishability between the multilayer network and the corresponding aggregated graph. We validate our approach on synthetic benchmarks and we show that the number of informative layers in some real multilayer networks of protein-genetic interactions, social, economical and transportation systems can be reduced by up to 75%.

  18. Alcohol reduces aversion to ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Tyszka, Tadeusz; Macko, Anna; Stańczak, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Several years ago, Cohen et al. (1958) demonstrated that under the influence of alcohol drivers became more risk prone, although their risk perception remained unchanged. Research shows that ambiguity aversion is to some extent positively correlated with risk aversion, though not very highly (Camerer and Weber, 1992). The question addressed by the present research is whether alcohol reduces ambiguity aversion. Our research was conducted in a natural setting (a restaurant bar), where customers with differing levels of alcohol intoxication were offered a choice between a risky and an ambiguous lottery. We found that alcohol reduced ambiguity aversion and that the effect occurred in men but not women. We interpret these findings in terms of the risk-as-value hypothesis, according to which, people in Western culture tend to value risk, and suggest that alcohol consumption triggers adherence to socially and culturally valued patterns of conduct different for men and women.

  19. Contrails reduce daily temperature range.

    PubMed

    Travis, David J; Carleton, Andrew M; Lauritsen, Ryan G

    2002-08-08

    The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the daily temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period.

  20. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  1. Mindfulness reduces the correspondence bias.

    PubMed

    Hopthrow, Tim; Hooper, Nic; Mahmood, Lynsey; Meier, Brian P; Weger, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    The correspondence bias (CB) refers to the idea that people sometimes give undue weight to dispositional rather than situational factors when explaining behaviours and attitudes. Three experiments examined whether mindfulness, a non-judgmental focus on the present moment, could reduce the CB. Participants engaged in a brief mindfulness exercise (the raisin task), a control task, or an attention to detail task before completing a typical CB measure involving an attitude-attribution paradigm. The results indicated that participants in the mindfulness condition experienced a significant reduction in the CB compared to participants in the control or attention to detail conditions. These results suggest that mindfulness training can play a unique role in reducing social biases related to person perception.

  2. Alcohol reduces aversion to ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Tyszka, Tadeusz; Macko, Anna; Stańczak, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Several years ago, Cohen et al. (1958) demonstrated that under the influence of alcohol drivers became more risk prone, although their risk perception remained unchanged. Research shows that ambiguity aversion is to some extent positively correlated with risk aversion, though not very highly (Camerer and Weber, 1992). The question addressed by the present research is whether alcohol reduces ambiguity aversion. Our research was conducted in a natural setting (a restaurant bar), where customers with differing levels of alcohol intoxication were offered a choice between a risky and an ambiguous lottery. We found that alcohol reduced ambiguity aversion and that the effect occurred in men but not women. We interpret these findings in terms of the risk-as-value hypothesis, according to which, people in Western culture tend to value risk, and suggest that alcohol consumption triggers adherence to socially and culturally valued patterns of conduct different for men and women. PMID:25642202

  3. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  4. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  5. Tandem motors reduce well costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, M.; Daigle, C.; Crowe, R.

    1995-10-01

    The new generation of tandem mud motors that recently appeared on the drilling scene is significantly affecting drilling efficiency worldwide. These motors provide drillers with increased horsepower at the bit, higher torque, and faster rates of penetration (ROP). With advanced engineering and more durable materials, motor life is being extended, thereby increasing the time between bit trips and reducing drilling costs. This article reviews the performance, design, and operation of these motors.

  6. MapReduce SVM Game

    SciTech Connect

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; Aimone, James B.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently and recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.

  7. MapReduce SVM Game

    DOE PAGES

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; ...

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently andmore » recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.« less

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin

  9. Interventions to Reduce Sedentary Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Todd M.; Carr, Lucas J.; King, Abby C.; Marshall, Simon; Robinson, Thomas N.; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper reports on presentations and discussion from the working group on “Influences on Sedentary Behavior & Interventions” as part of the Sedentary Behavior: Identifying Research Priorities Workshop. Methods Interventions were discussed in the context of targeting sedentary behavior (SB) as a concept distinct from physical activity (PA). It was recommended that interventions targeting SB should consider a life course perspective, a position predicated on the assumption that SB is age and life stage dependent. Additionally, targeting environments where individuals have high exposure to SB— such as workplace sitting— could benefit from new technology (e.g., computer-based prompting to stand or move), environmental changes (e.g., active workstations), policies targeting reduced sedentary time (e.g., allowing employees regular desk breaks), or by changing norms surrounding prolonged sitting (e.g., standing meetings). Results & Conclusions There are limited data about the minimal amount of SB change required to produce meaningful health benefits. In addition to developing relevant scientific and public health definitions of SB, it is important to further delineate the scope of health and quality of life outcomes associated with reduced SB across the life course, and clarify what behavioral alternatives to SB can be used to optimize health gains. SB interventions will benefit from having more clarity about the potential physiological and behavioral synergies with current PA recommendations, developing multi-level interventions aimed at reducing SB across all life phases and contexts, harnessing relevant and effective strategies to extend the reach of interventions to all sectors of society, as well as applying state-of-the-science adaptive designs and methods to accelerate advances in the science of sedentary behavior interventions. PMID:25222818

  10. Empowerment to reduce health disparities.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Nina

    2002-01-01

    This article articulates the theoretical construct of empowerment and its importance for health-enhancing strategies to reduce health disparities. Powerlessness is explored as a risk factor in the context of social determinants, such as poverty, discrimination, workplace hazards, and income inequities. Empowerment is presented and compared with social capital and community capacity as strategies to strengthen social protective factors. A case study of a youth empowerment and policy project in New Mexico illustrates the usefulness of empowerment strategies in both targeting social determinants, such as public policies which are detrimental to youth, and improving community capacities of youth to be advocates for social change. Challenges for future practice and research are articulated.

  11. Reducing rattlesnake-human conflicts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    Arizona is home to 11 species of rattlesnakes. As rapidly growing Arizona communities move into formerly undeveloped landscapes, encounters between people and rattlesnakes increase. As a result, the management of nuisance snakes, or snakes found in areas where people do not want them, is increasingly important. Since 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has conducted research on the behavior and ecology of nuisance rattlesnake in Arizona national park units. A decade of research provides important insights into rattlesnake behavior that can be used by national parks and communities to reduce rattlesnake-human conflicts.

  12. Reduced Vlasov-Maxwell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helluy, Philippe; Navoret, Laurent; Pham, Nhung; Crestetto, Anaïs

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we review two different numerical methods for Vlasov-Maxwell simulations. The first method is based on a coupling between a Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) Maxwell solver and a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Vlasov solver. The second method only uses a DG approach for the Vlasov and Maxwell equations. The Vlasov equation is first reduced to a space-only hyperbolic system thanks to the finite-element method. The two numerical methods are implemented using OpenCL in order to achieve high performance on recent Graphic Processing Units (GPU).

  13. Reducing Misanthropic Memory Through Self-Awareness: Reducing Bias.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the influence of self-awareness on misanthropic recall. Misanthropic recall is the tendency to recall more negative behaviors dispositionally attributed and positive behaviors situationally attributed than negative behaviors situationally attributed and positive behaviors dispositionally attributed. It was hypothesized that when one is self-aware, more systematic information processing would occur, thereby reducing misanthropic memory and influencing attitudinal judgments. The first experiment used a mirror and the second experiment used a live video to induce self-awareness. Participants were asked to form an impression of a group. The results of both experiments replicated the previously found pattern of misanthropic memory for non-self-aware participants (Ybarra & Stephan, 1996), and revealed less misanthropic recall bias in self-aware participants.

  14. Reduced prefrontal connectivity in psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Motzkin, Julian C; Newman, Joseph P; Kiehl, Kent A; Koenigs, Michael

    2011-11-30

    Linking psychopathy to a specific brain abnormality could have significant clinical, legal, and scientific implications. Theories on the neurobiological basis of the disorder typically propose dysfunction in a circuit involving ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). However, to date there is limited brain imaging data to directly test whether psychopathy may indeed be associated with any structural or functional abnormality within this brain area. In this study, we employ two complementary imaging techniques to assess the structural and functional connectivity of vmPFC in psychopathic and non-psychopathic criminals. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we show that psychopathy is associated with reduced structural integrity in the right uncinate fasciculus, the primary white matter connection between vmPFC and anterior temporal lobe. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that psychopathy is associated with reduced functional connectivity between vmPFC and amygdala as well as between vmPFC and medial parietal cortex. Together, these data converge to implicate diminished vmPFC connectivity as a characteristic neurobiological feature of psychopathy.

  15. FIREhose: Reducing Data from FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fica, Haley Diane; Lambrides, Erini; Faherty, Jackie; Cruz, Kelle L.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are stellar objects that do not have enough mass to ignite hydrogen fusion in their core. Their mass is between 0.08 solar masses and the mass of our sun. Brown dwarfs are very bright in the near-infrared wavelength band (0.8- 2.5 microns). We reduced data from the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) instrument on the Magellan Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory. FIRE is a medium-resolution echelle spectrometer, whose data reduction results in a spectrum of a star. When reducing FIRE data, it is important to account for inconsistencies in the data, such as bad pixels, cosmic rays, and the effects of our atmosphere. Using the FIREhose pipeline, these inconsistencies can be accounted for and corrected using a A0 telluric with a known spectrum. After telluric correcting, the data reduction results in a primed spectrum for an object, which can then be used to determine an object's physical properties, such as atmospheric composition, radial velocity, effective temperature and surface gravity.

  16. Reduced discretization error in HZETRN

    SciTech Connect

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tweed, John

    2013-02-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN is an efficient analysis tool for studying the effects of space radiation on humans, electronics, and shielding materials. In a previous work, numerical methods in the code were reviewed, and new methods were developed that further improved efficiency and reduced overall discretization error. It was also shown that the remaining discretization error could be attributed to low energy light ions (A < 4) with residual ranges smaller than the physical step-size taken by the code. Accurately resolving the spectrum of low energy light particles is important in assessing risk associated with astronaut radiation exposure. In this work, modifications to the light particle transport formalism are presented that accurately resolve the spectrum of low energy light ion target fragments. The modified formalism is shown to significantly reduce overall discretization error and allows a physical approximation to be removed. For typical step-sizes and energy grids used in HZETRN, discretization errors for the revised light particle transport algorithms are shown to be less than 4% for aluminum and water shielding thicknesses as large as 100 g/cm{sup 2} exposed to both solar particle event and galactic cosmic ray environments.

  17. Interventions to reduce school bullying.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter K; Ananiadou, Katerina; Cowie, Helen

    2003-10-01

    In the last 2 decades, school bullying has become a topic of public concern and research around the world. This has led to action to reduce the problem. We review interventions targeted at the school level (for example, whole school policy, classroom climate, peer support, school tribunal, and playground improvement), at the class level (for example, curriculum work), and at the individual level (for example, working with specific pupils). Effectiveness of interventions has been sporadically assessed. We review several systematically evaluated, large-scale, school-based intervention programs. Their effectiveness has varied, and we consider reasons for this. We suggest ways to improve the evaluation and comparability of studies, as well as the effectiveness of future interventions.

  18. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that “moral disgust” influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  19. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior.

  20. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  1. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Slavik, Charles J.; Rhudy, Ralph G.; Bushman, Ralph E.

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  2. Reducing stillbirths: interventions during labour

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Haws, Rachel A; Menezes, Esme V; Soomro, Tanya; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2009-01-01

    Background Approximately one million stillbirths occur annually during labour; most of these stillbirths occur in low and middle-income countries and are associated with absent, inadequate, or delayed obstetric care. The low proportion of intrapartum stillbirths in high-income countries suggests that intrapartum stillbirths are largely preventable with quality intrapartum care, including prompt recognition and management of intrapartum complications. The evidence for impact of intrapartum interventions on stillbirth and perinatal mortality outcomes has not yet been systematically examined. Methods We undertook a systematic review of the published literature, searching PubMed and the Cochrane Library, of trials and reviews (N = 230) that reported stillbirth or perinatal mortality outcomes for eight interventions delivered during labour. Where eligible randomised controlled trials had been published after the most recent Cochrane review on any given intervention, we incorporated these new trial findings into a new meta-analysis with the Cochrane included studies. Results We found a paucity of studies reporting statistically significant evidence of impact on perinatal mortality, especially on stillbirths. Available evidence suggests that operative delivery, especially Caesarean section, contributes to decreased stillbirth rates. Induction of labour rather than expectant management in post-term pregnancies showed strong evidence of impact, though there was not enough evidence to suggest superior safety for the fetus of any given drug or drugs for induction of labour. Planned Caesarean section for term breech presentation has been shown in a large randomised trial to reduce stillbirths, but the feasibility and consequences of implementing this intervention routinely in low-/middle-income countries add caveats to recommending its use. Magnesium sulphate for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia is effective in preventing eclamptic seizures, but studies have not demonstrated impact

  3. Reducing waste in Big D

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, R.

    1994-03-01

    The city of Dallas is in a unique position among major metropolitan areas of the US. Despite boasting a population of more than 1 million, which grows by 1.3% each year, and a municipal solid waste (MSW) stream averaging 1.2 million tons per year, the city -- the eighth-largest in the country -- has another 50 years of landfill disposal capacity left. This fact is even more impressive when one considers that Dallas' only municipal facility, known as the McCommas Bluff Landfill, accepted 33% more MSW in 1993 than in 1992. The positive landfill situation, however, does not mean Dallas lacks ambition for recycling and waste reduction. Last, April, the city set an aggressive goal of reducing 40% of its MSW from the landfill by 1997. To help reach this mark over the next three years, the city has banned lead-acid batteries, grass clippings, and leaves from landfills, mandated news and office paper collection, and set up a composting operation at the landfill. At present, Dallas recycles about 13% of its waste. Surprisingly, most of the residential recycling effort has been based on voluntary participation through dozens of drop-off sites scattered around the city, rather than on curbside service. The only curbside program the city is conducting is a once-per-week, blue bag pilot program involving 2,000 Dallas homes.

  4. Reducing power usage on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, G.; Dewhurst, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) datacentre provides large- scale High Performance Computing facilities for the scientific community. It currently consumes approximately 1.5MW and this has risen by 25% in the past two years. STFC has been investigating leveraging preemption in the Tier 1 batch farm to save power. HEP experiments are increasing using jobs that can be killed to take advantage of opportunistic CPU resources or novel cost models such as Amazon's spot pricing. Additionally, schemes from energy providers are available that offer financial incentives to reduce power consumption at peak times. Under normal operating conditions, 3% of the batch farm capacity is wasted due to draining machines. By using preempt-able jobs, nodes can be rapidly made available to run multicore jobs without this wasted resource. The use of preempt-able jobs has been extended so that at peak times machines can be hibernated quickly to save energy. This paper describes the implementation of the above and demonstrates that STFC could in future take advantage of such energy saving schemes.

  5. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Reduced Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the studies done to reduce neuromuscular strength loss during unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Since there are animals that undergo fairly long periods of muscular disuse without any or minimal muscular atrophy, there is an answer to that might be applicable to human in situations that require no muscular use to diminish the effects of muscular atrophy. Three sets of ULLS studies were reviewed indicated that muscle strength decreased more than the muscle mass. The study reviewed exercise countermeasures to combat the atrophy, including: ischemia maintained during Compound muscle action potential (CMAP), ischemia and low load exercise, Japanese kaatsu, and the potential for rehabilitation or situations where heavy loading is undesirable. Two forms of countermeasures to unloading have been successful, (1) high-load resistance training has maintained muscle mass and strength, and low load resistance training with blood flow restriction (LL(sub BFR)). The LL(sub BFR) has been shown to increase muscle mass and strength. There has been significant interest in Tourniquet training. An increase in Growth Hormone(GH) has been noted for LL(sub BFR) exercise. An experimental study with 16 subjects 8 of whom performed ULLS, and 8 of whom performed ULLS and LL(sub BFR) exercise three times per week during the ULLS. Charts show the results of the two groups, showing that performing LL(sub BFR) exercise during 30 days of ULLS can maintain muscle size and strength and even improve muscular endurance.

  6. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    PubMed Central

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-01-01

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  7. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-15

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  8. SRBF: Speckle reducing bilateral filtering.

    PubMed

    Balocco, Simone; Gatta, Carlo; Pujol, Oriol; Mauri, Josepa; Radeva, Petia

    2010-08-01

    Speckle noise negatively affects medical ultrasound image shape interpretation and boundary detection. Speckle removal filters are widely used to selectively remove speckle noise without destroying important image features to enhance object boundaries. In this article, a fully automatic bilateral filter tailored to ultrasound images is proposed. The edge preservation property is obtained by embedding noise statistics in the filter framework. Consequently, the filter is able to tackle the multiplicative behavior modulating the smoothing strength with respect to local statistics. The in silico experiments clearly showed that the speckle reducing bilateral filter (SRBF) has superior performances to most of the state of the art filtering methods. The filter is tested on 50 in vivo US images and its influence on a segmentation task is quantified. The results using SRBF filtered data sets show a superior performance to using oriented anisotropic diffusion filtered images. This improvement is due to the adaptive support of SRBF and the embedded noise statistics, yielding a more homogeneous smoothing. SRBF results in a fully automatic, fast and flexible algorithm potentially suitable in wide ranges of speckle noise sizes, for different medical applications (IVUS, B-mode, 3-D matrix array US).

  9. Restricted sample variance reduces generalizability.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Kimberley D

    2013-06-01

    One factor that affects the reliability of observed scores is restriction of range on the construct measured for a particular group of study participants. This study illustrates how researchers can use generalizability theory to evaluate the impact of restriction of range in particular sample characteristics on the generalizability of test scores and to estimate how changes in measurement design could improve the generalizability of the test scores. An observer-rated measure of child self-regulation (Response to Challenge Scale; Lakes, 2011) is used to examine scores for 198 children (Grades K through 5) within the generalizability theory (GT) framework. The generalizability of ratings within relatively developmentally homogeneous samples is examined and illustrates the effect of reduced variance among ratees on generalizability. Forecasts for g coefficients of various D study designs demonstrate how higher generalizability could be achieved by increasing the number of raters or items. In summary, the research presented illustrates the importance of and procedures for evaluating the generalizability of a set of scores in a particular research context.

  10. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  11. Reduced neutral XLPE cable design

    SciTech Connect

    Valli, G.F.; Zawadzki, J.A.; Orton, H.E. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the theoretical, laboratory and economic analyses undertaken to determine the optimum metallic concentric neutral design for its single conductor 750 and 500 kcmil aluminum XLPE 15 kV insulated concentric-neutral type feeder cables. The results suggest that reducing the cross-sectional area of this concentric neutral from the currently-recognized industry standard of 20 percent of the central conductor to 7% results in overall present-worth system cost saving of approximately $3 per conductor meter or approximately 22% of the cable first cost. The neutral configuration ultimately chosen to replace the previous standard 37 - number 14 AWG wires was 2 - 1 inch {times} 5 mil tinned copper tapes overlapped by 25%. Line voltage fault test were run in the high-power laboratory on samples with various neutral configurations to confirm they would successfully pass our worst-case fault duty of 10 kA for 20 cycles (i.e., .33 sec) with no reclosing.

  12. Reduced friction engine tappet construction

    SciTech Connect

    Pieprzak, J.M.; Wilermet, P.A.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a tappet construction for the valve train of an internal combustion engine having an element of the valve train engaged by the tappet for moving the same. The tappet having an outer cup-shaped case member with side walls and an essentially flat bottom wall adapted to be engaged by a rotating cam member. The cam member having a circumferential base circle no-load portion and a countoured cam circumferential load portion, the cam member engaging the bottom wall to one side of its center to impart a rotative torque on the case. The case slidably and rotatably receiving therein in back-to-back relationship first and second channel-like members each having spaced side walls joined by a continuous essentially flat end wall, the first member being engageable by a portion of the engine element. The flat end walls of the members being adjacent one another and movable relative to each other to at times form a fluid chamber therebetween, a fluid inlet to the chamber and a source of fluid lubricant under pressure connected to the inlet for supplying lubricant at a pressure level greater than the force of the element and cam member against the first member and case to thereby effect separation of the end walls by a film of lubricant thereby reducing frictional resistance to rotation between the parts.

  13. Regulating environments to reduce obesity.

    PubMed

    Hayne, Cheryl L; Moran, Patricia A; Ford, Mary M

    2004-01-01

    The marked increase in the prevalence of obesity appears to be attributable to environmental conditions that implicitly discourage physical activity while explicitly encouraging the consumption of greater quantities of energy-dense, low-nutrient foods. In the United States food environment, consumers are bombarded with advertising for unhealthy food, and receive inadequate nutritional information, especially at restaurants. In the US school environment children have access to sugary sodas and unhealthy a la carte foods in their cafeterias, at the same time getting inadequate physical activity and nutrition education. In the built environment, sprawl has reduced active living. We describe these environments and explore the potential effects of regulatory measures on these environments. In the United States, regulatory opportunities exist at the national, state and local levels to mandate action and to allocate funds for promising health-promoting strategies. Regulatory approaches, much like litigation, can transform the entire environment in which corporations operate. Even with incomplete enforcement of rules, they send a public message about what is acceptable behavior for corporations and individuals. Additionally, because the United States is party to many multilateral and bilateral trade agreements and is an active participant in the GATT/WTO framework, US regulatory actions promise to have a beneficial impact both domestically and globally.

  14. Bioventing reduces soil cleanup costs

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, M.C.; Erickson, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    An offshoot technology from soil venting, bioventing offers a win-win solution for soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nonvolatile contaminants such as diesel and fuel oil. Using low air flowrates through permeable soils, bioventing injects sufficient oxygen to support naturally-occurring bacteria, which biodegraded the VOCs and other contaminants into benign byproducts. Waste gas can be directly discharged to atmosphere without further treatment. This results in no offgas treatment required. Bioventing is a cost-effective alternative to traditional soil-venting techniques. Soil venting uses air to volatilize organic-compound contamination from the vadose zone, the unsaturated soil layer above groundwater. Unfortunately, this simple-and-fast approach creates a waste offgas that requires further treatment before discharge, thus adding significantly to overall project costs. In contrast, bioventing uses low air flowrates, which require lower capital and operating costs. No offgas treatment further reduces equipment and operating costs and often eliminates air permitting. As in all treatment strategies, the process must meet the cleanup objectives. Bioventing is an alternative technique making inroads into refining and petrochemical soil-remediation applications.

  15. Clearance of Hepatitis C Virus Improves Insulin Resistance During and After Peginterferon and Ribavirin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chien, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Chih-Lang; Hu, Ching-Chih; Chang, Jia-Jang; Chien, Rong-Nan

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at a greater risk of developing insulin resistance (IR). However, little is known about when insulin sensitivity may improve during or after treatment for hepatitis C. In this study, we examined the effect of combination therapy with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin on IR in patients with chronic HCV infection. We also analyzed factors associated with changes in insulin sensitivity. IR was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). HOMA-IR was measured before therapy, during therapy (12 and 24 weeks), and at the end of therapy (EOT; 24 or 48 weeks). We analyzed 78 HCV patients receiving combination therapy. Twenty-two patients (28.2%) exhibited pretreatment IR (HOMA-IR >2.5). In all patients, HOMA-IR was not significantly different from baseline values at 12 weeks (P = 0.823), 24 weeks (P = 0.417), or at EOT (P = 0.158). In patients with pretreatment IR, a significant decrease in HOMA-IR was observed at 12 weeks (P = 0.023), 24 weeks (P = 0.008), and at EOT (P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that baseline HOMA-IR is the only factor associated with the decline in HOMA-IR during and after therapy. The eradication of HCV infection was associated with improved insulin sensitivity among patients with pretreatment IR. This significant improvement in insulin sensitivity may occur as early as 12 weeks after the initiation of antiviral therapy.

  16. Bell's palsy associated with chronic HCV infection before and during peginterferon alfa and ribavirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Hossain; Fakharzadeh, Elham; Merat, Shahin; Zamini, Hedyeh; Sharifi, Amir Houshang

    2011-05-01

    Neuropsychiatric side effects of peg interferon-α (PEG-IFN-α) therapy consist of a large spectrum of symptoms. Organic personality syndrome, organic affective syndrome, psychotic manifestations and seizures are more common side effects of PEG-IFN-α whereas cranial neuropathy and movement disorders are less common. Bell's palsy is often idiopathic, but has been linked to some viral infections, particularly with herpes viruses. Other infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and Lyme disease, may also lead to idiopathic facial paralysis. Neither acute nor chronic Hepatitis C infection has been implicated previously in Bell's palsy, but PEG-IFN-α may play a role. Two patients with CHC who developed Bell's palsy before and during treatment with PEG-IFN-α and Ribavirin are presented here.

  17. Simeprevir with peginterferon and ribavirin induced interstitial pneumonitis: first case report.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Katsuyoshi; Okubo, Akihiko

    2015-01-21

    The effectiveness of hepatitis C treatment has improved with the development of interferon (IFN), and it has drastically improved with the development of peg-interferon-α (PEG-IFN) in combination with ribavirin (RBV) and, more recently, with the addition of a protease inhibitor. Simeprevir, which is a second-generation protease inhibitor, has shown clinically favorable safety and tolerability profiles. Simeprevir received its first global approval in Japan in September 2013 for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C in combination with PEG-IFN and RBV. One serious adverse event associated with IFN therapy is interstitial pneumonitis, which can be fatal. We experienced a patient with interstitial pneumonitis that was induced by simeprevir with PEG-IFN and RBV therapy for chronic hepatitis C in the early stages of therapy (8 wk after initiating therapy). This is the first case report of interstitial pneumonitis with simeprevir with PEG-IFN and RBV in the world. In addition, it is very interesting that the onset of interstitial pneumonitis was earlier than that in conventional PEG-IFN and RBV therapy. This finding suggests that simeprevir augments the adverse event. We present this case report in light of relevant literature on interstitial pneumonitis with conventional PEG-IFN and RBV therapy.

  18. Reducing abortion: the Danish experience.

    PubMed

    Risor, H

    1989-01-01

    In 1987, 20,830 legal abortions were performed in Denmark. 2,845 involved women below the age of 20, and 532 involved women terminating pregnancy after the 12th week. Danish law permits all of its female citizens to have an abortion free-of-charge before the 12th week of pregnancy. After the 12th week, the abortion must be applied for through a committee of 3 members, and all counties in Denmark have a committee. It is felt in Denmark that a woman has a right to an abortion if she decides to have one. It she makes that choice, doctors and nurses are supportive. Since 1970, sex education has been mandatory in Danish schools. Teachers often collaborate closely with school doctors and nurses in this education. All counties are required to have at least 1 clinic that provides contraceptive counselling. It was recently found that the lowest number of pregnancies among teenaged girls was found in a county in Jutland where all 9th grade students visit the county clinic to learn about contraceptives, pregnancy, and abortion. Within 1 year after Copenhagen had adopted this practice, the number of abortions among teenagers declined by 20%. One fourth of all pharmacies also collaborate with schools to promote sex education, instructing students about contraceptives and pregnancy tests. The Danish Family Planning Association has produced a film on abortion, and plans to produce videos on abortion for use in schools. The organization also holds training programs for health care personnel on contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. By means of the practices described above, it is hoped that the number of abortions and unwanted pregnancies in Denmark will be reduced.

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-12-01

    [Methoxy-(11)C]PD-153035, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Adalimumab, Adecatumumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, ADX-10059, Aflibercept, AIR-human growth hormone, Aliskiren fumarate, AMG-221, Amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil, Aprepitant; Bavituximab, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BIBW-2992, BMS-690514, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Briakinumab; Capecitabine, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cholecalciferol, Choline fenofibrate, Chorionic gonadotropin (human), Cixutumumab, Clopidogrel, CP-690550 citrate; Dabigatran, Dacetuzumab, Daclizumab, Dapagliflozin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Denosumab; Efavirenz, Elisidepsin, Enoxaparin, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide; Fenobam, Figitumumab, Filibuvir, Fondaparinux sodium, Fresolimumab; Gefitinib, Golimumab, Golnerminogene pradenovec; Ifosfamide, Imatinib mesylate, Ipilimumab, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide; M-118, Masitinib mesylate, Metformin hydrochloride, Micafungin sodium, Moxifloxacin hydrochloride; Neratinib; Oblimersen sodium, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Palifosfamide lysine, Panobacumab, Panobinostat, Patupilone, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pegylated arginine deiminase 20000, Piclozotan hydrochloride hydrate, Pixantrone maleate, Prasterone, Prasugrel, Prednisone, Progesterone, Prucalopride, pVGI.1 (VEGF-2); Retigabine, rhFSH, Rituximab, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salinosporamide A, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Somatropin, Sorafenib, SSR-244738, Sunitinib malate; Tamoxifen citrate, Teduglutide, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telmisartan, Telmisartan/amlodipine, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Temsirolimus, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tipifarnib, Tolvaptan, Trastuzumab, Trastuzumab-MCC-DM1, Travoprost, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Valsartan/amlodipine besylate/hydrochlorothiazide, Valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Vandetanib

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-03-01

    , mycophenolate mofetil, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nitisinone; Omalizumab, omapatrilat, ONYX-015, oxaliplatin; Paclitaxel, paclitaxel nanoparticles, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pertuzumab, phosphatidylcholine-rich phospholipid mixture, pimecrolimus, pioglitazone hydrochloride, pramlintide acetate, prasterone; QR-333; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rasagiline mesilate, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, ribavirin, rifabutin, risperidone, rituximab, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride, rotavirus vaccine; S-236, salmeterol xinafoate, sarizotan hydrochloride, sildenafil, sildenafil citrate, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, tegaserod maleate, temozolomide, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, trabectedin, treprostinil sodium; Vandetanib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vatalanib succinate, vinflunine, virosome influenza vaccine, voriconazole; Zidovudine.

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    4; NBI-56418, NCX-4016, nesiritide, nicotine conjugate vaccine, NSC-330507; Oglufanide, omalizumab, oxipurinol; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, PEGylated interferon alfacon-1, perospirone hydrochloride, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plerixafor hydrochloride, PowderJect lidocaine, pradefovir mesylate, prasterone, pregabalin, Prostvac VF, PT-141, PTC-124, pyridoxamine; QS-21, quercetin; R-126638, R-411, ralfinamide, rasagiline mesilate, rF-PSA, RG-2077, rhThrombin, rimonabant hydrochloride, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride, rV-PSA; S-18886, S-303, seocalcitol, SGN-40, sitaxsentan sodium, SPP-301, St. John's Wort extract; Tadalafil, taxus, telithromycin, tenatoprazole, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, testosterone MDTS, testosterone transdermal patch, tgAAC-09, TH-9507, thioacetazone, tipifarnib, TQ-1011, trabectedin, travoprost, trimethoprim; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, valopicitabine, voriconazole; Xcellerated T cells.

  2. 40 CFR 1500.4 - Reducing paperwork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... environmental issues deserving of study, but also to deemphasize insignificant issues, narrowing the scope of... 1500.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY PURPOSE, POLICY, AND MANDATE § 1500.4 Reducing paperwork. Agencies shall reduce excessive paperwork by: (a) Reducing the length of...

  3. 40 CFR 1500.4 - Reducing paperwork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... environmental issues deserving of study, but also to deemphasize insignificant issues, narrowing the scope of... 1500.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY PURPOSE, POLICY, AND MANDATE § 1500.4 Reducing paperwork. Agencies shall reduce excessive paperwork by: (a) Reducing the length of...

  4. 40 CFR 1500.4 - Reducing paperwork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... environmental issues deserving of study, but also to deemphasize insignificant issues, narrowing the scope of... 1500.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY PURPOSE, POLICY, AND MANDATE § 1500.4 Reducing paperwork. Agencies shall reduce excessive paperwork by: (a) Reducing the length of...

  5. 40 CFR 1500.4 - Reducing paperwork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... environmental issues deserving of study, but also to deemphasize insignificant issues, narrowing the scope of... 1500.4 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY PURPOSE, POLICY, AND MANDATE § 1500.4 Reducing paperwork. Agencies shall reduce excessive paperwork by: (a) Reducing the length of...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5375 Iron reduced. (a) Product. Iron reduced. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  7. Reducing Sugar in Children's Diets: Why? How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cosby S.; Morris, Sandra S.

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that sugar intake should be reduced in young children's diets because of its link to dental cavities, poor nutrition, and obesity. Reducing the focus on sweetness, limiting sugar consumption, and using natural sources of sweetness and other treats are ways to help reduce sugar intake. (BB)

  8. Reduced Toxicity Fuel Satellite Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A reduced toxicity fuel satellite propulsion system including a reduced toxicity propellant supply for consumption in an axial class thruster and an ACS class thruster. The system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to the ACS decomposing element of an ACS thruster. The ACS decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot propulsive gases. In addition the system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to an axial decomposing element of the axial thruster. The axial decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot gases. The system further includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying a second propellant to a combustion chamber of the axial thruster, whereby the hot gases and the second propellant auto-ignite and begin the combustion process for producing thrust.

  9. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  10. Reducing energy costs in nursing homes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The handbook presents ideas and techniques for energy conservation in nursing homes. Case studies were developed of nursing homes located in different parts of the US. The typical nursing home assessed was proprietary, of intermediate-care level, medicaid-certified, and had less than 200 beds. Specific energy conservation measures were analyzed to determine the energy and dollar savings that could be realized. These include reducing heat loss through the building shell; reducing hot water costs; recovering the heat generated by dryers; reducing lighting costs; reducing heating and cooling costs, and analyzing fuels and fuel rates. A case for converting electric clothes dryers to gas was analyzed. (MCW)

  11. Reducing pawing in horses using positive reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fox, Adam E; Belding, Devon L

    2015-12-01

    Aversive control is a common method to reduce undesirable behavior in horses. However, it often results in unintended negative side effects, including potential abuse of the animal. Procedures based on positive reinforcement, such as differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO), may reduce undesirable behaviors with fewer negative consequences. The current study used DRO schedules to reduce pawing using a multiple baseline design across 3 horses. Results indicated that DRO schedules were effective at reducing pawing. However, individual differences in sensitivity to DRO and reinforcer efficacy may be important considerations.

  12. The Consumer's Handbook for Reducing Solid Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This profusely illustrated and informally written booklet describes how people can help solve a growing problem--garbage. The following 12 tips are presented: (1) Reduce the amount of unnecessary packaging; (2) Adopt practices that reduce waste toxicity; (3) Consider reusable products; (4) Maintain and repair durable products; (5) Reuse bags,…

  13. Simple Potentiometric Determination of Reducing Sugars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moresco, Henry; Sanson, Pedro; Seoane, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    In this article a potentiometric method for reducing sugar quantification is described. Copper(II) ion reacts with the reducing sugar (glucose, fructose, and others), and the excess is quantified using a copper wire indicator electrode. In order to accelerate the kinetics of the reaction, working conditions such as pH and temperature must be…

  14. Welfare Reform and Reducing Teen Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawhill, Isabel V.

    2000-01-01

    Most adolescent mothers are unmarried and on welfare. Congress enacted new welfare legislation that emphasizes reducing teen pregnancy and requiring work, but states are reluctant to meet this challenge. Discusses child poverty's new face, public policy and culture wars, welfare reform, and social norms. Concludes that reducing unwed parenthood…

  15. Tools to Reduce Waste in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This guide was produced to help schools and school districts reduce the amount of waste they generate It shows how to start a waste reduction program or expand an existing one. The booklet shows how such programs can benefit schools, communities, and the environment by reducing, reusing, and recycling waste. Each section--schools, school…

  16. Partial turbo detection with reduced complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouardi, Aissa; Djebbari, A.; Bouazza, B. S.

    2011-06-01

    In this article, we propose a novel method for reducing the complexity of the turbo detector MAP (maximum a posteriori). The basic idea consists in turbo detecting a part of intersymbol interference (ISI) after decomposing the channel in two parts. We show that we can reduce the trellis complexity in the turbo process at a certain cost, i.e. performance loss.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into low-density lipoprotein-receptor knockout mice and put these on a Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. Initially after treatment, we found higher levels of circulating regulatory T cells. In the long-term, overall numbers of effector T cells were reduced by MSC treatment. Moreover, MSC-treated mice displayed a significant 33% reduction in circulating monocytes and a 77% reduction of serum CCL2 levels. Most strikingly, we found a previously unappreciated effect on lipid metabolism. Serum cholesterol was reduced by 33%, due to reduced very low-density lipoprotein levels, likely a result of reduced de novo hepatic lipogenesis as determined by a reduced expression of Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and lipoprotein lipase. MSCs significantly affected lesion development, which was reduced by 33% in the aortic root. These lesions contained 56% less macrophages and showed a 61% reduction in T cell numbers. We show here for the first time that MSC treatment affects not only inflammatory responses but also significantly reduces dyslipidaemia in mice. This makes MSCs a potent candidate for atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:26490642

  18. Social Work Practice to Reduce Underachievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Richard P.

    1988-01-01

    Social workers' direct work with students can help to reduce the disparity between educational ability and achievement. Interventions with low achievers must include fostering linkages between home and school. Consultation and followup are necessary components for reducing underachievement. The intervention must be done in conjunction with school…

  19. Reducing the Deficit: Spending and Revenue Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    efforts-- defense and international discretionary spending , domestic discretion- ary spending , and entitlements and other mandatory spending . The last...9 TWO DEFENSE AND INTERNATIONAL DISCRETIONARY SPENDING 13 Threats to National Security ....................... 13 Economic and...Reducing Defense Spending .............................. 16 Stratezic Prourams DEF-01 Reduce Nuclear Delivery Systems Within Overall Limits of START II

  20. Soluble calcium amendments: reducing pathogen losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a byproduct of coal-fired power plants. Its application to agricultural fields may increase water infiltration, reduce soil erosion, and decrease nutrient losses from applications of animal manures. It may also reduce fecal bacterial contamination of surface ...

  1. Multiclass Reduced-Set Support Vector Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Benyang; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2006-01-01

    There are well-established methods for reducing the number of support vectors in a trained binary support vector machine, often with minimal impact on accuracy. We show how reduced-set methods can be applied to multiclass SVMs made up of several binary SVMs, with significantly better results than reducing each binary SVM independently. Our approach is based on Burges' approach that constructs each reduced-set vector as the pre-image of a vector in kernel space, but we extend this by recomputing the SVM weights and bias optimally using the original SVM objective function. This leads to greater accuracy for a binary reduced-set SVM, and also allows vectors to be 'shared' between multiple binary SVMs for greater multiclass accuracy with fewer reduced-set vectors. We also propose computing pre-images using differential evolution, which we have found to be more robust than gradient descent alone. We show experimental results on a variety of problems and find that this new approach is consistently better than previous multiclass reduced-set methods, sometimes with a dramatic difference.

  2. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  3. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes.

  4. Reducibility of Matrix Equations Containing Several Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    AD-AI15 568 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH SCHOO;-ETC EF G 12 1ADA1551 REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING SEVERAL...PARAMETERS.E U)CA E UNCLASSIFIED AFIT/GE/RA/81D-1 N P11111111II soonhh Eu;o I. ’Trm * a, ~t- NMI 4 i’- 00Nt. met r~ REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING...1 REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING SEVERAL PARAMETERS THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force

  5. Top Five Lifestyle Changes to Reduce Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    Top 5 lifestyle changes to improve your cholesterol Lifestyle changes can help reduce cholesterol, keep you off cholesterol-lowering medications or enhance the effect of your medications. Here are five lifestyle ...

  6. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K.; Biedermann, Sarah V.; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-01-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach. PMID:26057198

  7. 49 CFR 609.23 - Reduced fare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION FOR ELDERLY AND HANDICAPPED PERSONS § 609.23 Reduced fare. Applicants for financial... Administrator may prescribe, that the rates charged elderly and handicapped persons during non-peak hours...

  8. 49 CFR 609.23 - Reduced fare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION FOR ELDERLY AND HANDICAPPED PERSONS § 609.23 Reduced fare. Applicants for financial... Administrator may prescribe, that the rates charged elderly and handicapped persons during non-peak hours...

  9. Optimal Microstructures Drag Reducing Mechanism of Riblets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, Elfriede; Richter, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    We consider an optimal shape design problem of periodically distributed three-dimensional microstructures on surfaces of swimming bodies in order to reduce their drag. Our model is restricted to the flow in the viscous sublayer of the boundary layer of a turbulent flow. The costs for the optimization problem are very high because the three-dimensional flow equations have to be solved several times. We avoid this problem by approximations: the microscopic optimization problem is reduced applying homogenization. Considering a special geometry (riblets) the resulting so-called macroscopic optimization problem can be additionally reduced to a two-dimensional problem. We analyze the drag reducing mechanism of riblets which are believed to be optimal structures. Therefore we perform direct simulations on the total rough channel for different shapes of microstructures: riblets and fully three-dimensional structures.

  10. Auto Accidents: Reducing Frequency, Increasing Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Linda Atkins

    1988-01-01

    Careful hiring, monitoring, training, discipline, and safety policies will reduce school automobile and bus accidents. Guidelines are offered for accident reporting, claim handling, and dealing with insurance adjusters. (MLF)

  11. Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov

    2009-05-15

    Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

  12. Vaccine Reduces HPV Infections in Young Men

    Cancer.gov

    An international randomized clinical trial has shown that the vaccine Gardasil can reduce the incidence of anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in young men 16 to 26 years of age at the time of vaccination.

  13. Reducing health inequalities for older LGBTQ+ people.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ben

    2016-10-26

    The recent LGBTQ+ history exhibition Speak Out London, Diversity City presented a fantastic collection of stories, documents and photographs from LGBTQ+ Londoners. It also provided a reminder of how far we have come in reducing stigma, prejudice and discrimination.

  14. Dual photochemical replenisher system reduces chemical losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolber, J. M.

    1967-01-01

    Dual replenisher system reduces chemical losses and maintains optimum solution concentration during long nonprocessing cycles of photo processing machines. Using a single 3-position switch and solenoid control valves, the system provides instantaneous flow control to each processing tank.

  15. New approaches to reduce radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kevin D.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is associated with a long term risk of health effects including cancer. Radiation exposure to the U.S. population from cardiac imaging has increased markedly over the past three decades. Initiatives to reduce radiation exposure have focused on the tenets of appropriate study “justification” and “optimization” of imaging protocols. This article reviews ways to optimally reduce radiation dose across the spectrum of cardiac imaging. PMID:25962784

  16. Reduced gravity - A new biomedical research environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    Experiment programs for continuous flow electrophoresis and protein crystal growth are described to demonstrate the utility of the reduced gravity environment for scientific research. The advantages of the reduced gravity environment are outlined. The results of experiments on the Space Shuttle using the Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System and crystal growth experiments on Spacelab-1 and the Space Shuttle are examined, noting the importance of microgravity research.

  17. Boiler burden reduced at Bedford site.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Chris

    2011-10-01

    With the NHS aiming to reduce its 2007 carbon footprint by 10% by 2015, Chris Horsley, managing director of Babcock Wanson UK, a provider of industrial boilers and burners, thermal oxidisers, air treatment, water treatment, and associated services, looks at how one NHS Trust has approached the challenge, and considerably reduced its carbon emissions, by refurbishing its boiler house and moving from oil to gas-fired steam generation.

  18. Interventions to Reduce Myopia Progression in Children.

    PubMed

    Tay, Su Ann; Farzavandi, Sonal; Tan, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Efforts to reduce the progression of myopia in childhood are on the rise, due to an increasing incidence of myopia worldwide and its associated sight-threatening complications. Interventions are aimed at reducing myopia in childhood and include environmental considerations, spectacles, contact lenses, and pharmacological agents. We reviewed recent literature with interventions aimed at reducing myopia progression in children and found that a number of interventions were significant in reducing the progression of myopia. Of these interventions, atropine showed the largest dose-related effect on myopia progression control. Although higher doses are associated with side effects of pupil dilatation, loss of accommodation, near vision blur, and rebound phenomenon, low-dose atropine has also been shown to provide effective myopia control with minimal side effects and rebound. To a lesser degree, bifocal soft contact lenses have also been shown to be effective in reducing the progression of myopia, though compliance is an issue. Similarly, orthokeratology lenses have also been shown to be effective in reducing axial length elongation and myopia progression, though long-term data on its rebound effects are unavailable.

  19. Model diagnostics in reduced-rank estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Reduced-rank methods are very popular in high-dimensional multivariate analysis for conducting simultaneous dimension reduction and model estimation. However, the commonly-used reduced-rank methods are not robust, as the underlying reduced-rank structure can be easily distorted by only a few data outliers. Anomalies are bound to exist in big data problems, and in some applications they themselves could be of the primary interest. While naive residual analysis is often inadequate for outlier detection due to potential masking and swamping, robust reduced-rank estimation approaches could be computationally demanding. Under Stein's unbiased risk estimation framework, we propose a set of tools, including leverage score and generalized information score, to perform model diagnostics and outlier detection in large-scale reduced-rank estimation. The leverage scores give an exact decomposition of the so-called model degrees of freedom to the observation level, which lead to exact decomposition of many commonly-used information criteria; the resulting quantities are thus named information scores of the observations. The proposed information score approach provides a principled way of combining the residuals and leverage scores for anomaly detection. Simulation studies confirm that the proposed diagnostic tools work well. A pattern recognition example with hand-writing digital images and a time series analysis example with monthly U.S. macroeconomic data further demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approaches. PMID:28003860

  20. Coal ash behavior in reducing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Brekke, D.W.; Folkedahl, B.C.; Tibbetts, J.E.; Nowok, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    This project is a four-year program designed to investigate the transformations and properties of coal ash in reducing environment systems. This project is currently midway through its third year. The work to date has emphasized four areas of research: (1) the development of quantitative techniques to analyze reduced species, (2) the production of gasification-type samples under closely controlled conditions, (3) the systematic gasification of specific coals to produce information about their partitioning during gasification, and (4) the study of the physical properties of ashes and slags under reducing atmospheres. The project is organized into three tasks which provide a strong foundation for the project. Task 1, Analytical Methods Development, has concentrated on the special needs of analyzing samples produced under a reducing atmosphere as opposed to the more often studied combustion systems. Task 2, Inorganic Partitioning and Ash Deposition, has focused on the production of gasification-type samples under closely controlled conditions for the study of inorganic partitioning that may lead to deposition. Task 3, Ash and Slag Physical Properties, has made large gains in the areas of sintering and strength development of coal ashes under reducing atmospheres for the evaluation of deposition problems. Results are presented for all three tasks.

  1. Reduced pressure quenching oil and distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Asada, S.; Ogino, M.

    1996-12-31

    Cooling process observed in a quenching oil`s cooling curve determination by JIS silver probe method, has been divided into three stages, vapor blanket stage, boiling stage and convection stage. Under reduced pressure vaporization is accelerated and extend the vapor blanket stage which shift the position of boiling stage the fastest of cooling speed among the cooling process toward low temperature side. Taking advantage of this behavior in quenching under reduced pressure, it is possible to improve quench hardenability by controlling reduced pressure. Vapor pressure of quenching oil increases under very high vacuum and accelerates vapor blanket formation and covers the material with more vapor blanket, resulting in reduction of cooling speed. Excessive vapor blanket covering the material will lead to partially uneven quenching of the treated material caused by uneven conditions by partial decomposition. Making vapor blanket distribution more even and to optimize uniform coating condition enables to prevent heat treatment distortion caused by uneven quenching conditions.

  2. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  3. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D; Black, Bryan A; Walsh, Sheila M; McField, Melanie

    2009-07-22

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  4. Mistake proofing: changing designs to reduce error

    PubMed Central

    Grout, J R

    2006-01-01

    Mistake proofing uses changes in the physical design of processes to reduce human error. It can be used to change designs in ways that prevent errors from occurring, to detect errors after they occur but before harm occurs, to allow processes to fail safely, or to alter the work environment to reduce the chance of errors. Effective mistake proofing design changes should initially be effective in reducing harm, be inexpensive, and easily implemented. Over time these design changes should make life easier and speed up the process. Ideally, the design changes should increase patients' and visitors' understanding of the process. These designs should themselves be mistake proofed and follow the good design practices of other disciplines. PMID:17142609

  5. Lasercom system architecture with reduced complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, James R. (Inventor); Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Ansari, Homayoon (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Spatial acquisition and precision beam pointing functions are critical to spaceborne laser communication systems. In the present invention, a single high bandwidth CCD detector is used to perform both spatial acquisition and tracking functions. Compared to previous lasercom hardware design, the array tracking concept offers reduced system complexity by reducing the number of optical elements in the design. Specifically, the design requires only one detector and one beam steering mechanism. It also provides the means to optically close the point-ahead control loop. The technology required for high bandwidth array tracking was examined and shown to be consistent with current state of the art. The single detector design can lead to a significantly reduced system complexity and a lower system cost.

  6. Targets set to reduce Lake Erie algae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In February 2016, the Great Lakes Executive Committee, which oversees the implementation of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) between the U.S. and Canada, approved phosphorus loading targets for Lake Erie to reduce the size of harmful algal blooms (HABs), reduce the presence of the low oxygen zone in the central basin, and protect nearshore water quality. The targets are set with respect to the nutrient loads calculated for 2008. To reduce the impacts of HABs on Lake Erie a target was set of a 40 percent reduction in total and soluble reactive phosphorus loads in the spring from two Canadian rivers and several Michigan and Ohio rivers, especially the Maumee River (https://binational.net/2016/02/22/ finalptargets-ciblesfinalesdep/). States and the province of Ontario are already developing Domestic Action Plans to accomplish the reductions and scientists are developing research and monitoring plans to assess progress.

  7. Moral elevation reduces prejudice against gay men.

    PubMed

    Lai, Calvin K; Haidt, Jonathan; Nosek, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is linked to social evaluation. People with higher disgust sensitivity exhibit more sexual prejudice, and inducing disgust increases sexual prejudice. We tested whether inducing moral elevation, the theoretical opposite of disgust, would reduce sexual prejudice. In four studies (N = 3622), we induced elevation with inspiring videos and then measured sexual prejudice with implicit and explicit measures. Compared to control videos that elicited no particular affective state, we found that elevation reduced implicit and explicit sexual prejudice, albeit very slightly. No effect was observed when the target of social evaluation was changed to race (Black-White). Inducing amusement, another positive emotion, did not significantly affect sexual prejudice. We conclude that elevation weakly but reliably reduces prejudice towards gay men.

  8. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid medium of the formula NR.sub.3 and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  9. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-05-06

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid meidum of the formula NR/sub 3/ and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  10. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-10-07

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  11. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  12. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  13. Reduced-energy decoding of MPEG streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarina, Melena; Turner, Yoshio

    2001-12-01

    Long battery life and high performance multimedia decoding are competing design goals for portable appliances. For a target level of QoS, the achievable battery life can be increased by dynamically adjusting the supply voltage throughout execution. In this paper, an efficient offline scheduling algorithm is proposed for preprocessing stored MPEG audio and video streams. It computes the order and voltage settings at which the appliance's CPU decodes the frames, reducing energy consumption without violating timing or buffering constraints. Our experimental results elucidate the tradeoff of QoS and energy consumption. They demonstrate that the scheduler reduces CPU energy consumption by 19%, without any sacrifice of quality, and by nearly 50%, with only slightly reduced quality. The results also explore how the QoS/energy tradeoff is affected by buffering and processor speed.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizas reduce nitrogen loss via leaching.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Hamid R; Cavagnaro, Timothy R

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root systems to reduce nitrate (NO₃⁻) and ammonium (NH₄⁺) loss from soils via leaching was investigated in a microcosm-based study. A mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant and its mycorrhizal wildtype progenitor were used in this experiment in order to avoid the indirect effects of establishing non-mycorrhizal control treatments on soil nitrogen cycling and the wider soil biota. Mycorrhizal root systems dramatically reduced nitrate loss (almost 40 times less) via leaching, compared to their non-mycorrhizal counterparts, following a pulse application of ammonium nitrate to experimental microcosms. The capacity of AM to reduce nutrient loss via leaching has received relatively little attention, but as demonstrated here, can be significant. Taken together, these data highlight the need to consider the potential benefits of AM beyond improvements in plant nutrition alone.

  15. Reducing online identity disclosure using warnings.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Sandra; Zhu, Feng; Kolimi, Swapna

    2014-09-01

    In an experimental design, we tested whether written warnings can reduce the amount of identity information exposure online. A psychological attack on information privacy that has been shown to be effective in previous research was launched. This attack took advantage of the fact that people respond to certain types of requests in a relatively automatic, or mindless, fashion. The experiment manipulated the word that was used in the alert header: "warning", "caution", or "hazard". All warnings proved to be effective in reducing disclosure, but "hazard" proved to be most effective. Also warnings were more effective in reducing disclosure of driver's license numbers than email addresses. The discussion (a) provides tentative conclusions why these patterns were obtained, (b) suggests how to design warnings in cyber-environments, and (c) addresses future possibilities for research on this topic.

  16. Study examines sulfate-reducing bacteria activity

    SciTech Connect

    McElhiney, J.E.; Hardy, J.A.; Rizk, T.Y.; Stott, J.F.D.; Eden, R.D.

    1996-12-09

    Low-sulfate seawater injection can reduce the potential of an oil reservoir turning sour because of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) convert sulfate ions in seawater used in waterflooding into sulfide with the concomitant oxidation of a carbon source. A recent study at Capcis investigated the efficiency of SRB under various conditions of sulfate limitation. This study was conducted in a flowing bioreactor at 2,000 psia with different temperature zones (mesophilic 35 C and thermophilic 60--80 C). The study mixed microfloral populations derived from real North Sea-produced fluids, and included an active population of marine methanogenic bacteria present to provide competition for the available carbon sources. In general, results showed that SRB continue to convert sulfate to sulfide in stoichiometric quantities without regard to absolute concentrations. The paper discusses the results and recommends nanofiltration of seawater for ``sweet`` reservoirs.

  17. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  18. Stress, burnout, and strategies for reducing them

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F. Joseph; Stewart, Moira; Brown, Judith Belle

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To ascertain Canadian family physicians’ levels of stress and burnout and the strategies they use to reduce these problems. DESIGN Census survey. SETTING Kitchener-Waterloo, an urban area with a population of approximately 300 000 in southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Family physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Scores on the Family Physician Stress Inventory, scores on strategies to reduce personal stress, scores on strategies to reduce stress on the job, and scores on the Maslach Burnout Inventory. RESULTS Participation rate was 77.8% (123 of 158 surveys returned). About 42.5% of participants had high stress levels. Burnout was defined by 3 components: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization (going through the day like an “automaton”), and perceived lack of personal accomplishment. Many respondents scored high on the burnout inventory, and almost half had high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (47.9% and 46.3%, respectively). No demographic factors were associated with high scores on these components. Use of strategies to reduce personal and occupational stress was associated with lower levels of burnout. Scores on the Family Physician Stress Inventory correlated highly with scores on the Maslach Burnout Inventory. CONCLUSION Regardless of demographic factors, family physicians are at risk of having high levels of stress and burnout. Classic burnout is related to stress brought on by factors such as too much paperwork, long waits for specialists and tests, feeling undervalued, feeling unsupported, and having to abide by rules and regulations. Common strategies for reducing personal stress included eating nutritiously and spending time with family and friends. Common strategies for reducing stress on the job included valuing relationships with patients and participating in continuing medical education. Stress and burnout are related to the desire to give up practice and are, therefore, a human resources issue for the entire health

  19. Reducing the capacitance of piezoelectric film sensors.

    PubMed

    González, Martín G; Sorichetti, Patricio A; Santiago, Guillermo D

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel design for large area, wideband, polymer piezoelectric sensor with low capacitance. The large area allows better spatial resolution in applications such as photoacoustic tomography and the reduced capacitance eases the design of fast transimpedance amplifiers. The metalized piezoelectric polymer thin film is segmented into N sections, electrically connected in series. In this way, the total capacitance is reduced by a factor 1/N(2), whereas the mechanical response and the active area of the sensor are not modified. We show the construction details for a two-section sensor, together with the impedance spectroscopy and impulse response experimental results that validate the design.

  20. A Review of Focal Reducer Interferometer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    searches. G.Courtes has also proposed a design for a focal reducer for the E.S.O. 3.6m. Ritchey -Chretien telescope (Fig. 4b). He uses a Schmidt camera...spaced components, with a modified Wynne camera design (Fig. 7). The instrument proposed used folded optics and would operate at the F/8 Ritchey Cretien ...G.Courtes for the 3.6m Ritchey Chretien telescope . a, telescope focal plane and field lens; b, collimator; c, camera. Figure 5 The focal reducer of A.B

  1. Viscous damped space structure for reduced jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James F.; Davis, L. Porter

    1987-01-01

    A technique to provide modal vibration damping in high performance space structures was developed which uses less than one once of incompressible fluid. Up to 50 percent damping can be achieved which can reduce the settling times of the lowest structural mode by as much as 50 to 1. This concept allows the designers to reduce the weight of the structure while improving its dynamic performance. Damping by this technique is purely viscous and has been shown by test to be linear over 5 orders of input magnitude. Amplitudes as low as 0.2 microinch were demonstrated. Damping in the system is independent of stiffness and relatively insensitive to temperature.

  2. Vacancy ordering in reduced barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, David I.; Reaney, Ian M.; Yang, Gaiying Y.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Randall, Clive A.

    2004-06-01

    A crystal structure is proposed for reduced barium titanate, BaTiO3-δ, δ≈0.33, formed during the degradation of Ni-BaTiO3 X7R multilayer ceramic capacitors. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction have been used in combination with computer simulations to show that oxygen vacancies accrete on every third pseudocubic {111} plane, resulting in a cell with space group P3m1. Additionally, from electron energy loss spectroscopy, it is proposed that Ti4+ is reduced to Ti3+ as a mechanism of charge compensation within oxygen-deficient octahedra.

  3. Natural genetic variability reduces recalcitrance in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagia, Samarthya; Muchero, Wellington; Kumar, Rajeev; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Wyman, Charles E.

    2016-05-20

    Here, lignin content and structure are known to affect recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass to chemical/biochemical conversion. Previously, we identified rare Populus trichocarpa natural variants with significantly reduced lignin content. Because reduced lignin content may lower recalcitrance, 18 rare variants along with 4 comparators, and BESC standard Populus was analyzed for composition of structural carbohydrates and lignin. Sugar yields from these plants were measured at 5 process conditions: one for just enzymatic hydrolysis without pretreatment and four via our combined high-throughput hot water pretreatment and co-hydrolysis (HTPH) technique.

  4. Natural genetic variability reduces recalcitrance in poplar

    DOE PAGES

    Bhagia, Samarthya; Muchero, Wellington; Kumar, Rajeev; ...

    2016-05-20

    Here, lignin content and structure are known to affect recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass to chemical/biochemical conversion. Previously, we identified rare Populus trichocarpa natural variants with significantly reduced lignin content. Because reduced lignin content may lower recalcitrance, 18 rare variants along with 4 comparators, and BESC standard Populus was analyzed for composition of structural carbohydrates and lignin. Sugar yields from these plants were measured at 5 process conditions: one for just enzymatic hydrolysis without pretreatment and four via our combined high-throughput hot water pretreatment and co-hydrolysis (HTPH) technique.

  5. Reduced Basis Method for Nanodevices Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pau, George Shu Heng

    2008-05-23

    Ballistic transport simulation in nanodevices, which involves self-consistently solving a coupled Schrodinger-Poisson system of equations, is usually computationally intensive. Here, we propose coupling the reduced basis method with the subband decomposition method to improve the overall efficiency of the simulation. By exploiting a posteriori error estimation procedure and greedy sampling algorithm, we are able to design an algorithm where the computational cost is reduced significantly. In addition, the computational cost only grows marginally with the number of grid points in the confined direction.

  6. A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus (FPA) was constructed in order to study the effects of gravity on glass fiber formation. The apparatus was specifically designed and built for use on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. To date, four flights have been completed during which E-glass fiber was successfully produced in simulated lunar gravity.

  7. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOEpatents

    Laabs, G.W.; Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-06-09

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter is disclosed. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile. 4 figs.

  8. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOEpatents

    Laabs, Gary W.; Funk, David J.; Asay, Blaine W.

    1998-01-01

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile.

  9. Reducing the diameters of computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods of reducing the diameters of computer networks by adding additional processor to processor links under the constraint that no more than one I/O port be added to each processor are discussed. This is equivalent to adding edges to a given graph under the constraint that the degree of any node be increased, at most, by one.

  10. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  14. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  15. Reducing Error in Mail Surveys. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Weiwei

    This Digest describes four types of errors in mail surveys and summarizes the ways they can be reduced. Any one of these sources of error can make survey results unacceptable. Sampling error is examined through inferential statistics applied to sample survey results. In general, increasing sample size will decrease sampling error when simple…

  16. Fluidized-bed combustion reduces atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonke, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Method of reducing sulfur and nitrogen oxides released during combustion of fossil fuels is described. Fuel is burned in fluidized bed of solids with simultaneous feeding of crushed or pulverized limestone to control emission. Process also offers high heat transfer rates and efficient contacting for gas-solid reactions.

  17. Reducing sucrose loss in sugarbeet storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose loss in sugarbeet storage is a considerable problem which is negatively influenced by environmental conditions, stress on roots from disease problems in the field, rough handling during harvest and transport, and microbial growth. To reduce sucrose loss in sugarbeet storage, studies were in...

  18. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  19. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-06-15

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization.

  20. Reducing Skin Picking via Competing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Thompson, Ada; Reske, Cara L.; Gable, Lauren M.; Barton-Arwood, Sally

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the outcomes of a competing activities intervention to decrease skin picking exhibited by a 9-year-old student with comorbid diagnoses. Results of an ABCBAB design revealed that the use of student-selected manipulatives resulted in reduced skin picking. (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. Reducing Adverse Impact: One City's Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Jeff

    Following a workshop on "Innovations in Employment Testing that Improve Validity and Reduce Adverse Impact," the City of Louisville (Kentucky) implemented a strategy to develop a comprehensive testing and recruiting program for police recruits. To improve candidate expectations and preparation, the following activities were undertaken:…

  2. Reflecting layers reduce weight of insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. D.; Schlessinger, E. D.; Rockoff, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    Metalized films placed between layers of fibrous material maintain equivalent thermal conductivity while cutting blanket density in half. Tests indicate that insulation with 1 lb/cu ft density with goldized films has thermal conductivity equal to 2 lb/cu ft of conventional insulation. Concept reduces weight in commercial aircraft and increases cargo space.

  3. Reducing Class Size: Promises and Perils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bascia, Nina; Fredua-Kwarteng, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Reducing class size, especially in primary grades, can have tremendous academic and social benefits for children--benefits that endure well beyond those first years of school. But smaller class sizes are not a cure-all. Beyond the hoopla of enthusiasm for this seemingly simple change in educational practice lie serious consequences for students…

  4. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot was constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors were found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  5. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  6. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    2010-05-11

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  7. Reducing Alcohol Consumption through Television Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, James G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed impact of television commercial based on controlled-drinking principles. Measures were taken 12 months prior to start of campaign and 3 weeks after campaign from regular drinkers of general public whose drinking behavior was known to be unaffected by previous antidrug advertising campaign. Found that advertisement reduced intake provided…

  8. A Health Plan to Reduce Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Noting that the failures of the U.S. health care system are compounding the problems faced by low-income Americans, Alan Weil argues that any strategy to reduce poverty must provide access to health care for all low-income families. Although nearly all children in families with incomes under 200 percent of poverty are eligible for either Medicaid…

  9. Reducing Depression in Pregnancy: Designing Multimodel Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Maddy; Zayas, Luis H.

    2002-01-01

    High levels of stress on low-income, inner-city women from ethnic minority groups often causes both poor maternal functioning and infant development outcomes. This article reviews literature that proposes using several social work treatment options instead a single approach to reduce maternal depression, expand mothers' social networks, and…

  10. Speak Up: Reduce Your Risk of Falling

    MedlinePlus

    ... sluggish or confused. Ask how to reduce these side effects or if you can take another medicine. The goal of the Speak Up ™ program is to help patients and their advocates become more informed and involved in their health care.

  11. Reducing Research Anxiety among MSW Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einbinder, Susan Dana

    2014-01-01

    Research anxiety significantly declined in a diverse sample of 59 MSW students in their first-year hybrid online research course in which the instructor used an array of innovative educational techniques empirically proven to reduce this phenomenon. The pretest/posttest study, the standardized survey instruments used, and a summary of these…

  12. Sodium Valproate Withdrawal Correlates with Reduced Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Duncan; Hoerger, Marguerite; Dyer, Tim; Graham, Nicola; Penney, Heather; Mace, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are sometimes prescribed psychotropic medication to help manage their challenging behaviour. This case study describes how a multicomponent behavioural intervention in conjunction with the systematic withdrawal of sodium valproate was strongly correlated with reduced aggression. No symptoms of bipolar disorder or…

  13. Microwave Oscillator Would Have Reduced Phase Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Saunders, Jon

    1991-01-01

    Microwave oscillators of proposed new type incorporate suppressed-carrier/negative-feedback feature to reduce phase noise near their carrier frequencies. Concept results in phase noise less than achievable by cryogenically stabilized microwave components or by room-temperature oscillators stabilized by quartz crystals. Implemented in three different versions.

  14. How to reduce your fire insurance rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubain, M.

    1971-01-01

    Construction procedures and utilization of materials to reduce the cost of insuring large buildings against losses from fire are discussed. Examples of good and bad techniques in building construction and fire safety management are provided. The inadequacies of building codes and the hazards resulting from improper construction are examined.

  15. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone…

  16. Using Technology To Reduce Public School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John A.; Brown, Robert C.; Ledford, Bruce R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes technology-driven strategies for reducing school violence: (1) commitment communicated by newsletters and cable television; (2) elimination of weapons using metal detectors, surveillance cameras, breathalyzers, student passes, alarm systems, and school emergency plans; (3) two-way communications and low technology; (4) educational…

  17. Reducing exhaust gas emissions from Citydiesel busses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkonen, Seppo

    The effect of fuel composition and exhaust gas aftertreatment on the emissions was measured from truck and bus engines. Possibilities to measure unregulated emissions (aldehydes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, mutagenicity) were built. A reformulated diesel fuel 'Citydiesel' was developed. Citydiesel was able to reduce emissions compared to standard diesel fuel as follows: particulates by 10 to 30%, nitrogen oxides by 2 to 10%, sulphur dioxide by 97%, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) over 50%, mutagenicity of the exhaust particulates clearly, odor of the exhaust, and smoke after a cold start. The use of Citydiesel fuel reduces emissions of the existing vehicles immediately which is a remarkable benefit. The very low sulphur content (below 50 ppm) makes it possible to use oxidation. catalytic converters to reduce emissions of diesel vehicles. The new Euro 2 exhaust regulations coming into force during 1996 can be met with a modern diesel engine, Citydiesel fuel, and exhaust gas aftertreatment. Properties of Citydiesel fuel were verified in a three year field test with 140 city buses. Experience was good; e.g., engine oil change interval could be lengthened. Total value of the exhaust was estimated with different fuels and aftertreatment device in order to find out cheap ways to reduce emissions.

  18. Attributional Retraining: Reducing the Likelihood of Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes Stewart, Tara L.; Clifton, Rodney A.; Daniels, Lia M.; Perry, Raymond P.; Chipperfield, Judith G.; Ruthig, Joelle C.

    2011-01-01

    Failing a course is an acutely negative event for first-year university students, and a major contributor to high attrition rates at North American universities. Despite its prevalence, course failure receives relatively little research attention. What can be done to reduce course failure and help first-year students remain in university? This…

  19. Software system for reducing PAM-2 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    A software system for reducing PAM-II data was constructed. The data reduction process concatenates data tapes; determines ephemeris; and inverts full sun extinction data. Tests of this data reduction process show that PAM-II data can be compared with data from other, similar satellites.

  20. Chemicals Reduce Need To Mow Grass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrys, Brooks; Farley, Max; Gast, Larry J.

    1993-01-01

    Brief report discusses use of herbicides Roundup(R), Campaign(R), and Oust(R) to retard growth of Argentine bahia grass. Herbicide applied by use of spraying apparatus pulled by tractor. "Chemical mowing" keeps grass at "freshly mowed" height with less mechanical mowing. Applied to grass on shoulders of roads, reducing time spent on mowing.

  1. Reducing Children's Littering on a Nature Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaHart, David E.; Bailey, Jon S.

    1975-01-01

    This study compared incentives and educational methods to motivate children to pick up litter and to prevent littering. Incentives did aid in getting litter picked up. One-sentence anti-litter statements, educational materials, and lectures reduced littering, but incentives did not. (MR)

  2. Coatings to reduce wood preservative leaching.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Mojgan; Cooper, Paul

    2010-08-15

    The efficiency of semitransparent penetrating stains to reduce leaching of wood preservative components was evaluated. Five commercial wood deck finishes were applied to untreated and chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quat (ACQ), and copper azole (CA) treated wood, and leachates were collected and analyzed during 3 years of natural weathering exposure in Toronto, Canada. All stains evaluated effectively reduced the cumulative leaching of all inorganic preservative components by about 60% on average. Although most coatings showed significant film degradation starting around 12 months, the reduced leaching persisted even after 3 years. This suggests that temporary protection of wood with a coating during the early stages of use resulted in long-term reduction in preservative leaching potential. A two-week screening leaching test was able to predict the long-term leaching performance of different coatings reasonably well. Cured coating glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid coating viscosity were the most important variables affecting a leaching prediction model. To effectively reduce leaching of preservative components from treated wood, coatings should have Tg low enough to withstand stresses caused by freezing in winter and have adequate viscosity to form a barrier film layer on the wood surface.

  3. Reducing grain storage losses in developing countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the use of insecticide-treated material and modified atmosphere storage for reducing insect damage in stored maize. Results showed that insecticide treated netting and insecticide treated seed bags protected grain from insect damage for up to nine months if the grain was free from i...

  4. Reducing the Negative Effects of Large Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Daniel L.; Trautvetter, Sara

    This report presents an overview of recent efforts to promote small schools by first reviewing the rationale for small schools based on recent studies linking school size and various educational outcomes, followed by arguments supporting larger schools. Succeeding sections explore the following four ways to reduce the negative effects of school…

  5. Plasma melatonin is reduced in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalliolia, Eirini; Silajdžić, Edina; Nambron, Rajasree; Hill, Nathan R; Doshi, Anisha; Frost, Chris; Watt, Hilary; Hindmarsh, Peter; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T

    2014-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the production of melatonin, a hormone regulating sleep in relation to the light/dark cycle, is altered in Huntington's disease. We analyzed the circadian rhythm of melatonin in a 24-hour study of cohorts of control, premanifest, and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects. The mean and acrophase melatonin concentrations were significantly reduced in stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects compared with controls. We also observed a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean and acrophase melatonin in premanifest Huntington's disease subjects. Onset of melatonin rise was significantly more temporally spread in both premanifest and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects compared with controls. A nonsignificant trend also was seen for reduced pulsatile secretion of melatonin. Melatonin concentrations are reduced in Huntington's disease. Altered melatonin patterns may provide an explanation for disrupted sleep and circadian behavior in Huntington's disease, and represent a biomarker for disease state. Melatonin therapy may help the sleep disorders seen in Huntington's disease.

  6. Reducing Incidents of Cheating in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopp, Mary; Gleason, Patricia; Misicka, Stacey

    This report describes a program implemented to raise the awareness of the dramatic increases of reported academic cheating, to influence the attitudes of the targeted students towards cheating, and ultimately to reduce incidents of cheating in the targeted classrooms. The targeted populations consisted of middle school students in growing…

  7. 40 CFR 1500.5 - Reducing delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY PURPOSE, POLICY, AND MANDATE § 1500.5 Reducing...). (b) Emphasizing interagency cooperation before the environmental impact statement is prepared, rather... identification of what are and what are not the real issues (§ 1501.7). (e) Establishing appropriate time...

  8. 40 CFR 1500.5 - Reducing delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY PURPOSE, POLICY, AND MANDATE § 1500.5 Reducing...). (b) Emphasizing interagency cooperation before the environmental impact statement is prepared, rather... identification of what are and what are not the real issues (§ 1501.7). (e) Establishing appropriate time...

  9. 40 CFR 1500.5 - Reducing delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY PURPOSE, POLICY, AND MANDATE § 1500.5 Reducing...). (b) Emphasizing interagency cooperation before the environmental impact statement is prepared, rather... identification of what are and what are not the real issues (§ 1501.7). (e) Establishing appropriate time...

  10. 40 CFR 1500.5 - Reducing delay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY PURPOSE, POLICY, AND MANDATE § 1500.5 Reducing...). (b) Emphasizing interagency cooperation before the environmental impact statement is prepared, rather... identification of what are and what are not the real issues (§ 1501.7). (e) Establishing appropriate time...

  11. Reducing Abstraction When Learning Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzan, Orit; Hadar, Irit

    2005-01-01

    This article presents research on students' understanding of basic concepts in Graph Theory. Students' understanding is analyzed through the lens of the theoretical framework of reducing abstraction (Hazzan, 1999). As it turns out, in spite of the relative simplicity of the concepts that are introduced in the introductory part of a traditional…

  12. Teachers: Recognize Important Steps to Reduce Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supon, Viola

    2008-01-01

    Teachers must walk the steps and live the steps if reducing cheating is going to occur. Teachers begin this process by being cognizant and vigilant relative to administering means of measurement and assigning written work. This process includes skill acquisition in regards to: (1) acknowledging cheating, (2) purposeful planning, (3) electronic…

  13. Reducing Radon in Schools: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligman, Bryan K.; Fisher, Eugene J.

    This document presents the process of radon diagnostics and mitigation in schools to help educators determine the best way to reduce elevated radon levels found in a school. The guidebook is designed to guide school leaders through the process of measuring radon levels, selecting the best mitigation strategy, and directing the efforts of a…

  14. The Three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1991

    1991-01-01

    A student hand-out for a recycling unit defines the terms reduce, recycle, and reuse as they relate to solid waste management. Presents the characteristics of recyclable items such as yard wastes, metals, glass, and paper. Lists organizations through which more information about recycling can be obtained. (MCO)

  15. Poultry litter moisture management to reduce ammonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia generation in poultry houses results from the natural breakdown of litter (bedding material mixed with deposits of feces, feathers, spilled feed and water). Good management practices can reduce ammonia concentrations in poultry houses. This factsheet relates findings from a recent publicat...

  16. Novel tactile feedback to reduce overt stuttering.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Dwight E; Goggans, Paul M; Snyder, Gregory J

    2012-08-22

    Stuttering is generally considered to be a speech disorder that affects ∼1% of the global population. Various forms of speech feedback have been shown to reduce overt stuttered speaking, and in particular, second speech signal through speech feedback has drastically reduced utterances of stuttered speech in adults with persistent stuttering. This study reports data for increased overt fluency of speech in an adult stuttering population, whereby the vocalization of the speaker is captured by a microphone or an accelerometer, signal processed, and returned as mechanical tactile speech feedback to the speaker's skin. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to show that both the microphone and the accelerometer speaking conditions were significantly more fluent than a control (no feedback) condition, with the microphone-driven tactile feedback reducing instances of stuttering by 71% and the accelerometer-driven tactile feedback reducing instances of stuttering by 80%. It is apparent that self-generated tactile feedback can be used to enhance fluency significantly in those who stutter.

  17. Estimating Reduced Consumption for Dynamic Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Chelmis, Charalampos; Aman, Saima; Saeed, Muhammad Rizwan; Frincu, Marc; Prasanna, Viktor K.

    2015-01-30

    Growing demand is straining our existing electricity generation facilities and requires active participation of the utility and the consumers to achieve energy sustainability. One of the most effective and widely used ways to achieve this goal in the smart grid is demand response (DR), whereby consumers reduce their electricity consumption in response to a request sent from the utility whenever it anticipates a peak in demand. To successfully plan and implement demand response, the utility requires reliable estimate of reduced consumption during DR. This also helps in optimal selection of consumers and curtailment strategies during DR. While much work has been done on predicting normal consumption, reduced consumption prediction is an open problem that is under-studied. In this paper, we introduce and formalize the problem of reduced consumption prediction, and discuss the challenges associated with it. We also describe computational methods that use historical DR data as well as pre-DR conditions to make such predictions. Our experiments are conducted in the real-world setting of a university campus microgrid, and our preliminary results set the foundation for more detailed modeling.

  18. A Plan To Reduce Library Book Losses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Darlene S.

    The author researched and adapted ways to promote responsibility for library books. The program's aims were to reduce and retrieve lost library books that were reported on the inventory check and to make students, parents, and teachers aware of the problems and the importance of being responsible library users. Introduction to the project was done…

  19. Reducing Infant Mortality. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Despite the wide range of expertise that has been brought to bear on reducing infant mortality across the nation, the first year of life remains a time of considerable risk for many babies. Although the U.S. spends more on health care than any other country, its infant mortality rate remains higher than that of most other industrialized nations.…

  20. Reducing the Deficit; Spending and Revenue Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    income Social insurance Other Total Outlays National defense Nondefense discre- tionary spending Entitlements and other mandatory spending ...Total Outlays National defense Nondefense discre- tionary spending Entitlements and other mandatory spending Net interest Offsetting receipts...Fiscal Years SOURCE: Congressional Budget Office. CHAPTER I REDUCING THE DEFICIT: AN OVERVIEW 5 titlements and national defense spending tell the

  1. Reduced graphene oxide by chemical graphitization.

    PubMed

    Moon, In Kyu; Lee, Junghyun; Ruoff, Rodney S; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2010-09-21

    Reduced graphene oxides (RG-Os) have attracted considerable interest, given their potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits. However, very little is known regarding the chemically induced reduction method of graphene oxide (G-O) in both solution and gas phases, with the exception of the hydrazine-reducing agent, even though it is essential to use the vapour phase for the patterning of hydrophilic G-Os on prepatterned substrates and in situ reduction to hydrophobic RG-Os. In this paper, we report a novel reducing agent system (hydriodic acid with acetic acid (HI-AcOH)) that allows for an efficient, one-pot reduction of a solution-phased RG-O powder and vapour-phased RG-O (VRG-O) paper and thin film. The reducing agent system provided highly qualified RG-Os by mass production, resulting in highly conducting RG-O(HI-AcOH). Moreover, VRG-O(HI-AcOH) paper and thin films were prepared at low temperatures (40 °C) and were found to be applicable to flexible devices. This one-pot method is expected to advance research on highly conducting graphene platelets.

  2. Reducing Thermal Conduction In Acoustic Levitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, Ernst G.; Leung, Emily W.; Bhat, Balakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic transducers containing piezoelectric driving elements made more resistant to heat by reduction of effective thermal-conductance cross sections of metal vibration-transmitting rods in them, according to proposal. Used to levitate small objects acoustically for noncontact processing in furnaces. Reductions in cross sections increase amplitudes of transmitted vibrations and reduce loss of heat from furnaces.

  3. Sexual Harassment at Camp: Reducing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakleaf, Linda; Grube, Angela Johnson

    2003-01-01

    Employers are responsible for sexual harassment perpetrated by a supervisor. Camps may be responsible for sexual harassment between campers. Steps to reduce liability include providing multiple channels for reporting sexual harassment; having written policies prohibiting sexual harassment and procedures for reporting it; posting these policies and…

  4. Strategies for Reducing Text Book Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the price of college textbooks has become a growing concern for students and others who care about keeping college costs affordable. As policymakers and higher education systems explore the issue further, there are actions that can be taken immediately on college campuses to reduce the cost of textbooks. This brief presents…

  5. Nonlinear Acoustics Used To Reduce Leakage Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    Leakage and wear are two fundamental problems in all traditional turbine seals that contribute to an engine's inefficiency. The solutions to seal leakage and wear conflict in the conventional design space. Reducing the clearance between the seal and rotating shaft reduces leakage but increases wear because of increased contact incidents. Increasing the clearance to reduce the contact between parts reduces wear but increases parasitic leakage. The goal of this effort is to develop a seal that restricts leakage flow using acoustic pressure while operating in a noncontacting manner, thereby increasing life. In 1996, Dr. Timothy Lucas announced his discovery of a method to produce shock-free high-amplitude pressure waves. For the first time, the formation of large acoustic pressures was possible using dissonant resonators. A pre-prototype acoustic seal developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center exploits this fundamental acoustic discovery: a specially shaped cavity oscillated at the contained fluid's resonant frequency produces high-amplitude acoustic pressure waves of a magnitude approaching those required of today's seals. While the original researchers are continuing their development of acoustic pumps, refrigeration compressors, and electronic thermal management systems using this technology, the goal of researchers at Glenn is to apply these acoustic principles to a revolutionary sealing device. When the acoustic resonator shape is optimized for the sealing device, the flow from a high-pressure cavity to a low-pressure cavity will be restricted by a series of high-amplitude standing pressure waves of higher pressure than the pressure to be sealed. Since the sealing resonator cavity will not touch the adjacent sealing structures, seal wear will be eliminated, improving system life. Under a cooperative agreement between Glenn and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI), an acoustic-based pre-prototype seal was demonstrated for the first time. A pressurized cavity was

  6. Phenylthiourea specifically reduces zebrafish eye size.

    PubMed

    Li, Zeran; Ptak, Devon; Zhang, Liyun; Walls, Elwood K; Zhong, Wenxuan; Leung, Yuk Fai

    2012-01-01

    Phenylthiourea (PTU) is commonly used for inhibiting melanization of zebrafish embryos. In this study, the standard treatment with 0.2 mM PTU was demonstrated to specifically reduce eye size in larval fish starting at three days post-fertilization. This effect is likely the result of a reduction in retinal and lens size of PTU-treated eyes and is not related to melanization inhibition. This is because the eye size of tyr, a genetic mutant of tyrosinase whose activity is inhibited in PTU treatment, was not reduced. As PTU contains a thiocarbamide group which is presented in many goitrogens, suppressing thyroid hormone production is a possible mechanism by which PTU treatment may reduce eye size. Despite the fact that thyroxine level was found to be reduced in PTU-treated larvae, thyroid hormone supplements did not rescue the eye size reduction. Instead, treating embryos with six goitrogens, including inhibitors of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), suggested an alternative possibility. Specifically, three TPO inhibitors, including those that do not possess thiocarbamide, specifically reduced eye size; whereas none of the NIS inhibitors could elicit this effect. These observations indicate that TPO inhibition rather than a general suppression of thyroid hormone synthesis is likely the underlying cause of PTU-induced eye size reduction. Furthermore, the tissue-specific effect of PTU treatment might be mediated by an eye-specific TPO expression. Compared with treatment with other tyrosinase inhibitors or bleaching to remove melanization, PTU treatment remains the most effective approach. Thus, one should use caution when interpreting results that are obtained from PTU-treated embryos.

  7. [Interventions during labor for reducing instrumental deliveries].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, T; Meunier, E

    2008-12-01

    Several interventions have been demonstrated, with high evidence levels (EL), to be associated with reduced instrumental deliveries and should therefore be undertaken during labor for increasing spontaneous vaginal deliveries. Using a partogram (EL1) and continuous support during labor and childbirth (EL1) lead to fewer operative vaginal deliveries. Systematic early amniotomy increases the frequency of fetal heart rate abnormalities (EL2) without decreasing the incidence of instrumental deliveries (EL1) and should thus be avoided. Early oxytocin in dysfunctional labor (EL2) and manual rotation of posterior and transverse presentations (EL3) may reduce operative vaginal deliveries. Even without epidural analgesia, any upright or lateral positions compared to supine or lithotomy positions do not reduce instrumental deliveries (EL2). Epidural analgesia alters significantly instrumental delivery rates and therefore patient management in the labor ward. Indeed, when used with high concentration of local anesthetic, epidural analgesia is associated with increased operative vaginal deliveries (EL1), at least in part because of increased posterior presentations (EL2). However, the effect of epidural analgesia on instrumental delivery rates closely depends from the type of anesthetic and concentrations used. This effect is reduced when low concentrations of local anesthetic are used in combination with fat-soluble morphinated agent (EL1). Finally, for nulliparous women with continuous epidural analgesia, unless irresistible urge to push or medical indication to shorten second stage of labor, delayed pushing is associated with reduced difficult instrumental deliveries (EL1). Fundal pressure maneuvers should be prohibited because of their inefficiency (EL2) and dangerousness (EL4).

  8. Glucocorticoids reduce phobic fear in humans.

    PubMed

    Soravia, Leila M; Heinrichs, Markus; Aerni, Amanda; Maroni, Caroline; Schelling, Gustav; Ehlert, Ulrike; Roozendaal, Benno; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2006-04-04

    Phobias are characterized by excessive fear, cued by the presence or anticipation of a fearful situation. Whereas it is well established that glucocorticoids are released in fearful situations, it is not known whether these hormones, in turn, modulate perceived fear. As extensive evidence indicates that elevated glucocorticoid levels impair the retrieval of emotionally arousing information, they might also inhibit retrieval of fear memory associated with phobia and, thereby, reduce phobic fear. Here, we investigated whether acutely administrated glucocorticoids reduced phobic fear in two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in 40 subjects with social phobia and 20 subjects with spider phobia. In the social phobia study, cortisone (25 mg) administered orally 1 h before a socio-evaluative stressor significantly reduced self-reported fear during the anticipation, exposure, and recovery phase of the stressor. Moreover, the stress-induced release of cortisol in placebo-treated subjects correlated negatively with fear ratings, suggesting that endogenously released cortisol in the context of a phobic situation buffers fear symptoms. In the spider phobia study, repeated oral administration of cortisol (10 mg), but not placebo, 1 h before exposure to a spider photograph induced a progressive reduction of stimulus-induced fear. This effect was maintained when subjects were exposed to the stimulus again 2 days after the last cortisol administration, suggesting that cortisol may also have facilitated the extinction of phobic fear. Cortisol treatment did not reduce general, phobia-unrelated anxiety. In conclusion, the present findings in two distinct types of phobias indicate that glucocorticoid administration reduces phobic fear.

  9. Human Performance in Simulated Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently designing a new space suit capable of working in deep space and on Mars. Designing a suit is very difficult and often requires trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. Our current understanding of human performance in reduced gravity in a planetary environment (the moon or Mars) is limited to lunar observations, studies from the Apollo program, and recent suit tests conducted at JSC using reduced gravity simulators. This study will look at our most recent reduced gravity simulations performed on the new Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) compared to the C-9 reduced gravity plane. Methods: Subjects ambulated in reduced gravity analogs to obtain a baseline for human performance. Subjects were tested in lunar gravity (1.6 m/sq s) and Earth gravity (9.8 m/sq s) in shirt-sleeves. Subjects ambulated over ground at prescribed speeds on the ARGOS, but ambulated at a self-selected speed on the C-9 due to time limitations. Subjects on the ARGOS were given over 3 minutes to acclimate to the different conditions before data was collected. Nine healthy subjects were tested in the ARGOS (6 males, 3 females, 79.5 +/- 15.7 kg), while six subjects were tested on the C-9 (6 males, 78.8 +/- 11.2 kg). Data was collected with an optical motion capture system (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and was analyzed using customized analysis scripts in BodyBuilder (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). Results: In all offloaded conditions, variation between subjects increased compared to 1-g. Kinematics in the ARGOS at lunar gravity resembled earth gravity ambulation more closely than the C-9 ambulation. Toe-off occurred 10% earlier in both reduced gravity environments compared to earth gravity, shortening the stance phase. Likewise, ankle, knee, and hip angles remained consistently flexed and had reduced peaks compared to earth gravity. Ground reaction forces in lunar gravity (normalized to Earth body weight) were 0.4 +/- 0.2 on

  10. Simulation of sediment settling in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus; Kuhn, Brigitte; Rüegg, Hans-Rudolf; Gartmann, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Gravity has a non-linear effect on the settling velocity of sediment particles in liquids and gases due to the interdependence of settling velocity, drag and friction. However, Stokes' Law or similar empirical models, the common way of estimating the terminal velocity of a particle settling in a gas or liquid, carry the notion of a drag as a property of a particle, rather than a force generated by the flow around the particle. For terrestrial applications, this simplifying assumption is not relevant, but it may strongly influence the terminal velocity achieved by settling particles on other planetary bodies. False estimates of these settling velocities will, in turn, affect the interpretation of particle sizes observed in sedimentary rocks, e.g. on Mars and the search for traces of life. Simulating sediment settling velocities on other planets based on a numeric simulation using Navier-Stokes equations and Computational Fluid Dynamics requires a prohibitive amount of time and lacks measurements to test the quality of the results. The aim of the experiments presented in this study was therefore to quantify the error incurred by using settling velocity models calibrated on Earth at reduced gravities, such as those on the Moon and Mars. In principle, the effect of lower gravity on settling velocity can be achieved by reducing the difference in density between particle and liquid. However, the use of such analogues creates other problems because the properties (i.e. viscosity) and interaction of the liquids and sediment (i.e. flow around the boundary layer between liquid and particle) differ from those of water and mineral particles. An alternative for measuring the actual settling velocities of particles under reduced gravity, on Earth, is offered by placing a settling tube on a reduced gravity flight and conduct settling velocity measurements within the 20 to 25 seconds of Martian gravity that can be simulated during such a flight. In this presentation, the results

  11. Speed reducing or increasing planetary gear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Minegishi, K.; Ishida, T.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a planetary gear apparatus. It includes: an external gear mounted on an input shaft with an eccentric member and a bearing fitted onto the eccentric member therebetween; an internal gear engaging with the external gear, the internal gear being coaxial with respect to the input shaft; an output shaft for outputting a reduced rotational force; and a drive for coupling the external gear and the output shaft, the planetary gear apparatus being adapted to transmit the rotational force of the input shaft to the output shaft after it has reduced the speed of the rotational force, or to transmit the rotational force of the output shaft to the input shaft after it has increased the speed of the rotational force by fixing the internal gear.

  12. Sulfate-reducing bacteria: Microbiology and physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    The sulfate reducing bacteria, the first nonphotosynthetic anaerobic bacteria demonstrated to contain c type cytochromes, perform electron transfer coupled to phosphorylation. A new bioenergetic scheme for the formation of a proton gradient for growth of Desulfovibrio on organic substrates and sulfate involving vectors electron transfer and consistent with the cellular localization of enzymes and electron transfer components was proposed. Hydrogen is produced in the cytoplasm from organic substrates and, as a permease molecule diffuses rapidly across the cytoplasmic membrane, it is oxidized to protons and electrons by the periplasmic hydrogenase. The electrons only are transferred across the cytoplasmic membrane to the cytoplasm where they are used to reduce sulfate to sulfide. The protons are used for transport or to drive a reversible ATPOSE. The net effect is the transfer of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane with the intervention of a proton pump. This type of H2 cycling is relevant to the bioenergetics of other types of anaerobic microorganisms.

  13. Sertraline reduces glutamate uptake in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Débora Olmedo; Bristot, Ivi Juliana; Klamt, Fábio; Frizzo, Marcos Emílio

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial damage and declines in ATP levels have been recently attributed to sertraline. The effects of sertraline on different parameters were investigated in washed platelets from 18 healthy male volunteers, after 24h of drug exposure. Sertraline toxicity was observed only at the highest concentrations, 30 and 100 μM, which significantly reduced platelet viability to 76 ± 3% and 20 ± 2%, respectively. The same concentrations significantly decreased total ATP to 73 ± 3% and 13 ± 2%, respectively. Basal values of glycogen were not significantly affected by sertraline treatment. Glutamate uptake was significantly reduced after treatment with 3, 30 and 100 μM, by 28 ± 6%, 32 ± 5% and 54 ± 4%, respectively. Our data showed that sertraline at therapeutic concentrations does not compromise platelet viability and ATP levels, but they suggest that in a situation where extracellular glutamate levels are potentially increased, sertraline might aggravate an excitotoxic condition.

  14. FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruether, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

  15. Cascaded Microinverter PV System for Reduced Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bellus, Daniel R.; Ely, Jeffrey A.

    2013-04-29

    In this project, a team led by Delphi will develop and demonstrate a novel cascaded photovoltaic (PV) inverter architecture using advanced components. This approach will reduce the cost and improve the performance of medium and large-sized PV systems. The overall project objective is to develop, build, and test a modular 11-level cascaded three-phase inverter building block for photovoltaic applications and to develop and analyze the associated commercialization plan. The system will be designed to utilize photovoltaic panels and will supply power to the electric grid at 208 VAC, 60 Hz 3-phase. With the proposed topology, three inverters, each with an embedded controller, will monitor and control each of the cascade sections, reducing costs associated with extra control boards. This report details the final disposition on this project.

  16. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  17. Evaluating State Options for Reducing Medicaid Churning

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Katherine; Short, Pamela Farley; Graefe, Deborah R.; Uberoi, Namrata

    2015-01-01

    Medicaid churning - the constant exit and re-entry of beneficiaries as their eligibility changes - has long been a problem for both Medicaid administrators and recipients. Churning will continue under the Affordable Care Act, because despite new federal rules, Medicaid eligibility will continue to be based on current monthly income. We developed a longitudinal simulation model to evaluate four policy options for modifying or extending Medicaid eligibility to reduce churning. The simulations suggest that two options, extending Medicaid eligibility either to the end of a calendar year or for twelve months after enrollment, would be far more effective in reducing churning than the other options of a three-month extension or eligibility based on projected annual income. States should consider implementation of the option that best balances costs, including both administration and services, with improved health of Medicaid enrollees. PMID:26153313

  18. Brief mindfulness induction reduces inattentional blindness.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Timothy P; Creswell, J David; Denson, Thomas F

    2015-12-01

    Prior research has linked mindfulness to improvements in attention, and suggested that the effects of mindfulness are particularly pronounced when individuals are cognitively depleted or stressed. Yet, no studies have tested whether mindfulness improves declarative awareness of unexpected stimuli in goal-directed tasks. Participants (N=794) were either depleted (or not) and subsequently underwent a brief mindfulness induction (or not). They then completed an inattentional blindness task during which an unexpected distractor appeared on the computer monitor. This task was used to assess declarative conscious awareness of the unexpected distractor's presence and the extent to which its perceptual properties were encoded. Mindfulness increased awareness of the unexpected distractor (i.e., reduced rates of inattentional blindness). Contrary to predictions, no mindfulness×depletion interaction emerged. Depletion however, increased perceptual encoding of the distractor. These results suggest that mindfulness may foster awareness of unexpected stimuli (i.e., reduce inattentional blindness).

  19. Explosive Forming of Butt Welded Pipe Reducers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    Ao—A 072 I3Q NAVAL ORDNANCE STATION LOUISVILLE KY F~ G 13/it EXPLOSIVE FORMING OF BIJTT WELDED PIPE REDUCERS. (U) APR 79 M W JO$*4SON UNCLASSIFIED...NOSL MT OS2 _ Eli _ _El [LII] DliB I I —~~~~~~~~~~ I 4 1 V S -. RB’ORT NO. M1052 AP~t 1919v-fl o~toswE FORMING (j~~c BUTI WELDED PIPE RE~~~ A PQWECT...MING BUTT WELDED PIPE REDUCERS A PROJECT OP THE MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY PROGR AM NAVAL SEA SYST~~(S COMMA ND fiNAL REPORT NAVAL ORDNANCE STATION L

  20. Skeletal Structural Consequences of Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Christropher B.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to provide structurally meaningful data on bone loss after exposure to reduced gravity environments so that more precise estimates of fracture risk and the effectiveness of countermeasures in reducing fracture risk can be developed. The project has three major components: (1) measure structural changes in the limb bones of rats subjected to complete and partial nonweightbearing, with and without treatment with ibandronate and periodic full weightbearing; (2) measure structural changes in the limb bones of human bedrest subjects, with and without treatment with alendronate and resistive exercise, and Russian cosmonauts flying on the Mir Space Station; and (3) validate and extend the 2-dimensional structural analyses currently possible in the second project component (bedrest and Mir subjects) using 3-dimensional finite element modeling techniques, and determine actual fracture-producing loads on earth and in space.

  1. Reducing fumigant emissions after soil application.

    PubMed

    Yates, S R; Gan, J; Papiernik, S K; Dungan, R; Wang, D

    2002-12-01

    ABSTRACT Volatilization and soil transformation are major pathways by which pesticides dissipate from treated agricultural soil. Volatilization is a primary source of unwanted agricultural chemicals in the atmosphere and can significantly affect fumigant efficacy. Volatile pesticides may cause other unique problems; for example, the soil fumigant methyl bromide has been shown to damage stratospheric ozone and will soon be phased out. There is also great concern about the health consequences of inhalation of fumigants by people living in proximity to treated fields. Because replacement fumigants will likely face increased scrutiny in years ahead, there is a great need to understand the mechanisms that control their emission into the atmosphere so these losses can be minimized without loss of efficacy. Recent research has shown that combinations of vapor barriers and soil amendments can be effective in reducing emissions. In this paper, some potential approaches for reducing fumigant emissions to the atmosphere are described.

  2. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  3. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction,more » it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.« less

  4. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOEpatents

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Chau, Hoi Fung

    1998-01-01

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

  5. Activating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images

    PubMed Central

    Foord, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional memories, and especially intrusive memories, are a common feature of many psychological disorders, and are overconsolidated by stress. Attachment theory posits that activation of mental representations of attachment figures can reduce stress and boost coping. This study tested the proposition that attachment activation would reduce consolidation of emotional and intrusive memories. Sixty-seven undergraduate students viewed subliminal presentations of traumatic and neutral images, which were preceded by subliminal presentations of either attachment-related images or non-attachment-related images; free recall and intrusive memories were assessed two days later. Participants with low avoidant attachment tendencies who received the attachment primes recalled fewer memories and reported fewer intrusions than those who received the non-attachment primes. Unexpectedly, those with high anxious attachment tendencies reported fewer memories. These findings generally accord with attachment theory, and suggest that consolidation of emotional memories can be moderated by activation of attachment representations. PMID:27631498

  6. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOEpatents

    Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

    1998-03-24

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

  7. Analysis of driver performance under reduced visibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaeppler, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical models describing vehicle dynamics as well as human behavior may be useful in evaluating driver performance and in establishing design criteria for vehicles more compatible with man. In 1977, a two level model of driver steering behavior was developed, but its parameters were identified for clear visibility conditions only. Since driver performance degrades under conditions of reduced visibility, e.g., fog, the two level model should be investigated to determine its applicability to such conditions. The data analysis of a recently performed driving simulation experiment showed that the model still performed reasonably well under fog conditions, although there was a degradation in its predictive capacity during fog. Some additional parameters affecting anticipation and lag time may improve the model's performance for reduced visibility conditions.

  8. Gratitude: a tool for reducing economic impatience.

    PubMed

    DeSteno, David; Li, Ye; Dickens, Leah; Lerner, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    The human mind tends to excessively discount the value of delayed rewards relative to immediate ones, and it is thought that "hot" affective processes drive desires for short-term gratification. Supporting this view, recent findings demonstrate that sadness exacerbates financial impatience even when the sadness is unrelated to the economic decision at hand. Such findings might reinforce the view that emotions must always be suppressed to combat impatience. But if emotions serve adaptive functions, then certain emotions might be capable of reducing excessive impatience for delayed rewards. We found evidence supporting this alternative view. Specifically, we found that (a) the emotion gratitude reduces impatience even when real money is at stake, and (b) the effects of gratitude are differentiable from those of the more general positive state of happiness. These findings challenge the view that individuals must tamp down affective responses through effortful self-regulation to reach more patient and adaptive economic decisions.

  9. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-08-22

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular body disposed above rear wheels, comprising a plurality of load bearing struts attached to the bottom of the rectangular body adjacent its sides, a plurality of opposing flat sheets attached to the load bearing struts, and angled flaps attached to the lower edge of the opposing sheets defining an obtuse angle with the opposing flat sheets extending inwardly with respect to the sides of the rectangular body to a predetermined height above the ground, which, stiffen the opposing flat sheets, bend to resist damage when struck by the ground, and guide airflow around the rear wheels of the vehicle to reduce its aerodynamic resistance when moving.

  10. Reduced ceria nanofilms from structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergey M; Demiroglu, Ilker; Neyman, Konstantin M; Bromley, Stefan T

    2015-03-14

    Experimentally, Ce2O3 films are used to study cerium oxide in its fully or partially reduced state, as present in many applications. We have explored the space of low energy Ce2O3 nanofilms using structure prediction and density functional calculations, yielding more than 30 distinct nanofilm structures. First, our results help to rationalize the roles of thermodynamics and kinetics in the preparation of reduced ceria nanofilms with different bulk crystalline structures (e.g. A-type or bixbyite) depending on the support used. Second, we predict a novel, as yet experimentally unresolved, nanofilm which has a structure that does not correspond to any previously reported bulk A2B3 phase and which has an energetic stability between that of A-type and bixbyite. To assist identification and fabrication of this new Ce2O3 nanofilm we calculate some observable properties and propose supports for its epitaxial growth.

  11. Summer jobs reduce violence among disadvantaged youth.

    PubMed

    Heller, Sara B

    2014-12-05

    Every day, acts of violence injure more than 6000 people in the United States. Despite decades of social science arguing that joblessness among disadvantaged youth is a key cause of violent offending, programs to remedy youth unemployment do not consistently reduce delinquency. This study tests whether summer jobs, which shift focus from remediation to prevention, can reduce crime. In a randomized controlled trial among 1634 disadvantaged high school youth in Chicago, assignment to a summer jobs program decreases violence by 43% over 16 months (3.95 fewer violent-crime arrests per 100 youth). The decline occurs largely after the 8-week intervention ends. The results suggest the promise of using low-cost, well-targeted programs to generate meaningful behavioral change, even with a problem as complex as youth violence.

  12. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Although the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  13. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based, analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. This work was supported by NNSA Grant No. DE- NA0002948, AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0391, and DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Hydrothermally reduced graphene oxide as a supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johra, Fatima Tuz; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2015-12-01

    The supercapacitance behavior of hydrothermally reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was investigated for the first time. The capacitive behavior of RGO was characterized by using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge methods. The specific capacitance of hydrothermally reduced RGO at 1 A/g was 367 F/g in 1 M H2SO4 electrolyte, which was higher than that of RGO synthesized via the hydrazine reduction method. The RGO-modified glassy carbon electrode showed excellent stability. After 1000 cycles, the supercapacitance was 107.7% of that achieved in the 1st cycle, which suggests that RGO has excellent electrochemical stability as a supercapacitor electrode material. The energy density of hydrothermal RGO reached 44.4 W h/kg at a power density of 40 kW/kg.

  15. Reducing Air Force Fighter Pilot Shortages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-31

    Albert A. Robbert, Anthony D. Rosello, Clarence R. Anderegg, John A. Ausink, James H. Bigelow, William W. Taylor, James Pita Reducing Air Force...Santa Monica, Calif. © Copyright 2015 RAND Corporation R® is a registered trademark. iii Preface The Air Force has faced a persistent challenge in...pilots in the reserve components. This research was sponsored by four elements of the U.S. Air Force: the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (AF/A3

  16. Thermosyphon Flooding in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc Andrew

    2013-01-01

    An innovative experiment to study the thermosyphon flooding limits was designed and flown on aparabolic flight campaign to achieve the Reduced Gravity Environments (RGE) needed to obtainempirical data for analysis. Current correlation models of Faghri and Tien and Chung do not agreewith the data. A new model is presented that predicts the flooding limits for thermosyphons inearths gravity and lunar gravity with a 95 confidence level of +- 5W.

  17. Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts

    SciTech Connect

    Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M.

    2007-06-15

    Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Reduced J-tube riser pull force

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, P.E.

    1991-07-30

    This patent describes a method for reducing the force required to move a pipe through a J-tube attached to an offshore platform. It comprises covering the pipe with at least one of a slippery coating and a slippery surface, each comprising hydrophilic polymer; reacting a polyol with the hydrophilic polymer to make the hydrophilic polymer slippery; and moving the pipe through the J-tube attached to the off-shore platform.

  19. Capsule Depolymerase Overexpression Reduces Bacillus anthracis Virulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Friedlander, A. M. (2004). The NheA component of the non- hemolytic enterotoxin of Bacillus cereus is produced by Bacillus anthracis but is not required for...Capsule depolymerase overexpression reduces Bacillus anthracis virulence Angelo Scorpio,3 Donald J. Chabot, William A. Day,4 Timothy A. Hoover and...depolymerase (CapD) is a c-glutamyl transpeptidase and a product of the Bacillus anthracis capsule biosynthesis operon. In this study, we examined the

  20. Reducing Peak Power in Automated Weapon Laying

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    aiming a weapon is referred to as gun laying. This report describes a method to calculate motion profiles that reach a given lay within the least...amount of time while reducing the amount of peak power required and, therefore, minimizing the forces caused by acceleration. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...Calculating New Acceleration Values 5 Results and Discussions 7 Conclusions 10 Distribution List 11 FIGURES 1 Trapezoidal motion profile 1 2

  1. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  2. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-11-10

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  3. Reducing the open porosity of pyroboroncarbon articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushov, G. G.; Zakharevich, A. M.; Pichkhidze, S. Ya.; Koshuro, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    It is established that a decrease in the open porosity of pyroboroncarbon, a pyrolytic glassy composite material of interest for manufacturing prosthetic heart valves (PHVs), can be achieved via impregnation of articles with an alcohol solution of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and subsequent thermal treatment. The maximum roughness height and linear size of open pores on the surface of PHV parts made of pyroboroncarbon can additionally be reduced by final mechanical processing of a silicon oxide film formed on the surface.

  4. Renewable Energy Can Help Reduce Oil Dependency

    ScienceCinema

    Arvizu, Dan

    2016-07-12

    In a speech to the Economic Club of Kansas City on June 23, 2010, NREL Director Dan Arvizu takes a realistic look at how renewable energy can help reduce America's dependence on oil, pointing out that the country gets as much energy from renewable sources now as it does from offshore oil production. For a transcript, visit http://www.nrel.gov/director/pdfs/energy_overview_06_10.pdf

  5. Commonwealth Edison reduces coal dust problem

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    After a successful test program, Commonwealth Edison is reducing the potential for coal dust explosions by installing mechanical agglomerating pin-mixer equipment in vacuum building and crusher houses. The devices mix coal dust with a controlled, small amount of moisture to form round pellets that can be discharged to the conveyor system and the boiler. As the pellets densify and grow inside the Dustmaler, they move almost as fast as the pins, which provides the unit's high efficiency. 2 figures.

  6. Reducing the Deficit: Spending and Revenue Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Office (as of January 2011). Note: n.a. = not applicable. Actual, 2012- 2012- 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2016 2021...reduce outlays for Medicare by a total of $14 billion between 2017 and 2021. Another assumption underlying CBO’s projections involves the role of...fund in 2017 , and the HI trust fund in 2021.8 (Because the SMI trust fund can draw on general revenues without limit, its receipts will not fall

  7. Reducing Hazardous Emissions at Anniston Army Depot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    Emissions at Anniston Army Depot Mr. Jack Kelley, ARL Mr. Wayne Ziegler, ARL Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reducing Hazardous Emissions at Anniston Army Depot 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Anniston Army Depot  Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) performs depot level maintenance for combat tanks

  8. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  9. Reflections on reducing insulin to lose weigh.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Val

    Diabulimia is not a recognised medical condition, although it is thought to affect one-third of women with type 1 diabetes. Diabulimia involves deliberately omitting or reducing insulin dosages to lose weight. This article reports the reflections of women with long-duration type 1 diabetes who said that they had manipulated their insulin in the past to lose weight. Many were now dealing with serious heart and neuropathic complications, which they felt were a result of their diabulimia.

  10. Leveraging Technology to Reduce Patient Transaction Costs.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Medical practices are under significant pressure to provide superior customer service in an environment of declining or flat reimbursement. The solution for many practices involves the integration of a variety of third-party technologies that conveniently interface with one's electronic practice management and medical records systems. Typically, the applications allow the practice to reduce the cost of each patient interaction. Drilling down to quantify the cost of each individual patient interaction helps to determine the practicality of implementation.

  11. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Sean C.

    2005-02-15

    A device for a vehicle with a pair of swinging rear doors, which converts flat sheets of pliable material hinged to the sides of the vehicle adjacent the rear thereof into effective curved airfoils that reduce the aerodynamic resistance of the vehicle, when the doors are closed by hand, utilizing a plurality of stiffeners disposed generally parallel to the doors and affixed to the sheets and a plurality of collapsible tension bearings struts attached to each stiffener and the adjacent door.

  12. Do workplace interventions reduce disability rates?

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing life expectancy and decreasing fertility have led to a shift in the workforce age structure towards older age groups. Deteriorating health and reduced work capacity are among the challenges to retaining older workers in the labour force. Aims To examine whether workplace interventions to facilitate work among employees with health problems or reduced work capacity affect disability rates among employees aged 50 years and older. Methods Data from a survey of Norwegian companies (n = 713) were linked with registry data on their employees aged 50-61 years (n = 30771). By means of a difference-in-differences approach, we compared change in likelihood of receiving a full disability pension among employees in companies with and without workplace interventions. Results Employees in companies reporting to have workplace interventions in 2005 had a higher risk of receiving full disability pension during the period 2001-03 compared with employees in companies without such interventions [odds ratio (OR) 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.45]. During the period 2005-07, there was an overall reduction in disability rates (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.71-0.96) in both the intervention and control group. However, employees in companies reporting to have interventions in 2005 experienced an additional reduction in an employee’s likelihood of receiving a full disability pension (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.64-0.99) compared with employees in companies without interventions. Conclusions Interventions to facilitate work among employees with health problems or reduced work capacity have reduced disability rates among employees aged 50-61. This suggests that companies’ preventive interventions are an effective means to retain older workers with deteriorating health. PMID:27986798

  13. The Economic Effects of Reduced Defense Spending

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    DEFENSE EXPENDITURES ON THE LEVEL OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY How Changes in Defense Spending Affect the Economy 5 Defining Alternative Paths for...EFFECTS OF REDUCED DEFENSE SPENDING The Congress of the United States Congressional Budget Office NOTES All years referred to when discussing...the effects of cuts in defense spending not only on the national economy but also on states, industries, and selected local areas. R. William

  14. Reduced Boil-Off System Sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Plachta, David W.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is currently developing cryogenic propellant storage and transfer systems for future space exploration and scientific discovery missions by addressing the need to raise the technology readiness level of cryogenic fluid management technologies. Cryogenic propellants are baselined in many propulsion systems due to their inherently high specific impulse; however, their low boiling points can cause substantial boil-off losses over time. Recent efforts such as the Reduced Boil-off Testing and the Active Thermal Control Scaling Study provide important information on the benefit of an active cooling system applied to LH2 propellant storage. Findings show that zero-boil off technologies can reduce overall mass in LH2 storage systems when low Earth orbit loiter periods extend beyond two months. A significant part of this mass reduction is realized by integrating two stages of cooling: a 20 K stage to intercept heat at the tank surface, and a 90 K stage to reduce the heat entering the less efficient 20 K stage. A missing element in previous studies, which is addressed in this paper, is the development of a direct method for sizing the 90 K cooling stage. Such a method requires calculation of the heat entering both the 90 K and 20 K stages as compared to the overall system masses, and is reliant upon the temperature distribution, performance, and unique design characteristics of the system in question. By utilizing the known conductance of a system without active thermal control, the heat being intercepted by a 90 K stage can be calculated to find the resultant lift and mass of each active thermal control stage. Integral to this is the thermal conductance of the cooling straps and the broad area cooling shield, key parts of the 90 K stage. Additionally, a trade study is performed to show the ability of the 90 K cooling stage to reduce the lift on the 20 K cryocooler stage, which is considerably less developed and efficient than 90 K cryocoolers.

  15. Tyramine pharmacokinetics and reduced bioavailability with food.

    PubMed

    VanDenBerg, Chad M; Blob, Lawrence F; Kemper, Eva M; Azzaro, Albert J

    2003-06-01

    Tyramine challenge studies have demonstrated that it requires approximately twice the amount of tyramine administered with a meal compared to administration after a fast to elicit the same effect, suggesting a reduction in bioavailability of tyramine when administered with food. The pharmacokinetics of tyramine when administered in a fasted versus a fed state were studied. A single 200-mg dose of tyramine was administered orally to healthy subjects both after an overnight fast and during a meal. Systemic exposure to tyramine was reduced by 53% (p < 0.05), and the maximum concentration of tyramine was reduced by 72% (p < 0.05) when the dose was administered during a meal. Tyramine maximum serum concentration was observed between 20 minutes and 1 hour when the dose was administered after an overnight fast and appeared to be delayed and/or prolonged by administration during a meal. Tyramine oral clearance was 135 +/- 55.4 L/min, maximum observed serum concentration was 37.7 +/- 26.01 ng/mL, and tyramine elimination half-life was 0.533 (range: 0.330-0.668) hours after administration to fasted subjects. Tyramine bioavailability was significantly reduced when administered with a meal compared to after a fast. The results suggest that larger amounts of dietary tyramine will be required to induce a pressor response equivalent to that following encapsulated tyramine administered in the fasted state.

  16. Gold Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Reduces Radiotherapy Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lynn; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Vadas, Timothy M.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can absorb near infrared light, resulting in heating and ablation of tumors. Gold nanoparticles have also been used for enhancing the dose of X-rays in tumors during radiotherapy. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy is synergistic, importantly allowing a reduction in X-ray dose with improved therapeutic results. Here we intratumorally infused small 15 nm gold nanoparticles engineered to be transformed from infrared-transparent to infrared-absorptive by the tumor, which were then heated by infrared followed by X-ray treatment. Synergy was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) in mice. It was found that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors, normally 55 Gy, could be reduced to <15 Gy (a factor of >3.7). Gold nanoparticles therefore provide a method to combine hyperthermia and radiotherapy to drastically reduce the X-ray radiation needed, thus sparing normal tissue, reducing the side effects, and making radiotherapy more effective. PMID:24990355

  17. Computing partial traces and reduced density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziero, Jonas

    Taking partial traces (PTrs) for computing reduced density matrices, or related functions, is a ubiquitous procedure in the quantum mechanics of composite systems. In this paper, we present a thorough description of this function and analyze the number of elementary operations (ops) needed, under some possible alternative implementations, to compute it on a classical computer. As we note, it is worthwhile doing some analytical developments in order to avoid making null multiplications and sums, what can considerably reduce the ops. For instance, for a bipartite system ℋa⊗ℋb with dimensions da=dimℋa and db=dimℋb and for da,db≫1, while a direct use of PTr definition applied to ℋb requires 𝒪(da6db6) ops, its optimized implementation entails 𝒪(da2db) ops. In the sequence, we regard the computation of PTrs for general multipartite systems and describe Fortran code provided to implement it numerically. We also consider the calculation of reduced density matrices via Bloch’s parametrization with generalized Gell Mann’s matrices.

  18. Reducing agitator energy consumption without sacrificing agitation

    SciTech Connect

    Golobic, R.A.; Derrickson, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    Rising energy costs and their increasing net effect on the cost of a mineral product requires that every aspect of processing-plant operations reduce consumed horsepower without sacrificing the grade of the product. This paper addresses two principles in the design and selection of axial-flow agitator propellers that contribute to significant reductions in required horsepower. The first of these involves the use of good design principles. The swirling wake generated by an agitator propeller induces losses in the pumping action. By designing an agitator of proper twist and shape one can minimize these losses. Depending upon the design chosen for comparison, these losses can be reduced by 30 to 50% without any sacrifice in pumping or without increasing the complexity of the design. The second aspect involves an appropriate selection of the agitator propeller diameter. The required horsepower can be significantly reduced by using a propeller of larger diameter while operating it at a lower revolutions per minute (RPM) with no sacrifice in the pumping. 3 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  19. New pharmaceuticals reduce cost of illness.

    PubMed

    Hansen, R W

    1986-06-01

    The cost of illness includes not only the funds required to treat illness, but also the effect on the patient's quality of life. Recent concern about rising health costs have focused on the direct expenditures without noting that the cost of illness in terms of mortality and morbidity has declined significantly. Pharmaceuticals have played a major role in reducing the total cost of illness. Several studies of the cost-effectiveness of past introductions of vaccines and pharmaceuticals reveal large cost savings. Although the focus of most studies has been on major advances, the continuing process of less dramatic therapeutic improvements has significantly trimmed the cost of illness. Cost-benefit studies of new drugs or changes in drug use, while more difficult to perform, make it possible to influence the selection of therapy. Since pharmaceuticals represent less than 10% of total treatment costs, reduction in the cost of pharmaceutical products can only have a minor impact on the total cost of illness. Pharmaceuticals can reduce the cost of illness by providing alternative therapies that reduce direct treatment cost or improve the public health.

  20. Can we reduce workplace fatalities by half?

    PubMed

    Koh, David Soo Quee

    2012-06-01

    Singapore, an island republic of over 5 million inhabitants, has 3.1 million workers. Most are employed in the service, finance and tourist/transport industry. Significant numbers work in manufacturing, construction and heavy industry. Following a series of construction and shipyard accidents with multiple deaths in 2004, the government announced its intention to reduce workplace fatalities from 4.9 to 2.5 per 100,000 by 2015. There was strong political will to achieve this target. The strategic approaches were to build workplace safety and health (WSH) capabilities; implement legislative changes with enforcement; promote benefits of WSH and recognize best practices, and enhance partnership with stakeholders. The anticipated outcomes were to reduce workplace fatality and injury rates; have WSH as an integral part of business; and establish a progressive and pervasive WSH culture. With these measures, the workplace fatality rate declined from 4.9/100,000 in 2004, to 2.2/100,000 in 2010. However, other confounding factors could also account for this decline, and have to be considered. The next target, announced by Singapore's Prime Minister in 2008, is to further reduce the workplace fatality rate to 1.8/100,000 by 2018, and to have "one of the best workplace safety records in the world".

  1. Analytic thinking reduces belief in conspiracy theories.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Voracek, Martin; Stieger, Stefan; Tran, Ulrich S; Furnham, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Belief in conspiracy theories has been associated with a range of negative health, civic, and social outcomes, requiring reliable methods of reducing such belief. Thinking dispositions have been highlighted as one possible factor associated with belief in conspiracy theories, but actual relationships have only been infrequently studied. In Study 1, we examined associations between belief in conspiracy theories and a range of measures of thinking dispositions in a British sample (N=990). Results indicated that a stronger belief in conspiracy theories was significantly associated with lower analytic thinking and open-mindedness and greater intuitive thinking. In Studies 2-4, we examined the causational role played by analytic thinking in relation to conspiracist ideation. In Study 2 (N=112), we showed that a verbal fluency task that elicited analytic thinking reduced belief in conspiracy theories. In Study 3 (N=189), we found that an alternative method of eliciting analytic thinking, which related to cognitive disfluency, was effective at reducing conspiracist ideation in a student sample. In Study 4, we replicated the results of Study 3 among a general population sample (N=140) in relation to generic conspiracist ideation and belief in conspiracy theories about the July 7, 2005, bombings in London. Our results highlight the potential utility of supporting attempts to promote analytic thinking as a means of countering the widespread acceptance of conspiracy theories.

  2. Can We Reduce Workplace Fatalities by Half?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Singapore, an island republic of over 5 million inhabitants, has 3.1 million workers. Most are employed in the service, finance and tourist/transport industry. Significant numbers work in manufacturing, construction and heavy industry. Following a series of construction and shipyard accidents with multiple deaths in 2004, the government announced its intention to reduce workplace fatalities from 4.9 to 2.5 per 100,000 by 2015. There was strong political will to achieve this target. The strategic approaches were to build workplace safety and health (WSH) capabilities; implement legislative changes with enforcement; promote benefits of WSH and recognize best practices, and enhance partnership with stakeholders. The anticipated outcomes were to reduce workplace fatality and injury rates; have WSH as an integral part of business; and establish a progressive and pervasive WSH culture. With these measures, the workplace fatality rate declined from 4.9/100,000 in 2004, to 2.2/100,000 in 2010. However, other confounding factors could also account for this decline, and have to be considered. The next target, announced by Singapore's Prime Minister in 2008, is to further reduce the workplace fatality rate to 1.8/100,000 by 2018, and to have "one of the best workplace safety records in the world". PMID:22993714

  3. Reduced barrier efficiency in axillary stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, A; Lee, R S; Moore, A E; Pudney, P D A; Paterson, S E; Rawlings, A V

    2002-06-01

    The skin of the axilla is cosmetically important with millions of consumers daily applying antiperspirant/deodorant products. Despite this, we know virtually nothing about axillary skin or how antiperspirant (AP) use impacts upon it. To characterize the axillary stratum corneum and determine whether this is a unique skin type, we have looked at stratum corneum composition and function, particularly its barrier properties, and compared it with other body sites. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneosurfametry (CSM) revealed a reduced barrier function in the axilla. HPTLC analysis of the stratum corneum lipids demonstrated statistically elevated levels of fatty acids, ceramides, and particularly cholesterol in the axilla. Both ceramide and cholesterol did not appear to change with depth, indicating that they were predominantly of stratum corneum origin. On the other hand, at least some of the fatty acid had a sebaceous origin. We hypothesized that the reduced barrier function might be owing to the changes in the crucial ceramide : cholesterol ratio. To address this, we used a combination of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) with cyanoacrylate sampling. These results demonstrated more ordered lipid-lamellae phase behaviour in the axilla, suggesting that the elevated cholesterol might form crystal microdomains within the lipid lamellae, allowing an increase in water flux. Since an exaggerated application of antiperspirant had no effect upon the axilla barrier properties, it is concluded that this region of skin physiologically has a reduced barrier function.

  4. Reducing the likelihood of long tennis matches.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Tristan; Alan, Brown; Pollard, Graham

    2006-01-01

    Long matches can cause problems for tournaments. For example, the starting times of subsequent matches can be substantially delayed causing inconvenience to players, spectators, officials and television scheduling. They can even be seen as unfair in the tournament setting when the winner of a very long match, who may have negative aftereffects from such a match, plays the winner of an average or shorter length match in the next round. Long matches can also lead to injuries to the participating players. One factor that can lead to long matches is the use of the advantage set as the fifth set, as in the Australian Open, the French Open and Wimbledon. Another factor is long rallies and a greater than average number of points per game. This tends to occur more frequently on the slower surfaces such as at the French Open. The mathematical method of generating functions is used to show that the likelihood of long matches can be substantially reduced by using the tiebreak game in the fifth set, or more effectively by using a new type of game, the 50-40 game, throughout the match. Key PointsThe cumulant generating function has nice properties for calculating the parameters of distributions in a tennis matchA final tiebreaker set reduces the length of matches as currently being used in the US OpenA new 50-40 game reduces the length of matches whilst maintaining comparable probabilities for the better player to win the match.

  5. Breast Cancer Detection with Reduced Feature Set.

    PubMed

    Mert, Ahmet; Kılıç, Niyazi; Bilgili, Erdem; Akan, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores feature reduction properties of independent component analysis (ICA) on breast cancer decision support system. Wisconsin diagnostic breast cancer (WDBC) dataset is reduced to one-dimensional feature vector computing an independent component (IC). The original data with 30 features and reduced one feature (IC) are used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of the classifiers such as k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), artificial neural network (ANN), radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and support vector machine (SVM). The comparison of the proposed classification using the IC with original feature set is also tested on different validation (5/10-fold cross-validations) and partitioning (20%-40%) methods. These classifiers are evaluated how to effectively categorize tumors as benign and malignant in terms of specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, F-score, Youden's index, discriminant power, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with its criterion values including area under curve (AUC) and 95% confidential interval (CI). This represents an improvement in diagnostic decision support system, while reducing computational complexity.

  6. Breast Cancer Detection with Reduced Feature Set

    PubMed Central

    Kılıç, Niyazi; Bilgili, Erdem

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores feature reduction properties of independent component analysis (ICA) on breast cancer decision support system. Wisconsin diagnostic breast cancer (WDBC) dataset is reduced to one-dimensional feature vector computing an independent component (IC). The original data with 30 features and reduced one feature (IC) are used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of the classifiers such as k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), artificial neural network (ANN), radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and support vector machine (SVM). The comparison of the proposed classification using the IC with original feature set is also tested on different validation (5/10-fold cross-validations) and partitioning (20%–40%) methods. These classifiers are evaluated how to effectively categorize tumors as benign and malignant in terms of specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, F-score, Youden's index, discriminant power, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with its criterion values including area under curve (AUC) and 95% confidential interval (CI). This represents an improvement in diagnostic decision support system, while reducing computational complexity. PMID:26078774

  7. Reoxidation of Bioreduced Uranium Under Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Larson, Joern; Zheng, Zuoping; Brodie, Eoin; Wang, Zheming; Herman, Don; Hazen, Terry C.; Firestone,Mary K.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2005-02-05

    Uranium mining and processing for nuclear weapons and fuel have left thousands of sites with toxic levels of this actinide in soil and ground water. An emerging strategy for remediating such environments involves using organic carbon to promote microbially-mediated reduction and precipitation of insoluble U(IV) minerals. Although previous U bioreduction studies have shown promising results, they were of short duration (up to a few months). Our longer-term (20 months) laboratory study using historically contaminated sediment has alarmingly shown that microbial reduction of U was transient even under reducing (methanogenic) conditions. Uranium was reductively immobilized during the first 100 days, but later (150 to 600 days) reoxidized and mobilized, although a microbial community capable of reducing U(VI) remained through the end of the experiment. The formation of Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} complexes (caused by the elevated carbonate concentration from microbial respiration and presence of calcium) drove the U(IV)/U(VI) reduction potential to much more reducing conditions. Fe(III) and Mn(IV) were found to be likely terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for U reoxidation. Thus, U remediation by organic carbon based reductive precipitation is not sustainable in calcareous, neutral to alkaline soils and ground waters.

  8. Reducing environmental bias when measuring natural selection.

    PubMed

    Scheiner, Samuel M; Donohue, Kathleen; Dorn, Lisa A; Mazer, Susan J; Wolfe, Lorne M

    2002-11-01

    Crucial to understanding the process of natural selection is characterizing phenotypic selection. Measures of phenotypic selection can be biased by environmental variation among individuals that causes a spurious correlation between a trait and fitness. One solution is analyzing genotypic data, rather than phenotypic data. Genotypic data, however, are difficult to gather, can be gathered from few species, and typically have low statistical power. Environmental correlations may act through traits other than through fitness itself. A path analytic framework, which includes measures of such traits, may reduce environmental bias in estimates of selection coefficients. We tested the efficacy of path analysis to reduce bias by re-analyzing three experiments where both phenotypic and genotypic data were available. All three consisted of plant species (Impatiens capensis, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Raphanus sativus) grown in experimental plots or the greenhouse. We found that selection coefficients estimated by path analysis using phenotypic data were highly correlated with those based on genotypic data with little systematic bias in estimating the strength of selection. Although not a panacea, using path analysis can substantially reduce environmental biases in estimates of selection coefficients. Such confidence in phenotypic selection estimates is critical for progress in the study of natural selection.

  9. Reducing the stigmatization of teen mothers.

    PubMed

    SmithBattle, Lee I

    2013-01-01

    Teen mothers are stigmatized by stereotypes that they are unmotivated, irresponsible, and incompetent parents. In spite of the pervasiveness of these stereotypes, stigma is rarely described as a contributing factor to teen mothers' difficulties and their health and social disparities. After tracing how teen mothers have been misrepresented and stereotyped over the last half century, I describe what is known about the stigma associated with teen mothering, reasons for its persistence, efforts to reduce it, and its potentially harmful effects. Stigma should be of concern to nurses because stigmatizing practices impede effective clinical care, contribute to teen mothers' many challenges, and violate the nursing ethic that patients be treated with respect and dignity. Recommendations for restoring dignity and reducing stigma in healthcare focus on developing recognition practices that are predicated on respect and concern for the teen's well-being and her capacity as a mother. Nurses are also urged to advocate for services and policies that reduce the stigmatization and marginalization of teen mothers.

  10. Laser reduced graphene for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongfang; Bock, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Graphene was prepared by excimer laser irradiation reduction of graphite oxide dissolved in an aqueous solution at different laser energies and irradiation time. The morphologies and structure of the laser reduced graphene were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The XRD results confirm that the deoxygenation of the graphite oxide sheets occurred almost completely for all laser irradiation conditions used. The graphene fabricated by laser irradiation reduction appears to be randomly aggregated, crumpled, disordered and small sheet solid material. The total amount of oxygen functional groups reduced significantly and the CC/CO intensity ratio increased, however, the atomic percentages of the Cdbnd O double bond were increased after laser reduction. The laser reduced graphene was used as the electrode active material for supercapacitors and its specific capacitance was evaluated in a two electrode cell in either a 0.5 M Na2SO4 aqueous or a 1 M Tetraethylammoniumtetrafluoroborate acetonitrile based electrolyte. The specific capacitance of the laser fabricated graphene was found to depend on the energy and irradiation time of the laser. The highest specific capacitance was determined to be 141 F/g at 1.04 A/g and 84 F/g at 1.46 A/g in the aqueous and ACN electrolytes, respectively.

  11. Does semantic preactivation reduce inattentional blindness?

    PubMed

    Kreitz, Carina; Schnuerch, Robert; Furley, Philip A; Gibbons, Henning; Memmert, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We are susceptible to failures of awareness if a stimulus occurs unexpectedly and our attention is focused elsewhere. Such inattentional blindness is modulated by various parameters, including stimulus attributes, the observer's cognitive resources, and the observer's attentional set regarding the primary task. In three behavioral experiments with a total of 360 participants, we investigated whether mere semantic preactivation of the color of an unexpected object can reduce inattentional blindness. Neither explicitly mentioning the color several times before the occurrence of the unexpected stimulus nor priming the color more implicitly via color-related concepts could significantly reduce the susceptibility to inattentional blindness. Even putting the specific color concept in the main focus of the primary task did not lead to reduced inattentional blindness. Thus, we have shown that the failure to consciously perceive unexpected objects was not moderated by semantic preactivation of the objects' most prominent feature: its color. We suggest that this finding reflects the rather general principle that preactivations that are not motivationally relevant for one's current selection goals do not suffice to make an unexpected object overcome the threshold of awareness.

  12. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Nanxi; Massoudieh, Arash; Liang, Xiaomeng; Hu, Dehong; Kamai, Tamir; Ginn, Timothy R.; Zilles, Julie L.; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  13. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  14. Reducing dietary sodium intake: the Canadian context.

    PubMed

    Barr, Susan I

    2010-02-01

    Sodium is a required nutrient; Adequate Intakes for adults range from 1200 to 1500 mg*day(-1), depending on age. The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for sodium is 2300 mg*day(-1) for adults, based on the relationship between sodium intake and increased blood pressure. Elevated blood pressure, which is prevalent among Canadians, is, in turn, a major risk factor for stroke, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease. Sodium intake is not the only determinant of blood pressure; other modifiable risk factors include relative mass, physical activity, overall dietary quality, and alcohol consumption. However, because >90% of adult Canadian men and two thirds of Canadian women have sodium intakes above the UL, Health Canada's Working Group on Dietary Sodium Reduction has been charged with developing, implementing, and overseeing a strategy to reduce Canadians' sodium intakes. It is estimated that approximately 75% of dietary sodium is added during food processing; in addition to taste and palatability, sodium also has functional roles in food manufacturing and preservation, although the amounts used often exceed those required. Because of the central role of processed foods in sodium intake, the strategy proposed by Health Canada's Working Group includes voluntary reduction of sodium in processed foods and foods sold in food service establishments. It will also include an education and awareness campaign, and research and surveillance. Initiatives to reduce sodium in other parts of the world have demonstrated that it will be challenging to reduce sodium intake to the recommended range and will likely require many years to accomplish.

  15. Reduced chemical kinetics for propane combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ying, Shuh-Jing; Nguyen, Hung Lee

    1990-01-01

    It is pointed out that a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism for the combustion of propane consists of 40 chemical species and 118 elementary chemical reactions. An attempt is made to reduce the number of chemical species and elementary chemical reactions so that the computer run times and storage requirements may be greatly reduced in three-dimensional gas turbine combustion flow calculations, while maintaining accurate predictions of the propane combustion and exhaust emissions. By way of a sensitivity analysis, the species of interest and chemical reactions are classified in descending order of importance. Nineteen species are chosen, and their pressure, temperature, and concentration profiles are presented for the reduced mechanisms, which are then compared with those from the full 118 reactions. It is found that 45 reactions involving 27 species have to be kept for comparable agreement. A comparison of the results obtained from the 45 reactions to that of the full 118 shows that the pressure and temperature profiles and concentrations of C3H8, O2, N2, H2O, CO, and CO2 are within 10 percent of maximum change.

  16. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  17. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical “piggyback” techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  18. Options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-08-01

    Improvements in energy efficiency can significantly reduce the annual growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Such improvements occur when energy intensity is reduced; no reduction in energy services is required. Using the concept of cost of conserved energy'' to develop conservation supply curves similar to resource supply curves, researchers consistently find that electricity and natural gas savings of nearly 50% of current consumption are possible for US buildings. Such reductions in energy consumption directly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. To capture these savings, we must continue to develop energy-efficient technologies and strategies. This paper describes three recent energy-efficient technologies that benefited from energy conservation research and development (R D) funding: high-frequency ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows. Other advanced technologies and strategies of spectrally selective windows, superwindows, electrochromic windows, advanced insulation, low-flow showerheads, improved recessed lamp fixtures, whitening surfaces and planting urban trees, daylighting, and thermal energy storage are also discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Huang, K.

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ˜1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells’ normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  20. Electrohydrodynamic Pool Boiling in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Stahl, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research is concerned with studying the effects of applied electric fields on pool boiling in a reduced-gravity environment. Experiments are conducted at the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec Drop tower using a drop rig constructed at UC Davis. In the experiments, a platinum wire is heated while immersed in saturated liquid refrigerants (FC-72 and FC-87), or water, causing vapor formation at the wire surface. Electric fields are applied between the wire surface and an outer screen electrode that surrounds the wire. Preliminary normal-gravity experiments with water have demonstrated that applied electric fields generated by the rig electronics can influence boiling characteristics. Reduced-gravity experiments will be performed in the summer of 1996. The experiments will provide fundamental data on electric field strengths required to disrupt film boiling (for various wire heat generation input rates) in reduced gravity for a cylindrical geometry. The experiments should also shed light on the roles of characteristic bubble generation times and charge relaxation times in determining the effects of electric fields on pool boiling. Normal-gravity comparison experiments will also be performed.

  1. Local cooling reduces regional bone blood flow.

    PubMed

    Venjakob, Arne J; Vogt, Stephan; Stöckl, Klaus; Tischer, Thomas; Jost, Philipp J; Thein, Eckart; Imhoff, Andreas B; Anetzberger, Hermann

    2013-11-01

    Local cooling is very common after bone and joint surgery. Therefore the knowledge of bone blood flow during local cooling is of substantial interest. Previous studies revealed that hypothermia leads to vasoconstriction followed by decreased blood flow levels. The aim of this study was to characterize if local cooling is capable of inducing reduced blood flow in bone tissue using a stepwise-reduced temperature protocol in experimental rabbits. To examine bone blood flow we utilized the fluorescent microsphere (FM) method. In New Zealand white rabbits one randomly chosen hind limb was cooled stepwise from 32 to 2°C, whereas the contra lateral hind limb served as control. Injection of microspheres was performed after stabilization of bone and muscle temperature at each temperature level. Bones were removed, dissected and fluorescence intensity was determined to calculate blood flow values. We found that blood flow of all cooled regions decreased relative to the applied external temperature. At maximum cooling blood flow was almost completely disrupted, indicating local cooling as powerful regulatory mechanism for regional bone blood flow (RBBF). Postoperative cooling therefore may lead to strongly decreased bone blood flow values. As a result external cooling has capacity to both diminish bone healing and reduce bleeding complications.

  2. Options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Price, Lynn

    1992-03-01

    Improvements in energy efficiency can significantly reduce the annual growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Such improvements occur when energy intensity is reduced; no reduction in energy services is required. Using the concept of ``cost of conserved energy'' to develop conservation supply curves similar to resource supply curves, researchers consistently find that electricity and natural gas savings of nearly 50% of current consumption are possible for U.S. buildings. Such reductions in energy consumption directly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. To capture these savings, we must continue to develop energy-efficient technologies and strategies. This paper describes three recent energy-efficient technologies that benefitted from energy conservation research and development (R&D) funding: high-frequency ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows. Other advanced technologies and strategies of spectrally selective windows, superwindows, electrochromic windows, advanced insulation, low-flow showerheads, improved recessed lamp fixtures, whitening surfaces and planting urban trees, daylighting, and thermal energy storage are also discussed.

  3. Improved reduced-resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, James; Milstein, Jaime

    1995-01-01

    The resolution of satellite imagery is often traded-off to satisfy transmission time and bandwidth, memory, and display limitations. Although there are many ways to achieve the same reduction in resolution, algorithms vary in their ability to preserve the visual quality of the original imagery. These issues are investigated in the context of the Landsat browse system, which permits the user to preview a reduced resolution version of a Landsat image. Wavelets-based techniques for resolution reduction are proposed as alternatives to subsampling used in the current system. Experts judged imagery generated by the wavelets-based methods visually superior, confirming initial quantitative results. In particular, compared to subsampling, the wavelets-based techniques were much less likely to obscure roads, transmission lines, and other linear features present in the original image, introduce artifacts and noise, and otherwise reduce the usefulness of the image. The wavelets-based techniques afford multiple levels of resolution reduction and computational speed. This study is applicable to a wide range of reduced resolution applications in satellite imaging systems, including low resolution display, spaceborne browse, emergency image transmission, and real-time video downlinking.

  4. Symmetry of semi-reduced lattices.

    PubMed

    Stróż, Kazimierz

    2015-05-01

    The main result of this work is extension of the famous characterization of Bravais lattices according to their metrical, algebraic and geometric properties onto a wide class of primitive lattices (including Buerger-reduced, nearly Buerger-reduced and a substantial part of Delaunay-reduced) related to low-restricted semi-reduced descriptions (s.r.d.'s). While the `geometric' operations in Bravais lattices map the basis vectors into themselves, the `arithmetic' operators in s.r.d. transform the basis vectors into cell vectors (basis vectors, face or space diagonals) and are represented by matrices from the set {\\bb V} of all 960 matrices with the determinant ±1 and elements {0, ±1} of the matrix powers. A lattice is in s.r.d. if the moduli of off-diagonal elements in both the metric tensors M and M(-1) are smaller than corresponding diagonal elements sharing the same column or row. Such lattices are split into 379 s.r.d. types relative to the arithmetic holohedries. Metrical criteria for each type do not need to be explicitly given but may be modelled as linear derivatives {\\bb M}(p,q,r), where {\\bb M} denotes the set of 39 highest-symmetry metric tensors, and p,q,r describe changes of appropriate interplanar distances. A sole filtering of {\\bb V} according to an experimental s.r.d. metric and subsequent geometric interpretation of the filtered matrices lead to mathematically stable and rich information on the Bravais-lattice symmetry and deviations from the exact symmetry. The emphasis on the crystallographic features of lattices was obtained by shifting the focus (i) from analysis of a lattice metric to analysis of symmetry matrices [Himes & Mighell (1987). Acta Cryst. A43, 375-384], (ii) from the isometric approach and invariant subspaces to the orthogonality concept {some ideas in Le Page [J. Appl. Cryst. (1982), 15, 255-259]} and splitting indices [Stróż (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 421-429] and (iii) from fixed cell transformations to transformations

  5. Reducing Spatial Data Complexity for Classification Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruta, Dymitr; Gabrys, Bogdan

    2007-11-01

    Intelligent data analytics gradually becomes a day-to-day reality of today's businesses. However, despite rapidly increasing storage and computational power current state-of-the-art predictive models still can not handle massive and noisy corporate data warehouses. What is more adaptive and real-time operational environment requires multiple models to be frequently retrained which further hinders their use. Various data reduction techniques ranging from data sampling up to density retention models attempt to address this challenge by capturing a summarised data structure, yet they either do not account for labelled data or degrade the classification performance of the model trained on the condensed dataset. Our response is a proposition of a new general framework for reducing the complexity of labelled data by means of controlled spatial redistribution of class densities in the input space. On the example of Parzen Labelled Data Compressor (PLDC) we demonstrate a simulatory data condensation process directly inspired by the electrostatic field interaction where the data are moved and merged following the attracting and repelling interactions with the other labelled data. The process is controlled by the class density function built on the original data that acts as a class-sensitive potential field ensuring preservation of the original class density distributions, yet allowing data to rearrange and merge joining together their soft class partitions. As a result we achieved a model that reduces the labelled datasets much further than any competitive approaches yet with the maximum retention of the original class densities and hence the classification performance. PLDC leaves the reduced dataset with the soft accumulative class weights allowing for efficient online updates and as shown in a series of experiments if coupled with Parzen Density Classifier (PDC) significantly outperforms competitive data condensation methods in terms of classification performance at the

  6. Reducing HPV-associated Cancer Globally

    PubMed Central

    Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers are a major worldwide public health concern. Virtually all cervical cancer is HPV-related, with 70% caused by HPV16 and -18. Variable proportions of certain non-cervical cancers (e.g., anal, vulvar, oropharyngeal) are HPV-related; over 90% of the HPV-related ones are related to HPV16, -18. The HPV-related cancers are dominated by cervical cancer in the developing world, where cervical cancer screening is limited. In this setting, widespread uptake of current HPV vaccines by adolescent girls could reduce this cancer's incidence and mortality by approximately two-thirds, with cost-effective screening programs of adult women having the potential to reduce mortality more rapidly. In the industrialized world, non-cervical HPV-related cancers, especially oropharyngeal, are rapidly increasing, and now rival the incidence of cervical cancer, whose rates continue to decline thanks to established cervical screening programs. Therefore, reducing HPV-associated non-cervical cancers with HPV vaccination has greater importance in the industrialized world, especially since there are no approved screening programs for these cancers. Preventing the substantial number of non-cervical HPV cancers in men will require either “herd” immunity through high vaccination rates in females or male vaccination. Current HPV vaccination can complement cervical screening in protecting against cervical cancer and may permit the safe reduction of screening intensity in industrialized countries. Second-generation HPV vaccines (active against a broader array of cervical cancer–related HPV types) could prevent an even higher proportion of cervical precancer and cancer and might permit further reductions in screening intensity. PMID:22219162

  7. Uranium Immobilization by Sulfate-reducing Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyenal, Haluk; Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-04-01

    Hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] was immobilized using biofilms of the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. The biofilms were grown in flat-plate continuous-flow reactors using lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the electron acceptor. U(VI) was continuously fed into the reactor for 32 weeks at a concentration of 126 íM. During this time, the soluble U(VI) was removed (between 88 and 96% of feed) from solution and immobilized in the biofilms. The dynamics of U immobilization in the sulfate-reducing biofilms were quantified by estimating: (1) microbial activity in the SRB biofilm, defined as the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production rate and estimated from the H2S concentration profiles measured using microelectrodes across the biofilms; (2) concentration of dissolved U in the solution; and (3) the mass of U precipitated in the biofilm. Results suggest that U was immobilized in the biofilms as a result of two processes: (1) enzymatically and (2) chemically, by reacting with microbially generated H2S. Visual inspection showed that the dissolved sulfide species reacted with U(VI) to produce a black precipitate. Synchrotron-based U L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of U precipitated abiotically by sodium sulfide indicated that U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV). Selected-area electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic analysis of transmission electron microscope lattice-fringe images confirmed the structure of precipitated U as being that of uraninite.

  8. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Jin; Park, Ki Rin; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gon; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2016-08-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction.

  9. Reducing Financing Costs for Federal ESPCs

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P.J.

    2005-01-28

    This report documents the recommendations of a working group commissioned by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) in 2002 to identify ways to reduce financing costs in federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects. The working group is part of continuing efforts launched by FEMP since the award of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Super ESPCs in 1998 and 1999 to ensure that practical, flexible, and cost-effective alternative financing for energy-efficiency improvements is available to all federal agencies. During FY 2002-2004, the working group pursued extensive fact finding, consulted with government and private-sector finance experts, and analyzed data from federal and local government ESPC programs. The working group observed that both competition and transparency were lacking in federal ESPCs. The working group also found that the government often falls short of full compliance with certain provisions of the final rule that codifies the federal ESPC authority into regulation (10 CFR 436), which speak to due diligence in determining fair and reasonable pricing. Based on these findings, the working group formulated their short-term recommendations of actions that agencies can take immediately to reduce ESPC financing costs. The working group recommended requiring competitive solicitation of offers from prospective financiers of ESPC projects, standardization of processes to keep the playing field level and reduce energy service companies (ESCOs) project development costs, and assuring transparency by specifying that the government will see and review all bids. The reforms are intended to enable the government to determine quickly and reliably whether the portion of price related to financing is fair and reasonable and to provide auditable records of the transaction. The working group's recommendations were incorporated into modifications to the Super ESPCs and requirements to be included in the Super ESPC delivery order request for proposal

  10. Intensive agriculture reduces soil biodiversity across Europe.

    PubMed

    Tsiafouli, Maria A; Thébault, Elisa; Sgardelis, Stefanos P; de Ruiter, Peter C; van der Putten, Wim H; Birkhofer, Klaus; Hemerik, Lia; de Vries, Franciska T; Bardgett, Richard D; Brady, Mark Vincent; Bjornlund, Lisa; Jørgensen, Helene Bracht; Christensen, Sören; Hertefeldt, Tina D'; Hotes, Stefan; Gera Hol, W H; Frouz, Jan; Liiri, Mira; Mortimer, Simon R; Setälä, Heikki; Tzanopoulos, Joseph; Uteseny, Karoline; Pižl, Václav; Stary, Josef; Wolters, Volkmar; Hedlund, Katarina

    2015-02-01

    Soil biodiversity plays a key role in regulating the processes that underpin the delivery of ecosystem goods and services in terrestrial ecosystems. Agricultural intensification is known to change the diversity of individual groups of soil biota, but less is known about how intensification affects biodiversity of the soil food web as a whole, and whether or not these effects may be generalized across regions. We examined biodiversity in soil food webs from grasslands, extensive, and intensive rotations in four agricultural regions across Europe: in Sweden, the UK, the Czech Republic and Greece. Effects of land-use intensity were quantified based on structure and diversity among functional groups in the soil food web, as well as on community-weighted mean body mass of soil fauna. We also elucidate land-use intensity effects on diversity of taxonomic units within taxonomic groups of soil fauna. We found that between regions soil food web diversity measures were variable, but that increasing land-use intensity caused highly consistent responses. In particular, land-use intensification reduced the complexity in the soil food webs, as well as the community-weighted mean body mass of soil fauna. In all regions across Europe, species richness of earthworms, Collembolans, and oribatid mites was negatively affected by increased land-use intensity. The taxonomic distinctness, which is a measure of taxonomic relatedness of species in a community that is independent of species richness, was also reduced by land-use intensification. We conclude that intensive agriculture reduces soil biodiversity, making soil food webs less diverse and composed of smaller bodied organisms. Land-use intensification results in fewer functional groups of soil biota with fewer and taxonomically more closely related species. We discuss how these changes in soil biodiversity due to land-use intensification may threaten the functioning of soil in agricultural production systems.

  11. Methamphetamine Reduces Human Influenza A Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that is among the most widely abused illicit drugs, with an estimated over 35 million users in the world. Several lines of evidence suggest that chronic meth abuse is a major factor for increased risk of infections with human immunodeficiency virus and possibly other pathogens, due to its immunosuppressive property. Influenza A virus infections frequently cause epidemics and pandemics of respiratory diseases among human populations. However, little is known about whether meth has the ability to enhance influenza A virus replication, thus increasing severity of influenza illness in meth abusers. Herein, we investigated the effects of meth on influenza A virus replication in human lung epithelial A549 cells. The cells were exposed to meth and infected with human influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. The viral progenies were titrated by plaque assays, and the expression of viral proteins and cellular proteins involved in interferon responses was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. We report the first evidence that meth significantly reduces, rather than increases, virus propagation and the susceptibility to influenza infection in the human lung epithelial cell line, consistent with a decrease in viral protein synthesis. These effects were apparently not caused by meth’s effects on enhancing virus-induced interferon responses in the host cells, reducing viral biological activities, or reducing cell viability. Our results suggest that meth might not be a great risk factor for influenza A virus infection among meth abusers. Although the underlying mechanism responsible for the action of meth on attenuating virus replication requires further investigation, these findings prompt the study to examine whether other structurally similar compounds could be used as anti-influenza agents. PMID:23139774

  12. Reducing Spatial Data Complexity for Classification Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ruta, Dymitr; Gabrys, Bogdan

    2007-11-29

    Intelligent data analytics gradually becomes a day-to-day reality of today's businesses. However, despite rapidly increasing storage and computational power current state-of-the-art predictive models still can not handle massive and noisy corporate data warehouses. What is more adaptive and real-time operational environment requires multiple models to be frequently retrained which further hinders their use. Various data reduction techniques ranging from data sampling up to density retention models attempt to address this challenge by capturing a summarised data structure, yet they either do not account for labelled data or degrade the classification performance of the model trained on the condensed dataset. Our response is a proposition of a new general framework for reducing the complexity of labelled data by means of controlled spatial redistribution of class densities in the input space. On the example of Parzen Labelled Data Compressor (PLDC) we demonstrate a simulatory data condensation process directly inspired by the electrostatic field interaction where the data are moved and merged following the attracting and repelling interactions with the other labelled data. The process is controlled by the class density function built on the original data that acts as a class-sensitive potential field ensuring preservation of the original class density distributions, yet allowing data to rearrange and merge joining together their soft class partitions. As a result we achieved a model that reduces the labelled datasets much further than any competitive approaches yet with the maximum retention of the original class densities and hence the classification performance. PLDC leaves the reduced dataset with the soft accumulative class weights allowing for efficient online updates and as shown in a series of experiments if coupled with Parzen Density Classifier (PDC) significantly outperforms competitive data condensation methods in terms of classification performance at the

  13. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27478339

  14. Reducing Truncation Error In Integer Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. Brooks; Berner, Jeffrey B.; Graham, J. Scott

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of rounding off (truncation of least-significant bits) in integer processing of data devised. Provides for reduction, to extremely low value, of numerical bias otherwise generated by accumulation of truncation errors from many arithmetic operations. Devised for use in integer signal processing, in which rescaling and truncation usually performed to reduce number of bits, which typically builds up in sequence of operations. Essence of method to alternate direction of roundoff (plus, then minus) on alternate occurrences of truncated values contributing to bias.

  15. Reduced multiple empirical kernel learning machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Lu, MingZhe; Gao, Daqi

    2015-02-01

    Multiple kernel learning (MKL) is demonstrated to be flexible and effective in depicting heterogeneous data sources since MKL can introduce multiple kernels rather than a single fixed kernel into applications. However, MKL would get a high time and space complexity in contrast to single kernel learning, which is not expected in real-world applications. Meanwhile, it is known that the kernel mapping ways of MKL generally have two forms including implicit kernel mapping and empirical kernel mapping (EKM), where the latter is less attracted. In this paper, we focus on the MKL with the EKM, and propose a reduced multiple empirical kernel learning machine named RMEKLM for short. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to reduce both time and space complexity of the MKL with EKM. Different from the existing MKL, the proposed RMEKLM adopts the Gauss Elimination technique to extract a set of feature vectors, which is validated that doing so does not lose much information of the original feature space. Then RMEKLM adopts the extracted feature vectors to span a reduced orthonormal subspace of the feature space, which is visualized in terms of the geometry structure. It can be demonstrated that the spanned subspace is isomorphic to the original feature space, which means that the dot product of two vectors in the original feature space is equal to that of the two corresponding vectors in the generated orthonormal subspace. More importantly, the proposed RMEKLM brings a simpler computation and meanwhile needs a less storage space, especially in the processing of testing. Finally, the experimental results show that RMEKLM owns a much efficient and effective performance in terms of both complexity and classification. The contributions of this paper can be given as follows: (1) by mapping the input space into an orthonormal subspace, the geometry of the generated subspace is visualized; (2) this paper first reduces both the time and space complexity of the EKM-based MKL; (3

  16. Generating a Reduced Gravity Environment on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, L. K.; Valle, P.; Shy, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is designed to simulate reduced gravity environments, such as Lunar, Martian, or microgravity using a vertical lifting hoist and horizontal motion system. Three directions of motion are provided over a 41 ft x 24 ft x 25 ft tall area. ARGOS supplies a continuous offload of a portion of a person's weight during dynamic motions such as walking, running, and jumping. The ARGOS system tracks the person's motion in the horizontal directions to maintain a vertical offload force directly above the person or payload by measuring the deflection of the cable and adjusting accordingly.

  17. Reducing temperature elevation of robotic bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Arne; Wandel, Jasmin; Zysset, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    This research work aims at reducing temperature elevation of bone drilling. An extensive experimental study was conducted which focused on the investigation of three main measures to reduce the temperature elevation as used in industry: irrigation, interval drilling and drill bit designs. Different external irrigation rates (0 ml/min, 15 ml/min, 30 ml/min), continuously drilled interval lengths (2 mm, 1 mm, 0.5 mm) as well as two drill bit designs were tested. A custom single flute drill bit was designed with a higher rake angle and smaller chisel edge to generate less heat compared to a standard surgical drill bit. A new experimental setup was developed to measure drilling forces and torques as well as the 2D temperature field at any depth using a high resolution thermal camera. The results show that external irrigation is a main factor to reduce temperature elevation due not primarily to its effect on cooling but rather due to the prevention of drill bit clogging. During drilling, the build up of bone material in the drill bit flutes result in excessive temperatures due to an increase in thrust forces and torques. Drilling in intervals allows the removal of bone chips and cleaning of flutes when the drill bit is extracted as well as cooling of the bone in-between intervals which limits the accumulation of heat. However, reducing the length of the drilled interval was found only to be beneficial for temperature reduction using the newly designed drill bit due to the improved cutting geometry. To evaluate possible tissue damage caused by the generated heat increase, cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM43) were calculated and it was found that the combination of small interval length (0.5 mm), high irrigation rate (30 ml/min) and the newly designed drill bit was the only parameter combination which allowed drilling below the time-thermal threshold for tissue damage. In conclusion, an optimized drilling method has been found which might also enable drilling in more

  18. Pretreatment for reducing oxidative reactivity of baseoils

    SciTech Connect

    Dickakian, G.B.

    1989-11-28

    This patent describes a method of producing lubricating oil baseoil having a reduced coking tendency. It comprises: subjecting the baseoil to conditions which accelerate formation of asphaltene coking precursors in the baseoil. The conditions comprising oxidizing the baseoil by sparging the baseoil with an oxidizing gas selected from the group consisting of air, oxygen; ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and mixtures thereof; and removing the asphaltene formed from the baseoil by contacting the baseoil with a liquid antisolvent. The liquid antisolvent being miscible with the baseoil and having a higher insolubility for the asphaltene than the baseoil has for the asphaltene whereby the asphaltene is precipitated.

  19. RHIC ABORT KICKER WITH REDUCED COUPLING IMPEDANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.; DAVINO,D.

    2002-06-02

    Kicker magnets typically represent the most important contributors to the transverse impedance budget of accelerators and storage rings. Methods of reducing the impedance value of the SNS extraction kicker presently under construction and, in view of a future performance upgrade, that of the RHIC abort kicker have been thoroughly studied at this laboratory. In this paper, the investigation of a potential improvement from using ferrite different from the BNL standard CMD5005 is reported. Permeability measurements of several ferrite types have been performed. Measurements on two kicker magnets using CMD5005 and C2050 suggest that the impedance of a magnet without external resistive damping, such as the RHIC abort kicker, would benefit.

  20. Non-food odorants reduce chocolate cravings.

    PubMed

    Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika; Bettany, Sarah

    2012-06-01

    The present study compared the relative effectiveness of simple, commercially available food and non-food olfactory tasks on chocolate craving reduction. Chocolate cravings were induced by a series of coloured photographs and 67 undergraduate women were asked to smell one of three odours (green apple, jasmine, or water). The non-food odorant (jasmine) significantly reduced chocolate cravings relative to both the food and control odorants. Thus simple non-food odorants offer potential scope as a technique for curbing unwanted food cravings.

  1. Reducing stigma and discrimination: Candidate interventions

    PubMed Central

    Thornicroft, Graham; Brohan, Elaine; Kassam, Aliya; Lewis-Holmes, Elanor

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes that stigma in relation to people with mental illness can be understood as a combination of problems of knowledge (ignorance), attitudes (prejudice) and behaviour (discrimination). From a literature review, a series of candidate interventions are identified which may be effective in reducing stigmatisation and discrimination at the following levels: individuals with mental illness and their family members; the workplace; and local, national and international. The strongest evidence for effective interventions at present is for (i) direct social contact with people with mental illness at the individual level, and (ii) social marketing at the population level. PMID:18405393

  2. Meteorological Data Analysis Using MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei; Sheng, V. S.; Wen, XueZhi; Pan, Wubin

    2014-01-01

    In the atmospheric science, the scale of meteorological data is massive and growing rapidly. K-means is a fast and available cluster algorithm which has been used in many fields. However, for the large-scale meteorological data, the traditional K-means algorithm is not capable enough to satisfy the actual application needs efficiently. This paper proposes an improved MK-means algorithm (MK-means) based on MapReduce according to characteristics of large meteorological datasets. The experimental results show that MK-means has more computing ability and scalability. PMID:24790576

  3. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  4. Segmented electrode hall thruster with reduced plume

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2004-08-17

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with segmented electrodes along the channel, which make the acceleration region as localized as possible. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to minimize erosion and arcing. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to produce a substantial reduction in plume divergence. The use of electrodes made of emissive material will reduce the radial potential drop within the channel, further decreasing the plume divergence. Also disclosed is a method of arranging and powering these electrodes so as to provide variable mode operation.

  5. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Comaskey, Brian; Sutton, Steven B.

    1994-01-01

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends.

  6. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.F.; Comaskey, B.; Sutton, S.B.

    1994-04-19

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends. 11 figures.

  7. Can Soft Drink Taxes Reduce Population Weight?

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jason M; Frisvold, David; Tefft, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Soft drink consumption has been hypothesized as one of the major factors in the growing rates of obesity in the US. Nearly two-thirds of all states currently tax soft drinks using excise taxes, sales taxes, or special exemptions to food exemptions from sales taxes to reduce consumption of this product, raise revenue, and improve public health. In this paper, we evaluate the impact of changes in state soft drink taxes on body mass index (BMI), obesity, and overweight. Our results suggest that soft drink taxes influence BMI, but that the impact is small in magnitude.

  8. Lubrication system with tolerance for reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor); McCune, Michael E. (Inventor); Dobek, Louis J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A lubrication system includes an auxiliary lubricant tank 48, a supply conduit 58 extending from a source of lubricant 26 to the auxiliary lubricant tank. A reduced-G bypass line 108 branches from the conduit and enters the auxiliary tank at a first elevation E.sub.1. The system also includes an auxiliary tank discharge conduit 116, a portion of which resides within the tank. The resident portion has an opening 122 at least partially at a second elevation E.sub.2 higher than the first elevation.

  9. Metallization of siderite ore in reducing roasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vusikhis, A. S.; Leont'ev, L. I.; Kudinov, D. Z.; Gulyakov, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of the initial ore and the concentrate of magnetoroasting beneficiation during metallization under the conditions that are close to those for reducing roasting of iron ores in a rotary furnace is studied in terms of works on extending the field of application of Bakal siderites. A difference in the mechanisms of the metallization of crude ore and the roasted concentrate is observed. The metallization of roasted concentrate lumps is more efficient than that of crude siderite ore. In this case, the process ends earlier and can be carried out at higher temperatures (1250-1300°C) without danger of skull formation.

  10. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    DOEpatents

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-01-28

    An apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure is particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives under ground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accomodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure. (10 claims)

  11. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    DOEpatents

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-10-21

    The design is given of an apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives underground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accommodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure.

  12. Improving Realism in Reduced Gravity Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvil, Lauren; Clowers, Kurt; Clark, Timothy; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    Since man was first determined to walk on the moon, simulating the lunar environment became a priority. Providing an accurate reduced gravity environment is crucial for astronaut training and hardware testing. This presentation will follow the development of reduced gravity simulators to a final comparison of environments between the currently used systems. During the Apollo program era, multiple systems were built and tested, with several NASA centers having their own unique device. These systems ranged from marionette-like suspension devices where the subject laid on his side, to pneumatically driven offloading harnesses, to parabolic flights. However, only token comparisons, if any, were made between systems. Parabolic flight allows the entire body to fall at the same rate, giving an excellent simulation of reduced gravity as far as the biomechanics and physical perceptions are concerned. While the effects are accurate, there is limited workspace, limited time, and high cost associated with these tests. With all mechanical offload systems only the parts of the body that are actively offloaded feel any reduced gravity effects. The rest of the body still feels the full effect of gravity. The Partial Gravity System (Pogo) is the current ground-based offload system used to training and testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Pogo is a pneumatic type system that allows for offloaded motion in the z-axis and free movement in the x-axis, but has limited motion in the y-axis. The pneumatic system itself is limited by cylinder stroke length and response time. The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is a next generation groundbased offload system, currently in development, that is based on modern robotic manufacturing lines. This system is projected to provide more z-axis travel and full freedom in both the x and y-axes. Current characterization tests are underway to determine how the ground-based offloading systems perform, how they compare to parabolic

  13. Method and apparatus for reducing mixed waste

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Michael L.; Perez, Jr., Joseph M.; Chapman, Chris C.; Peters, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for in-can waste reduction. The method is mixing waste with combustible material prior to placing the waste into a waste reduction vessel. The combustible portion is ignited, thereby reducing combustible material to ash and non-combustible material to a slag. Further combustion or heating may be used to sinter or melt the ash. The apparatus is a waste reduction vessel having receiving canister connection means on a first end, and a waste/combustible mixture inlet on a second end. An oxygen supply is provided to support combustion of the combustible mixture.

  14. Meteorological data analysis using MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Sheng, V S; Wen, XueZhi; Pan, Wubin

    2014-01-01

    In the atmospheric science, the scale of meteorological data is massive and growing rapidly. K-means is a fast and available cluster algorithm which has been used in many fields. However, for the large-scale meteorological data, the traditional K-means algorithm is not capable enough to satisfy the actual application needs efficiently. This paper proposes an improved MK-means algorithm (MK-means) based on MapReduce according to characteristics of large meteorological datasets. The experimental results show that MK-means has more computing ability and scalability.

  15. Polymer Coatings Reduce Electro-osmosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Snyder, Robert; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton; Van Alstine, James M.

    1989-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) film controls electrostatic potential. Electro-osmosis in quartz or glass chambers reduced or reversed by coating inside surface of chambers with monomacromolecular layers of poly(ethylene glycol). Stable over long times. Electrostatic potential across surface of untreated glass or plastic chamber used in electro-phoresis is negative and attracts cations in aqueous electrolyte. Cations solvated, entrains flow of electrolyte migrating toward cathode. Electro-osmotic flow interferes with desired electrophoresis of particles suspended in electrolyte. Polymer coats nontoxic, transparent, and neutral, advantageous for use in electrophoresis.

  16. Reduced ceria nanofilms from structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Sergey M.; Demiroglu, Ilker; Neyman, Konstantin M.; Bromley, Stefan T.

    2015-02-01

    Experimentally, Ce2O3 films are used to study cerium oxide in its fully or partially reduced state, as present in many applications. We have explored the space of low energy Ce2O3 nanofilms using structure prediction and density functional calculations, yielding more than 30 distinct nanofilm structures. First, our results help to rationalize the roles of thermodynamics and kinetics in the preparation of reduced ceria nanofilms with different bulk crystalline structures (e.g. A-type or bixbyite) depending on the support used. Second, we predict a novel, as yet experimentally unresolved, nanofilm which has a structure that does not correspond to any previously reported bulk A2B3 phase and which has an energetic stability between that of A-type and bixbyite. To assist identification and fabrication of this new Ce2O3 nanofilm we calculate some observable properties and propose supports for its epitaxial growth.Experimentally, Ce2O3 films are used to study cerium oxide in its fully or partially reduced state, as present in many applications. We have explored the space of low energy Ce2O3 nanofilms using structure prediction and density functional calculations, yielding more than 30 distinct nanofilm structures. First, our results help to rationalize the roles of thermodynamics and kinetics in the preparation of reduced ceria nanofilms with different bulk crystalline structures (e.g. A-type or bixbyite) depending on the support used. Second, we predict a novel, as yet experimentally unresolved, nanofilm which has a structure that does not correspond to any previously reported bulk A2B3 phase and which has an energetic stability between that of A-type and bixbyite. To assist identification and fabrication of this new Ce2O3 nanofilm we calculate some observable properties and propose supports for its epitaxial growth. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Graph of IP versus DFT relative energies for nanofilms, GGA + U calculated lattice parameters and

  17. Colchicine reduces myelin thickness and axoplasm volume.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S E; Sloan, H E; Jones, L B; Oakley, B

    1983-06-16

    A Silastic cuff containing either colchicine (1% w/v) or no colchicine was placed around the lingual disorder tympani nerve of the Mongolian gerbil. After 3 days of exposure to colchicine, the mean period of the myelin sheaths was 23% less than the period observed in nerves treated with cuffs lacking colchicine, while the average number of lamellae was unaltered. At the same time colchicine reduced the volume of axoplasm by an average of 19%, an effect which was independent of fiber diameter.

  18. Lubrication System with Tolerance for Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor); McCune, Michael E. (Inventor); Dobek, Louis J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A lubrication system includes an auxiliary lubricant tank 48, a supply conduit 58 extending from a source of lubricant 26 to the auxiliary lubricant tank. A reduced-G bypass line 108 branches from the conduit and enters the auxiliary tank at a first elevation E.sub.1. The system also includes an auxiliary tank discharge conduit 116, a portion of which resides within the tank. The resident portion has an opening 122 at least partially at a second elevation E.sub.2 higher than the first elevation.

  19. Reducing the spectral index in supernatural inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Min; Cheung, Kingman

    2009-04-01

    Supernatural inflation is an attractive model based on just a flat direction with soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms in the framework of supersymmetry. The beauty of the model is that it needs no fine-tuning. However, the prediction of the spectral index is ns≳1, in contrast to experimental data. In this paper, we discuss supernatural inflation with the spectral index reduced to ns=0.96 without any fine-tuning, considering the general feature that a flat direction is lifted by a nonrenormalizable term with an A-term.

  20. Environment, Renewable Energy and Reduced Carbon Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Khazanov, G.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Increased energy security and reduced carbon emissions pose significant challenges for science and technology. However, they also create substantial opportunities for innovative research and development. In this review paper, we highlight some of the key opportunities and mention public policies that are needed to enable the efforts and to maximize the probability of their success. Climate is among the uttermost nonlinear behaviors found around us. As recent studies showed the possible effect of cosmic rays on the Earth's climate, we investigate how complex interactions between the planet and its environment can be responsible for climate anomalies.

  1. Financial incentives for reducing proliferation risks

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, Rachel A.; Hund, Gretchen

    2016-08-15

    This article submitted for publication to the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists explains the possible financial incentives for financial institutions and large integrators to reduce nuclear proliferation risks by including anti-proliferation measures in their due diligence and requiring their suppliers to meet heightened compliance standards. Because manufacturers of dual-use nuclear goods are diverse and numerous outreach is difficult. However, financial institutions and large integrators work with nearly all dual-use manufacturers, making financial institutions and integrators well-positioned to increase awareness of proliferation and trafficking risks throughout the nuclear supply chain

  2. Quantifying data worth toward reducing predictive uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dausman, A.M.; Doherty, J.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a methodology for optimization of environmental data acquisition. Based on the premise that the worth of data increases in proportion to its ability to reduce the uncertainty of key model predictions, the methodology can be used to compare the worth of different data types, gathered at different locations within study areas of arbitrary complexity. The method is applied to a hypothetical nonlinear, variable density numerical model of salt and heat transport. The relative utilities of temperature and concentration measurements at different locations within the model domain are assessed in terms of their ability to reduce the uncertainty associated with predictions of movement of the salt water interface in response to a decrease in fresh water recharge. In order to test the sensitivity of the method to nonlinear model behavior, analyses were repeated for multiple realizations of system properties. Rankings of observation worth were similar for all realizations, indicating robust performance of the methodology when employed in conjunction with a highly nonlinear model. The analysis showed that while concentration and temperature measurements can both aid in the prediction of interface movement, concentration measurements, especially when taken in proximity to the interface at locations where the interface is expected to move, are of greater worth than temperature measurements. Nevertheless, it was also demonstrated that pairs of temperature measurements, taken in strategic locations with respect to the interface, can also lead to more precise predictions of interface movement. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  3. Ontological approach to reduce complexity in polypharmacy.

    PubMed

    Farrish, Susan; Grando, Adela

    2013-01-01

    Patients that are on many medications are often non-compliant due to the complexity of the medication regimen; consequently, a patient that is non-compliant can have poor medical outcomes. Providers are not always aware of the complexity of their patient's prescriptions. Methods have been developed to calculate the complexity for a patient's regimen but there are no widely available automated tools that will do this for a provider. Given that ontologies are known to provide well-principled, sharable, setting-independent and machine-interpretable declarative specification frameworks for modeling and reasoning on biomedical problems, we have explored their use in the context of reducing medication complexity. Previously we proposed an Ontology for modeling drug-related knowledge and a repository for complexity scoring. Here we tested the Ontology with patient data from the University of California San Diego Epic database, and we built a decision aide that computes the complexity and recommends changes to reduce the complexity, if needed.

  4. A Fast Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wan-Yu; Ong, Yew-Soon; Zheng, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a fast and accurate kernel-based supervised algorithm referred to as the Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine (RKELM). In contrast to the work on Support Vector Machine (SVM) or Least Square SVM (LS-SVM), which identifies the support vectors or weight vectors iteratively, the proposed RKELM randomly selects a subset of the available data samples as support vectors (or mapping samples). By avoiding the iterative steps of SVM, significant cost savings in the training process can be readily attained, especially on Big datasets. RKELM is established based on the rigorous proof of universal learning involving reduced kernel-based SLFN. In particular, we prove that RKELM can approximate any nonlinear functions accurately under the condition of support vectors sufficiency. Experimental results on a wide variety of real world small instance size and large instance size applications in the context of binary classification, multi-class problem and regression are then reported to show that RKELM can perform at competitive level of generalized performance as the SVM/LS-SVM at only a fraction of the computational effort incurred.

  5. ISCCP reduced resolution satellite radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W.

    1986-01-01

    The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is the first active project of the World Climate Research Program. It is a multinational data collection project focused on collecting a data set that will improve the ability to predict and/or simulate the radiative effects of clouds on climate. For specified cloud parameters, the goals are to archieve values for 3-hour periods over the whole globe for 5 years at 30 km resolution. The task of collecting and processing radiance data from both geosynchronous and polar orbiting satellites began in July 1983. A diagram was shown illustrating the flow of data from the transmitting satellites to the various receiving institutions that handle it. The various stages of processing were then explained in detail, emphasizing Level B3-normalized, reformatted, reduced raw satellite data. The reduction of data by sampling is an essential step in the flow. By the time the ISCCP data reaches the Global Processing Center at Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), the volume has been reduced by a factor of 1000. The Pilot Climate Data System (PLDS) will provide access to the ISCCP data set. It should prove to be one of the cleanest satellite data sets because it will have been through three filters--that of the operational agency, the Global Processing Center, and the PCDS. The ISCCP data set also includes other correlative data sets delivered in compatible format.

  6. Eye damage control by reduced blue illumination.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Toshihiko; Nakanishi-Ueda, Takako; Yasuhara, Hajime; Koide, Ryohei; Dawson, William W

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that a blue light and ultraviolet cut-off filter (blue filter) could reduce short-wavelength retina/RPE damage threshold by a continuous spectrum source. Sixteen normal eyes of two rhesus monkeys and six cynomolgus monkeys were subjected to macular irradiation of 20, 24, 27.4, 30, 35, 45, 50 and 60 J/cm(2) energy densities. The values of energy density were measured before the blue filter. Lesions were measured before and at 2 and 30 days after irradiation of a 2.8 mm diameter region within the macular arcade. Measures were fundoscopy, fluorescein angiography and long wavelength scanning by the Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph (HRT) unit. The lesions, which were produced, were scored and compared to irradiant energy density of the blue LED (NSPB500S, Nichia, Tokushima, Japan). The exposure at the 20 J/cm(2) produced no detectable result at 2 or 30 days. Exposure at 35 J/cm(2) showed definite lesion production without blue filter. With the filter added there was one indication of minor change. At 60 J/cm(2) there was extensive heavy, enduring damage without the filter and with the filter damage was present but was significantly attenuated. These results strongly support the conclusion that the blue filter attenuation reduces the frequency of damage by exposure. This experimental system is a useful model for normal human eye aging and continuous spectrum environment irradiance.

  7. Methyl Jasmonate Reduces Water Stress in Strawberry.

    PubMed

    Wang

    1999-11-01

    The effect of methyl jasmonate (MJ) on changes of oxygen-scavenging enzyme activities and membrane lipid composition was studied in strawberry leaves under water stress. Under water stress, MJ treatment reduced the increase of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7; POD) activity, maintained higher catalase (EC 1.11.1.6; CAT) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1; SOD) activities, and ascorbic acid content. In addition, MJ treatment reduced transpiration and membrane-lipid peroxidation as expressed by malondialdehyde (MDA) content, lessened the reduction of membrane lipids, glycolipids [monogalactosyl diglyceride (MGDG), digalactosyl diglyceride (DGDG)], and phospholipids [phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylinositol (PI)]. In water-deficit conditions, MJ treatment also alleviated the decline in the degree of fatty acid unsaturation and the ratio of linolenic (18:3) to linoleic acid (18:2). These results indicate that MJ treatment appears to alter the metabolism of strawberry plants rendering the tissue better able to withstand water stress.

  8. Complexities of ascorbate as a reducing agent

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, C.

    1981-12-01

    Ascorbic acid was utilized as a source of reducing equivalents in a multicomponent system that promotes the photoreduction of water. A summary of information on the redox characteristics of the various species generated in the oxidation of ascorbate in water is presented. Structures are given for ascorbic acid, ascorbate ion (HA/sup -/), dehydroascorbic acid, protonated ascorbate radical, and ascorbate radical. Data relevant to protonation equilibria, thermodynamic aspects, and reduction potentials are given as well as studies on the kinetics and stoichiometry of ascorbate oxidation reactions. The results of these studies illustrate some of the complexities of ascorbate as a reductant. Depending upon the pH and the propertes of the oxidant, H/sub 2/A, HA/sup -/, and/or A/sup 2 -/ may be the kinetically significant reducing agent(s). There is a discussion of the reactivities of the ascorbate radical/ascorbate couples toward outer-sphere redox reactions in terms of the driving force for the electron-transfer reaction and the intrinsic electron-transfer barrier associated with each of the reactants; and there is a brief discussion of the kinetics of the reduction of dehydroascorbic acid. (MWF)

  9. REDUCING GONAD IRRADIATION IN PEDIATRIC DIAGNOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Harry A.; Webber, Milo; O'Loughlin, Bernard J.

    1959-01-01

    The greatest danger of carcinogenesis and of genetic damage through diagnostic radiologic procedures is in children, whose smaller bodies are more vulnerable and who have a longer life span in which this damage can be realized. Film badges placed on the gonad area during radiologic studies indicated widely varying degrees of gonad irradiation from similar procedures. These results emphasize the importance of technique in protecting children from unnecessary exposure. Such exposure can be reduced by greater beam filtration, use of higher tube potentials, careful beam collimation and centering, closer coning and shielding of the gonads. A new film tested reduced exposure time by 50 per cent. Further reduction was obtained by high-speed screens. A most important measure is avoidance of unnecessary, repetitious and undiagnostic studies. Fluoroscopy should be avoided if possible. If not, the operator must dark-adapt his eyes, use the smallest possible current, the narrowest beam, and the shortest exposure time. Image intensification promotes these aims. Modern equipment, properly shielded, assures against unsuspected exposure. PMID:13618739

  10. Offset analgesia is reduced in older adults.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Kelly M; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Fillingim, Roger B; Riley, Joseph L

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that aging is associated with dysfunctional changes in pain modulatory capacity, potentially contributing to increased incidence of pain in older adults. However, age-related changes in offset analgesia (offset), a form of temporal pain inhibition, remain poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate age differences in offset analgesia of heat pain in healthy younger and older adults. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying offset, an additional aim of the study was to test offset at 2 anatomical sites with known differences in nociceptor innervation. A total of 25 younger adults and 20 older adults completed 6 offset trials in which the experimental heat stimulus was presented to the volar forearm and glabrous skin of the palm. Each trial consisted of 3 continuous phases: an initial 15-second painful stimulus (T1), a slight increase in temperature from T1 for 5 seconds (T2), and a slight decrease back to the initial testing temperature for 10 seconds (T3). During each trial, subjects rated pain intensity continuously using an electronic visual analogue scale (0-100). Older adults demonstrated reduced offset compared to younger adults when tested on the volar forearm. Interestingly, offset analgesia was nonexistent on the palm for all subjects. The reduced offset found in older adults may reflect an age-related decline in endogenous inhibitory systems. However, although the exact mechanisms underlying offset remain unknown, the absence of offset at the palm suggests that peripheral mechanisms may be involved in initiating this phenomenon.

  11. Listening to music reduces eye movements.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Thomas; Fachner, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Listening to music can change the way that people visually experience the environment, probably as a result of an inwardly directed shift of attention. We investigated whether this attentional shift can be demonstrated by reduced eye movement activity, and if so, whether that reduction depends on absorption. Participants listened to their preferred music, to unknown neutral music, or to no music while viewing a visual stimulus (a picture or a film clip). Preference and absorption were significantly higher for the preferred music than for the unknown music. Participants exhibited longer fixations, fewer saccades, and more blinks when they listened to music than when they sat in silence. However, no differences emerged between the preferred music condition and the neutral music condition. Thus, music significantly reduces eye movement activity, but an attentional shift from the outer to the inner world (i.e., to the emotions and memories evoked by the music) emerged as only one potential explanation. Other explanations, such as a shift of attention from visual to auditory input, are discussed.

  12. The Halophyte Cakile maritima Reduces Phenanthrene Phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Moez; Rabhi, Mokded; El Amrani, Abdelhak; Abdelly, Chedly

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the halophyte plant model Thellungiella salsuginea was more tolerant to phenanthrene (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon: PAH) than its relative glycophyte Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present work, we investigated the potential of another halophyte with higher biomass production, Cakile maritma, to reduce phenanthrene phytotoxicity. Sand was used instead of arable soil with the aim to avoid pollutant degradation by microorganisms or their interaction with the plant. After 6 weeks of treatment by 500 ppm phenanthrene (Phe), stressed plants showed a severe reduction (-73%) in their whole biomass, roots being more affected than leaves and stems. In parallel, Guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activity was increased by 185 and 62% in leaves and roots, respectively. Non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity (assayed by ABTS test) was maintained unchanged in all plant organs. The model halophytic plant Thellungiella salsuginea was used as a biomarker of phenanthrene stress severity and was grown at 0 (control), 125, 250, and 375 ppm. T. salsuginea plants grown on the sand previously contaminated by 500 ppm Phe then treated by C. maritma culture (phytoremediation culture) showed similar biomass production as plants subjected to 125 ppm Phe. This suggests that the phytotoxic effects of phenanthrene were reduced by 75% by the 6-week treatment by C. maritima. Our findings indicate that C. maritima can constitute a potentially good candidate for PAH phytoremediation.

  13. Reducing infection rates after prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Pilatz, Adrian; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw; Weidner, Wolfgang; Johansen, Truls E Bjerklund

    2014-02-01

    Over the years, prostate biopsy has become the gold-standard technique for diagnosing prostate carcinoma. Worldwide, several million prostate biopsies are performed every year, most commonly using the transrectal approach. Preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones has been shown to be effective for reducing infection rates. However, in recent years, an increase in febrile infection rates after transrectal prostate biopsy (from 1% to 4%) has been reported in retrospective and prospective studies. The predominant risk factor for infection seems to be the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in faeces. Patients at risk of fluoroquinolone resistance should receive carefully selected antibiotics at sufficient concentrations to be effective. Targeted prophylaxis after rectal flora swabbing has been shown to be efficacious compared with empirical antibiotic prophylaxis. Several forms of bowel preparations are under investigation, although none have yet been shown to significantly reduce infection rates. Perineal prostate biopsy is currently being evaluated as a strategy for preventing the inoculation of rectal flora, but limited data support this approach at present.

  14. Reduced artery diameters in Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foresta, C; Caretta, N; Palego, P; Ferlin, A; Zuccarello, D; Lenzi, A; Selice, R

    2012-10-01

    Various epidemiological studies in relatively large cohorts of patients with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) described the increased morbidity and mortality in these subjects. Our aim was to study the structure and function of arteries in different districts to investigate in these subjects possible alterations. A total of 92 patients having non-mosaic KS, diagnosed in Centre for Human Reproduction Pathology at the University of Padova, and 50 age-matched healthy male controls were studied. Klinefelter syndrome subjects and controls evaluation included complete medical history, physical examination, measurement of concentrations of the reproductive hormones, lipidic and glycidic metabolism, AR function and sensitivity, ultrasound examinations (diameters, carotid intima-media thickness and brachial flow-mediated dilation) of brachial, common carotid and common femoral artery and abdominal aorta. Klinefelter syndrome patients showed significantly reduced artery diameters in all districts evaluated. On the contrary no statistically significant difference was found in cIMT and brachial FMD values between KS patients and controls. Furthermore, we found no statistically significant correlation of artery diameters with reproductive hormones, metabolic parameters, anthropometric measures and weighted CAG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study finding a reduced artery diameter in several districts in KS patients compared with that of normal male subjects and overlapping to that of female subjects. We have not an explanation for this phenomenon, even if a possible involvement of genes controlling the development of vascular system might be hypothesized, and further research is required to verify this hypothesis.

  15. CHROMagar Orientation Medium Reduces Urine Culture Workload

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, Kanchana; Karlowsky, James A.; Adam, Heather; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe R. S.; Rendina, Assunta; Pang, Paulette; Murray, Brenda-Lee

    2013-01-01

    Microbiology laboratories continually strive to streamline and improve their urine culture algorithms because of the high volumes of urine specimens they receive and the modest numbers of those specimens that are ultimately considered clinically significant. In the current study, we quantitatively measured the impact of the introduction of CHROMagar Orientation (CO) medium into routine use in two hospital laboratories and compared it to conventional culture on blood and MacConkey agars. Based on data extracted from our Laboratory Information System from 2006 to 2011, the use of CO medium resulted in a 28% reduction in workload for additional procedures such as Gram stains, subcultures, identification panels, agglutination tests, and biochemical tests. The average number of workload units (one workload unit equals 1 min of hands-on labor) per urine specimen was significantly reduced (P < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5326 to 1.047) from 2.67 in 2006 (preimplementation of CO medium) to 1.88 in 2011 (postimplementation of CO medium). We conclude that the use of CO medium streamlined the urine culture process and increased bench throughput by reducing both workload and turnaround time in our laboratories. PMID:23363839

  16. Reducing morbidity and mortality among pregnant obese.

    PubMed

    Harper, Ann

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is increasing; in the UK, almost 20% of pregnant women have a body mass index (BMI) of ≥30 kg/m(2). Obese mothers have increased risks of pregnancy complications including miscarriage, congenital anomaly, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, macrosomia, induction of labour, caesarean section, anaesthetic and surgical complications, post-partum haemorrhage, infection and venous thromboembolism. Complications tend to be greater in those with the highest BMIs. In recent triennia, obesity (27-29%) was over-represented in maternal mortality figures. Strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality include calculating BMI at booking visit to identify obese mothers and plan their antenatal care and delivery. This should include nutritional and lifestyle advice, screening for gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia, thromboembolism risk assessment, antenatal anaesthetic review if BMI is ≥ 40 kg/m(2), ensuring availability of robust theatre tables and other equipment and involving senior doctors, especially in the labour ward. Afterwards, continuing weight reduction should be encouraged to reduce future pregnancy and health risks.

  17. Recommendations for reducing ambiguity in written procedures.

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous work instructions (WIs) and operating procedures (OPs) can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. This report outlines some of the sources of ambiguity in written English and describes three recommendations for reducing ambiguity in WIs and OPs. The recommendations are based on commonly used research techniques in the fields of linguistics and cognitive psychology. The first recommendation is to gather empirical data that can be used to improve the recommended word lists that are provided to technical writers. The second recommendation is to have a review in which new WIs and OPs and checked for ambiguities and clarity. The third recommendation is to use self-paced reading time studies to identify any remaining ambiguities before the new WIs and OPs are put into use. If these three steps are followed for new WIs and OPs, the likelihood of human errors related to ambiguity could be greatly reduced.

  18. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr−1 in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr−1 will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment. PMID:27445108

  19. Wavelet frame accelerated reduced support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Ratsch, Matthias; Teschke, Gerd; Romdhani, Sami; Vetter, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, a novel method for reducing the runtime complexity of a support vector machine classifier is presented. The new training algorithm is fast and simple. This is achieved by an over-complete wavelet transform that finds the optimal approximation of the support vectors. The presented derivation shows that the wavelet theory provides an upper bound on the distance between the decision function of the support vector machine and our classifier. The obtained classifier is fast, since a Haar wavelet approximation of the support vectors is used, enabling efficient integral image-based kernel evaluations. This provides a set of cascaded classifiers of increasing complexity for an early rejection of vectors easy to discriminate. This excellent runtime performance is achieved by using a hierarchical evaluation over the number of incorporated and additional over the approximation accuracy of the reduced set vectors. Here, this algorithm is applied to the problem of face detection, but it can also be used for other image-based classifications. The algorithm presented, provides a 530-fold speedup over the support vector machine, enabling face detection at more than 25 fps on a standard PC.

  20. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-07-22

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr(-1) in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr(-1) will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment.

  1. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Bang, Youngsuk; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Jessee, Matthew A.; ...

    2015-08-14

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has greatly improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the usemore » of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This paper extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Finally, numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system.« less

  2. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Youngsuk; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Jessee, Matthew A.; Mertyurek, Ugur

    2015-08-14

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has greatly improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the use of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This paper extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Finally, numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system.

  3. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr‑1 in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr‑1 will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment.

  4. How damage diversification can reduce systemic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of risk diversification on cascading failures in weighted complex networks, where weighted directed links represent exposures between nodes. These weights result from different diversification strategies and their adjustment allows us to reduce systemic risk significantly by topological means. As an example, we contrast a classical exposure diversification (ED) approach with a damage diversification (DD) variant. The latter reduces the loss that the failure of high degree nodes generally inflict to their network neighbors and thus hampers the cascade amplification. To quantify the final cascade size and obtain our results, we develop a branching process approximation taking into account that inflicted losses cannot only depend on properties of the exposed, but also of the failing node. This analytic extension is a natural consequence of the paradigm shift from individual to system safety. To deepen our understanding of the cascade process, we complement this systemic perspective by a mesoscopic one: an analysis of the failure risk of nodes dependent on their degree. Additionally, we ask for the role of these failures in the cascade amplification.

  5. How damage diversification can reduce systemic risk.

    PubMed

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of risk diversification on cascading failures in weighted complex networks, where weighted directed links represent exposures between nodes. These weights result from different diversification strategies and their adjustment allows us to reduce systemic risk significantly by topological means. As an example, we contrast a classical exposure diversification (ED) approach with a damage diversification (DD) variant. The latter reduces the loss that the failure of high degree nodes generally inflict to their network neighbors and thus hampers the cascade amplification. To quantify the final cascade size and obtain our results, we develop a branching process approximation taking into account that inflicted losses cannot only depend on properties of the exposed, but also of the failing node. This analytic extension is a natural consequence of the paradigm shift from individual to system safety. To deepen our understanding of the cascade process, we complement this systemic perspective by a mesoscopic one: an analysis of the failure risk of nodes dependent on their degree. Additionally, we ask for the role of these failures in the cascade amplification.

  6. Carbocisteine reduces the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qing; Bian, Xiao-Lan; Lu, Sheng-Rong; Zhu, Bin; Yu, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic injury induced by oxaliplatin has been reported. Even though agents are available that reduce oxaliplatin-induced hepatocyte toxicity, their mode of action has remained obscure. In the present study, hepatic L02 cells were incubated with different combinations of oxaliplatin and carbocisteine. Significantly increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were found in L02 cells treated with oxaliplatin. Using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) as an indicator of cell viability and flow cytometry, we found that carbocisteine could reverse oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis of L02 cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated that oxaliplatin could induce apoptosis of L02 cells by reducing the Bcl-2/Bim ratio, stimulating the cytochrome c release, and activating caspase-3. All of these effects could be suppressed by carbocisteine. We further found that carbocisteine did not affect the anticancer effect of oxaliplatin against HT-29 cells. This is the first report opening prospects for the clinical use of carbocisteine in the pretreatment against liver injury accompanying the chemotherapy regimen with oxaliplatin.

  7. Action plan to reduce perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    The government of India has set a goal of reducing perinatal mortality from its current rate of 48/1000 to 30-35/1000 by the year 2000. Perinatal deaths result from maternal malnutrition, inadequate prenatal care, complications of delivery, and infections in the postpartum period. Since reductions in perinatal mortality require attention to social, economic, and behavioral factors, as well as improvements in the health care delivery system, a comprehensive strategy is required. Social measures, such as raising the age at marriage to 18 years for females, improving the nutritional status of adolescent girls, reducing the strenuousness of work during pregnancy, improving female literacy, raising women's status in the society and thus in the family, and poverty alleviation programs, would all help eliminate the extent of complications of pregnancy. Measures required to enhance infant survival include improved prenatal care, prenatal tetanus toxoid immunization, use of sterile disposable cord care kits, the provision of mucus extractors and resuscitation materials to birth attendants, the creation of neonatal care units in health facilities, and more efficient referral of high-risk newborns and mothers. Since 90% of births in rural India take place at home priority must be given to training traditional birth attendants in the identification of high risk factors during pregnancy, delivery, and the newborn period.

  8. Spaceflight reduces somatic embryogenesis in orchardgrass (Poaceae)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conger, B. V.; Tomaszewski, Z. Jr; McDaniel, J. K.; Vasilenko, A.

    1998-01-01

    Somatic embryos initiate and develop from single mesophyll cells in in vitro cultured leaf segments of orchard-grass (Dactylis glomerata L.). Segments were plated at time periods ranging from 21 to 0.9 d (21 h) prior to launch on an 11 d spaceflight (STS-64). Using a paired t-test, there was no significant difference in embryogenesis from preplating periods of 14 d and 21 d. However, embryogenesis was reduced by 70% in segments plated 21 h before launch and this treatment was significant at P=0.0001. The initial cell divisions leading to embryo formation would be taking place during flight in this treatment. A higher ratio of anticlinal:periclinal first cell divisions observed in the flight compared to the control tissue suggests that microgravity affects axis determination and embryo polarity at a very early stage. A similar reduction in zygotic embryogenesis would reduce seed formation and have important implications for long-term space flight or colonization where seeds would be needed either for direct consumption or to grow another generation of plants.

  9. Treating Fibrous Insulation to Reduce Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Alfred; Tarkanian, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    A chemical treatment reduces the convective and radiative contributions to the effective thermal conductivity of porous fibrous thermal-insulation tile. The net effect of the treatment is to coat the surfaces of fibers with a mixture of transition-metal oxides (TMOs) without filling the pores. The TMO coats reduce the cross-sectional areas available for convection while absorbing and scattering thermal radiation in the pores, thereby rendering the tile largely opaque to thermal radiation. The treatment involves a sol-gel process: A solution containing a mixture of transition-metal-oxide-precursor salts plus a gelling agent (e.g., tetraethylorthosilicate) is partially cured, then, before it visibly gels, is used to impregnate the tile. The solution in the tile is gelled, then dried, and then the tile is fired to convert the precursor salts to the desired mixed TMO phases. The amounts of the various TMOs ultimately incorporated into the tile can be tailored via the concentrations of salts in the solution, and the impregnation depth can be tailored via the viscosity of the solution and/or the volume of the solution relative to that of the tile. The amounts of the TMOs determine the absorption and scattering spectra.

  10. A Reduced Model for the Magnetorotational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, Ben; Julien, Keith; Knobloch, Edgar

    2008-11-01

    The magnetorotational instability is investigated within the shearing box approximation in the large Elsasser number regime. In this regime, which is of fundamental importance to astrophysical accretion disk theory, shear is the dominant source of energy, but the instability itself requires the presence of a weaker vertical magnetic field. Dissipative effects are weaker still. However, they are sufficiently large to permit a nonlinear feedback mechanism whereby the turbulent stresses generated by the MRI act on and modify the local background shear in the angular velocity profile. To date this response has been omitted in shearing box simulations and is captured by a reduced pde model derived here from the global MHD fluid equations using multiscale asymptotic perturbation theory. Results from numerical simulations of the reduced pde model indicate a linear phase of exponential growth followed by a nonlinear adjustment to algebraic growth and decay in the fluctuating quantities. Remarkably, the velocity and magnetic field correlations associated with these algebraic growth and decay laws conspire to achieve saturation of the angular momentum transport. The inclusion of subdominant ohmic dissipation arrests the algebraic growth of the fluctuations on a longer, dissipative time scale.

  11. Viral Vectors: The Road to Reducing Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    David, Rhiannon M; Doherty, Ann T

    2017-02-01

    Viral vector use in gene therapy has highlighted several safety concerns, including genotoxic events. Generally, vector-mediated genotoxicity results from upregulation of cellular proto-oncogenes via promoter insertion, promoter activation, or gene transcript truncation, with enhancer-mediated activation of nearby genes the primary mechanism reported in gene therapy trials. Vector-mediated genotoxicity can be influenced by virus type, integration target site, and target cell type; different vectors have distinct integration profiles which are cell-specific. Non-viral factors, including patient age, disease, and dose can also influence genotoxic potential, thus the choice of test models and clinical trial populations is important to ensure they are indicative of efficacy and safety. Efforts have been made to develop viral vectors with less risk of insertional mutagenesis, including self-inactivating (SIN) vectors, enhancer-blocking insulators, and microRNA targeting of vectors, although insertional mutagenesis is not completely abrogated. Here we provide an overview of the current understanding of viral vector-mediated genotoxicity risk from factors contributing to viral vector-mediated genotoxicity to efforts made to reduce genotoxicity, and testing strategies required to adequately assess the risk of insertional mutagenesis. It is clear that there is not a 'one size fits all' approach to vector modification for reducing genotoxicity, and addressing these challenges will be a key step in the development of therapies such as CRISPR-Cas9 and delivery of future gene-editing technologies.

  12. [Global strategies to reduce salt intake].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela Landaeta, Karen; Atalah Samur, Eduardo

    2011-06-01

    Currently, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death worldwide. High blood pressure is one of the main risk factors for the development of CVD and blood pressure levels are strongly associated with salt intake. Worldwide, salt consumptions accounts more than two fold the recommended daily intake, which has been described to be associated with CVD and some cancers. Benefits of decrease salt intake (reduction of morbidity, mortality and health related costs) have promoted several public health strategies to reduce salt consumption globally. Among the most commonly used strategies include educational campaigns and the gradual decrease of added salt in processed foods. Chile has joined these initiatives with an agreement between the producers of bread and the Ministry of Health to gradually decrease the concentration of salt in bread nationwide. The purpose of this review is to provide updated information regarding recommended intakes of salt, real intake, adverse effects of excess consumption, profits attributable to a decline and analyze the global strategies to reduce salt intake in the population.

  13. Moving your head reduces perisaccadic compression.

    PubMed

    Matziridi, Maria; Brenner, Eli; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2016-10-01

    Flashes presented around the time of a saccade appear to be closer to the saccade endpoint than they really are. The resulting compression of perceived positions has been found to increase with the amplitude of the saccade. In most studies on perisaccadic compression the head is static, so the eye-in-head movement is equal to the change in gaze. What if moving the head causes part of the change in gaze? Does decreasing the eye-in-head rotation by moving the head decrease the compression of perceived positions? To find out, we asked participants to shift their gaze between two positions, either without moving their head or with the head contributing to the change in gaze. Around the time of the saccades we flashed bars that participants had to localize. When the head contributed to the change in gaze, the duration of the saccade was shorter and compression was reduced. We interpret this reduction in compression as being caused by a reduction in uncertainty about gaze position at the time of the flash. We conclude that moving one's head can reduce the systematic mislocalization of flashes presented around the time of saccades.

  14. Reduced graphite oxide in supercapacitor electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lobato, Belén; Vretenár, Viliam; Kotrusz, Peter; Hulman, Martin; Centeno, Teresa A

    2015-05-15

    The current energy needs have put the focus on highly efficient energy storage systems such as supercapacitors. At present, much attention focuses on graphene-like materials as promising supercapacitor electrodes. Here we show that reduced graphite oxide offers a very interesting potential. Materials obtained by oxidation of natural graphite and subsequent sonication and reduction by hydrazine achieve specific capacitances as high as 170 F/g in H2SO4 and 84F/g in (C2H5)4NBF4/acetonitrile. Although the particle size of the raw graphite has no significant effect on the physico-chemical characteristics of the reduced materials, that exfoliated from smaller particles (<75 μm) result more advantageous for the release of the stored electrical energy. This effect is particularly evident in the aqueous electrolyte. Graphene-like materials may suffer from a drop in their specific surface area upon fabrication of electrodes with features of the existing commercial devices. This should be taken into account for a reliable interpretation of their performance in supercapacitors.

  15. Reduced-order modelling numerical homogenization.

    PubMed

    Abdulle, A; Bai, Y

    2014-08-06

    A general framework to combine numerical homogenization and reduced-order modelling techniques for partial differential equations (PDEs) with multiple scales is described. Numerical homogenization methods are usually efficient to approximate the effective solution of PDEs with multiple scales. However, classical numerical homogenization techniques require the numerical solution of a large number of so-called microproblems to approximate the effective data at selected grid points of the computational domain. Such computations become particularly expensive for high-dimensional, time-dependent or nonlinear problems. In this paper, we explain how numerical homogenization method can benefit from reduced-order modelling techniques that allow one to identify offline and online computational procedures. The effective data are only computed accurately at a carefully selected number of grid points (offline stage) appropriately 'interpolated' in the online stage resulting in an online cost comparable to that of a single-scale solver. The methodology is presented for a class of PDEs with multiple scales, including elliptic, parabolic, wave and nonlinear problems. Numerical examples, including wave propagation in inhomogeneous media and solute transport in unsaturated porous media, illustrate the proposed method.

  16. Reducing arthroplasty costs via vendor contracts

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D. William C.; Beaupré, Lauren A.; Davies, Donna M.; Hessels, Rick

    1999-01-01

    Objective To describe a method of reducing the costs of implants in hip and knee arthroplasty. Design Implant costs were compared before and after the implementation of a 2-year contract with implant vendors, providing increased volume for decreased implant cost. An additional 20% of arthroplasties could be done outside the contract for research or special purposes. Setting A regional health authority involving 2 acute care hospitals. Method Costs were obtained for 942 hip and knee arthroplasties performed in 1993/94 and compared with costs of 1656 hip and knee arthroplasties performed in 1996/97. Outcome Measures Implant cost and number of joint arthroplasty procedures performed. Results A 40% decrease in the cost per implant for primary knee arthroplasty and an 18% decrease in the cost per implant for primary hip arthroplasty were achieved. A rebate, calculated as a percentage of volume used, was received from the vendor to support general orthopedic research and education. A new contract for 3 years has recently been signed with 3 vendors designated as primary vendors for 80% of the volume. Conclusion The vendor-contract economic strategy effectively reduced the cost of hip and knee arthroplasty and may be useful at other centres looking for cost reduction methods that maintain adequate patient care and support clinical research and education. PMID:10593246

  17. Effect of reducing system on capacitive behavior of reduced graphene oxide film: Application for supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Akbi, Hamdane; Yu, Lei; Wang, Bin; Liu, Qi; Wang, Jun; Liu, Jingyuan; Song, Dalei; Sun, Yanbo; Liu, Lianhe

    2015-01-15

    To determine the best chemical reduction of graphene oxide film with hydriodic acid that gives maximum energy and power density, we studied the effect of two reducing systems, hydriodic acid/water and hydriodic acid/acetic acid, on the morphology and electrochemical features of reduced graphene oxide film. Using acetic acid as solvent results in high electrical conductivity (5195 S m{sup −1}), excellent specific capacitance (384 F g{sup −1}) and good cyclic stability (about 98% of its initial response after 4000 cycles). Using water as a solvent, results in an ideal capacitive behavior and excellent cyclic stability (about 6% increase of its initial response after 2100 cycles). - Graphical abstract: The choice of reducing system determines the morphology and structure of the chemically reduced graphene film and, as a result, affects largely the capacitive behavior. - Highlights: • The structure of the graphene film has a pronounced effect on capacitive behavior. • The use of water/HI as reducing system results in an ideal capacitive behavior. • The use of acetic acid/HI as reducing system results in a high specific capacitance.

  18. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    DOE PAGES

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operationsmore » or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.« less

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    -2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Perillyl alcohol, Perphenazine 4-aminobutyrate, PeviPRO/breast cancer, PF-03814735, PHA-739358, Pimecrolimus, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Prasterone, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Prucalopride, PRX-08066; rAAV2-TNFR:Fc, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranibizumab, rCD154-CLL, Retapamulin, RTS,S/SBAS2, rV-PSA-TRICOM/rF-PSA-TRICOM; SG-2000, Sinecatechins, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, SP-1640, Strontium malonate, Succinobucol, Sunitinib malate; Taxus, Teduglutide, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telbivudine, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Tocilizumab; Ustekinumab; V-5 Immunitor, Voriconazole, Vorinostat; Xience V, XL-184, XL-647, XL-765; Y-39983, Zibotentan.

  20. Increased taxon sampling greatly reduces phylogenetic error.

    PubMed

    Zwickl, Derrick J; Hillis, David M

    2002-08-01

    Several authors have argued recently that extensive taxon sampling has a positive and important effect on the accuracy of phylogenetic estimates. However, other authors have argued that there is little benefit of extensive taxon sampling, and so phylogenetic problems can or should be reduced to a few exemplar taxa as a means of reducing the computational complexity of the phylogenetic analysis. In this paper we examined five aspects of study design that may have led to these different perspectives. First, we considered the measurement of phylogenetic error across a wide range of taxon sample sizes, and conclude that the expected error based on randomly selecting trees (which varies by taxon sample size) must be considered in evaluating error in studies of the effects of taxon sampling. Second, we addressed the scope of the phylogenetic problems defined by different samples of taxa, and argue that phylogenetic scope needs to be considered in evaluating the importance of taxon-sampling strategies. Third, we examined the claim that fast and simple tree searches are as effective as more thorough searches at finding near-optimal trees that minimize error. We show that a more complete search of tree space reduces phylogenetic error, especially as the taxon sample size increases. Fourth, we examined the effects of simple versus complex simulation models on taxonomic sampling studies. Although benefits of taxon sampling are apparent for all models, data generated under more complex models of evolution produce higher overall levels of error and show greater positive effects of increased taxon sampling. Fifth, we asked if different phylogenetic optimality criteria show different effects of taxon sampling. Although we found strong differences in effectiveness of different optimality criteria as a function of taxon sample size, increased taxon sampling improved the results from all the common optimality criteria. Nonetheless, the method that showed the lowest overall

  1. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  2. Reducing Methyl Halide Emissions from Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. R.; Xuan, R.; Ashworth, D.; Luo, L.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization and soil transformation are major pathways by which pesticides dissipate from treated agricultural soil. Methyl bromide (MeBr) emissions from agricultural fumigation can lead to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. This has led to a gradual phase-out of MeBr and replacement by other halogenated chemicals. However, MeBr continues to be widely used under Critical Use Exemptions and development of emission-reduction strategies remains important. Several methods to reduce emissions of MeBr, and other halogenated soil fumigants, have been developed and are currently being tested under field conditions. In this paper, several approaches for reducing fumigant emissions to the atmosphere are described and include the use of virtually impermeable films, the creation of reactive soil barriers and a recently developed reactive film which was designed to limit loss of MeBr from soil without adding any material to the soil surface. Ammonium thiosulfate (ATS) was used to create a reactive layer. For a reactive soil layer, ATS was sprayed on the soil surface or incorporated to a depth of 1-2 cm. For the reactive film, ATS was placed between two layers of plastic film. The lower plastic layer was a high-density polyethylene film (HDPE), which is readily permeable to MeBr. The upper layer was a virtually impermeable film (VIF) and limits MeBr diffusion. MeBr diffusion and transformation through VIFs and reactive layers were tested in laboratory and field experiments. Although ineffective when dry, when sufficient water was present, reactive barriers substantially depleted halogenated fumigants, including MeBr. When ATS was activated in laboratory experiments, MeBr half-life was about 9.0 h (20C) in a reactive film barrier, and half life decreased with increasing temperature. When the soil was covered with VIF, less than 10% of the added MeBr diffused through the film and the remainder was transformed within the soil. This compares with 60 to 90% emission

  3. Technology for reducing aircraft engine pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Kempke, E. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Programs have been initiated by NASA to develop and demonstrate advanced technology for reducing aircraft gas turbine and piston engine pollutant emissions. These programs encompass engines currently in use for a wide variety of aircraft from widebody-jets to general aviation. Emission goals for these programs are consistent with the established EPA standards. Full-scale engine demonstrations of the most promising pollutant reduction techniques are planned within the next three years. Preliminary tests of advanced technology gas turbine engine combustors indicate that significant reductions in all major pollutant emissions should be attainable in present generation aircraft engines without adverse effects on fuel consumption. Fundamental-type programs are yielding results which indicate that future generation gas turbine aircraft engines may be able to utilize extremely low pollutant emission combustion systems.

  4. Reducing the uncertainty in subtropical cloud feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Timothy A.; Norris, Joel R.

    2016-03-01

    Large uncertainty remains on how subtropical clouds will respond to anthropogenic climate change and therefore whether they will act as a positive feedback that amplifies global warming or negative feedback that dampens global warming by altering Earth's energy budget. Here we reduce this uncertainty using an observationally constrained formulation of the response of subtropical clouds to greenhouse forcing. The observed interannual sensitivity of cloud solar reflection to varying meteorological conditions suggests that increasing sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability in the future climate will have largely canceling effects on subtropical cloudiness, overall leading to a weak positive shortwave cloud feedback (0.4 ± 0.9 W m-2 K-1). The uncertainty of this observationally based approximation of the cloud feedback is narrower than the intermodel spread of the feedback produced by climate models. Subtropical cloud changes will therefore complement positive cloud feedbacks identified by previous work, suggesting that future global cloud changes will amplify global warming.

  5. Reduced truck fuel consumption through aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L. L.; Saltzman, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Full-scale fuel consumption and drag tests were performed on a conventional cab-over-engine tractor-trailer combination and a version of the same vehicle with significant forebody modifications. The modified configuration had greatly increased radii on all front corners and edges of the tractor and a smooth fairing of the modified tractor top and sides extending to the trailer. Concurrent highway testing of the two configurations showed that the modified design used 20% to 24% less fuel than the baseline configuration at 88.5 km/hr (55 mph) with near-calm wind conditions. Coastdown test results showed that the modified configuration reduced the drag coefficient by 0.43 from the baseline value of 1.17 at 88.5 km/hr (55 mph) in calm wind conditions.

  6. Method of data communications with reduced latency

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A; Parker, Jeffrey J

    2013-11-05

    Data communications with reduced latency, including: writing, by a producer, a descriptor and message data into at least two descriptor slots of a descriptor buffer, the descriptor buffer comprising allocated computer memory segmented into descriptor slots, each descriptor slot having a fixed size, the descriptor buffer having a header pointer that identifies a next descriptor slot to be processed by a DMA controller, the descriptor buffer having a tail pointer that identifies a descriptor slot for entry of a next descriptor in the descriptor buffer; recording, by the producer, in the descriptor a value signifying that message data has been written into descriptor slots; and setting, by the producer, in dependence upon the recorded value, a tail pointer to point to a next open descriptor slot.

  7. Care bundles reduce readmissions for COPD.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Healther; Tooley, Cathy; Nicholls, Carol; Lindsey-Halls, Anna

    In 2011, the respiratory nursing team at the James Paget University Hospital Foundation Trust were considering introducing a discharge care bundle for patients admitted with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. At the same time, the trust was asking for applications for Commissioning for Quality and Innovation schemes (CQUINs). These are locally agreed packages of quality improvement goals and indicators, which, if achieved in total, enable the provider to earn its full CQUIN payment. A CQUIN scheme should address the three domains of quality, safety and effectiveness, patient experience and also show innovation. This article discusses how the care bundle was introduced and how, over a 12-month period, it showed tangible results in improving the care pathway for COPD patients as well as reducing readmissions and saving a significant amount of money.

  8. Reducing falls in a care home

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Rosie

    2017-01-01

    Care home residents are 3 times more likely to fall than their community dwelling peers and 10 times more likely to sustain a significant injury as a result. 2 A project commenced at a care home in Aberdeen with the aim of reducing the number of falls by 20% by 30st April 2016 using the model for improvement. Qualitative data was gathered to establish staff belief about falls and their level of knowledge& understanding about falls risks and how to manage these. This informed the training which was delivered and iterative testing commenced with the introduction of the Lanarkshire Falls Risk/Intervention tool – where the multifactorial nature of a resident's falls risks are explored and specific actions to manage these are identified and implemented. Failure to meet PDSA predictions about sharing risk reducing actions with staff and length of time to complete the tool prompted a focus on communication and the processes whereby the tool is completed. “Teach back” was employed to highlight communication difficulties and ultimately the introduction of Huddles out improved the flow of information about residents and informed the Falls Risk/Intervention tool. 5 PDSAs were completed and within them multiple tests of change. The improvement shift came following a root cause analysis of the nature & cause of one resident's falls and applying the tool & communication processes. The average falls rate fell from 49 per 1000 occupied bed days to 23.6 and was sustained because of the attention to the importance of communication. The aim was achieved with a 36.6% reduction in Falls rate. Care home residents are 3 times more likely to fall than their community dwelling peers and 10 times more likely to sustain a significant injury as a result. 2 A project commenced at a care home in Aberdeen with the aim of reducing the number of falls by 20% by 30th April 2016 using the model for improvement. Qualitative data was gathered to establish staff belief about falls and their level

  9. Example of reduced turbulence during thunderstorm outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B.M.

    1996-06-01

    This research note describes the effects of a gust front passage resulting from a thunderstorm outflow on wind, turbulence, and other basic meteorological variables in northern Mew Mexico. The purpose of this note is to explain how a thunderstorm outflow can greatly reduce horizontal and vertical turbulence and produce strong winds, thereby promoting the rapid transport of elevated pollutant concentrations. Another goal is to demonstrate the usefulness of a sodar in combination with a tower to provide data for dispersion and transport calculations during an emergency response. Hopefully, this note will motivate other researchers to analyze and document the effects of thunderstorms on turbulence and dispersion by routine monitoring or by experimentation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Salt-finger convection under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to differential diffusion rates. Because of the fact that the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number (the ratio of thermal diffusivity to solute diffusivity) salt-finger convection can be generated at very much reduced gravity levels. This effect may be of importance in the directional solidification of binary alloys carried out in space. The transport of solute and heat by salt-finger convection at microgravity conditions is considered; instability arising from surface tension gradients, the Marangoni instability, is discussed, and the possible consequences of combined salt-finger and Marangoni instability are considered.

  11. Fisheries management to reduce contaminant consumption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stow, Craig A.; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Eby, Lisa A.; Jackson, Leland J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper concludes that contaminants in Lake Michigan fishes are likely to remain above detectable levels for some time. Some interest groups have called for measures ranging from additional effluent controls to a ban on the industrial use of chlorine. Such measures, however well intended, are likely to have little impact on many of the contaminants of primary concern. PCBs, in particular, are largely the legacy of past activities and are not likely to be substantially affected by additional regulation. The authors review several options for reducing human exposure to PCBs, using relatively simple fisheries manipulations, although they do not propose that these measures are the ultimate solution to the contaminant problem. Of the options presented, the most promising is the replacement of lake trout with less-contaminated species, such as rainbow trout.

  12. Strategies to reduce pulmonary complications after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weijs, Teus J; Ruurda, Jelle P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard AP; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Luyer, Misha DP

    2013-01-01

    Esophagectomy, the surgical removal of all or part of the esophagus, is a surgical procedure that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary complications are an especially important postoperative problem. Therefore, many perioperative strategies to prevent pulmonary complications after esophagectomy have been investigated and introduced in daily clinical practice. Here, we review these strategies, including improvement of patient performance and technical advances such as minimally invasive surgery that have been implemented in recent years. Furthermore, interventions such as methylprednisolone, neutrophil elastase inhibitor and epidural analgesia, which have been shown to reduce pulmonary complications, are discussed. Benefits of the commonly applied routine nasogastric decompression, delay of oral intake and prophylactic mechanical ventilation are unclear, and many of these strategies are also evaluated here. Finally, we will discuss recent insights and new developments aimed to improve pulmonary outcomes after esophagectomy. PMID:24151374

  13. A relatively reduced Hadean continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhi; Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    Among the physical and chemical parameters used to characterize the Earth, oxidation state, as reflected by its prevailing oxygen fugacity (fO2), is a particularly important one. It controls many physicochemical properties and geological processes of the Earth's different reservoirs, and affects the partitioning of elements between coexisting phases and the speciation of degassed volatiles in melts. In the past decades, numerous studies have been conducted to document the evolution of mantle and atmospheric oxidation state with time and in particular the possible transition from an early reduced state to the present oxidized conditions. So far, it has been established that the oxidation state of the uppermost mantle is within ±2 log units of the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer, probably back to ~4.4 billion years ago (Ga) based on trace-elements studies of mantle-derived komatiites, kimberlites, basalts, volcanics and zircons, and that the O2 levels of atmosphere were initially low and rose markedly ~2.3 Ga known as the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), progressively reaching its present oxidation state of ~10 log units above QFM. In contrast, the secular evolution of oxidation state of the continental crust, an important boundary separating the underlying upper mantle from the surrounding atmosphere and buffering the exchanges and interactions between the Earth's interior and exterior, has rarely been addressed, although the presence of evolved crustal materials on the Earth can be traced back to ~4.4 Ga, e.g. by detrital zircons. Zircon is a common accessory mineral in nature, occurring in a wide variety of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, and is almost ubiquitous in crustal rocks. The physical and chemical durability of zircons makes them widely used in geochemical studies in terms of trace-elements, isotopes, ages and melt/mineral inclusions; in particular, zircons are persistent under most crustal conditions and can survive many secondary

  14. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  15. Reducing miner absenteeism. Information Circular/1989

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.H.; Clingan, M.R.; Randolph, R.F.

    1988-05-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has prepared the report on strategies for maintaining high job attendance among underground coal miners because high absenteeism is a threat to miners' safety and seriously hampers productivity. A substantial number of research studies on the effectiveness of various strategies for reducing absenteeism among the employees of nonmining industries have been reported in the literature. These strategies have aimed at improving job attendance through one or more of the following: improving employment procedures, overcoming problems that adversely affect one's ability to attend work, and increasing miners' motivation to attend work. Many of these strategies appear applicable to the mining industry and are reviewed in the first half of the report. The second half of the report describes how one could develop and implement a program for maintaining high attendance at underground coal mines.

  16. Reducing home heating and cooling costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

  17. Reducing firearm violence: a research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Janet; Wiebe, Douglas J; Richmond, Therese S; Beam, Kristen; Berman, Alan L; Branas, Charles C; Cheney, Rose A; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Firman, John; Fishbein, Martin; Hargarten, Stephen; Hemenway, David; Jeffcoat, Robert; Kennedy, David; Koper, Christopher S; Lemaire, Jean; Miller, Matthew; Roth, Jeffrey A; Schwab, C William; Spitzer, Robert; Teret, Stephen; Vernick, Jon; Webster, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In the United States, firearms are involved in tens of thousands of deaths and injuries each year. The magnitude of this problem prompted the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to issue a report in 2004 detailing the strengths and limitations of existing research on the relationship between firearms and violence. In response, a multidisciplinary group of experts in the field of firearms and violence formed the National Research Collaborative on Firearm Violence. The Collaborative met for 2 days in June 2005 to (1) critically review the main findings of the NAS report and (2) define a research agenda that could fill research and data gaps and inform policy that reduces gun-related crime, deaths and injuries. This article summarizes the Collaborative's conclusions and identifies priorities for research and funding. PMID:17446246

  18. Engineering reduced evolutionary potential for synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Renda, Brian A; Hammerling, Michael J; Barrick, Jeffrey E

    2014-07-01

    The field of synthetic biology seeks to engineer reliable and predictable behaviors in organisms from collections of standardized genetic parts. However, unlike other types of machines, genetically encoded biological systems are prone to changes in their designed sequences due to mutations in their DNA sequences after these devices are constructed and deployed. Thus, biological engineering efforts can be confounded by undesired evolution that rapidly breaks the functions of parts and systems, particularly when they are costly to the host cell to maintain. Here, we explain the fundamental properties that determine the evolvability of biological systems. Then, we use this framework to review current efforts to engineer the DNA sequences that encode synthetic biology devices and the genomes of their microbial hosts to reduce their ability to evolve and therefore increase their genetic reliability so that they maintain their intended functions over longer timescales.

  19. How an Elastic Body Reduces its Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas; Shelley, Michael; Zhang, Jun

    2002-11-01

    Recent studies from bio-fluid dynamics have quantified dramatic decreases in fluid drag on flexible organic structures (including tree leaves and underwater plants) as they deform in high-Reynolds-number flows. Our simple experiment considers the role of elastic bending in the steady case. Using a thin glass fiber wetted into a planar soap-film flow, we identify a transition in flow speed beyond which the fluid forces dominate the elastic response, and yield large deformations that greatly reduce drag. We construct a free-streamline model coupling fluid and elastic forces and solve it numerically. Self-similarity emerges on a shrinking length scale, resulting in a transition from the U^2 growth of rigid bodies to a U^4/3 law as the fiber exhibits large deformation. The theory gives a good rationalization of the experimental data in terms of a single non-dimensional parameter.

  20. Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.

    2010-08-11

    The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

  1. Organizing Questions for Reduced-Gravity Flammability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Fletcher

    2004-01-01

    A team consisting of of the Microgravity Flight Project Scientists for solid flammability experiments has been reviewing and prioritizing a set of organizing questions for fire prevention (material flammability).In particular the team has been charged with determining:What experiments must be conducted to best answer these questions, and can some of the quest ions be answered using existing/planned hardware or experimental concepts?Is the NASA STD 6001, Test 1 configuration conservative or non-conservative in assessing material flammability in reduced gravity?NASA ST D 6001, Test 1 is an upward flammability test, considered the most stringent test in normal gravity. A material that passes this test would most likely not burn in a quiescent microgravity environment.A forced ignition and spread test is described.

  2. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  3. Can mass media interventions reduce child mortality?

    PubMed

    Head, Roy; Murray, Joanna; Sarrassat, Sophie; Snell, Will; Meda, Nicolas; Ouedraogo, Moctar; Deboise, Laurent; Cousens, Simon

    2015-07-04

    Many people recognise that mass media is important in promoting public health but there have been few attempts to measure how important. An ongoing trial in Burkina Faso (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01517230) is an attempt to bring together the very different worlds of mass media and epidemiology: to measure rigorously, using a cluster-randomised design, how many lives mass media can save in a low-income country, and at what cost. Application of the Lives Saved Tool predicts that saturation-based media campaigns could reduce child mortality by 10-20%, at a cost per disability-adjusted life-year that is as low as any existing health intervention. In this Viewpoint we explain the scientific reasoning behind the trial, while stressing the importance of the media methodology used.

  4. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  5. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Mark M [Charlotte, NC; True, Bradford G [Charlotte, NC

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  6. Reducing US Oil Dependence Using Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayoub, Fadi; Arnaout, Georges M.

    2011-01-01

    People across the world are addicted to oil; as a result, the instability of oil prices and the shortage of oil reserves have influenced human behaviors and global businesses. Today, the United States makes up only 5% of the global population but consumes 25% of the. world total energy. Most of this energy is generated from fossil fuels in the form of electricity. The contribution of this paper is to examine the possibilities of replacing fossil fuel with renewable energies to generate electricity as well as to examine other methods to reduce oil and gas consumption. We propose a system dynamics model in an attempt to predict the future US dependence on fossil fuels by using renewable energy resources such as, nuclear, wind, solar, and hydro powers. Based on the findings of our model, the study expects to provide insights towards promising solutions of the oil dependency problem.

  7. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-03-07

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular flat front face comprising a plurality of load bearing struts of a predetermined size attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides and top thereof, a pair of pliable opposing flat sheets having an outside edge portion attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides thereof and an upper edge with a predetermined curve; the opposing flat sheets being bent and attached to the struts to form effective curved airfoil shapes, and a top pliable flat sheet disposed adjacent the top of the flat front face and having predetermined curved side edges, which, when the top sheet is bent and attached to the struts to form an effective curved airfoil shape, mate with the curved upper edges of the opposing sheets to complete the aerodynamic device.

  8. Urban warming reduces aboveground carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Emily; Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dunn, Robert R; Frank, Steven D

    2016-10-12

    A substantial amount of global carbon is stored in mature trees. However, no experiments to date test how warming affects mature tree carbon storage. Using a unique, citywide, factorial experiment, we investigated how warming and insect herbivory affected physiological function and carbon sequestration (carbon stored per year) of mature trees. Urban warming increased herbivorous arthropod abundance on trees, but these herbivores had negligible effects on tree carbon sequestration. Instead, urban warming was associated with an estimated 12% loss of carbon sequestration, in part because photosynthesis was reduced at hotter sites. Ecosystem service assessments that do not consider urban conditions may overestimate urban tree carbon storage. Because urban and global warming are becoming more intense, our results suggest that urban trees will sequester even less carbon in the future.

  9. Advanced technology for reducing aircraft engine pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Combustor research programs are described whose purpose is to demonstrate significantly lower exhaust emission levels. The proposed EPA regulations covering the allowable levels of emissions will require a major technological effort if these levels are to be met by 1979. Pollution reduction technology is being pursued by NASA through a combination of in-house research, contracted progams, and university grants. In-house research with the swirl-can modular combustor and the double-annular combustor has demonstrated significant reduction in the level of NO(x) emissions. The work is continuing in an attempt to further reduce these levels by improvements in module design and in air-fuel scheduling. Research on the reduction of idle emissions has included the conversion of conventional duplex fuel nozzles to air-assisted nozzles and exploration of the potential improvements possible with fuel staging and variable combustor geometry.

  10. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes.

  11. Reducing empiricism in malaria vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Vasee S; Kieny, Marie Paule

    2010-03-01

    Gains in the control of malaria and the promising progress of a malaria vaccine that is partly efficacious do not reduce the need for a high-efficacy vaccine in the longer term. Evidence supports the feasibility of developing a highly efficacious malaria vaccine. However, design of candidate malaria vaccines remains empirical and is necessarily based on many unproven assumptions because much of the knowledge needed to design vaccines and to predict efficacy is not available. Data to inform key questions of vaccine science might allow the design of vaccines to progress to a less empirical stage, for example through availability of assay results associated with vaccine efficacy. We discuss six strategic gaps in knowledge that contribute to empiricism in the design of vaccines. Comparative evaluation, assay and model standardisation, greater sharing of information, collaboration and coordination between groups, and rigorous evaluation of existing datasets are steps that can be taken to enable reductions in empiricism over time.

  12. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN; Van Berkel, Gary [Clinton, TN

    2011-08-23

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  13. Aligning parallel arrays to reduce communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Robert; Gilbert, John R.; Chatterjee, Siddhartha

    1994-01-01

    Axis and stride alignment is an important optimization in compiling data-parallel programs for distributed-memory machines. We previously developed an optimal algorithm for aligning array expressions. Here, we examine alignment for more general program graphs. We show that optimal alignment is NP-complete in this setting, so we study heuristic methods. This paper makes two contributions. First, we show how local graph transformations can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. Second, we give a heuristic that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. Our algorithms have been implemented; we present experimental results showing their effect on the performance of some example programs running on the CM-5.

  14. Using LEDs to reduce energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eweni, Chukwuebuka E.

    The most popularly used light bulb in homes is the incandescent. It is also the least energy efficient. The filament in the bulb is so thin that it causes resistance in the electricity, which in turn causes the electricity's energy to form heat. This causes the incandescent to waste a lot of energy forming heat rather than forming the light. It uses 15 lumens per watt of input power. A recorded MATLAB demonstration showcased LED versatility and how it can be used by an Arduino UNO board. The objective of this thesis is to showcase how LEDs can reduce energy consumption through the use of an Arduino UNO board and MATLAB and to discuss the applications of LED. LED will be the future of lighting homes and will eventually completely incandescent bulbs when companies begin to make the necessary improvements to the LED.

  15. Reducing long-term reservoir performance uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1988-04-01

    Reservoir performance is one of the key issues that have to be addressed before going ahead with the development of a geothermal field. In order to select the type and size of the power plant and design other surface installations, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the production wells and of the produced fluids, and to predict the changes over a 10--30 year period. This is not a straightforward task, as in most cases the calculations have to be made on the basis of data collected before significant fluid volumes have been extracted from the reservoir. The paper describes the methodology used in predicting the long-term performance of hydrothermal systems, as well as DOE/GTD-sponsored research aimed at reducing the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Sex reduces genetic variation: a multidisciplinary review.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Root; Heng, Henry H Q

    2011-04-01

    For over a century, the paradigm has been that sex invariably increases genetic variation, despite many renowned biologists asserting that sex decreases most genetic variation. Sex is usually perceived as the source of additive genetic variance that drives eukaryotic evolution vis-à-vis adaptation and Fisher's fundamental theorem. However, evidence for sex decreasing genetic variation appears in ecology, paleontology, population genetics, and cancer biology. The common thread among many of these disciplines is that sex acts like a coarse filter, weeding out major changes, such as chromosomal rearrangements (that are almost always deleterious), but letting minor variation, such as changes at the nucleotide or gene level (that are often neutral), flow through the sexual sieve. Sex acts as a constraint on genomic and epigenetic variation, thereby limiting adaptive evolution. The diverse reasons for sex reducing genetic variation (especially at the genome level) and slowing down evolution may provide a sufficient benefit to offset the famed costs of sex.

  17. Composite binders for concrete with reduced permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R.; Yushin, A.

    2016-02-01

    Composite binder consisting of cement (55%), acid fly ash (40%) and limestone (5%) has been designed. It is obtained by co-milling to a specific surface of 550 kg/m2, it has an activity of 77.3 MPa and can produce a more dense cement stone structure. Integrated study revealed that the concrete on the composite binder basis provides an effective diffusion coefficient D. So we can conclude that the concrete layer protects buildings from toxic effects of expanded polystyrene. Low water absorption of the material (2.5% by weight) is due to the structure of its cement stone pore space. Besides lime powder prevents the penetration of moisture, reduces water saturation of the coverage that has a positive effect on useful life period. It also explains rather low water vapor permeability of the material - 0.021 mg/(m- hour-Pa).

  18. Quantum State Tomography via Reduced Density Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Tao; Lu, Dawei; Klassen, Joel; Yu, Nengkun; Ji, Zhengfeng; Chen, Jianxin; Ma, Xian; Long, Guilu; Zeng, Bei; Laflamme, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Quantum state tomography via local measurements is an efficient tool for characterizing quantum states. However, it requires that the original global state be uniquely determined (UD) by its local reduced density matrices (RDMs). In this work, we demonstrate for the first time a class of states that are UD by their RDMs under the assumption that the global state is pure, but fail to be UD in the absence of that assumption. This discovery allows us to classify quantum states according to their UD properties, with the requirement that each class be treated distinctly in the practice of simplifying quantum state tomography. Additionally, we experimentally test the feasibility and stability of performing quantum state tomography via the measurement of local RDMs for each class. These theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the advantages and possible pitfalls of quantum state tomography with local measurements.

  19. Do psychological interventions reduce preoperative anxiety?

    PubMed

    Renouf, Tessa; Leary, Alison; Wiseman, Theresa

    The systematic review investigates whether, during preoperative assessments, nurse-delivered psychological interventions reduce anxiety levels preoperatively for patients undergoing elective surgery. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria for data extraction and in-depth critiquing. Of these, two were discarded due to lack of validity, while the remaining studies were organised thematically in a narrative synthesis, generating two principal results: patients' preoperative anxieties were lowered by nurse-delivered general preoperative psychological interventions; and patients valued individualised preoperative interventions delivered by nurses. However, the single oncology study in the review showed an elevation in preoperative anxiety, regardless of intervention, and highlights the need for more research in this under-reviewed area. In the meantime, the authors believe that service improvements should be implemented to ensure that, where possible, psychological preoperative interventions are individualised.

  20. Automated monitoring to reduce electron microscope downtime.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Matthias J; Resch, Guenter P

    2009-10-01

    High-end transmission electron microscopes are complex and sensitive instruments. Failure of one of the external supplies, malfunction of the microscope hardware or maloperation are typical reasons for subsystems to fail. Especially if undiscovered for a longer period of time, this can cause unnecessary downtime, compromising user access and increasing operating costs. Utilizing the software introduced in this article ("MoniTEM"), we have succeeded to reduce downtime of an FEI Tecnai Polara by coupling constant monitoring of critical subsystems with automatic, remote feedback to the system supervisor, ensuring immediate problem solving. The software described here is freely available from http://www.imba.oeaw.ac.at/monitem/ and can be readily adapted for use with other FEI transmission electron microscopes.