Science.gov

Sample records for reducing technological risk

  1. Accident Precursor Analysis and Management: Reducing Technological Risk Through Diligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phimister, James R. (Editor); Bier, Vicki M. (Editor); Kunreuther, Howard C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Almost every year there is at least one technological disaster that highlights the challenge of managing technological risk. On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia and her crew were lost during reentry into the atmosphere. In the summer of 2003, there was a blackout that left millions of people in the northeast United States without electricity. Forensic analyses, congressional hearings, investigations by scientific boards and panels, and journalistic and academic research have yielded a wealth of information about the events that led up to each disaster, and questions have arisen. Why were the events that led to the accident not recognized as harbingers? Why were risk-reducing steps not taken? This line of questioning is based on the assumption that signals before an accident can and should be recognized. To examine the validity of this assumption, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) undertook the Accident Precursors Project in February 2003. The project was overseen by a committee of experts from the safety and risk-sciences communities. Rather than examining a single accident or incident, the committee decided to investigate how different organizations anticipate and assess the likelihood of accidents from accident precursors. The project culminated in a workshop held in Washington, D.C., in July 2003. This report includes the papers presented at the workshop, as well as findings and recommendations based on the workshop results and committee discussions. The papers describe precursor strategies in aviation, the chemical industry, health care, nuclear power and security operations. In addition to current practices, they also address some areas for future research.

  2. Reducing the Risks of Military Aircrew Training through Simulation Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Douglas R.

    1982-01-01

    This discussion of the types of risks associated with military aircrew training and the varieties of training devices and techniques currently utilized to minimize those risks includes an examination of flight trainer simulators and complex mission simulators for coping with military aviation hazards. Four references are listed. (Author/MER)

  3. Reducing security risk using data loss prevention technology.

    PubMed

    Beeskow, John

    2015-11-01

    Data loss/leakage protection (DLP) technology seeks to improve data security by answering three fundamental questions: > Where are confidential data stored? > Who is accessing the information? > How are data being handled?

  4. Pathogen Inactivation Technologies: The Advent of Pathogen-Reduced Blood Components to Reduce Blood Safety Risk.

    PubMed

    Devine, Dana V; Schubert, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Pathogen inactivation technologies represent a shift in blood safety from a reactive approach to a proactive protective strategy. Commercially available technologies demonstrate effective killing of most viruses, bacteria, and parasites and are capable of inactivating passenger leukocytes in blood products. The use of pathogen inactivation causes a decrease in the parameters of products that can be readily measured in laboratory assays but that do not seem to cause any alteration in hemostatic effect of plasma or platelet transfusions. Effort needs to be made to further develop these technologies so that the negative quality impact is ameliorated without reducing the pathogen inactivation effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TEDCHNOLOGY VERIFICATION TO REDUCE THE RISK OF USING INNOVATIVE COATING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The papeer discusses the use of environmental technology verification (ETV) to reduce the risk of using innovative coating technologies. It presents key concepts of the ETV program, reviews the scope of the ETV program's coatings and coating equipment pilot (CCEP) and its use of ...

  6. Priorities for technology development and policy to reduce the risk from radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Ruth Ann

    2010-06-01

    The Standing Committee on International Security of Radioactive and Nuclear Materials in the Nonproliferation and Arms Control Division conducted its fourth annual workshop in February 2010 on Reducing the Risk from Radioactive and Nuclear Materials. This workshop examined new technologies in real-time tracking of radioactive materials, new risks and policy issues in transportation security, the best practices and challenges found in addressing illicit radioactive materials trafficking, industry leadership in reducing proliferation risk, and verification of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, Article VI. Technology gaps, policy gaps, and prioritization for addressing the identified gaps were discussed. Participants included academia, policy makers, radioactive materials users, physical security and safeguards specialists, and vendors of radioactive sources and transportation services. This paper summarizes the results of this workshop with the recommendations and calls to action for the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) membership community.

  7. Early Warning System for reducing disaster risk: the technological platform DEWETRA for the Republic of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabo, Marco; Molini, Luca; Kostic, Bojan; Campanella, Paolo; Stevanovic, Slavimir

    2015-04-01

    Disaster risk reduction has long been recognized for its role in mitigating the negative environmental, social and economic impacts of natural hazards. Flood Early Warning System is a disaster risk reduction measure based on the capacities of institutions to observe and predict extreme hydro-meteorological events and to disseminate timely and meaningful warning information; it is furthermore based on the capacities of individuals, communities and organizations to prepare and to act appropriately and in sufficient time to reduce the possibility of harm or loss. An operational definition of an Early Warning System has been suggested by ISDR - UN Office for DRR [15 January 2009]: "EWS is the set of capacities needed to generate and disseminate timely and meaningful warning information to enable individuals, communities and organizations threatened by a hazard to prepare and to act appropriately and in sufficient time to reduce the possibility of harm or loss.". ISDR continues by commenting that a people-centered early warning system necessarily comprises four key elements: 1-knowledge of the risks; 2-monitoring, analysis and forecasting of the hazards; 3-communication or dissemination of alerts and warnings; and 4- local capabilities to respond to the warnings received." The technological platform DEWETRA supports the strengthening of the first three key elements of EWS suggested by ISDR definition, hence to improve the capacities to build real-time risk scenarios and to inform and warn the population in advance The technological platform DEWETRA has been implemented for the Republic of Serbia. DEWETRA is a real time-integrate system that supports decision makers for risk forecasting and monitoring and for distributing warnings to end-user and to the general public. The system is based on the rapid availability of different data that helps to establish up-to-date and reliable risk scenarios. The integration of all relevant data for risk management significantly

  8. Leveraging costs and reducing risk in the development of optics manufacturing technological thrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Joe

    1992-01-01

    The Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) program has exerted a strong and lasting influence on the U.S. defense industrial base for more than 25 years. The defense industrial base can be described as the aggregate ability to provide the manufacturing technology, research, development, and resources necessary to produce defense material. The Army's MANTECH program is designed to develop manufacturing thrusts (such as optics) that will result in the development of new and improved manufacturing processes. The Joint Logistics Commanders' assessment of the precision optics industrial base emphasized the need to modernize optics fabrication techniques and equipment. As a result of the study, the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association (APOMA), the Department of the Army, and several academic institutions have collaborated to establish and support the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM) at the University of Rochester. Through this successful collaboration of knowledge and resources, participants are able to leverage and reduce the cost, risk, and difficulty of developing new automated optics manufacturing systems and supporting technologies. The optics manufacturing thrust is now in its second year and support from industrial, academic, and government participants continues to increase.

  9. Reducing risk of fire in the operating room using coblation technology.

    PubMed

    Matt, Bruce H; Cottee, Lauren A

    2010-09-01

    Operating room fires are rare, but when they occur, they have potentially devastating and deadly consequences. Coblation (ArthroCare ENT, Austin, TX) technology has become popular for many otolaryngology procedures and seems to have the advantage of reducing fire risk. Our objective was to test the Coblator II on various flammable materials commonly found and used in the operating room. We placed the active Coblator II at the highest settings, in direct contact with flammable operating room equipment and materials, and made the environment even more volatile by introducing oxygen into the testing environment. We found that the Coblator II did not produce fire when in contact with any of the materials. This finding is very important in otolaryngology because airway procedures often take place in environments with high concentrations of oxygen. Our testing shows that the Coblator II is safe to use in these types of environments. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... incidence could be reduced if people changed their sexual behaviors. Our research has demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV risk-associated sexual behaviors among African American adolescents and adults." Spring 2008 ...

  11. Observations Concerning the National Task Force on Educational Technology Report: "Reducing the Risk to the Nation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salser, Carl

    1987-01-01

    Presents one educator's reaction to the National Task Force on Educational Technology's report. Provides responses to certain passages from the report's eight sections. Emphasizes that educators should look for ways to implement existing information-age technology in addition to more traditional forms of education technologies. (TW)

  12. Information Technology Investment: Agencies Can Improve Performance, Reduce Costs, and Minimize Risks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    strengthened management of three fundamental assets: personnel, knowledge and information, and capital property/fixed assets. Investments in information ... technology (IT) can have a dramatic impact on all three of these assets. However, an IT project’s impact comes from how the investment is selected, designed

  13. Management technologies can reduce the environmental risk of pesticides in agricultural production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pesticide use in agriculture, the potential risk posed by pesticides when they are transported beyond the intended target, and their effects on human and environmental health have been of public concern for many years. We utilized 5 years of field data, quantifying pesticide transport with runoff fr...

  14. Remote monitoring of blood pressure to reduce the risk of preeclampsia related complications with an innovative use of mobile technology.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, R; Grewal, A; Castleman, J S

    2016-10-01

    Assess suitability of remote self-monitoring of blood pressure with an innovative use of technology in detecting raised blood pressure in pregnancy. Assess ease of use and safety of the newly developed kit which included a Bluetooth enabled blood pressure machine and an android based mobile phone. The phone was modified to have only one application in it which showed the blood pressure readings with a traffic light system. The study was a proof of concept for wider use of the kit. We provided 50 women who were admitted with the kit. We assessed ease of use of the blood pressure machine and accuracy of readings including remote transfer to a computer. Technological feasibility and acceptance by women. The technology provides accurate data and visual cues including safe remote transfer instantaneously. 90% of the women agreed that the Kit was simple to use and 78% would prefer this model of testing at home. In a relatively resource rich setting the machine can reduce the number of patient visits for women who are at risk for preeclampsia. In resource poor settings it helps to triage resources to women who need it the most. It also is a valuable tool for research. Studies of the Kit in both developed and developing world will be needed to show reduction in perinatal and maternal morbidity or mortality secondary to preeclampsia. Copyright © 2016 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spaceflight - Reducing the Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K. M.

    Space systems are uniquely characterized by: the large amounts of energy which they contain and control; limited failure tolerance and performance margins; complex system design; an extremely dynamic operational regime; hostile operating environments; and to some extent by the application of immature technologies. As a consequence, the level of safety risk to which astronauts are currently exposed is approximately the same as that applicable for aviation test pilots. This level of risk would be clearly unacceptable for popular commercial human spaceflight to be successful. Furthermore the risk of loss or failure for automated spaceflight is presently at a similar, if not higher, level than that associated with human spaceflight. This paper compares some current approaches to spaceflight dependability (safety and reliability) with that of the commercial aviation industry, and makes proposals for a practical and cost effective risk reduction and certification process which could be applied to both human and automatic spaceflight.

  16. Reducing risk in smokers.

    PubMed

    Westmaas, J Lee; Brandon, Thomas H

    2004-07-01

    Tobacco smoking is a leading cause of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. For smokers who want to quit, nicotine replacement therapy and bupropion are frequently recommended. Currently, disagreement surrounds the extent of risk reduction from quitting, the consequences of the change of nicotine replacement therapy to over-the-counter status, and the safety and efficacy of new tobacco products being marketed by tobacco companies. This article reviews the current evidence relevant to these and other developments in smoking interventions and describes the most effective strategies that smokers can use to reduce their risk. Although it may take approximately 10 to 30 years of abstinence for former smokers' risk of lung cancer to reach that of never smokers, quitting at any time is substantially less risky than continuing to smoke. Quitting after diagnosis also prolongs survival. Bupropion and nicotine replacement therapy are effective pharmacotherapies, doubling quit rates compared with self-quitting. However, many users of over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy are using it inappropriately. More research is needed to determine the long-term health effects of modified tobacco products and their efficacy in helping smokers quit. Switching to "low tar" filter cigarettes to reduce lung cancer risk, however, is clearly ineffective. The most effective interventions for quitting continue to be a combination of behavioral and pharmacologic approaches. Health care practitioners should encourage all smokers to attempt cessation and emphasize pharmacotherapy as an important aid to quitting. Professionals who educate patients on the appropriate use of pharmacotherapy and follow-up on smokers' attempts to quit will help reduce the societal burden and personal risks of smoking.

  17. Technology to Reduce Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Ester; Choudhary, Pratik

    2015-07-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major barrier toward achieving glycemic targets and is associated with significant morbidity (both psychological and physical) and mortality. This article reviews technological strategies, from simple to more advanced technologies, which may help prevent or mitigate exposure to hypoglycemia. More efficient insulin delivery systems, bolus advisor calculators, data downloads providing information on glucose trends, continuous glucose monitoring with alarms warning of hypoglycemia, predictive algorithms, and finally closed loop insulin delivery systems are reviewed. The building blocks to correct use and interpretation of this range of available technology require patient education and appropriate patient selection.

  18. Technology to Reduce Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Ester; Choudhary, Pratik

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major barrier toward achieving glycemic targets and is associated with significant morbidity (both psychological and physical) and mortality. This article reviews technological strategies, from simple to more advanced technologies, which may help prevent or mitigate exposure to hypoglycemia. More efficient insulin delivery systems, bolus advisor calculators, data downloads providing information on glucose trends, continuous glucose monitoring with alarms warning of hypoglycemia, predictive algorithms, and finally closed loop insulin delivery systems are reviewed. The building blocks to correct use and interpretation of this range of available technology require patient education and appropriate patient selection. PMID:25883167

  19. Conventional Reduced Risk Pesticide Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find out about the Conventional Reduced Risk Pesticide Program, which expedites the review and regulatory decision-making process of conventional pesticides that pose less risk to human health and the environment than existing conventional alternatives.

  20. Reducing Rock Climbing Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    1998-01-01

    Provides checklists that can be used as risk-management tools to evaluate rock-climbing programs: developing goals, policies, and procedures; inspecting the climbing environment; maintaining and inspecting equipment; protecting participants; and managing staff (hiring, training, retraining, and evaluating) and campers (experience level, needs, and…

  1. Reducing Iatrogenic Risks

    PubMed Central

    Ely, E. Wesley; Speroff, Theodore; Pun, Brenda T.; Boehm, Leanne; Dittus, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    ICUs are experiencing an epidemic of patients with acute brain dysfunction (delirium) and weakness, both associated with increased mortality and long-term disability. These conditions are commonly acquired in the ICU and are often initiated or exacerbated by sedation and ventilation decisions and management. Despite > 10 years of evidence revealing the hazards of delirium, the quality chasm between current and ideal processes of care continues to exist. Monitoring of delirium and sedation levels remains inconsistent. In addition, sedation, ventilation, and physical therapy practices proven successful at reducing the frequency and severity of adverse outcomes are not routinely practiced. In this article, we advocate for the adoption and implementation of a standard bundle of ICU measures with great potential to reduce the burden of ICU-acquired delirium and weakness. Individual components of this bundle are evidence based and can help standardize communication, improve interdisciplinary care, reduce mortality, and improve cognitive and functional outcomes. We refer to this as the “ABCDE bundle,” for awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring, and exercise/early mobility. This evidence-based bundle of practices will build a bridge across the current quality chasm from the “front end” to the “back end” of critical care and toward improved cognitive and functional outcomes for ICU survivors. PMID:21051398

  2. Use of Dual Electromagnetic Radiation Technology to Reduce Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes Risk on Cooked and Packaged Meat Products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogenic bacteria including Salmonella and Listeria can potentially contaminate ready-to-eat meats. These bacteria compromise the safety of our food supply. The objective of this research was to develop and test new low temperature pasteurization technology for packaged or thermally sensitive food...

  3. Microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with triamcinolone improved the therapeutic effect on Chinese patients with hypertrophic scar and reduced the risk of tissue atrophy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shui; Li, Hengjin

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to assess the value of microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with triamcinolone for the therapy of Chinese patients with hypertrophic scar. A total of 120 participants with hypertrophic scars were enrolled in the current study. Participants were divided into two groups based on sex, and then randomly and evenly divided into four groups (Groups A, B, C, and D). Participants in Group A received microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with triamcinolone. Participants in Group B received microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with normal saline. Participants in Groups C and D received triamcinolone (40 and 10 mg/mL) injected directly into scar. Experienced physicians evaluated the condition of scars according to the Vancouver Scar Scale 1 month before and after the therapy. There was no difference in age, sex, area, height and location of scars, and Vancouver Scar Scale scores before the therapy between any groups (P>0.05 for all). Vancouver Scar Scale scores after the therapy were significantly lower than those before the therapy in all groups (P<0.05 for all). Vancouver Scar Scale scores after the therapy in Group A were significantly lower than those after the therapy in Groups B and C (P<0.05 for all). Vancouver Scar Scale scores after the therapy in Group B were significantly higher than those after the therapy in Group C (P<0.05 for all) and similar to those after the therapy in Group D (P>0.05 for all). Incidences of tissue atrophy after the therapy were significantly lower in Groups A and B than in Group C (P<0.05 for all) and similar among Groups A, B, and D (P>0.05 for all). Microplasma radiofrequency technology combined with triamcinolone improved the therapeutic effect on Chinese patients with hypertrophic scar and reduced the risk of tissue atrophy compared with the use of either microplasma radiofrequency technology or triamcinolone injection alone.

  4. RISK AND TECHNOLOGY REVIEW (RTR) RISK ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A compilation of risk assessment methodologies for review by EPA's Science Advisory Board, including 2 case study assessments; one for Petroleum Refineries and one for Portland Cement Manufacturing. To obtain peer review and approval of the analytical approach to be used in the conduct of risk assessments in support of EPA's Risk and Technology Review (RTR) program.

  5. Breastfeeding Reduces Childhood Obesity Risks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Collins, Candice; Ratliff, Melanie; Xie, Bin; Wang, Youfa

    2017-06-01

    The present study examined the effects of breastfeeding and its duration on the development of childhood obesity from 24 months through grade 6. U.S. longitudinal data collected from 1234 children were analyzed using logistic regression models and generalized estimating equation (GEE). Child height and weight were measured six times at ages of 24 months, 36 months, 54 months, grade 1, grade 3, and grade 6. During the early 1990s, prevalence of breastfeeding was low in the United States, 60% and 48% at 1 and 6 months, respectively. Nonsmoking, white, married mothers with both parents in the household, and with income above the poverty line, were more likely to breastfeed at 1 month of age of their babies. Obesity rate of the children increased with age from 24 months to grade 6. Logistic regression showed that breastfeeding at month 1 was associated with 53% (odds ratio [OR]: 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.30-0.73) and 47% (OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.36-0.78) decreased risks for childhood obesity at grades 1 and 6, respectively. GEE analysis showed that breastfeeding at 1 month reduced risk for childhood obesity by 36% (95% CI: 0.47-0.88) from ages 24 months through grade 6. Regarding breastfeeding duration, more than 6 months (vs. never) was associated with a decreased risk for childhood obesity by 42% (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.36-0.94). Breastfeeding at 1 month and more than 6 months reduced the risk of childhood obesity. Rate of breastfeeding was low in the United States in the 1990s, which may have had long-term implications on children.

  6. Risk Management in Biologics Technology Transfer.

    PubMed

    Toso, Robert; Tsang, Jonathan; Xie, Jasmina; Hohwald, Stephen; Bain, David; Willison-Parry, Derek

    Technology transfer of biological products is a complex process that is important for product commercialization. To achieve a successful technology transfer, the risks that arise from changes throughout the project must be managed. Iterative risk analysis and mitigation tools can be used to both evaluate and reduce risk. The technology transfer stage gate model is used as an example tool to help manage risks derived from both designed process change and unplanned changes that arise due to unforeseen circumstances. The strategy of risk assessment for a change can be tailored to the type of change. In addition, a cross-functional team and centralized documentation helps maximize risk management efficiency to achieve a successful technology transfer. © PDA, Inc. 2016.

  7. Parafricta Bootees and Undergarments to Reduce Skin Breakdown in People with or at Risk of Pressure Ulcers: A NICE Medical Technologies Guidance.

    PubMed

    Meads, Catherine; Glover, Matthew; Dimmock, Paul; Pokhrel, Subhash

    2016-12-01

    As part of the development of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Medical Technologies Guidance on Parafricta Bootees and Undergarments to reduce skin breakdown in people with, or at risk of, pressure ulcers, the manufacturer (APA Parafricta Ltd) submitted clinical and economic evidence, which was critically appraised by an External Assessment Centre (EAC) and subsequently used by the Medical Technologies Advisory Committee (MTAC) to develop recommendations for further research. The University of Birmingham and Brunel University, acting as a consortium, were commissioned to act as the EAC, independently appraising the submission. This article is an overview of the original evidence submitted, the EAC's findings and the final NICE guidance. Very little comparative evidence was submitted to demonstrate the effectiveness of Parafricta Bootees or Undergarments. The sponsor submitted a simple cost analysis to estimate the costs of using Parafricta in addition to current practice-in comparison with current practice alone-in hospital and community settings separately. The analysis took a National Health Service (NHS) perspective. The basis of the analysis was a previously published comparative study, which showed no statistical difference in average lengths of stay between patients who wore Parafricta Undergarments and Bootees, and those who did not. The economic model incorporated the costs of Parafricta but assumed shorter lengths of stay with Parafricta. The sponsor concluded that Parafricta was cost saving relative to the comparators. The EAC made amendments to the sponsor's analysis to correct for errors and to reflect alternative assumptions. Parafricta remained cost saving in most analyses, and the savings per prevalent case ranged from £757 in the hospital model to £3455 in the community model. All analyses were severely limited by the available data on effectiveness-in particular, a lack of good-quality comparative studies.

  8. The holy grail of soil metal contamination site assessment: reducing risk and increasing confidence of decision making using infield portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouillon, M.; Taylor, M. P.; Dong, C.

    2016-12-01

    This research assesses the advantages of integrating field portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) technology for reducing the risk and increase confidence of decision making for metal-contaminated site assessments. Metal-contaminated sites are often highly heterogeneous and require a high sampling density to accurately characterize the distribution and concentration of contaminants. The current regulatory assessment approaches rely on a small number of samples processed using standard wet-chemistry methods. In New South Wales (NSW), Australia, the current notification trigger for characterizing metal-contaminated sites require the upper 95% confidence interval of the site mean to equal or exceed the relevant guidelines. The method's low `minimum' sampling requirements can misclassify sites due to the heterogeneous nature of soil contamination, leading to inaccurate decision making. To address this issue, we propose integrating infield pXRF analysis with the established sampling method to overcome sampling limitations. This approach increases the minimum sampling resolution and reduces the 95% CI of the site mean. Infield pXRF analysis at contamination hotspots enhances sample resolution efficiently and without the need to return to the site. In this study, the current and proposed pXRF site assessment methods are compared at five heterogeneous metal-contaminated sites by analysing the spatial distribution of contaminants, 95% confidence intervals of site means, and the sampling and analysis uncertainty associated with each method. Finally, an analysis of costs associated with both the current and proposed methods is presented to demonstrate the advantages of incorporating pXRF into metal-contaminated site assessments. The data shows that pXRF integrated site assessments allows for faster, cost-efficient, characterisation of metal-contaminated sites with greater confidence for decision making.

  9. Risk Management for Human Support Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    jones, Harry

    2005-01-01

    NASA requires continuous risk management for all programs and projects. The risk management process identifies risks, analyzes their impact, prioritizes them, develops and carries out plans to mitigate or accept them, tracks risks and mitigation plans, and communicates and documents risk information. Project risk management is driven by the project goal and is performed by the entire team. Risk management begins early in the formulation phase with initial risk identification and development of a risk management plan and continues throughout the project life cycle. This paper describes the risk management approach that is suggested for use in NASA's Human Support Technology Development. The first step in risk management is to identify the detailed technical and programmatic risks specific to a project. Each individual risk should be described in detail. The identified risks are summarized in a complete risk list. Risk analysis provides estimates of the likelihood and the qualitative impact of a risk. The likelihood and impact of the risk are used to define its priority location in the risk matrix. The approaches for responding to risk are either to mitigate it by eliminating or reducing the effect or likelihood of a risk, to accept it with a documented rationale and contingency plan, or to research or monitor the risk, The Human Support Technology Development program includes many projects with independently achievable goals. Each project must do independent risk management, considering all its risks together and trading them against performance, budget, and schedule. Since the program can succeed even if some projects fail, the program risk has a complex dependence on the individual project risks.

  10. Risk Management for Human Support Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    jones, Harry

    2005-01-01

    NASA requires continuous risk management for all programs and projects. The risk management process identifies risks, analyzes their impact, prioritizes them, develops and carries out plans to mitigate or accept them, tracks risks and mitigation plans, and communicates and documents risk information. Project risk management is driven by the project goal and is performed by the entire team. Risk management begins early in the formulation phase with initial risk identification and development of a risk management plan and continues throughout the project life cycle. This paper describes the risk management approach that is suggested for use in NASA's Human Support Technology Development. The first step in risk management is to identify the detailed technical and programmatic risks specific to a project. Each individual risk should be described in detail. The identified risks are summarized in a complete risk list. Risk analysis provides estimates of the likelihood and the qualitative impact of a risk. The likelihood and impact of the risk are used to define its priority location in the risk matrix. The approaches for responding to risk are either to mitigate it by eliminating or reducing the effect or likelihood of a risk, to accept it with a documented rationale and contingency plan, or to research or monitor the risk, The Human Support Technology Development program includes many projects with independently achievable goals. Each project must do independent risk management, considering all its risks together and trading them against performance, budget, and schedule. Since the program can succeed even if some projects fail, the program risk has a complex dependence on the individual project risks.

  11. Integrating Technology to Reduce Fratricide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    shortly after the Gulf War, John D. Morrocco, a writer for Aviation Week & Space Tech- nology, lauded the performance of the high technology systems...the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command to determine the Army�s need for a battlefield IFF system for tanks. In June, 1982, J.R. Sculley , the As

  12. Managing information technology security risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David

    2003-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) Security Risk Management is a critical task for the organization to protect against the loss of confidentiality, integrity and availability of IT resources. As systems bgecome more complex and diverse and and attacks from intrusions and malicious content increase, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage IT security risk. This paper describes a two-pronged approach in addressing IT security risk and risk management in the organization: 1) an institutional enterprise appraoch, and 2) a project life cycle approach.

  13. Managing information technology security risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David

    2003-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) Security Risk Management is a critical task for the organization to protect against the loss of confidentiality, integrity and availability of IT resources. As systems bgecome more complex and diverse and and attacks from intrusions and malicious content increase, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage IT security risk. This paper describes a two-pronged approach in addressing IT security risk and risk management in the organization: 1) an institutional enterprise appraoch, and 2) a project life cycle approach.

  14. Reducing Risks of Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Clinical Updates Practice Management Coding Health Info Technology Professional Liability Managing Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality ...

  15. Using Technology To Reduce Public School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John A.; Brown, Robert C.; Ledford, Bruce R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes technology-driven strategies for reducing school violence: (1) commitment communicated by newsletters and cable television; (2) elimination of weapons using metal detectors, surveillance cameras, breathalyzers, student passes, alarm systems, and school emergency plans; (3) two-way communications and low technology; (4) educational…

  16. REDUCING CHILDREN'S RISK FROM LEAD IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for reducing risk from elevated levels of soil Pb involves removal, covering, or dilution by mixing with uncontaminated soil. Believing that in situ remediation techniques are viable alternatives, the EPA=s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) ...

  17. Collaborative planning to reduce risk

    Treesearch

    Victoria Sturtevant; Pamela Jakes

    2008-01-01

    Wildland fire knows no political boundaries, nor should efforts to address its risk. Collaboration is not a new idea; many examples of natural resource managers and community groups working together can be found in forest management planning, watershed restoration, and wildland fire suppression (Sturtevant et al. 2005). Direction from a number of sources has urged...

  18. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  19. Leveraging Technology to Reduce Patient Transaction Costs.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Medical practices are under significant pressure to provide superior customer service in an environment of declining or flat reimbursement. The solution for many practices involves the integration of a variety of third-party technologies that conveniently interface with one's electronic practice management and medical records systems. Typically, the applications allow the practice to reduce the cost of each patient interaction. Drilling down to quantify the cost of each individual patient interaction helps to determine the practicality of implementation.

  20. Multiscale wolf predation risk for elk: does migration reduce risk?

    PubMed

    Hebblewhite, Mark; Merrill, Evelyn H

    2007-05-01

    While migration is hypothesized to reduce predation risk for ungulates, there have been few direct empirical tests of this hypothesis. Furthermore, few studies examined multiscale predation risk avoidance by migrant ungulates, yet recent research reveals that predator-prey interactions occur at multiple scales. We test the predation risk reduction hypothesis at two spatial scales in a partially migratory elk (Cervus elaphus) population by comparing exposure of migrant and resident elk to wolf (Canis lupus) predation risk. We used GPS and VHF telemetry data collected from 67 migrant and 44 resident elk over the summers of 2002-2004 in and adjacent to Banff National Park (BNP), Canada. We used wolf GPS and VHF telemetry data to estimate predation risk as a function of the relative probability of wolf occurrence weighted by a spatial density model that adjusted for varying pack sizes. We validated the predation risk model using independent data on wolf-killed elk, and showed that combining wolf presence and spatial density best predicted where an elk was likely to be killed. Predation risk on summer ranges of migrant elk was reduced by 70% compared to within resident elk summer ranges. Because wolves avoided areas near high human activity, however, fine-scale selection by resident elk for areas near high human activity reduced their predation risk exposure to only 15% higher than migrants, a difference significant in only one of three summers. Finally, during actual migration, elk were exposed to 1.7 times more predation risk than residents, even though migration was rapid. Our results support the hypothesis that large-scale migrations can reduce predation. However, we also show that where small-scale spatial variation in predation risk exists, nonmigratory elk may equally reduce predation risk as effectively as migrants under some circumstances.

  1. Does Metformin Reduce Cancer Risks? Methodologic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Golozar, Asieh; Liu, Shuiqing; Lin, Joeseph A; Peairs, Kimberly; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    The substantial burden of cancer and diabetes and the association between the two conditions has been a motivation for researchers to look for targeted strategies that can simultaneously affect both diseases and reduce their overlapping burden. In the absence of randomized clinical trials, researchers have taken advantage of the availability and richness of administrative databases and electronic medical records to investigate the effects of drugs on cancer risk among diabetic individuals. The majority of these studies suggest that metformin could potentially reduce cancer risk. However, the validity of this purported reduction in cancer risk is limited by several methodological flaws either in the study design or in the analysis. Whether metformin use decreases cancer risk relies heavily on the availability of valid data sources with complete information on confounders, accurate assessment of drug use, appropriate study design, and robust analytical techniques. The majority of the observational studies assessing the association between metformin and cancer risk suffer from methodological shortcomings and efforts to address these issues have been incomplete. Future investigations on the association between metformin and cancer risk should clearly address the methodological issues due to confounding by indication, prevalent user bias, and time-related biases. Although the proposed strategies do not guarantee a bias-free estimate for the association between metformin and cancer, they will reduce synthesis of and reporting of erroneous results.

  2. Technology for reducing aircraft engine pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Kempke, E. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Programs have been initiated by NASA to develop and demonstrate advanced technology for reducing aircraft gas turbine and piston engine pollutant emissions. These programs encompass engines currently in use for a wide variety of aircraft from widebody-jets to general aviation. Emission goals for these programs are consistent with the established EPA standards. Full-scale engine demonstrations of the most promising pollutant reduction techniques are planned within the next three years. Preliminary tests of advanced technology gas turbine engine combustors indicate that significant reductions in all major pollutant emissions should be attainable in present generation aircraft engines without adverse effects on fuel consumption. Fundamental-type programs are yielding results which indicate that future generation gas turbine aircraft engines may be able to utilize extremely low pollutant emission combustion systems.

  3. Advanced technology for reducing aircraft engine pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Combustor research programs are described whose purpose is to demonstrate significantly lower exhaust emission levels. The proposed EPA regulations covering the allowable levels of emissions will require a major technological effort if these levels are to be met by 1979. Pollution reduction technology is being pursued by NASA through a combination of in-house research, contracted progams, and university grants. In-house research with the swirl-can modular combustor and the double-annular combustor has demonstrated significant reduction in the level of NO(x) emissions. The work is continuing in an attempt to further reduce these levels by improvements in module design and in air-fuel scheduling. Research on the reduction of idle emissions has included the conversion of conventional duplex fuel nozzles to air-assisted nozzles and exploration of the potential improvements possible with fuel staging and variable combustor geometry.

  4. Quality of care, risk management, and technology in obstetrics to reduce hospital-based maternal mortality in Senegal and Mali (QUARITE): a cluster-randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Alexandre; Fournier, Pierre; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Traoré, Mamadou; Haddad, Slim; Fraser, William D

    2013-07-13

    Maternal mortality is higher in west Africa than in most industrialised countries, so the development and validation of effective interventions is essential. We did a trial to assess the effect of a multifaceted intervention to promote maternity death reviews and onsite training in emergency obstetric care in referral hospitals with high maternal mortality rates in Senegal and Mali. We did a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial, with hospitals as the units of randomisation and patients as the unit of analysis. 46 public first-level and second-level referral hospitals with more than 800 deliveries a year were enrolled, stratified by country and hospital type, and randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n=23) or the control group with no external intervention (n=23). All women who delivered in each of the participating facilities during the baseline and post-intervention periods were included. The intervention, implemented over a period of 2 years at the hospital level, consisted of an initial interactive workshop and quarterly educational clinically-oriented and evidence-based outreach visits focused on maternal death reviews and best practices implementation. The primary outcome was reduction of risk of hospital-based mortality. Analysis was by intention-to-treat and relied on the generalised estimating equations extension of the logistic regression model to account for clustering of women within hospitals. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number ISRCTN46950658. 191,167 patients who delivered in the participating hospitals were analysed (95,931 in the intervention groups and 95,236 in the control groups). Overall, mortality reduction in intervention hospitals was significantly higher than in control hospitals (odds ratio [OR] 0·85, 95% CI 0·73-0·98, p=0·0299), but this effect was limited to capital and district hospitals, which mainly acted as first-level referral hospitals in this trial. There was no effect in second

  5. Financial incentives for reducing proliferation risks

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, Rachel A.; Hund, Gretchen

    2016-08-15

    This article submitted for publication to the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists explains the possible financial incentives for financial institutions and large integrators to reduce nuclear proliferation risks by including anti-proliferation measures in their due diligence and requiring their suppliers to meet heightened compliance standards. Because manufacturers of dual-use nuclear goods are diverse and numerous outreach is difficult. However, financial institutions and large integrators work with nearly all dual-use manufacturers, making financial institutions and integrators well-positioned to increase awareness of proliferation and trafficking risks throughout the nuclear supply chain

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Snowberg, David; Weber, Jochem

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade, the global marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry has suffered a number of serious technological and commercial setbacks. To help reduce the risks of industry failures and advance the development of new technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an MHK Risk Management Framework. By addressing uncertainties, the MHK Risk Management Framework increases the likelihood of successful development of an MHK technology. It covers projects of any technical readiness level (TRL) or technical performance level (TPL) and all risk types (e.g. technological risk, regulatory risk, commercial risk) over the development cycle. This framework is intended for the development and deployment of a single MHK technology—not for multiple device deployments within a plant. This risk framework is intended to meet DOE’s risk management expectations for the MHK technology research and development efforts of the Water Power Program (see Appendix A). It also provides an overview of other relevant risk management tools and documentation.1 This framework emphasizes design and risk reviews as formal gates to ensure risks are managed throughout the technology development cycle. Section 1 presents the recommended technology development cycle, Sections 2 and 3 present tools to assess the TRL and TPL of the project, respectively. Section 4 presents a risk management process with design and risk reviews for actively managing risk within the project, and Section 5 presents a detailed description of a risk registry to collect the risk management information into one living document. Section 6 presents recommendations for collecting and using lessons learned throughout the development process.

  7. Moving and handling: reducing risk through assessment.

    PubMed

    Warren, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Manual handling injuries can occur almost anywhere in a healthcare environment, and most staff perform a variety of moving and handling tasks every day. Heavy lifting, awkward posture, and previous or existing injury can increase the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. A healthcare professional's involvement in moving and handling is more widespread than it might appear, and their actions and understanding of techniques, legislation and guidelines have a direct effect on patient care. Every situation that involves the handling, or partial handling, of a person presents varying levels of risk to the patient and the carer. Maintaining a good level of patient mobility and independence is an essential part of care delivery and can reduce the risk of long-term physical and psychological effects. Delivery of care should focus on the individual's capacity, not their incapacity, to ensure that they are treated with dignity and respect.

  8. The role of vitamin D in reducing gastrointestinal disease risk and assessment of individual dietary intake needs: Focus on genetic and genomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Laing, Bobbi; Marlow, Gareth; Bishop, Karen

    2016-01-01

    With the endogenous formation of vitamin D being significantly curtailed because of public awareness of skin cancer dangers, attention is turning to dietary sources. Cumulative evidence has implicated vitamin D deficiency in increasing susceptibility to various gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, diverticulitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also reason to suggest adjunct vitamin D therapy for such diseases. Although there is justification for increasing vitamin D intake overall, optimal intakes will vary among individuals. Genomic technologies have revealed several hundreds of genes associated with vitamin D actions. The nature of these genes emphasizes the potentially negative implications of modulating vitamin D intakes in the absence of complementary human genetic and genomic data, including information on the gut microbiome. However, we are not yet in a position to apply this information. Genomic data (transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) could provide evidence that vitamin D sufficiency has been achieved. We suggest that there is an increasingly strong case for considering the more widespread use of vitamin D fortified foods and/or dietary supplements to benefit gastrointestinal health. However, intake levels might beneficially be informed by personalized genetic and genomic information, for optimal disease prevention and maintenance of remission. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Reducing blood loss in total joint surgery with a saline-coupled bipolar sealing technology.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Aaron G

    2007-06-01

    Despite the availability of a number of techniques to reduce blood loss in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty, many patients remain at risk of receiving blood transfusions postoperatively. We have used a new technology that couples bipolar radiofrequency energy with saline to reduce blood loss in patients undergoing total joint surgery. The use of this technology has been shown to effectively minimize the risk of transfusion and reduce intraoperative and postoperative bleeding-related complications.

  10. How damage diversification can reduce systemic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of risk diversification on cascading failures in weighted complex networks, where weighted directed links represent exposures between nodes. These weights result from different diversification strategies and their adjustment allows us to reduce systemic risk significantly by topological means. As an example, we contrast a classical exposure diversification (ED) approach with a damage diversification (DD) variant. The latter reduces the loss that the failure of high degree nodes generally inflict to their network neighbors and thus hampers the cascade amplification. To quantify the final cascade size and obtain our results, we develop a branching process approximation taking into account that inflicted losses cannot only depend on properties of the exposed, but also of the failing node. This analytic extension is a natural consequence of the paradigm shift from individual to system safety. To deepen our understanding of the cascade process, we complement this systemic perspective by a mesoscopic one: an analysis of the failure risk of nodes dependent on their degree. Additionally, we ask for the role of these failures in the cascade amplification.

  11. How damage diversification can reduce systemic risk.

    PubMed

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of risk diversification on cascading failures in weighted complex networks, where weighted directed links represent exposures between nodes. These weights result from different diversification strategies and their adjustment allows us to reduce systemic risk significantly by topological means. As an example, we contrast a classical exposure diversification (ED) approach with a damage diversification (DD) variant. The latter reduces the loss that the failure of high degree nodes generally inflict to their network neighbors and thus hampers the cascade amplification. To quantify the final cascade size and obtain our results, we develop a branching process approximation taking into account that inflicted losses cannot only depend on properties of the exposed, but also of the failing node. This analytic extension is a natural consequence of the paradigm shift from individual to system safety. To deepen our understanding of the cascade process, we complement this systemic perspective by a mesoscopic one: an analysis of the failure risk of nodes dependent on their degree. Additionally, we ask for the role of these failures in the cascade amplification.

  12. Linking High Risk Postpartum Women with a Technology Enabled Health Coaching Program to Reduce Diabetes Risk and Improve Wellbeing: Program Description, Case Studies, and Recommendations for Community Health Coaching Programs

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Melanie; Delgadillo-Duenas, Adriana T.; Leong, Karen; Najmabadi, Adriana; Harleman, Elizabeth; Rios, Christina; Quan, Judy; Soria, Catalina; Handley, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Low-income minority women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) or high BMIs have increased risk for chronic illnesses postpartum. Although the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) provides an evidence-based model for reducing diabetes risk, few community-based interventions have adapted this program for pGDM women. Methods. STAR MAMA is an ongoing randomized control trial (RCT) evaluating a hybrid HIT/Health Coaching DPP-based 20-week postpartum program for diabetes prevention compared with education from written materials at baseline. Eligibility includes women 18–39 years old, ≥32 weeks pregnant, and GDM or BMI > 25. Clinic- and community-based recruitment in San Francisco and Sonoma Counties targets 180 women. Sociodemographic and health coaching data from a preliminary sample are presented. Results. Most of the 86 women included to date (88%) have GDM, 80% were identified as Hispanic/Latina, 78% have migrant status, and most are Spanish-speaking. Women receiving the intervention indicate high engagement, with 86% answering 1+ calls. Health coaching callbacks last an average of 9 minutes with range of topics discussed. Case studies presented convey a range of emotional, instrumental, and health literacy-related supports offered by health coaches. Discussion. The DPP-adapted HIT/health coaching model highlights the possibility and challenge of delivering DPP content to postpartum women in community settings. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02240420. PMID:27830157

  13. Linking High Risk Postpartum Women with a Technology Enabled Health Coaching Program to Reduce Diabetes Risk and Improve Wellbeing: Program Description, Case Studies, and Recommendations for Community Health Coaching Programs.

    PubMed

    Athavale, Priyanka; Thomas, Melanie; Delgadillo-Duenas, Adriana T; Leong, Karen; Najmabadi, Adriana; Harleman, Elizabeth; Rios, Christina; Quan, Judy; Soria, Catalina; Handley, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Low-income minority women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) or high BMIs have increased risk for chronic illnesses postpartum. Although the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) provides an evidence-based model for reducing diabetes risk, few community-based interventions have adapted this program for pGDM women. Methods. STAR MAMA is an ongoing randomized control trial (RCT) evaluating a hybrid HIT/Health Coaching DPP-based 20-week postpartum program for diabetes prevention compared with education from written materials at baseline. Eligibility includes women 18-39 years old, ≥32 weeks pregnant, and GDM or BMI > 25. Clinic- and community-based recruitment in San Francisco and Sonoma Counties targets 180 women. Sociodemographic and health coaching data from a preliminary sample are presented. Results. Most of the 86 women included to date (88%) have GDM, 80% were identified as Hispanic/Latina, 78% have migrant status, and most are Spanish-speaking. Women receiving the intervention indicate high engagement, with 86% answering 1+ calls. Health coaching callbacks last an average of 9 minutes with range of topics discussed. Case studies presented convey a range of emotional, instrumental, and health literacy-related supports offered by health coaches. Discussion. The DPP-adapted HIT/health coaching model highlights the possibility and challenge of delivering DPP content to postpartum women in community settings. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02240420.

  14. A surety engineering framework to reduce cognitive systems risks.

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Thomas P.; Peercy, David Eugene; Caldera, Eva O.; Shaneyfelt, Wendy L.

    2008-12-01

    Cognitive science research investigates the advancement of human cognition and neuroscience capabilities. Addressing risks associated with these advancements can counter potential program failures, legal and ethical issues, constraints to scientific research, and product vulnerabilities. Survey results, focus group discussions, cognitive science experts, and surety researchers concur technical risks exist that could impact cognitive science research in areas such as medicine, privacy, human enhancement, law and policy, military applications, and national security (SAND2006-6895). This SAND report documents a surety engineering framework and a process for identifying cognitive system technical, ethical, legal and societal risks and applying appropriate surety methods to reduce such risks. The framework consists of several models: Specification, Design, Evaluation, Risk, and Maturity. Two detailed case studies are included to illustrate the use of the process and framework. Several Appendices provide detailed information on existing cognitive system architectures; ethical, legal, and societal risk research; surety methods and technologies; and educing information research with a case study vignette. The process and framework provide a model for how cognitive systems research and full-scale product development can apply surety engineering to reduce perceived and actual risks.

  15. Reducing risk where tectonic plates collide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Ludwig, Kristin A.

    2017-06-19

    Most of the world’s earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, and volcanic eruptions are caused by the continuous motions of the many tectonic plates that make up the Earth’s outer shell. The most powerful of these natural hazards occur in subduction zones, where two plates collide and one is thrust beneath another. The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) “Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide—A USGS Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science” is a blueprint for building the crucial scientific foundation needed to inform the policies and practices that can make our Nation more resilient to subduction zone-related hazards.

  16. Youth at Risk: Is Technology the Answer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuirk, Jenny

    2001-01-01

    Discusses youth at-risk in Australia and describes a small research project on youth at risk and technology. The project investigated if and how computers were being used in youth-at-risk programs in New South Wales. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy Education) (Author/VWL)

  17. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, F.

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  18. Managing the Perception of Advanced Technology Risks in Mission Proposals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellisario, Sebastian Nickolai

    2012-01-01

    Through my work in the project proposal office I became interested in how technology advancement efforts affect competitive mission proposals. Technology development allows for new instruments and functionality. However, including technology advancement in a mission proposal often increases perceived risk. Risk mitigation has a major impact on the overall evaluation of the proposal and whether the mission is selected. In order to evaluate the different approaches proposals took I compared the proposals claims of heritage and technology advancement to the sponsor feedback provided in the NASA debriefs. I examined a set of Discovery 2010 Mission proposals to draw patterns in how they were evaluated and come up with a set of recommendations for future mission proposals in how they should approach technology advancement to reduce the perceived risk.

  19. Managing the Perception of Advanced Technology Risks in Mission Proposals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellisario, Sebastian Nickolai

    2012-01-01

    Through my work in the project proposal office I became interested in how technology advancement efforts affect competitive mission proposals. Technology development allows for new instruments and functionality. However, including technology advancement in a mission proposal often increases perceived risk. Risk mitigation has a major impact on the overall evaluation of the proposal and whether the mission is selected. In order to evaluate the different approaches proposals took I compared the proposals claims of heritage and technology advancement to the sponsor feedback provided in the NASA debriefs. I examined a set of Discovery 2010 Mission proposals to draw patterns in how they were evaluated and come up with a set of recommendations for future mission proposals in how they should approach technology advancement to reduce the perceived risk.

  20. RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174

    SciTech Connect

    Cercy, M; Steven P Schneider, S; Kurt D Gerdes, K

    2008-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks.

  1. RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174

    SciTech Connect

    Cercy, M; Steven P Schneider, S; Kurt D Gerdes, K

    2009-01-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks.

  2. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Perella, V.F.

    1999-11-29

    A Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team (RRTT) was chartered by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Spent Fuel Management with the responsibility to recommend a course of action leading to a final technology selection for the interim management and ultimate disposition of the foreign and domestic aluminum-based research reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under DOE''s jurisdiction. The RRTT evaluated eleven potential SNF management technologies and recommended that two technologies, direct co-disposal and an isotopic dilution alternative, either press and dilute or melt and dilute, be developed in parallel. Based upon that recommendation, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE for a preferred SNF alternative management technology. A technology risk assessment was conducted as a first step in this recommendation process to determine if either, or both, of the technologies posed significant risks that would make them unsuitable for further development. This report provides the results of that technology risk assessment.

  3. Reducing Risk with Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, F.L.; Feblowitz, J.; Samal, L.; Sato, L.; Wright, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Identify clinical opportunities to intervene to prevent a malpractice event and determine the proportion of malpractice claims potentially preventable by clinical decision support (CDS). Materials and Methods Cross-sectional review of closed malpractice claims over seven years from one malpractice insurance company and seven hospitals in the Boston area. For each event, clinical opportunities to intervene to avert the malpractice event and the presence or absence of CDS that might have a role in preventing the event, were assigned by a panel of expert raters. Compensation paid out to resolve a claim (indemnity), was associated with each CDS type. Results Of the 477 closed malpractice cases, 359 (75.3%) were categorized as substantiated and 195 (54%) had at least one opportunity to intervene. Common opportunities to intervene related to performance of procedure, diagnosis, and fall prevention. We identified at least one CDS type for 63% of substantiated claims. The 41 CDS types identified included clinically significant test result alerting, diagnostic decision support and electronic tracking of instruments. Cases with at least one associated intervention accounted for $40.3 million (58.9%) of indemnity. Discussion CDS systems and other forms of health information technology (HIT) are expected to improve quality of care, but their potential to mitigate risk had not previously been quantified. Our results suggest that, in addition to their known benefits for quality and safety, CDS systems within HIT have a potential role in decreasing malpractice payments. Conclusion More than half of malpractice events and over $40 million of indemnity were potentially preventable with CDS. PMID:25298814

  4. Evaluating Process Effectiveness to Reduce Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2017-01-01

    It is well documented that government agencies do not have the same incentive as the private sector to focus on process effectiveness and continual improvement of those processes. It is also well documented whenever government agencies fail to deliver efficient, effective, consistent, and fair services to the citizens. In spite of the various "reinventing government" and "effectiveness initiatives" of the past decades, and in spite of the efforts on the part of many agencies to improve, government in general still lags behind industry in creating a culture of effective processes and systems. While the tragic events that unfolded recently in Flint, Michigan, teach us that running government "like a business" does not always take the needs of the citizenry into account, there are many lessons and techniques from the private sector that government agencies can use to improve. The incentive to improve, while mandated by various administrations1, needs to come from within the workforce, in order to effectively take root. The best, most effective incentive is to reduce, control or eliminate risk. Government agencies face some of the same risks as the private sector, while some are unique. While ISO 310002 has been around since 2009, risk has taken on increased visibility within the private sector with the advent of the emphasis on risk-based thinking in ISO 9001:20153. The relationship between risk-based thinking and effective processes is simple and direct. Those processes that are well thought out and standardized (i.e. Plan-Do-Check-Act), will have taken into account the applicable policy, statutory, regulatory, safety, quality and technical parameters, which may not occur to someone performing the process with minimal experience or training; and thus protect the employees, the public and the agency from statutory and regulatory violations; delay in providing services; non-delivery of services; harm to public or employee safety and health; cost overruns; breaches in

  5. Reducing Disaster Vulnerability Through Science and Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    the 7.9- magnitude earthquake that occurred on the Alaska Denali Fault in November 2002, juxtaposed with the site of the 1857 Fort Tejon , CA, earthquake...in coop- eration with the National Weather Service in Fort Worth, engaged in a Tornado Damage Risk Assessment. The project estimated the potential...impact of a major tornado outbreak to the Dallas- Fort Worth Metroplex, home to 5 million people, 1 million houses, and 60 thousand commercial structures

  6. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  7. Technology-Induced Risks in History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabkin, Ya.

    Our perception of risk contains three main aspects: (1) probability of the risk occurring; (2) the extent of possible damage; (3) the degree of voluntary or involuntary exposure to risk. History of risk assessment has been traced in several areas, such as transportation, and has largely focused on insurance. Construction projects constitute one of the oldest areas of technology where accidents continue to occur, while health has always been a fragile commodity. Urbanization has multiplied the risks of illness and death, while natural catastrophes, though still frightening, have ceded their central place to technology-based disasters in the Western perceptions of risk. The human has become the main source of danger to the very survival of the planet. The Enlightenment utopia of scientific progress resulting in social and moral progress of humanity has collided with the awareness of new technology induced risks. Life on Earth began without humans, and it may end without them. Our civilization is the first that faces an end to be brought about by our own technological ingenuity.

  8. Nanocarbon Technologies: Prospects and Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, S.; Yakutseni, P.

    In this paper we review the current state and prospects of carbon nano-technologies as a new emerging point for atomic-molecular manipulation, design and discovery connected with fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and biology. The merging nanoscale interface between carbon and biology structures are shortly discussed in terms of fundamental insights and possible applications encompassing nanobionics as lessons from animate nature, artificial modifications of living systems as well as multicomponent molecular structures for biology, physics, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Protein-based as well as carbohydrates-, lipids-, or DNA-based molecular assemblies loaded with nanocarbon are addressed in the context of the engineering systems design. Several examples from our collaborative work are used to demonstrate connections between points of nano and bio and to show how such an interdisciplinary approach has led us to new ideas and applications. Nanocarbons have little similarity with the well-known biologically active substances. There is no oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorous-containing or other typical moieties, such as common pharmacophoric anchors or groups. In the same time fullerenes demonstrated a wide spectrum of biological activity. Mechanisms of their biological action are still unknown. For this reason our work was focused on the computer-based molecular modeling of the action of nanocarbon structures on the well-known biological structures: proteins, DNA, carbohydrates, and lipid molecules. Possible biological hazards, fundamental questions and prospects associated with nano-carbon technologies are highlighted.

  9. Assistive technologies in reducing caregiver burden among informal caregivers of older adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Madara Marasinghe, Keshini

    2016-01-01

    The world population is rapidly ageing. As population age, the incidence of functional limitations increases, demanding higher levels of care from caregivers. Assistive technologies improve individuals' functioning, independence, well-being and quality of life. By increasing independence of older adults, assistive technologies decrease workloads required from informal caregivers. This review investigates, evaluates, and synthesises existing findings to examine whether and how assistive technologies reduce caregiver burden. Databases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. Three groups of keywords were combined: those relating to assistive technology, caregiver burden, and older adults. Two theories emerged from the analysis of study results. Caregivers reported that assistive technologies decrease caregiver burden. However, caregivers had concerns that assistive technologies could add to caregiver burden, highlighting the limitations of assistive technology. As suggested by a majority of the studies in this review, assistive technologies contribute to reducing caregiver burden among caregivers of older adults. Assistive technologies assisted caregivers by reducing time, levels of assistance and energy put towards caregiving, anxiety and fear, task difficulty, safety risk particularly for activities requiring physical assistance and increasing the independence of the users. Further research is required to better understand limitations of assistive technologies. Implications for Rehabilitation Support for informal caregivers of older adults need more attention and recognition. Assistive technologies can reduce caregiver burden among informal caregivers of older adults. Further research is required to better understand the effectiveness of assistive technologies in reducing caregiver burden as well as limitations and barriers associated with using assistive technologies.

  10. Screening Methodologies to Support Risk and Technology ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act establishes a two-stage regulatory process for addressing emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from stationary sources. In the first stage, the Act requires the EPA to develop technology-based standards for categories of industrial sources. We have largely completed the required “Maximum Achievable Control Technology” (MACT) standards. In the second stage of the regulatory process, EPA must review each MACT standard at least every eight years and revise them as necessary, “taking into account developments in practices, processes and control technologies.” We call this requirement the “technology review.” EPA is also required to complete a one-time assessment of the health and environmental risks that remain after sources come into compliance with MACT. This residual risk review also must be done within 8 years of setting the initial MACT standard. If additional risk reductions are necessary to protect public health with an ample margin of safety or to prevent adverse environmental effects, EPA must develop standards to address these remaining risks. Because the risk review is an important component of the RTR process, EPA is seeking SAB input on the scientific credibility of specific enhancements made to our risk assessment methodologies, particularly with respect to screening methodologies, since the last SAB review was completed in 2010. These enhancements to our risk methodologies are outlined in the document title

  11. Reducing the Risks of Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, M. Faith

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the medical and social risks of teenage pregnancy and describes two successful programs dealing with pregnancy and parenting: the St. Paul Maternal and Infant Care Project in Minnesota and the Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Project in San Francisco. (SK)

  12. Reducing the Risks of Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, M. Faith

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the medical and social risks of teenage pregnancy and describes two successful programs dealing with pregnancy and parenting: the St. Paul Maternal and Infant Care Project in Minnesota and the Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Project in San Francisco. (SK)

  13. Reducing the risk in neonatal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal anesthesia is fraught with potential risk for the patient and stress for the anesthesiologist. Where possible, recognition of these risks, avoidance of, and being able to manage them appropriately, must impact positively on perioperative outcomes in this vulnerable group of patients. Good communication with the parents, as well as with other healthcare providers, is crucial to safe and successful anesthetic care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Natural-technological risk assessment and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burova, Valentina; Frolova, Nina

    2016-04-01

    EM-DAT statistical data on human impact and economic damages in the 1st semester 2015 are the highest since 2011: 41% of disasters were floods, responsible for 39% of economic damage and 7% of events were earthquakes responsible for 59% of total death toll. This suggests that disaster risk assessment and management still need to be improved and stay the principle issue in national and international related programs. The paper investigates the risk assessment and management practice in the Russian Federation at different levels. The method is proposed to identify the territories characterized by integrated natural-technological hazard. The maps of the Russian Federation zoning according to the integrated natural-technological hazard level are presented, as well as the procedure of updating the integrated hazard level taking into account the activity of separate processes. Special attention is paid to data bases on past natural and technological processes consequences, which are used for verification of current hazard estimation. The examples of natural-technological risk zoning for the country and some regions territory are presented. Different output risk indexes: both social and economic, are estimated taking into account requirements of end-users. In order to increase the safety of population of the Russian Federation the trans-boundaries hazards are also taken into account.

  15. Reducing risk through 'not cutting corners'.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to water risk and legislation, with a particular focus on the challenges in healthcare, was provided by Blane Judd, chief executive of the Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering (CIPHE), at a recent IHEEM seminar in London. In the spotlight in the presentation, part of a seminar entitled "Total water management within healthcare premises" were subjects ranging from how to deal with Legionella, and the dangers and potential costs of misconnection, to how to minimise scalding, especially among vulnerable patients, and the infection risks inherent in hydrotherapy pool use. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports.

  16. Reducing Risks Associated with Medical Device Misconnections

    MedlinePlus

    ... partners, professional societies, advocacy groups, patients and other stakeholders to reduce the chance of medical device misconnections. ... medical device misconnections; Communicating with patients and other stakeholders to understand the impact of new connector designs. ...

  17. Government's Role in Reducing "Year-2000" Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kappelman, Leon A.; Johnson, Jerry L.; Rosmond, Kathy

    1999-01-01

    Outlines initiatives for government agencies to help mitigate risks of the year-2000 computer problem. Highlights include courts; criminal justice systems; electric power generation and distribution systems; emergency response systems; environmental agencies; financial institutions; insurance industry; petrochemical refineries and oil/gas-line…

  18. Government's Role in Reducing "Year-2000" Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kappelman, Leon A.; Johnson, Jerry L.; Rosmond, Kathy

    1999-01-01

    Outlines initiatives for government agencies to help mitigate risks of the year-2000 computer problem. Highlights include courts; criminal justice systems; electric power generation and distribution systems; emergency response systems; environmental agencies; financial institutions; insurance industry; petrochemical refineries and oil/gas-line…

  19. Reducing Adolescent Risk: Toward an Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romer, David, Ed.

    This collection of papers focuses on common influences that result in a number of interrelated risk behaviors, summarizing presentations and discussions from a recent conference at which a group of specialists from different health traditions synthesized current knowledge on the subject. There are 39 papers in four parts. Part 1, "Adolescents…

  20. Reducing Adolescent Risk: Toward an Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romer, David, Ed.

    This collection of papers focuses on common influences that result in a number of interrelated risk behaviors, summarizing presentations and discussions from a recent conference at which a group of specialists from different health traditions synthesized current knowledge on the subject. There are 39 papers in four parts. Part 1, "Adolescents…

  1. New Technologies for Reducing Aviation Weather-Related Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. Paul, III; Watson, James F., III; Jarrell, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed technologies to reduce aviation weather-related accidents. New technologies are presented for data-link and display of weather information to aircraft in flight, for detection of turbulence ahead of aircraft in flight, and for automated insitu reporting of atmospheric conditions from aircraft.

  2. Mine Waste Technology Program. Passive Treatment for Reducing Metal Loading

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 48, Passive Treatment Technology Evaluation for Reducing Metal Loading, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Departmen...

  3. Mine Waste Technology Program. Passive Treatment for Reducing Metal Loading

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 48, Passive Treatment Technology Evaluation for Reducing Metal Loading, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Departmen...

  4. REDUCING CHILDREN'S RISK TO SOIL LEAD: SUMMARY OF A FIELD EXPERIMENT TO REDUCE SOIL LEAD BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing risks associated with Pb in soil has typically been accomplished by soil removal, covering, or dilution by mixing with uncontaminated soil. EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) and DuPont Corporation established a collaborative effort to evaluation...

  5. Speak Up: Reduce Your Risk of Falling

    MedlinePlus

    ... sluggish or confused. Ask how to reduce these side effects or if you can take another medicine. The goal of the Speak Up ™ program is to help patients and their advocates become more informed and involved in their health care.

  6. Sharing risk between payer and provider by leasing health technologies: an affordable and effective reimbursement strategy for innovative technologies?

    PubMed

    Edlin, Richard; Hall, Peter; Wallner, Klemens; McCabe, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    The challenge of implementing high-cost innovative technologies in health care systems operating under significant budgetary pressure has led to a radical shift in the health technology reimbursement landscape. New reimbursement strategies attempt to reduce the risk of making the wrong decision, that is, paying for a technology that is not good value for the health care system, while promoting the adoption of innovative technologies into clinical practice. The remaining risk, however, is not shared between the manufacturer and the health care payer at the individual purchase level; it continues to be passed from the manufacturer to the payer at the time of purchase. In this article, we propose a health technology payment strategy-technology leasing reimbursement scheme-that allows the sharing of risk between the manufacturer and the payer: the replacing of up-front payments with a stream of payments spread over the expected duration of benefit from the technology, subject to the technology delivering the claimed health benefit. Using trastuzumab (Herceptin) in early breast cancer as an exemplar technology, we show how a technology leasing reimbursement scheme not only reduces the total budgetary impact of the innovative technology but also truly shares risk between the manufacturer and the health care system, while reducing the value of further research and thus promoting the rapid adoption of innovative technologies into clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reducing the risk of unplanned perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Susan; Dixon, Jacqueline; Leary, Donna

    2010-11-01

    Maintaining normothermia is important for patient safety, positive surgical outcomes, and increased patient satisfaction. Causes of unplanned hypothermia in the OR include cold room temperatures, the effects of anesthesia, cold IV and irrigation fluids, skin and wound exposure, and patient risk factors. Nurses at Riddle Memorial Hospital in Media, Pennsylvania, performed a quality improvement project to evaluate the effectiveness of using warm blankets, warm irrigation fluids, or forced-air warming on perioperative patients to maintain their core temperature during the perioperative experience. Results of the project showed that 75% of patients who received forced-air warming perioperatively had temperatures that reached or were maintained at 36° C (96.8° F) or higher within 15 minutes after leaving the OR.

  8. Affect and Acceptability: Exploring Teachers' Technology-Related Risk Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Sarah K.

    2011-01-01

    Educational change, such as technology integration, involves risk. Teachers are encouraged to "take risks", but what risks they are asked to take and how do they perceive these risks? Developing an understanding of teachers' technology-related risk perceptions can help explain their choices and behaviours. This paper presents a way to…

  9. Reducing Diabetes Risk in American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Janice L.; Allen, Peg; Helitzer, Deborah L.; Qualls, Clifford; Whyte, Ayn N.; Wolfe, Venita K.; Herman, Carla J.

    2008-01-01

    Background American Indians experience high rates of type 2 diabetes. The impact of low-intensity interventions on diabetes risk among young American Indian women is unknown. Design Randomized controlled trial Setting/Participants Community-based; participants were 200 young urban American Indian women who were block-randomized on fasting blood glucose (FBG) into intervention and control groups. Inclusion criteria included self-reported identity, aged 18–40 years, not pregnant, willingness to stay in urban area for 2 years, and not having type 2 diabetes. Measures were taken at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Data were gathered 2002–2006 and analyzed 2006–2007. Intervention Five discussion group sessions (one meeting per month for five months) were held focusing on healthful eating, physical activity, goal-setting, and social support.. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes included dietary fat and vegetable consumption and self-reported physical activity. Secondary outcomes included cardiorespiratory fitness, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, lipid profiles, percent body fat, BMI, intake of fruit, total sugar and sweetened beverages, FBG, and television viewing. Results Mean vegetable and fruit intake increased significantly more in the intervention group than in the control group over time (group by visit interaction, p=0.02 and p=0.002, respectively). Both groups had significant increases in percent body fat and decreases in waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, blood cholesterol, LDL, television viewing, and total intakes of energy, saturated fat, sugar, and sweetened beverages. Conclusions A culturally influenced, low-intensity lifestyle intervention can improve self-reported intakes of vegetables and fruit over 18 months in young, urban American Indian women. PMID:18312806

  10. Additional risk of end-of-the-pipe geoengineering technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohle, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Humans are engineers, even the artists who engineer the surface of the globe. Should humans endeavour to engineer the Earth to counter climate change hazards? Striving towards 'global sustainability' will require to adjust the current production and consumption patterns. Contrary to an approach of global sustainability, 'geoengineering' deploys a 'technology fix' for the same purpose. Humans are much inclined to look for technological fixes for problems because well engineered technological methods have created modern societies. Thus, it seems obvious to apply an engineering solution to climate change issues too. In particular, as air pollution causing acid rains has been reduced by cleaner combustion processes or ozone destructing chemical coolants have been replaced by other substances. Common to these approaches was to reduce inputs into global or regional systems by withholding emission, replacing substances or limiting use cases for certain substances. Thus, the selected approach was a technological fix or regulatory measure targeting the 'start of the pipe'. However applying a 'start of the pipe' approach to climate change faces the issue that mankind should reduce inputs were its hurts, namely reducing radically energy that is produced from burning fossil fuels. Capping burning of fossil fuels would be disruptive for the economic structures or the consumption pattern of the developed and developing industrialised societies. Facing that dilemma, affordable geoengineering looks tempting for some. However geoengineering technologies, which counter climate change by other means than carbon capture at combustion, are of a different nature than the technological fixes and negotiated regulatory actions, which so far have been applied to limit threats to regional and global systems. Most of the proposed technologies target other parts of the climate system but the carbon-dioxide input into the atmosphere. Therefore, many geoengineering technologies differ

  11. Evaluating Shielding Effectiveness for Reducing Space Radiation Cancer Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ren, Lei

    2007-01-01

    We discuss calculations of probability distribution functions (PDF) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). The PDF s are used in significance tests of the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments are considered in models of cancer risk PDF s. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are treated in the calculations. We show that the cancer risk uncertainty, defined as the ratio of the 95% confidence level (CL) to the point estimate is about 4-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missions (<180 d), SPE s present the most significant risk, however one that is mitigated effectively by shielding, especially for carbon composites structures with high hydrogen content. In contrast, for long duration lunar (>180 d) or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits, with 95% CL s exceeding 10% fatal risk for males and females on a Mars mission. For reducing GCR cancer risks, shielding materials are marginally effective because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativistic particles. At the present time, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding can not be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding based on a significance test that accounts for radiobiology uncertainties in GCR risk projection.

  12. Study on Risk of Enterprise' Technology Innovation Based on ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyan

    The risk in the process of enterprise' technology innovation is concluted five subsystems: environmental risk, market risk, enterprise capacity risk, project risk and project management risk, 16 risk factors under each subsystem are identified. A Interpretative Structural Modeling(ISM) of of risk factors is established, the relationship and influence levels of them is confirmed, the purpose is to help enterprise assessing risks and taking countermeasure to minimize the potential loss and increase the innovation income.

  13. New Guidelines for Reducing Stroke Risks Unique to Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hub Making News on Heart.org Learn More New guidelines for reducing stroke risks unique to women ... Bushnell, M.D., M.H.S., author of the new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association ...

  14. Using Technology to Reduce Attrition of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Freda; Igein, Godwin

    2007-01-01

    Attrition of doctoral students at the rate of 50-60% of those who enter the program, suggests the need to examine alternative strategies within educational institutions in working with doctoral students. The purpose of this paper is to suggest how incorporating Internet technology might be one alternative in reducing attrition in doctoral…

  15. Reducing Stressful Aspects of Information Technology in Public Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Brian

    1995-01-01

    Identifies sources of technological stress for public services librarians and patrons and proposes ways to reduce stress, including communicating with staff, implementing a system gradually, providing adequate training, creating proper documentation, planning, considering ergonomics in hardware and software selection, selecting a good interface,…

  16. Central Leptin Gene Therapy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    W81XWH-04-1-0701 TITLE: Central Leptin Gene Therapy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk Factors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Urszula T. Iwaniec...CONTRACT NUMBER Central Leptin Gene Therapy to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk Factors 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0701 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...control of obesity through centrally administered, recombinant adeno-associated virus leptin gene (rAAV-lep) therapy will decrease the incidence of

  17. Reducing the Risk of Human Missions to Mars Through Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.

    2007-01-01

    order to put into context an updated Integrated Space Transportation Plan (post- Columbia) and guide Agency planning. NASA was on the verge of committing significant funding in programs that would be better served if longer term goals were better known including the Orbital Space Plane, research on the ISS, National Aerospace Initiative, Shuttle Life Extension Program, Project Prometheus, as well as a wide range of technology development throughout the Agency. Much of the focus during this period was on integrating the results from the previous studies into more concrete implementation strategies in order to understand the relationship between NASA programs, timing, and resulting budgetary implications. This resulted in an integrated approach including lunar surface operations to retire risk of human Mars missions, maximum use of common and modular systems including what was termed the exploration transfer vehicle, Earth orbit and lunar surface demonstrations of long-life systems, collaboration of human and robotic missions to vastly increase mission return, and high-efficiency transportation systems (nuclear) for deep-space transportation and power. The data provided in this summary viewgraph presentation was developed to begin to address one of the key elements of the emerging implementation strategy, namely how lunar missions help retire risk of human missions to Mars. During this process the scope of the activity broadened into the issue of how testing in general, in various venues including the Moon, can help reduce the risk for Mars missions.

  18. Reducing the Risk of Human Missions to Mars Through Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Bret G.

    2007-07-01

    order to put into context an updated Integrated Space Transportation Plan (post- Columbia) and guide Agency planning. NASA was on the verge of committing significant funding in programs that would be better served if longer term goals were better known including the Orbital Space Plane, research on the ISS, National Aerospace Initiative, Shuttle Life Extension Program, Project Prometheus, as well as a wide range of technology development throughout the Agency. Much of the focus during this period was on integrating the results from the previous studies into more concrete implementation strategies in order to understand the relationship between NASA programs, timing, and resulting budgetary implications. This resulted in an integrated approach including lunar surface operations to retire risk of human Mars missions, maximum use of common and modular systems including what was termed the exploration transfer vehicle, Earth orbit and lunar surface demonstrations of long-life systems, collaboration of human and robotic missions to vastly increase mission return, and high-efficiency transportation systems (nuclear) for deep-space transportation and power. The data provided in this summary viewgraph presentation was developed to begin to address one of the key elements of the emerging implementation strategy, namely how lunar missions help retire risk of human missions to Mars. During this process the scope of the activity broadened into the issue of how testing in general, in various venues including the Moon, can help reduce the risk for Mars missions.

  19. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    National Lab Directors, . .

    2001-04-05

    The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

  20. Exemestane Reduces Breast Cancer Risk in High-Risk Postmenopausal Women

    Cancer.gov

    Clinical trial results presented at the 2011 ASCO annual meeting showed that the aromatase inhibitor exemestane—used to treat early and advanced breast cancer—substantially reduced the risk of invasive breast cancer in high-risk postmenopausal women.

  1. Effective Strategies to Reduce High Risk Drinking among College Students and Residents in an Urban Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkley, Marsha; Zeigler, Donald W.

    2007-01-01

    An urban American university, Georgia Institute of Technology, established a campus-community coalition to reduce high risk drinking, its harms and second-hand effects among university students and residents of the Atlanta community. The Atlanta-based institution was part of a ten-year, ten-university project, A Matter of Degree (AMOD),…

  2. Improving technologies to reduce abortion-related morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Rogo, K

    2004-06-01

    This article reviews the technologies used to diagnose pregnancy and manage abortion in developing countries. The author discusses methods of diagnosing pregnancy--including physical examination, laboratory and home testing, and ultrasound--as well as methods for performing safe abortions. Due to manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) advances, vacuum aspiration has become safer and more feasible in low-resource settings. The discussion of medical abortion includes the advantages and limitations of mifepristone, misoprostol-only regimens, methotrexate, and other methods. The author stresses the importance of post-abortion care and post-abortion contraception and, in the conclusion, identifies six areas in which technology can reduce abortion-related morbidity and mortality: pregnancy prevention, early diagnosis of pregnancy, accurate assessment of gestation, standardization and supply of MVA technology, and simple and affordable regimens for medical abortion.

  3. Aircraft Engine Technology for Green Aviation to Reduce Fuel Burn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; VanZante, Dale E.; Heidmann, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project and Integrated Systems Research Program Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate are conducting research on advanced aircraft technology to address the environmental goals of reducing fuel burn, noise and NOx emissions for aircraft in 2020 and beyond. Both Projects, in collaborative partnerships with U.S. Industry, Academia, and other Government Agencies, have made significant progress toward reaching the N+2 (2020) and N+3 (beyond 2025) installed fuel burn goals by fundamental aircraft engine technology development, subscale component experimental investigations, full scale integrated systems validation testing, and development validation of state of the art computation design and analysis codes. Specific areas of propulsion technology research are discussed and progress to date.

  4. Semiconductor technology for reducing emissions and increasing efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Duffin, B.; Frank, R.

    1997-12-31

    The cooperation and support of all industries are required to significantly impact a worldwide reduction in gaseous emissions that may contribute to climate change. Each industry also is striving to more efficiently utilize the resources that it consumes since this is both conservation for good citizenship and an intelligent approach to business. The semiconductor industry is also extremely concerned with these issues. However, semiconductor manufacturer`s products provide solutions for reduced emissions and increased efficiency in their industry, other industries and areas that can realize significant improvements through control technology. This paper will focus on semiconductor technologies of digital control, power switching and sensing to improve efficiency and reduce emissions in automotive, industrial, and office/home applications. 10 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Safety risk analysis of an innovative environmental technology.

    PubMed

    Parnell, G S; Frimpon, M; Barnes, J; Kloeber, J M; Deckro, R E; Jackson, J A

    2001-02-01

    The authors describe a decision and risk analysis performed for the cleanup of a large Department of Energy mixed-waste subsurface disposal area governed by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In a previous study, the authors worked with the site decision makers, state regulators, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regional regulators to develop a CERCLA-based multiobjective decision analysis value model and used the model to perform a screening analysis of 28 remedial alternatives. The analysis results identified an innovative technology, in situ vitrification, with high effectiveness versus cost. Since this technology had not been used on this scale before, the major uncertainties were contaminant migration and pressure buildup. Pressure buildup was a safety concern due to the potential risks to worker safety. With the help of environmental technology experts remedial alternative changes were identified to mitigate the concerns about contaminant migration and pressure buildup. The analysis results showed that the probability of an event with a risk to worker safety had been significantly reduced. Based on these results, site decision makers have refocused their test program to examine in situ vitrification and have continued the use of the CERCLA-based decision analysis methodology to analyze remedial alternatives.

  6. Colonoscopy Reduces Risk of Death from Colorectal Cancer in High-Risk Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term results from the National Polyp Study confirm that removing precancerous adenomas not only reduces the risk of colorectal cancer but also reduces the number of deaths from the disease by more than half.

  7. Intervention of drudgery reducing technologies in agriculture and impact evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Manju; Gandhi, Sudesh; Dilbaghi, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Agriculture is main source of livelihood for majority of the population in India. Agriculture has been established as one of the drudgery prone occupation of unorganized sector due to lack of access to improved agricultural technologies. The present study was planned to assess intervention of drudgery reducing technologies in agriculture and its impact evaluation. The drudgery areas/activities in agriculture were identified. Participatory field level skill training for proper use of the ergonomically improved farm technologies were given to men and women in separate groups. An intervention package consisting of improved sickle, wheel hand hoe, capron, cot bag and protective gloves was introduced in village Shahpur. Data were collected to quantify the impact of intervention on the level of drudgery of worker before and after the technology intervention from sample of 30 respondents (15 male and 15 female) selected randomly from village Shahpur. Gain in knowledge and change in awareness level were calculated after the training.Evaluation of field validation of technology on drudgery of men & women was done after its use in the field conditions. A significant gain in awareness was observed among both men(2.6) & women (3.0) whereas the gain in knowledge was more among men (6.6) than women (4.5). In evaluation of field validation of technology on drudgery it was found that all the five technologies reduced the drudgery of men as well as women. However wheel hand hoe was used successfully by men in comparison to women who preferred to use their conventional technology i.e improved long-handled hoe. Evaluation of validation trials of the technologies reported that improved sickle was used successfully by both men & women farmers. More than half of the men farmers (53.3%) & only 13.3 percent women farmers preferred the wheel hand hoe over the traditional one as they found it four times more efficient in terms of time, energy & money saving. Cot bag was preferred by the

  8. Pacifier use and SIDS: evidence for a consistently reduced risk.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rachel Y; Tanabe, Kawai O; Yang, Diane Choi; Young, Heather A; Hauck, Fern R

    2012-04-01

    Pacifier use at sleep time decreases sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) risk. It is yet unclear whether pacifier use can modify the impact of other sleep-related factors upon SIDS risk. The objective of this study was to examine the association between pacifier use during sleep and SIDS in relation to other risk factors and to determine if pacifier use modifies the impact of these risk factors. Data source was a population based case-control study of 260 SIDS deaths and 260 matched living controls. Pacifier use during last sleep decreased SIDS risk (aOR 0.30, 95% CI 0.17-0.52). Furthermore, pacifier use decreased SIDS risk more when mothers were ≥20 years of age, married, nonsmokers, had adequate prenatal care, and if the infant was ever breastfed. Pacifier use also decreased the risk of SIDS more when the infant was sleeping in the prone/side position, bedsharing, and when soft bedding was present. The association between adverse environmental factors and SIDS risk was modified favorably by pacifier use, but the interactions between pacifier use and these factors were not significant. Pacifier use may provide an additional strategy to reduce the risk of SIDS for infants at high risk or in adverse sleep environments.

  9. Reducing the Risk of Human Space Missions with INTEGRITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Dillon-Merill, Robin L.; Tri, Terry O.; Henninger, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    The INTEGRITY Program will design and operate a test bed facility to help prepare for future beyond-LEO missions. The purpose of INTEGRITY is to enable future missions by developing, testing, and demonstrating advanced human space systems. INTEGRITY will also implement and validate advanced management techniques including risk analysis and mitigation. One important way INTEGRITY will help enable future missions is by reducing their risk. A risk analysis of human space missions is important in defining the steps that INTEGRITY should take to mitigate risk. This paper describes how a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of human space missions will help support the planning and development of INTEGRITY to maximize its benefits to future missions. PRA is a systematic methodology to decompose the system into subsystems and components, to quantify the failure risk as a function of the design elements and their corresponding probability of failure. PRA provides a quantitative estimate of the probability of failure of the system, including an assessment and display of the degree of uncertainty surrounding the probability. PRA provides a basis for understanding the impacts of decisions that affect safety, reliability, performance, and cost. Risks with both high probability and high impact are identified as top priority. The PRA of human missions beyond Earth orbit will help indicate how the risk of future human space missions can be reduced by integrating and testing systems in INTEGRITY.

  10. End TB strategy: the need to reduce risk inequalities.

    PubMed

    Gomes, M Gabriela M; Barreto, Maurício L; Glaziou, Philippe; Medley, Graham F; Rodrigues, Laura C; Wallinga, Jacco; Squire, S Bertel

    2016-03-22

    Diseases occur in populations whose individuals differ in essential characteristics, such as exposure to the causative agent, susceptibility given exposure, and infectiousness upon infection in the case of infectious diseases. Concepts developed in demography more than 30 years ago assert that variability between individuals affects substantially the estimation of overall population risk from disease incidence data. Methods that ignore individual heterogeneity tend to underestimate overall risk and lead to overoptimistic expectations for control. Concerned that this phenomenon is frequently overlooked in epidemiology, here we feature its significance for interpreting global data on human tuberculosis and predicting the impact of control measures. We show that population-wide interventions have the greatest impact in populations where all individuals face an equal risk. Lowering variability in risk has great potential to increase the impact of interventions. Reducing inequality, therefore, empowers health interventions, which in turn improves health, further reducing inequality, in a virtuous circle.

  11. Reducing risk for ventilator associated pneumonia through nursing sensitive interventions.

    PubMed

    Micik, Svatka; Besic, Nihada; Johnson, Natalie; Han, Matilda; Hamlyn, Stephen; Ball, Hayley

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an improvement initiative designed to implement nurse sensitive interventions known to reduce patients' risk for ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP), in cardiothoracic intensive care patients. This initiative is a part of one Australian critical care unit's efforts to identify and measure compliance with key nursing interventions known to improve cardiac surgical patients' outcomes. The premise behind the initiative is that improved nursing process and surveillance systems allow emerging trends to catalyse action and motivate nurses to reduce patients' risk for infection acquisition. At five and nine months following implementation of the initiative a>70% compliance rate in 11 out of the 15 nurse sensitive interventions known to reduce patients' risks for VAP and a drop in VAP incidence from 13.4% to 7.69% from per 1000 ventilator days was accomplished.

  12. How to reduce the risk of surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jennie

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are an important cause of healthcare- associated infection and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Although intrinsic factors in patients--such as age, underlying illness and site of the procedure--increase the risk, the quality of care delivered during the perioperative period is critical to preventing SSI. This article explores what is known about the epidemiology and pathogenesis of SSI, and practices that are effective in reducing the risk of SSI.

  13. Mitigating flood exposure: Reducing disaster risk and trauma signature.

    PubMed

    Shultz, James M; McLean, Andrew; Herberman Mash, Holly B; Rosen, Alexa; Kelly, Fiona; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Youngs, Georgia A; Jensen, Jessica; Bernal, Oscar; Neria, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In 2011, following heavy winter snowfall, two cities bordering two rivers in North Dakota, USA faced major flood threats. Flooding was foreseeable and predictable although the extent of risk was uncertain. One community, Fargo, situated in a shallow river basin, successfully mitigated and prevented flooding. For the other community, Minot, located in a deep river valley, prevention was not possible and downtown businesses and one-quarter of the homes were inundated, in the city's worst flood on record. We aimed at contrasting the respective hazards, vulnerabilities, stressors, psychological risk factors, psychosocial consequences, and disaster risk reduction strategies under conditions where flood prevention was, and was not, possible. Methods. We applied the "trauma signature analysis" (TSIG) approach to compare the hazard profiles, identify salient disaster stressors, document the key components of disaster risk reduction response, and examine indicators of community resilience. Results. Two demographically-comparable communities, Fargo and Minot, faced challenging river flood threats and exhibited effective coordination across community sectors. We examined the implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies in situations where coordinated citizen action was able to prevent disaster impact (hazard avoidance) compared to the more common scenario when unpreventable disaster strikes, causing destruction, harm, and distress. Across a range of indicators, it is clear that successful mitigation diminishes both physical and psychological impact, thereby reducing the trauma signature of the event. Conclusion. In contrast to experience of historic flooding in Minot, the city of Fargo succeeded in reducing the trauma signature by way of reducing risk through mitigation.

  14. Integrative Treatments to Reduce Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan; Oberg, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing the contribution and interrelatedness of lipoprotein risk factors is critical to prioritizing treatment strategies for cardiovascular risk reduction. Lipoprotein factors still dominate risk for developing cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Some emerging risk factors such as C-reactive protein are gaining acceptance due to recent prospective clinical trials demonstrating clinical benefit in reducing these markers. Other emerging risk factors, including lipoprotein particle size, remain to be validated. In this second article of a 2-part series, we will begin with a review of formal risk assessment, discussing the contribution of multiple “risky” and “healthy” components that play a part in overall cardiovascular health. Following risk assessment, we will discuss evidence-based integrative therapies that can be used to modify any risky lipoprotein and inflammatory patient profiles, including medications, functional foods, supplements, and lifestyle approaches. The focus is on low-density lipoproteins, high-density lipoproteins, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein. Understanding the interrelatedness of lipoprotein risk factors, and finding efficient methods of treating multiple risk factors simultaneously, will not only improve the long-term health of patients but will also save on the expenditure of healthcare dollars for unnecessary testing and ineffective treatments. Integrative practitioners who understand the contribution of lifestyle factors, and who have numerous effective treatment options at their disposal, are well positioned to counsel patients on cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21461347

  15. Development of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metrics and Risk Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Anderson, K. K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2012-10-01

    This is an internal project milestone report to document the CCSI Element 7 team's progress on developing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) metrics and risk measures. In this report, we provide a brief overview of the current technology readiness assessment research, document the development of technology readiness levels (TRLs) specific to carbon capture technologies, describe the risk measures and uncertainty quantification approaches used in our research, and conclude by discussing the next steps that the CCSI Task 7 team aims to accomplish.

  16. Technology limits for reducing EU transport sector CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Dray, Lynnette M; Schäfer, Andreas; Ben-Akiva, Moshe E

    2012-05-01

    Using a new data set describing the techno-economic characteristics of current and projected future transport technologies and a synthesis of existing transport demand models, lifecycle CO(2) emissions from 27 EU countries (EU27) were estimated in the absence and presence of new policy interventions to 2050. Future CO(2) emissions are strongly dependent on geographical scope and economic growth assumptions, and to a lesser extent on uncertainties in technology characteristics, but in the absence of new policy intervention they continue to rise from present-day values in all three scenarios examined. Consequently, EU27 emissions goals, which may require a 60% decrease in transport sector greenhouse gas emissions from year-1990 values by 2050, will be difficult to meet. This is even the case under widespread adoption of the most promising technologies for all modes, due primarily to limitations in biofuel production capacity and a lack of technologies that would drastically reduce CO(2) emissions from heavy trucks and intercontinental aviation.

  17. Reducing Weight for Transportation Applications: Technology Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taub, Alan I.

    Today's land, sea and air transportation industries — as a business necessity — are focused on technology solutions that will make vehicles more sustainable in terms of energy, the environment, safety and affordability. Reducing vehicle weight is a key enabler for meeting these challenges as well as increasing payload and improving performance. The potential weight reductions from substituting lightweight metals (advanced high-strength steels, aluminum, magnesium and titanium alloys) are well established. For magnesium castings, weight savings of 60% have been reported [1]. The value of weight reduction depends on the transportation sector and ranges from about 5/kg saved for automobiles to over 500/kg saved for aircraft [2]. The challenge is to optimize the material properties and develop robust, high volume, manufacturing technologies and the associated supply chain to fabricate components and subsystems at the appropriate cost for each application.

  18. The Manchester guidelines for contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Basu, Narendra Nath; Ross, G L; Evans, D G; Barr, L

    2015-08-07

    Rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM) are rising, despite a decreasing global incidence of contralateral breast cancer. Reasons for requesting this procedure are complex, and we have previously shown a variable practice amongst breast and plastic surgeons in England. We propose a protocol, based on a published systematic review, a national UK survey and the Manchester experience of CRRM. We reviewed the literature for risk factors for contralateral breast cancer and have devised a 5-step process that includes history taking, calculating contralateral breast cancer risk, cooling off period/counselling, multi-disciplinary assessment and consent. Members of the multi-disciplinary team included the breast surgeon, plastic surgeon and geneticist, who formulated guidelines. A simple formula to calculate the life-time risk of contralateral breast cancer has been devised. This allows stratification of breast cancer patients into different risk-groups: low, above average, moderate and high risk. Recommendations vary according to different risk groups. These guidelines are a useful tool for clinicians counselling women requesting CRRM. Risk assessment is mandatory in this group of patients, and our formula allows evidence-based recommendations to be made.

  19. Does a Mediterranean-Type Diet Reduce Cancer Risk?

    PubMed

    Schwingshackl, Lukas; Hoffmann, Georg

    Overall cancer incidence has been observed to be lower in Mediterranean countries compared to that in Northern countries, such as the UK, and the USA. There is increasing evidence that adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern correlates with reduced risk of several cancer types and cancer mortality. In addition, specific aspects of the Mediterranean diet, such as high consumption of fruit and vegetables, whole grains, and low processed meat intake, are inversely associated with risk of tumor pathogenesis at different cancer sites. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available evidence regarding the association between the Mediterranean diet and cancer risk from clinical trials, prospective cohort studies, and case-control studies. Furthermore, we focused on the different definitions of a Mediterranean diet in an attempt to assess their efficiency. Observational studies provide new evidence suggesting that high adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk of overall cancer mortality as well as a reduced risk of incidence of several cancer types (especially cancers of the colorectum, aerodigestive tract, breast, stomach, pancreas, prostate, liver, and head and neck).

  20. [Strategies for reducing risks in smoking: opportunity or threat].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Rodrigo; Nerín, Isabel

    2009-12-01

    The smoking control policies recommended by the World Health Organisation have achieved a slight decrease in smoking prevalence in the developed countries, although associated mortality is still very high. The use of tobacco products other than cigarettes and even medicinal nicotine (known as nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)) has been proposed as a risk reduction strategy. Among the tobacco products with less individual risk than cigarettes would be any type of tobacco without smoke (smokeless) with a low content in nitrosamines and modified cigarettes; both forms included under the PREP (Potentially Reduced Exposure Products) concept. The idea would be to promote these products among those who cannot quit smoking or wish to reduce their risk without giving up nicotine intake. The possible effects of risk reduction strategies, including PREP, on the decreased prevalence and morbidity and mortality are reviewed, and the possible implications that this measure could have in our country are analysed. Tobacco control measures in Spain are recent and still insufficient. Therefore, the current priority in Spain is the development of policies of control that have shown to more than effective. The marketing and advertising of new tobacco products, even with reduced potential risk, seems more a serious threat than an opportunity for the development of smoking control policies.

  1. Tests to Reduce TorreCat™ Technology to Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, Tyler; Emerson, Rachel Marie

    2016-02-26

    Torrefaction is the thermal treatment of materials in the absence of oxygen in the temperature range of 200 to 300 °C and has been shown to improve handling and grinding properties, hydrophobicity, volatiles content, energy density, and combustion performance of renewable energy biomass feedstock materials. The disadvantages of torrefaction are its relative high cost compared to the low value input feedstock material and the energy that can be lost to volatized gases. This work will demonstrate a new technology developed by Advanced Torrefaction Systems (ATS), known as TorreCat™ Technology, that uses an oxidation catalyst in a closed system to combust and destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other byproducts produced in the torrefaction process. An oxidation catalyst is a substance, or a combination of substances, that accelerate the rate of a chemical reaction without being consumed by the reaction. Catalytic combustion is a reaction that occurs at temperatures 50% lower than traditional combustion, such that essentially no NOx is created. The output of the oxidation catalyst (flue gas) consists mainly of superheated steam and inert gases (carbon dioxide and nitrogen), which can be used for heat in the thermal treatment process. INL has previously developed a pilot-scale Continuous-Feed Thermal Treatment System (CFTTS) that has 10 kg/hr capacity but does not reform the flue gas to reduce environmental concerns or capture all available heat from the biomass material. Using the TorreCat™ technology in INL’s thermal treatment system will demonstrate increased thermal efficiencies during the treatment process as well as reduced environmental impact and clean-up costs. The objective of this project is to determine the effectiveness of the Torrecat™ technology to reform the flue gas and capture as much of its heat content as possible.

  2. An Approach to Reducing Risk through School System Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Gary D.; Gottfredson, Denise C.

    This paper provides school district administrators with a structured method for developing school programs aimed at reducing the risk of adolescent dropout. The methodology encompasses problem definition, fact finding, mission management, overcoming inertia, cohering programs tied to theory, feasible goal-setting, and normative personnel…

  3. How to reduce the risk of purchasing fraud.

    PubMed

    Mann, Lance

    2013-07-01

    Purchasing fraud leads to significant losses for healthcare entities and damages the reputation of the industry. Designing and implementing an effective internal control environment helps reduce the risk of fraud. An effective control environment includes a variety of policies, procedures, strategies, and tactics.

  4. Healthy eating and reduced risk of cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Mahshid; O'Donnell, Martin; Anderson, Craig; Teo, Koon; Gao, Peggy; Sleight, Peter; Dagenais, Gilles; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the association of dietary factors and risk of cognitive decline in a population at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods: Baseline dietary intake and measures of the Mini-Mental State Examination were recorded in 27,860 men and women who were enrolled in 2 international parallel trials of the ONTARGET (Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial) and TRANSCEND (Telmisartan Randomised Assessment Study in ACE Intolerant Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease) studies. We measured diet quality using the modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to determine the association between diet quality and risk of ≥3-point decline in Mini-Mental State Examination score, and reported as hazard ratio with 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for covariates. Results: During 56 months of follow-up, 4,699 cases of cognitive decline occurred. We observed lower risk of cognitive decline among those in the healthiest dietary quintile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index compared with lowest quintile (hazard ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.86, Q5 vs Q1). Lower risk of cognitive decline was consistent regardless of baseline cognitive level. Conclusion: We found that higher diet quality was associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Improved diet quality represents an important potential target for reducing the global burden of cognitive decline. PMID:25948720

  5. Reducing uncertainty in risk modeling for methylmercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, R.; Egeland, G.; Middaugh, J.; Lee, R.

    1995-12-31

    The biomagnification and bioaccumulation of methylmercury in marine species represents a challenge for risk assessment related to the consumption of subsistence foods in Alaska. Because of the profound impact that food consumption advisories have on indigenous peoples seeking to preserve a way of life, there is a need to reduce uncertainty in risk assessment. Thus, research was initiated to reduce the uncertainty in assessing the health risks associated with the consumption of subsistence foods. Because marine subsistence foods typically contain elevated levels of methylmercury, preliminary research efforts have focused on methylmercury as the principal chemical of concern. Of particular interest are the antagonistic effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity. Because of this antagonism, methylmercury exposure through the consumption of marine mammal meat (with high selenium) may not be as toxic as comparable exposures through other sources of dietary intake, such as in the contaminated bread episode of Iraq (containing relatively low selenium). This hypothesis is supported by animal experiments showing reduced toxicity of methylmercury associated with marine mammal meat, by the antagonistic influence of selenium on methylmercury toxicity, and by negative clinical findings in adult populations exposed to methylmercury through a marine diet not subject to industrial contamination. Exploratory model development is underway to identify potential improvements and applications of current deterministic and probabilistic models, particularly by incorporating selenium as an antagonist in risk modeling methods.

  6. Reduced cancer risk in vegetarians: an analysis of recent reports.

    PubMed

    Lanou, Amy Joy; Svenson, Barbara

    2010-12-20

    This report reviews current evidence regarding the relationship between vegetarian eating patterns and cancer risk. Although plant-based diets including vegetarian and vegan diets are generally considered to be cancer protective, very few studies have directly addressed this question. Most large prospective observational studies show that vegetarian diets are at least modestly cancer protective (10%-12% reduction in overall cancer risk) although results for specific cancers are less clear. No long-term randomized clinical trials have been conducted to address this relationship. However, a broad body of evidence links specific plant foods such as fruits and vegetables, plant constituents such as fiber, antioxidants and other phytochemicals, and achieving and maintaining a healthy weight to reduced risk of cancer diagnosis and recurrence. Also, research links the consumption of meat, especially red and processed meats, to increased risk of several types of cancer. Vegetarian and vegan diets increase beneficial plant foods and plant constituents, eliminate the intake of red and processed meat, and aid in achieving and maintaining a healthy weight. The direct and indirect evidence taken together suggests that vegetarian diets are a useful strategy for reducing risk of cancer.

  7. Reduced cancer risk in vegetarians: an analysis of recent reports

    PubMed Central

    Lanou, Amy Joy; Svenson, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This report reviews current evidence regarding the relationship between vegetarian eating patterns and cancer risk. Although plant-based diets including vegetarian and vegan diets are generally considered to be cancer protective, very few studies have directly addressed this question. Most large prospective observational studies show that vegetarian diets are at least modestly cancer protective (10%–12% reduction in overall cancer risk) although results for specific cancers are less clear. No long-term randomized clinical trials have been conducted to address this relationship. However, a broad body of evidence links specific plant foods such as fruits and vegetables, plant constituents such as fiber, antioxidants and other phytochemicals, and achieving and maintaining a healthy weight to reduced risk of cancer diagnosis and recurrence. Also, research links the consumption of meat, especially red and processed meats, to increased risk of several types of cancer. Vegetarian and vegan diets increase beneficial plant foods and plant constituents, eliminate the intake of red and processed meat, and aid in achieving and maintaining a healthy weight. The direct and indirect evidence taken together suggests that vegetarian diets are a useful strategy for reducing risk of cancer. PMID:21407994

  8. Using Epidemiology and Neurotoxicology to Reduce Risks to Young Workers

    PubMed Central

    Rohlman, Diane S.; Nuwayhid, Iman; Ismail, Ahmed; Saddik, Basema

    2012-01-01

    Children around the world are working in hazardous or unsafe conditions and they are at risk to injury through manual labor and susceptible to poisoning due to chemical exposures in the work place. Because of their behavior and the developmental changes occurring throughout childhood and adolescence children are more vulnerable to injury. Often children work because of economic necessity, coming from families living in extreme poverty, with poor housing conditions, unsafe water supplies, poor sanitation, and inadequate food supplies making them even more vulnerable to poor developmental outcomes. This presents a multifaceted problem that can be challenging to address. Although many studies have examined occupational risks among adults very few studies have examined the impact of these risks on children. This paper reflects a summary of the talks from the symposium “Using Epidemiology and Neurotoxicology to Reduce Risks to Young Workers” presented at the 13th International Neurotoxicology Association Meeting and the 11th International Symposium on Neurobehavioral Methods and Effects in Occupational and Environmental Health in Xi’an China in June 2011. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that children are exposed to various neurotoxicants, show increased symptoms and health problems and are working in hazardous conditions with minimal safety restrictions. Other studies have identified neurotoxicology effects in children from occupational exposures. Prevention methods have potential for reducing risks to young workers short of eliminating child labor and should be addressed to multiple stakeholders, parents, employers and children. PMID:22394482

  9. Technology for managing risk during international inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Lemley, J.R.; Curtiss, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    Inspections under international agreements related to nonproliferation of nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons place sensitive commercial and national-defense information at risk. Facility operators can control risk to sensitive information by denying physical access to inspectors and providing alternative means of inspection. Similarly, exposure of inspectors and facility personnel to radiation or hazardous environments can be reduced, and damage to sensitive processing environments can be avoided if inspection objectives can be achieved without the need for direct physical access by inspectors. A system developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) enables inspectors to achieve inspection objectives in sensitive or hazardous areas by providing virtual presence at an inspection location in place of physical presence. The system has two parts, a mobile unit operated by facility personnel and a stationary base station operated by inspectors. The mobile and stationary units are connected by a fiber-optic communications link. The mobile unit is equipped with two video cameras, a global positioning system (GPS) with dead-reckoning capability, distance measuring equipment (DME), and a theodolite. Five unused channels of RS-232 are available to accommodate data transfer from and control of additional sensor modules. The base station is equipped with monitors for video signals and a notebook computer for analysis and display of sensor data. Inspectors can direct inspection activities through two-way voice communication with the operators of the mobile unit; the real-time response to interactions between inspectors and operators enhances the credibility of the inspection process. Applications involving international inspections for arms control and nonproliferation as well as other applications, such as As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and two-person-rule implementation, are discussed. Planned improvements and extensions of system capabilities are outlined.

  10. Strategies for the Commercialization and Deployment of Greenhouse Gas Intensity-Reducing Technologies and Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration

    2009-01-01

    New technologies will be a critical component--perhaps the critical component--of our efforts to tackle the related challenges of energy security, climate change, and air pollution, all the while maintaining a strong economy. But just developing new technologies is not enough. Our ability to accelerate the market penetration of clean energy, enabling, and other climate-related technologies will have a determining impact on our ability to slow, stop, and reverse the growth in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Title XVI, Subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the Administration to report on its strategy to promote the commercialization and deployment (C&D) of GHG intensity-reducing technologies and practices. The Act also requests the Administration to prepare an inventory of climate-friendly technologies suitable for deployment and to identify the barriers and commercial risks facing advanced technologies. Because these issues are related, they are integrated here within a single report that we, representing the Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI), are pleased to provide the President, the Congress, and the public. Over the past eight years, the Administration of President George W. Bush has pursued a series of policies and measures aimed at encouraging the development and deployment of advanced technologies to reduce GHG emissions. This report highlights these policies and measures, discusses the barriers to each, and integrates them within a larger body of other extant policy. Taken together, more than 300 policies and measures described in this document may be viewed in conjunction with the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program's (CCTP's) Strategic Plan, published in September 2006, which focuses primarily on the role of advanced technology and associated research and development (R&D) for mitigating GHG emissions. The CCTP, a multi-agency technology planning and coordination program, initiated by

  11. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce coronary heart disease risk.

    PubMed

    Adedeji, O O; Oyakhire, G K; Saeed, A K; Ghamdi, A I

    2011-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, and its incidence is increasing in the developing world. The effectiveness of interventions in developing countries has been questioned in view of the overwhelming burden of other health problems in such environments. To determine the effectiveness of coronary heart disease risk reduction interventions. The effects of lipid lowering interventions as well as dietary and lifestyle modifications on some risk factors of CHD were studied retrospectively in 47 males and 53 female patients [aged 33 to 61 years; mean age 47.20 ±14.17 years] attending a lipid clinic in Saudi Arabia. The main outcome measures were reductions in the values of the body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, blood glucose and lipid levels, as well as absolute reductions of risk category. The interventions were associated with reduced BMI by 2.75 percent (p<0.05), systolic pressure by 3.05% (p=0.12), diastolic pressure by 5.13% (p<0.05), blood glucose by 6.51% (p<0.05), total cholesterol by 16.35% (p<0.05), LDL-cholesterol by 4.81% (p<0.05) and triglyceride by 35.01% (p<0.05). HDL-cholesterol remained within the normal range before and after the interventions in all patients. Following the interventions, the absolute risk reductions in category 1 were 45.51% and 53.35%, for males and females, respectively. In category 2, the absolute risk reductions were 30.05% and 45.67%, for males and females, respectively. In category 3, the absolute risk reductions were 100% for both sexes. For the entire study population, the absolute risk reductions were 48.65% in category 1 and 38.10% in category 2, while the percentage of patients with one or no risk factor (category 3) increased by 62%. Lipid-lowering interventions appear to be as effective in reducing CHD risk in Bisha patients as in other populations. Appreciable absolute risk reductions can be achieved within a short period of time in all patients

  12. Determining Best Practices to Reduce Occupational Health Risks in Firefighters.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Suzanne L; Phillips, Jonathan S; Twilbeck, Travis J

    2015-07-01

    The physical demands of firefighting are extensive, and firefighters face increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, musculoskeletal injury, and cancer. To reduce these risks, a tailored wellness initiative program (FIT Firefighter) was developed and executed. Implementation of FIT Firefighter, consisting of assessment, educational, instructional, and personal coaching and training elements regarding nutrition, health, fitness, wellness, and strength and conditioning, revealed enhanced healthy behavior change including increased motivation and marked improvements in blood pressure, resting heart rate, aerobic fitness, body mass index, waist circumference, percent body fat, back flexibility, and biceps strength among participating firefighters.

  13. Management strategies to reduce risk of postoperative infections.

    PubMed

    Galor, Anat; Goldhardt, Raquel; Wellik, Sarah R; Gregori, Ninel Z; Flynn, Harry W

    2013-12-01

    Postoperative infections, although rare, are still of great concern to the ophthalmologist. The incidence of post-cataract endophthalmitis is low, with a range of .28 per 1,000 to 2.99 per 1000. In addition to intraoperative considerations such as poor wound construction, vitreous loss, topical anesthesia, and prolonged surgical time, other risk factors include preoperative factors such as a diseased ocular surface and systemic immunosuppression. Potential methods of reducing risk of endophthalmitis after anterior segment surgery are discussed and available literature is summarized.

  14. Management strategies to reduce risk of postoperative infections

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Goldhardt, Raquel; Wellik, Sarah R.; Gregori, Ninel Z.; Flynn, Harry W.

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative infections, although rare, are still of great concern to the ophthalmologist. The incidence of post-cataract endophthalmitis is low, with a range of .28 per 1,000 to 2.99 per 1000. In addition to intraoperative considerations such as poor wound construction, vitreous loss, topical anesthesia, and prolonged surgical time, other risk factors include preoperative factors such as a diseased ocular surface and systemic immunosuppression. Potential methods of reducing risk of endophthalmitis after anterior segment surgery are discussed and available literature is summarized. PMID:24319649

  15. Wikipedia use: Risk for developing technology addiction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the addictive potential of Wikipedia usage. The users approached a technology addiction clinic for the management of excessive use of technology. A clinical interview was used to elicit information about usages. It indicates the addictive use of Wikipedia and associated dysfunction in lifestyle. It has implication for promotion of healthy use of technology. PMID:28163416

  16. Wikipedia use: Risk for developing technology addiction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the addictive potential of Wikipedia usage. The users approached a technology addiction clinic for the management of excessive use of technology. A clinical interview was used to elicit information about usages. It indicates the addictive use of Wikipedia and associated dysfunction in lifestyle. It has implication for promotion of healthy use of technology.

  17. Reducing OR Traffic Using Education, Policy Development, and Communication Technology.

    PubMed

    Esser, Jennifer; Shrinski, Keonemana; Cady, Rhonda; Belew, John

    2016-01-01

    A bundled approach to surgical site infection (SSI) prevention strategies includes reducing OR traffic. A nurse-led quality improvement (QI) team sought to reduce OR traffic through education and a process change that included wireless communication technology and policy development. The team measured OR traffic by counting the frequency of door openings per hour in seven surgical suites during 305 surgical procedures conducted during similar 22-week periods before and after the QI project intervention. Door openings decreased significantly (P < 0.05) from an average of 37.8 per hour to 32.8 per hour after the QI project intervention. This suggests that our multifaceted approach reduces OR traffic. The next steps of this project include analyzing automatically captured video to understand OR traffic patterns and expanding education to departments and external personnel frequently present in our surgical suites. Future research evaluating the effectiveness of this OR traffic initiative on SSI incidence is recommended. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Technology Development Risk Assessment for Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathias, Donovan L.; Godsell, Aga M.; Go, Susie

    2006-01-01

    A new approach for assessing development risk associated with technology development projects is presented. The method represents technology evolution in terms of sector-specific discrete development stages. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to generate development probability distributions based on statistical models of the discrete transitions. Development risk is derived from the resulting probability distributions and specific program requirements. Two sample cases are discussed to illustrate the approach, a single rocket engine development and a three-technology space transportation portfolio.

  19. Reducing Metabolic Syndrome Risk Using a Personalized Wellness Program.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gregory; Scott, Adam; Honcz, Joseph; Spettell, Claire; Pradhan, Susil

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a targeted, personalized wellness program on reducing employees' future risk of metabolic syndrome. Aetna piloted a year-long program that included a limited genetic profile, a traditional psychosocial assessment, and high-intensity coaching in a randomized controlled study of Aetna employees with an increased risk for metabolic syndrome. Sustained employee engagement of 50% over the course of 1 year; 76% of participating employees lost an average of 10 pounds (4.5 kg) (P < 0.001 vs baseline weight), and there were trends in improved clinical outcomes relative to three of five metabolic factors. Average health care costs were reduced by $122 per participant per month, resulting in a positive return on investment in the program's first year. At scale, such programs would be expected to lead to significant downstream reduction in major clinical events and costs.

  20. Dairy food supplementation may reduce malnutrition risk in institutionalised elderly.

    PubMed

    Iuliano, Sandra; Poon, Shirley; Wang, Xiaofang; Bui, Minh; Seeman, Ego

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition in institutionalised elderly increases morbidity and care costs. Meat and dairy foods are high-quality protein sources so adequate intakes may reduce malnutrition risk. We aimed to determine whether inadequate intakes of meat and dairy foods contribute to malnutrition in institutionalised elderly. This cross-sectional study involved 215 elderly residents (70·2 % females, mean age 85·8 years) from twenty-one aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Dietary intake was assessed using observed plate waste. Food groups and serving sizes were based on the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. Nutrient content was analysed using a computerised nutrient analysis software (Xyris). Malnutrition risk was assessed using the Mini Nutrition Assessment (MNA) tool; a score between 24 and 30 indicates normal nutritional status. Data were analysed using robust regression. Mean MNA score was 21·6 (sd 2·7). In total, 68 % of residents were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (MNA score≤23·5). Protein intake was 87 (sd 28) % of the Australian recommended dietary intake (RDI). Consumption averaged 1 serving each of dairy foods and meat daily. Number of dairy and meat servings related to proportion of protein RDI (both P24 points). Provision of meat and dairy foods did not meet recommended levels. On the basis of current dietary intakes in aged-care residents, increasing consumption of dairy foods to the recommended four servings daily ensures protein adequacy and may reduce malnutrition risk in institutionalised elderly, and so reduce risk of comorbidities and costs associated with malnutrition.

  1. Using detection and deterrence to reduce insider risk

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, R F; Carlson, R L; Udell, C J

    1988-06-01

    This paper addresses a new concept of interaction between adversary detection and deterrence. It provides an initial evaluation of the effects of these variables on the risk of theft of special nuclear material by an insider adversary and can be extended to the sabotage threat. A steady-state risk equation is used. Exercises with this equation show that deterrence, resulting from the prospect of detection, has a greater ability to reduce the risk than the detection exercise itself. This is true for all cases except those in which the probability of detection is 1. Cases were developed for three different types of adversaries that can be distinguished from one another by the level of detection they are willing to tolerate before they are deterred from attempting a theft. By considering the effects of detection, deterrence, and adversary type, the ground work is laid for designing cost-effective insider threat-protection systems. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Nuclear Process Science - 9279

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Poloski, Adam P.; Vienna, John D.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Hobbs, David; Wilmarth, B.; Mcilwain, Michael; Subramanian, K.; Krahn, Steve; Machara, N.

    2009-03-01

    In this document, we propose that scientific investments for the disposal of nuclear and hazardous wastes should not be focused solely on what may be viewed as current Department of Energy needs, but also upon longer-term investments in specific areas of science that underpin technologies presently in use. In the latter regard, we propose four science theme areas: 1) the structure and dynamics of materials and interfaces, 2) coupled chemical and physical processes, 3) complex solution phase phenomena, and 4) chemical recognition phenomena. The proposed scientific focus for each of these theme areas and the scientific opportunities are identified, along with links to major risks within the initiative areas identified in EM’s Engineering and Technology Roadmap.

  3. Reducing the Risks for Contrast-Induced Nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Stacul, Fulvio

    2005-12-15

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is one of the most serious adverse events associated with the use of contrast media (CM). Patients who develop this complication can have increased morbidity, higher rates of mortality, lengthy hospital stays, and poor long-term outcomes. Although CIN cannot be eliminated, the chances of developing this condition can be reduced by using appropriate prevention strategies. An important first step to reduce the chance of CIN is to identify risk factors associated with this condition. Patients with a previously elevated serum creatinine level, especially when secondary to diabetic nephropathy, are at great risk for developing CIN. Other patient-related risk factors include concurrent use of nephrotoxic medications, dehydration, congestive heart failure, age greater than 70 years, and probably the presence of diabetes mellitus even if serum creatinine is normal. Adequate hydration is widely accepted as an important prophylactic measure for preventing CIN, but the optimal hydration regimen is still debatable. The risk of CIN increases with greater doses of CM, as well as with the type of CM used. A high-osmolar CM poses a greater risk of CIN than does a low-osmolar CM and, as recent but limited data suggest, the use of an iso-osmolar CM is less nephrotoxic than a low-osmolar CM in patients with renal impairment following intra-arterial procedures, although this finding needs to be verified in future clinical studies. Pharmacologic agents such as calcium channel blockers, dopamine, atrial natriuretic peptide, fenoldopam, prostaglandin E1, and endothelin receptor antagonist have not been proven effective against CIN development. Controversies still exist on the possible effectiveness of theophylline and N-acetylcysteine. Simple strategies for the prevention of CIN in at-risk patients are reviewed and unproven interventions are discussed.

  4. Allergy reduces the risk of meningioma: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-fei; Ji, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Li, Shou-wei; Yan, Chang-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common brain tumours; however, little is known regarding their aetiology. The data are inconsistent concerning atopic disease and the risk of developing meningioma. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between allergic conditions and the risk of developing meningioma. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Web of SCI from Jan 1979 to Feb 2016. Two investigators independently selected the relevant articles according to the inclusion criteria. Eight case-control studies and 2 cohort studies were included in the final analysis, comprising 5,679 meningioma cases and 55,621 control subjects. Compared with no history of allergy, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for allergic conditions was 0.81 (0.70–0.94) for meningioma in a random-effects meta-analysis. Inverse correlations of meningioma occurrence were also identified for asthma and eczema, in which the pooled ORs were 0.78 (0.70–0.86) and 0.78 (0.69–0.87), respectively. A reduced risk of meningioma occurrence was identified in hay fever; however, the association was weak (0.88, 95% CI = 0.78–0.99). The source of this heterogeneity could be the various confounding variables in individual studies. Overall, the current meta-analysis indicated that allergy reduced the risk of developing meningiomas. Large cohort studies are required to investigate this relationship. PMID:28071746

  5. Natural disturbance reduces disease risk in endangered rainforest frog populations

    PubMed Central

    Roznik, Elizabeth A.; Sapsford, Sarah J.; Pike, David A.; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Alford, Ross A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural disturbances can drive disease dynamics in animal populations by altering the microclimates experienced by hosts and their pathogens. Many pathogens are highly sensitive to temperature and moisture, and therefore small changes in habitat structure can alter the microclimate in ways that increase or decrease infection prevalence and intensity in host populations. Here we show that a reduction of rainforest canopy cover caused by a severe tropical cyclone decreased the risk of endangered rainforest frogs (Litoria rheocola) becoming infected by a fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis). Reductions in canopy cover increased the temperatures and rates of evaporative water loss in frog microhabitats, which reduced B. dendrobatidis infection risk in frogs by an average of 11–28% in cyclone-damaged areas, relative to unaffected areas. Natural disturbances to the rainforest canopy can therefore provide an immediate benefit to frogs by altering the microclimate in ways that reduce infection risk. This could increase host survival and reduce the probability of epidemic disease outbreaks. For amphibian populations under immediate threat from this pathogen, targeted manipulation of canopy cover could increase the availability of warmer, drier microclimates and therefore tip the balance from host extinction to coexistence. PMID:26294048

  6. Natural disturbance reduces disease risk in endangered rainforest frog populations.

    PubMed

    Roznik, Elizabeth A; Sapsford, Sarah J; Pike, David A; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Alford, Ross A

    2015-08-21

    Natural disturbances can drive disease dynamics in animal populations by altering the microclimates experienced by hosts and their pathogens. Many pathogens are highly sensitive to temperature and moisture, and therefore small changes in habitat structure can alter the microclimate in ways that increase or decrease infection prevalence and intensity in host populations. Here we show that a reduction of rainforest canopy cover caused by a severe tropical cyclone decreased the risk of endangered rainforest frogs (Litoria rheocola) becoming infected by a fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis). Reductions in canopy cover increased the temperatures and rates of evaporative water loss in frog microhabitats, which reduced B. dendrobatidis infection risk in frogs by an average of 11-28% in cyclone-damaged areas, relative to unaffected areas. Natural disturbances to the rainforest canopy can therefore provide an immediate benefit to frogs by altering the microclimate in ways that reduce infection risk. This could increase host survival and reduce the probability of epidemic disease outbreaks. For amphibian populations under immediate threat from this pathogen, targeted manipulation of canopy cover could increase the availability of warmer, drier microclimates and therefore tip the balance from host extinction to coexistence.

  7. Regulatory uncertainty and the associated business risk for emerging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerr, Robert A.

    2011-04-01

    An oversight system specifically concerned with nanomaterials should be flexible enough to take into account the unique aspects of individual novel materials and the settings in which they might be used, while recognizing that heretofore unrecognized safety issues may require future modifications. This article considers a question not explicitly considered by the project team: what is the risk that uncertainty over how regulatory oversight will be applied to nanomaterials will delay or block the development of this emerging technology, thereby depriving human health of potential and substantial benefits? An ambiguous regulatory environment could delay the availability of valuable new technology and therapeutics for human health by reducing access to investment capital. Venture capitalists list regulatory uncertainty as a major reason not to invest at all in certain areas. Uncertainty is far more difficult to evaluate than risk, which lends itself to quantitative models and can be factored into projections of return on possible investments. Loss of time has a large impact on investment return. An examination of regulatory case histories suggests that an increase in regulatory resting requirement, where the path is well-defined, is far less costly than a delay of a year or more in achieving product approval and market launch.

  8. Relationship between climate change and environmental risk's of forestry technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécsinger, Judit; Polgár, András

    2017-04-01

    Environmental risk analysis of the technological aspects of forestry is an important complement to the climate research. Commonly used forestry technologies, like cleaning cutting or final harvest, causes various environmental effects which presents different environmental risks. Based on their material and energy deductions and emissions, they can contribute in different ways to global environmental problems such as climate change. Using environmental risk assessment we explored the newly emerging environmental hazards of the typical forestry technologies due to climate change. These hazards are known in terms of their properties (eg. aridification, toxic load etc), but the spatial appearance is novel. We investigated the possible stressor-response relationships, then estimated the expected exposure. In the risk characterization, we summarized information received in the previous steps. As a result we set up the risk matrices of the working systems of intermediate cutting and final harvest in the stands of beech, oak and spruce. In the matrices, the technologies ranked by values of Global Warming Potential (GWP 100 years) were placed in relation of the average temperature change (dT [° C]) of climate change scenarios. We defined the environmental risks in text form, specifying classes of risks: - I. Class: high risk - II. Class: medium risk - III. Class: low risk. The use of a risk matrix is an important complement to climate change decision-making when selecting the forestry technologies. It serves as a guideline for both foresters and decision makers. Keywords: climate change / environmental risk / risk assessment / forest technology's risk matrix Acknowledgement: This research has been supported by the Agroclimate.2 VKSZ_12-1- 2013-0034 project.

  9. Extreme Geohazards: Reducing the Disaster Risk and Increasing Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, Hans-Peter; Stein, Seth; Brocklebank, Sean; Jules-Plag, Shelley; Marsh, Stuart; Campus, Paola

    2013-04-01

    Extreme geohazards have the potential to escalate the global sustainability crisis and put us close to the boundaries of the safe operating space for humanity. Exposure of human assets to geohazards has increased dramatically in recent decades, and the sensitivity of the built environment and the embedded socio-economic fabric have changed. We are putting the urban environment, including megacities, in harm's way. Paradoxically, innovation during recent decades, in particular, urban innovation, has increased the disaster risk and coupled this risk to the sustainability crisis. Only more innovation can reduce disaster risk and lead us out of the sustainability crisis. Extreme geohazards (volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis) that occurred regularly throughout the last few millennia mostly did not cause major disasters because population density was low and the built environment was not sprawling into hazardous areas to the same extent as today. Similar extreme events today would cause unparalleled damage on a global scale and could worsen the sustainability crisis. Simulation of these extreme hazards under present conditions can help to assess the disaster risk. The Geohazards Community of Practice of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) with support from the European Science Foundation is preparing a white paper assessing the contemporary disaster risks associated with extreme geohazards and developing a vision for science and society to engage in deliberations addressing this risk (see http://www.geohazcop.org/projects/extgeowp). Risk awareness and monitoring is highly uneven across the world, and this creates two kinds of problems. Firstly, potential hazards are much more closely monitored in wealthy countries than in the developing world. But the largest hazards are global in nature, and it is critical to get as much forewarning as possible to develop an effective response. The disasters and near-misses of the past show that adherence to scientific

  10. Risk-based systems analysis for emerging technologies: Applications of a technology risk assessment model to public decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Quadrel, M.J.; Fowler, K.M.; Cameron, R.; Treat, R.J.; McCormack, W.D.; Cruse, J.

    1995-04-01

    The risk-based systems analysis model was designed to establish funding priorities among competing technologies for tank waste remediation. The model addresses a gap in the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) ``toolkit`` for establishing funding priorities among emerging technologies by providing disciplined risk and cost assessments of candidate technologies within the context of a complete remediation system. The model is comprised of a risk and cost assessment and a decision interface. The former assesses the potential reductions in risk and cost offered by new technology relative to the baseline risk and cost of an entire system. The latter places this critical information in context of other values articulated by decision makers and stakeholders in the DOE system. The risk assessment portion of the model is demonstrated for two candidate technologies for tank waste retrieval (arm-based mechanical retrieval -- the ``long reach arm``) and subsurface barriers (close-coupled chemical barriers). Relative changes from the base case in cost and risk are presented for these two technologies to illustrate how the model works. The model and associated software build on previous work performed for DOE`s Office of Technology Development and the former Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration, and complement a decision making tool presented at Waste Management 1994 for integrating technical judgements and non-technical (stakeholder) values when making technology funding decisions.

  11. Avanex Unique Endophyte Technology: Reduced Insect Food Source at Airports.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Christopher G L; Popay, Alison J; Rolston, M Philip; Townsend, Richard J; Lloyd-West, Catherine M; Card, Stuart D

    2016-02-01

    Birds and other forms of wildlife are a major issue for airport authorities worldwide, as they can create hazards to operating aircraft. Wildlife "strikes," the majority caused by birds, can cause damage to operating aircraft and in severe cases lead to a loss of human life. Many airfields contain large areas of ground cover herbage alongside their runways that consist of mixtures of grasses, legumes, and weeds that can harbor many invertebrates. Many airfields use insecticides to control insect populations; however, mounting pressure from regional councils and water boards aim to reduce this practice due to ground water runoff and contamination concerns. Avanex Unique Endophyte Technology, a product specifically developed to reduce the attractiveness of airports and surrounding areas to birds, is based on a novel association between a selected strain of Epichloë endophyte and a turf-type tall fescue cultivar. This grass-endophyte association acts through a direct mechanism whereby a negative response in birds is created through taste aversion and postingestion feedback as well as an indirect mechanism by deterring many invertebrates, a food source of many bird species.

  12. From Lipids to Inflammation: New Approaches to Reducing Atherosclerotic Risk.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael D; Fazio, Sergio

    2016-02-19

    The introduction of statins ≈ 30 years ago ushered in the era of lipid lowering as the most effective way to reduce risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, residual risk remains high, and statin intolerance is frequently encountered in clinical practice. After a long dry period, the field of therapeutics targeted to lipids and atherosclerosis has entered a renaissance. Moreover, the demonstration of clinical benefits from the addition of ezetimibe to statin therapy in subjects with acute coronary syndromes has renewed the enthusiasm for the cholesterol hypothesis and the hope that additional agents that lower low-density lipoprotein will decrease risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Drugs in the orphan disease category are now available for patients with the most extreme hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, discovery and rapid translation of a novel biological pathway has given rise to a new class of cholesterol-lowering drugs, the proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin-9 inhibitors. Trials of niacin added to statin have failed to demonstrate cardiac benefits, and 3 cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors have also failed to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, despite producing substantial increases in HDL levels. Although the utility of triglyceride-lowering therapies remains uncertain, 2 large clinical trials are testing the influence of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on atherosclerotic events in hypertriglyceridemia. Novel antisense therapies targeting apolipoprotein C-III (for triglyceride reduction) and apo(a) (for lipoprotein(a) reduction) are showing a promising trajectory. Finally, 2 large clinical trials are formally putting the inflammatory hypothesis of atherosclerosis to the test and may open a new avenue for cardiovascular disease risk reduction.

  13. Reduced kidney function is a risk factor for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Jari A; Zaccardi, Francesco; Karppi, Jouni; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kurl, Sudhir

    2016-08-01

    There is limited knowledge on the relationship between kidney function and incidence of atrial fibrillation. Thus, this prospective study was designed to evaluate whether various biomarkers of kidney function are associated to the risk of atrial fibrillation. The study population consisted of 1840 subjects (615 women and 1225 men) aged 61-82 years. Cystatin C- and creatinine-based estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcys and eGRFcreat , respectively) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) were assessed to investigate their relationship with the risk of atrial fibrillation. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, a total of 159 incident atrial fibrillation cases occurred. After adjustment for potential confounders, the risk of atrial fibrillation was increased (hazard ratio 2.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.56-4.81, P < 0.001) in subjects with reduced kidney function (eGFRcys , 15-59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ) compared to subjects with normal kidney function (≥90 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ). Similar results were also found when comparing the respective groups of subjects defined by their eGRFcreat levels (hazard ratio 2.41, CI 1.09-5.30, P = 0.029). Consistently, subjects with ACR ≥300 mg/g had an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio 2.16, CI 1.35-2.82, P < 0.001) compared to those with ACR <30 mg/g. Reduced eGFR and albuminuria were associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation.

  14. Novel technology for reducing wavefront image processing latency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, David; Schwartz, Noah; Vick, Andy; Coughlan, John; Halsall, Rob; Basden, Alastair; Dipper, Nigel

    2016-07-01

    Adaptive optics is essential for the successful operation of the future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). At the heart of these AO system lies the real-time control which has become computationally challenging. A majority of the previous efforts has been aimed at reducing the wavefront reconstruction latency by using many-core hardware accelerators such as Xeon Phis and GPUs. These modern hardware solutions offer a large numbers of cores combined with high memory bandwidths but have restrictive input/output (I/O). The lack of efficient I/O capability makes the data handling very inefficient and adds both to the overall latency and jitter. For example a single wavefront sensor for an ELT scale adaptive optics system can produce hundreds of millions of pixels per second that need to be processed. Passing all this data through a CPU and into GPUs or Xeon Phis, even by reducing memory copies by using systems such as GPUDirect, is highly inefficient. The Mellanox TILE series is a novel technology offering a high number of cores and multiple 10 Gbps Ethernet ports. We present results of the TILE-Gx36 as a front-end wavefront sensor processing unit. In doing so we are able to greatly reduce the amount of data needed to be transferred to the wavefront reconstruction hardware. We show that the performance of the Mellanox TILE-GX36 is in-line with typical requirements, in terms of mean calculation time and acceptable jitter, for E-ELT first-light instruments and that the Mellanox TILE series is a serious contender for all E-ELT instruments.

  15. Women's constructions of the 'right time' to consider decisions about risk-reducing mastectomy and risk-reducing oophorectomy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Women who are notified they carry a BRCA1/2 mutation are presented with surgical options to reduce their risk of breast and ovarian cancer, including risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) and risk-reducing oophorectomy (RRO). Growing evidence suggests that a sub-group of women do not make decisions about RRM and RRO immediately following genetic testing, but rather, consider these decisions years later. Women's perspectives on the timing of these decisions are not well understood. Accordingly, the purpose of this research was to describe how women construct the 'right time' to consider decisions about RRM and RRO. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 22 BRCA1/2 carrier women and analyzed using qualitative, constant comparative methods. Results The time that lapsed between receipt of genetic test results and receipt of RRM or RRO ranged from three months to nine years. The findings highlighted the importance of considering decisions about RRM and RRO one at a time. The women constructed the 'right time' to consider these decisions to be when: (1) decisions fit into their lives, (2) they had enough time to think about decisions, (3) they were ready emotionally to deal with the decisions and the consequences, (4) all the issues and conflicts were sorted out, (5) there were better options available, and (6) the health care system was ready for them. Conclusions These findings offer novel insights relevant to health care professionals who provide decision support to women considering RRM and RRO. PMID:20687957

  16. A probabilistic risk management based process for planning and management of technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largent, Matthew Clinton

    In the current environment of limited research funding and evolving aerospace needs and requirements, the development of new technology is a critical process. Technologies are designed to meet specific system performance needs, but must be developed in order to reduce uncertainty associated with meeting the needs, as well as uncertainty regarding additional effects that the technology will have on the system. The development project will have risk associated with meeting budget and schedule requirements, and with the completion of the development project plan. Existing methods for technology development fall short of quantifying all areas of risk and uncertainty, and do not provide a method for linking the reduction of performance uncertainty with the management of cost, time, and project risk. This thesis introduces the Technology Development Planning and Management (TDPM) process, a structured process using probabilistic methods and risk management concepts to assist in the planning and management of technology development projects. The TDPM process focuses on planning activities to reduce the areas of performance uncertainty that have the largest effects on system level goals. The cost and schedule uncertainty and project risk associated with the project plan are quantified in order to allow informed management of the project plan and eventual development project. TDPM was implemented for two technology development examples. The first example focused on the implementation of the process for a simple technology development project, showcasing the ability to plan for uncertainty reduction, demonstrate the resulting effects on the system level, and still manage the project cost and schedule risk. The second example was performed by an experienced technology development manager, who implemented TDPM on the hypothetical development of a technology currently being studied. Through the examples, the TDPM process was shown to be a valid and useful tool that advances the

  17. Targeting ApoC-III to Reduce Coronary Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Qamar, Arman; Millar, John S; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are causal contributors to the risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD). Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) is a component of TRLs that elevates plasma triglycerides (TGs) through delaying the lipolysis of TGs and the catabolism of TRL remnants. Recent human genetics approaches have shown that heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in APOC3, the gene encoding apoC-III, lower plasma TGs and protect from CAD. This observation has spawned new interest in therapeutic efforts to target apoC-III. Here, we briefly review both currently available as well as developing therapies for reducing apoC-III levels and function to lower TGs and cardiovascular risk. These therapies include existing options including statins, fibrates, thiazolidinediones, omega-3-fatty acids, and niacin, as well as an antisense oligonucleotide targeting APOC3 currently in clinical development. We review the mechanisms of action by which these drugs reduce apoC-III and the current understanding of how reduction in apoC-III may impact CAD risk.

  18. Reducing homicide risk in Indianapolis between 1997 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Nicholas; McGarrell, Edmund F

    2010-09-01

    Rates of homicide risk are not evenly distributed across the US population. Prior research indicates that young males in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods are particularly vulnerable to lethal violence. The traditional criminal justice response to violent crime in the urban context has the potential to exacerbate problems, particularly when broad-based arrest sweeps and general deterrence initiatives are the standard models used by law enforcement. Recent studies suggest that alternative intervention approaches that use both specific deterrence combined with improving pro-social opportunities has shown promise in reducing violent crime in these high-risk contexts. This paper examines the changes in homicide patterns for the highest-risk populations in Indianapolis after a "pulling levers" intervention was implemented in the late 1990s to address youth, gang, and gun violence. Multilevel growth curve regression models controlling for a linear trend over time, important structural correlates of homicide across urban neighborhoods, and between-neighborhood variance estimates showed that homicide rates involving the highest-risk populations (i.e., actors 15 to 24 years old) were most likely to experience a statistically significant and substantive reduction after the intervention was implemented (IRR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.29 - 0.78). Among male actors in this age range, Black male homicide rates (IRR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.25 - 0.70) and White male rates (IRR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.15 - 0.79) declined substantially more than homicide rates involving actors outside the 15 to 24 years age range (IRR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.54 - 1.69). In addition, neighborhoods where specific, community-level strategies were implemented had statistically significant and substantive high-risk homicide rate declines. We conclude that further extension of the pulling levers framework appears warranted in light of the recent findings. Alternative justice

  19. Reducing Homicide Risk in Indianapolis between 1997 and 2000

    PubMed Central

    McGarrell, Edmund F.

    2010-01-01

    Rates of homicide risk are not evenly distributed across the US population. Prior research indicates that young males in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods are particularly vulnerable to lethal violence. The traditional criminal justice response to violent crime in the urban context has the potential to exacerbate problems, particularly when broad-based arrest sweeps and general deterrence initiatives are the standard models used by law enforcement. Recent studies suggest that alternative intervention approaches that use both specific deterrence combined with improving pro-social opportunities has shown promise in reducing violent crime in these high-risk contexts. This paper examines the changes in homicide patterns for the highest-risk populations in Indianapolis after a “pulling levers” intervention was implemented in the late 1990s to address youth, gang, and gun violence. Multilevel growth curve regression models controlling for a linear trend over time, important structural correlates of homicide across urban neighborhoods, and between-neighborhood variance estimates showed that homicide rates involving the highest-risk populations (i.e., actors 15 to 24 years old) were most likely to experience a statistically significant and substantive reduction after the intervention was implemented (IRR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.29 – 0.78). Among male actors in this age range, Black male homicide rates (IRR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.25 – 0.70) and White male rates (IRR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.15 – 0.79) declined substantially more than homicide rates involving actors outside the 15 to 24 years age range (IRR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.54 – 1.69). In addition, neighborhoods where specific, community-level strategies were implemented had statistically significant and substantive high-risk homicide rate declines. We conclude that further extension of the pulling levers framework appears warranted in light of the recent findings. Alternative

  20. Got risk? risk-centric perspective for spacecraft technology decision-making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Cornford, Steven L.; Moran, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    A risk-based decision-making methodology conceived and developed at JPL and NASA has been used to aid in decision making for spacecraft technology assessment, adoption, development and operation. It takes a risk-centric perspective, through which risks are used as a reasoning step to interpose between mission objectives and risk mitigation measures.

  1. Active fans and grizzly bears: Reducing risks for wilderness campers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakals, M. E.; Wilford, D. J.; Wellwood, D. W.; MacDougall, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears ( Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation, stream bank conditions, and bear ecology and behaviour. Educating wilderness campers and providing a method of decision-making to reduce risk supports Parks Canada's public safety program; a program based on the principle of user self-sufficiency. Reducing grizzly bear-human conflicts complements the efforts of Parks Canada to ensure a healthy grizzly bear population.

  2. EPA Recognized for Research on Reducing Risks to Drinking ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical Brief Threat Ensemble Vulnerability Assessment (TEVA) among finalists for Edelman Award On February 7, 2008, the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS ® of Hanover, MD) announced that a TEVA Research project is one of six finalists vying for this year’s prestigious Franz Edelman Award. The project is called “Reducing Security Risks in American Drinking Water Systems.” Edelman Award Information This is the thirty-seventh year of the Edelman competition. Every year, the competition recognizes outstanding operations research-based projects that transform companies, entire industries, and people’s lives. Operations research uses advanced analytical methods to make optimal decisions in order to solve complex problems. The winner of the award will be announced in mid-April 2008. Past Edelman Award finalists include Travelocity; IBM; Merrill Lynch; the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; and Georgia Tech. The winning team for 2007 reduced both patient suffering and health care costs from the treatment of prostate and breast cancer. The Edelman competition attests to the contributions of operations research in the profit and nonprofit sectors. It is estimated that the cumulative dollar benefits from Edelman finalist projects between 1984 and 2006 reached the $100 billion mark. TEVA Research Program The TEVA research program has focused on reducing the security risks to drinking water systems. Ad

  3. Contralateral risk reducing mastectomy in Non-BRCA-Mutated patients

    PubMed Central

    Falco, Giuseppe; Bordoni, Daniele; Marano, Luigi; Accurso, Antonello; Buccelli, Claudio; Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Capasso, Emanuele; Policino, Fabio; Niola, Massimo; Ferrari, Guglielmo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of contralateral risk reducing mastectomy (CRRM) is indicated in women affected by breast cancer, who are at high risk of developing a contralateral breast cancer, particularly women with genetic mutation of BRCA1, BRCA2 and P53. However we should consider that the genes described above account for only 20-30% of the excess familiar risk. What is contralaterally indicated when genetic assessment results negative for mutation in a young patient with unilateral breast cancer? Is it ethically correct to remove a contralateral “healthy” breast? CRRM rates continue to rise all over the world although CRRM seems not to improve overall survival in women with unilateral sporadic breast cancer. The decision to pursue CRRM as part of treatment in women who have a low-to-moderate risk of developing a secondary cancer in the contralateral breast should consider both breast cancer individual-features and patients preferences, but should be not supported by the surgeon and avoided as first approach with the exception of women highly worried about cancer. Prospective studies are needed to identify cohorts of patients most likely to benefit from CRRM. PMID:28352801

  4. AIDS and behavioral change to reduce risk: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M H; Joseph, J G

    1988-01-01

    Published reports describing behavioral changes in response to the threat of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) are reviewed. These studies demonstrate rapid, profound, but expectably incomplete alterations in the behavior of both homosexual/bisexual males and intravenous drug users. This is true in the highest risk metropolitan areas such as New York City and in areas with lower AIDS incidence. Risk reduction is occurring more frequently through the modification of sexual or drug-use behavior than through its elimination. In contrast to aggregate data, longitudinal descriptions of individual behavior demonstrate considerable instability or recidivism. Behavioral change in the potentially vulnerable heterosexual adolescent and young adult populations is less common, as is risk reduction among urban minorities. Reports of AIDS-related knowledge and attitudes generally parallel the pattern of behavioral changes. Nonetheless, few studies investigate the relationship of knowledge and attitudes to risk reduction. Future studies should provide much-needed information about the determinants as well as the magnitude of behavioral changes required to reduce the further spread of AIDS. PMID:3279837

  5. The Role of Hedonic Behavior in Reducing Perceived Risk

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jayson S.; Jia, Jianmin; Hsee, Christopher K.; Shiv, Baba

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how human populations naturally respond to and cope with risk is important for fields ranging from psychology to public health. We used geophysical and individual-level mobile-phone data (mobile-apps, telecommunications, and Web usage) of 157,358 victims of the 2013 Ya’an earthquake to diagnose the effects of the disaster and investigate how experiencing real risk (at different levels of intensity) changes behavior. Rather than limiting human activity, higher earthquake intensity resulted in graded increases in usage of communications apps (e.g., social networking, messaging), functional apps (e.g., informational tools), and hedonic apps (e.g., music, videos, games). Combining mobile data with a field survey (N = 2,000) completed 1 week after the earthquake, we use an instrumental-variable approach to show that only increases in hedonic behavior reduced perceived risk. Thus, hedonic behavior could potentially serve as a population-scale coping and recovery strategy that is often missing in risk management and policy considerations. PMID:27881710

  6. Interventions to reduce risks associated with vehicle incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Vernick, Jon S; Tung, Gregory J; Kromm, Jonathan N

    2012-01-01

    Occupants of smaller, lighter passenger cars are more likely to be killed or injured in collisions with larger, heavier sport utility vehicles and light trucks than in collisions with other cars. Interventions are needed to reduce this vehicle "incompatibility" and its consequences. The authors conducted a systematic literature review to identify evaluations of interventions to reduce incompatibility. They reviewed engineering, biomedical, and other technical literature. To be included, a study must have 1) evaluated an intervention to reduce vehicle incompatibility, or its consequences, in a crash; 2) reported new research; and 3) been published in English from 1990 to 2010. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. Interventions were designed to reduce the aggressivity of larger vehicles or improve the crashworthiness of smaller vehicles. Effective interventions included 1) modified bumper heights, 2) improved side strength of smaller vehicles, 3) side-impact air bags, 4) changes to vehicle stiffness, and 5) modifications of other front-end structures. Some of the interventions shown to be effective are now in wide use. However, others have yet to be required by regulators or voluntarily agreed to by manufacturers. If larger, heavier vehicles remain on the nation's roads, countermeasures will be needed to reduce risks for occupants of other vehicles.

  7. Public support for policies to reduce risk after Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael R; Weiner, Marc D; Noland, Robert; Herb, Jeanne; Kaplan, Marjorie; Broccoli, Anthony J

    2014-06-01

    A phone survey was conducted in New Jersey in 2013 four months after the second of two major devastating tropical storms (Sandy in 2012 and Irene in 2011). The objective was to estimate public support for restricting land uses in flood zones, requiring housing to be built to resist storm waters, and otherwise increasing mitigation and resilience. Respondents who supported these mitigation and resilience policies disproportionately were concerned about global climate change, trusted climate scientists and the federal government, and were willing to contribute to a redevelopment program through taxes, bonds, and fees. They also tended to have collectivist and egalitarian worldviews. Half of the respondents supported at least four of the seven risk-reducing policies. How their support translates into public policy remains to be seen. Lack of willingness to personally fund these policies is an obstacle. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  8. Workplace Interventions to Reduce Obesity and Cardiometabolic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Thorndike, Anne N.

    2012-01-01

    The worksite is ideal for implementing interventions to reduce obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors. Although worksite health promotion is not new, employer-sponsored wellness programs have become more widespread due to the rising prevalence and high cost of obesity. Over the past two decades, employers and researchers focused efforts on individual-based programs to change employees’ nutrition and exercise behaviors, but more recently, the worksite environment has been targeted. Overall, there is good evidence that individual-based worksite programs can produce modest weight loss, but the evidence for effects on other risk factors and on long-term health outcomes and costs is inconsistent. There is less evidence for the benefit of environmental-based interventions, and more data will be needed to establish conclusions about the benefits of these types of interventions. A major challenge for employers and researchers in the future will be to find the balance between effectiveness and economic viability of worksite wellness programs. PMID:22708000

  9. The spectre of uncertainty in communicating technological risk

    SciTech Connect

    Broesius, Michael T.

    1993-12-01

    The literature does not clearly describe the potential moral and ethical conflicts that can exist between technology sponsors and the technical communicators whose job it is to present potentially risky technology to the non-technical people most likely to be imperiled by such risk. Equally important, the literature does not address the issue of uncertainty -- not the uncertainty likely to be experienced by the community at risk, but the unreliable processes and methodologies used by technology sponsors to define, quantify, and develop strategies to mitigate technological risks. In this paper, the author goes beyond a description of risk communication, the nature of the generally predictable interaction between technology advocates and non-technically trained individuals, and current trends in the field. Although that kind of information is critical to the success of any risk communication activity, and he has included it when necessary to provide background and perspective, without knowing how and why risk assessment is done, it has limited practical applicability outside the sterile, value-free vacuum in which it is usually framed. Technical communicators, particularly those responsible for communicating potential technological risk, must also understand the social, political, economic, statistical, and ethical issues they will invariably encounter.

  10. Breast-feeding reduces the risk for childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Kull, Inger; Böhme, Maria; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Nordvall, Lennart; Pershagen, Göran; Wickman, Magnus

    2005-09-01

    The evidence for a preventive effect of breast-feeding on the development of eczema in childhood remains controversial. To investigate the effect of breast-feeding in various phenotypes of eczema to 4 years. A birth cohort of 4089 children made up the study base. Data on breast-feeding, allergic symptoms, and potential confounders were obtained from questionnaires when the children were 2 months and 1, 2, and 4 years old. At 4 years, blood specific IgE was analyzed. Children with symptoms of eczema and asthma during the period of breast-feeding were excluded in most analyses on risk assessment of eczema and asthma, respectively, to avoid disease-related modification of exposure. Exclusive breast-feeding for >or=4 months reduced the risk for eczema at the age of 4 years (odds ratio [OR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.63--0.96) irrespective of combination with asthma, sensitization to common allergens, or parental allergic disease. This decreased risk was most evident for children with onset of eczema during the first 2 years persisting to 4 years (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.45--0.77). Among children with early-onset eczema, irrespective of persistency, followed by late onset of asthma or early-onset asthma irrespective of persistency, followed by late-onset eczema to 4 years, a protective effect of breast-feeding was also seen (OR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.30--0.76). Breast-feeding 4 months or more reduces the risk for eczema and onset of the allergy march to age 4.

  11. Case Management Reduces Drinking During Pregnancy among High Risk Women

    PubMed Central

    May, Philip A.; Marais, Anna-Susan; Gossage, J. Phillip; Barnard, Ronel; Joubert, Belinda; Cloete, Marise; Hendricks, Natalie; Roux, Sumien; Blom, Annalien; Steenekamp, Jeanetta; Alexander, Theresa; Andreas, Romena; Human, Suzanne; Snell, Cudore; Seedat, Soraya; Parry, Charles C.; Kalberg, Wendy O.; Buckley, David; Blankenship, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Aim Estimate the efficacy of Case Management (CM) for women at high risk for bearing a child with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Design Women were recruited from antenatal clinics and engaged in 18 months of CM. Setting A South African community with a subculture of heavy, regular, weekend, recreational drinking and high documented rates of FASD. Participants Forty-one women who were high risk for bearing a child with FASD. Measures Statistical analysis of trends in drinking and other risk factors. Findings At intake 87.8% were pregnant, most had previous alcohol-exposed pregnancies, most/all of their friends drink alcohol (67.5%), and 50.0% had stressful lives. CM was particularly valuable for pregnant women, as statistically significant reductions in alcohol risk were obtained for them in multiple variables: total drinks on weekends after six months of CM (p = .026) and estimated peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at six (p < .001) and 18 months (p < .001). For participants completing 18 months of CM, AUDIT scores improved significantly by 6-month follow-up (from 19.8 to 9.7, p = .000), and even though rising at 12 and 18 months, AUDIT scores indicate that problematic drinking remained statistically significantly lower than baseline throughout CM. Happiness scale scores correlated significantly with reduced drinking in most time periods. Conclusions An enduring change in drinking behavior is difficult in this social setting. Yet, CM provided by skilled and empathic case managers reduced maternal drinking at critical times, and therefore, alcohol exposure levels to the fetus. PMID:24729823

  12. Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Nuclear Process Science

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Poloski, Adam P.; Vienna, John D.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Hobbs, David; Wilmarth, B.; Mcilwain, Michael; Subramanian, K.; Krahn, Steve; Machara, N.

    2009-08-28

    overall intent of this paper is to foster a dialogue on how basic scientific research can assist DOE in executing its cleanup and environmental management mission. In this paper, we propose that such scientific investments not be focused solely on what may be viewed as current DOE needs, but also be based upon longer-term investments in specific areas of science that underpin technologies presently in use. In the latter regard, we propose four science theme areas: 1) the structure and dynamics of materials and interfaces, 2) coupled chemical and physical processes, 3) complex solution phase phenomena, and 4) chemical recognition phenomena. The proposed scientific focus for each of these theme areas and the scientific opportunities are identified, along with links to major risks within the initiative areas identified in EM’s Engineering and Technology Roadmap.

  13. Use of comprehensive NEPA documents to reduce program risk

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, T.A.; Hansen, R.P.

    1994-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates DOE`s Kauai Test Facility (KTF) on the western coast of the Hawaiian island of Kauai. In July 1992, DOE approved a comprehensive Environmental Assessment (EA) covering ongoing and future rocket launches of experimental payloads. The KTF EA fulfilled two basic objectives: Consideration of environmental values early in the planning and decision making process; and public disclosure. These objectives can also be considered to be benefits of preparing comprehensive NEPA documents. However, proponents of an action are not as dedicated to these twin NEPA objectives as they are motivated by NEPA`s ability to reduce program risks. Once the KTF environmental assessment was underway, it was apparent that reducing risks to the program, budget, and schedule was the main incentive for successful completion of the EA. The comprehensive or ``omnibus`` environmental assessment prepared for the KTF is a de facto ``detailed statement,`` and it is also a good example of a ``mitigated FONSI,`` i.e., mitigation measures are essential to render some potential impacts not significant. Because the KTF EA is a broad scope, umbrella-like, site-wide assessment, it ``bounds`` the impacts of continuing and proposed future actions. The successful completion of this document eliminated the need to review, document, and gain approval individually for numerous related actions. Also, because it supported a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) after identifying appropriate mitigation, it also eliminated the need for an environmental impact statement (EIS). This paper discusses seven specific ways in which the KTF EA reduced program risks and supported budget and schedule objectives.

  14. NGNP Risk Management through Assessing Technology Readiness

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Collins

    2010-08-01

    Throughout the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project life cycle, technical risks are identified, analyzed, and mitigated and decisions are made regarding the design and selection of plant and sub-system configurations, components and their fabrication materials, and operating conditions. Risk resolution and decision making are key elements that help achieve project completion within budget and schedule constraints and desired plant availability. To achieve this objective, a formal decision-making and risk management process was developed for NGNP, based on proven systems engineering principles that have guided aerospace and military applications.

  15. Emerging Radiation Health-Risk Mitigation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Schimmerling, W.

    2004-02-04

    Past space missions beyond the confines of the Earth's protective magnetic field have been of short duration and protection from the effects of solar particle events was of primary concern. The extension of operational infrastructure beyond low-Earth orbit to enable routine access to more interesting regions of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). There are significant challenges in providing protection from the long-duration exposure to GCR: the human risks to the exposures are highly uncertain and safety requirements places unreasonable demands in supplying sufficient shielding materials in the design. A vigorous approach to future radiation health-risk mitigation requires a triage of techniques (using biological and technical factors) and reduction of the uncertainty in radiation risk models. The present paper discusses the triage of factors for risk mitigation with associated materials issues and engineering design methods.

  16. Reducing The Risk Of Fires In Conveyor Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremushkina, M. S.; Poddubniy, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with the actual problem of increasing the safety of operation of belt conveyors in mines. Was developed the control algorithm that meets the technical requirements of the mine belt conveyors, reduces the risk of fires of conveyors belt, and enables energy and resource savings taking into account random sort of traffic. The most effective method of decision such tasks is the construction of control systems with the use of variable speed drives for asynchronous motors. Was designed the mathematical model of the system "variable speed multiengine drive - conveyor - control system of conveyors", that takes into account the dynamic processes occurring in the elements of the transport system, provides an assessment of the energy efficiency of application the developed algorithms, which allows to reduce the dynamic overload in the belt to (15-20)%.

  17. Reducing environmental risk associated with laboratory decommissioning and property transfer.

    PubMed

    Dufault, R; Abelquist, E; Crooks, S; Demers, D; DiBerardinis, L; Franklin, T; Horowitz, M; Petullo, C; Sturchio, G

    2000-12-01

    The need for more or less space is a common laboratory problem. Solutions may include renovating existing space, leaving or demolishing old space, or acquiring new space or property for building. All of these options carry potential environmental risk. Such risk can be the result of activities related to the laboratory facility or property (e.g., asbestos, underground storage tanks, lead paint), or the research associated with it (e.g., radioactive, microbiological, and chemical contamination). Regardless of the option chosen to solve the space problem, the potential environmental risk must be mitigated and the laboratory space and/or property must be decommissioned or rendered safe prior to any renovation, demolition, or property transfer activities. Not mitigating the environmental risk through a decommissioning process can incur significant financial liability for any costs associated with future decommissioning cleanup activities. Out of necessity, a functioning system, environmental due diligence auditing, has evolved over time to assess environmental risk and reduce associated financial liability. This system involves a 4-phase approach to identify, document, manage, and clean up areas of environmental concern or liability, including contamination. Environmental due diligence auditing includes a) historical site assessment, b) characterization assessment, c) remedial effort and d) final status survey. General practice standards from the American Society for Testing and Materials are available for conducting the first two phases. However, standards have not yet been developed for conducting the third and final phases of the environmental due diligence auditing process. Individuals involved in laboratory decommissioning work in the biomedical research industry consider this a key weakness.

  18. Malpractice risk and cost are significantly reduced after tort reform.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ronald M; Geoghegan, Kathy; Myers, John G; Sirinek, Kenneth R; Corneille, Michael G; Mueller, Deborah; Dent, Daniel L; Wolf, Steven E; Pruitt, Basil A

    2011-04-01

    Rising medical malpractice premiums have reached a crisis point in many areas of the United States. In 2003 the Texas legislature passed a comprehensive package of tort reform laws that included a cap at $250,000 on noneconomic damages in most medical malpractice cases. We hypothesized that tort reform laws significantly reduce the risk of malpractice lawsuit in an academic medical center. We compared malpractice prevalence, incidence, and liability costs before and after comprehensive state tort reform measures were implemented. Two prospectively maintained institutional databases were used to calculate and characterize malpractice risk: a surgical operation database and a risk management and malpractice database. Risk groups were divided into pretort reform (1992 to 2004) and post-tort reform groups (2004 to the present). Operative procedures were included for elective, urgent, and emergency general surgery procedures. During the study period, 98,513 general surgical procedures were performed. A total of 28 lawsuits (25 pre-reform, 3 postreform) were filed, naming general surgery faculty or residents. The prevalence of lawsuits filed/100,000 procedures performed is as follows: before reform, 40 lawsuits/100,000 procedures, and after reform, 8 lawsuits/100,000 procedures (p < 0.01, relative risk 0.21 [95% CI 0.063 to 0.62]). Virtually all of the liability and defense cost was in the pretort reform period: $595,000/year versus $515/year in the postreform group (p < 0.01). Implementation of comprehensive tort reform in Texas was associated with a significant decrease in the prevalence and cost of surgical malpractice lawsuits at one academic medical center. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Reducing environmental risk associated with laboratory decommissioning and property transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Dufault, R; Abelquist, E; Crooks, S; Demers, D; DiBerardinis, L; Franklin, T; Horowitz, M; Petullo, C; Sturchio, G

    2000-01-01

    The need for more or less space is a common laboratory problem. Solutions may include renovating existing space, leaving or demolishing old space, or acquiring new space or property for building. All of these options carry potential environmental risk. Such risk can be the result of activities related to the laboratory facility or property (e.g., asbestos, underground storage tanks, lead paint), or the research associated with it (e.g., radioactive, microbiological, and chemical contamination). Regardless of the option chosen to solve the space problem, the potential environmental risk must be mitigated and the laboratory space and/or property must be decommissioned or rendered safe prior to any renovation, demolition, or property transfer activities. Not mitigating the environmental risk through a decommissioning process can incur significant financial liability for any costs associated with future decommissioning cleanup activities. Out of necessity, a functioning system, environmental due diligence auditing, has evolved over time to assess environmental risk and reduce associated financial liability. This system involves a 4-phase approach to identify, document, manage, and clean up areas of environmental concern or liability, including contamination. Environmental due diligence auditing includes a) historical site assessment, b) characterization assessment, c) remedial effort and d) final status survey. General practice standards from the American Society for Testing and Materials are available for conducting the first two phases. However, standards have not yet been developed for conducting the third and final phases of the environmental due diligence auditing process. Individuals involved in laboratory decommissioning work in the biomedical research industry consider this a key weakness. PMID:11121365

  20. Technology and Risk Sciences Program. FY99 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Regens, James L.

    2000-01-01

    In making the transition from weapons production to environmental restoration, DOE has found that it needs to develop reliable means of defining and understanding health and environmental risks and of selecting cost-efficient environmental management technologies so that cleanup activities can be appropriately directed. Through the Technology and Risk Sciences Project, the Entergy Spatial Analysis Research Laboratory attempts to provide DOE with products that incorporate spatial analysis techniques in the risk assessment, communication, and management processes; design and evaluate methods for evaluating innovative environmental technologies; and collaborate and access technical information on risk assessment methodologies, including multimedia modeling and environmental technologies in Russia and the Ukraine, while in addition training and developing the skills of the next generation of scientists and environmental professionals.

  1. Can helmet design reduce the risk of concussion in football?

    PubMed

    Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Greenwald, Richard M; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Chu, Jeffrey J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Mihalik, Jason P; Crisco, Joseph J; Wilcox, Bethany J; McAllister, Thomas W; Maerlender, Arthur C; Broglio, Steven P; Schnebel, Brock; Anderson, Scott; Brolinson, P Gunnar

    2014-04-01

    Of all sports, football accounts for the highest incidence of concussion in the US due to the large number of athletes participating and the nature of the sport. While there is general agreement that concussion incidence can be reduced through rule changes and teaching proper tackling technique, there remains debate as to whether helmet design may also reduce the incidence of concussion. A retrospective analysis was performed of head impact data collected from 1833 collegiate football players who were instrumented with helmet-mounted accelerometer arrays for games and practices. Data were collected between 2005 and 2010 from 8 collegiate football teams: Virginia Tech, University of North Carolina, University of Oklahoma, Dartmouth College, Brown University, University of Minnesota, Indiana University, and University of Illinois. Concussion rates were compared between players wearing Riddell VSR4 and Riddell Revolution helmets while controlling for the head impact exposure of each player. A total of 1,281,444 head impacts were recorded, from which 64 concussions were diagnosed. The relative risk of sustaining a concussion in a Revolution helmet compared with a VSR4 helmet was 46.1% (95% CI 28.1%-75.8%). When controlling for each player's exposure to head impact, a significant difference was found between concussion rates for players in VSR4 and Revolution helmets (χ(2) = 4.68, p = 0.0305). This study illustrates that differences in the ability to reduce concussion risk exist between helmet models in football. Although helmet design may never prevent all concussions from occurring in football, evidence illustrates that it can reduce the incidence of this injury.

  2. Reasons for adopting technological innovations reducing physical workload in bricklaying.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A M; Vink, P; de Kroon, J C A

    2003-09-15

    In this paper the adoption of technological innovations to improve the work of bricklayers and bricklayers' assistants is evaluated. Two studies were performed among 323 subjects to determine the adoption of the working methods, the perceived workload, experiences with the working methods, and the reasons for adopting the working methods. Furthermore, a comparison of the results of the studies was made with those of two similar studies in the literature. The results show that more than half of the sector adopted the innovations. The perceived workload was reduced. The employees and employers are satisfied with the working methods and important reasons for adoption were cost/benefit advantages, improvement of work and health, and increase in productivity. Problems preventing the adoption were the use of the working methods at specific sites, for instance in renovation work. The adoption of the new working methods could perhaps have been higher or faster if more attention had been paid to the active participation of bricklayers and bricklayers' assistants during the development of the new working methods and to the use of modern media techniques, such as the Internet and CD/DVD.

  3. Technological progress in reducing CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) and halon emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N.D.; Shapiro, P.S.

    1989-04-01

    This paper discusses EPA's development of a technological program to implement in the U.S. the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. EPA's Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) has the lead for developing the technical and economic goals of the program, and EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) has the lead in providing technical support to meet the goals, including both short-term projects and long-term research. EPA's strategy is to target the halon and high chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-using industries or industry subgroups to identify opportunities to reduce CFC and halon usage and find alternatives. When such opportunities are found, cooperative industry/government groups are formed to identify and solve the problems that impede transition away from CFC and halon usage. Other groups (including academic, non-profit research institutes, other government agencies, and foreign individuals or groups) are invited to join in the effort if they have a special expertise or interest. Identifying the high-use industry sectors and subsectors is not difficult; however, identifying appropriate industries, individuals, and groups who are willing to influence industry usage of CFCs is not easy.

  4. Reduced Risk of Incident Kidney Cancer from Walking and Running

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Test whether incident kidney cancer risk is associated with exercise energy expenditure (i.e., metabolic equivalents, 1 MET) when calculated from distance walked or run. Methods Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) from Cox proportional hazard analyses of self-reported physician-diagnosed incident kidney cancer vs. MET-hours/wk in 91,820 subjects recruited between 1991 and 1993 (7.7 yr follow-up of 42,833 subjects) and between 1998 and 1999 (6.4 yr follow-up of 33,053 subjects) as part of the National Runners' Health Study and between 1998 and 1999 as part of the National Walkers' Health Study (5.7 yr follow-up of 15,934 subjects). Results Fifty-two incident cancers were reported. Age- and sex-adjusted risk declined 1.9% per MET-hour/wk run or walked (HR: 0.981; 95%CI: 0.964 to 0.997, P=0.02). Compared to walking or running below guidelines levels (<7.5 MET-hours/wk), the risk for incident kidney cancer was 61% lower for meeting the guidelines (HR: 0.39, 95%CI: 0.11 to 1.08, P=0.07 for 7.5 to 12.5 MET-hours/wk), 67% lower for exercising one to two-times the recommended level (HR: 0.33; 95%CI: 0.15 to 0.72, P=0.005 for 12.6 to 25.1 MET-hours/wk), and 76.3% lower for exercising ≥2-times the recommended level (HR: 0.24; 95%CI: 0.11 to 0.52, P=0.0005 for ≥25.2 MET-hours/wk). Incident kidney cancer risk also increased in association with baseline BMI (P=0.002), smoking (P=0.02), and hypertensive (P=0.007) and diabetes medication use (P=0.01), however, exercise-associated reductions in kidney cancer risk persisted for 12.6 to 25.1 MET-hours/wk (HR: 0.35, P=0.01), and ≥ 25.2 MET-hours/wk (HR: 0.29, P=0.004) vis-à-vis <7.5 MET-hours/wk when also adjusted for BMI, hypertension, diabetes, and pack-years smoked. Conclusion Running and walking may reduce incident kidney cancer risk independent of its other known risk factors. PMID:23863620

  5. Reduced risk of incident kidney cancer from walking and running.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul T

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to test whether incident kidney cancer risk is associated with exercise energy expenditure (i.e., metabolic equivalents, 1 MET) when calculated from distance walked or run. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) from Cox proportional hazard analyses of self-reported physician-diagnosed incident kidney cancer versus MET-hours per week in 91,820 subjects recruited between 1991 and 1993 (7.7 yr follow-up of 42,833 subjects) and between 1998 and 1999 (6.4 yr follow-up of 33,053 subjects) as part of the National Runners' Health Study and between 1998 and 1999 as part of the National Walkers' Health Study (5.7 yr follow-up of 15,934 subjects). Fifty-two incident cancers were reported. Age- and sex-adjusted risk declined 1.9% per MET-hour per week run or walked (HR = 0.981, 95% CI = 0.964-0.997, P = 0.02). Compared with walking or running below guidelines levels (<7.5 MET·h·wk(-1)), the risk for incident kidney cancer was 61% lower for meeting the guidelines (HR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.11-1.08, P = 0.07 for 7.5-12.5 MET·h·wk(-1)), 67% lower for exercising one to two times the recommended level (HR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.15-0.72, P = 0.005 for 12.6-25.1 MET·h·wk(-1)), and 76.3% lower for exercising two times or more the recommended level (HR = 0.24, 95% CI = 0.11-0.52, P = 0.0005 for ≥ 25.2 MET·h·wk(-1)). Incident kidney cancer risk also increased in association with baseline body mass index (P = 0.002), smoking (P = 0.02), and hypertensive (P = 0.007) and diabetes medication use (P = 0.01); however, exercise-associated reductions in kidney cancer risk persisted for 12.6-25.1 MET·h·wk(-1) (HR = 0.35, P = 0.01) and ≥ 25.2 MET·h·wk(-1) (HR = 0.29, P = 0.004) vis-à-vis <7.5 MET·h·wk(-1) when also adjusted for body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and pack-years smoked. Running and walking may reduce incident kidney cancer risk independent of its other known risk factors.

  6. Reduced Risk of Disease During Postsecondary Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Olkowski, Sandra; Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Scott, Thomas W.; Stoddard, Steven T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Antibodies induced by infection with any 1 of 4 dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1–4) may influence the clinical outcome of subsequent heterologous infections. To quantify potential cross-protective effects, we estimated disease risk as a function of DENV infection, using data from longitudinal studies performed from September 2006 through February 2011 in Iquitos, Peru, during periods of DENV-3 and DENV-4 transmission. Methods. DENV infections before and during the study period were determined by analysis of serial serum samples with virus neutralization tests. Third and fourth infections were classified as postsecondary infections. Dengue fever cases were detected by door-to-door surveillance for acute febrile illness. Results. Among susceptible participants, 39% (420/1077) and 53% (1595/2997) seroconverted to DENV-3 and DENV-4, respectively. Disease was detected in 7% of DENV-3 infections and 10% of DENV-4 infections. Disease during postsecondary infections was reduced by 93% for DENV-3 and 64% for DENV-4, compared with primary and secondary infections. Despite lower disease rates, postsecondary infections constituted a significant proportion of apparent infections (14% [for DENV-3 infections], 45% [for DENV-4 infections]). Conclusions. Preexisting heterotypic antibodies markedly reduced but did not eliminate the risk of disease in this study population. These results improve understanding of how preinfection history can be associated with dengue outcomes and DENV transmission dynamics. PMID:23776195

  7. Statins Reduce the Risks of Relapse to Addiction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Claudia; Nicolas, Celine; Lafay-Chebassier, Claire; Jaber, Mohamed; Thiriet, Nathalie; Solinas, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    Statins are drugs that have been used for decades in humans for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. More recently, several lines of evidence demonstrate that statins, in addition to their peripheral effects, produce a wide variety of effects in the brain and may be beneficial in neurological and psychiatric conditions. In this study, we allowed rats to self-administer cocaine for several weeks and, at the end of self-administration training, we treated them with low doses of statins daily for a 21-day period of abstinence. Chronic administration of brain-penetrating statins, simvastatin (1 mg/kg) and atorvastatin (1 mg/kg), reduced cocaine seeking compared with vehicle, whereas administration of pravastatin (2 mg/kg), a statin with low brain penetrability, did not. Importantly, the effects of brain-penetrating statins persisted even after discontinuation of the treatment and were specific for drug seeking because drug taking was not altered by simvastatin treatment. Finally, the effects of simvastatin were found to generalize to another drug of abuse such as nicotine, but not to food reward, and to reinstatement of cocaine seeking induced by stress. These results demonstrate that brain-penetrating statins can reduce risks of relapse to addiction. Given their well-known safety profile in humans, statins could be a novel effective treatment for relapse to cocaine and nicotine addiction and their use could be implemented in clinical settings without major health risks.

  8. Reduced risk of atopic sensitization among farmers: the Humboldt study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Rennie, Donna; Cormier, Yvon; McDuffie, Helen; Pahwa, Punam; Dosman, James

    2007-01-01

    It needs to be clarified whether farming is associated with a reduced risk of atopy or allergic condition. There is a lack of consistent evidence for prevalences of atopy, respiratory allergy and asthma in adult farmers. A cross-sectional study of adults (n = 2,081) was conducted in the town of Humboldt, Sask. Allergy skin prick tests were conducted to determine atopic sensitization. Respiratory allergy and physician-diagnosed asthma were based on self-reporting. Logistic regression was used to assess the associations of atopy, respiratory allergy and asthma with farming practices, adjusting for other important variables. Of 2,081 participants, 27.8% were farmers. Reduced risks of atopic sensitization, respiratory allergy and asthma were observed among farmers compared to non-farmers. After adjustment for sex and age, which are major confounders, the odds ratio for atopic sensitization was 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.97) for farmers versus non-farmers. Asthma showed a similar trend; however, there was no statistically significant difference in either respiratory allergy or asthma rates observed between farmers and non-farmers. The prevalence of atopy was lower in adult farmers than in non-farmers. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. REDUCING CHILDREN'S RISK TO SOIL LEAD: SUMMARY OF A FIELD EXPERIMENT TO REDUCE SOIL LEAD BIOAVAILABILITY (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing risks associated with Pb in soil has typically been accomplished by soil removal, covering, or dilution by mixing with uncontaminated soil. EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) and DuPont Corporation established a collaborative effort to evaluation...

  10. Reducing the Risk of Human Missions to Mars Through Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Bret G.

    2007-07-01

    The NASA Deputy Administrator charted an internal NASA planning group to develop the rationale for exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. This team, termed the Exploration Blueprint, performed architecture analyses to develop roadmaps for how to accomplish the first steps beyond Low-Earth Orbit through the human exploration of Mars. Following the results of the Exploration Blueprint study, the NASA Administrator asked for a recommendation on the next steps in human and robotic exploration. Much of the focus during this period was on integrating the results from the previous studies into more concrete implementation strategies in order to understand the relationship between NASA programs, timing, and resulting budgetary implications. This resulted in an integrated approach including lunar surface operations to retire risk of human Mars missions, maximum use of common and modular systems including what was termed the exploration transfer vehicle, Earth orbit and lunar surface demonstrations of long-life systems, collaboration of human and robotic missions to vastly increase mission return, and high-efficiency transportation systems (nuclear) for deep-space transportation and power. The data provided in this summary presentation was developed to begin to address one of the key elements of the emerging implementation strategy, namely how lunar missions help retire risk of human missions to Mars. During this process the scope of the activity broadened into the issue of how testing in general, in various venues including the moon, can help reduce the risk for Mars missions.

  11. Treating ocular hypertension to reduce glaucoma risk: when to treat?

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Eve J

    2006-01-01

    When to treat the patient who presents with ocular hypertension has been a question that has 'stumped' the ophthalmic community for decades. Population-based studies and intervention trials have provided the basis for understanding why we consider treating such patients. Although the EGPS (European Glaucoma Prevention Study) did not demonstrate that reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) with dorzolamide prevented the onset of glaucoma compared with individuals receiving a placebo, the investigators of the OHTS (Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study) found that the treatment of ocular hypertension can be delayed with topical medication when treated patients were compared with an observation group. There are differences in inclusion criteria, study design and retention rates between the EGPS and the OHTS, which may have led to the discrepancies in outcomes between these two studies. These differences provide a basis for understanding the relevance of the findings of both trials to clinical practice. The clinician should consider key risk factors such as age, thin corneal thickness measurements, large cup-to-disc ratio and mean IOP when determining who should be treated. However, the ultimate decision of when to treat will be determined by other issues such as life expectancy, the general health of the patient and the number of risk factors. Clearly, the treatment of only high-risk patients with ocular hypertension should be considered.

  12. Through Technology Leverage and Risk Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugasawa, Yoshio; Shinomiya, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Companies make concerted efforts to survive in a radically changing global society with the advent of a highly-networked and information-rich society that is featured by intense market competition. Manufacturing industries in particular have a tendency to rely on technological development strengths as a means of survival in a highly globalised and…

  13. Through Technology Leverage and Risk Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugasawa, Yoshio; Shinomiya, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Companies make concerted efforts to survive in a radically changing global society with the advent of a highly-networked and information-rich society that is featured by intense market competition. Manufacturing industries in particular have a tendency to rely on technological development strengths as a means of survival in a highly globalised and…

  14. Integrating Technology into the Curriculum for "At-Risk" Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Denise

    2009-01-01

    This Independent Learning Project (ILP) discusses the best practices in educational technology to improve the behavior, instruction, and learning of at-risk youth, for whom technology offers unique opportunities. Research is compiled from numerous scholarly print and online sources. A guide for teachers provides detailed strategies, software…

  15. Can ultrasound guidance reduce the risk of pneumothorax following thoracentesis?*, **

    PubMed Central

    Perazzo, Alessandro; Gatto, Piergiorgio; Barlascini, Cornelius; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Nicolini, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thoracentesis is one of the bedside procedures most commonly associated with iatrogenic complications, particularly pneumothorax. Various risk factors for complications associated with thoracentesis have recently been identified, including an inexperienced operator; an inadequate or inexperienced support team; the lack of a standardized protocol; and the lack of ultrasound guidance. We sought to determine whether ultrasound-guided thoracentesis can reduce the risk of pneumothorax and improve outcomes (fewer procedures without fluid removal and greater volumes of fluid removed during the procedures). In our comparison of thoracentesis with and without ultrasound guidance, all procedures were performed by a team of expert pulmonologists, using the same standardized protocol in both conditions. METHODS: A total of 160 participants were randomly allocated to undergo thoracentesis with or without ultrasound guidance (n = 80 per group). The primary outcome was pneumothorax following thoracentesis. Secondary outcomes included the number of procedures without fluid removal and the volume of fluid drained during the procedure. RESULTS: Pneumothorax occurred in 1 of the 80 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided thoracentesis and in 10 of the 80 patients who underwent thoracentesis without ultrasound guidance, the difference being statistically significant (p = 0.009). Fluid was removed in 79 of the 80 procedures performed with ultrasound guidance and in 72 of the 80 procedures performed without it. The mean volume of fluid drained was larger during the former than during the latter (960 ± 500 mL vs. 770 ± 480 mL), the difference being statistically significant (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound guidance increases the yield of thoracentesis and reduces the risk of post-procedure pneumothorax. (Chinese Clinical Trial Registry identifier: ChiCTR-TRC-12002174 [http://www.chictr.org/en/]) PMID:24626264

  16. Propranolol Reduces Cancer Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ping-Ying; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Cheng-Li; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Jia-Hong; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    β-Blockers have been reported to exhibit potential anticancer effects in cancer cell lines and animal models. However, clinical studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding cancer outcomes and cancer risk when β-blockers were used. This study investigated the association between propranolol and cancer risk.Between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011, a patient cohort was extracted from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, a subset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A propranolol cohort (propranolol usage >6 months) and nonpropranolol cohort were matched using a propensity score. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cancer associated with propranolol treatment.The study sample comprised 24,238 patients. After a 12-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidence for developing cancer was low in the propranolol cohort (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.67-0.85; P < 0.001). Patients with propranolol treatment exhibited significantly lower risks of cancers in head and neck (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-0.95), esophagus (HR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.13-0.96), stomach (HR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.98), colon (HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49-0.93), and prostate cancers (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.33-0.83). The protective effect of propranolol for head and neck, stomach, colon, and prostate cancers was most substantial when exposure duration exceeded 1000 days.This study supports the proposition that propranolol can reduce the risk of head and neck, esophagus, stomach, colon, and prostate cancers. Further prospective study is necessary to confirm these findings.

  17. Bedtime Dosing of Antihypertensive Medications Reduces Cardiovascular Risk in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Diana E.; Mojón, Artemio; Fernández, José R.

    2011-01-01

    Time of ingestion of hypertension medications can affect circadian patterns of BP, but whether this translates into an effect on clinical outcomes is unknown. Here, in an open-label trial, we randomly assigned 661 patients with CKD either to take all prescribed hypertension medications upon awakening or to take at least one of them at bedtime. We measured 48-hour ambulatory BP at baseline and 3 months after any adjustment in treatment or, at the least, annually. After a median follow-up of 5.4 years, patients who took at least one BP-lowering medication at bedtime had an adjusted risk for total cardiovascular events (a composite of death, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, revascularization, heart failure, arterial occlusion of lower extremities, occlusion of the retinal artery, and stroke) that was approximately one-third that of patients who took all medications upon awakening (adjusted HR 0.31; 95% CI 0.21 to 0.46; P < 0.001). Bedtime dosing demonstrated a similar significant reduction in risk for a composite outcome of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke (adjusted HR 0.28; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.61; P < 0.001). Furthermore, patients on bedtime treatment had a significantly lower mean sleep-time BP and a greater proportion demonstrated control of their ambulatory BP (56% versus 45%, P = 0.003). Each 5-mmHg decrease in mean sleep-time systolic BP was associated with a 14% reduction in the risk for cardiovascular events during follow-up (P < 0.001). In conclusion, among patients with CKD and hypertension, taking at least one antihypertensive medication at bedtime improves control of BP and reduces the risk for cardiovascular events. PMID:22025630

  18. The Technology Implications of "A Nation at Risk"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Lee

    2008-01-01

    In 1983, when "A Nation at Risk" appeared, it offered recommendations in the areas of content, standards and expectations, time, teaching, and leadership and fiscal support. The growing use of technology was addressed briefly in the section dealing with "indicators of risk," which listed examples of deficiencies in education as compared to the…

  19. Nanotechnology risk perceptions and communication: emerging technologies, emerging challenges.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Nick; Harthorn, Barbara; Satterfield, Terre

    2011-11-01

    Nanotechnology involves the fabrication, manipulation, and control of materials at the atomic level and may also bring novel uncertainties and risks. Potential parallels with other controversial technologies mean there is a need to develop a comprehensive understanding of processes of public perception of nanotechnology uncertainties, risks, and benefits, alongside related communication issues. Study of perceptions, at so early a stage in the development trajectory of a technology, is probably unique in the risk perception and communication field. As such it also brings new methodological and conceptual challenges. These include: dealing with the inherent diversity of the nanotechnology field itself; the unfamiliar and intangible nature of the concept, with few analogies to anchor mental models or risk perceptions; and the ethical and value questions underlying many nanotechnology debates. Utilizing the lens of social amplification of risk, and drawing upon the various contributions to this special issue of Risk Analysis on Nanotechnology Risk Perceptions and Communication, nanotechnology may at present be an attenuated hazard. The generic idea of "upstream public engagement" for emerging technologies such as nanotechnology is also discussed, alongside its importance for future work with emerging technologies in the risk communication field.

  20. Assisted Reproductive Technology and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachor, Ditza A.; Itzchak, E. Ben

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies on maternal and pregnancy risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including use of assisted reproductive technology (ART), found conflicting results. This study included the following aims: to assess frequencies of ART in a large ASD group; to examine confounding birth and familial risk factors in the ASD with ART…

  1. The Technology Implications of "A Nation at Risk"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Lee

    2008-01-01

    In 1983, when "A Nation at Risk" appeared, it offered recommendations in the areas of content, standards and expectations, time, teaching, and leadership and fiscal support. The growing use of technology was addressed briefly in the section dealing with "indicators of risk," which listed examples of deficiencies in education as compared to the…

  2. Reducing Technology-Induced Errors: Organizational and Health Systems Approaches.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Senthriajah, Yalini; Kushniruk, Andre W; Palojoki, Sari; Saranto, Kaija; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Technology-induced errors are a growing concern for health care organizations. Such errors arise from the interaction between healthcare and information technology deployed in complex settings and contexts. As the number of health information technologies that are used to provide patient care rises so will the need to develop ways to improve the quality and safety of the technology that we use. The objective of the panel is to describe varying approaches to improving software safety from and organizational and health systems perspective. We define what a technology-induced error is. Then, we discuss how software design and testing can be used to improve health information technologies. This discussion is followed by work in the area of monitoring and reporting at a health district and national level. Lastly, we draw on the quality, safety and resilience literature. The target audience for this work are nursing and health informatics researchers, practitioners, administrators, policy makers and students.

  3. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, Federico

    1997-10-01

    This report serves as the technology basis of a needed national climate change technology strategy, with the confidence that a strong technology R&D program will deliver a portfolio of technologies with the potential to provide very substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions along with continued economic growth. Much more is needed to define such a strategy, including identification of complementary deployment policies and analysis to support the seeping and prioritization of R&D programs. A national strategy must be based upon governmental, industrial, and academic partnerships.

  4. Effectiveness of trees and forests in reducing flood risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marapara, T. R.; Jackson, B. M.; Hartley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Trees and forests have become vital components of flood mitigation policies at national and international levels as their role in reducing flood risk has become more evident. This has led to their wide-spread use to complement traditional structural defences in flood prone landscapes. The establishment of forests and planting of trees changes surface and subsurface hydrology, often delaying peak discharge and reducing overland runoff and flood risk. There is a significant amount of research that demonstrates flood reduction by forests (plantation and native), and small strips of trees or shelterbelts established in agricultural landscapes. Studies from the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Latin America have shown that the attenuation of floods by trees and forests is circumscribed to their position in the landscape, growth season, age, root structure, canopy architecture, geology and climate. At the same time, there is research indicating a negligible impact of trees and forests when catchment scale is large and rainfall events are extreme. Flood incidences are still on the increase in regions with large areas of forested land. Much emphasis has been placed on the ability of trees and forests to reduce peak flow and mitigate floods through interception loss, high transpiration rates, and amelioration of soil properties such as infiltration, hydraulic conductivity and bulk density at the field or small catchment scale. Less emphasis has been put on identifying the climatic and geological areas where trees are likely to deliver significant flood mitigation services. Furthermore, the stand characteristics that are optimal in delivering this service where appropriate have seldom been reported. This study presents a review of the relationship between trees/forests and flooding. The investigation has focused on how the interaction is affected by different species, age, position in the landscape, scale, soils and magnitude of rainfall events under changing geology and

  5. Nanotechnology, risk, and oversight: learning lessons from related emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Priest, Susanna

    2010-11-01

    Emerging technologies are defined by their novelty and thus are accompanied by significant uncertainty in determining appropriate ways to manage risks associated with them. Yet, there is a body of prior knowledge about risk management and oversight policy for other technologies that have already permeated society. Here, we describe two ways in which prospective oversight policy analysis for emerging technologies can draw upon these past experiences. One involves comparing specific products that have already been marketed to similar products of the emerging technology (cognate-product approach). The other treats the emerging technology as a body of products and methods and relates it to another technological field that has already emerged and penetrated markets (whole-technology approach). In this article, we describe our work using these approaches to inform risk and oversight policy for nanotechnology and its products. We draw parallels between biotechnology and nanotechnology as whole fields of development and also between genetically engineered organisms in the food supply and agricultural products of nanotechnology. Through these comparisons, we find that both approaches to historical learning have value and present lessons that could be applied to nanotechnology. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  6. NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Remediation Technology Collaboration Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romeo, James

    2013-01-01

    NASA is committed to finding solutions to agency cleanup problems that are better, cheaper, and more effective than the status quo. Unfortunately, some potential solutions involve innovative technologies for which NASA remediation managers may not have a high level of understanding or confidence. Since 2004, NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) in Mississippi has been pumping groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOC) from their cleanup location designated "Area G" through extraction wells to an aboveground treatment system. Over time, however, the effectiveness of this treatment strategy has diminished and an alternative approach is needed. In 2012, professionals from NASA's Principal Center for Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) introduced SSC managers to an innovative technology for enhancing the performance of SSC's existing pump and treat system. The technology, generally referred to as in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), involves slowly and continuously injecting a strong but safe chemical oxidant into the groundwater. Treatment is enhanced by a "surfactant-type effect" which causes residual contamination from saturated soil to be released into the dissolved-phase where it can be readily oxidized. Any dissolved-phase contamination that was not oxidized can be collected by the extraction well network and treated aboveground. SSC was not familiar with the technology so to increase their confidence, TEERM identified a contractor who was willing to demonstrate their product and process at a significantly reduced price. An initial, small-scale demonstration of ISCO began at sse in March 2012 and completed in August 2012. This successful demonstration was followed by three larger-scale ISCO demonstrations between August and December 2012. The contractor's innovative Continuous Injection System (CIS) incorporated "green" and sustainable technologies and practices. A slow

  7. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM - SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA REACTIVE WALL DEMO

    EPA Science Inventory


    Efforts reported in this document focused on the demonstration of a passive technology that could be used for remediation of
    thousands of abandoned mines existing in the Western United States that emanate acid mine drainage (AMD). This passive remedial technology takes ad...

  8. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM - SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA REACTIVE WALL DEMO

    EPA Science Inventory


    Efforts reported in this document focused on the demonstration of a passive technology that could be used for remediation of
    thousands of abandoned mines existing in the Western United States that emanate acid mine drainage (AMD). This passive remedial technology takes ad...

  9. Innovative Technology Reduces Power Plant Emissions-Commercialization Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde; Chung, Landy

    2004-01-01

    Overview of emission control system development: (1) Development of new oxidizer scrubber system to eliminate NOx waste and produce fertilizer (2) Technology licensed and a 1 to 3 MWatt-scale prototype installed on power plant (3) Development of method to oxidize NO to NO2 (4) Experience gained from licensing NASA technology.

  10. Innovative Technology Reduces Power Plant Emissions - Commercialization Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde

    2004-01-01

    Emission control system development includes: (1) Development of new oxidizer scrubber system to eliminate NOx waste and produce fertilizer (2) Technology licensed and a 1 to 3 MWatt-scale prototype installed on. power plant (3) Development of method to oxidize NO. to N02 (4) Experience gained from licensing NASA technology

  11. [Air transport biomechanical risk: reduced mobility passengers' handling].

    PubMed

    Draicchio, F; Campoli, G; Silvetti, A; Badellino, E; Forzano, F; Ranavolo, A; Iavicoli, S; Campagna, G; Raffaele, G; Gismondi, M

    2012-01-01

    As the airport traffic increases there is a continuous increase of passengers with different motor disabilities. Disabled passenger's assistance causes a biomechanical overload in airport workers. Some disabled passengers are classified by IATA as WCHC (wheel chair in cabin or Charlie). Our study, was performed in one of the most important Italian airport on Charlie passengers (about 10% of all assistances). We identified four critical points: 1) wheelchair and baggage moving (unstable load), 2) inclined ramps with worker's backwards steps and braked wheelchair to prevent passenger tipping or falling, 3) transfer from standard wheelchair to bicycle wheelchair, specifically designed for the aisle; 4.) transfer from bicycle wheelchair to aircraft seat. The last two points required sometimes to lift passengers over the armrest and positioning them on a window side seat, causing a serious increase of biomechanical load. For each critical point we have proposed technical and organizational measures to reduce airport worker's biomechanical risk.

  12. Positive attributes in children and reduced risk of future psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Ribas, Pablo; Goodman, Robert; Stringaris, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    Background There is little research on children’s positive attributes and their association with psychiatric outcomes. Aims To examine the hypothesis that children’s positive attributes are associated with a reduced risk of developing psychopathology in future. Method Positive attributes, measured with the Youth Strengths Inventory (YSI) and psychiatric outcomes were assessed on two occasions over 3 years in a large epidemiological sample of British children and adolescents (n = 5325). Results The YSI showed high to moderate cross-informant correlations and longitudinal stability. Children scoring high on positive attributes at baseline had fewer psychiatric symptoms and disorders at follow-up, adjusting for symptoms at baseline, disorder at baseline and child and family factors. Analyses with propensity score matching also suggested that positive attributes decrease the likelihood of psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions Children’s positive attributes are associated with significantly less psychopathology across time and may be a target for intervention. PMID:25359925

  13. Small fenestra stapedectomy technique: reducing risk and improving hearing.

    PubMed

    Bailey, H A; Pappas, J J; Graham, S S

    1983-10-01

    During the past 25 years many variations have emerged in stapedectomy, most of which centered around either a change in the prosthesis itself or in the type of oval window seal. The small fenestra stapedectomy technique (SFT) represents a change in surgical procedure rather than in prosthetic design. This technique offers the opportunity to improve hearing results while reducing risks in stapedectomy surgery. Four areas of significant improvement are seen in patients in whom the SFT was used: (1) improved hearing in the high frequencies of 2000, 4000, and 8000 Hz, (2) improved speech discrimination scores, (3) a significant reduction in the number of reported vestibular complaints, and (4) a reduction in the number of serious postoperative sensorineural hearing losses.

  14. Finasteride Reduces the Risk of Incident Clinical Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J. Kellogg; Schenk, Jeannette M.; Arnold, Kathryn B.; Messer, Karen; Till, Cathee; Thompson, Ian M.; Kristal, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the high prevalence of clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) among older men, there remains a notable absence of studies focused on BPH prevention. Objective To determine if finasteride prevents incident clinical BPH in healthy older men. Design, setting, and participants Data for this study are from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. After excluding those with a history of BPH diagnosis or treatment, or an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) ≥8 at study entry, 9253 men were available for analysis. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis The primary outcome was incident clinical BPH, defined as the initiation of medical treatment, surgery, or sustained, clinically significant urinary symptoms (IPSS >14). Finasteride efficacy was estimated using Cox proportional regression models to generate hazards ratios (HRs). Results and limitations Mean length of follow-up was 5.3 yr. The rate of clinical BPH was 19 per 1000 person-years in the placebo arm and 11 per 1000 person-years in the finasteride arm (p < 0.001). In a covariate-adjusted model, finasteride reduced the risk of incident clinical BPH by 40% (HR: 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.51–0.69; p < 0.001). The effect of finasteride on incident clinical BPH was attenuated in men with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (pinteraction = 0.04) but otherwise did not differ significantly by physical activity, age, race, current diabetes, or current smoking. The post hoc nature of the analysis is a potential study limitation. Conclusions Finasteride substantially reduces the risk of incident clinical BPH in healthy older men. These results should be considered in formulating recommendations for the use of finasteride to prevent prostate diseases in asymptomatic older men. PMID:22459892

  15. Does landscape diversity reduce the risk of catastrophic tipping points?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temme, Arnaud; Baartman, Jantiene; Saco, Patricia; Nijp, Jelmer; Langston, Abigail

    2016-04-01

    Most studies about tipping points are based on computer simulations. These simulations, based on first principles of vegetation growth and competition, are not only able to explain a surprising number of vegetation patterns occurring in natural ecosystems, but they also predict shifts between multiple stable states that may be catastrophic. Initially, such studies were performed on simplistic 'non-landscapes' - flats or straight slopes. Recently, we have been able to resolve geomorphic redistribution processes more accurately, so that vegetation patterning can be simulated in more complex landscapes. Here, we present a first look into how such 'real landscapes' affect the risk of catastrophic shifts. We test the hypothesis that increasing complexity and organisation in a landscape reduce the risk of catastrophic shifts by effectively creating mini-refugia where vegetation persists over a wider range of boundary conditions such as precipitation. Depending on the extent of a study area, large complexity could even change the system from one with multiple stable states into one with only one stable state.

  16. Science and strategies to reduce mercury risks: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Selin, Noelle E

    2011-09-01

    Despite decades of scientific research and policy actions to control mercury, exposure to toxic methylmercury continues to pose risks to humans and the environment. This article critically reviews the linkages between scientific advancements and mercury reduction policies aimed at reducing this risk, focusing on the challenges that mercury poses as an issue that crosses both spatial and temporal scales. Scientific aspects of the mercury issue at various spatial and temporal scales are reviewed, and policy examples at global, national and local scale are analysed. Policy activity to date has focused on the mercury problem at a single level of spatial scale, and on near-term timescales. Efforts at the local scale have focused on monitoring levels in fish and addressing local contamination issues; national-scale assessments have addressed emissions from particular sources; and global-scale reports have integrated long-range transport of emissions and commercial trade concerns. However, aspects of the mercury issue that cross the political scale (such as interactions between different forms of mercury) as well as contamination problems with long timescales are at present beyond the reach of current policies. It is argued that these unaddressed aspects of the mercury problem may be more effectively addressed by (1) expanded cross-scale policy coordination on mitigation actions and (2) better incorporating adaptation into policy decision-making to minimize impacts.

  17. Reducing CKD risks among vulnerable populations in primary care.

    PubMed

    Greer, Raquel; Boulware, L Ebony

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic/racial and socioeconomic status disparities in the health-care and clinical outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are pervasive. The vast majority of care to decrease incidence of CKD risk and progression occurs in primary care settings. High-quality primary care, therefore, represents a key strategy through which disparities in the incidence and progression of CKD may be eliminated. The Chronic Care Model provides a framework for the delivery of high-quality primary care for chronic diseases, and it is frequently used to guide health-care quality improvement initiatives. Evidence suggests that Chronic Care Model constructs, including provider and organizational quality improvement initiatives focused on team approaches to chronic care (eg, case management, community health workers), are effective in modifying patients' CKD risks among ethnic minority and low-income patients. Other Chronic Care Model constructs, including clinical information systems (eg, disease registries), decision support interventions, and the provision of patient-centered care have been shown to improve processes related to CKD care but with limited and/or mixed effects on patient outcomes. Few studies have examined the effect of these approaches on reducing disparities. Research is needed to examine the effectiveness of these strategies to eliminate CKD disparities among vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reducing acquisition risk through integrated systems of systems engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Andrew; Hobson, Brian; Bouwens, Christina

    2016-05-01

    In the fall of 2015, the Joint Staff J7 (JS J7) sponsored the Bold Quest (BQ) 15.2 event and conducted planning and coordination to combine this event into a joint event with the Army Warfighting Assessment (AWA) 16.1 sponsored by the U.S. Army. This multipurpose event combined a Joint/Coalition exercise (JS J7) with components of testing, training, and experimentation required by the Army. In support of Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology (ASA(ALT)) System of Systems Engineering and Integration (SoSE&I), Always On-On Demand (AO-OD) used a system of systems (SoS) engineering approach to develop a live, virtual, constructive distributed environment (LVC-DE) to support risk mitigation utilizing this complex and challenging exercise environment for a system preparing to enter limited user test (LUT). AO-OD executed a requirements-based SoS engineering process starting with user needs and objectives from Army Integrated Air and Missile Defense (AIAMD), Patriot units, Coalition Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (CISR), Focused End State 4 (FES4) Mission Command (MC) Interoperability with Unified Action Partners (UAP), and Mission Partner Environment (MPE) Integration and Training, Tactics and Procedures (TTP) assessment. The SoS engineering process decomposed the common operational, analytical, and technical requirements, while utilizing the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Distributed Simulation Engineering and Execution Process (DSEEP) to provide structured accountability for the integration and execution of the AO-OD LVC-DE. As a result of this process implementation, AO-OD successfully planned for, prepared, and executed a distributed simulation support environment that responsively satisfied user needs and objectives, demonstrating the viability of an LVC-DE environment to support multiple user objectives and support risk mitigation activities for systems in the acquisition process.

  19. Risk assessing study for Bio-CCS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kano, Y.; Higashino, H.; Suzumura, M.; Tosha, T.; Nakao, S.; Komai, T.

    2013-12-01

    We have started a new R&D project titled 'Energy resources creation by geo-microbes and CCS'. It is new concept of a technology which cultivate methanogenic geo-microbes in reservoirs of geological CCS conditions to produce methane gas effectively and safely. As one of feasibility studies, we are evaluating risks around its new Bio-CCS technology. Our consideration involves risk scenarios about Bio-CCS in geological strata, marine environment, surface facilities, ambient air and injection sites. To cover risk scenarios in these areas, we are carrying out a sub-project with five sub-themes. Four sub-themes out of five are researches for identifying risk scenarios: A) Underground strata and injection well, B) Ambient air, C) Surface facilities and D) Seabed. We are developing risk assessment tool,named GERAS-CO2GS (Geo-environmental Risk Assessment System,CO2 Geological Storage Risk Assessment System. We are going to combine identified risk scenarios into GERAS-CO2GS accordingly. It is expected that new GERAS-CO2GS will contribute to risk assessment and management for not only Bio-CCS but also individual injection sites, and facilitate under standing of risks among legislators and concerned peoples around injection site.

  20. Online social integration is associated with reduced mortality risk

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, William R.; Burke, Moira; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Social interactions increasingly take place online. Friendships and other offline social ties have been repeatedly associated with human longevity, but online interactions might have different properties. Here, we reference 12 million social media profiles against California Department of Public Health vital records and use longitudinal statistical models to assess whether social media use is associated with longer life. The results show that receiving requests to connect as friends online is associated with reduced mortality but initiating friendships is not. Additionally, online behaviors that indicate face-to-face social activity (like posting photos) are associated with reduced mortality, but online-only behaviors (like sending messages) have a nonlinear relationship, where moderate use is associated with the lowest mortality. These results suggest that online social integration is linked to lower risk for a wide variety of critical health problems. Although this is an associational study, it may be an important step in understanding how, on a global scale, online social networks might be adapted to improve modern populations’ social and physical health. PMID:27799553

  1. Integrated Biorefineries: Reducing Investment Risk in Novel Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-18

    Achieving national energy and climate goals will require a large, economically viable, and environmentally sustainable U.S. bioeconomy. The U.S. goal to build a diverse, robust, and resilient energy sector creates an urgent need to bridge the gap between promising research and pioneering large scale production of advanced biofuels.

  2. K-12 Teachers' Preparedness for Utilizing Technology to Reduce Classroom Administrative Workload

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parizo, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Research on technology in the K-12 classroom has focused on student learning initiatives. Few studies, however, have addressed whether technology is being used to reduce classroom administrative workload or whether teachers are prepared to utilize technology for reducing administrative workload. The problem this study addressed was the unclear…

  3. Comparative risk analysis of technological hazards (a review).

    PubMed Central

    Kates, R W; Kasperson, J X

    1983-01-01

    Hazards are threats to people and what they value and risks are measures of hazards. Comparative analyses of the risks and hazards of technology can be dated to Starr's 1969 paper [Starr, C. (1969) Science 165, 1232-1238] but are rooted in recent trends in the evolution of technology, the identification of hazard, the perception of risk, and the activities of society. These trends have spawned an interdisciplinary quasi profession with new terminology, methodology, and literature. A review of 54 English-language monographs and book-length collections, published between 1970 and 1983, identified seven recurring themes: (i) overviews of the field of risk assessment, (ii) efforts to estimate and quantify risk, (iii) discussions of risk acceptability, (iv) perception, (v) analyses of regulation, (vi) case studies of specific technological hazards, and (vii) agenda for research. Within this field, science occupies a unique niche, for many technological hazards transcend the realm of ordinary experience and require expert study. Scientists can make unique contributions to each area of hazard management but their primary contribution is the practice of basic science. Beyond that, science needs to further risk assessment by understanding the more subtle processes of hazard creation and by establishing conventions for estimating risk and for presenting and handling uncertainty. Scientists can enlighten the discussion of tolerable risk by setting risks into comparative contexts, by studying the process of evaluation, and by participating as knowledgeable individuals, but they cannot decide the issue. Science can inform the hazard management process by broadening the range of alternative control actions and modes of implementation and by devising methods to evaluate their effectiveness. PMID:6580625

  4. Antagonist Models for Relapse Prevention and Reducing HIV Risk.

    PubMed

    Woody, George E; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Zvartau, Edwin

    2016-09-01

    Naltrexone is an antagonist that binds tightly to μ-opioid receptors and blocks the subjective and analgesic effects of opioids. It does not produce physiologic dependence and precipitates withdrawal if administered to an opioid dependent person, thus starting it must begin with detoxification. It was first available in the mid-1970s as a 50 mg tablet that blocked opioids for 24-36 h if taken daily, or every 2-3 days at higher doses - for example: 100 mg Monday and Wednesday, 150 mg on Friday. From a pharmacological perspective it worked very well and was hoped to be an effective treatment but results were disappointing due to low patient interest and high dropout followed by relapse. Interest in it waned but rose again in the late 1990's when injecting opioid use and the rapid spread of HIV in the Russian Federation converged with an international interest in reducing the spread of HIV. One result was a series of meetings sponsored by the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and Pavlov State Medical University in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, on ways to reduce the spread of HIV in that country. Addiction treatment was a clear priority and discussions showed that naltrexone could have a role since agonist treatment is against Russian law but naltrexone is approved and the government funds over 25,000 beds for detoxification, which is the first step in starting naltrexone treatment. These meetings were followed by NIDA studies that showed better compliance to oral naltrexone than in prior U.S. studies with the expected reductions in HIV injecting risk for those that stayed in treatment. These events and findings provided a background and identified an infrastructure for the study that led to FDA approval of extended release injectable naltrexone for preventing relapse to opioid dependence. This paper will briefly review findings from these studies and end with comments on the potential role of extended release naltrexone as a meaningful addition

  5. Initiatives to Reduce Earthquake Risk of Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    The seventeen-year-and-counting history of the Palo Alto-based nonprofit organization GeoHazards International (GHI) is the story of many initiatives within a larger initiative to increase the societal impact of geophysics and civil engineering. GHI's mission is to reduce death and suffering due to earthquakes and other natural hazards in the world's most vulnerable communities through preparedness, mitigation and advocacy. GHI works by raising awareness in these communities about their risk and about affordable methods to manage it, identifying and strengthening institutions in these communities to manage their risk, and advocating improvement in natural disaster management. Some of GHI's successful initiatives include: (1) creating an earthquake scenario for Quito, Ecuador that describes in lay terms the consequences for that city of a probable earthquake; (2) improving the curricula of Pakistani university courses about seismic retrofitting; (3) training employees of the Public Works Department of Delhi, India on assessing the seismic vulnerability of critical facilities such as a school, a hospital, a police headquarters, and city hall; (4) assessing the vulnerability of the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives in Dharamsala, India; (5) developing a seismic hazard reduction plan for a nonprofit organization in Kathmandu, Nepal that works to manage Nepal's seismic risk; and (6) assisting in the formulation of a resolution by the Council of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to promote school earthquake safety among OECD member countries. GHI's most important resource, in addition to its staff and Board of Trustees, is its members and volunteer advisors, who include some of the world's leading earth scientists, earthquake engineers, urban planners and architects, from the academic, public, private and nonprofit sectors. GHI is planning several exciting initiatives in the near future. One would oversee the design and construction of

  6. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies. Revision 5/94

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which man is routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies. This report is not a risk assessment; nor does it contain instructions on how to do a risk assessment. Rather, it provides background information on how most of us think about risks and why it is difficult to do it rationally, it provides a philosophy and data with which to do a better job of judging risks more rationally, and it provides an overview of where risks of energy technologies fit within the spectrum of all risks. Much of the quantitative information provided here is on relative risk of dying of various causes. This is not because risk of dying is seen as the most important kind of risk, but because the statistics on mortality rates by cause are the highest quality data available on health risks in the general population.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Program - Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-01

    R&D drives innovation while lowering technology costs, which then enables the private sector to accelerate clean technology deployment. Along with R&D, DOE's Vehicles Technologies Program deploys clean, efficient vehicle technologies and renewable fuels, which reduce U.S. demand for petroleum products.

  8. Risk-Based Comparison of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Jones, Edward

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we describe an integrated probabilistic risk assessment methodological framework and a decision-support tool suite for implementing systematic comparisons of competing carbon capture technologies. Culminating from a collaborative effort among national laboratories under the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI), the risk assessment framework and the decision-support tool suite encapsulate three interconnected probabilistic modeling and simulation components. The technology readiness level (TRL) assessment component identifies specific scientific and engineering targets required by each readiness level and applies probabilistic estimation techniques to calculate the likelihood of graded as well as nonlinear advancement in technology maturity. The technical risk assessment component focuses on identifying and quantifying risk contributors, especially stochastic distributions for significant risk contributors, performing scenario-based risk analysis, and integrating with carbon capture process model simulations and optimization. The financial risk component estimates the long-term return on investment based on energy retail pricing, production cost, operating and power replacement cost, plan construction and retrofit expenses, and potential tax relief, expressed probabilistically as the net present value distributions over various forecast horizons.

  9. Enhancing Vocational Preparedness for At Risk Students through Technology Enhanced Learning Using Reading/Writing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Kevin; Parkins, Sherri

    The authors describe their experience over the last 4 years at Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology, enhancing the vocational opportunities for at risk students through the use of Reading and Writing Technology, primarily, Microsofts word processor, Word and WordQ, a word prediction and text to speech software designed to assist learning…

  10. Mitochondrial Polymorphisms Significantly Reduce the Risk of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Walt, Joelle M.; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Martin, Eden R.; Scott, William K.; Nance, Martha A.; Watts, Ray L.; Hubble, Jean P.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Koller, William C.; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh; Stern, Matthew B.; Colcher, Amy; Hiner, Bradley C.; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William G.; Allen Jr., Fred H.; Goetz, Christopher G.; Small, Gary W.; Mastaglia, Frank; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; McLaurin, Adam C.; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Scott, Burton L.; Schmechel, Donald E.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Vance, Jeffery M.

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) impairment, particularly within complex I of the electron transport system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). More than half of mitochondrially encoded polypeptides form part of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH) complex I enzyme. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA variation contributes to PD expression, we genotyped 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that define the European mtDNA haplogroups in 609 white patients with PD and 340 unaffected white control subjects. Overall, individuals classified as haplogroup J (odds ratio [OR] 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34–0.91; P=.02) or K (OR 0.52; 95% CI 0.30–0.90; P=.02) demonstrated a significant decrease in risk of PD versus individuals carrying the most common haplogroup, H. Furthermore, a specific SNP that defines these two haplogroups, 10398G, is strongly associated with this protective effect (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.39–0.73; P=.0001). SNP 10398G causes a nonconservative amino acid change from threonine to alanine within the NADH dehydrogenase 3 (ND3) of complex I. After stratification by sex, this decrease in risk appeared stronger in women than in men (OR 0.43; 95% CI 0.27–0.71; P=.0009). In addition, SNP 9055A of ATP6 demonstrated a protective effect for women (OR 0.45; 95% CI 0.22–0.93; P=.03). Our results suggest that ND3 is an important factor in PD susceptibility among white individuals and could help explain the role of complex I in PD expression. PMID:12618962

  11. Moderate alcohol intake reduces risk of ischemic stroke in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Joo; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kim, Jae Guk; Ko, Youngchai; Hong, Keun-Sik; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Jang, Myung Suk; Han, Moon-Ku; Gorelick, Philip B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We undertook a population-based, case-control study to examine a dose-response relationship between alcohol intake and risk of ischemic stroke in Koreans who had different alcoholic beverage type preferences than Western populations and to examine the effect modifications by sex and ischemic stroke subtypes. Methods: Cases (n = 1,848) were recruited from patients aged 20 years or older with first-ever ischemic stroke. Stroke-free controls (n = 3,589) were from the fourth and fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and were matched to the cases by age (±3 years), sex, and education level. All participants completed an interview using a structured questionnaire about alcohol intake. Results: Light to moderate alcohol intake, 3 or 4 drinks (1 drink = 10 g ethanol) per day, was significantly associated with a lower odds of ischemic stroke after adjusting for potential confounders (no drinks: reference; <1 drink: odds ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.32–0.45; 1–2 drinks: 0.45, 0.36–0.57; and 3–4 drinks: 0.54, 0.39–0.74). The threshold of alcohol effect in women was slightly lower than that in men (up to 1–2 drinks in women vs up to 3–4 drinks in men), but this difference was not statistically significant. There was no statistical interaction between alcohol intake and the subtypes of ischemic stroke (p = 0.50). The most frequently used alcoholic beverage was one native to Korea, soju (78% of the cases), a distilled beverage with 20% ethanol by volume. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that light to moderate distilled alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of ischemic stroke in Koreans. PMID:26519539

  12. Hybrid procedures can reduce the risk of congenital cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Christoph; Esmailzadeh, Bahman; Herberg, Ulrike; Lang, Nora; Sodian, Ralf; Kozlik-Feldmann, Rainer; Welz, Armin; Breuer, Johannes

    2008-10-01

    Minimally invasive operations and percutaneous interventions are well-accepted options in the treatment of congenital heart defects. However, percutaneous interventions may be associated with an increased risk due to limited vascular access or a very tortuous catheter course. In these cases, combining operative and interventional approaches with direct puncture of the heart or the great vessels may facilitate implantation of even large devices. Furthermore, in some situations, cardiopulmonary bypass or circulatory arrest can be omitted when doing a hybrid procedure. Between January 2000 and April 2007 17 patients were operated in a hybrid fashion. Age ranged from 14 days to 45 years. Operative procedures consisted of implantation of an atrial septal defect occluder via direct puncture of the right atrium (n=4), closure of a ventricular septal defect via direct puncture of the right ventricle (n=1), implantation of isthmus stents via the ascending aorta (n=5), redilation of an isthmus stent (n=1), redilation of a ductal stent (n=1), angioplasty of a pulmonary artery stenosis (n=1), interventional occlusion of an intrahepatic porto-caval shunt (n=1), stent implantation into the right pulmonary artery (n=1) and into the right ventricular outflow tract (n=1) under direct vision as well as atrioseptoplasty combined with a bilateral pulmonary artery banding in one newborn with a single ventricle and very low birth weight (n=1). The planned intervention could be performed in all cases under the assistance of intraoperative fluoroscopy, transesophageal or epicardial echocardiography, or under direct vision. In all cases, the primary hemodynamic objectives were achieved. In selected patients, the combination of a surgical procedure and a percutaneous intervention may help to reduce both operative and interventional risks. This concept may enable new treatment options, especially in patients with complex congenital heart defects or complex vascular situations.

  13. Lower levels of sodium intake and reduced cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nancy R; Appel, Lawrence J; Whelton, Paul K

    2014-03-04

    Recent studies have raised the possibility of adverse effects of low sodium, particularly <2300 mg/d, on cardiovascular disease; however, these paradoxical findings might have resulted from suboptimal measurement of sodium and potential biases related to indication or reverse causation. Phases 1 and 2 of the Trials of Hypertension Prevention (TOHP) collected multiple 24-hour urine specimens among prehypertensive individuals. During extended post-trial surveillance, 193 cardiovascular events or cardiovascular disease deaths occurred among 2275 participants not in a sodium reduction intervention with 10 (TOHP II) or 15 (TOHP I) years of post-trial follow-up. Median sodium excretion was 3630 mg/d, with 1.4% of the participants having intake <1500 mg/d and 10% <2300 mg/d, consistent with national levels. Compared with those with sodium excretion of 3600 to <4800 mg/d, risk for those with sodium <2300 mg/d was 32% lower after multivariable adjustment (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-1.37; P for trend=0.13). There was a linear 17% increase in risk per 1000 mg/d increase in sodium (P=0.05). Spline curves supported a linear association of sodium with cardiovascular events, which continued to decrease from 3600 to 2300 and 1500 mg/d, although the data were sparse at the lowest levels. Controlling for creatinine levels had little effect on these results. Results from the TOHP studies, which overcome the major methodological challenges of prior studies, are consistent with overall health benefits of reducing sodium intake to the 1500 to 2300 mg/d range in the majority of the population, in agreement with current dietary guidelines.

  14. Role of probiotics in reducing the risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Collado, M C; Salminen, S

    2015-08-01

    Overweight and obesity currently constitute a major threat to human well-being. Almost half of the female population are currently overweight. Pregnant overweight women are at risk of gestational diabetes affecting the health of the mother and the child, in both the short and long term. Notwithstanding the extensive scientific interest centred on the problem, research efforts have thus far been unable to devise preventive strategies. Recent scientific advances point to a gut microbiota dysbiosis, with ensuing low-grade inflammation as a contributing element, in obesity and its comorbidities. Such findings would suggest a role for specific probiotics in the search for preventive and therapeutic adjunct applications in gestational diabetes. The aim of the present paper was to critically review recent demonstrations of the role of intestinal microbes in immune and metabolic regulation, which could be exploited in nutritional management of pregnant women by probiotic bacteria. By modulating specific target functions, probiotic dietary intervention may exert clinical effects beyond the nutritional impact of food. As this approach in pregnancy is new, an overview of the role of gut microbiota in shaping host metabolism, together with the definition of probiotics are presented, and finally, specific targets and potential mechanisms for probiotics in pregnancy are discussed. Pregnancy appears to be the most critical stage for interventions aiming to reduce the risk of non-communicable disease in future generations, beyond the immediate dangers attributable to the health of the mother, labour and the neonate. Specific probiotic interventions during pregnancy provide an opportunity, therefore, to promote the health not only of the mother but also of the child.

  15. Technological iatrogenesis: new risks force heightened management awareness.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Patrick A; Peterson, Lori T; Ford, Eric W

    2007-01-01

    Iatrogenesis is a term typically reserved to express the state of ill health or the adverse outcome resulting from a medical intervention, or lack thereof. Three types of iatrogenesis are described in the literature: clinical, social and cultural. This paper introduces a fourth type, technological iatrogenesis, or emerging errors stimulated by the infusion of technological innovations into complex healthcare systems. While health information technologies (HIT) have helped to make healthcare safer, this has also produced contemporary varieties of iatrogenic errors and events. The potential pitfalls of technological innovations and risk management solutions to address these concerns are discussed. Specifically, failure mode effect analysis and root cause analysis are discussed as opportunities for risk managers to prevent problems and avert errors from becoming sentinel events.

  16. Modeling Manufacturing Processes to Mitigate Technological Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Manges, W.W.

    1999-10-24

    An economic model is a tool for determining the justifiable cost of new sensors and subsystems with respect to value and operation. This process balances the R and D costs against the expense of maintaining current operations and allows for a method to calculate economic indices of performance that can be used as control points in deciding whether to continue development or suspend actions. The model can also be used as an integral part of an overall control loop utilizing real-time process data from the sensor groups to make production decisions (stop production and repair machine, continue and warn of anticipated problems, queue for repairs, etc.). This model has been successfully used and deployed in the CAFE Project. The economic model was one of seven (see Fig. 1) elements critical in developing an investment strategy. It has been successfully used in guiding the R and D activities on the CAFE Project, suspending activities on three new sensor technologies, and continuing development o f two others. The model has also been used to justify the development of a new prognostic approach for diagnosing machine health using COTS equipment and a new algorithmic approach. maintaining current operations and allows for a method to calculate economic indices of performance that can be used as control points in deciding whether to continue development or suspend actions. The model can also be used as an integral part of an overall control loop utilizing real-time process data from the sensor groups to make production decisions (stop production and repair machine, continue and warn of anticipated problems, queue for repairs, etc.).

  17. Statin reduces orbitopathy risk in patients with Graves' disease by modulating apoptosis and autophagy activities.

    PubMed

    Bifulco, Maurizio; Ciaglia, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Statins use has been associated with reduced risk for developing orbitopathy among patients with Graves' disease. We hypothesize that statin reduces orbitopathy risk mainly by modulating both apoptosis and autophagy activities in patients with Graves' disease.

  18. Using Genetic Technologies To Reduce, Rather Than Widen, Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Caren E.; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Dookeran, Keith A.; Hampel, Heather; Tin, Adrienne; Maruthur, Nisa M.; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Tucker, Katherine L.; Ordovás, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that both biological and nonbiological factors contribute to health disparities. Genetics, in particular, plays a part in how common diseases manifest themselves. Today, unprecedented advances in genetically based diagnoses and treatments provide opportunities for personalized medicine. However, disadvantaged groups may lack access to these advances, and treatments based on research on non-Hispanic whites might not be generalizable to members of minority groups. Unless genetic technologies become universally accessible, existing disparities could be widened. Addressing this issue will require integrated strategies, including expanding genetic research, improving genetic literacy, and enhancing access to genetic technologies among minority populations in a way that avoids harms such as stigmatization. PMID:27503959

  19. Using Genetic Technologies To Reduce, Rather Than Widen, Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caren E; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Dookeran, Keith A; Hampel, Heather; Tin, Adrienne; Maruthur, Nisa M; Schisler, Jonathan C; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Tucker, Katherine L; Ordovás, José M

    2016-08-01

    Evidence shows that both biological and nonbiological factors contribute to health disparities. Genetics, in particular, plays a part in how common diseases manifest themselves. Today, unprecedented advances in genetically based diagnoses and treatments provide opportunities for personalized medicine. However, disadvantaged groups may lack access to these advances, and treatments based on research on non-Hispanic whites might not be generalizable to members of minority groups. Unless genetic technologies become universally accessible, existing disparities could be widened. Addressing this issue will require integrated strategies, including expanding genetic research, improving genetic literacy, and enhancing access to genetic technologies among minority populations in a way that avoids harms such as stigmatization.

  20. Electrosurgery: principles and practice to reduce risk and maximize efficacy.

    PubMed

    Brill, Andrew I

    2011-12-01

    Science becomes art and art becomes function when fundamental principles are utilized to dictate surgical practice. Most important, the risk for inadvertent thermal injury during electrosurgery can be minimized by a sound comprehension of the predictable behaviors of electricity in living tissue.Guided by the Hippocratic charge of primum non nocere, the ultimate aim of energy-assisted surgery is the attainment of anatomic dissection and hemostasis with the least amount of collateral damage and subsequent scar tissue formation.Ideally, the surgeon’s final view of the operative field should accurately approximate the topography discoverable after postoperative healing. Despite the continued innovation of products borne to reduce thermal damage and then marketed as being comparatively safer, it is the hands and mind of the surgeon that serve to preserve tissue integrity by reducing the burden of delayed thermal necrosis and taking steps to prevent excessive devitalization of tissue. Regardless of the chosen modality, the inseparable and exponentially linked elements of time and the quantity of delivered energy must be integrated while purposefully moderating to attain the desired tissue effect. Ultimately, the reduction of unwanted thermal injury is inherently linked to good surgical judgment and technique, a sound comprehension of the applied energy modality, and the surgeon’s ability to recognize anatomic structures within the field of surgical dissection as well as those within the zone of significant thermal change.During the use of any energy-based device for hemostasis, out of sight must never mean out of mind. If the bowel, bladder, or ureter is in close proximity to a bleeder,they should be sufficiently mobilized before applying energy. Thermal energy should always be withheld until an orderly sequence of anatomic triage is carried out.Whenever a vital structure cannot be adequately mobilized, hemorrhage is preferentially controlled by using mechanical

  1. Integration of natural and technological risks in Lombardy, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, S.; Frattini, P.; Crosta, G. B.

    2009-12-01

    Multi-risk assessment is becoming a valuable tool for land planning, emergency management and the deployment of mitigation strategies. Multi-risk maps combine all available information about hazard, vulnerability, and exposed values related to different dangerous phenomena, and provide a quantitative support to complex decision making. We analyse and integrate through an indicator-based approach nine major threats affecting the Lombardy Region (Northern Italy, 25 000 km2), namely landslide, avalanche, flood, wildfire, seismic, meteorological, industrial (technological) risks; road accidents, and work injuries. For each threat, we develop a set of indicators that express the physical risk and the coping capacity or system resilience. By combining these indicators through different weighting strategies (i.e. budgetary allocation, and fuzzy logic), we calculate a total risk for each threat. Then, we integrate these risks by applying AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) weighting, and we derive a set of multi-risk maps. Eventually, we identify the dominant risks for each zone, and a number of risk hot-spot areas. The proposed approach can be applied with different degree of detail depending on the quality of the available data. This allows the application of the method even in case of non homogeneous data, which is often the case for regional scale analyses. Moreover, it allows the integration of different risk types or metrics. Relative risk scores are provided from this methodology, not directly accounting for the temporal occurrence probability of the phenomena.

  2. Waiting for Disasters: A Risk Reduction Assessment of Technological Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovins, Jane; Winningham, Sam

    2010-05-01

    This session provides a risk reduction/mitigation assessment of natural hazards causation of technological disasters and possible solution. People use technology in an attempt to not only control their environment but nature itself in order to make them feel safe and productive. Most strategies for managing hazards followed a traditional planning model i.e. study the problem, identify and implement a solution, and move on to the next problem. This approach is often viewed as static model and risk reduction is more of an upward, positive, linear trend. However, technological disasters do not allow risk reduction action to neatly fit this upward, positive, linear trend with actual or potential threats to the environment and society. There are different types of technological disasters, including industrial accidents; pipeline ruptures; accidents at power, water and heat supply systems and other lines of communication; sudden collapse of buildings and mines; air crashes; shipwrecks; automobile and railway accidents to name a few. Natural factors can play an essential role in triggering or magnifying technological disasters. They can result from the direct destruction of given technical objects by a hazardous natural process such as the destruction of an atomic power plant or chemical plant due to an earthquake. Other examples would include the destruction of communications or infrastructure systems by heavy snowfalls, strong winds, avalanches. Events in the past ten years clearly demonstrate that natural disasters and the technological disasters that accompany them are not problems that can be solved in isolation and risk reduction can play an important part. Risk reduction was designed to head off the continuing rising financial and structural tolls from disasters. All Hazard Risk Reduction planning was supposed to include not only natural, but technological, and human-made disasters as well. The subsequent disaster risk reduction (DRR) indicators were to provide the

  3. Understanding and reducing the risk of supply chain disruptions.

    PubMed

    Clark, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Natural disasters can wreck havoc on business operations. When civil unrest swept the UK in August 2011, the effect on business was stark, losing the retail sector £300m in unexpected costs and lost revenues. On the other side of the world, the natural disaster that hit Japan in early 2011 is estimated to have run up costs in the region of £189bn in repairs. Beyond this, the earthquake and its aftermath shattered supply chains, with technology companies expecting delays of up to six months before business could resume fully. It is impossible to predict incidents like these, but businesses can help mitigate disruption in the supply chain by undertaking business continuity management (BCM). A flexible supply chain is essential when it comes to BCM - whether it means being able to cope with altering transport routes at short notice, or finding or replacing a supplier at the last minute. Understanding the supply chain is critical when responding to major impacts that affect supply chains in multiple points - like IT system failures and country-wide fuel strikes. Businesses should carry out detailed business impact assessments and risk assessments right across the end-to-end supply chain and not just at key single points of failure. It is an intensive process that needs dedicated resources and ownership at the highest level. Recognising this, DHL has designed a 10-step process, which it has implemented across its global supply chain business. This paper provides an overview of what a supply chain really looks like, what can cause disruptions and how far up/down the supply chain companies need to go with their BCM planning.

  4. Reducing cardiometabolic risk through selective antagonism of CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Van Gaal, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, research on the endogenous cannabinoid (CB) system-now usually referred to as the endocannabinoid system (ECS)-has identified the significant effects of the ECS on the regulation of food intake and lipid and glucose metabolism in animals and humans. Endocannabinoids are endogenous lipids capable of binding to endogenous CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB1 receptors are present in the hypothalamic nuclei, which are involved in the control of energy balance and body weight, and in the mesolimbic system, which mediates the motivation to consume palatable food, as well as in adipocytes, the gut, and the liver. In the recent Rimonabant in Obesity (RIO)-Europe study, treatment with the first CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant, led to sustained, clinically meaningful weight loss and a reduction in waist circumference. Patients treated with rimonabant also demonstrated statistically significant improvement in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, and insulin resistance, as well as a reduced overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Results of this and other studies support the role of endocannabinoids in the development and maintenance of obesity. In addition, these findings suggest that CB1 receptor antagonists such as rimonabant may offer a potential new approach to managing obesity and associated cardiometabolic risk factors.

  5. Weight Management to Reduce Prostate Cancer Risk: A Survey of Men’s Needs and Interests

    PubMed Central

    Schleper, Amy; Sullivan, Debra K.; Thrasher, J. Brantley; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey M.; Klemp, Jennifer; Befort, Christie; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill M.

    2016-01-01

    Obese men have a higher rate of prostate cancer-related death than non-obese men, and obesity increases the risk of prostate cancer progression and biochemical recurrence. The purpose of this study was to assess needs and interests of men for a technology-driven weight loss intervention to reduce prostate cancer risk. We distributed a survey collecting demographic characteristics, health history, exercise and eating habits (and perception of those habits), current and prior attempts of health behavior change, and technology use. Survey answers were summarized by count and percent of total respondents. Completed surveys (N = 109) described men with a family history of prostate cancer (25%), a history of elevated prostate specific antigen (26%), and prostate cancer survivors (22%). We compared body mass index (BMI) to perception of weight; overweight and obese men perceived their weight as more normal than their BMI category suggests. Most men reported their diet needed minor improvement (74%), and 65% of men reported they are either currently trying to lose weight or interested in weight loss. Most respondents access the internet (92%), while text messaging (60%) and smartphone application use (40%) are less frequent, especially in men over 60. Our results revealed a need and willingness for lifestyle modification and suggest a need for evidence-based weight loss strategies and for addressing the misperception of weight status. A male-tailored intervention that implements technology could improve energy balance, hold men accountable to healthy behavior change, and promote dietary patterns in order to reduce prostate cancer risk. PMID:27547287

  6. Occupational Health Promotion Programs to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Russell E.; Terborg, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Surveys literature on worksite health promotion programs targeting cardiovascular risk factors. Reviews findings on health-risk appraisal, hypertension control, smoking cessation, weight reduction, exercise, and programs addressing multiple risk factors. Discusses current knowledge, highlights exemplary studies, and identifies problems and…

  7. Emerging technologies in healthcare: navigating risks, evaluating rewards.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Elizabeth; Conger, Sue; Blanke, Sandra; Landry, Brett J L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this prescriptive research is to help decision makers become better informed about three technologies emerging in the healthcare arena by providing a basic description of the technology and describing their current applications, future healthcare deployment, potential risks, and related managerial issues. Two of the technologies, radio frequency identification (RFID) and global positioning systems (GPS), are currently available to healthcare organizations and appear capable of decreasing cost but may require significant initial investment and have disruptive potential. The third technology, nanotechnology, has limited current use but may revolutionize both the delivery of medicine and hospital infrastructure management. With cautious attention to managerial issues and meticulous attention to implementation details, healthcare organizations that can successfully navigate the coming technologically driven paradigm shifts will emerge more resilient organizations.

  8. Laser Solutions for Reducing the Environmental Risks Associated with Orbital Debris and Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Increasing activity in space is gradually increasing the amount of orbital debris in low earth orbit. As the debris increases, the environmental risk (hypervelocity collisions) associated with spaceflight also increases. Debris larger than 10 cm can typically be detected and tracked sufficiently to allow risk avoidance to be achieved by maneuvering to safe distances. Risk reduction for objects smaller than I cm may be accomplished through shielding. However, intermediate sized debris remains a problem. A convenient risk reduction solution has been identified using modem laser technology. In this approach, a relatively low energy laser facility operating near e equator may significantly reduce the amount of intermediate sized debris (1 - 10 cm) in a few years of operation. A sufficiently intense laser pulse arriving at a debris objects surface will ablate a micro-thin layer of material. As this hot gas rapidly expands away from the object, a small change in momentum is imparted. The momentum change for one pulse is insignificant. However, since the laser can provide 10-1000 pulses per second over several minutes, the cumulative effect is substantive. The object's perigee may be lowered in this manner into atmosphere where it will be vaporized. This same technique may be employed on a larger scale for risk reduction in asteroids, meteoroids, and comets colliding with the Earth at hypervelocities.

  9. Hybrid Vehicle Technologies and their potential for reducing oil use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, John

    2006-04-01

    Vehicles with hybrid gasoline-electric powertrains are starting to gain market share. Current hybrid vehicles add an electric motor, battery pack, and power electronics to the conventional powertrain. A variety of engine/motor configurations are possible, each with advantages and disadvantages. In general, efficiency is improved due to engine shut-off at idle, capture of energy during deceleration that is normally lost as heat in the brakes, downsizing of the conventional engine, and, in some cases, propulsion on the electric motor alone. Ongoing increases in hybrid market share are dependent on cost reduction, especially the battery pack, efficiency synergies with other vehicle technologies, use of the high electric power to provide features desired by customers, and future fuel price and availability. Potential barriers include historically low fuel prices, high discounting of the fuel savings by new vehicle purchasers, competing technologies, and tradeoffs with other factors desired by customers, such as performance, utility, safety, and luxury features.

  10. Reducing trauma associated with burns care using Safetac technology.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Martyn; Swales, Beverley

    The nature of a burn may itself cause significant pain, which may be exacerbated by external factors such as dressing of the wound, wound debridement and surgical reconstruction. Selection of appropriate dressings is essential to minimise pain, particularly in cases where dressings need to be changed frequently, and to provide an optimum environment for wound healing. Although there are many products available for nurses to choose from, this article focuses only on the use of dressings with Safetac technology.

  11. Reducing the distance in distance-caregiving by technology innovation

    PubMed Central

    Benefield, Lazelle E; Beck, Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    Family caregivers are responsible for the home care of over 34 million older adults in the United States. For many, the elder family member lives more than an hour’s distance away. Distance caregiving is a growing alternative to more familiar models where: 1) the elder and the family caregiver(s) may reside in the same household; or 2) the family caregiver may live nearby but not in the same household as the elder. The distance caregiving model involves elders and their family caregivers who live at some distance, defined as more than a 60-minute commute, from one another. Evidence suggests that distance caregiving is a distinct phenomenon, differs substantially from on-site family caregiving, and requires additional assistance to support the physical, social, and contextual dimensions of the caregiving process. Technology-based assists could virtually connect the caregiver and elder and provide strong support that addresses the elder’s physical, social, cognitive, and/or sensory impairments. Therefore, in today’s era of high technology, it is surprising that so few affordable innovations are being marketed for distance caregiving. This article addresses distance caregiving, proposes the use of technology innovation to support caregiving, and suggests a research agenda to better inform policy decisions related to the unique needs of this situation. PMID:18044143

  12. Reduced Pressure Cabin Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by United Technologies Corp. Aerospace Systems (UTAS, formerly Hamilton Sundstrand) and baselined for the Atmosphere Revitalization System for moderate duration missions of the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). In previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated and actual human metabolic loads in both open and closed-loop configurations. In 2011, the technology was tested in an open cabin-loop configuration at ambient and two sub-ambient pressures to compare the performance of the system to the results of previous tests at ambient pressure. The testing used a human metabolic simulator with a different type of water vapor generation than previously used, which added some unique challenges in the data analysis. This paper summarizes the results of: baseline and some matrix testing at all three cabin pressures, increased vacuum regeneration line pressure testing with a high metabolic load, a set of tests studying CO2 and water vapor co-adsorption effects relative to model-predicted performance, and validation tests of flight project computer model predictions with specific operating conditions.

  13. Can Avoiding Light at Night Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer?

    PubMed

    Keshet-Sitton, Atalya; Or-Chen, Keren; Yitzhak, Sara; Tzabary, Ilana; Haim, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Excessive exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) suppresses nocturnal melatonin (MLT) production in the pineal gland and is, therefore, associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (BC). We examined indoor and outdoor light habits of 278 women, BC patients (n = 93), and controls (n = 185; 2010-2014). Cases and controls were age and residential area matched. Data regarding behavior in the sleeping habitat in a 5-year period, 10 to 15 years prior to disease diagnosis, were collected using a questionnaire. Sleep quality, bedtime, sleep duration, TV watching habits, presleeping reading habits, subjective illumination intensity, and type of illumination were collected. Binary logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (ORs with 95% CIs) for BC patients in relation to those habits. OR results revealed that women who had slept longer (controls), 10 to 15 years before the time of the study, in a period of 5 years, had a significant (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.57-0.97; P < .03) reduced BC risk. Likewise, women who had been moderately exposed to ALAN as a result of reading using bed light (reading lamp) illumination and women who had slept with closed shutters reduced their BC risk: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.67-0.97, P < .02, and OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68-0.99, P < .04, respectively. However, women who had been exposed to ALAN as a result of living near strong illumination sources were at a significantly higher BC risk (OR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.10-2.12; P < .01). These data support the hypothesis that diminishing nighttime light exposure will diminish BC risk and incidence. This hypothesis needs to be tested directly using available testing strategies and technologies that continuously measure an individual's light exposure, its timing, and sleep length longitudinally and feed this information back to the individual, so that BC risk can be distinguished prospectively.

  14. Model of areas for identifying risks influencing the compliance of technological processes and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, A.; Belu, N.

    2016-08-01

    Operation of every company is associated with the risk of interfering with proper performance of its fundamental processes. This risk is associated with various internal areas of the company, as well as the environment in which it operates. From the point of view of ensuring compliance of the course of specific technological processes and, consequently, product conformity with requirements, it is important to identify these threats and eliminate or reduce the risk of their occurrence. The purpose of this article is to present a model of areas of identifying risk affecting the compliance of processes and products, which is based on multiregional targeted monitoring of typical places of interference and risk management methods. The model is based on the verification of risk analyses carried out in small and medium-sized manufacturing companies in various industries..

  15. Reducing Cascading Failure Risk by Increasing Infrastructure Network Interdependence

    DOE PAGES

    Korkali, Mert; Veneman, Jason G.; Tivnan, Brian F.; ...

    2017-03-20

    Increased coupling between critical infrastructure networks, such as power and communication systems, has important implications for the reliability and security of these systems. To understand the effects of power-communication coupling, several researchers have studied models of interdependent networks and reported that increased coupling can increase vulnerability. However, these conclusions come largely from models that have substantially different mechanisms of cascading failure, relative to those found in actual power and communication networks, and that do not capture the benefits of connecting systems with complementary capabilities. In order to understand the importance of these details, this paper compares network vulnerability in simplemore » topological models and in models that more accurately capture the dynamics of cascading in power systems. First, we compare a simple model of topological contagion to a model of cascading in power systems and find that the power grid model shows a higher level of vulnerability, relative to the contagion model. Second, we compare a percolation model of topological cascading in coupled networks to three different models of power networks coupled to communication systems. Again, the more accurate models suggest very different conclusions than the percolation model. In all but the most extreme case, the physics-based power grid models indicate that increased power-communication coupling decreases vulnerability. This is opposite from what one would conclude from the percolation model, in which zero coupling is optimal. Only in an extreme case, in which communication failures immediately cause grid failures, did we find that increased coupling can be harmful. Together, these results suggest design strategies for reducing the risk of cascades in interdependent infrastructure systems.« less

  16. Towards landscape design guidelines for reducing Lyme disease risk.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Laura E; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Thomas, James C

    2006-04-01

    Incidence of Lyme disease in the US continues to grow. Low-density development is also increasing in endemic regions, raising questions about the relationship between development pattern and disease. This study sought to model Lyme disease incidence rate using quantitative, practical metrics of regional landscape pattern. The objective was to progress towards the development of design guidelines that may help minimize known threats to human and environmental health. Ecological analysis was used to accommodate the integral landscape variables under study. Case data derived from passive surveillance reports across 12 counties in the US state of Maryland during 1996-2000; 2,137 cases were spatially referenced to residential addresses. Major roads were used to delineate 514 landscape analysis units from 0.002 to 580 km(2). The parameter that explained the most variation in incidence rate was the percentage of land-cover edge represented by the adjacency of forest and herbaceous cover [R(2) = 0.75; rate ratio = 1.34 (1.26-1.43); P < 0.0001]. Also highly significant was the percentage of the landscape in forest cover (cumulative R(2) = 0.82), which exhibited a quadratic relationship with incidence rate. Modelled relationships applied throughout the range of landscape sizes. Results begin to provide quantitative landscape design parameters for reducing casual peridomestic contact with tick and host habitat. The final model suggests that clustered forest and herbaceous cover, as opposed to high forest-herbaceous interspersion, would minimize Lyme disease risk in low-density residential areas. Higher-density development that precludes a large percentage of forest-herbaceous edge would also limit exposure.

  17. Vaginal delivery to reduce the risk of hypothermia to newborn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulala, Nuli Nuryanti; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Sulistyaningsih

    2017-08-01

    The prevalence of hypothermia in the world is in the range of 8.5% to 52%, while in Indonesia it is around 47%. Hypothermia has caused 6.3% of neonatal deaths. The method in the process of giving birth determines the way to take care of the newborn. This study aims to observe the effect of the method of delivery on the hypothermia in newborn. This research has obtained an approval from the Ethics Committee of Aisyiyah University, Yogyakarta. This prospective cohort study was conducted to 74 newborns in November 2016. The research subjects were divided into the group of Caesarian section (n = 28) and the group of vaginal delivery (n = 46). Axillary temperature was measured using a digital thermometer at 1st minute, 30th minute, 60th minute, 6th hour, 12th hour and 24th hour. The average temperature difference between the caesarian section group and vaginal delivery group at the 1st minute was at 36°C vs. 36.4° C, at 30th minute at 35.7°C vs. 36.5°C, at 60th minute at 36°C vs. 36.5°C), at 6th hour at 36.2 °C vs. 36.6°C), 12th hour at 36.4°C vs. 36.7°C, and at 24th hour at 36.7°C vs. 36.8°C. The results of the study showed that vaginal delivery could reduce the risk of hypothermia by 1.5 times compared to caesarian section (ρ-value 0.004 CI 95% 1.154 to 1.880)

  18. Risk assessment for release of genetically modified organisms: a virus to reduce the fertility of introduced wild mice, Mus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Williams, C K

    2002-01-01

    Risk assessment is a key task in developing genetically modified organisms (GMOs) intended for release into the environment. A risk assessment protocol is described, focusing on genetically modified biological control agents intended to reduce fertility in mammalian pests. The protocol is being applied to development of an immunocontraceptive murine cytomegalovirus vaccine intended to reduce the frequency and extent of costly troublesome plagues of introduced house mice, Mus domesticus, in southern Australia. Success of the agent, including regulatory approval for release to target populations, will depend on demonstrated biosafety, on the biophysical consequences of releasing the agent, and on public perceptions of the consequences and ongoing risks. The proposed risk assessment protocol addresses biosafety and the biophysical and social risks. It elicits perceptions of interaction and risk from the project scientists and from representatives of interested or affected sectors of society. The perceptions are documented for examination interactively in subsequent socially inclusive formal risk assessments. Representatives of the relevant social sectors participate with the scientists, iteratively if needed, in a workshop to assess the risks of releasing the particular GMO into the environment, using a formal inductive procedure, GENHAZ, designed specifically for assessment and management of the risks of GMOs. Use of this protocol is intended to precede and complement risk assessment and risk management procedures specified by gene technology legislation and regulations.

  19. Anticoagulation in the older adult: optimizing benefit and reducing risk.

    PubMed

    Ko, Darae; Hylek, Elaine M

    2014-09-01

    The risk for both arterial and venous thrombosis increases with age. Despite the increasing burden of strokes related to atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) among older adults, the use of anticoagulant therapy is limited in this population due to the parallel increase in risk of serious hemorrhage. Understanding the risks and their underlying mechanisms would help to mitigate adverse events and improve persistence with these life-saving therapies. The objectives of this review are to: (1) elucidate the age-related physiologic changes that render this high risk subgroup susceptible to hemorrhage, (2) identify mutable risk factors and hazards contributing to an increased bleeding risk in older individuals, and (3) discuss interventions to optimize anticoagulation therapy in this population.

  20. Helping to reduce turbomachinery losses through advanced technology and on-line expertise

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel, R.E.

    1994-12-31

    It`s clear that turbomachinery poses a set of unique problems for risk managers. The size of the equipment, the role it often takes in production and the severity of a loss all combine to make a risk manager`s job that much more difficult. But while the job may be difficult, it`s not impossible. Through a combination of advanced technology, regular predictive maintenance and some expert advice, today`s risk managers, working with plant operational personnel, are reducing major turbomachinery losses. There are several telltale signs that warn plant personnel of an impending turbomachinery failure. One is vibration. All turbomachinery will vibrate at some level, even when in good working condition. But a change in the vibration level usually indicates a change in the machine`s performance. If plant personnel can detect a change early enough, they may be able to avoid an unscheduled shutdown. Hartford Steam Boiler recently introduced a periodic vibration data collection program called DATALERT{trademark} to help its customers separate problem from non-problem machines. As a result, companies can focus resources on equipment that needs immediate attention. And equipment in good working condition doesn`t tie up resources unnecessarily at the next maintenance turnaround. DATALERT is an integrated machinery vibration data collecting and expert analysis system developed by Hartford Steam Boiler to assist customers in preventing rotating machine downtime or losses. The data collection program is described.

  1. Neonatal extracorporeal life support: will the newest technology reduce morbidity?

    PubMed

    Reed-Thurston, Deborah; Shenberger, Jeffrey; Qiu, Feng; Undar, Akif

    2011-11-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS) research at the Penn State Pediatric Cardiovascular Research evaluating new pediatric ECLS components and to discuss a proposed continuous quality improvement model after implementation of new technology. Review of current literature pertaining to studies at the Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital (PSHCH) is presented along with a retrospective chart review of ECLS pediatric patients from January 2000 to June 2010. We describe improvements in the newest hollow-fiber oxygenator demonstrating a lower pressure drop (compared with silicone), and in the newest RotaFlow centrifugal pump which allows higher hemodynamic energy delivered to the patient at higher flow rates with less retrograde flow. The miniaturized pediatric circuit implemented is portable and primes quickly for rapid deployment. Our model of continuous quality improvement includes in-depth evaluation of all circuit component performance through on-site in vivo and in vitro testing at the PSHCH. We utilize the same model to provide comprehensive education and hands-on training of the staff. This cycle can be repeated for evaluation and implementation of any new circuit component. Our comprehensive approach to ECLS may provide the ideal means from which to safely introduce new technology. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reduced Pressure Cabin Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy; Sweterlisch, Jeffery J.

    2013-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Atmosphere Revitalization System for moderate duration missions of the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. In previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated and actual human metabolic loads in both open and closed-loop configurations. In 2011, the technology was tested in an open cabin-loop configuration at ambient and two sub-ambient pressures to compare the performance of the system to the results of previous tests at ambient pressure. The testing used a human metabolic simulator with a different type of water vapor generation than previously used, which added some unique challenges in the data analysis. This paper summarizes the results of: baseline and some matrix testing at all three cabin pressures, increased vacuum regeneration line pressure with a high metabolic load, a set of tests studying CO2 and water vapor co-adsorption effects relative to model-predicted performance, and validation tests of flight program computer model predictions with specific operating conditions.

  3. Reduced Pressure Cabin Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Atmosphere Revitalization System for moderate duration missions of the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. In previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated and actual human metabolic loads in both open and closed-loop configurations. In 2011, the technology was tested in an open cabin-loop configuration at ambient and two sub-ambient pressures to compare the performance of the system to the results of previous tests at ambient pressure. The testing used a human metabolic simulator with a different type of water vapor generation than previously used, which added some unique challenges in the data analysis. This paper summarizes the results of: baseline and some matrix testing at all three cabin pressures, increased vacuum regeneration line pressure with a high metabolic load, a set of tests studying CO2 and water vapor co-adsorption effects relative to model-predicted performance, and validation tests of flight program computer model predictions with specific operating conditions.

  4. Reducing exposure to environmental toxicants before birth: moving from risk perception to risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Grason, Holly A; Misra, Dawn P

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we considered approaches to reducing maternal exposure to hazardous environmental toxicants, focusing on risk communication to pregnant women and providers, but also considering identification of environmental toxicants in the community and reduction of environmental toxicants. We addressed the following questions: (1) What do pregnant women and their providers know about environmental toxicants and perinatal health? and (2) What policy strategies are needed (should be considered) to move forward in risk reduction in this area? We reviewed the literature on knowledge of pregnant women and providers regarding these issues. While there is limited research on what pregnant women and their providers know about environmental toxicants and perinatal health, there is evidence of reproductive and perinatal toxicity. This article describes a wide range of policy strategies that could be implemented to address environmental toxicants in the context of perinatal health. Effective leadership in this area will likely require collaboration of both environmental health and maternal and child health leaders and organizations.

  5. Investigation of Fuel Nozzle Technologies to Reduce Gas Turbine Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony Francis, Roger Neil

    With increasing requirements for reduced emissions from future gas turbines, a multitude of research is being conducted into fuel nozzles by gas turbine manufacturers. This thesis focuses on the development of a novel spill return nozzle, to improve combustion efficiency at starting and low power conditions -where combustion efficiency is often the poorest. The spill return nozzle has the advantage of being able to improve atomization performance and reduce internal coking potential, all while being a simple and durable design. The spill return nozzle tech- nology was subsequently applied to a design for an existing small gas turbine combustor, and its improvements over the existing nozzle were demonstrated. The proposed design was also extended to experimental testing in a simplified form. CAD drawings of the components for testing were made, and prototypes were built in plastic using a high accuracy 3D printer. Future work involves conducting experimental tests to validate results.

  6. Replacement of HEPA Filters at the LANL CMR Facility: Risks Reduced by Comprehensive Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Corpion, J.; Barr, A.; Martinez, P.; Bader, M.

    2002-02-28

    In March 2001, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) completed the replacement of 720 radioactively contaminated HEPA filters for $5.7M. This project was completed five months ahead of schedule and $6.0M under budget with no worker injuries or contaminations. Numerous health and safety, environmental, and waste disposal problems were overcome, including having to perform work in a radioactively contaminated work environment, that was also contaminated with perchlorates (potential explosive). High waste disposal costs were also an issue. A project risk analysis and government cost estimate determined that the cost of performing the work would be $11.8M. To reduce risk, a $1.2M comprehensive condition assessment was performed to determine the degree of toxic and radioactive contamination trapped on the HEPA filters; and to determine whether explosive concentrations of perchlorates were present. Workers from LANL and personnel from Waldheim International of Knoxville, TN collected hundreds of samples wearing personnel protective gear against radioactive, toxic, and explosive hazards. LANL also funded research at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology to determine the explosivity of perchlorates. The data acquired from the condition assessment showed that toxic metals, toxic organic compounds, and explosive concentrations of perchlorates were absent. The data also showed that the extent of actinide metal contamination was less than expected, reducing the potential of transuranic waste generation by 50%. Consequently, $4.2M in cost savings and $1.8M in risk reduction were realized by increased worker productivity and waste segregation.

  7. Replacement of HEPA Filters at the LANL CMR Facility : risk reduced by comprehensive waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Corpion, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    In March 2001, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) completed the replacement of 720 radioactively contaminated HEPA filters for $5.7M. This project was completed five months ahead of schedule and $6.0M under budget with no worker injuries or contaminations. Numerous health and safety, environmental, and waste disposal problems were overcome, including having to perform work in a radioactively contaminated work environment, that was also contaminated with perchlorates (potential explosive). High waste disposal costs were also an issue. A project risk analysis and government cost estimate determined that the cost of performing the work would be $11.8M. To reduce risk, a $1.2M comprehensive condition assessment was performed to determine the degree of toxic and radioactive contamination trapped on the HEPA filters; and to determine whether explosive concentrations of perchlorates were present. Workers from LANL and personnel from Waldheim International of Knoxville, TN collected hundreds of samples wearing personnel protective gear against radioactive, toxic, and explosive hazards. LANL also funded research at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology to determine the explosivity of perchlorates. The data acquired from the condition assessment showed that toxic metals, toxic organic compounds, and explosive concentrations of perchlorates were absent. The data also showed that the extent of actinide metal contamination was less than expected, reducing the potential of transuranic waste generation by 50%. Consequently, $4.2M in cost savings and $1.8M in risk reduction were realized by increased worker productivity and waste segregation.

  8. New combustion technology reduces pollutant emissions and operating costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    The new system, called PEP-99, is used to produce an emulsified fuel. This new fuel is being used in an 850 megawatt boiler used to generate electric power by the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation in Oswego, NY, where it has reduced pollutant levels and maintained the boiler peak thermal efficiency for longer periods of time as compared to performance with conventional No. 6 fuel oil. Hydroflow's PEP-99 products are designed for the on-site production of water-in-oil fuel emulsions. Very small droplets of water are mixed uniformly throughout the fuel oil and are contained within larger droplets of oil. When the fuel is sprayed into the hot combustion chamber, the water is flashed to steam, creating an explosive force that shatters each individual oil droplet. These smaller particles of oil burn much more cleanly and completely than standard residual fuels. This reduces particulate emissions or unburned carbon which is discharged to the atmosphere. The presence of water in the fuel emulsion slightly reduces the combustion temperature resulting in a significant reduction in nitrogen oxides. PEP-99 emulsified fuels typically provide 40 to 50 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides, 30-40 percent reduction in SO/sub 3/ and up to 50 percent cut in particulate emissions.

  9. Reducing the Risk, Increasing the Promise: Strategies for Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergmann, Sherrel; Brough, Judith Allen

    2012-01-01

    In their new book, Bergmann and Brough provide a clear path to follow for helping your at-risk students achieve success in and out of the classroom. Packed with classroom-tested, practical strategies and lesson plans for teaching respect, responsibility, resilience, reading, and other essential skills to at-risk students, this is a must-have book…

  10. Outdoor Play: Does Avoiding the Risks Reduce the Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Helen; Wyver, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    Although the term "risk-taking" often has negative connotations, the reality is that the willingness to engage in some risky activities provides opportunities to learn new skills, try new behaviours and ultimately reach our potential. Challenge and risk, in particular during outdoor play, allows children to test the limits of their…

  11. Offshore technology aims for reduced costs, greater safety

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, P.

    1985-04-01

    OFFSHORE TECHNOLOGY continued to make headway last year, although dramatic breakthroughs were few and far between. Major oil companies have been spending heavily on acquisitions and the service companies, which historically have done much innovative work, have been forced to curtail their engineering budgets. The Weir hydraulic pump has been vetted for offshore service and a production model is being installed on a North Sea platform. A CO/sub 2/ fire-control system has been developed for both offshore and onshore applications, and Drilco's Trans-Wate pipe promises to extend drillstring life. And, perhaps most significantly, the Poseidon project is healthy and flourishing. If successful, Poseidon could cut development costs by more than half.

  12. Dietary Cholesterol Increases the Risk whereas PUFAs Reduce the Risk of Active Tuberculosis in Singapore Chinese.

    PubMed

    Soh, Avril Z; Chee, Cynthia Be; Wang, Yee-Tang; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2016-05-01

    Experimental studies suggest that cholesterol enhances the intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whereas marine ω-3 (n-3) and ω-6 (n-6) fatty acids (FAs) may modulate responses to M. tuberculosis in macrophage and animal models. However, there are no epidemiologic data from prospective studies of the relation between dietary cholesterol and FAs and the risk of developing active tuberculosis. We aimed to investigate the relation between dietary intake of cholesterol and FAs and the risk of active tuberculosis in a prospective cohort in Singapore. We analyzed data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women aged 45-74 y recruited between 1993 and 1998. Dietary intake of cholesterol and FAs was determined with the use of a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Incident cases of active tuberculosis were identified via linkage with the nationwide tuberculosis registry. Analysis was performed with the use of Cox proportional hazards models. As of 31 December 2013, 1136 incident cases of active tuberculosis were identified. Dietary cholesterol was positively associated with an increased risk of active tuberculosis in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with the lowest intake quartile, the HR was 1.22 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.47) for the highest quartile (P-trend = 0.04). Conversely, dietary marine n-3 and n-6 FAs were associated with a reduced risk of active tuberculosis in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with the lowest quartile, the HR for the highest intake quartile was 0.77 (95% CI: 0.62, 0.95) for marine n-3 FAs (P-trend = 0.01) and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.98) for n-6 FAs (P-trend = 0.03). There was no association with saturated, monounsaturated, or plant-based n-3 FA intake. Dietary intake of cholesterol may increase the risk of active tuberculosis, whereas marine n-3 and n-6 FAs may reduce the risk of active tuberculosis in the Chinese population. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Reduced Risk-Taking following Disruption of the Intraparietal Sulcus

    PubMed Central

    Coutlee, Christopher G.; Kiyonaga, Anastasia; Korb, Franziska M.; Huettel, Scott A.; Egner, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Decision makers frequently encounter opportunities to pursue great gains—assuming they are willing to accept greater risks. Previous neuroimaging studies have shown that activity in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and the inferior frontal junction (IFJ) are associated with individual preferences for economic risk (“known unknowns,” e.g., a 50% chance of winning $5) and ambiguity (“unknown unknowns,” e.g., an unknown chance of winning $5), respectively. Whether processing in these regions causally enables risk-taking for individual decisions, however, remains unknown. To examine this question, we assessed the decision to engage in risk-taking after disrupting neural processing in the IPS and IFJ of healthy human participants using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. While stimulation of the IFJ resulted in general slowing of decision times, disrupting neural processing within the IPS selectively suppressed risk-taking, biasing choices toward certain options featuring both lower risks and lower expected rewards. Our results are the first to demonstrate the necessity of intact IPS function for choosing uncertain outcomes when faced with calculable risks and rewards. Engagement of IPS during decision making may support a willingness to accept uncertain outcomes for a chance to obtain greater gains. PMID:28066171

  14. As health care technology advances: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Funk, Marjorie

    2011-07-01

    Technology permeates every dimension of critical care. Bedside technology is integral to the assessment and monitoring of patients and to the provision of treatment. It also helps with access to vital information and can enhance communication. Although it offers extraordinary benefits to patients and clinicians, technology may also create problems. Our research addresses the wise use of technology in the care of critically ill patients. It examines the appropriate and safe use of technology, its equitable distribution, and the human-machine interface. Given that some devices are more effective and safe than others, it is important to assess the appropriateness of a specific technology in a specific situation. Just because a particular device is available, is it necessary to use it in every possible situation? Do we use it just because it is there? Do we employ "heroic" measures sometimes when it would be kinder not to? Studies on the safe use of technology in patient care lead to a consideration of the risk-benefit ratio. Our research on gender and racial differences in the use of cardiac procedures in patients with acute myocardial infarction focused on the equitable distribution of technology. The results of this line of research, along with those of numerous other studies, suggest possible racism in our health care practices. The human-machine interface, or how clinicians and patients interact with health care technology, is a crucial focus of research. Technology is at the heart of critical care. It allows clinicians to perform miracles, but is also a seductive and self-perpetuating force that needs careful monitoring by those who use it.

  15. Strategic materials: Technologies to reduce US import vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    Three nations, South Africa, Zaire, and the U.S.S.R., account for over half of the world's production of chromium, cobalt, manganese, and platinum group metals. These metals are essential in the production of high-temperature alloys, steel and stainless steel, industrial and automotive catalysts, electronics, and other applications that are critical to the U.S. economy and the national defense. With minor exceptions, there is no domestic mine production of any of the four metals. Government actions to assure secure supplies of metals critical to the United States have been limited largely to reliance on the national defense stockpile to ensure the availability of materials required for national defense in time of war, leaving it to the free market to provide a diversity of suppliers for the industrial economy. An overall strategy to reduce U.S. reliance on uncertain sources of supply of strategic materials should be based on a combination of three technical approaches: increase the diversity of the world supply of strategic metals through the development of promising deposits; decrease demand for strategic metals through the implementation of improved manufacturing processes and recycling of strategic materials from scrap and waste; and identify and test substitute materials for current applications and develop new materials with reduced strategic material content for future applications.

  16. Salpingectomy as a Means to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Mary B.; Dresher, Charles W.; Yates, Melinda S.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Alberts, David S.; Lu, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) has become the standard of care for risk reduction in women at hereditary risk of ovarian cancer. While this procedure significantly decreases both the incidence of and mortality from ovarian cancer, it impacts quality of life, and the premature cessation of ovarian function may have long term health hazards. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathways of ovarian cancer point to the fallopian tube epithelium as the origin of most high grade serous cancers (HGSC). This evolving appreciation of the role of the fallopian tube in HGSC has led to the consideration of salpingectomy alone as an option for risk management, especially in premenopausal women. In addition, it is postulated that bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian retention (BSOR), may have a public health benefit for women undergoing benign gynecologic surgery. In this review we provide the rationale for salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer risk reduction strategy. PMID:25586903

  17. Reducing mortality for high risk surgical patients in the UK.

    PubMed

    Rogers, B A; Carrothers, A D; Jones, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Over 40 million surgical procedures are performed per annum in the USA and Europe, including several million patients who are considered to be high risk (Bennett-Guerrero et al 2003). Overall, the risk of death or major complications after surgery in the general surgical patient population is low, with a post-operative mortality rate of less than1% during the same hospital admission (Niskanen et al 2001).

  18. Gait alterations can reduce the risk of edge loading.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; Meyer, Christophe; De Groote, Friedl; Corten, Kristoff; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty, edge loading (i.e., loading near the edge of a prosthesis cup) can increase wear and lead to early revision. The position and coverage angle of the prosthesis cup influence the risk of edge loading. This study investigates the effect of altered gait patterns, more specific hip, and pelvis kinematics, on the orientation of hip contact force and the consequent risk of antero-superior edge loading using muscle driven simulations of gait. With a cup orientation of 25° anteversion and 50° inclination and a coverage angle of 168°, many gait patterns presented risk of edge loading. Specifically at terminal double support, 189 out of 405 gait patterns indicated a risk of edge loading. At this time instant, the high hip contact forces and the proximity of the hip contact force to the edge of the cup indicated the likelihood of the occurrence of edge loading. Although the cup position contributed most to edge loading, altering kinematics considerably influenced the risk of edge loading. Increased hip abduction, resulting in decreasing hip contact force magnitude, and decreased hip extension, resulting in decreased risk on edge loading, are gait strategies that could prevent edge loading. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1069-1076, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Preliminary Technical Risk Analysis for the Geothermal Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    This report explains the goals, methods, and results of a probabilistic analysis of technical risk for a portfolio of R&D projects in the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program (The Program). The analysis is a task by Princeton Energy Resources International, LLC, in support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory on behalf of the Program. The main challenge in the analysis lies in translating R&D results to a quantitative reflection of technical risk for a key Program metric: levelized cost of energy (LCOE).

  20. Thrombotic risk of reduced ADAMTS13 activity in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Han, Kyou-Sup; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-12-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease in which antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are generated. Previous studies show concurrence of APS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; therefore it is plausible to assume that anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibody is also involved in the pathophysiology of APS. We investigated the clinical significance of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody in patients with aPLs. Two hundred and sixteen patients with positive lupus anticoagulant and/or anticardiolipin antibody were included. ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody were measured using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer technology and ELISA, respectively. Reduced ADAMTS13 activity was observed in 40.3% (87/216) of patients with aPLs. Although 33.8% (73/216) of patients were positive for anti-ADAMTS13 antibody, 41 of these 73 patients had normal levels of ADAMTS13 activity. Reduced ADAMTS13 activity was a significant risk factor for thrombotic events. Thrombotic events and age contributed to the reduced level of ADAMTS13 activity. Presence of anti-ADAMTS13 antibody did not show any association with the level of ADAMTS13 activity. Patients with autoimmune diseases tended to show higher levels of anti-ADAMTS13 antibody. Our findings suggest that reduced ADAMTS13 activity is a significant thrombotic risk factor in patients with aPLs irrespective of the presence of anti-ADAMTS13 antibody. Presence of anti-ADAMTS13 antibody is not seen with reduced activity and it tends to be increased in patients with autoimmune diseases.

  1. New laser technology helps reduce coal-slagging headaches

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, A.

    2009-02-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is starting to light the way for power plant operators who want to reduce coal ash deposition in their boilers. The method was developed by Lehigh University's Energy Research Centre and the Energy Research Co. The LIBS system analyzes the chemical properties of coal using a pulsating laser with two frequencies, one infrared and one visible light. The laser vaporizes a sample, resulting in a distinct elemental signature. From these data, a newly developed software package containing artificial neural network (ANN) models estimates ash fusion temperature and predicts coal slagging potential. LIBS is the size of a table top, safe to use and provides instantaneous data without interrupting the process. The performance of the LIBS system was verified in lab experiments and then the system was set up at Dominion's Brayton Point Power Station, a 1,150-MW coal-fired power plant in Somerset, MA. The project demonstrated the merit of the LIBS system that produces coal elemental analysis and estimated fusion temperatures. Further development is needed to equip a LIBS system with an automatic online coal-sampling attachment and to achieve higher accuracy and repeatability. The researchers have been awarded a second DOE grant to fund development of a commercial prototype of the LIBS system. 2 figs., 2 photos.

  2. A psychometric study of information technology risks in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Coles, Robert; Hodgkinson, Gerard P

    2008-02-01

    As organizations become increasingly reliant on information technology (IT) they are exposed to a growing number of risks. Surprisingly, however, very few studies to date have investigated the psychometric representation of IT risks, and none have been undertaken in the workplace. Accordingly, the present study was designed to map the judgments of a representative group of workplace IT users. Fifty-seven participants evaluated 18 IT risk scenarios by means of 13 bipolar attribute-rating scales. Profile proximities derived from the raw data were submitted to a weighted multidimensional scaling analysis. The results indicated that a six-dimensional solution was required on both statistical and conceptual grounds to represent adequately the participants' judgments. The dimensions reflected the extent to which the various risk scenarios were perceived as: (1) serious or minor in nature; (2) having a high or low probability of occurrence; (3) causing a high or low degree of stress; (4) deliberate or accidental; (5) having an impact on the organization or on individuals; and (6) the product of human or technological causes. The data were also submitted to a series of hierarchical cluster analyses, using a variety of agglomeration techniques. This second approach revealed a robust structure in which the risk scenarios were grouped into two broad categories, based on whether the events depicted would be likely to have a major or minor impact. The major impact category broke down further, into two subcategories, based on whether the scenarios were seen to arise from deliberate causes or through negligence. In conclusion, we consider the implications of our findings for future research, the refinement of IT risk assessment frameworks and tools, and the training of risk management professionals.

  3. Reducing Software Security Risk Through an Integrated Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, D.; Kelly, J.; Bishop, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses new joint work by the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of California at Davis sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop a security assessment instrument for the software development and maintenance life cycle.

  4. Reducing Software Security Risk Through an Integrated Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, D.; Kelly, J.; Bishop, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses new joint work by the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of California at Davis sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop a security assessment instrument for the software development and maintenance life cycle.

  5. Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Nuclear Process Science

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Hobbs, David T.; Krahn, Steve; Machara, N.; Mcilwain, Michael; Moyer, Bruce A.; Poloski, Adam P.; Subramanian, K.; Vienna, John D.; Wilmarth, B.

    2008-07-18

    Cleaning up the nation’s nuclear weapons complex remains as one of the most technologically challenging and financially costly problems facing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Safety, cost, and technological challenges have often delayed progress in retrieval, processing, and final disposition of high-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, and challenging materials. Some of the issues result from the difficulty and complexity of the technological issues; others have programmatic bases, such as contracting strategies that may provide undue focus on near-term, specific clean-up goals or difficulty in developing and maintaining stakeholder confidence in the proposed solutions. We propose that independent basic fundamental science research focused on the full cleanup life-cycle offers an opportunity to help address these challenges by providing 1) scientific insight into the fundamental mechanisms involved in currently selected processing and disposal options, 2) a rational path to the development of alternative technologies should the primary options fail, 3) confidence that models that predict long-term performance of different disposal options are based upon the best available science, 4) fundamental science discovery that enables transformational solutions to revolutionize the current baseline processes.

  6. Methodology for conceptual remote sensing spacecraft technology: insertion analysis balancing performance, cost, and risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearden, David A.; Duclos, Donald P.; Barrera, Mark J.; Mosher, Todd J.; Lao, Norman Y.

    1997-12-01

    Emerging technologies and micro-instrumentation are changing the way remote sensing spacecraft missions are developed and implemented. Government agencies responsible for procuring space systems are increasingly requesting analyses to estimate cost, performance and design impacts of advanced technology insertion for both state-of-the-art systems as well as systems to be built 5 to 10 years in the future. Numerous spacecraft technology development programs are being sponsored by Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) agencies with the goal of enhancing spacecraft performance, reducing mass, and reducing cost. However, it is often the case that technology studies, in the interest of maximizing subsystem-level performance and/or mass reduction, do not anticipate synergistic system-level effects. Furthermore, even though technical risks are often identified as one of the largest cost drivers for space systems, many cost/design processes and models ignore effects of cost risk in the interest of quick estimates. To address these issues, the Aerospace Corporation developed a concept analysis methodology and associated software tools. These tools, collectively referred to as the concept analysis and design evaluation toolkit (CADET), facilitate system architecture studies and space system conceptual designs focusing on design heritage, technology selection, and associated effects on cost, risk and performance at the system and subsystem level. CADET allows: (1) quick response to technical design and cost questions; (2) assessment of the cost and performance impacts of existing and new designs/technologies; and (3) estimation of cost uncertainties and risks. These capabilities aid mission designers in determining the configuration of remote sensing missions that meet essential requirements in a cost- effective manner. This paper discuses the development of CADET modules and their application to several remote sensing satellite

  7. How to reduce your cancer risk: mechanisms and myths

    PubMed Central

    Nahleh, Zeina; Bhatti, Narinder Singh; Mal, Meenakshi

    2011-01-01

    Cancer prevention continues to be a high research priority and the most optimal way to ultimately lower the economic and psychological burden of cancer. Many known risk factors associated with cancer are related to dietary and lifestyle factors and can be avoided. These risk factors include among others, smoking, obesity, alcohol, physical inactivity, and carcinogens in diet. This article reviews the biological mechanisms leading to cancer in association with these factors, highlights important achievable cancer prevention methods, addresses commonly asked questions about lifestyle and cancer, and dispels some of the myths about cancer prevention. PMID:21556314

  8. How to reduce your cancer risk: mechanisms and myths.

    PubMed

    Nahleh, Zeina; Bhatti, Narinder Singh; Mal, Meenakshi

    2011-04-08

    Cancer prevention continues to be a high research priority and the most optimal way to ultimately lower the economic and psychological burden of cancer. Many known risk factors associated with cancer are related to dietary and lifestyle factors and can be avoided. These risk factors include among others, smoking, obesity, alcohol, physical inactivity, and carcinogens in diet. This article reviews the biological mechanisms leading to cancer in association with these factors, highlights important achievable cancer prevention methods, addresses commonly asked questions about lifestyle and cancer, and dispels some of the myths about cancer prevention.

  9. Study Shows Aspirin Reduces Colorectal Cancer in Those at High Risk

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from the first large clinical trial of its kind indicate that taking high doses of aspirin daily for at least 2 years substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer among people at increased risk of the disease.

  10. Reducing drinking water supply chemical contamination: risks from underground storage tanks.

    PubMed

    Enander, Richard T; Hanumara, R Choudary; Kobayashi, Hisanori; Gagnon, Ronald N; Park, Eugene; Vallot, Christopher; Genovesi, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Drinking water supplies are at risk of contamination from a variety of physical, chemical, and biological sources. Ranked among these threats are hazardous material releases from leaking or improperly managed underground storage tanks located at municipal, commercial, and industrial facilities. To reduce human health and environmental risks associated with the subsurface storage of hazardous materials, government agencies have taken a variety of legislative and regulatory actions--which date back more than 25 years and include the establishment of rigorous equipment/technology/operational requirements and facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs. Given a history of more than 470,000 underground storage tank releases nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency continues to report that 7,300 new leaks were found in federal fiscal year 2008, while nearly 103,000 old leaks remain to be cleaned up. In this article, we report on an alternate evidence-based intervention approach for reducing potential releases from the storage of petroleum products (gasoline, diesel, kerosene, heating/fuel oil, and waste oil) in underground tanks at commercial facilities located in Rhode Island. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a new regulatory model can be used as a cost-effective alternative to traditional facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs for underground storage tanks. We conclude that the alternative model, using an emphasis on technical assistance tools, can produce measurable improvements in compliance performance, is a cost-effective adjunct to traditional facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs, and has the potential to allow regulatory agencies to decrease their frequency of inspections among low risk facilities without sacrificing compliance performance or increasing public health risks.

  11. Plan Your Marketing: Enhance Profits and Reduce Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, William; And Others

    This marketing unit was developed to help farm families formulate a step-by-step plan for marketing their commodities in order to help remove much of the guesswork and anxiety from the process. The unit is organized in the following eight sections: introduction; sources of risk; pricing alternatives; developing a plan (10 steps); summary;…

  12. Reduce Fraud Risk in Your District with Stronger Internal Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okrzesik, Daryl J.; Nuehring, Bert G.

    2011-01-01

    Internal accounts offer schools a faster, more convenient way to handle the income and expenses that result from student fees, school clubs and organizations, field trips, fund-raising, and similar activities. But this convenience also incurs the added risk of fraud. Fortunately, there are proven ways to strengthen internal controls and reduce…

  13. Prevention: Reducing the risk of CVD in patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2010-09-01

    The association between periodontitis and other chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus, could be related to systemic inflammation initiated by a local inflammatory challenge. Oliveira et al. have added lack of oral hygiene, and its link with systemic inflammation, to the spectrum of risk factors for CVD.

  14. Does a vegan diet reduce risk for Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-09-01

    Three recent case-control studies conclude that diets high in animal fat or cholesterol are associated with a substantial increase in risk for Parkinson's disease (PD); in contrast, fat of plant origin does not appear to increase risk. Whereas reported age-adjusted prevalence rates of PD tend to be relatively uniform throughout Europe and the Americas, sub-Saharan black Africans, rural Chinese, and Japanese, groups whose diets tend to be vegan or quasi-vegan, appear to enjoy substantially lower rates. Since current PD prevalence in African-Americans is little different from that in whites, environmental factors are likely to be responsible for the low PD risk in black Africans. In aggregate, these findings suggest that vegan diets may be notably protective with respect to PD. However, they offer no insight into whether saturated fat, compounds associated with animal fat, animal protein, or the integrated impact of the components of animal products mediates the risk associated with animal fat consumption. Caloric restriction has recently been shown to protect the central dopaminergic neurons of mice from neurotoxins, at least in part by induction of heat-shock proteins; conceivably, the protection afforded by vegan diets reflects a similar mechanism. The possibility that vegan diets could be therapeutically beneficial in PD, by slowing the loss of surviving dopaminergic neurons, thus retarding progression of the syndrome, may merit examination. Vegan diets could also be helpful to PD patients by promoting vascular health and aiding blood-brain barrier transport of L-dopa.

  15. Timing of Your Meals Might Reduce Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure and cholesterol numbers, and have lower risks of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to the AHA. The problem is, those studies don't prove that breakfast deserves the credit. And few trials have actually tested the effects ...

  16. Green nanotech can reduce risks to poor nations

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been major breakthroughs in nanomaterials for use in healthcare situations and some of these have already moved beyond the laboratory into the 'real world'. Now we need to pay serious attention to their potential risk to health and to the environment, both of which are...

  17. Reducing the Risks: Reflections on Bridging Home and School Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, S. Kay; Bruneau, Beverly J.

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes the reflections of the developers of the Literacy Outreach Program (LOP) about how they might better support at-risk students' learning through attempting to build bridges between the home and the program. Notes the importance of inviting (instead of mandating) parents to participate, as well as modeling for parents appropriate…

  18. Reducing the Risk of Postoperative Genital Complications in Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossanova, ?ssem; Lozovoy, Vasiliy; Wood, Dan; ??nekenova, ?enzhekyz; Botabayeva, ?igul; Dossanov, Bolatbek; Lozovaya, Yelena; ?marov, ?algat

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive system of adolescents is exposed to a high risk of anomalies. In spite of the successes of surgical correction, the percentage of postoperative complications remains high. Special attention should be paid to circumcision, which is regarded as a religious tradition in many countries and carried out with sanitary violations. This…

  19. Green nanotech can reduce risks to poor nations

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been major breakthroughs in nanomaterials for use in healthcare situations and some of these have already moved beyond the laboratory into the 'real world'. Now we need to pay serious attention to their potential risk to health and to the environment, both of which are...

  20. Coupling risk-based remediation with innovative technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goodheart, G.F.; Teaf, C.M. |; Manning, M.J.

    1998-05-01

    Tiered risk-based cleanup approaches have been effectively used at petroleum sites, pesticide sites and other commercial/industrial facilities. For example, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) has promulgated guidance for a Tiered Approach to Corrective action Objectives (TACO) to establish site-specific remediation goals for contaminated soil and groundwater. As in the case of many other state programs, TACO is designed to provide for adequate protection of human health and the environment based on potential risks posed by site conditions. It also incorporates site-related information that may allow more cost-effective remediation. IEPA developed TACO to provide flexibility to site owners/operators when formulating site-specific remediation activities, as well as to hasten property redevelopment to return sites to more productive use. Where appropriate, risk-based cleanup objectives as set by TACO-type programs may be coupled with innovative remediation technologies such as air sparging, bioremediation and soil washing.

  1. Risk assessment of technologies for detecting illicit drugs in containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenstein, Albert E.

    1995-03-01

    This paper provides the highlights of the role risk assessment plays in the United States technology program for nonintrusive inspection of cargo containers for illicit drugs. The Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center is coordinating the national effort to develop prototype technologies for an advanced generation, nonintrusive cargo inspection system. In the future, the U.S. Customs Service could configure advanced technologies for finding not only drugs and other contraband hidden in cargo, but for a wide variety of commodities for customs duty verification purposes. The overall nonintrusive inspection system is envisioned to consist primarily of two classes of subsystems: (1) shipment document examination subsystems to prescreen exporter and importer documents; and (2) chemical and physics-based subsystems to detect and characterize illicit substances. The document examination subsystems would use software algorithms, artificial intelligence, and neural net technology to perform an initial prescreening of the information on the shipping manifest for suspicious patterns. This would be accomplished by creating a `profile' from the shipping information and matching it to trends known to be used by traffickers. The chemical and physics-based subsystems would apply nuclear physics, x-ray, gas chromatography and spectrometry technologies to locate and identify contraband in containers and other conveyances without the need for manual searches. The approach taken includes using technology testbeds to assist in evaluating technology prototypes and testing system concepts in a fully instrumented but realistic operational environment. This approach coupled with a substance signature phenomenology program to characterize those detectable elements of benign, as well as target substances lends itself particularly well to the topics of risk assessment and elemental characterization of substances. A technology testbed established in Tacoma, Washington provides a national

  2. Navigating the information technology highway: computer solutions to reduce errors and enhance patient safety.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Ranie

    2005-10-01

    Standardized, seamless, integrated information technology in the health-care environment used with other industry tools can markedly decrease preventable errors or adverse events and increase patient safety. According to an Institute of Medicine (IOM) report released in 1999, preventable errors have caused between 44,000 and 98,000 deaths per year. Following the report, President Bill Clinton requested that the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality, a government agency, look into the issue and fund, at the local or state level, processes that can reduce errors. Funding subsequently was made available for research that utilizes best practice tools in clinical practice to increase patient safety. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization has placed a great deal of emphasis on strategies to reduce patient identification errors. Fragmented systems tout the individual as well as enhanced safety applications. These applications, however, are related to prevention in specific conditions and in specific health-care settings. Systems are not integrated with common reference data and common terminology aggregated at a regional or national level to provide access to patient safety risks for timely interventions before errors and adverse events occur. Standardized integrated patient care information systems are not available either on a regional or on a national level. This article examines tangible options to increase patient safety through improved state-of-the-art tools that can be incorporated into the health-care system to prevent errors.

  3. Managing sedentary behavior to reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Paddy C; Owen, Neville; Biddle, Stuart J H; Dunstan, David W

    2014-01-01

    Modern human environments are vastly different from those of our forebears. Rapidly advancing technology in transportation, communications, workplaces, and home entertainment confer a wealth of benefits, but increasingly come with costs to human health. Sedentary behavior-too much sitting as distinct from too little physical activity-contributes adversely to cardiometabolic health outcomes and premature mortality. Findings from observational epidemiology have been synthesized in meta-analyses, and evidence is now shifting into the realm of experimental trials with the aim of identifying novel mechanisms and potential causal relationships. We discuss recent observational and experimental evidence that makes a compelling case for reducing and breaking up prolonged sitting time in both the primary prevention and disease management contexts. We also highlight future research needs, the opportunities for developing targeted interventions, and the potential of population-wide initiatives designed to address too much sitting as a health risk.

  4. Social risk management--reducing disparities in risk, vulnerability and poverty equitably.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2008-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina, which struck the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005 and took 1,000 lives or more, was the third deadliest storm to hit the United States, falling behind only the Galveston Hurricane of 1900 and the 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane. It is New Orleans' worst natural disaster in its nearly 300-year history. The storm left hundreds of thousands without access to shelter, food, water, clothing and basic sanitation. The human suffering and health consequences are immeasurable. Dissatisfaction with the federal, national and local governments' planning and response is widespread. Many believe that the system discriminated cruelly by race and class against those in greatest need. The storm revealed serious flaws in disaster relief and preparedness structures, which require major reform. As an alternative, this article proposes a social risk management system to provide both universal risk protection and an efficient, more equitable approach to managing and reducing disparities in vulnerability. While one must realize that incremental rather than comprehensive reform of the system is most likely and most politically feasible, Katrina's horrific consequences and revealed inequities necessitate an alternative model.

  5. A Risk Assessment Model for Reduced Aircraft Separation: A Quantitative Method to Evaluate the Safety of Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Smith, Alex; Connors, Mary; Wojciech, Jack; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    As new technologies and procedures are introduced into the National Airspace System, whether they are intended to improve efficiency, capacity, or safety level, the quantification of potential changes in safety levels is of vital concern. Applications of technology can improve safety levels and allow the reduction of separation standards. An excellent example is the Precision Runway Monitor (PRM). By taking advantage of the surveillance and display advances of PRM, airports can run instrument parallel approaches to runways separated by 3400 feet with the same level of safety as parallel approaches to runways separated by 4300 feet using the standard technology. Despite a wealth of information from flight operations and testing programs, there is no readily quantifiable relationship between numerical safety levels and the separation standards that apply to aircraft on final approach. This paper presents a modeling approach to quantify the risk associated with reducing separation on final approach. Reducing aircraft separation, both laterally and longitudinally, has been the goal of several aviation R&D programs over the past several years. Many of these programs have focused on technological solutions to improve navigation accuracy, surveillance accuracy, aircraft situational awareness, controller situational awareness, and other technical and operational factors that are vital to maintaining flight safety. The risk assessment model relates different types of potential aircraft accidents and incidents and their contribution to overall accident risk. The framework links accident risks to a hierarchy of failsafe mechanisms characterized by procedures and interventions. The model will be used to assess the overall level of safety associated with reducing separation standards and the introduction of new technology and procedures, as envisaged under the Free Flight concept. The model framework can be applied to various aircraft scenarios, including parallel and in

  6. A Risk Assessment Model for Reduced Aircraft Separation: A Quantitative Method to Evaluate the Safety of Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Smith, Alex; Connors, Mary; Wojciech, Jack; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    As new technologies and procedures are introduced into the National Airspace System, whether they are intended to improve efficiency, capacity, or safety level, the quantification of potential changes in safety levels is of vital concern. Applications of technology can improve safety levels and allow the reduction of separation standards. An excellent example is the Precision Runway Monitor (PRM). By taking advantage of the surveillance and display advances of PRM, airports can run instrument parallel approaches to runways separated by 3400 feet with the same level of safety as parallel approaches to runways separated by 4300 feet using the standard technology. Despite a wealth of information from flight operations and testing programs, there is no readily quantifiable relationship between numerical safety levels and the separation standards that apply to aircraft on final approach. This paper presents a modeling approach to quantify the risk associated with reducing separation on final approach. Reducing aircraft separation, both laterally and longitudinally, has been the goal of several aviation R&D programs over the past several years. Many of these programs have focused on technological solutions to improve navigation accuracy, surveillance accuracy, aircraft situational awareness, controller situational awareness, and other technical and operational factors that are vital to maintaining flight safety. The risk assessment model relates different types of potential aircraft accidents and incidents and their contribution to overall accident risk. The framework links accident risks to a hierarchy of failsafe mechanisms characterized by procedures and interventions. The model will be used to assess the overall level of safety associated with reducing separation standards and the introduction of new technology and procedures, as envisaged under the Free Flight concept. The model framework can be applied to various aircraft scenarios, including parallel and in

  7. A methodology for spacecraft technology insertion analysis balancing benefit, cost, and risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearden, David Allen

    Emerging technologies are changing the way space missions are developed and implemented. Technology development programs are proceeding with the goal of enhancing spacecraft performance and reducing mass and cost. However, it is often the case that technology insertion assessment activities, in the interest of maximizing performance and/or mass reduction, do not consider synergistic system-level effects. Furthermore, even though technical risks are often identified as a large cost and schedule driver, many design processes ignore effects of cost and schedule uncertainty. This research is based on the hypothesis that technology selection is a problem of balancing interrelated (and potentially competing) objectives. Current spacecraft technology selection approaches are summarized, and a Methodology for Evaluating and Ranking Insertion of Technology (MERIT) that expands on these practices to attack otherwise unsolved problems is demonstrated. MERIT combines the modern techniques of technology maturity measures, parametric models, genetic algorithms, and risk assessment (cost and schedule) in a unique manner to resolve very difficult issues including: user-generated uncertainty, relationships between cost/schedule and complexity, and technology "portfolio" management. While the methodology is sufficiently generic that it may in theory be applied to a number of technology insertion problems, this research focuses on application to the specific case of small (<500 kg) satellite design. Small satellite missions are of particular interest because they are often developed under rigid programmatic (cost and schedule) constraints and are motivated to introduce advanced technologies into the design. MERIT is demonstrated for programs procured under varying conditions and constraints such as stringent performance goals, not-to-exceed costs, or hard schedule requirements. MERIT'S contributions to the engineering community are its: unique coupling of the aspects of performance

  8. Reduced relative risk of fractures among users of lithium.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, P; Rejnmark, L; Mosekilde, L

    2005-07-01

    Lithium has been shown to inhibit bone resorption and to interact with W nt signaling, potentially pointing to bone anabolic properties. We, therefore, studied the effects of lithium on fracture risk using a case-control study design. Cases were all subjects including children with any fracture sustained during the year 2000 (n=124,655). For each case, three controls (n=373,962) matched according to age and gender was randomly drawn from the background population. Adjustments were made for use of other psychotropic drugs (neuroleptics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics/sedatives), psychiatric disease (manic depressive states, schizophrenia, and other psychoses), and other confounders. The effect of dose was examined by stratifying for cumulated dose (DDD, defined daily dose). In the crude analysis, there was a decreasing relative risk of any fracture with increasing accumulated dose of lithium. After adjustment for psychotropic drug use, the risk of any fracture was decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60--0.92 for 250--849 DDD, and OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.55--0.81 for >or= 850 DDD of lithium). For Colles' fractures and spine fractures, a significant decrease was seen with >or= 850 DDD (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35--0.94 for Colles' fracture and OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.11--0.95 for spine fractures). For hip fractures, a nonsignificant trend toward a decrease was seen; however, without a dose-response relationship. Adjustment for further confounders did not change the results. Lithium treatment was associated with a decreased risk of fractures potentially pointing at bone anabolic properties.

  9. [Could Helicobacter pylori treatment reduce stomach cancer risk?].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Jean-François

    2003-03-01

    Despite its dramatic decline in incidence in developed countries, gastric cancer is a major public health issue in the world. Accumulating evidence for considering H. pylori as a causal factor for gastric cancer comes from recent epidemiologic studies, the advent of an animal model of gastric cancer and from new insights into the biological mechanisms for gastric carcinogenesis. The stomach cancer risk for people infected with H. pylori is rather low, inferior to 1%. It depends on genotypic polymorphisms of both the bacterium and the host. Environmental risk factors such as smoking habits, salt intake, and the amount of antioxidants in diet may interfere with H. pylori and modify the cancer risk. There is no definite clinical evidence of the benefit of eradication on cancer risk in humans due to the lack of randomized controlled studies in large populations. The occurrence of gastric adenocarcinomas in patients after complete remission of gastric MALT lymphoma induced by H. pylori eradication suggests also the limits of the preventive strategy against gastric cancer. Furthermore, the effectiveness of eradication to reverse precancerous gastric lesions such as severe atrophy and intestinal metaplasia is questionable. For many reasons discussed in our review, population-based screening and routine eradication of H. pylori infection seem to be an unrealistic goal and cannot be recommended in France. By waiting for effective anti-H. pylori vaccine, public health measures such as dietary modification should be promoted to further decrease the gastric cancer incidence. On the individual basis the specialist has a role in the diagnosis of gastric precancerous lesions by endoscopy and also in the prevention of gastric cancer by selecting indications for H. pylori therapy.

  10. Tubal Factor Infertility and Perinatal Risk After Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kawwass, Jennifer F.; Crawford, Sara; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Session, Donna R.; Boulet, Sheree; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess trends of tubal factor infertility and to evaluate risk of miscarriage and delivery of preterm or low birth weight (LBW) neonates among women with tubal factor infertility using assisted reproductive technology (ART). METHODS We assessed trends of tubal factor infertility among all fresh and frozen, donor, and nondonor ART cycles performed annually in the United States between 2000 and 2010 (N=1,418,774) using the National ART Surveillance System. The data set was then limited to fresh, nondonor in vitro fertilization cycles resulting in pregnancy to compare perinatal outcomes for cycles associated with tubal compared with male factor infertility. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses controlling for maternal characteristics and calculated adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS The percentage of ART cycles associated with tubal factor infertility diagnoses decreased from 2000 to 2010 (26.02–14.81%). Compared with male factor infertility, tubal factor portended an increased risk of miscarriage (14.0% compared with 12.7%, adjusted RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04–1.12); risk was increased for both early and late miscarriage. Singleton neonates born to women with tubal factor infertility had an increased risk of pre-term birth (15.8% compared with 11.6%, adjusted RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20–1.34) and LBW (10.9% compared with 8.5%, adjusted RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.20–1.36). Significant increases in risk persisted for early and late preterm delivery and very low and moderately LBW delivery. A significantly elevated risk was also detected for twin, but not triplet, pregnancies. CONCLUSION Tubal factor infertility, which is decreasing in prevalence in the United States, is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, and LBW delivery as compared with couples with male factor infertility using ART. PMID:23812461

  11. Saturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Replacements for Saturated Fat to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Michelle A.; Petersen, Kristina S.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2017-01-01

    Dietary recommendations to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have focused on reducing intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA) for more than 50 years. While the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans advise substituting both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids for SFA, evidence supports other nutrient substitutions that will also reduce CVD risk. For example, replacing SFA with whole grains, but not refined carbohydrates, reduces CVD risk. Replacing SFA with protein, especially plant protein, may also reduce CVD risk. While dairy fat (milk, cheese) is associated with a slightly lower CVD risk compared to meat, dairy fat results in a significantly greater CVD risk relative to unsaturated fatty acids. As research continues, we will refine our understanding of dietary patterns associated with lower CVD risk. PMID:28635680

  12. Saturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Replacements for Saturated Fat to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Michelle A; Petersen, Kristina S; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2017-06-21

    Dietary recommendations to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have focused on reducing intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA) for more than 50 years. While the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans advise substituting both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids for SFA, evidence supports other nutrient substitutions that will also reduce CVD risk. For example, replacing SFA with whole grains, but not refined carbohydrates, reduces CVD risk. Replacing SFA with protein, especially plant protein, may also reduce CVD risk. While dairy fat (milk, cheese) is associated with a slightly lower CVD risk compared to meat, dairy fat results in a significantly greater CVD risk relative to unsaturated fatty acids. As research continues, we will refine our understanding of dietary patterns associated with lower CVD risk.

  13. Scientific Opportunity to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Looney, Brian B.; Zachara, John M.; Liang, Liyuan; Lesmes, D.; Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Adams, V.; Denham, Miles E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-08-25

    In this report, we start by examining previous efforts at linking science and DOE EM research with cleanup activities. Many of these efforts were initiated by creating science and technology roadmaps. A recurring feature of successfully implementing these roadmaps into EM applied research efforts and successful cleanup is the focus on integration. Such integration takes many forms, ranging from combining information generated by various scientific disciplines, to providing technical expertise to facilitate successful application of novel technology, to bringing the resources and creativity of many to address the common goal of moving EM cleanup forward. Successful projects identify and focus research efforts on addressing the problems and challenges that are causing “failure” in actual cleanup activities. In this way, basic and applied science resources are used strategically to address the particular unknowns that are barriers to cleanup. The brief descriptions of the Office of Science basic (Environmental Remediation Science Program [ERSP]) and EM’s applied (Groundwater and Soil Remediation Program) research programs in subsurface science provide context to the five “crosscutting” themes that have been developed in this strategic planning effort. To address these challenges and opportunities, a tiered systematic approach is proposed that leverages basic science investments with new applied research investments from the DOE Office of Engineering and Technology within the framework of the identified basic science and applied research crosscutting themes. These themes are evident in the initial portfolio of initiatives in the EM groundwater and soil cleanup multi-year program plan. As stated in a companion document for tank waste processing (Bredt et al. 2008), in addition to achieving its mission, DOE EM is experiencing a fundamental shift in philosophy from driving to closure to enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation.

  14. Product liability: engineering and legal teamwork to reduce risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Product liability can be a major issue with the commercialization of any technology in introducing it to the marketplace. Proper planning and execution of a product design, development, test, and manufacturing process, in conjunction with an experienced legal council, are necessary to avoid unnecessary liability exposure or to mitigate the effects of lawsuits if and when they occur. The involvement of corporate management in the principles of safety, quality, and a disciplined team approach will serve a company well in this unique market. This paper presents ten areas for product development teams to consider as they proceed with the design, development, test, manufacturing, and support of law enforcement and corrections products.

  15. Papaya Varietal Resistance to Internal Yellowing: Reducing Food Safety Risk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Internal yellowing (IY) is a bacterial disease of ripening papaya fruit that is caused by the enteric bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae. The disease is characterized by yellow discoloration of flesh, tissue softening and a foul or rotten odor that reduces the quality of fresh fruit and value-added pr...

  16. Reducing software security risk through an integrated approach research initiative model based verification of the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John D.

    2003-01-01

    This document discusses the verification of the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) communication protocol as a demonstration of the Model Based Verification (MBV) portion of the verification instrument set being developed under the Reducing Software Security Risk (RSSR) Trough an Integrated Approach research initiative. Code Q of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funds this project. The NASA Goddard Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) facility manages this research program at the NASA agency level and the Assurance Technology Program Office (ATPO) manages the research locally at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (California institute of Technology) where the research is being carried out.

  17. Reducing software security risk through an integrated approach research initiative model based verification of the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John D.

    2003-01-01

    This document discusses the verification of the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) communication protocol as a demonstration of the Model Based Verification (MBV) portion of the verification instrument set being developed under the Reducing Software Security Risk (RSSR) Trough an Integrated Approach research initiative. Code Q of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funds this project. The NASA Goddard Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) facility manages this research program at the NASA agency level and the Assurance Technology Program Office (ATPO) manages the research locally at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (California institute of Technology) where the research is being carried out.

  18. New technologies in the management of risk and violence in forensic settings.

    PubMed

    Tully, John; Larkin, Fintan; Fahy, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Novel technological interventions are increasingly used in mental health settings. In this article, we describe 3 novel technological strategies in use for management of risk and violence in 2 forensic psychiatry settings in the United Kingdom: electronic monitoring by GPS-based tracking devices of patients on leave from a medium secure service in London, and closed circuit television (CCTV) monitoring and motion sensor technology at Broadmoor high secure hospital. A common theme is the use of these technologies to improve the completeness and accuracy of data used by clinicians to make clinical decisions. Another common thread is that each of these strategies supports and improves current clinical approaches rather than drastically changing them. The technologies offer a broad range of benefits. These include less restrictive options for patients, improved accountability of both staff and patients, less invasive testing, improved automated record-keeping, and better assurance reporting. Services utilizing technologies need also be aware of limitations. Technologies may be seen as unduly restrictive by patients and advocates, and technical issues may reduce effectiveness. It is vital that the types of technological innovations described in this article should be subject to thorough evaluation that addresses cost effectiveness, qualitative analysis of patients' attitudes, safety, and ethical considerations.

  19. Risk disparities in the globalisation of assisted reproductive technology: the case of Asia.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Ok

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the disparities in risks associated with biomedical technology focusing on the results of assisted reproductive technology (ART). ART among biomedical technologies transferred to Asia is a representative case that reveals in its clinical use and related scientific research the global politics of technology. This study notes the global politics at work in the recognition of and reaction to such risks. While many Asian countries aggressively pursue technological development, weak legislative and administrative regulations have created various problems and controversial cases. This study asserts that risks associated with technology are characterised as social facts not natural ones or mere 'side effects', since technological development and risk are closely intertwined.

  20. Mandatory Risk Assessment Reduces Venous Thromboembolism in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Nimeri, Abdelrahman A; Bautista, Jejomar; Ibrahim, Maha; Philip, Ruby; Al Shaban, Talat; Maasher, Ahmed; Altinoz, Ajda

    2017-08-23

    Bariatric surgery patients are at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), and chemoprophylaxis is recommended. Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) is an American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) member since 2009. We report the rates of VTE in bariatric surgery patients from 2010 to 2016 compared to ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs before and after switching from heparin to low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), initiating mandatory risk assessment using Caprini scoring for VTE and adopting an aggressive strategy for high-risk patients regarding dosage of LMWH and chemoprophylaxis after discharge. During the study period, there were 1152 cases (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) 625 and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) 527) at Bariatric & Metabolic Institute (BMI) Abu Dhabi compared to 65,693 cases (LRYGB 32,130 and LSG 33,563) at ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs. VTE rates remained stable at ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs from 2010 to 2016 (0.45, 0.45, 0.45, 0.25, 0.35, 0.3, and 0.3%). In contrast, VTE rates at BMI Abu Dhabi decreased from 2.2% in 2011 to 0.35% after we adopted an aggressive strategy to VTE without an increase in bleeding complications. LRYGB patients with VTE had higher OR time, leak, collection, and mortality at ACS NSQIP hospitals compared to those at BMI Abu Dhabi. In contrast, rates were similar in LSG patients with VTE. Changing our approach to VTE management led our VTE rates to decrease and become like those of ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery patients in LSG and LRYGB.

  1. Groundwater-risk analysis of New York utilizing GIS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Charles John, III

    Using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology, data layers can be processed and analyzed to produce a regional groundwater-risk grid of New York State (NYS). GIS can be used to assess the potential to introduce contaminants at the ground surface, and assess the potential for the contaminants to migrate through the vadose zone and be introduced to an aquifer at the water-table. The potential to introduce contaminants to the ground surface was assessed utilizing existing database information in combination with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Resolution Land Classification (MRLC) land use grid. The databases allowed an analysis of contaminant association with Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes, risk evaluation of the contaminants using groundwater intake values protective of human health, the development of SIC code-risk values, the construction of a SIC code-risked facility point coverage, and the construction of a land use-risk grid; this grid assesses the potential to introduce contaminants to the ground surface. Aquifer susceptibility was determined by analyzing vadose zone residence time assuming saturated conditions. Vadose zone residence time is a measure of the vadose zone's ability to attenuate and retard the migration of contaminants. Existing data layers were processed to produce a depth to water-table (vadose zone thickness) grid. Existing GIS data layers of soil, surficial geology and bedrock geology, along with review of literature and pump/slug test data, enabled the creation of thickness, porosity and vertical hydraulic conductivity grids for the three considered components of the vadose zone. The average linear velocity was then calculated for each vadose zone component by dividing their hydraulic conductivity grid by their respective porosity grid. The thickness grid of each vadose zone component was then divided by their respective average linear velocity grid to produce vadose zone residence time grids. The sum

  2. Can Bariatric Surgery Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Stanek, Kelly; Gunstad, John

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that obesity is independently associated with poor neurocognitive outcomes, including cognitive impairment, increased risk for dementia, and regional alterations in brain structure. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity and initial findings suggest that it may result in cognitive improvements. The current paper reviews and integrates recent research in this area, with a focus on potential mediators and moderators of neuropsychological outcome in bariatric surgery patients, including anesthetic and nutritional complications and proposes novel avenues for continued study in this area. PMID:22771689

  3. Postmenopausal therapy reduces catalase activity and attenuates cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Castanho, Vera S; Nakamura, Rui Tsutomu; Pinto-Neto, Aarão M; Faria, Eliana Cotta de

    2012-11-01

    Menopause can lead to alterations in women's health, with changes in the oxidative status of postmenopausal women in whom information regarding the influence of hormone therapy (HT) on antioxidant enzyme activities is limited. To evaluate the influence of HT on catalase activity; concentrations of lipids and lipoprotein, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, nitrates, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and carotid thickness in postmenopausal women. Ninety-four consecutive women were allocated to one of four groups, without HT and with HT. The latter group was subdivided into women using estrogen and those using estrogen plus progestogen therapy. Plasma biochemical parameters and common carotid intima-media thickness measurements were performed. HT antagonized the decrease in catalase activity after menopause, but had no effect on the levels of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, lipid peroxide, nitrate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or on the common carotid intima-media thickness. Multivariate analysis showed that estrogen-based HT attenuated the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and the intima-media thickness of the common carotid. This study indicates that HT in postmenopausal women produces beneficial antioxidant and anti-atherosclerotic effects by ameliorating the plasma lipid and lipoprotein profiles, increasing plasma catalase activity and attenuating the association between cardiovascular risk factors and early atherosclerosis.

  4. Extreme Geohazards: Reducing Disaster Risk and Increasing Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, Hans-Peter; Stein, Seth; Brocklebank, Sean; Jules-Plag, Shelley; Campus, Paola

    2014-05-01

    Extreme natural hazards have the potential to cause global disasters and to lead to an escalation of the global sustainability crisis. Floods and droughts pose threats that could reach planetary extent, particularly through secondary economic and social impacts. Earthquakes and tsunamis cause disasters that could exceed the immediate coping capacity of the global economy, particularly in hazardous areas containing megacities, that can be particularly vulnerable to natural hazards if proper emergency protocols and infrastructures are not set in place. Recent events illustrate the destruction extreme hazards can inflict, both directly and indirectly, through domino effects resulting from the interaction with the built environment. Unfortunately, the more humanity learns to cope with relatively frequent (50 to 100 years) natural hazard events, the less concerns remain about the low-probability (one in a few hundred or more years) high-impact events. As a consequence, threats from low-probability extreme floods, droughts, and volcanic eruptions are not appropriately accounted for in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) discussions. With the support of the European Science Foundation (ESF), the Geohazards Community of Practice (GHCP) of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) has developed a White Paper (WP) on the risk associated with low-probability, high-impact geohazards. These events are insufficiently addressed in risk management, although their potential impacts are comparable to those of a large asteroid impact, a global pandemic, or an extreme drought. The WP aims to increase awareness of the risk associated with these events as a basis for a comprehensive risk management. Extreme geohazards have occurred regularly throughout the past, but mostly did not cause major disasters because the exposure of human assets to such hazards and the global population density were much lower than today. The most extreme events during the last 2,000 years would cause today unparalleled

  5. Identification of technology options for reducing nitrogen pollution in cropping systems of Pujiang*

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bin; Wang, Guang-huo; Van den berg, Marrit; Roetter, Reimund

    2005-01-01

    This work analyses the potential role of nitrogen pollution technology of crop systems of Pujiang, County in Eastern China’s Zhejiang Province, rice and vegetables are important cropping systems. We used a case study approach involving comparison of farmer practices and improved technologies. This approach allows assessing the impact of technology on pollution, is forward looking, and can yield information on the potential of on-the-shelf technology and provide opportunities for technology development. The approach particularly suits newly developed rice technologies with large potential of reducing nitrogen pollution and for future rice and vegetables technologies. The results showed that substantial reductions in nitrogen pollution are feasible for both types of crops. PMID:16187411

  6. Methodology Development for Assessment of Spaceport Technology Returns and Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joglekar, Prafulla; Zapata, Edgar

    2001-01-01

    As part of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) challenge to open the space frontier, new spaceport technologies must be developed, matured and successfully transitioned to operational systems. R&D investment decisions can be considered from multiple perspectives. Near mid and far term technology horizons must be understood. Because a multitude of technology investment opportunities are available, we must identify choices that promise the greatest likelihood of significant lifecycle At the same time, the costs and risks of any choice must be well understood and balanced against its potential returns The problem is not one of simply rank- ordering projects in terms of their desirability. KSC wants to determine a portfolio of projects that simultaneously satisfies multiple goals, such as getting the biggest bang for the buck, supporting projects that may be too risky for private funding, staying within annual budget cycles without foregoing the requirements of a long term technology vision, and ensuring the development of a diversity of technologies that, support the variety of operational functions involved in space transportation. This work aims to assist in the development of in methods and techniques that support strategic technology investment decisions and ease the process of determining an optimal portfolio of spaceport R&D investments. Available literature on risks and returns to R&D is reviewed and most useful pieces are brought to the attention of the Spaceport Technology Development Office (STDO). KSC's current project management procedures are reviewed. It is found that the "one size fits all" nature of KSC's existing procedures and project selection criteria is not conducive to prudent decision-making. Directions for improving KSC's - procedures and criteria are outlined. With help of a contractor, STDO is currently developing a tool, named Change Management Analysis Tool (CMAT)/ Portfolio Analysis Tool (PAT), to assist KSC's R&D portfolio determination. A

  7. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, S. D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-01-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The authors have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  8. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-12-31

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The authors have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  9. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S. D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-01-15

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. We have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  10. Setting priorities for reducing risk and advancing patient safety.

    PubMed

    Gaffey, Ann D

    2016-04-01

    We set priorities every day in both our personal and professional lives. Some decisions are easy, while others require much more thought, participation, and resources. The difficult or less appealing priorities may not be popular, may receive push-back, and may be resource intensive. Whether personal or professional, the urgency that accompanies true priorities becomes a driving force. It is that urgency to ensure our patients' safety that brings many of us to work each day. This is not easy work. It requires us to be knowledgeable about the enterprise we are working in and to have the professional skills and competence to facilitate setting the priorities that allow our organizations to minimize risk and maximize value.

  11. Does avian conspicuous colouration increase or reduce predation risk?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rodríguez, M; Avilés, J M; Cuervo, J J; Parejo, D; Ruano, F; Zamora-Muñoz, C; Sergio, F; López-Jiménez, L; Tanferna, A; Martín-Vivaldi, M

    2013-09-01

    Animals often announce their unprofitability to predators through conspicuous coloured signals. Here we tested whether the apparently conspicuous colour designs of the four European Coraciiformes and Upupiformes species may have evolved as aposematic signals, or whether instead they imply a cost in terms of predation risk. Because previous studies suggested that these species are unpalatable, we hypothesized that predators could avoid targeting them based on their colours. An experiment was performed where two artificial models of each bird species were exposed simultaneously to raptor predators, one painted so as to resemble the real colour design of these birds, and the other one painted using cryptic colours. Additionally, we used field data on the black kite's diet to compare the selection of these four species to that of other avian prey. Conspicuous models were attacked in equal or higher proportions than their cryptic counterparts, and the attack rate on the four species increased with their respective degree of contrast against natural backgrounds. The analysis of the predator's diet revealed that the two least attacked species were negatively selected in nature despite their abundance. Both conspicuous and cryptic models of one of the studied species (the hoopoe) received fewer attacks than cryptic models of the other three species, suggesting that predators may avoid this species for characteristics other than colour. Globally, our results suggest that the colour of coraciiforms and upupiforms does not function as an aposematic signal that advises predators of their unprofitability, but also that conspicuous colours may increase predation risk in some species, supporting thus the handicap hypothesis.

  12. Women and Cardiovascular Disease: What Can Health Care Providers Do to Reduce the Risks?

    PubMed

    Miller, Paula

    Cardiovascular disease impacts everybody and places significant burdens on the health care system. Educating women on their risks and how to reduce these risks will not only make women more aware but will help to improve lives and reduce health care costs. This commentary will review heart disease in women and what women can do to improve their cardiovascular health.

  13. Acid-reducing vagotomy is associated with reduced risk of subsequent ischemic heart disease in complicated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Chi; Fang, Chu-Wen; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Muo, Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Persistent exacerbation of a peptic ulcer may lead to a complicated peptic ulcer (perforation or/and bleeding). The management of complicated peptic ulcers has shifted from acid-reducing vagotomy, drainage, and gastrectomy to simple local suture or non-operative (endoscopic/angiographic) hemostasis. We were interested in the long-term effects of this trend change. In this study, complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy were compared with those who received simple suture/hemostasis to determine the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD). This retrospective cohort study analyzed 335,680 peptic ulcer patients recorded from 2000 to 2006 versus 335,680 age-, sex-, comorbidity-, and index-year matched comparisons. Patients with Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection were excluded. In order to identify the effect of vagus nerve severance, patients who received gastrectomy or antrectomy were also excluded. The incidence of IHD in both cohorts, and in the complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy versus those who received simple suture or hemostasis was evaluated. The overall incidence of IHD was higher in patients with peptic ulcer than those without peptic ulcer (17.00 vs 12.06 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.46 based on multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis controlling for age, sex, Charlson's comorbidity index, and death (competing risk). While comparing peptic ulcer patients with acid-reducing vagotomy to those with simple suture/hemostasis or those without surgical treatment, the aHR (0.58) was the lowest in the acid-reducing vagotomy group. Patients with peptic ulcer have an elevated risk of IHD. However, complicated peptic ulcer patients who received acid-reducing vagotomy were associated with reduced risk of developing IHD. PMID:27977613

  14. Preliminary Technical Risk Analysis for the Geothermal Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    McVeigh, J.; Cohen, J.; Vorum, M.; Porro, G.; Nix, G.

    2007-03-01

    This report explains the goals, methods, and results of a probabilistic analysis of technical risk for a portfolio of R&D projects in the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program ('the Program'). The analysis is a task by Princeton Energy Resources International, LLC (PERI), in support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on behalf of the Program. The main challenge in the analysis lies in translating R&D results to a quantitative reflection of technical risk for a key Program metric: levelized cost of energy (LCOE). This requires both computational development (i.e., creating a spreadsheet-based analysis tool) and a synthesis of judgments by a panel of researchers and experts of the expected results of the Program's R&D.

  15. Interventions for reducing extinction risk in chytridiomycosis-threatened amphibians.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Ben C; Hunter, David A; Grogan, Laura F; Berger, Lee; Kolby, Jon E; McFadden, Michael S; Marantelli, Gerry; Skerratt, Lee F; Driscoll, Don A

    2014-10-01

    Wildlife diseases pose an increasing threat to biodiversity and are a major management challenge. A striking example of this threat is the emergence of chytridiomycosis. Despite diagnosis of chytridiomycosis as an important driver of global amphibian declines 15 years ago, researchers have yet to devise effective large-scale management responses other than biosecurity measures to mitigate disease spread and the establishment of disease-free captive assurance colonies prior to or during disease outbreaks. We examined the development of management actions that can be implemented after an epidemic in surviving populations. We developed a conceptual framework with clear interventions to guide experimental management and applied research so that further extinctions of amphibian species threatened by chytridiomycosis might be prevented. Within our framework, there are 2 management approaches: reducing Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (the fungus that causes chytridiomycosis) in the environment or on amphibians and increasing the capacity of populations to persist despite increased mortality from disease. The latter approach emphasizes that mitigation does not necessarily need to focus on reducing disease-associated mortality. We propose promising management actions that can be implemented and tested based on current knowledge and that include habitat manipulation, antifungal treatments, animal translocation, bioaugmentation, head starting, and selection for resistance. Case studies where these strategies are being implemented will demonstrate their potential to save critically endangered species. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. 40 CFR 1036.610 - Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 1036.610 Section 1036.610 Protection of Environment... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (a) You may ask us to apply the provisions of this...

  17. 40 CFR 1036.610 - Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 1036.610 Section 1036.610 Protection of Environment... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (a) You may ask us to apply the provisions of this...

  18. 40 CFR 1036.610 - Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 1036.610 Section 1036.610 Protection of Environment... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (a) You may ask us to apply the provisions of this...

  19. [Risks associated with unrestricted consumption of alkaline-reduced water].

    PubMed

    Henry, Marc; Chambron, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of alkaline reduced water produced by domestic electrolysis devices was approved in Japan in 1965 by the Minister of Health, Work and Wellbeing, for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Today, these devices are also freely available in France. The commercial information provided with the devices recommends the consumption of 1 to 1.5 liters per day, not only for gastrointestinal disorders but also for numerous other illnesses such as diabetes, cancer and inflammation. Academic research on this subject has been undergoing in Japan since 1990, and has established that the active ingredient is dissolved dihydrogen, which eliminates the free radical HO· in vivo. It has also been shown that electrode degradation during use of the devices releases highly reactive platinum nanoparticles, the toxicity of which is unknown. The authors of this report recommend alerting the French health authorities to the uncontrolled availability of these devices that generate drug substances and should therefore be subject to regulatory requirements.

  20. Utilization of UV Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce the Manufacturing Cost of LIB Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Voelker, Gary; Arnold, John

    2015-11-30

    Previously identified novel binders and associated UV curing technology have been shown to reduce the time required to apply and finish electrode coatings from tens of minutes to less than one second. This revolutionary approach can result in dramatic increases in process speeds, significantly reduced capital (a factor of 10 to 20) and operating costs, reduced energy requirements, and reduced environmental concerns and costs due to the virtual elimination of harmful volatile organic solvents and associated solvent dryers and recovery systems. The accumulated advantages of higher speed, lower capital and operating costs, reduced footprint, lack of VOC recovery, and reduced energy cost is a reduction of 90% in the manufacturing cost of cathodes. When commercialized, the resulting cost reduction in Lithium batteries will allow storage device manufacturers to expand their sales in the market and thereby accrue the energy savings of broader utilization of HEVs, PHEVs and EVs in the U.S., and a broad technology export market is also envisioned.

  1. Standardization of infusion solutions to reduce the risk of incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Karin; Kopelent-Frank, Hannelore; Greif, Robert

    2008-09-01

    Although critically ill patients usually have various central intravenous (i.v.) lines, numerous drugs have to be infused simultaneously through the same lines. This can result in potentially harmful in-line incompatibility that can cause decreased drug effectiveness or increased microparticle load. To minimize the risk of these medication errors at an anesthesia intensive care unit (ICU), the preparation and administration of continuously infused drugs were standardized and the practicability in daily clinical routine was evaluated. The concentration and diluent of continuously administered i.v. drugs were standardized. The drugs were grouped according to pH, medical indication, and chemical structure. The ICU staff decided to use multilumen central venous catheters, and each group of drugs was assigned to one lumen. Only drugs that belonged to the same group were infused simultaneously through the same lumen; therefore, intragroup incompatibilities had to be excluded before establishing the new drug administration plan at the ICU. The visual compatibility of 115 clinically reasonable intragroup drug mixtures was investigated. All drug combinations were compatible for six hours except mixtures containing thiopental, which was reassigned to a single-line use. In the following year, the practicability of this drug administration plan was evaluated. No deviations were found in the compliance of the staff prescribing and preparing only standardized concentrations and diluents. Further research to investigate the chemical compatibility of the drugs in these multiple mixtures will follow. A project intended to avoid incompatibility among i.v. drugs infused in the intensive care setting included steps to standardize solutions and determine which could be given together.

  2. The use of technology to address patterns of risk among teenage drivers.

    PubMed

    Brovold, Shawn; Ward, Nic; Donath, Max; Simon, Stephen; Shankwitz, Craig; Creaser, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The crash risk of teens is high, with fatal crash rates of teen drivers higher than any other age group. New approaches to reduce teen traffic fatalities are clearly needed. A possible approach to reduce the incidence of teen driver crashes and fatalities is through the use of vehicle-based intelligent driver support systems. To be most effective, the system should address the behaviors associated with an overwhelming number of teen fatal crashes: speed, low seatbelt use, and alcohol impairment. In-vehicle technology also offers an opportunity to address the issue of inexperience through enforcement of certain Graduated Driver's License provisions. To fully understand the capability of such technologies, there should be a concerted effort to further their development, and human factors testing should take place to understand their effects on the driver. If successfully implemented, a Teen Driver Support System (TDSS), such as the one described here, could significantly decrease the number of teens killed in traffic crashes.

  3. Institute a modest carbon tax to reduce carbon emissions, finance clean energy technology development, cut taxes, and reduce the deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Muro, Mark; Rothwell, Jonathan

    2012-11-15

    The nation should institute a modest carbon tax in order to help clean up the economy and stabilize the nation’s finances. Specifically, Congress and the president should implement a $20 per ton, steadily increasing carbon excise fee that would discourage carbon dioxide emissions while shifting taxation onto pollution, financing energy efficiency (EE) and clean technology development, and providing opportunities to cut taxes or reduce the deficit. The net effect of these policies would be to curb harmful carbon emissions, improve the nation’s balance sheet, and stimulate job-creation and economic renewal.

  4. The Benefits of Social Technology Use Among Older Adults Are Mediated by Reduced Loneliness.

    PubMed

    Chopik, William J

    2016-09-01

    Technology has the ability to enhance and enrich the lives of older adults by facilitating better interpersonal relationships. However, few studies have directly examined associations between technology use for social reasons and physical and psychological health among older adults. The current study examines the benefits of technology use in 591 older adults from the 2012 wave of the Health and Retirement Study (Mage = 68.18, SD = 10.75; 55.5% female). Social technology use was assessed through five technology-based behaviors (i.e., using e-mail, social networking sites, online video/phone calls, online chatting/instant messaging, using a smartphone). Attitudes toward the usability and benefits of technology use were also assessed. Older adults had generally positive attitudes toward technology. Higher social technology use was associated with better self-rated health, fewer chronic illnesses, higher subjective well-being, and fewer depressive symptoms. Furthermore, each of the links between social technology use and physical and psychological health was mediated by reduced loneliness. Close relationships are a large determinant of physical health and well-being, and technology has the potential to cultivate successful relationships among older adults.

  5. The Benefits of Social Technology Use Among Older Adults Are Mediated by Reduced Loneliness

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Technology has the ability to enhance and enrich the lives of older adults by facilitating better interpersonal relationships. However, few studies have directly examined associations between technology use for social reasons and physical and psychological health among older adults. The current study examines the benefits of technology use in 591 older adults from the 2012 wave of the Health and Retirement Study (Mage = 68.18, SD = 10.75; 55.5% female). Social technology use was assessed through five technology-based behaviors (i.e., using e-mail, social networking sites, online video/phone calls, online chatting/instant messaging, using a smartphone). Attitudes toward the usability and benefits of technology use were also assessed. Older adults had generally positive attitudes toward technology. Higher social technology use was associated with better self-rated health, fewer chronic illnesses, higher subjective well-being, and fewer depressive symptoms. Furthermore, each of the links between social technology use and physical and psychological health was mediated by reduced loneliness. Close relationships are a large determinant of physical health and well-being, and technology has the potential to cultivate successful relationships among older adults. PMID:27541746

  6. Sediment Management Methods to Reduce Dredging: Part 2, Sediment Collector Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    dredging by lowering the downstream grade to reduce flooding and ultimately reduce sediment deposition as far downstream as John Martin Reservoir, a U.S...reservoir storage capacity and related hydroelectric generating capacity and reduce flood risks that would otherwise increase with a loss of storage...Watershed, Flood Control, and Greenway District was created. ERDC TN-DOER-T13 April 2017 6 Costs shown in Table 1 approximate the actual system cost

  7. Risk of peripartum hysterectomy in births after assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Cromi, Antonella; Candeloro, Ilario; Marconi, Nicola; Casarin, Jvan; Serati, Maurizio; Agosti, Massimo; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether women who conceive after assisted reproductive technology (ART) are at higher risk for emergency peripartum hysterectomy. A case-control study using a prospectively maintained institutional database. A tertiary referral university teaching maternity hospital. Thirty-one women who underwent peripartum hysterectomy for management of hemorrhage, and 19,902 control women. None. Association between potential predictors and peripartum hysterectomy. The incidence of peripartum hysterectomy was 1.7 cases per 1,000 births (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.4). After adjustment for maternal age and twin pregnancy, placenta previa (odds ratio [OR] 50.78, 95% CI 23.30-110.68), prior cesarean delivery (OR 6.72, 95% CI 2.99-15.09 for one cesarean; OR 6.80, 95% CI 1.45-31.90 for two or more cesareans), previous myomectomy (OR 24.59, 95% CI 6.70-90.19), and ART conception (OR 5.98, 95% CI 2.18-16.40) were all antenatal predictors for peripartum hysterectomy. In women having a peripartum hysterectomy, 13.4% of the risk is attributable to mode of conception. A history of ART increases the likelihood of needing a peripartum hysterectomy to control hemorrhage. Further investigation is needed to determine whether ART conception should be included in algorithms of risk stratification for emergency cesarean hysterectomy and plan of care be modified accordingly. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Using computer, mobile and wearable technology enhanced interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Aoife; McDonough, Suzanne M; Murphy, Marie H; Nugent, Chris D; Mair, Jacqueline L

    2017-08-11

    High levels of sedentary behaviour (SB) are associated with negative health consequences. Technology enhanced solutions such as mobile applications, activity monitors, prompting software, texts, emails and websites are being harnessed to reduce SB. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of such technology enhanced interventions aimed at reducing SB in healthy adults and to examine the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) used. Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomised-controlled trials (RCTs), published up to June 2016. Interventions using computer, mobile or wearable technologies to facilitate a reduction in SB, using a measure of sedentary time as an outcome, were eligible for inclusion. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool and interventions were coded using the BCT Taxonomy (v1). Meta-analysis of 15/17 RCTs suggested that computer, mobile and wearable technology tools resulted in a mean reduction of -41.28 min per day (min/day) of sitting time (95% CI -60.99, -21.58, I2 = 77%, n = 1402), in favour of the intervention group at end point follow-up. The pooled effects showed mean reductions at short (≤ 3 months), medium (>3 to 6 months), and long-term follow-up (>6 months) of -42.42 min/day, -37.23 min/day and -1.65 min/day, respectively. Overall, 16/17 studies were deemed as having a high or unclear risk of bias, and 1/17 was judged to be at a low risk of bias. A total of 46 BCTs (14 unique) were coded for the computer, mobile and wearable components of the interventions. The most frequently coded were "prompts and cues", "self-monitoring of behaviour", "social support (unspecified)" and "goal setting (behaviour)". Interventions using computer, mobile and wearable technologies can be effective in reducing SB. Effectiveness appeared most prominent in the short-term and lessened over time. A range of BCTs have been implemented in these interventions. Future studies need to improve reporting

  9. Introduction: Risk and safety management in infertility and assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, David R; de Ziegler, Dominique

    2013-12-01

    Drs. Meldrum and de Ziegler contrast medicine with the ultra-safe industry of aviation. Analogous to the "right patient, right side, and right organ" procedures already instituted widely throughout medicine, they emphasize the extreme importance and methods for identification and tracking of specimens and recipients for assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures. One of the authors describes his experience with a formal "ISO" accreditation process that standardizes most aspects of risk and safety management. Because risk and safety management has yet to be commonly extended into physicians' offices and that is where ART procedures are usually recommended and carried out, detailed suggestions are offered regarding ways to reduce risk and maximize safety in that environment. Finally, a suggestion is made for establishment of a Clinical Safety Board for ART so adverse events are reported and investigated, promoting educative efforts and preventive strategies to enhance future patient safety. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The prefabricated building risk decision research of DM technology on the basis of Rough Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. L.; Zhang, W. B.; Ma, L. H.

    2017-08-01

    With the resources crises and more serious pollution, the green building has been strongly advocated by most countries and become a new building style in the construction field. Compared with traditional building, the prefabricated building has its own irreplaceable advantages but is influenced by many uncertainties. So far, a majority of scholars have been studying based on qualitative researches from all of the word. This paper profoundly expounds its significance about the prefabricated building. On the premise of the existing research methods, combined with rough set theory, this paper redefines the factors which affect the prefabricated building risk. Moreover, it quantifies risk factors and establish an expert knowledge base through assessing. And then reduced risk factors about the redundant attributes and attribute values, finally form the simplest decision rule. This simplest decision rule, which is based on the DM technology of rough set theory, provides prefabricated building with a controllable new decision-making method.

  11. LISA Technology Development, Risk Reduction and Mission Formulation at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin; Ziemer, John; Livas, Jeffrey; Ira Thorpe, James; Merkowitz, Stephen

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint ESA-NASA project to design, build and operate a space-based gravitational wave detector based on a laser interferometer. LISA relies on several technologies that are either new to spaceflight or must perform at levels not previously demonstrated in a spaceflight environment. The ESA-led LISA Pathfinder mission is the main effort to demonstrate LISA technology. NASA also supports complementary ground-based technology development and risk reduction activities. This presentation will report the status of NASA work on micronewton thrusters, the telescope, the optical pointing subsystem and mission formulation. More details on some of these topics will be given in posters. Other talks and posters will describe NASA-supported work on the laser subsystem, the phasemeter, and aspects of the interferometry. Two flight-qualified clusters of four colloid micronewton thrusters, each capable of thrust levels between 5 and 30 µN with a resolution ¡0.1 µN and a thrust noise ¡0.1 µN/sqrtHz (0.001 to 4 Hz), have been integrated onto the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft. The complementary ground-based development focuses on lifetime demonstration. Laboratory verification of failure models and accelerated life tests are just getting started. LISA needs a 40 cm diameter, afocal telescope for beam expansion/reduction that maintains an optical pathlength stability of 1 pm/sqrtHz in an extremely stable thermal environment. A mechanical prototype of a silicon carbide primary-secondary structure has been fabricated for stability testing. Two optical assemblies must point at different distant spacecraft with nanoradian accuracy over 1° annual variation in the angle between the distant spacecraft. A candidate piezo-inchworm actuator is being tested in a suitable testbed. In addition to technology development, NASA has carried out several studies in support of the mission formulation. The results of systems engineering work on flight

  12. Risk assessment - hospital view in selecting medical technology.

    PubMed

    David, Yadin; Jahnke, Ernest; Blair, Curtis

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate deployment of technological innovation contributes to improvement in the quality of healthcare delivered, the containment of cost, and access to the healthcare system. Hospitals have been allocating a significant portion of their resources to procuring and managing capital assets; they are continuously faced with demands for new medical equipment and are asked to manage existing inventory for which they are not well prepared. To objectively direct their investment, hospitals are developing medical technology management programs that need pertinent information and planning methodology for integrating new equipment into existing operations as well as for mitigating patient safety issues and costs of ownership. Clinical engineers identify technological solutions based on the matching of new medical equipment with hospital's objectives. They review their institution's overall technological position, determine strengths and weaknesses, develop equipment-selection criteria, supervise installations, train users and monitor post procurement performance to assure meeting of goals. This program, together with consistent assessment methodology and evaluation analysis, will objectively guide the capital assets decision-making process. At Texas Children's Hospital we integrated engineering simulation, bench testing and clinical studies with financial information to assure the validity of risk avoidance practice and the promotion of medical equipment and supplies selection based on quantitative measurement process and product comparison practice. The clinical engineer's skills and expertise are needed to facilitate the adoption of an objective methodology for implementing the program, thus improving the match between the hospital's needs and budget projections, equipment performance and cost of ownership. The result of systematic planning and execution is a program that assures the safety and appropriateness of inventory level at the lowest life-cycle costs at the

  13. Effects of radon mitigation vs smoking cessation in reducing radon-related risk of lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, D; Warner, K E; Courant, P N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this paper is to provide smokers with information on the relative benefits of mitigating radon and quitting smoking in reducing radon-related lung cancer risk. METHODS: The standard radon risk model, linked with models characterizing residential radon exposure and patterns of moving to new homes, was used to estimate the risk reduction produced by remediating high-radon homes, quitting smoking, or both. RESULTS: Quitting smoking reduces lung cancer risk from radon more than does reduction of radon exposure itself. CONCLUSIONS: Smokers should understand that, in addition to producing other health benefits, quitting smoking dominates strategies to deal with the problem posed by radon. PMID:9585753

  14. Cancer risk among parous women following assisted reproductive technology

    PubMed Central

    Reigstad, M.M.; Larsen, I.K.; Myklebust, T.Å.; Robsahm, T.E.; Oldereid, N.B.; Omland, A.K.; Vangen, S.; Brinton, L.A.; Storeng, R.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do women who give birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) have an increased risk of cancer compared with women who give birth without ART? SUMMARY ANSWER Without correction, the results indicate an increase in overall cancer risk, as well as a 50% increase in risk of CNS cancer for women giving birth after ART, however the results were not significant after correcting for multiple analyses. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Studies regarding the effects of hormonal treatments involved with ART on subsequent cancer risk have provided inconsistent results, and it has also been suggested that infertility itself could be a contributory factor. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A population-based cohort consisting of all women registered in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway as having given birth between 1 January 1984 and 31 December 2010 was assembled (n = 812 986). Cancers were identified by linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway. Study subjects were followed from start of first pregnancy during the observational period until the first cancer, death, emigration, or 31 December 2010. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Of the total study population (n = 806 248), 16 525 gave birth to a child following ART. Cox regression analysis computed hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing cancer risk between ART women and non-ART women; for overall cancer, and for cervical, ovarian, uterine, central nervous system (CNS), colorectal and thyroid cancers, and for malignant melanoma. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE A total of 22 282 cohort members were diagnosed with cancer, of which 338 were ART women and 21 944 non-ART women. The results showed an elevated risk in one out of seven sites for ART women. The HR for cancer of the CNS was 1.50 (95% CI 1.03– 2.18), and among those specifically subjected to IVF (without ICSI) the HR was 1.83 (95% CI 1.22–2.73). Analysis of risk of overall cancer gave an HR of 1.16 (95% CI 1.04–1

  15. Navy Ship Propulsion Technologies: Options for Reducing Oil Use - Background for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-11

    include a permanent magnet motor (PMM) and a high-temperature superconducting ( HTS ) synchronous motor . Fuel Cells Fuel cell technology,27 if successfully...horsepower of propulsion . The RMI team found that retrofitting motors , pumps, fans, chillers, lights, and potable water systems could save an...Order Code RL33360 Navy Ship Propulsion Technologies: Options for Reducing Oil Use — Background for Congress Updated December 11, 2006 Ronald

  16. Technology Needs for Reduced Design and Manufacturing Cost of Commercial Transport Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the needs in the design and manufacturing processes and identify areas where technology could impact in cost and cycle-time reduction. At the highest level, the team first identified the goals that were in line with long-range needs of the aeropropulsion industry, and to which technology and process improvements would be required to contribute. These goals are to reduce the time and costs in the development cycle of aircraft engines by a factor of two, reduce production cycle time by a factor of four, and to reduce production costs by 25%. Also, it was the intent of the team to identify the highest impact technologies that could be developed and demonstrated in five years.

  17. Technology Needs for Reduced Design and Manufacturing Cost of Commercial Transport Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the needs in the design and manufacturing processes and identify areas where technology could impact in cost and cycle-time reduction. At the highest level, the team first identified the goals that were in line with long-range needs of the aeropropulsion industry, and to which technology and process improvements would be required to contribute. These goals are to reduce the time and costs in the development cycle of aircraft engines by a factor of two, reduce production cycle time by a factor of four, and to reduce production costs by 25%. Also, it was the intent of the team to identify the highest impact technologies that could be developed and demonstrated in five years.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of risk-reducing surgeries in preventing hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Schrauder, Michael G; Brunel-Geuder, Lisa; Häberle, Lothar; Wunderle, Marius; Hoyer, Juliane; Reis, André; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lux, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    Risk-reducing surgeries are a feasible option for mitigating the risk in individuals with inherited susceptibility to cancer, but are the procedures cost-effective in the current health-care system in Germany? This study compared the health-care costs for bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy (BRRM) and risk-reducing (bilateral) salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) with cancer treatment costs that could potentially be prevented. The analysis is based on interdisciplinary consultations with individuals with a high familial risk for breast and ovarian cancer at the University Breast Center for Franconia (Germany) between 2009 and 2013 (370 consultations; 44 patients with BRCA1 mutations and 26 with BRCA2 mutations). Health-care costs for risk-reducing surgeries in BRCA mutation carriers were calculated as reimbursements in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) hospital pricing system. These costs for the health-care system were compared with the potential cancer treatment costs that could possibly be prevented by risk-reducing surgeries. Long-term health-care costs can be reduced by risk-reducing surgeries after genetic testing in BRCA mutation carriers. The health-care system in Germany would have saved € 136,295 if BRRM had been performed and € 791,653 if RRSO had been performed before the development of cancer in only 50% of the 70 mutation carriers seen in our center. Moreover, in patients with combined RRSO and BRRM (without breast reconstruction), one further life-year for a 40-year-old BRCA mutation carrier would cost € 2,183. Intensive care, including risk-reducing surgeries in BRCA mutation carriers, is cost-effective from the point of view of the health-care system in Germany. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Innovative patient access schemes for the adoption of new technology: risk-sharing agreements].

    PubMed

    Espín, Jaime; Oliva, Juan; Rodríguez-Barrios, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The incorporation of new treatments, procedures and technologies into the services' portfolio of healthcare providers should aim to improve three areas equally: patient access to innovative solutions, the sustainability of the health system and compensation for innovation. However, traditional schemes based on fixed prices that fail to consider the product's appropriate use or its results in terms of effectiveness may lead to inefficient decision-making processes. Recently, risk-sharing agreements have appeared as new access schemes based on results that aim to reduce the uncertainty of the distinct health care players involved in reaching an agreement on new health technology financing and conditions of use. Key elements in the debate on these instruments are the huge variety of instruments available (especially those based on results), the implications for different players involved in their design and supervision, and their possible implementation in Spain. Our main conclusion is that risk-sharing agreements should be used in highly limited cases when standard conditions of access cannot be applied due to uncertainty about long-term effectiveness. These measures are aimed not only at regulating price but also at acting on the appropriate use of new technology. However, because international experience is limited, drawing a solid conclusion on the final results of the application of risk-sharing agreements would be premature. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Minimal support technology and in situ resource utilization for risk management of planetary spaceflight missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. L.; Rygalov, V. Ye.; Johnson, S. B.

    2009-04-01

    All artificial systems and components in space degrade at higher rates than on Earth, depending in part on environmental conditions, design approach, assembly technologies, and the materials used. This degradation involves not only the hardware and software systems but the humans that interact with those systems. All technological functions and systems can be expressed through functional dependence: [Function]˜[ERU]∗[RUIS]∗[ISR]/[DR];where [ERU]efficiency (rate) of environmental resource utilization[RUIS]resource utilization infrastructure[ISR]in situ resources[DR]degradation rateThe limited resources of spaceflight and open space for autonomous missions require a high reliability (maximum possible, approaching 100%) for system functioning and operation, and must minimize the rate of any system degradation. To date, only a continuous human presence with a system in the spaceflight environment can absolutely mitigate those degradations. This mitigation is based on environmental amelioration for both the technology systems, as repair of data and spare parts, and the humans, as exercise and psychological support. Such maintenance now requires huge infrastructures, including research and development complexes and management agencies, which currently cannot move beyond the Earth. When considering what is required to move manned spaceflight from near Earth stations to remote locations such as Mars, what are the minimal technologies and infrastructures necessary for autonomous restoration of a degrading system in space? In all of the known system factors of a mission to Mars that reduce the mass load, increase the reliability, and reduce the mission’s overall risk, the current common denominator is the use of undeveloped or untested technologies. None of the technologies required to significantly reduce the risk for critical systems are currently available at acceptable readiness levels. Long term interplanetary missions require that space programs produce a craft

  1. Personalized medicine: risk prediction, targeted therapies and mobile health technology.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Daniel F; Markus, Hugh S; Leslie, R David; Topol, Eric J

    2014-02-28

    Personalized medicine is increasingly being employed across many areas of clinical practice, as genes associated with specific diseases are discovered and targeted therapies are developed. Mobile apps are also beginning to be used in medicine with the aim of providing a personalized approach to disease management. In some areas of medicine, patient-tailored risk prediction and treatment are applied routinely in the clinic, whereas in other fields, more work is required to translate scientific advances into individualized treatment. In this forum article, we asked specialists in oncology, neurology, endocrinology and mobile health technology to discuss where we are in terms of personalized medicine, and address their visions for the future and the challenges that remain in their respective fields.

  2. Personalized medicine: risk prediction, targeted therapies and mobile health technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine is increasingly being employed across many areas of clinical practice, as genes associated with specific diseases are discovered and targeted therapies are developed. Mobile apps are also beginning to be used in medicine with the aim of providing a personalized approach to disease management. In some areas of medicine, patient-tailored risk prediction and treatment are applied routinely in the clinic, whereas in other fields, more work is required to translate scientific advances into individualized treatment. In this forum article, we asked specialists in oncology, neurology, endocrinology and mobile health technology to discuss where we are in terms of personalized medicine, and address their visions for the future and the challenges that remain in their respective fields. PMID:24580858

  3. Improving performance of HVAC systems to reduce exposure to aerosolized infectious agents in buildings; recommendations to reduce risks posed by biological attacks.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Penny J; Mair, Michael; Inglesby, Thomas V; Gross, Jonathan; Henderson, D A; O'Toole, Tara; Ahern-Seronde, Joa; Bahnfleth, William P; Brennan, Terry; Burroughs, H E Barney; Davidson, Cliff; Delp, William; Ensor, David S; Gomory, Ralph; Olsiewski, Paula; Samet, Jonathan M; Smith, William M; Streifel, Andrew J; White, Ronald H; Woods, James E

    2006-01-01

    The prospect of biological attacks is a growing strategic threat. Covert aerosol attacks inside a building are of particular concern. In the summer of 2005, the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center convened a Working Group to determine what steps could be taken to reduce the risk of exposure of building occupants after an aerosol release of a biological weapon. The Working Group was composed of subject matter experts in air filtration, building ventilation and pressurization, air conditioning and air distribution, biosecurity, building design and operation, building decontamination and restoration, economics, medicine, public health, and public policy. The group focused on functions of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems in commercial or public buildings that could reduce the risk of exposure to deleterious aerosols following biological attacks. The Working Group's recommendations for building owners are based on the use of currently available, off-the-shelf technologies. These recommendations are modest in expense and could be implemented immediately. It is also the Working Group's judgment that the commitment and stewardship of a lead government agency is essential to secure the necessary financial and human resources and to plan and build a comprehensive, effective program to reduce exposure to aerosolized infectious agents in buildings.

  4. Reducing the Risk of Tick-Borne Diseases through Smart, Safe and Sustainable Pest Control

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Each year PestWise programs form new partnerships to address ongoing and emerging issues. Reducing the risk from ticks and tick-borne disease is an issue of importance and EPA is contributing to a larger federal effort.

  5. Features of Construction Contracts to Expedite Construction Work, Reduce Owner's Financial Risks and Expenditures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birrell, George S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the array of contractual features between the project owner and the main contractor that can lead individually or in permutations to expediting the construction process and reducing the financial risks and expenditures of the project owner. (MLF)

  6. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... the-Counter Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and ... any pharmacy, grocery or convenience store and buy aspirin without a prescription. The Drug Facts label on ...

  7. Webinar Presentation: EPA Actions to Reduce Children's Health Risks from Environmental Factors

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, EPA Actions to Reduce Children's Health Risks from Environmental Factors, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: The Significance of Children’s Environmental Health Research Through Collaboration.

  8. A replication study of Reducing the Risk, a theory-based sexuality curriculum for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, B M; Giese, M L; Rainey, J

    1998-08-01

    Reducing the Risk is a theory-based, sexuality education curriculum shown to influence the knowledge and behaviors of secondary students. This study determined whether the behavioral effects of the curriculum could be duplicated in a southern, rural state. In a quasiexperimental design, pretest and posttest inventories were administered to students in treatment and comparison groups to determine the influence of Reducing the Risk on sexual behaviors. Results of the 18-month study indicated students receiving the curriculum significantly delayed initiating sexual intercourse. Sexually active students in the treatment group were significantly more likely to protect themselves from STD/HIV and pregnancy than sexually active students in the comparison group. In addition, students receiving Reducing the Risk showed a significant increase in parent-child communication about sexual issues. These results reinforce previous research that found positive behavioral effects for students receiving the Reducing the Risk curriculum.

  9. Healthy Pre-Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... they become pregnant are less likely to develop gestational diabetes mellitus, a type of diabetes that occurs only ...

  10. Finasteride Reduces the Risk of Low-Grade Prostate Cancer in Men 55 and Older

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Finasteride Reduces the Risk of Low-Grade Prostate Cancer ... PCPT) continue to show that regular use of finasteride (Proscar®) for up to 7 years decreased the ...

  11. Comparison of human exposure pathways in an urban brownfield: reduced risk from paving roads.

    PubMed

    James, Kyle; Farrell, Richard E; Siciliano, Steven D

    2012-10-01

    Risk assessments often do not quantify the risk associated with soil inhalation. This pathway generally makes a negligible contribution to the cumulative risk, because soil ingestion is typically the dominant exposure pathway. Conditions in northern or rural centers in Canada characterized by large areas of exposed soil, including unpaved roads, favor the resuspension of soil particles, making soil inhalation a relevant risk pathway. The authors determined and compared human exposure to metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil ingestion and inhalation and analyzed the carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic risks before and after roads were paved in a northern community. To determine the inhalation exposure, three size fractions of airborne particulate matter were collected (total suspended particulates [TSP], particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 µm [PM10], and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm [PM2.5]) before and after roads were paved. Road paving reduced the concentration of many airborne contaminants by 25 to 75%, thus reducing risk. For example, before paving, the carcinogenic risk associated with inhalation of Cr was 3.4 excess cancers per 100,000 people exposed, whereas after paving, this risk was reduced to 1.6 in 100,000. Paving roads reduced the concentrations of total suspended particulates (TSP; p < 0.1) and PM10 (p < 0.05) but not PM25. Consequently, the ingestion of inhaled soil particles was substantially reduced. The authors conclude that resuspended soil is likely an important source of risk for many northern communities and that paving roads is an effective method of reducing risk from the inhalation of soil particles. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  12. An Integrated Intervention in Pregnant African Americans Reduces Postpartum Risk: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    El-Mohandes, Ayman A.E.; Kiely, Michele; Joseph, Jill G.; Subramanian, Siva; Johnson, Allan A.; Blake, Susn M.; Gantz, Marie G.; El-Khorazaty, M. Nabil

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of an integrated multiple risk intervention delivered mainly during pregnancy, in reducing such risks (smoking, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, depression and intimate partner violence) postpartum. Design Data from this randomized controlled trial were collected prenatally and on average 10 weeks postpartum in six prenatal care sites in the District of Columbia. African Americans were screened, recruited and randomly assigned to the behavioral intervention or usual care. Clinic-based, individually tailored counseling was delivered to intervention women. The outcome measures were number of reisks reported postpartum and reduction of these risks between baseline and postpartum. Results The intervention was effective in significantly reducing the number of risks reported in the postpartum period. In Bivariate analyses, the intervention group was more successful in resolving all risks (47% compared with 35%, p=0.007), number needed to treat=9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5-31) and in resolving some risks (63% compared with 54%, p=0.009), number needed to treat=11, 95% CI 7-43) as compared with the usual care group. In logistical regression analyses, women in the intervention group were more likely to resolve all risks (OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.25-2.75) and in resolving at least one risk (OR=1.6, 95% CI: 1.15-2.22). Conclusions An integrated multiple risk factor intervention addressing psychosocial and behavioral risks delivered mainly during pregnancy can have beneficial effects in risk reduction postpartum. PMID:18757660

  13. Living with fire: How social scientists are helping wildland-urban interface communities reduce wildfire risk

    Treesearch

    Brian Cooke; Daniel Williams; Travis Paveglio; Matthew Carroll

    2016-01-01

    Reducing wildfire risk to lives and property is a critical issue for policy makers, land managers, and citizens who reside in high-risk fire areas of the United States - this is especially the case in the Rocky Mountain region and other western states. In order for a wildfire risk reduction effort to be effective in a U.S. wildland-urban interface (WUI)...

  14. Coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: findings from the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Shane; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Yu, Mimi C; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2011-03-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced markers of hepatic cell damage, reduced risk of chronic liver disease, and cirrhosis across a variety of populations. Data on the association between coffee consumption and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), especially in high-risk populations, are sparse. This study examines the relationship between coffee and caffeine consumption, and the risk of developing HCC within the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 middle-aged and older Chinese men and women, a relatively high-risk population for HCC. Baseline data on coffee consumption and other dietary and lifestyle factors were collected through in-person interviews at enrollment between 1993 and 1998. As of 31 December 2006, 362 cohort participants had developed HCC. High levels of coffee or caffeine consumption were associated with reduced risk of HCC (p for trend < 0.05). Compared with non-drinkers of coffee, individuals who consumed three or more cups of coffee per day experienced a statistically significant 44% reduction in risk of HCC (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval, 0.31-1.00, p = .049) after adjustment for potential confounders and tea consumption. These data suggest that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of developing HCC in Chinese in Singapore.

  15. PROVIDING SOLUTIONS FOR A BETTER TOMORROW: REDUCING THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH LEAD IN SOIL; URL:

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief publication describes, in general language, the health risks associated with exposure to soil and dust contaminated with lead as well as an innovative method to immobilize lead contaminants in the soil (and thereby reduce the risk of exposure) at Superfund sites. Also ...

  16. Coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: findings from the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shane; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Yu, Mimi C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Coffee consumption has been associated with reduced markers of hepatic cell damage, reduced risk of chronic liver disease, and cirrhosis across a variety of populations. Data on the association between coffee consumption and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), especially in high-risk populations, are sparse. Methods This study examines the relationship between coffee and caffeine consumption, and the risk of developing HCC within the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 middle-aged and older Chinese men and women, a relatively high-risk population for HCC. Baseline data on coffee consumption and other dietary and lifestyle factors were collected through inperson interviews at enrollment between 1993 and 1998. Results As of 31 December 2006, 362 cohort participants had developed HCC. High levels of coffee or caffeine consumption were associated with reduced risk of HCC (p for trend < 0.05). Compared with non-drinkers of coffee, individuals who consumed three or more cups of coffee per day experienced a statistically significant 44% reduction in risk of HCC (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval, 0.31–1.00, p = .049) after adjustment for potential confounders and tea consumption. Conclusion These data suggest that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of developing HCC in Chinese in Singapore. PMID:21258859

  17. PROVIDING SOLUTIONS FOR A BETTER TOMORROW: REDUCING THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH LEAD IN SOIL; URL:

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief publication describes, in general language, the health risks associated with exposure to soil and dust contaminated with lead as well as an innovative method to immobilize lead contaminants in the soil (and thereby reduce the risk of exposure) at Superfund sites. Also ...

  18. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    DiNunzio, Camillo A.; Gupta, Abhinav; Golay, Michael; Luk, Vincent; Turk, Rich; Morrow, Charles; Jin, Geum-Taek

    2002-11-30

    This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

  19. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  20. Casting And Solidification Technology (CAST): Directional solidification phenomena in a metal model at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiment will study the phenomena that occur during directional solidification of an alloy, e.g., constitutional supercooling, freckling, and dendrite coarsening. The reduced gravity environment of space will permit the individual phenomena to be examined with minimum complication from buoyancy driven flows.

  1. Reducing Warehouse Employee Errors Using Voice-Assisted Technology That Provided Immediate Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Samuel M.; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    A foodservice distributor in the southeastern United States implemented a voice assisted selecting tool to reduce selector errors by providing immediate feedback when errors occurred. An AB design with a nonequivalent comparison group was used to examine the effects of the voice technology on 132 selectors whose mispicks and shorts were collected…

  2. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  3. Development of air conditioning technologies to reduce CO2 emissions in the commercial sector

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yukiko

    2006-01-01

    Background Architectural methods that take into account global environmental conservation generally concentrate on mitigating the heat load of buildings. Here, we evaluate the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions that can be achieved by improving heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) technologies. Results The Climate Change Research Hall (CCRH) of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) is used as a case study. CCRH was built in line with the "Green Government Buildings" program of the Government Buildings Department at the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport in Japan. We have assessed the technology used in this building, and found that there is a possibility to reduce energy consumption in the HVAC system by 30%. Conclusion Saving energy reduces CO2 emissions in the commercial sector, although emission factors depend on the country or region. Consequently, energy savings potential may serve as a criterion in selecting HVAC technologies with respect to emission reduction targets. PMID:17062161

  4. Development of air conditioning technologies to reduce CO2 emissions in the commercial sector.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukiko

    2006-10-25

    Architectural methods that take into account global environmental conservation generally concentrate on mitigating the heat load of buildings. Here, we evaluate the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions that can be achieved by improving heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) technologies. The Climate Change Research Hall (CCRH) of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) is used as a case study. CCRH was built in line with the "Green Government Buildings" program of the Government Buildings Department at the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport in Japan. We have assessed the technology used in this building, and found that there is a possibility to reduce energy consumption in the HVAC system by 30%. Saving energy reduces CO2 emissions in the commercial sector, although emission factors depend on the country or region. Consequently, energy savings potential may serve as a criterion in selecting HVAC technologies with respect to emission reduction targets.

  5. [Modifiable risk factors of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The current guidelines for reducing the risk of SIDS].

    PubMed

    Wasilewska, Jolanta; Kaczmarski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is a subgroup of unexpected infant deaths that occur during the postneonatal period with relatively consistent clinical, epidemiological, and pathological features. SIDS remains the major cause of death in infants aged between 1 week and 1 year in western countries. While many SIDS risk factors have been and continue to be identified, the diagnosis remains one of exclusion--the definition of SIDS requires a negative history as well as a negative autopsy result. Epidemiological studies have led to the definition of populations with an increased risk for SIDS: prematurely born infants with perinatal risk factors, subsequent siblings of SIDS victims, ALTE infants (10%). Avoidable risk factors such as those associated with inappropriate infants' sleeping position, type of bedding used and sleeping arrangements strongly suggest a basis for further substantial reductions in SIDS incidence rates. The current guidelines for reducing the risk of SIDS are presented.

  6. Reducing the risk of infection associated with vascular access devices through nanotechnology: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Keogh, Samantha; Rickard, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular catheter-related infections are still a major problem in health care and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and additional cost. The formation of microbial biofilm on catheters makes these infections particularly complicated, as microbial cells that detach from the biofilm can lead to infection, and because these microorganisms are highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents; thus, catheter removal is often required to successfully treat infection. To reduce the risks of catheter-related infections, many strategies have been applied, such as improvements in aseptic insertion and post-insertion care practices, implantation techniques, and antibiotic coated or impregnated materials. However, despite significant advances in using these methods, it has not been possible to completely eradicate biofilm infections. Currently, nanotechnology approaches seem to be among the most promising for preventing biofilm formation and resultant catheter-related bloodstream infection (especially with multi-resistant bacterial strains). In this review, current knowledge about catheter technology and design, the mechanisms of catheter-related bloodstream infection, and the insertion and care practices performed by medical staff, are discussed, along with novel, achievable approaches to infection prevention, based on nanotechnology. PMID:24293997

  7. Risk-based systems analysis of emerging high-level waste tank remediation technologies. Volume 2: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormack, W.D.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of DOE`s Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area is to identify and develop new technologies that will reduce the risk and/or cost of remediating DOE underground waste storage tanks and tank contents. There are, however, many more technology investment opportunities than the current budget can support. Current technology development selection methods evaluate new technologies in isolation from other components of an overall tank waste remediation system. This report describes a System Analysis Model developed under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) program. The report identifies the project objectives and provides a description of the model. Development of the first ``demonstration`` version of this model and a trial application have been completed and the results are presented. This model will continue to evolve as it undergoes additional user review and testing.

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology technology assessment on breast cancer risk reduction strategies: tamoxifen and raloxifene.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T; Collyar, D E; Somerfield, M R; Pfister, D G

    1999-06-01

    To conduct an evidence-based technology assessment to determine whether tamoxifen and raloxifene as breast cancer risk-reduction strategies are appropriate for broad-based conventional use in clinical practice. Tamoxifen and raloxifene. Outcomes of interest include breast cancer incidence, breast cancer-specific survival, overall survival, and net health benefits. A comprehensive, formal literature review was conducted for tamoxifen and raloxifene on the following topics: breast cancer risk reduction; tamoxifen side effects and toxicity, including endometrial cancer risk; tamoxifen influences on nonmalignant diseases, including coronary heart disease and osteoporosis; and decision making by women at risk for breast cancer. Testimony was collected from invited experts and interested parties. More weight was given to publications that described randomized trials. BENEFITS/HARMS/COSTS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Working Group acknowledges that a woman's decision regarding breast cancer risk-reduction strategies will depend on the importance and weight attributed to the information provided regarding both cancer and non-cancer-related risks. For women with a defined 5-year projected risk of breast cancer of >/= 1.66%, tamoxifen (at 20 mg/d for up to 5 years) may be offered to reduce their risk. It is premature to recommend raloxifene use to lower the risk of developing breast cancer outside of a clinical trial setting. On the basis of available information, use of raloxifene should currently be reserved for its approved indication to prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women. Conclusions are based on single-agent use of the drugs. At the present time, the effect of using tamoxifen or raloxifene with other medications (such as hormone replacement therapy), or using tamoxifen and raloxifene in combination or sequentially, has not been studied adequately. The continuing use of placebo-controlled trials in other risk-reduction trials highlights the

  9. LISA Technology Development and Risk Reduction at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint ESA-NASA project to design, build and operate a space-based gravitational wave detector based on a laser interferometer. LISA relies on several technologies that are either new to spaceflight or must perform at levels not previously demonstrated in a spaceflight environment. The ESA-led LISA Pathfinder mission is the main effort to demonstrate LISA technology. NASA also supports complementary ground-based technology development and risk reduction activities. This presentation will report the status of NASA work on micronewton thrusters, the telescope, the optical pointing subsystem and mission formulation. More details on some of these topics will be given in posters. Other talks and posters will describe NASA-supported work on the laser subsystem, the phasemeter, and aspects of the interferometry. Two flight-qualified clusters of four colloid micronewton thrusters, each capable of thrust Levels between 5 and 30 microNewton with a resolution less than 0.l microNewton and a thrust noise less than 0.1 microNewton/vHz (0.001 to 4 Hz), have been integrated onto the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft. The complementary ground-based development focuses on lifetime demonstration. Laboratory verification of failure models and accelerated life tests are just getting started. LISA needs a 40 cm diameter, afocal telescope for beam expansion/reduction that maintains an optical pathlength stability of approximately 1 pm/vHz in an extremely stable thermal environment. A mechanical prototype of a silicon carbide primary-secondary structure has been fabricated for stability testing. Two optical assemblies must point at different distant spacecraft with nanoradian accuracy over approximately 1 degree annual variation in the angle between the distant spacecraft. A candidate piezo-inchworm actuator is being tested in a suitable testbed. In addition to technology development, NASA has carried out several studies in support of the

  10. LISA Technology Development and Risk Reduction at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint ESA-NASA project to design, build and operate a space-based gravitational wave detector based on a laser interferometer. LISA relies on several technologies that are either new to spaceflight or must perform at levels not previously demonstrated in a spaceflight environment. The ESA-led LISA Pathfinder mission is the main effort to demonstrate LISA technology. NASA also supports complementary ground-based technology development and risk reduction activities. This presentation will report the status of NASA work on micronewton thrusters, the telescope, the optical pointing subsystem and mission formulation. More details on some of these topics will be given in posters. Other talks and posters will describe NASA-supported work on the laser subsystem, the phasemeter, and aspects of the interferometry. Two flight-qualified clusters of four colloid micronewton thrusters, each capable of thrust Levels between 5 and 30 microNewton with a resolution less than 0.l microNewton and a thrust noise less than 0.1 microNewton/vHz (0.001 to 4 Hz), have been integrated onto the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft. The complementary ground-based development focuses on lifetime demonstration. Laboratory verification of failure models and accelerated life tests are just getting started. LISA needs a 40 cm diameter, afocal telescope for beam expansion/reduction that maintains an optical pathlength stability of approximately 1 pm/vHz in an extremely stable thermal environment. A mechanical prototype of a silicon carbide primary-secondary structure has been fabricated for stability testing. Two optical assemblies must point at different distant spacecraft with nanoradian accuracy over approximately 1 degree annual variation in the angle between the distant spacecraft. A candidate piezo-inchworm actuator is being tested in a suitable testbed. In addition to technology development, NASA has carried out several studies in support of the

  11. APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISK IN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Paterek; W.W. Bogan; L.M. Lahner; A. May

    2000-04-01

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate integrated biological/physical/chemical co-treatment strategies for the remediation of wastes associated with the exploration and production of fossil energy. The specific objectives of this project are: chemical accelerated biotreatment (CAB) technology development for enhanced site remediation, application of the risk based analyses to define and support the rationale for environmental acceptable endpoints (EAE) for exploration and production wastes, and evaluate both the technological technologies in conjugation for effective remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils from E&P sites in the USA.

  12. APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISK IN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Paterek; W.W. Bogan; L.M. Lahner; V. Trbovic; E. Korach

    2001-05-01

    The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate integrated biological/physical/chemical co-treatment strategies for the remediation of wastes associated with the exploration and production of fossil energy. The specific objectives of this project are: chemical accelerated biotreatment (CAB) technology development for enhanced site remediation, application of the risk based analyses to define and support the rationale for environmental acceptable endpoints (EAE) for exploration and production wastes, and evaluate both the technological technologies in conjugation for effective remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils from E&P sites in the USA.

  13. Reducing fall risk in the elderly: risk factors and fall prevention, a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pfortmueller, C A; Lindner, G; Exadaktylos, A K

    2014-08-01

    Falls in the elderly are a major source of injury resulting in disability and hospitalization. They have a significant impact on individual basis (loss of quality of live, nursing home admissions) and social basis (healthcare costs). Even though falls in the elderly are common there are some well studied risk factors. Special emphasis should be put on sarcopenia/frailty, polypharmacy, multimorbidity, vitamin D status and home hazards. There are several well evaluated fall prevention approaches that either target a single fall risk factor or focus on multiple risk factors. It has to be kept in mind that not all fall prevention strategies are useful for all patients as for example dietary substitution of vitamin D is only recommended in people with increased risk for a vitamin D deficiency. Home hazard reduction strategies are more effective when combined with other fall prevention approaches such as for example exercise programs. In conclusion elderly patients should routinely be screened for relevant risk factors and if need an indiviudally targeted fall prevention program compiled.

  14. Social Adjustment of At-Risk Technology Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Moye, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual technology education students' subgroup dynamic informs progressions of research while apprising technology teacher educators and classroom technology education teachers of intricate differences between students. Recognition of these differences help educators realize that classroom structure, instruction, and activities must be…

  15. Technology and building design: initiatives to reduce inpatient falls among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hignett, Sue

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a narrative exploration of interventions for inpatient falls among the elderly with respect to the design of technology (equipment and furniture) and buildings. Most of the contributory risk factors for inpatient falls among the elderly were identified in the 1950s, but incident and injury rates remain relatively unchanged in the 2000s. Interventions have predominantly focused on staff and organizational changes, for example monitoring (observation) and communication, possibly in response to increased patient privacy (isolation) in single rooms. The clinical response has been to modify the patient by means of medication review, continence management, and impact protectors. This paper considers whether technology and building design have helped or hindered the newly admitted frail and/or confused elderly patient at risk of falling, assuming the provision of good nursing and medical practice (e.g., observation, treatment, and care).

  16. An emotion regulation intervention to reduce risk behaviors among at-risk early adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Christopher D.; Hadley, Wendy; Barker, David; Brown, Larry K.; Hancock, Evan; Almy, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an intervention designed to enhance early adolescents’ emotion regulation skill use and to decrease risk behaviors. Adolescents 12 to 14 years old (N = 420; 53% male) with mental health symptoms were referred for participation in either an Emotion Regulation (ER) or Health Promotion (HP) intervention consisting of twelve after-school sessions. Participants completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires on laptop computers. Using a generalized analysis of covariance controlling for baseline scores, participants in the ER intervention were less likely to be sexually active and engage in other risk behaviors, such as fighting, at the conclusion of the program. Additionally, participants in the ER intervention reported greater use of emotion regulation strategies and more favorable attitudes toward abstinence. Interventions directly targeting emotion regulation may be useful in addressing health risk behaviors of adolescents with mental health symptoms. PMID:26297499

  17. The efficiency of asset management strategies to reduce urban flood risk.

    PubMed

    ten Veldhuis, J A E; Clemens, F H L R

    2011-01-01

    In this study, three asset management strategies were compared with respect to their efficiency to reduce flood risk. Data from call centres at two municipalities were used to quantify urban flood risks associated with three causes of urban flooding: gully pot blockage, sewer pipe blockage and sewer overloading. The efficiency of three flood reduction strategies was assessed based on their effect on the causes contributing to flood risk. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in the data source, citizens' calls, was analysed through incorporation of uncertainty ranges taken from customer complaint literature. Based on the available data it could be shown that increasing gully pot blockage is the most efficient action to reduce flood risk, given data uncertainty. If differences between cause incidences are large, as in the presented case study, call data are sufficient to decide how flood risk can be most efficiently reduced. According to the results of this analysis, enlargement of sewer pipes is not an efficient strategy to reduce flood risk, because flood risk associated with sewer overloading is small compared to other failure mechanisms.

  18. Recent results from clinical trials using SERMs to reduce the risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Victor G

    2006-11-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are used for the treatment of invasive breast cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of specific natural or synthetic chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the progression of premalignant lesions to invasive carcinoma. The finding of a decrease in contralateral breast cancer incidence following tamoxifen administration for adjuvant therapy led to its use in breast cancer prevention. Four large trials have used tamoxifen, the prototypical SERM, as a breast cancer chemopreventive agent with differing results. In the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's (NSABP) Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT), tamoxifen reduced the risk of invasive breast cancer by 49%. Tamoxifen also reduced the incidence of benign breast disease as well as the number of breast biopsies in the treated women. Three other randomized prevention trials comparing tamoxifen with placebo have been reported and show a reduction in breast cancer incidence of 38%. Serum levels of estrone sulfate and testosterone are significantly associated with breast cancer risk, and estradiol appears to be more strongly associated with breast cancer in high-risk women. Raloxifene is comparable to tamoxifen in its ability to reduce the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal, high-risk women and has fewer side effects, as shown in the study of tamoxifen and raloxifene. Several ongoing and planned studies will evaluate the ability of aromatase inhibitors to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at increased risk.

  19. Motivational interviewing to reduce cardiovascular risk in African American and Latina women.

    PubMed

    Witt, Dawn R; Lindquist, Ruth; Treat-Jacobson, Diane; Boucher, Jackie L; Konety, Suma H; Savik, Kay

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for women, and disproportionally so for African American and Latina women. CVD is largely preventable and many risks can be attributable to health behaviors, implementing and sustaining positive health behaviors is a challenge. Motivational interviewing is one promising intervention for initiating behavior change. The purpose of this review was to identify, synthesize, and critically analyze the existing literature on the use of motivational interviewing as a behavioral intervention to reduce CVD risk among African American and Latina women. Seven studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. Results of this review suggest that motivational interviewing has mixed results when used to reduce cardiovascular risk factors in African American and Latina women. More research using a standardized motivational interviewing approach is needed to definitively determine if it is an effective behavioral intervention to reduce CVD risk when used in populations of African American and Latina women.

  20. Online Design Aid for Evaluating Manure Pit Ventilation Systems to Reduce Entry Risk.

    PubMed

    Manbeck, Harvey B; Hofstetter, Daniel W; Murphy, Dennis J; Puri, Virendra M

    2016-01-01

    On-farm manure storage pits contain both toxic and asphyxiating gases such as hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia. Farmers and service personnel occasionally need to enter these pits to conduct repair and maintenance tasks. One intervention to reduce the toxic and asphyxiating gas exposure risk to farm workers when entering manure pits is manure pit ventilation. This article describes an online computational fluid dynamics-based design aid for evaluating the effectiveness of manure pit ventilation systems to reduce the concentrations of toxic and asphyxiating gases in the manure pits. This design aid, developed by a team of agricultural engineering and agricultural safety specialists at Pennsylvania State University, represents the culmination of more than a decade of research and technology development effort. The article includes a summary of the research efforts leading to the online design aid development and describes protocols for using the online design aid, including procedures for data input and for accessing design aid results. Design aid results include gas concentration decay and oxygen replenishment curves inside the manure pit and inside the barns above the manure pits, as well as animated motion pictures of individual gas concentration decay and oxygen replenishment in selected horizontal and vertical cut plots in the manure pits and barns. These results allow the user to assess (1) how long one needs to ventilate the pits to remove toxic and asphyxiating gases from the pit and barn, (2) from which portions of the barn and pit these gases are most and least readily evacuated, and (3) whether or not animals and personnel need to be removed from portions of the barn above the manure pit being ventilated.

  1. Online Design Aid for Evaluating Manure Pit Ventilation Systems to Reduce Entry Risk

    PubMed Central

    Manbeck, Harvey B.; Hofstetter, Daniel W.; Murphy, Dennis J.; Puri, Virendra M.

    2016-01-01

    On-farm manure storage pits contain both toxic and asphyxiating gases such as hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia. Farmers and service personnel occasionally need to enter these pits to conduct repair and maintenance tasks. One intervention to reduce the toxic and asphyxiating gas exposure risk to farm workers when entering manure pits is manure pit ventilation. This article describes an online computational fluid dynamics-based design aid for evaluating the effectiveness of manure pit ventilation systems to reduce the concentrations of toxic and asphyxiating gases in the manure pits. This design aid, developed by a team of agricultural engineering and agricultural safety specialists at Pennsylvania State University, represents the culmination of more than a decade of research and technology development effort. The article includes a summary of the research efforts leading to the online design aid development and describes protocols for using the online design aid, including procedures for data input and for accessing design aid results. Design aid results include gas concentration decay and oxygen replenishment curves inside the manure pit and inside the barns above the manure pits, as well as animated motion pictures of individual gas concentration decay and oxygen replenishment in selected horizontal and vertical cut plots in the manure pits and barns. These results allow the user to assess (1) how long one needs to ventilate the pits to remove toxic and asphyxiating gases from the pit and barn, (2) from which portions of the barn and pit these gases are most and least readily evacuated, and (3) whether or not animals and personnel need to be removed from portions of the barn above the manure pit being ventilated. PMID:27303661

  2. Meta-analyses on behavioral interventions to reduce the risk of transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Vergidis, Paschalis I; Falagas, Matthew E

    2009-06-01

    Different behavioral interventions have found to be efficacious in reducing high-risk sexual activity. Interventions have been evaluated in both original research and meta-analytic reviews. Most of the studies have shown that interventions are efficacious among different study populations. In adolescents, both in- and out-of-the classroom interventions showed a decrease in the risk of unprotected sex. In African Americans, greater efficacy was found for interventions including peer education. For Latinos, effect was larger in interventions with segmentation in the same gender. Geographic and social isolation are barriers in approaching MSM. For IDUs, interventions provided within a treatment program have an impact on risk reduction above that produced by drug treatment alone. Finally, people diagnosed with HIV tend to reduce their sexual risk behavior. However, adherence to safe sex practices for life can be challenging. Relentless efforts for implementation of behavioral interventions to decrease high-risk behavior are necessary to decrease HIV transmission.

  3. Fighting Testing ACAT/FRRP: Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology/Fighter Risk Reduction Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Flight testing Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology/Fighter Risk Reduction Project (ACAT/FRRP). The goal of this project is to develop common modular architecture for all aircraft, and to enable the transition of technology from research to production as soon as possible to begin to reduce the rate of mishaps. The automated Ground Collision Avoidance System (GCAS) system is designed to prevent collision with the ground, by avionics that project the future trajectory over digital terrain, and request an evasion maneuver at the last instance. The flight controls are capable of automatically performing a recovery. The collision avoidance is described in the presentation. Also included in the presentation is a description of the flight test.

  4. [Lead compound optimization strategy (2)--structure optimization strategy for reducing toxicity risks in drug design].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Long; Wang, Jiang; Lin, Dai-Zong; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IDR) induce severe medical complications or even death in patients. Alert structure in drugs can be metabolized as reactive metabolite (RM) in the bodies, which is one of the major factors to induce IDR. Structure modification and avoidance of alert structure in the drug candidates is an efficient method for reducing toxicity risks in drug design. This review briefly summarized the recent development of the methodologies for structure optimization strategy to reduce the toxicity risks of drug candidates. These methods include blocking metabolic site, altering metabolic pathway, reducing activity, bioisosterism, and prodrug.

  5. Traditional smallpox vaccination with reduced risk of inadvertent contact spread by administration of povidone iodine ointment

    PubMed Central

    Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Matthew W.; Hanifin, Jon; Simpson, Eric L.; Carlson, Nichole E.; Slifka, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    One concern with traditional smallpox vaccination is inadvertent spread of virus to atopic or immunocompromised contacts. To reduce this risk, we tested the ability of povidone iodine to inactivate infectious virus at the vaccination site beginning at 7 days after transcutaneous smallpox vaccination. This ointment rapidly inactivated virus on the skin without reducing neutralizing antibody titers or antiviral T cell responses. Moreover, there was no delay in healing/eschar separation following povidone iodine application. Together, this indicates that administration of an antiviral/antimicrobial cream can effectively block virus shedding after traditional smallpox vaccination and reduce the risks of autoinoculation or contact spread. PMID:18083278

  6. Clinical engineering and risk management in healthcare technological process using architecture framework.

    PubMed

    Signori, Marcos R; Garcia, Renato

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a model that aids the Clinical Engineering to deal with Risk Management in the Healthcare Technological Process. The healthcare technological setting is complex and supported by three basics entities: infrastructure (IS), healthcare technology (HT), and human resource (HR). Was used an Enterprise Architecture - MODAF (Ministry of Defence Architecture Framework) - to model this process for risk management. Thus, was created a new model to contribute to the risk management in the HT process, through the Clinical Engineering viewpoint. This architecture model can support and improve the decision making process of the Clinical Engineering to the Risk Management in the Healthcare Technological process.

  7. Smoker and ex-smoker reactions to cigarettes claiming reduced risk

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, S; Pillitteri, J; Burton, S; Di, M

    2004-01-01

    Context: The tobacco industry is introducing modified tobacco products claiming to reduce the risk of smoking (potential reduced exposure products, PREPs). If PREPs are perceived as safe, they may deter smokers from quitting and encourage re-initiation by smokers who have quit. Objective: To assess smokers' and ex-smokers' perceptions of PREPs and the impact of PREP claims on interest in quitting (among smokers) or in resuming smoking (ex-smokers). Design: A random-digit-dialled survey of US smokers and ex-smokers. We used Eclipse, a modified PREP cigarette, as an exemplar PREP. During the survey, the interviewer read risk reduction claims made for Eclipse by its manufacturer, assessing smokers' interest in quitting before and after the exposure. Participants: 1000 current cigarette smokers and 499 ex-smokers (300 quit within the last two years), over 18 years old. Main outcome measures: Perception of risk reduction from Eclipse; interest in using Eclipse; smokers' interest in quitting was assessed using a stage of change approach (pre- and post-exposure to claims). Results: 91% of smokers thought Eclipse was safer than regular cigarettes. 24% believed Eclipse was completely safe. 57.4% of smokers were interested in using Eclipse; interest was greatest among smokers who were contemplating quitting. Exposure to Eclipse's claims was followed by reduced interest in quitting. Among all ex-smokers, interest in Eclipse was 6.2%, but interest was 15.2% among young adults (18–25 years) who had stopped smoking within two years. Conclusions: There is substantial risk that smokers will overinterpret reduced risk claims made for modified tobacco products. PREPs appeal to smokers who are contemplating quitting and exposure to reduced risk product claims appears to reduce smokers' readiness to quit. PREPs also appealed to young adults who had recently stopped smoking. Thus, reduced risk tobacco product claims can undermine adult cessation and youth prevention, possibly

  8. Reducing health risk assigned to organic emissions from a chemical weapons incinerator.

    PubMed

    Laman, David M; Weiler, B Douglas; Skeen, Rodney S

    2013-03-01

    Organic emissions from a chemical weapons incinerator have been characterized with an improved set of analytical methods to reduce the human health risk assigned to operations of the facility. A gas chromatography/mass selective detection method with substantially reduced detection limits has been used in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared microscopy to improve the speciation of semi-volatile and non-volatile organics emitted from the incinerator. The reduced detection limits have allowed a significant reduction in the assumed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and aminobiphenyl (ABP) emission rates used as inputs to the human health risk assessment for the incinerator. A mean factor of 17 decrease in assigned human health risk is realized for six common local exposure scenarios as a result of the reduced PAH and ABP detection limits.

  9. Integrating mHealth Mobile Applications to Reduce High Risk Drinking among Underage Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazemi, Donna M.; Cochran, Allyson R.; Kelly, John F.; Cornelius, Judith B.; Belk, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: College students embrace mobile cell phones (MCPs) as a primary communication and entertainment device. The aim of this study was to investigate college students' perceptions toward using mHealth technology to deliver interventions to prevent high-risk drinking and associated consequences. Design/setting: Four focus group interviews…

  10. Integrating mHealth Mobile Applications to Reduce High Risk Drinking among Underage Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazemi, Donna M.; Cochran, Allyson R.; Kelly, John F.; Cornelius, Judith B.; Belk, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: College students embrace mobile cell phones (MCPs) as a primary communication and entertainment device. The aim of this study was to investigate college students' perceptions toward using mHealth technology to deliver interventions to prevent high-risk drinking and associated consequences. Design/setting: Four focus group interviews…

  11. Interactions Between High- and Low-Risk HPV Types Reduce the Risk of Squamous Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Karin; Ploner, Alexander; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Eloranta, Sandra; Palmgren, Juni; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ylitalo Helm, Nathalie; Sparén, Pär; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-10-01

    The clinical significance of co-infections with high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) human papillomavirus (HPV) in the etiology of cervical cancer is debated, as prospective evidence on this issue is limited. However, the question is of increasing relevance in relation to HPV-based cancer prevention. In two population-based nested case-control studies among women participating in cervical screening with baseline normal smears, we collected 4659 smears from women who later developed cancer in situ (CIS; n = 524) or squamous cervical cancer (SCC; n = 378) and individually matched control subjects who remained free of disease during study follow-up. The median follow-up until diagnosis was 6.4 to 7.8 years. All smears were tested for HPV. We used conditional logistic regression models with two-way interaction terms to estimate relative risks (RRs) for CIS and SCC, respectively. All statistical tests were two-sided. Compared with women who were infected with HRHPV only, women who were also infected with LRHPV had a lower risk for SCC (RR = 0.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.04 to 0.99, P = .049). This interaction was not shown for CIS (RR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.4 to 3.6). Women who were positive for both HRHPV and LRHPV had, on average, a 4.8 year longer time to diagnosis of SCC than women who were positive for HRHPV only (P = .006). Results were highly robust in sensitivity analyses. Co-infection with LRHPV is associated with a lower risk of future invasive disease and longer time to diagnosis than infection with HRHPV alone. We propose that co-infection with LRHPV interferes with the rate of progression to invasive cervical cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Estimates of global and regional potential health gains from reducing multiple major risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, Majid; Hoorn, Stephen Vander; Rodgers, Anthony; Lopez, Alan D; Mathers, Colin D; Murray, Christopher J L

    2003-07-26

    Estimates of the disease burden due to multiple risk factors can show the potential gain from combined preventive measures. But few such investigations have been attempted, and none on a global scale. Our aim was to estimate the potential health benefits from removal of multiple major risk factors. We assessed the burden of disease and injury attributable to the joint effects of 20 selected leading risk factors in 14 epidemiological subregions of the world. We estimated population attributable fractions, defined as the proportional reduction in disease or mortality that would occur if exposure to a risk factor were reduced to an alternative level, from data for risk factor prevalence and hazard size. For every disease, we estimated joint population attributable fractions, for multiple risk factors, by age and sex, from the direct contributions of individual risk factors. To obtain the direct hazards, we reviewed publications and re-analysed cohort data to account for that part of hazard that is mediated through other risks. Globally, an estimated 47% of premature deaths and 39% of total disease burden in 2000 resulted from the joint effects of the risk factors considered. These risks caused a substantial proportion of important diseases, including diarrhoea (92%-94%), lower respiratory infections (55-62%), lung cancer (72%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (60%), ischaemic heart disease (83-89%), and stroke (70-76%). Removal of these risks would have increased global healthy life expectancy by 9.3 years (17%) ranging from 4.4 years (6%) in the developed countries of the western Pacific to 16.1 years (43%) in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Removal of major risk factors would not only increase healthy life expectancy in every region, but also reduce some of the differences between regions. The potential for disease prevention and health gain from tackling major known risks simultaneously would be substantial.

  13. Risk reduction methodologies and technologies for the Earth Observing System (EOS) Operations Center (EOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Richard K.; Pingitore, Nelson V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will discuss proposed Flight Operations methodologies and technologies for the Earth Observing System (EOS) Operations Center (EOC), to reduce risks associated with the operation of complex multi-instrument spacecraft in a multi-spacecraft environment. The EOC goals are to obtain 100 percent science data capture and maintain 100 percent spacecraft health, for each EOS spacecraft. Operations risks to the spacecraft and data loss due to operator command error, mission degradation due to mis-identification of an anomalous trend in component performance or mis-management of resources, and total mission loss due to improper subsystem configuration or mis-identification of an anomalous condition. This paper discusses automation of routine Flight Operations Team (FOT) responsibilities, Expert systems for real-time non-nominal condition decision support, and Telemetry analysis systems for in-depth playback data analysis and trending.

  14. How Can Home Care Patients and Their Caregivers Better Manage Fall Risks by Leveraging Information Technology?

    PubMed

    Alhuwail, Dari; Koru, Güneş; Nahm, Eun-Shim

    2016-12-01

    From the perspectives of home care patients and caregivers, this study aimed to (a) identify the challenges for better fall-risk management during home care episodes and (b) explore the opportunities for them to leverage health information technology (IT) solutions to improve fall-risk management during home care episodes. Twelve in-depth semistructured interviews with the patients and caregivers were conducted within a descriptive single case study design in 1 home health agency (HHA) in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Patients and caregivers faced challenges to manage fall risks such as unmanaged expectations, deteriorating cognitive abilities, and poor care coordination between the HHA and physician practices. Opportunities to leverage health IT solutions included patient portals, telehealth, and medication reminder apps on smartphones. Effectively leveraging health IT could further empower patients and caregivers to reduce fall risks by acquiring the necessary information and following clinical advice and recommendations. The HHAs could improve the quality of care by adopting IT solutions that show more promise of improving the experiences of patients and caregivers in fall-risk management.

  15. How Can Home Care Patients and Their Caregivers Better Manage Fall Risks by Leveraging Information Technology?

    PubMed Central

    Koru, Güneş; Nahm, Eun-Shim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: From the perspectives of home care patients and caregivers, this study aimed to (a) identify the challenges for better fall-risk management during home care episodes and (b) explore the opportunities for them to leverage health information technology (IT) solutions to improve fall-risk management during home care episodes. Methods: Twelve in-depth semistructured interviews with the patients and caregivers were conducted within a descriptive single case study design in 1 home health agency (HHA) in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Results: Patients and caregivers faced challenges to manage fall risks such as unmanaged expectations, deteriorating cognitive abilities, and poor care coordination between the HHA and physician practices. Opportunities to leverage health IT solutions included patient portals, telehealth, and medication reminder apps on smartphones. Conclusion: Effectively leveraging health IT could further empower patients and caregivers to reduce fall risks by acquiring the necessary information and following clinical advice and recommendations. The HHAs could improve the quality of care by adopting IT solutions that show more promise of improving the experiences of patients and caregivers in fall-risk management. PMID:28725850

  16. Perceptions of Risk of Developing Skin Cancer for Diverse Audiences: Enhancing Relevance of Sun Protection to Reduce the Risk.

    PubMed

    Robinson, June K; Friedewald, John; Gordon, Elisa J

    2016-03-01

    Sixty-five percent of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Perceptions of risk of developing skin cancer, amelioration of this risk with sun protection, and having choices among sun protection strategies may enhance sun protection use by KTRS, who are at greater risk than the general population. Thirty KTRs stratified among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Hispanic/Latinos evaluated three versions of the interactive, web-based, electronic sun protection program and suggested refinements. The sequence of content presentation prepared the participant to accept the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of the message. Beginning with informing participants that using sun protection reduces the chance of developing skin cancer made the information credible to KTRs. Showing skin cancer on all skin types and patient testimonials enhanced participants' awareness of their susceptibility to develop skin cancer and primed patients to receive their personal risk of developing skin cancer. Coupling presentation of knowledge about the benefits of sun protection in reducing the risk of developing skin cancer with the personal risk of getting the disease was essential to KTRs believing that they could influence their health outcome.

  17. Perceptions of Risk of Developing Skin Cancer for Diverse Audiences: Enhancing Relevance of Sun Protection to Reduce the Risk

    PubMed Central

    Friedewald, John; Gordon, Elisa J.

    2016-01-01

    Sixty-five percent of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Perceptions of risk of developing skin cancer, amelioration of this risk with sun protection, and having choices among sun protection strategies may enhance sun protection use by KTRS, who are at greater risk than the general population. Thirty KTRs stratified among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and Hispanic/Latinos evaluated three versions of the interactive, web-based, electronic sun protection program and suggested refinements. The sequence of content presentation prepared the participant to accept the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of the message. Beginning with informing participants that using sun protection reduces the chance of developing skin cancer made the information credible to KTRs. Showing skin cancer on all skin types and patient testimonials enhanced participants' awareness of their susceptibility to develop skin cancer and primed patients to receive their personal risk of developing skin cancer. Coupling presentation of knowledge about the benefits of sun protection in reducing the risk of developing skin cancer with the personal risk of getting the disease was essential to KTRs believing that they could influence their health outcome. PMID:26209181

  18. Supporting Technology at GRC to Mitigate Risk as Stirling Power Conversion Transitions to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Thieme, Lanny G.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2009-01-01

    Stirling power conversion technology has been reaching more advanced levels of maturity during its development for space power applications. The current effort is in support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Sunpower Inc., and the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) to convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. Of paramount importance is the reliability of the power system and as a part of this, the Stirling power convertors. GRC has established a supporting technology effort with tasks in the areas of reliability, convertor testing, high-temperature materials, structures, advanced analysis, organics, and permanent magnets. The project utilizes the matrix system at GRC to make use of resident experts in each of the aforementioned fields. Each task is intended to reduce risk and enhance reliability of the convertor as this technology transitions toward flight status. This paper will provide an overview of each task, outline the recent efforts and accomplishments, and show how they mitigate risk and impact the reliability of the ASC s and ultimately, the ASRG.

  19. Supporting Technology at GRC to Mitigate Risk as Stirling Power Conversion Transitions to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Thieme, Lanny G.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2008-01-01

    Stirling power conversion technology has been reaching more advanced levels of maturity during its development for space power applications. The current effort is in support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Sunpower Inc., and the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) to convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. Of paramount importance is the reliability of the power system and as a part of this, the Stirling power convertors. GRC has established a supporting technology effort with tasks in the areas of reliability, convertor testing, high-temperature materials, structures, advanced analysis, organics, and permanent magnets. The project utilizes the matrix system at GRC to make use of resident experts in each of the aforementioned fields. Each task is intended to reduce risk and enhance reliability of the convertor as this technology transitions toward flight status. This paper will provide an overview of each task, outline the recent efforts and accomplishments, and show how they mitigate risk and impact the reliability of the ASC s and ultimately, the ASRG.

  20. Multisite parent-centered risk assessment to reduce pediatric oral chemotherapy errors.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kathleen E; Mazor, Kathleen M; Roblin, Douglas; Biggins, Colleen; Wagner, Joann L; Houlahan, Kathleen; Li, Justin W; Keuker, Christopher; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Donovan, Jennifer; Kanaan, Abir; Weingart, Saul N

    2013-01-01

    Observational studies describe high rates of errors in home oral chemotherapy use in children. In hospitals, proactive risk assessment methods help front-line health care workers develop error prevention strategies. Our objective was to engage parents of children with cancer in a multisite study using proactive risk assessment methods to identify how errors occur at home and propose risk reduction strategies. We recruited parents from three outpatient pediatric oncology clinics in the northeast and southeast United States to participate in failure mode and effects analyses (FMEA). An FMEA is a systematic team-based proactive risk assessment approach in understanding ways a process can fail and develop prevention strategies. Steps included diagram the process, brainstorm and prioritize failure modes (places where things go wrong), and propose risk reduction strategies. We focused on home oral chemotherapy administration after a change in dose because prior studies identified this area as high risk. Parent teams consisted of four parents at two of the sites and 10 at the third. Parents developed a 13-step process map, with two to 19 failure modes per step. The highest priority failure modes included miscommunication when receiving instructions from the clinician (caused by conflicting instructions or parent lapses) and unsafe chemotherapy handling at home. Recommended risk assessment strategies included novel uses of technology to improve parent access to information, clinicians, and other parents while at home. Parents of pediatric oncology patients readily participated in a proactive risk assessment method, identifying processes that pose a risk for medication errors involving home oral chemotherapy.

  1. Reducing risk where tectonic plates collide—U.S. Geological Survey subduction zone science plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Ludwig, Kristin A.; Bekins, Barbara; Brocher, Thomas M.; Brock, John C.; Brothers, Daniel; Chaytor, Jason D.; Frankel, Arthur; Geist, Eric L.; Haney, Matt; Hickman, Stephen H.; Leith, William S.; Roeloffs, Evelyn A.; Schulz, William H.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Wallace, Kristi; Watt, Janet; Wein, Anne

    2017-06-19

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information and tools to build resilience in communities exposed to subduction zone earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, and volcanic eruptions. Improving the application of USGS science to successfully reduce risk from these events relies on whole community efforts, with continuing partnerships among scientists and stakeholders, including researchers from universities, other government labs and private industry, land-use planners, engineers, policy-makers, emergency managers and responders, business owners, insurance providers, the media, and the general public.Motivated by recent technological advances and increased awareness of our growing vulnerability to subduction-zone hazards, the USGS is uniquely positioned to take a major step forward in the science it conducts and products it provides, building on its tradition of using long-term monitoring and research to develop effective products for hazard mitigation. This science plan provides a blueprint both for prioritizing USGS science activities and for delineating USGS interests and potential participation in subduction zone science supported by its partners.The activities in this plan address many USGS stakeholder needs:High-fidelity tools and user-tailored information that facilitate increasingly more targeted, neighborhood-scale decisions to mitigate risks more cost-effectively and ensure post-event operability. Such tools may include maps, tables, and simulated earthquake ground-motion records conveying shaking intensity and frequency. These facilitate the prioritization of retrofitting of vulnerable infrastructure;Information to guide local land-use and response planning to minimize development in likely hazardous zones (for example, databases, maps, and scenario documents to guide evacuation route planning in communities near volcanoes, along coastlines vulnerable to tsunamis, and built on landslide-prone terrain);New tools

  2. Enhancing Motivation to Reduce the Risk of HIV Infection for Economically Disadvantaged Urban Women

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michael P.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Kalichman, Seth C.; Forsyth, Andrew D.; Wright, Ednita M.; Johnson, Blair T.

    2008-01-01

    This research evaluated a motivation-based HIV-risk-reduction intervention for economically disadvantaged urban women. Participants completed a survey that assessed HIV-related knowledge, risk perceptions, behavioral intentions, sexual communication, substance use, and risk behavior. A total of 102 at-risk women (76% African-American) were randomly assigned to either the risk-reduction intervention or to a waiting list. Women were reassessed at three and twelve weeks. Results indicated that treated women increased their knowledge and risk awareness, strengthened their intentions to adopt safer sexual practices, communicated their intentions with partners, reduced substance use proximal to sexual activities, and engaged in fewer acts of unprotected vaginal intercourse. These effects were observed immediately and most were maintained at follow-up. PMID:9256553

  3. Spatial Patterning of Prey at Reproduction to Reduce Predation Risk: What Drives Dispersion from Groups?

    PubMed

    DeMars, Craig A; Breed, Greg A; Potts, Jonathan R; Boutin, Stan

    2016-05-01

    Group living is a widespread behavior thought to be an evolutionary adaptation for reducing predation risk. Many group-living species, however, spend a portion of their life cycle as dispersed individuals, suggesting that the costs and benefits of these opposing behaviors vary temporally. Here, we evaluated mechanistic hypotheses for explaining individual dispersion as a tactic for reducing predation risk at reproduction (i.e., birthing) in an otherwise group-living animal. Using simulation analyses parameterized by empirical data, we assessed whether dispersion increases reproductive success by (i) increasing predator search time, (ii) reducing predator encounter rates because individuals are inconspicuous relative to groups, or (iii) eliminating the risk of multiple kills per encounter. Simulations indicate that dispersion becomes favorable only when detectability increases with group size and there is risk of multiple kills per encounter. This latter effect, however, is likely the primary mechanism driving females to disperse at reproduction because group detectability effects are presumably constant year-round. We suggest that the risk of multiple kills imposed by highly vulnerable offspring may be an important factor influencing dispersive behavior in many species, and conservation strategies for such species will require protecting sufficient space to allow dispersion to effectively reduce predation risk.

  4. Reducing sexual risk behavior among high-risk couples in Northern India.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah; Bagga, Rashmi; Nehra, Ritu; Deepika; Sethi, Sunil; Walia, Kamini; Kumar, Mahendra; Villar-Loubet, Olga; Lopez, Maria; Weiss, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    With a population of 1.1 billion, India is considered to be a country in which effective prevention interventions could contain the development of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. Heterosexual transmission accounts for 85 % of the extant HIV infections. This study sought to assess the feasibility of conducting a group, culturally tailored behavioral intervention and its impact on sexual barrier use, self-efficacy, knowledge, conflict resolution, and coping among high-risk heterosexual couples in Northern India. This pilot study was conducted at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India from February 2008 to January 2009. Thirty sexually active high-risk couples were drawn from a convenience sample of PGIMER patients attending infectious disease and family planning clinics. Couples participated in 1 month of three weekly gender-concordant behavioral intervention groups and were individually administered assessments preintervention and post-intervention. The intervention was tailored to the Northern Indian context and addressed sexual barrier use, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infection transmission, and cognitive behavioral skill building focusing on sexual negotiation and communication. The participants had a mean age of 32 years (men) and 29 years (women), and the majority had at least 10 years of education. At baseline, the majority reported inconsistent condom use (<100 % of the time; 64 % of women, 59 % of men). Post-intervention, nearly all participants reported consistent condom use (100 % of the time; 100 % of men, 97 % of women). Participants also reported decreased verbal aggression, increased self-efficacy, and increased HIV-related knowledge, and women increased their use of positive coping tactics. The results highlight the potential to successfully utilize a group intervention to discuss sensitive issues such as sexual risk behavior among both men and women

  5. Reducing sexual risk behavior among high risk couples in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah; Bagga, Rashmi; Nehra, Ritu; Deepika; Sethi, Sunil; Walia, Kamini; Kumar, Mahendra; Villar-Loubet, Olga; Lopez, Maria; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to assess the feasibility of conducting a group, culturally tailored behavioral intervention and its impact on sexual barrier use, self efficacy, knowledge, conflict resolution and coping among high risk heterosexual couples in Northern India. Method This pilot study was conducted at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India from February 2008 to January 2009. Thirty sexually active high risk couples were drawn from a convenience sample of PGIMER patients attending infectious disease and family planning clinics. Couples participated in one month of 3 weekly gender concordant behavioral intervention groups and were individually administered assessments pre- and post-intervention. The intervention was tailored to the Northern Indian context, and addressed sexual barrier use, HIV/STI transmission and cognitive behavioral skill building focusing on sexual negotiation and communication. Results Participants were a mean age of 32 (men) and 29 (women) years, and the majority had at least 10 years of education. At baseline, the majority reported inconsistent condom use (<100% of the time) (64% of women, 59% of men). Post-intervention, nearly all participants reported consistent use (100% of the time) (100% of men, 97% of women). Participants also reported decreased verbal aggression, increased self efficacy and increased HIV-related knowledge, and women increased their use of positive coping tactics. Conclusions Results highlight the potential to successfully utilize a group intervention to discuss sensitive issues such as sexual risk behavior among both men and women. Strategies to improve condom use and communication without increasing intimate partner violence in high risk couples may be an important adjunct to preventing the development of a generalized epidemic in India. PMID:22648338

  6. Reduced cost alternatives to premise wiring using ATM and microcellular technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra R.

    1993-01-01

    The cost of premises wiring keeps increasing due to personnel moves, new equipment, capacity upgrades etc. It would be desirable to have a wireless interface from the workstations to the fixed network, so as to minimize the wiring changes needed. New technologies such as microcellular personal communication systems are promising to bring down the cost of wireless communication. Another promising technology is Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), which could dramatically increase the bandwidth available for wireless connections. In addition, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology is emerging as a technique for integrated management of voice, data, and video traffic on a single network. The focus of this investigation will be to assess the future utility of these new technologies for reducing the premise wiring cost at KSC. One of the issues to be studied is the cost comparison of 'old' versus 'new,' especially as time and technology progress. An additional issue for closer study is a feasible time-line for progress in technological capability.

  7. A Multifaceted School-based Intervention to Reduce Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in At-Risk Youth

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Margaret; Jaser, Sarah S.; Holl, Marita G.; Jefferson, Vanessa; Dziura, James; Northrup, Veronika

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a multifaceted, school-based intervention on inner city youth at high risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to determine whether the addition of coping skills training (CST) and health coaching improves outcomes. Method 198 students in New Haven, CT at risk for T2DM (BMI > 85th percentile and family history of diabetes) were randomized by school to an educational intervention with or without the addition of CST and health coaching. Students were enrolled from 2004–2007 and followed for 12 months. Results Students in both groups showed some improvement in anthropometric measures, lipids, and depressive symptoms over 12 months. BMI was not improved by the intervention. Students who received CST showed greater improvement on some indicators of metabolic risk than students who received education only. Conclusion A multifaceted, school-based intervention may hold promise for reducing metabolic risk in urban, minority youth. PMID:19643125

  8. Policies for Reducing Coastal Risk on the East and Gulf Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Johnson, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hurricane- and coastal storm-related economic losses have increased substantially over the past century, largely due to expanding population and development in susceptible coastal areas. Concurrent with this growth, the federal government has assumed an increasing proportion of the financial responsibility associated with U.S. coastal storms, which may discourage state and local governments from taking appropriate actions to reduce risk and enhance resilience. Strategies to manage coastal storm risks fall into two categories: reducing the probability of flooding or wave impact (such as seawalls, storm surge barriers, beach nourishment, dune building, restoration/expansion of oyster reefs, salt marshes, and mangroves) and reducing the number or vulnerability of people or structures (such as relocation, land-use planning, and elevating or floodproofing buildings). Over the past century, most coastal risk management programs have emphasized coastal armoring, while doing little to decrease development in harm's way. This National Research Council report calls for the development of a national vision for managing coastal risks that includes a long-term view, regional solutions, and recognition of all benefits. A national coastal risk assessment is needed to identify high priority areas. Benefit-cost analysis provides a reasonable framework to evaluate national investments in coastal risk reduction, if constrained by other important environmental, social, and life-safety factors. Extensive collaboration and additional policy changes will be necessary to move from a nation that is primarily reactive to coastal disasters to one that invests wisely in coastal risk reduction and builds resilience among coastal communities.

  9. Reducing cardiovascular risk in spouses of cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yates, Bernice C; Rowland, Sheri; Mancuso, Kerry; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Norman, Joseph F; Shurmur, Scott; Tesina, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined risk-reducing interventions in spouses of coronary artery bypass patients. This study examined the effects of the Partners Together in Health (PaTH) intervention versus usual care on cardiovascular risk factors. Spouses in the experimental group (n = 17/group) attended cardiac rehabilitation with patients and made the same physical activity and healthy eating changes as patients. Spouses in the usual care group attended educational classes with patients. Spouses' 30-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Scale before and after cardiac rehabilitation (3 months), and at 6 months. Spouses in both groups significantly reduced 30-year risk scores at 3 and 6 months. Exercise was the key ingredient in lowering risk. There was a trend toward reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both groups. Although there were no group differences, having spouses participate in cardiac rehabilitation with the patient was effective for reducing spouses' cardiovascular risk. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Reducing need and demand for medical services in high-risk persons. A health education approach.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, J F; McShane, D

    1998-01-01

    We undertook this study to identify persons with high medical use to target them for health promotion and self-management interventions specific to their problems. We compared the reductions in cost and health risk of a health education program aimed at high-risk persons with a similar program addressed to all risk levels. We compared health risk and use in 2,586 high-risk persons with those of employee (N = 50,576) and senior (N = 39,076) groups and contrasted results in specific high-risk disease or behavior categories (modules)--arthritis, back pain, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, smoking, and obesity--against each other, using validated self-report measures, over a 6-month period. Interventions were a standard generic health education program and a similar program directed at high risk individuals (Healthtrac). Health risk scores improved by 11% in the overall high-risk group compared with 9% in the employee group and 6% in the senior group. Physician use decreased by 0.8 visits per 6 months in the high-risk group compared with 0.05 and 0.15 visits, respectively, per 6 months in the employee and senior groups. Hospital stays decreased by 0.2 days per 6 months in the high-risk group compared with 0.05 days in the comparison groups. The duration of illness or confinement to home decreased by 0.9 days per 6 months in the high-risk group and 0.15 and 0.25, respectively, in the employee and senior groups. Using imputed costs of $130 per physician visit, $1,000 per hospital day, and $200 per sick day, previous year costs were $1,138 in direct costs for the high-risk groups compared with $352 and $995 in the employee and senior groups, respectively. At 6 months, direct costs were reduced by $304 in the high-risk group compared with $57 and $70 in the comparison groups. Total costs were reduced $484 in the high-risk groups compared with $87 in the employee group and $120 in the senior group. The return on investment was about 6:1 in the high-risk

  11. Engaging with residents' perceived risks and benefits about technologies as a way of resolving remediation dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Prior, Jason; Rai, Tapan

    2017-12-01

    In recent decades the diversity of remediation technologies has increased significantly, with the breadth of technologies ranging from dig and dump to emergent technologies like phytoremediation and nanoremediation. The benefits of these technologies to the environment and human health are believed to be substantial. However, they also potentially constitute risks. Whilst there is a growing body of knowledge about the risks and benefits of these technologies from the perspective of experts, little is known about how residents perceive the risks and benefits of the application of these technologies to address contaminants in their local environment. This absence of knowledge poses a challenge to remediation practitioners and policy makers who are increasingly seeking to engage these affected local residents in choosing technology applications. Building on broader research into the perceived benefits and risks of technologies, and data from a telephone survey of 2009 residents living near 13 contaminated sites in Australia, regression analysis of closed-ended survey questions and coding of open-ended questions are combined to identify the main predictors of resident's perceived levels of risk and benefit to resident's health and to their local environment from remediation technologies. This research identifies a range of factors associated with the residents' physical context, their engagement with institutions during remediation processes, and the technologies which are associated with residents' level of perceived risk and benefit for human health and the local environment. The analysis found that bioremediation technologies were perceived as less risky and more beneficial than chemical, thermal and physical technologies. The paper also supports broader technology research that reports an inverse correlation between levels of perceived risks and benefits. In addition, the paper reveals the types of risks and benefits to human health and the local environment that

  12. Risk analysis and technology assessment in support of technology development; putting responsible innovation in practice in a case study for nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    van Wezel, Annemarie P; van Lente, Harro; van de Sandt, Johannes J M; Bouwmeester, Hans; Vandeberg, Rens L J; M Sips, Adrienne J A

    2017-09-13

    Governments invest in 'key enabling technologies' such as nanotechnology, to solve societal challenges and boost the economy. At the same time governmental agencies demand for risk reduction to prohibit any often unknown adverse effects, and industrial parties demand for smart approaches to reduce uncertainties. Responsible research and innovation (RRI) is therefore a central theme in policy-making. Risk Analysis and Technology Assessment, together referred to as RATA, can provide a basis to assess human, environmental and societal risks of new technological developments during the various stages of technological development. This can help both governmental authorities and innovative industry to move forward in a sustainable manner. Here we describe the developed procedures and products and our experiences to bring RATA in practice within a large Dutch nanotechnology consortium. This is an example of putting responsible innovation in practice as integrated part of a research program, and to increase awareness on RATA and how to perform and use this by technology developers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Reducing overdiagnosis by polygenic risk-stratified screening: findings from the Finnish section of the ERSPC

    PubMed Central

    Pashayan, Nora; Pharoah, Paul DP; Schleutker, Johanna; Talala, Kirsi; Tammela, Teuvo LJ; Määttänen, Liisa; Harrington, Patricia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Eeles, Rosalind; Duffy, Stephen W; Auvinen, Anssi

    2015-01-01

    Background: We derived estimates of overdiagnosis by polygenic risk groups and examined whether polygenic risk-stratified screening for prostate cancer reduces overdiagnosis. Methods: We calculated the polygenic risk score based on genotypes of 66 known prostate cancer loci for 4967 men from the Finnish section of the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer. We stratified the 72 072 men in the trial into those with polygenic risk below and above the median. Using a maximum likelihood method based on interval cancers, we estimated the mean sojourn time (MST) and episode sensitivity. For each polygenic risk group, we estimated the proportion of screen-detected cancers that are likely to be overdiagnosed from the difference between the observed and expected number of screen-detected cancers. Results: Of the prostate cancers, 74% occurred among men with polygenic risk above population median. The sensitivity was 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45–0.65) and MST 6.3 (95% CI 4.2–8.3) years. The overall overdiagnosis was 42% (95% CI 37–52) of the screen-detected cancers, with 58% (95% CI 54–65) in men with the lower and 37% (95% CI 31–47) in those with higher polygenic risk. Conclusion: Targeting screening to men at higher polygenic risk could reduce the proportion of cancers overdiagnosed. PMID:26291059

  14. The role of risk management in reducing costs and increasing patient safety.

    PubMed

    Wendin, S Robert

    2006-01-01

    In the last few years risk managers have been very frustrated with the high costs, or sheer unavailability, of medical malpractice insurance. The frustration is very understandable, given the rising financial costs of litigation for medical negligence. This presentation will aim to recommend a way out of this conundrum which works equally well regardless of whether the prevailing litigation environment be high or low, or one which is a fault-based or no-fault based compensation system, or whether a conventional insurance, self-insurance, or pooled risk insurance scheme. This paper will seek further to recommend that it's time risk managers took more responsibility themselves for reducing medical errors and optimising their control of risk. By understanding the concept of Total Cost of Risk, risk managers would be able to reduce losses, relying less on the insurance market, and accept responsibility for risk themselves, and, as a result, lowering insurance premiums in the process as the risk will have been taken away from insurance underwriters.

  15. Risk assessment can be a game-changing information technology--but too often it isn't.

    PubMed

    Goble, Robert; Bier, Vicki M

    2013-11-01

    The printing press was a game-changing information technology. Risk assessment could be also. At present, risk assessments are commonly used as one-time decision aids: they provide justification for a particular decision, and afterwards usually sit on a shelf. However, when viewed as information technologies, their potential uses are much broader. Risk assessments: (1) are repositories of structured information and a medium for communication; (2) embody evaluative structures for setting priorities; (3) can preserve information over time and permit asynchronous communication, thus encouraging learning and adaptation; and (4) explicitly address uncertain futures. Moreover, because of their "what-if" capabilities, risk assessments can serve as a platform for constructive discussion among parties that hold different values. The evolution of risk assessment in the nuclear industry shows how such attributes have been used to lower core-melt risks substantially through improved templates for maintenance and more effective coordination with regulators (although risk assessment has been less commonly used in improving emergency-response capabilities). The end result of this evolution in the nuclear industry has been the development of "living" risk assessments that are updated more or less in real time to answer even routine operational questions. Similar but untapped opportunities abound for the use of living risk assessments to reduce risks in small operational decisions as well as large policy decisions in other areas of hazard management. They can also help improve understanding of and communication about risks, and future risk assessment and management. Realization of these opportunities will require significant changes in incentives and active promotion by the risk analytic community. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  16. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Sill, A.E.; Warren, S.; Dillinger, J.D.; Cloer, B.K.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. This study was conducted by implementing both top-down and bottom-up strategies. The top-down approach used prosperity gaming methodology to identify future health care delivery needs. This effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements. The bottom-up approach identified and ranked interventional therapies employed in existing care delivery systems for a host of health-related conditions. Economic analysis formed the basis for development of care pathway interaction models for two of the most pervasive, chronic disease/disability conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Societal cost-benefit relationships based on these analyses were used to evaluate the effect of emerging technology in these treatment areas. 17 figs., 48 tabs.

  17. Change IS Possible: Reducing High-Risk Drinking Using a Collaborative Improvement Model.

    PubMed

    Lanter, Patricia L; Wolff, Kristina B; Johnson, Lisa C; Ercolano, Ellyn M; Kilmer, Jason R; Provost, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    To describe the adoption of public health and improvement methodologies to address college students' high-risk drinking behaviors and to aid in prevention efforts. Members of 32 colleges and universities, content experts, and staff members of the National College Health Improvement Program (NCHIP). A 2-year learning collaborative developed by NCHIP trained individuals from 32 different college and universities in using the Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle as a method to create and implement initiatives aimed at reducing students' high-risk drinking behaviors and related harms. Participants experienced success ranging from noteworthy increases in type and amount of interventions directed at reducing high-risk drinking, to creating collaboratives across campus, the local community, and stakeholders. Challenges related to data collection and creating lasting cultural change remain. The use of quality improvement methodologies and creation of a national collaborative successfully effected meaningful change in high-risk drinking behaviors on college campuses.

  18. The interplay between gait, falls and cognition: can cognitive therapy reduce fall risk?

    PubMed Central

    Segev-Jacubovski, Orit; Herman, Talia; Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we briefly summarize the incidence and significant consequences of falls among older adults, the insufficient effectiveness of commonly used multifactorial interventions and the evidence linking falls and cognitive function. Recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies that evaluated the effects of cognitive therapy on fall risk are reviewed. The results of this article illustrate the potential utility of multiple, diverse forms of cognitive therapy for reducing fall risk. The article also indicates that large-scale, randomized controlled trials are warranted and that additional research is needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the interplay between human mobility, fall risk and cognitive function. Nonetheless, we suggest that multimodality interventions that combine motor and cognitive therapy should, eventually, be incorporated into clinical practice to enable older adults and patients to move safer and with a reduced fall risk. PMID:21721921

  19. Status of Technological Advancements for Reducing Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Pollutant Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Combustor test rig results indicate that substantial reductions from current emission levels of carbon monoxide (CO), total unburned hydrocarbons (THC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and smoke are achievable by employing varying degrees of technological advancements in combustion systems. Minor to moderate modifications to existing conventional combustors produced significant reductions in CO and THC emissions at engine low power (idle/taxi) operating conditions but did not effectively reduce NOx at engine full power (takeoff) operating conditions. Staged combusiton techniques were needed to simultaneously reduce the levels of all the emissions over the entire engine operating range (from idle to takeoff). Emission levels that approached or were below the requirements of the 1979 EPA standards were achieved with the staged combustion systems and in some cases with the minor to moderate modifications to existing conventional combustion systems. Results from research programs indicate that an entire new generation of combustor technology with extremely low emission levels may be possible in the future.

  20. Microwave and digital imaging technology reduce turnaround times for diagnostic electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Giberson, Richard T; Austin, Ronald L; Charlesworth, Jon; Adamson, Grete; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2003-01-01

    The contributions of microwave methods and digital imaging techniques, when taken together, can reduce routine specimen processing and evaluation for diagnostic electron microscopy to a time frame never thought possible. Significant improvements in both technologies over the last 5 years led the authors to evaluate their combined attributes as the most likely candidate to provide a realistic solution in the reduction of turnaround times for diagnostic electron microscopy. For diagnostic electron microscopy to compete favorably with immunohistochemistry and other ancillary diagnostic techniques, it must improve its turnaround time. To evaluate this hypothesis the microwave-assisted processing results of over 2,000 diagnostic cases were evaluated as was a digital image administration system used for the acquisition and dissemination of diagnostic results. The incorporation of both technologies resulted in turnaround times being reduced to 4 h or less.

  1. Risk reducing mastectomy, breast reconstruction and patient satisfaction in Norwegian BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Anne Irene; Mæhle, Lovise; Vedå, Nina; Vetti, Hildegunn Høberg; Stormorken, Astrid; Ludvigsen, Trond; Guntvedt, Bente; Isern, Anne Elisabeth; Schlichting, Ellen; Kleppe, Geir; Bofin, Anna; Gullestad, Hans Petter; Møller, Pål

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with and without breast cancer. Uptake, methods of operation and reconstruction, complications, patient satisfaction and histopathological findings were registered at all five departments of genetics in Norway. Data from 267 affected and unaffected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers were analyzed, including a study-specific questionnaire returned by 178 mutation carriers. There was a steady increase in the uptake of risk-reducing mastectomies during the study period. Complications were observed in 106/266 (39.7%) women. Patient satisfaction was high. The majority of women expressed great relief after risk-reducing mastectomy and would have chosen the same option again.

  2. Development of Microarrays-Based Metagenomics Technology for Monitoring Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Subsurface Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cindy, Shi

    2015-07-17

    At the contaminated DOE sites, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are a significant population and play an important role in the microbial community during biostimulation for metal reduction. However, the diversity, structure and dynamics of SRB communities are poorly understood. Therefore, this project aims to use high throughput sequencing-based metagenomics technologies for characterizing the diversity, structure, functions, and activities of SRB communities by developing genomic and bioinformatics tools to link the SRB biodiversity with ecosystem functioning.

  3. Modifying eating behavior: novel approaches for reducing body weight, preventing weight regain, and reducing chronic disease risk.

    PubMed

    Gletsu-Miller, Nana; McCrory, Megan A

    2014-11-01

    This article is a summary of the symposium "Modifying Eating Behavior: Novel Approaches for Reducing Body Weight, Preventing Weight Regain, and Reducing Chronic Disease Risk" held 29 April 2014 at the ASN Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology 2014 in San Diego, CA. In this symposium, novel approaches to modifying eating behavior were highlighted, including 1) alteration of meal timing and macronutrient composition and 2) retraining and provision of feedback about eating behavior. Dr. Ciampolini discussed a method for teaching individuals to recognize a decrease in blood glucose concentration, and therefore the need for energy, by learning the associated physical sensations (signifying hunger). Dr. Madar and Sigal Sofer presented their work on reducing hunger during energy reduction by feeding carbohydrate only in the evening. Dr. Hamilton-Shield reviewed studies on the Mandometer (Mikrodidakt), a device for training individuals to slow eating rate. Finally, Dr. Sazonov presented information on a wearable device, the Automatic Ingestion Monitor, which senses jaw motion and/or hand-to-mouth gestures to detect and characterize food intake. His goal is to use the instrument to prevent overeating by providing feedback to the user to stop ingestion at a predetermined limit. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Development of a Risk-Based Comparison Methodology of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Thompson, Julie; Leclaire, Rene; Edward, Bryan; Jones, Edward

    2014-06-01

    Given the varying degrees of maturity among existing carbon capture (CC) technology alternatives, an understanding of the inherent technical and financial risk and uncertainty associated with these competing technologies is requisite to the success of carbon capture as a viable solution to the greenhouse gas emission challenge. The availability of tools and capabilities to conduct rigorous, risk–based technology comparisons is thus highly desirable for directing valuable resources toward the technology option(s) with a high return on investment, superior carbon capture performance, and minimum risk. To address this research need, we introduce a novel risk-based technology comparison method supported by an integrated multi-domain risk model set to estimate risks related to technological maturity, technical performance, and profitability. Through a comparison between solid sorbent and liquid solvent systems, we illustrate the feasibility of estimating risk and quantifying uncertainty in a single domain (modular analytical capability) as well as across multiple risk dimensions (coupled analytical capability) for comparison. This method brings technological maturity and performance to bear on profitability projections, and carries risk and uncertainty modeling across domains via inter-model sharing of parameters, distributions, and input/output. The integration of the models facilitates multidimensional technology comparisons within a common probabilistic risk analysis framework. This approach and model set can equip potential technology adopters with the necessary computational capabilities to make risk-informed decisions about CC technology investment. The method and modeling effort can also be extended to other industries where robust tools and analytical capabilities are currently lacking for evaluating nascent technologies.

  5. Perceptions of New Zealand adults about reducing their risk of getting cancer.

    PubMed

    Trevena, Judy; Reeder, Anthony

    2007-07-20

    To assess perceptions about potentially modifiable causes of cancer. An anonymous telephone questionnaire administered to a sample, 20 years and older, randomly selected from telephone directory listings. Nearly 90% of 438 respondents (68% participation) considered that there were things which people could do to reduce cancer risk. Unprompted, almost two-thirds mentioned nutrition, and more than half suggested "not smoking." Other suggestions included being physically active, and protection from excessive sun exposure. Two-thirds believed they could reduce their own risk, and by interview end this increased significantly to 72%. Half named items which people could consume to reduce risk: more vegetables, fruit or water; less alcohol, fatty foods, and meat. Greatest awareness was of risks from sunburn, secondhand tobacco smoke, sunlamps, eating animal fat, and being overweight, and of the protective effects of eating grains, fruit, and vegetables. Many considered stress, cellular phones, and genetically modified foods as risks, and vitamin and mineral supplements as protective. Few indicated awareness of risks from hepatitis B or alcohol. Greater public awareness about avoiding tobacco smoking and excessive sun exposure suggests gains from past efforts. To achieve similar awareness for other cancer prevention strategies, and to correct misconceptions, comparable resources and efforts are likely to be required.

  6. Reducing the risk of shoulder dystocia and associated brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Gurewitsch, Edith D; Allen, Robert H

    2011-06-01

    Despite persisting controversy over shoulder dystocia prediction, prevention, and injury causation, the authors find considerable evidence in recent research in the field to recommend additional guidelines beyond the current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines to improve clinical practice in managing patients at risk for experiencing shoulder dystocia. In this article, the authors offer health care providers information, practical direction, and advice on how to limit shoulder dystocia risk and, more importantly, to reduce adverse outcome risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CT Dose Optimization in Pediatric Radiology: A Multiyear Effort to Preserve the Benefits of Imaging While Reducing the Risks.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Taylor J; Lopez-Costa, Rodrigo I; Rhoades, Patrick D; Ramírez-Giraldo, Juan C; Starr, Matthew; Street, Mandie; Duncan, James; McKinstry, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    The marked increase in radiation exposure from medical imaging, especially in children, has caused considerable alarm and spurred efforts to preserve the benefits but reduce the risks of imaging. Applying the principles of the Image Gently campaign, data-driven process and quality improvement techniques such as process mapping and flowcharting, cause-and-effect diagrams, Pareto analysis, statistical process control (control charts), failure mode and effects analysis, "lean" or Six Sigma methodology, and closed feedback loops led to a multiyear program that has reduced overall computed tomographic (CT) examination volume by more than fourfold and concurrently decreased radiation exposure per CT study without compromising diagnostic utility. This systematic approach involving education, streamlining access to magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography, auditing with comparison with benchmarks, applying modern CT technology, and revising CT protocols has led to a more than twofold reduction in CT radiation exposure between 2005 and 2012 for patients at the authors' institution while maintaining diagnostic utility.

  8. Using Artificial Intelligence to Reduce the Risk of Nonadherence in Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Labovitz, Daniel L; Shafner, Laura; Reyes Gil, Morayma; Virmani, Deepti; Hanina, Adam

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of an artificial intelligence platform on mobile devices in measuring and increasing medication adherence in stroke patients on anticoagulation therapy. The introduction of direct oral anticoagulants, while reducing the need for monitoring, have also placed pressure on patients to self-manage. Suboptimal adherence goes undetected as routine laboratory tests are not reliable indicators of adherence, placing patients at increased risk of stroke and bleeding. A randomized, parallel-group, 12-week study was conducted in adults (n=28) with recently diagnosed ischemic stroke receiving any anticoagulation. Patients were randomized to daily monitoring by the artificial intelligence platform (intervention) or to no daily monitoring (control). The artificial intelligence application visually identified the patient, the medication, and the confirmed ingestion. Adherence was measured by pill counts and plasma sampling in both groups. For all patients (n=28), mean (SD) age was 57 years (13.2 years) and 53.6% were women. Mean (SD) cumulative adherence based on the artificial intelligence platform was 90.5% (7.5%). Plasma drug concentration levels indicated that adherence was 100% (15 of 15) and 50% (6 of 12) in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Patients, some with little experience using a smartphone, successfully used the technology and demonstrated a 50% improvement in adherence based on plasma drug concentration levels. For patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants, absolute improvement increased to 67%. Real-time monitoring has the potential to increase adherence and change behavior, particularly in patients on direct oral anticoagulant therapy. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02599259. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Higher dietary folate intake reduces the breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P; Li, C; Li, X; Li, J; Chu, R; Wang, H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many epidemiological studies have investigated the association between folate intake, circulating folate level and risk of breast cancer; however, the findings were inconsistent between the studies. Methods: We searched the PubMed and MEDLINE databases updated to January, 2014 and performed the systematic review and meta-analysis of the published epidemiological studies to assess the associations between folate intake level, circulating folate level and the overall risk of breast cancer. Results: In all, 16 eligible prospective studies with a total of 744 068 participants and 26 205 breast cancer patients and 26 case–control studies with a total of 16 826 cases and 21 820 controls that have evaluated the association between folate intake and breast cancer risk were identified. Pooled analysis of the prospective studies and case–control studies suggested a potential nonlinearity relationship for dietary folate intake and breast cancer risk. Prospective studies indicated a U-shaped relationship for the dietary folate intake and breast cancer risk. Women with daily dietary folate intake between 153 and 400 μg showed a significant reduced breast cancer risk compared with those <153 μg, but not for those >400 μg. The case–control studies also suggested a significantly negative correlation between the dietary folate intake level and the breast cancer risk. Increased dietary folate intake reduced breast cancer risk for women with higher alcohol intake level, but not for those with lower alcohol intake. No significant association between circulating folate level and breast cancer risk was found when the results of 8 identified studies with 5924 participants were pooled. Conclusions: Our studies suggested that folate may have preventive effects against breast cancer risk, especially for those with higher alcohol consumption level; however, the dose and timing are critical and more studies are warranted to further elucidate the questions

  10. A Framework for Integrating Knowledge Management with Risk Management for Information Technology Projects (RiskManiT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadsheh, Louay A.

    2010-01-01

    This research focused on the challenges experienced when executing risk management activities for information technology projects. The lack of adequate knowledge management support of risk management activities has caused many project failures in the past. The research objective was to propose a conceptual framework of the Knowledge-Based Risk…

  11. A Framework for Integrating Knowledge Management with Risk Management for Information Technology Projects (RiskManiT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadsheh, Louay A.

    2010-01-01

    This research focused on the challenges experienced when executing risk management activities for information technology projects. The lack of adequate knowledge management support of risk management activities has caused many project failures in the past. The research objective was to propose a conceptual framework of the Knowledge-Based Risk…

  12. What can individuals do to reduce personal health risks from air pollution?

    PubMed Central

    Laumbach, Robert; Meng, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    In many areas of the world, concentrations of ambient air pollutants exceed levels associated with increased risk of acute and chronic health problems. While effective policies to reduce emissions at their sources are clearly preferable, some evidence supports the effectiveness of individual actions to reduce exposure and health risks. Personal exposure to ambient air pollution can be reduced on high air pollution days by staying indoors, reducing outdoor air infiltration to indoors, cleaning indoor air with air filters, and limiting physical exertion, especially outdoors and near air pollution sources. Limited evidence suggests that the use of respirators may be effective in some circumstances. Awareness of air pollution levels is facilitated by a growing number of public air quality alert systems. Avoiding exposure to air pollutants is especially important for susceptible individuals with chronic cardiovascular or pulmonary disease, children, and the elderly. Research on mechanisms underlying the adverse health effects of air pollution have suggested potential pharmaceutical or chemopreventive interventions, such as antioxidant or antithrombotic agents, but in the absence of data on health outcomes, no sound recommendations can be made for primary prevention. Health care providers and their patients should carefully consider individual circumstances related to outdoor and indoor air pollutant exposure levels and susceptibility to those air pollutants when deciding on a course of action to reduce personal exposure and health risks from ambient air pollutants. Careful consideration is especially warranted when interventions may have unintended negative consequences, such as when efforts to avoid exposure to air pollutants lead to reduced physical activity or when there is evidence that dietary supplements, such as antioxidants, have potential adverse health effects. These potential complications of partially effective personal interventions to reduce exposure or

  13. What can individuals do to reduce personal health risks from air pollution?

    PubMed

    Laumbach, Robert; Meng, Qingyu; Kipen, Howard

    2015-01-01

    In many areas of the world, concentrations of ambient air pollutants exceed levels associated with increased risk of acute and chronic health problems. While effective policies to reduce emissions at their sources are clearly preferable, some evidence supports the effectiveness of individual actions to reduce exposure and health risks. Personal exposure to ambient air pollution can be reduced on high air pollution days by staying indoors, reducing outdoor air infiltration to indoors, cleaning indoor air with air filters, and limiting physical exertion, especially outdoors and near air pollution sources. Limited evidence suggests that the use of respirators may be effective in some circumstances. Awareness of air pollution levels is facilitated by a growing number of public air quality alert systems. Avoiding exposure to air pollutants is especially important for susceptible individuals with chronic cardiovascular or pulmonary disease, children, and the elderly. Research on mechanisms underlying the adverse health effects of air pollution have suggested potential pharmaceutical or chemopreventive interventions, such as antioxidant or antithrombotic agents, but in the absence of data on health outcomes, no sound recommendations can be made for primary prevention. Health care providers and their patients should carefully consider individual circumstances related to outdoor and indoor air pollutant exposure levels and susceptibility to those air pollutants when deciding on a course of action to reduce personal exposure and health risks from ambient air pollutants. Careful consideration is especially warranted when interventions may have unintended negative consequences, such as when efforts to avoid exposure to air pollutants lead to reduced physical activity or when there is evidence that dietary supplements, such as antioxidants, have potential adverse health effects. These potential complications of partially effective personal interventions to reduce exposure or

  14. Prospective method for estimating occupational health risks in new energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P D; Briggs, T; Ungers, L; Hamilton, L D

    1981-09-01

    In design, development, and acceptance of new energy technologies, concern for health and safety is increasingly important. Determining risks for emerging technologies is difficult because health statistics associated with these new alternatives are unavailable. Nevertheless boundaries on such risks must be determined to identify potentially significant hazards and to permit technology comparisons to be made. An approach to determining occupational health costs is to disaggregate labor requirements of an emerging industy by different worker classifications. Risks to workers can then be determined for these classifications from occupational health statistics of related industries. By summing risks for each worker classification, prospective estimates of individual and societal risk from an emerging technology can be developed. Although this approach identifies accident-related effects, it cannot be used to quantitate occupationally induced disease. An example of this method analyzing different photovoltaic fabrication alternatives is given. Individual vs. societal risk is considered in these analyses.

  15. The Term Risk: Etymology, Legal Definition and Various Traits

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzo, Gaetano; Bentley, Stefano; Giacometti, Federica; Bonfante, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The etymology of the term risk and its legal qualification and definitions are reported in this article; decription of the various traits of the term risk used in food safety management (acceptable risk, current risk, emerging risk, crude risk, unrestricted risk, perceived risk, real risk, residual risk, reduced risk, baseline risk, serious risk, major technological risk, etc.) are presented and discussed. PMID:27800325

  16. Solutions for reducing lawsuits in orthopedic surgery by using psychology and IT technology.

    PubMed

    Purcarea, V L; Cazac, C

    2015-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery is among the top 5 medical specialties with an increased risk of facing a lawsuit. A large part of medical malpractice claims are due to poor communication between physician and patient; therefore, by addressing this issue and implementing psychological methods as well as IT solutions, a reduction in the incidence of medical lawsuits can be achieved. Some of these solutions include implementing and applying psychometric tools such as the SF-36 and SCL-90R tests, creating virtual information hubs for the patient, and establishing efficient communication methods by using IT technology between physician and patient.

  17. Improving Learning Processes in Institutions of Higher Education by Incorporating High-Risk Web Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinga, Sophia W.; Chen, Linlin Irene

    With the assistance of learning technology consultants in the Technology Teaching and Learning Center (TTLC) at the University of Houston-Downtown (Texas), professors have shifted their paradigms and are taking the leap to use more high-risk World Wide Web technologies in their courses. One that has become a hallmark is delivering exams via the…

  18. Meta-analysis: Does garlic intake reduce risk of gastric cancer?

    PubMed

    Kodali, R T; Eslick, Guy D

    2015-01-01

    In the past 2 decades, various epidemiological studies investigated whether garlic can positively modify the risk of gastric cancer. Garlic contains numerous sulfide compounds, including diallyl trisulfide, which have anticarcinogenic properties. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine if garlic intake reduces the risk of gastric cancer. An electronic search of MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE to June 2014 was completed. There were 14 case control studies, 2 randomized controlled studies, and 1 cohort study that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. We used a random effects model to calculate pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of gastric cancer with garlic consumption. Meta-analysis of a total of 8,621 cases and 14,889 controls was conducted. Significant variability in duration of garlic intake and reference categories for amount of intake was noted. High, low, and any garlic intake were all associated with reduced risk of gastric cancer. High intake had the most significant risk reduction, OR = 0.49 (95% CI: 0.38-0.62). Heterogeneity was low (I² = 30.85, P = 0.17). A more modest risk reduction was associated with low intake, OR = 0.75 (95% CI: 0.58-0.97). Half of the studies did not separate garlic intake into high or low amounts, intake was only noted as consumption vs. non-consumption. Any amount of consumption still showed a risk reduction similar to low intake, OR = 0.77 (95% CI: 0.60-1.00). Low and any amount of consumption showed moderate heterogeneity (58% and 45%, respectively). Garlic intake appears to be associated with reduced risk of gastric cancer. Further high quality studies are required to confirm this finding and to assess the amount of garlic that needs to be consumed for protective effect.

  19. Reducing the Risk of Internalizing Symptoms among High-risk Hispanic Youth through a Family Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Tatiana; Pantin, Hilda; Huang, Shi; Brincks, Ahnalee; Brown, C Hendricks; Prado, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    Familias Unidas is an intervention that has been found to be efficacious in preventing and reducing substance use, sexual risk, and problem behaviors among Hispanic youth. While it does not specifically target youth internalizing symptoms, the intervention works to strengthen parenting and family factors associated with reduced risk of internalizing symptoms (i.e., depression, anxiety symptoms). This study examines the effects of Familias Unidas on internalizing symptoms among high-risk youth, as well as the role of family level factors in the intervention's effects. A total of 242 12-17-year-old Hispanic youth with a history of delinquency and their primary caregivers were recruited from the school and juvenile justice systems, and randomly assigned to the Familias Unidas intervention or community practice control. A linear latent growth model was used to examine intervention effects on the trajectory of adolescent internalizing symptoms from baseline to 6 and 12 months post-baseline. Results show that the Familias Unidas intervention was more efficacious than control in reducing youth internalizing symptoms. Baseline youth externalizing and internalizing symptoms did not moderate the intervention's effects on the trajectory of youth internalizing symptoms. While parent-adolescent communication did not significantly moderate the intervention's effects, changes in parent-adolescent communication mediated the intervention's effects on internalizing symptoms, showing stronger intervention effects for youth starting with poorer communication. Findings indicate that the Familias Unidas intervention can reduce internalizing symptoms among high-risk Hispanic youth, and that improving parent-youth communication, a protective family factor, may be one of the mechanisms by which the intervention influences youth internalizing symptoms. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  20. Psychosocial factors and uptake of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy in women at high risk for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Bettina; Price, Melanie A; Butow, Phyllis N; Karatas, Janan; Wilson, Judy; Heiniger, Louise; Baylock, Brandi; Charles, Margaret; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Phillips, Kelly-Anne

    2013-03-01

    Bilateral risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. This study assessed factors predicting uptake of RRSO. Women participating in a large multiple-case breast cancer family cohort study who were at increased risk for ovarian and fallopian tube cancer (i.e. BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carrier or family history including at least one first- or second-degree relative with ovarian or fallopian tube cancer), with no personal history of cancer and with at least one ovary in situ at cohort enrolment, were eligible for this study. Women who knew they did not carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation segregating in their family (true negatives) were excluded. Sociodemographic, biological and psychosocial factors, including cancer-specific anxiety, perceived ovarian cancer risk, optimism and social support, were assessed using self-administered questionnaires and interviews at cohort enrolment. RRSO uptake was self-reported every three years during systematic follow-up. Of 2,859 women, 571 were eligible. Mean age was 43.3 years; 62 women (10.9 %) had RRSO a median of two years after cohort entry. Factors predicting RRSO were: being parous (OR 3.3, p = 0.015); knowing one's mutation positive status (OR 2.9, p < 0.001) and having a mother and/or sister who died from ovarian cancer (OR 2.5, p = 0.013). Psychological variables measured at cohort entry were not associated with RRSO. These results suggest that women at high risk for ovarian cancer make decisions about RRSO based on risk and individual socio-demographic characteristics, rather than in response to psychological factors such as anxiety.

  1. Work stress and subsequent risk of internet addiction among information technology engineers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sung-Wei; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Pikhart, Hynek; Peasey, Anne; Chen, Shih-Tse; Tsai, Ming-Chen

    2014-08-01

    Work stress, as defined by the Demand-Control-Support (DCS) model and the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model, has been found to predict risks for depression, anxiety, and substance addictions, but little research is available on work stress and Internet addiction. The aims of this study are to assess whether the DCS and ERI models predict subsequent risks of Internet addiction, and to examine whether these associations might be mediated by depression and anxiety. A longitudinal study was conducted in a sample (N=2,550) of 21-55 year old information technology engineers without Internet addiction. Data collection included questionnaires covering work stress, demographic factors, psychosocial factors, substance addictions, Internet-related factors, depression and anxiety at wave 1, and the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) at wave 2. Ordinal logistic regression was used to assess the associations between work stress and IAT; path analysis was adopted to evaluate potentially mediating roles of depression and anxiety. After 6.2 months of follow-up, 14.0% of subjects became problematic Internet users (IAT 40-69) and 4.1% pathological Internet users (IAT 70-100). Job strain was associated with an increased risk of Internet addiction (odds ratio [OR] of having a higher IAT outcome vs. a lower outcome was 1.53); high work social support reduced the risk of Internet addiction (OR=0.62). High ER ratio (OR=1.61) and high overcommitment (OR=1.68) were associated with increased risks of Internet addiction. Work stress defined by the DCS and ERI models predicted subsequent risks of Internet addiction.

  2. Reducing High Risk Behaviors among Street Living Youth: Outcomes of an Integrated Prevention Intervention.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Jasmin; Slesnick, Natasha; Guo, Xiamei; Letcher, Amber

    2014-08-01

    Research efforts to reduce Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) risk behavior among street living youth have shown disappointing outcomes, with few studies reporting reduced risk behaviors. The current study tested the impact of an integrated HIV prevention intervention, and predictors of change, for youth (N=270) between the ages of 14 to 20 years receiving substance use treatment through a drop-in center. Condom use, HIV knowledge, number of sexual partners and behaviors associated with an overall HIV risk index were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months post-baseline. Findings suggest that HIV prevention integrated with substance use treatment is associated with increased condom use and reduced sex partners. However, the effects on condom use were short lived and dissipated by 12 months post-baseline. Higher treatment attendance and baseline substance use predicted increased condom use. Although no significant change was observed in the overall HIV risk index, increases in depressive symptoms were associated with increases in the index score, as well as more sexual partners. Future research should determine whether successful intervention requires reinforcement of risk reduction behaviors while youth remain homeless.

  3. Adequate muscular strength may help to reduce mortality risk in those with an elevated gamma gap.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    An elevated (≥3.1g/dl) gamma gap (Total Protein (g/dl)-Albumin (g/dl)) is associated with increased heart failure risk and an increased mortality risk. Adequate muscular strength is associated with reduced mortality risk, but the potential protective effects of muscular strength on mortality among those with an elevated gamma gap has yet to be investigated, which was this study's purpose. Data from the 1999-2002 NHANES were utilized, with follow-up through 2011. Lower extremity strength was objectively-measured via a knee extensor test. Gamma gap was measured from a blood sample. 2776 participants (50-85yrs) constituted the analytic sample. After adjustments, and among those with an elevated gamma gap, a 50N increase in lower extremity strength was associated with a 27% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HRadjusted=0.73; 95% CI: 0.65-0.82; P<0.001). Having adequate lower extremity strength in middle-age and older adult years may be of critical importance in reducing mortality risk, particularly among those with an elevated gamma gap. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Megan L.; Garnett, Sarah P.; Baur, Louise A.; Lister, Natalie B.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  5. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth.

    PubMed

    Gow, Megan L; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A; Lister, Natalie B

    2016-08-09

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet.

  6. Does opioid substitution treatment in prisons reduce injecting-related HIV risk behaviours? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Larney, Sarah

    2010-02-01

    To review systematically the evidence on opioid substitution treatment (OST) in prisons in reducing injecting-related human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviours. Systematic review in accordance with guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration. Electronic databases were searched to identify studies of prison-based opioid substitution treatment programmes that included assessment of effects of prison OST on injecting drug use, sharing of needles and syringes and HIV incidence. Published data were used to calculate risk ratios for outcomes of interest. Risk ratios were not pooled due to the low number of studies and differences in study designs. Five studies were included in the review. Poor follow-up rates were reported in two studies, and representativeness of the sample was uncertain in the remaining three studies. Compared to inmates in control conditions, for treated inmates the risk of injecting drug use was reduced by 55-75% and risk of needle and syringe sharing was reduced by 47-73%. No study reported a direct effect of prison OST on HIV incidence. There may be a role for OST in preventing HIV transmission in prisons, but methodologically rigorous research addressing this question specifically is required. OST should be implemented in prisons as part of comprehensive HIV prevention programmes that also provide condoms and sterile injecting and tattooing equipment.

  7. POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T. M.; Lipfert, F. W.; Morris, S. C.; Moskowitz, P. D.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no

  8. Are You Saved? HIM, an Intranet-based Expert System Reduces Fatality Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Crofts, Von David; Simpson, Wayne Winger; Hopkins, Deborah Jean; Hawke, Scott Allen

    2000-06-01

    proven review checklists and processes.The manual process is lengthy—sometimes taking 12 to 18 hours to complete. As such, it is difficult, prone to errors, and very tempting to shortcut. Automation of this process through the HIM system reduced a monumental hazard identification task for each work order, into a streamlined, efficient, and accurate process that can be completed in less than one hour. The result is that the process gets done, the regulations are met, and risk to human life is reduced.

  9. Obesity Increases the Risk for High-grade Prostate Cancer: Results from the REDUCE study

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Adriana C.; Howard, Lauren E.; Moreira, Daniel M.; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest obesity is associated with lower risk of prostate cancer (PC) but more aggressive cancers. As obesity lowers PSA levels, these observations may be influenced by detection bias. We examined the association between obesity and risk of low- and high-grade PC in REDUCE, where biopsies were largely independent of PSA. Methods The REDUCE study tested dutasteride for PC risk reduction in men with a PSA of 2.5–10.0 ng/mL and a negative biopsy. Study participants included 6,729 men who underwent at least one on-study biopsy. The association between baseline body mass index (BMI <25 kg/m2-normal weight; 25–29.9 kg/m2-overweight; ≥30 kg/m2-obese) and risk of high-grade (Gleason ≥7) or low-grade PC (Gleason <7) vs. no PC was examined using multinomial logistic regression. Results Overall, 1,739 men (27%) were normal weight, 3,384 (53%) overweight, and 1,304 (20%) were obese. Obesity was associated with lower risk of low-grade PC in both univariable (OR 0.74, p=0.001) and multivariable analyses (OR 0.79, p=0.01). In univariable analysis, obesity was not associated with high-grade PC (OR 1.08, p=0.50). However, in multivariable analysis, obesity was associated with increased risk of high-grade PC (OR 1.28, p=0.042). The current analysis was not able to address how obesity may influence prostate cancer progression. Conclusions Obesity is associated with decreased risk of low-grade and increased risk of high-grade PC. These data provide further support to the hypothesis that obesity is associated with aggressive PC. Impact Obesity is linked with aggressive PC. Avoiding obesity may prevent the risk of developing high-grade PC. PMID:25261967

  10. Influences on Adaptive Planning to Reduce Flood Risks among Parishes in South Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Paille, Mary; Reams, Margaret; Argote, Jennifer; Lam, Nina S-N; Kirby, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    Residents of south Louisiana face a range of increasing, climate-related flood exposure risks that could be reduced through local floodplain management and hazard mitigation planning. A major incentive for community planning to reduce exposure to flood risks is offered by the Community Rating System (CRS) of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The NFIP encourages local collective action by offering reduced flood insurance premiums for individual policy holders of communities where suggested risk-reducing measures have been implemented. This preliminary analysis examines the extent to which parishes (counties) in southern Louisiana have implemented the suggested policy actions and identifies key factors that account for variation in the implementation of the measures. More measures implemented results in higher CRS scores. Potential influences on scores include socioeconomic attributes of residents, government capacity, average elevation and past flood events. The results of multiple regression analysis indicate that higher CRS scores are associated most closely with higher median housing values. Furthermore, higher scores are found in parishes with more local municipalities that participate in the CRS program. The number of floods in the last five years and the revenue base of the parish does not appear to influence CRS scores. The results shed light on the conditions under which local adaptive planning to mitigate increasing flood risks is more likely to be implemented and offer insights for program administrators, researchers and community stakeholders.

  11. A Community Health Advisor Program to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk among Rural African-American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, C. E.; Littleton, M. A.; Greene, P. G.; Pulley, L.; Brownstein, J. N.; Sanderson, B. K.; Stalker, V. G.; Matson-Koffman, D.; Struempler, B.; Raczynski, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The Uniontown, Alabama Community Health Project trained and facilitated Community Health Advisors (CHAs) in conducting a theory-based intervention designed to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among rural African-American women. The multiphased project included formative evaluation and community organization, CHA recruitment and…

  12. Potential Mediating Pathways through Which Sports Participation Relates to Reduced Risk of Suicidal Ideation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Miller, M. David; Pigg, R. Morgan; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2010-01-01

    Suicide ranks as the third leading cause of death for American youth. Researchers examining sport participation and suicidal behavior have regularly found inverse relationships. This study represents the first effort to test a model depicting potential mechanisms through which sport participation relates to reduced risk of suicidal ideation. The…

  13. Maternal HIV-1 envelope-specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Permar, Sallie R; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L; Overman, R Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David C; Denny, Thomas N; Moody, M Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-07-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1-transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score-matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1-infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3-specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT.

  14. Assessing the effect of a fuel break network to reduce burnt area and wildfire risk transmission

    Treesearch

    Tiago M. Oliveira; Ana M. G. Barros; Alan A. Ager; Paulo M. Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Wildfires pose complex challenges to policymakers and fire agencies. Fuel break networks and area-wide fuel treatments are risk-management options to reduce losses from large fires. Two fuel management scenarios covering 3% of the fire-prone Algarve region of Portugal and differing in the intensity of treatment in 120-m wide fuel breaks were examined and compared with...

  15. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  16. Insights and perspectives on dietary modifications to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article summarizes presentations from, “Insights and Perspectives on Dietary Modifications to Reduce the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease”, a symposium held at the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions in conjunction with Experimental Biology 2014 in San Dieg...

  17. Reducing Environmental Risks by Information Disclosure: Evidence in Residential Lead Paint Disclosure Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Hyunhoe

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a surge in environmental regulations that require information disclosure. However, existing empirical evidence is limited to certain applications and has yet to generalize the effectiveness of this approach as a policy strategy to reduce environmental risks. This study evaluates the disclosure rule of the residential lead…

  18. Reducing Risk in DoD Software-Intensive Systems Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    PROGRAM SPONSORED REPORT SERIES Reducing Risk in DoD Software -Intensive Systems Development March 2016 Brad Naegle, Senior Lecturer Graduate...both successful and unsuccessful software -intensive systems development, despite all of the considerable qualifications of the workforce and the...significant controls offered by the Defense Acquisition System (DAS). The unsuccessful software -intensive systems have suffered dramatic cost and

  19. Influences on Adaptive Planning to Reduce Flood Risks among Parishes in South Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Paille, Mary; Reams, Margaret; Argote, Jennifer; Lam, Nina S.-N.; Kirby, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Residents of south Louisiana face a range of increasing, climate-related flood exposure risks that could be reduced through local floodplain management and hazard mitigation planning. A major incentive for community planning to reduce exposure to flood risks is offered by the Community Rating System (CRS) of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The NFIP encourages local collective action by offering reduced flood insurance premiums for individual policy holders of communities where suggested risk-reducing measures have been implemented. This preliminary analysis examines the extent to which parishes (counties) in southern Louisiana have implemented the suggested policy actions and identifies key factors that account for variation in the implementation of the measures. More measures implemented results in higher CRS scores. Potential influences on scores include socioeconomic attributes of residents, government capacity, average elevation and past flood events. The results of multiple regression analysis indicate that higher CRS scores are associated most closely with higher median housing values. Furthermore, higher scores are found in parishes with more local municipalities that participate in the CRS program. The number of floods in the last five years and the revenue base of the parish does not appear to influence CRS scores. The results shed light on the conditions under which local adaptive planning to mitigate increasing flood risks is more likely to be implemented and offer insights for program administrators, researchers and community stakeholders. PMID:27330828

  20. Using prescribed fire to reduce the risk of smoke related traffic problems on I-95

    Treesearch

    Steven R. Miller

    2015-01-01

    In many areas of the United States, prescribed burning near highways is considered too risky because of the potential for smoke to obscure the highway. In one area in Florida, prescribed fire is used to reduce the risks of smoke related impacts to Interstate 95. The St Johns River Water Management District manages over 400,000 acres of land. Seventy percent of those...

  1. Maternal HIV-1 envelope–specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission

    PubMed Central

    Permar, Sallie R.; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E.; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R.; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David C.; Denny, Thomas N.; Moody, M. Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1–transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score–matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1–infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3–specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT. PMID:26053661

  2. Reducing mortality risk by targeting specific air pollution sources: Suva, Fiji.

    PubMed

    Isley, C F; Nelson, P F; Taylor, M P; Stelcer, E; Atanacio, A J; Cohen, D D; Mani, F S; Maata, M

    2017-08-29

    Health implications of air pollution vary dependent upon pollutant sources. This work determines the value, in terms of reduced mortality, of reducing ambient particulate matter (PM2.5: effective aerodynamic diameter 2.5μm or less) concentration due to different emission sources. Suva, a Pacific Island city with substantial input from combustion sources, is used as a case-study. Elemental concentration was determined, by ion beam analysis, for PM2.5 samples from Suva, spanning one year. Sources of PM2.5 have been quantified by positive matrix factorisation. A review of recent literature has been carried out to delineate the mortality risk associated with these sources. Risk factors have then been applied for Suva, to calculate the possible mortality reduction that may be achieved through reduction in pollutant levels. Higher risk ratios for black carbon and sulphur resulted in mortality predictions for PM2.5 from fossil fuel combustion, road vehicle emissions and waste burning that surpass predictions for these sources based on health risk of PM2.5 mass alone. Predicted mortality for Suva from fossil fuel smoke exceeds the national toll from road accidents in Fiji. The greatest benefit for Suva, in terms of reduced mortality, is likely to be accomplished by reducing emissions from fossil fuel combustion (diesel), vehicles and waste burning. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Reducing Environmental Risks by Information Disclosure: Evidence in Residential Lead Paint Disclosure Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Hyunhoe

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a surge in environmental regulations that require information disclosure. However, existing empirical evidence is limited to certain applications and has yet to generalize the effectiveness of this approach as a policy strategy to reduce environmental risks. This study evaluates the disclosure rule of the residential lead…

  4. A Community Health Advisor Program to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk among Rural African-American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, C. E.; Littleton, M. A.; Greene, P. G.; Pulley, L.; Brownstein, J. N.; Sanderson, B. K.; Stalker, V. G.; Matson-Koffman, D.; Struempler, B.; Raczynski, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The Uniontown, Alabama Community Health Project trained and facilitated Community Health Advisors (CHAs) in conducting a theory-based intervention designed to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among rural African-American women. The multiphased project included formative evaluation and community organization, CHA recruitment and…

  5. Potential Mediating Pathways through Which Sports Participation Relates to Reduced Risk of Suicidal Ideation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Miller, M. David; Pigg, R. Morgan; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2010-01-01

    Suicide ranks as the third leading cause of death for American youth. Researchers examining sport participation and suicidal behavior have regularly found inverse relationships. This study represents the first effort to test a model depicting potential mechanisms through which sport participation relates to reduced risk of suicidal ideation. The…

  6. Hand hygiene in the dental setting: reducing the risk of infection.

    PubMed

    Fluent, Marie T

    2013-09-01

    Hand hygiene remains the single most important measure for reducing the risk of healthcare-associated infections. In the past 20 years, hand-washing recommendations and guidelines have become increasingly complex, and a plethora of products have become available. This article aims to discuss and clarify the fundamentals of appropriate hand hygiene in dentistry.

  7. Reducing the Risk for Preschool Expulsion: Mental Health Consultation for Young Children with Challenging Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Deborah F.; Dunne, M. Clare; McFadden, LaTanya; Campbell, Doreen

    2008-01-01

    Increasing numbers of young children are being expelled from child care settings because of their problem behavior. Access to mental health consultation is related to lower rates of expulsion, but additional data are needed to document the pathways through which mental health consultation reduces the risk of expulsion. We report on outcomes from a…

  8. NIH study finds regular aspirin use may reduce ovarian cancer risk

    Cancer.gov

    Women who take aspirin daily may reduce their risk of ovarian cancer by 20 percent, according to a study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. However, further research is needed before clinical r

  9. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  10. Physical activity reduces hippocampal atrophy in elders at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Carson; Nielson, Kristy A.; Woodard, John L.; Seidenberg, Michael; Durgerian, Sally; Hazlett, Kathleen E.; Figueroa, Christina M.; Kandah, Cassandra C.; Kay, Christina D.; Matthews, Monica A.; Rao, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the impact of physical activity (PA) on longitudinal change in hippocampal volume in cognitively intact older adults at varying genetic risk for the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hippocampal volume was measured from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans administered at baseline and at an 18-month follow-up in 97 healthy, cognitively intact older adults. Participants were classified as High or Low PA based on a self-report questionnaire of frequency and intensity of exercise. Risk status was defined by the presence or absence of the apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4) allele. Four subgroups were studied: Low Risk/High PA (n = 24), Low Risk/Low PA (n = 34), High Risk/High PA (n = 22), and High Risk/Low PA (n = 17). Over the 18 month follow-up interval, hippocampal volume decreased by 3% in the High Risk/Low PA group, but remained stable in the three remaining groups. No main effects or interactions between genetic risk and PA were observed in control brain regions, including the caudate, amygdala, thalamus, pre-central gyrus, caudal middle frontal gyrus, cortical white matter (WM), and total gray matter (GM). These findings suggest that PA may help to preserve hippocampal volume in individuals at increased genetic risk for AD. The protective effects of PA on hippocampal atrophy were not observed in individuals at low risk for AD. These data suggest that individuals at genetic risk for AD should be targeted for increased levels of PA as a means of reducing atrophy in a brain region critical for the formation of episodic memories. PMID:24795624

  11. A Proposed Set of Metrics to Reduce Patient Safety Risk From Within the Anatomic Pathology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Peter; Brown, Richard; Laslowski, Alex; Daniels, Yvonne; Branton, Phil; Carpenter, John; Zarbo, Richard; Forsyth, Ramses; Liu, Yan-hui; Kohl, Shane; Diebold, Joachim; Masuda, Shinobu; Plummer, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anatomic pathology laboratory workflow consists of 3 major specimen handling processes. Among the workflow are preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic phases that contain multistep subprocesses with great impact on patient care. A worldwide representation of experts came together to create a system of metrics, as a basis for laboratories worldwide, to help them evaluate and improve specimen handling to reduce patient safety risk. Method: Members of the Initiative for Anatomic Pathology Laboratory Patient Safety (IAPLPS) pooled their extensive expertise to generate a list of metrics highlighting processes with high and low risk for adverse patient outcomes. Results: Our group developed a universal, comprehensive list of 47 metrics for patient specimen handling in the anatomic pathology laboratory. Steps within the specimen workflow sequence are categorized as high or low risk. In general, steps associated with the potential for specimen misidentification correspond to the high-risk grouping and merit greater focus within quality management systems. Primarily workflow measures related to operational efficiency can be considered low risk. Conclusion: Our group intends to advance the widespread use of these metrics in anatomic pathology laboratories to reduce patient safety risk and improve patient care with development of best practices and interlaboratory error reporting programs. PMID:28340232

  12. Evaluation of vegetable production management practices to reduce the ecological risk of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Rice, Pamela J; Hapeman, Cathleen J; McConnell, Laura L; Sadeghi, Ali M; Teasdale, John R; Coffman, C Benjamin; McCarty, Gregory W; Abdul-Baki, Aref A; Starr, James L

    2007-11-01

    The ability of agricultural management practices to reduce the ecological risks of pesticides was evaluated. Risk quotients, a mathematical description of the relationship between exposure and toxicity, and hazard ratings, a rank of the potential risk of pesticides to aquatic environments, were calculated for conventional and alternative cultivation practices for tomatoes: Poly-Bare, raised beds covered with polyethylene mulch with bare-soil furrows; Poly-Rye, raised beds covered with polyethylene mulch with cereal rye (Secale cereale) grown in the furrows; and Vetch, raised beds and furrows planted with hairy vetch seed (Vicia villosa). Evaluations were conducted using measured pesticide concentrations in runoff at the edge-of-field and estimated environmental concentrations in an adjacent creek and a theoretical pond receiving the runoff. Runoff from Poly-Bare presented the greatest risk to ecosystem health and to sensitive organisms, whereas the use of Vetch minimized these risks. Previous studies have shown that harvest yields were maintained and that runoff volume, soil loss, and off-site transport of pesticides measured in runoff were reduced using the alternative management practices (Poly-Rye and Vetch). Together, these results indicate that the alternative management practices (Poly-Rye and Vetch) have a less adverse impact on the environment than the conventional management practice (Poly-Bare) while providing growers with an acceptable economic return. In addition, the present study demonstrates the need to consider the management practice when assessing the potential risks and hazards for certain pesticides.

  13. A Proposed Set of Metrics to Reduce Patient Safety Risk From Within the Anatomic Pathology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Banks, Peter; Brown, Richard; Laslowski, Alex; Daniels, Yvonne; Branton, Phil; Carpenter, John; Zarbo, Richard; Forsyth, Ramses; Liu, Yan-Hui; Kohl, Shane; Diebold, Joachim; Masuda, Shinobu; Plummer, Tim; Dennis, Eslie

    2017-05-01

    Anatomic pathology laboratory workflow consists of 3 major specimen handling processes. Among the workflow are preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic phases that contain multistep subprocesses with great impact on patient care. A worldwide representation of experts came together to create a system of metrics, as a basis for laboratories worldwide, to help them evaluate and improve specimen handling to reduce patient safety risk. Members of the Initiative for Anatomic Pathology Laboratory Patient Safety (IAPLPS) pooled their extensive expertise to generate a list of metrics highlighting processes with high and low risk for adverse patient outcomes. : Our group developed a universal, comprehensive list of 47 metrics for patient specimen handling in the anatomic pathology laboratory. Steps within the specimen workflow sequence are categorized as high or low risk. In general, steps associated with the potential for specimen misidentification correspond to the high-risk grouping and merit greater focus within quality management systems. Primarily workflow measures related to operational efficiency can be considered low risk. Our group intends to advance the widespread use of these metrics in anatomic pathology laboratories to reduce patient safety risk and improve patient care with development of best practices and interlaboratory error reporting programs.

  14. Multisite Parent-Centered Risk Assessment to Reduce Pediatric Oral Chemotherapy Errors

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kathleen E.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Roblin, Douglas; Biggins, Colleen; Wagner, Joann L.; Houlahan, Kathleen; Li, Justin W.; Keuker, Christopher; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Donovan, Jennifer; Kanaan, Abir; Weingart, Saul N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Observational studies describe high rates of errors in home oral chemotherapy use in children. In hospitals, proactive risk assessment methods help front-line health care workers develop error prevention strategies. Our objective was to engage parents of children with cancer in a multisite study using proactive risk assessment methods to identify how errors occur at home and propose risk reduction strategies. Methods: We recruited parents from three outpatient pediatric oncology clinics in the northeast and southeast United States to participate in failure mode and effects analyses (FMEA). An FMEA is a systematic team-based proactive risk assessment approach in understanding ways a process can fail and develop prevention strategies. Steps included diagram the process, brainstorm and prioritize failure modes (places where things go wrong), and propose risk reduction strategies. We focused on home oral chemotherapy administration after a change in dose because prior studies identified this area as high risk. Results: Parent teams consisted of four parents at two of the sites and 10 at the third. Parents developed a 13-step process map, with two to 19 failure modes per step. The highest priority failure modes included miscommunication when receiving instructions from the clinician (caused by conflicting instructions or parent lapses) and unsafe chemotherapy handling at home. Recommended risk assessment strategies included novel uses of technology to improve parent access to information, clinicians, and other parents while at home. Conclusion: Parents of pediatric oncology patients readily participated in a proactive risk assessment method, identifying processes that pose a risk for medication errors involving home oral chemotherapy. PMID:23633976

  15. Reducing Radiation Exposure in an Electrophysiology Lab with Introduction of Newer Fluoroscopic Technology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Munish; Khalighi, Koroush

    2017-06-07

    The use of fluoroscopic devices exposes patients and operators to harmful effects of ionizing radiation in an electrophysiology (EP) lab. We sought to know if the newer fluoroscopic technology (Allura Clarity) installed in a hybrid EP helps to reduce prescribed radiation dose. We performed radiation dose analysis of 90 patients who underwent various procedures in the EP lab at a community teaching hospital after the introduction of newer fluoroscopic technology in June of 2016. Watchman device insertion, radiofrequency ablation procedures, permanent pacemaker (PPM)/implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) placement and battery changes were included in the study to compare radiation exposure during different procedures performed commonly in an EP lab. In all cases of watchman device placement, radiofrequency ablation procedures, PPM/ICD placement and battery changes, there was a statistically significant difference (<0.05) in radiation dose exposure. Significant reduction in radiation exposure during various procedures performed in an EP lab was achieved with aid of newer fluoroscopic technology and better image detection technology.

  16. Identifying Postpartum Intervention Approaches to Reduce Cardiometabolic Risk Among American Indian Women With Prior Gestational Diabetes, Oklahoma, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Peercy, Michael; Woods, J. Cedric; Parker, Stephany P.; Jackson, Teresa; Mata, Sara A.; McCage, Shondra; Levkoff, Sue E.; Nicklas, Jacinda M.; Seely, Ellen W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Innovative approaches are needed to reduce cardiometabolic risk among American Indian women with a history of gestational diabetes. We assessed beliefs of Oklahoma American Indian women about preventing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease after having gestational diabetes. We also assessed barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum and intervention approaches that facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle program. Methods In partnership with a tribal health system, we conducted a mixed-method study with American Indian women aged 19 to 45 years who had prior gestational diabetes, using questionnaires, focus groups, and individual interviews. Questionnaires were used to identify women’s cardiometabolic risk perceptions and feasibility and acceptability of Internet or mobile phone technology for delivery of a postpartum lifestyle modification program. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted to identify key perspectives and preferences related to a potential program. Results Participants were 26 women, all of whom completed surveys; 11 women participated in focus group sessions, and 15 participated in individual interviews. Most women believed they would inevitably develop diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or both; however, they were optimistic that they could delay onset with lifestyle change. Most women expressed enthusiasm for a family focused, technology-based intervention that emphasizes the importance of delaying disease onset, provides motivation, and promotes accountability while accommodating women’s competing priorities. Conclusions Our findings suggest that an intervention that uses the Internet, text messaging, or both and that emphasizes the benefits of delaying disease onset should be tested as a novel, culturally relevant approach to reducing rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this high-risk population. PMID:25837258

  17. Identifying postpartum intervention approaches to reduce cardiometabolic risk among American Indian women with prior gestational diabetes, Oklahoma, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily J; Peercy, Michael; Woods, J Cedric; Parker, Stephany P; Jackson, Teresa; Mata, Sara A; McCage, Shondra; Levkoff, Sue E; Nicklas, Jacinda M; Seely, Ellen W

    2015-04-02

    Innovative approaches are needed to reduce cardiometabolic risk among American Indian women with a history of gestational diabetes. We assessed beliefs of Oklahoma American Indian women about preventing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease after having gestational diabetes. We also assessed barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum and intervention approaches that facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle program. In partnership with a tribal health system, we conducted a mixed-method study with American Indian women aged 19 to 45 years who had prior gestational diabetes, using questionnaires, focus groups, and individual interviews. Questionnaires were used to identify women's cardiometabolic risk perceptions and feasibility and acceptability of Internet or mobile phone technology for delivery of a postpartum lifestyle modification program. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted to identify key perspectives and preferences related to a potential program. Participants were 26 women, all of whom completed surveys; 11 women participated in focus group sessions, and 15 participated in individual interviews. Most women believed they would inevitably develop diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or both; however, they were optimistic that they could delay onset with lifestyle change. Most women expressed enthusiasm for a family focused, technology-based intervention that emphasizes the importance of delaying disease onset, provides motivation, and promotes accountability while accommodating women's competing priorities. Our findings suggest that an intervention that uses the Internet, text messaging, or both and that emphasizes the benefits of delaying disease onset should be tested as a novel, culturally relevant approach to reducing rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this high-risk population.

  18. Human biomonitoring to optimize fish consumption advice: reducing uncertainty when evaluating benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Scott M; Lynn, Tracey V; Verbrugge, Lori A; Middaugh, John P

    2005-03-01

    National fish consumption advisories that are based solely on assessment of risk of exposure to contaminants without consideration of consumption benefits result in overly restrictive advice that discourages eating fish even in areas where such advice is unwarranted. In fact, generic fish advisories may have adverse public health consequences because of decreased fish consumption and substitution of foods that are less healthy. Public health is on the threshold of a new era for determining actual exposures to environmental contaminants, owing to technological advances in analytical chemistry. It is now possible to target fish consumption advice to specific at-risk populations by evaluating individual contaminant exposures and health risk factors. Because of the current epidemic of nutritionally linked disease, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, general recommendations for limiting fish consumption are ill conceived and potentially dangerous.

  19. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in ultrasound: Can you reduce risk?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Gill; Harris, Allison

    2015-11-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a common cause of pain and sickness absence for ultrasound practitioners. This article aims to provide background information about factors increasing the chance of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders and potential ways to reduce risk. Factors influencing ultrasound professionals' likelihood of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders include poor posture, repetitive movements, transducer pressure and poor grip, stress, workload, limited support or sense of control and other psychosocial factors. The impact of these risk factors on the health and well being of ultrasound practitioners can be reduced by following recommendations published by professional bodies and the Health and Safety Executive. Ultrasound practitioners should remember that optimising the examination should not be at the detriment of their health. Some hints and tips to reduce the chance of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders are provided.

  20. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in ultrasound: Can you reduce risk?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a common cause of pain and sickness absence for ultrasound practitioners. This article aims to provide background information about factors increasing the chance of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders and potential ways to reduce risk. Factors influencing ultrasound professionals’ likelihood of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders include poor posture, repetitive movements, transducer pressure and poor grip, stress, workload, limited support or sense of control and other psychosocial factors. The impact of these risk factors on the health and well being of ultrasound practitioners can be reduced by following recommendations published by professional bodies and the Health and Safety Executive. Ultrasound practitioners should remember that optimising the examination should not be at the detriment of their health. Some hints and tips to reduce the chance of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders are provided. PMID:27433262