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Sample records for reducing volatile organic

  1. Reduced Magmatic Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Ardia, P.; Stanley, B. D.; Foley, N.

    2012-12-01

    Volatiles in Earth's upper mantle are dominated by H2O and CO2, but under more reduced conditions likely deeper in the mantle, other volatile species may be important or dominant. However, the speciation, solubilities, and effect on physical properties of reduced magmatic volatiles are poorly constrained. Here we summarize results from an experimental campaign to better understand reduced volatiles in magmas. Experiments emphasize spectroscopic and SIMS characterization of dissolved species in experiments for which fluid fugacities are known, thereby facilitating thermodynamic parameterization. Experimental determinations of molecular H2 solubility in basaltic and andesitic liquids show concentrations that are proportional to H2 fugacity. Because H2 increases with fH2 whereas dissolved H2O increases with fH2O1/2, the relative importance of H2 increases with pressure and for more hydrous magmas. At 1 GPa and IW-1, solubility in basalt reaches 0.3 wt.% (equivalent to 2.7 wt.% H2O). Solubilities at pressures of the deep upper mantle have not been explored experimentally (as is also true for H2O and CO2), but H2 could become the dominant hydrous species at 400 km and deeper, and so deep hydrous melts may have chiefly H2 rather than H2O or OH. Experiments suggest an extremely low partial specific density (0.18 kg/m3) for dissolved H2 at low pressure, and so appreciable dissolved H2 in melt atop the 410 km discontinuity or in the lower mantle may promote positive buoyancy. Solubilities of reduced C-species remain poorly known. In contrast to results in Na2O-SiO2 liquids (Mysen et al., 2009), experiments with a haplobasaltic liquid at controlled CH4 fugacities indicated very small (<0.05 wt.%) CH4 solubilities even at very reduced conditions (reduced conditions and in

  2. Effect of in situ composting on reducing offensive odors and volatile organic compounds in swineries.

    PubMed

    Louhelainen, K; Kangas, J; Veijanen, A; Viilos, P

    2001-01-01

    Seven swine farms were studied to find out how the in situ composting system, compared to the slatted floor pit system, influences the concentration and occurrence of malodorous compounds. Ammonia concentrations were measured with diffusion tubes. Small molecular sulfur compounds were analyzed using laminated bags and a gas chromatograph with a FP-detector. All other volatile organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with simultaneous sniffing of the eluted compounds. About 400 organic compounds were identified from the air samples, and 94 suspect odorous compounds are listed in the present article. The most intense and unpleasant odors were caused by p-cresol, carboxylic acids (C2-C7), and some ketones such as 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-butanone. Terpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, and limonene), which originate from sawdust, caused the main peaks in the chromatograms of compost swineries. In swine confinement buildings where the composting system was functioning properly, the concentration of sulfur compounds, and especially of carboxylic acids, ketones, and p-cresol, fell effectively. The use of sawdust as composting material caused elevated concentrations of terpenes in the ambient air. There was clearly less airborne ammonia and hydrogen sulfide in the well-functioning compost swineries than in the poorly functioning ones. Elevated hydrogen sulfide levels were measured during turning work, however. In one composting swinery, the hydrogen sulfide level was as high as 15 mg/m3 during turning work. All the other concentrations of odorous compounds did not exceed occupational exposure limit values, but several compounds exceeded the respective threshold odor concentrations.

  3. Reduced Heart Rate Volatility

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Eric L.; Morris, John A.; Norris, Patrick R.; France, Daniel J.; Ozdas, Asli; Stiles, Renée A.; Harris, Paul A.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Speroff, Theodore

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine if using dense data capture to measure heart rate volatility (standard deviation) measured in 5-minute intervals predicts death. Background: Fundamental approaches to assessing vital signs in the critically ill have changed little since the early 1900s. Our prior work in this area has demonstrated the utility of densely sampled data and, in particular, heart rate volatility over the entire patient stay, for predicting death and prolonged ventilation. Methods: Approximately 120 million heart rate data points were prospectively collected and archived from 1316 trauma ICU patients over 30 months. Data were sampled every 1 to 4 seconds, stored in a relational database, linked to outcome data, and de-identified. HR standard deviation was continuously computed over 5-minute intervals (CVRD, cardiac volatility–related dysfunction). Logistic regression models incorporating age and injury severity score were developed on a test set of patients (N = 923), and prospectively analyzed in a distinct validation set (N = 393) for the first 24 hours of ICU data. Results: Distribution of CVRD varied by survival in the test set. Prospective evaluation of the model in the validation set gave an area in the receiver operating curve of 0.81 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.1 and 80.0, respectively. CVRD predict death as early as 24 hours in the validation set. Conclusions: CVRD identifies a subgroup of patients with a high probability of dying. Death is predicted within first 24 hours of stay. We hypothesize CVRD is a surrogate for autonomic nervous system dysfunction. PMID:15319726

  4. Reducing Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds - Final Report - 08/15/1997 - 02/14/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Stensel, H. David; Strand, Stuart E.

    2001-03-14

    The overall objective of this research was to determine if the shallow suspended growth reactor (SSGR) could provide sufficient treatment performance of organic and reduced sulfur (TRS) compounds, at 50 C to meet the EPA ''cluster rule'' regulatory limits. The biodegradation of a mixture of organic compounds that could be present in pulp and paper high volume low concentration gas streams was evaluated at 50 C in a bench-scale SSGR. The removal of methanol was followed in particular, and was mathematically modeled to evaluate the effect of process design and operating parameters on methanol removal. Additional tests were performed to obtain mass transfer and biodegradation kinetic parameters for the model. The acclimation of microbial populations capable of degrading TRS compounds from various seed sources was studied in batch reactors at 30 and 50 C. The degradation of TRS compounds in bench-scale SSGR was studied at 20-50 C. Also, the biodegradation kinetic and mass transfer coefficients for alpha-terpinene and gamma-terpinene were studied. Finally, a pilot plant was constructed and operated at Simpson pulp and paper mill in Tacoma, WA.

  5. Assessment of control strategies for reducing volatile organic compound emissions from the polyvinyl chloride wallpaper production industry in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang-Tang; Chiou, Chyow-Shan

    2006-05-01

    This study attempts to assess the effectiveness of control strategies for reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emission from the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) wallpaper production industry. In Taiwan, methyl ethyl ketone, TOL, and cyclohexanone have comprised the major content of solvents, accounting for approximately 113,000 t/yr to avoid excessive viscosity of plasticizer dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and to increase facility in working. Emissions of these VOCs from solvents have caused serious odor and worse air quality problems. In this study, 80 stacks in five factories were tested to evaluate emission characteristics at each VOC source. After examining the VOC concentrations in the flue gases and contents, the VOC emission rate before treatment and from fugitive sources was 93,000 and 800 t/yr, respectively. In this study, the semiwet electrostatic precipitator is recommended for use as cost-effective control equipment.

  6. Biogenic volatile organic compound analyses by PTR-TOF-MS: Calibration, humidity effect and reduced electric field dependency.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaobing

    2015-06-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) emitted by plants after stress or damage induction are a major part of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) is a high-resolution and sensitive technique for in situ GLV analyses, while its performance is dramatically influenced by humidity, electric field, etc. In this study the influence of gas humidity and the effect of reduced field (E/N) were examined in addition to measuring calibration curves for the GLVs. Calibration curves measured for seven of the GLVs in dry air were linear, with sensitivities ranging from 5 to 10 ncps/ppbv (normalized counts per second/parts per billion by volume). The sensitivities for most GLV analyses were found to increase by between 20% and 35% when the humidity of the sample gas was raised from 0% to 70% relative humidity (RH) at 21°C, with the exception of (E)-2-hexenol. Product ion branching ratios were also affected by humidity, with the relative abundance of the protonated molecular ions and higher mass fragment ions increasing with humidity. The effect of reduced field (E/N) on the fragmentation of GLVs was examined in the drift tube of the PTR-TOF-MS. The structurally similar GLVs are acutely susceptible to fragmentation following ionization and the fragmentation patterns are highly dependent on E/N. Overall the measured fragmentation patterns contain sufficient information to permit at least partial separation and identification of the isomeric GLVs by looking at differences in their fragmentation patterns at high and low E/N.

  7. Direct green waste land application: How to reduce its impacts on greenhouse gas and volatile organic compound emissions?

    PubMed

    Zhu-Barker, Xia; Burger, Martin; Horwath, William R; Green, Peter G

    2016-06-01

    Direct land application as an alternative to green waste (GW) disposal in landfills or composting requires an understanding of its impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. We investigated the effects of two approaches of GW direct land application, surface application and soil incorporation, on carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), and VOC emissions for a 12month period. Five treatments were applied in fall 2013 on fallow land under a Mediterranean climate in California: 30cm height GW on surface; 15cm height GW on surface; 15cm height GW tilled into soil; control+till; control+no till. In addition, a laboratory experiment was conducted to develop a mechanistic understanding of the influence of GW application on soil O2 consumption and GHG emission. The annual cumulative N2O, CO2 and VOC emissions ranged from 1.6 to 5.5kgN2O-Nha(-1), 5.3 to 40.6MgCO2-Cha(-1) and 0.6 to 9.9kgVOCha(-1), respectively, and were greatly reduced by GW soil incorporation compared to surface application. Application of GW quickly consumed soil O2 within one day in the lab incubation. These results indicate that to reduce GHG and VOC emissions of GW direct land application, GW incorporation into soil is recommended.

  8. Elimination of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds in fungal biofilters: reducing start-up time using different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, Alberto; Hernández, Sergio; Revah, Sergio

    2011-04-01

    Fungal biofilters have been recently studied as an alternative to the bacterial systems for the elimination of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds (VOC). Fungi foster reduced transport limitation of hydrophobic VOCs due to their hydrophobic surface and extended gas exchange area associated to the hyphal growth. Nevertheless, one of their principal drawbacks is their slow growth, which is critical in the start-up of fungal biofilters. This work compares the use of different carbon sources (glycerol, 1-hexanol, wheat bran, and n-hexane) to reduce the start-up period and sustain high n-hexane elimination capacities (EC) in biofilters inoculated with Fusarium solani. Four parallel experiments were performed with the different media and the EC, the n-hexane partition coefficient, the biomass production and the specific consumption rate were evaluated. Biofilters were operated with a residence time of 1.3 min and an inlet n-hexane load of 325 g m(-3) (reactor) h(-1). The time to attain maximum EC once gaseous n-hexane was fed was reduced in the three experiments with alternate substrates, as compared to the 36 days needed with the control where only n-hexane was added. The shortest adaptation period was 7 days when wheat bran was initially used obtaining a maximum EC of 160 g m(-3) (reactor) h(-1) and a critical load of 55 g m(-3) (reactor) h(-1). The results were also consistent with the pressure drop, the amount of biomass produced and its affinity for the gaseous n-hexane, as represented by its partition coefficient. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Effect of Golden Pothos in Reducing the Level of Volatile Organic Compounds in a Simulated Spacecraft Cabin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ursprung, Matthew; Amiri, Azita; Kayatin, Matthew; Perry, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The impact of Golden Pothos on indoor air quality was studied against a simulated spacecraft trace contaminant load model, consistent with the International Space Station (ISS), containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde. Previous research provides inconclusive results on the efficacy of plant VOC removal which this projects seeks to rectify through a better experimental design. This work develops a passive system for removing common VOC's from spacecraft and household indoor air and decreasing the necessity for active cabin trace contaminant removal systems.

  10. Ultimate detectability of volatile organic compounds: how much further can we reduce their ambient air sample volumes for analysis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2012-10-02

    To understand the ultimately lowest detection range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air, application of a high sensitivity analytical system was investigated by coupling thermal desorption (TD) technique with gas chromatography (GC) and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The performance of the TD-GC/TOF MS system was evaluated using liquid standards of 19 target VOCs prepared in the range of 35 pg to 2.79 ng per μL. Studies were carried out using both total ion chromatogram (TIC) and extracted ion chromatogram (EIC) mode. EIC mode was used for calibration to reduce background and to improve signal-to-noise. The detectability of 19 target VOCs, if assessed in terms of method detection limit (MDL, per US EPA definition) and limit of detection (LOD), averaged 5.90 pg and 0.122 pg, respectively, with the mean coefficient of correlation (R(2)) of 0.9975. The minimum quantifiable mass of target analytes, when determined using real air samples by the TD-GC/TOF MS, is highly comparable to the detection limits determined experimentally by standard. In fact, volumes for the actual detection of the major aromatic VOCs like benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) in ambient air samples were as low as 1.0 mL in the 0.11-2.25 ppb range. It was thus possible to demonstrate that most target compounds including those in low abundance could be reliably quantified at concentrations down to 0.1 ppb at sample volumes of less than 10 mL. The unique sensitivity of this advanced analytical system can ultimately lead to a shift in field sampling strategy with smaller air sample volumes facilitating faster, simpler air sampling (e.g., use of gas syringes rather than the relative complexity of pumps or bags/canisters), with greatly reduced risk of analyte breakthrough and minimal interference, e.g., from atmospheric humidity. The improved detection limits offered by this system can also enhance accuracy and measurement precision.

  11. Characterizing reduced sulfur compounds and non-methane volatile organic compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian Cooper

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have become a potential environmental and human health concern. Both RSCs and NMVOCs contribute to odor. In addition, RSCs also have the potential to form fine particulate matter (PMfine) and NMVOCs the potential to form ozone. Measurements of RSCs and NMVOCs emissions were made from both an anaerobic lagoon and barn at a swine CAFO in North Carolina. Emission measurements were made over all four seasonal periods. In each seasonal period, measurements were made from both the anaerobic lagoon and barn for ˜1 week. RSC and NMVOCs samples were collected using passivated canisters. Nine to eleven canister samples were taken from both the lagoon and barn over each sampling period. The canisters were analyzed ex-situ using gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) measurements were made in-situ using a pulsed fluorescence H2S/SO2 analyzer. During sampling, measurements of meteorological and physiochemical parameters were made. H2S had the largest RSC flux, with an overall average lagoon flux of 1.33 mug m-2 min-1. The two main RSCs identified by the GC-FID, dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), had overall average lagoon fluxes an order of magnitude lower, 0.12 and 0.09 mug m-2 min-1, respectively. Twelve significant NMVOCs were identified in lagoon samples (ethanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, decanal, heptanal, hexanal, nonanal, octanal, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and 4-methylphenol). The overall average fluxes for these NMVOCs, ranged from 0.08 mug m-2 min-1 (4-methylphenol) to 2.11 mug m-2 min-1 (acetone). Seasonal H2S barn concentrations ranged from 72-631 ppb. DMS and DMDS seasonal concentrations were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower. There were six significant NMVOCs identified in barn samples (methanol, ethanol, acetone 2-3 butanedione, acetaldehyde

  12. Volatile Organic Compunds (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Mercury Lead Arsenic Volatile Organic Compounds Plastics Pesticides Climate Change Climate Change Home What is Climate ... Home Mercury Lead Arsenic Volatile Organic Compounds Plastics Pesticides Climate Change Climate Change Home What is Climate ...

  13. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F [Laramie, WY; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M [Waxahachie, TX; Sorini-Wong, Susan S [Laramie, WY; Wong, Gregory K [Laramie, WY

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  14. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F [Laramie, WY; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M [Laramie, WY; Sorini-Wong, Susan S [Laramie, WY

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  15. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  16. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Gregory D.; Moore, Glenn A.; Stone, Mark L.; Reagen, William K.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  17. Nanostructure and Volatile Organic Compounds Sensing Properties of α-Fe2O3/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Derived by Spray Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolghadr, S.; Kimiagar, S.; Khojier, K.

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposite as a volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sensor. The α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites of about 370 nm thickness were synthesized by a spray method with different rGO contents (3%, 4%, and 5%) on SiO2/Si substrates. The samples were structurally and morphologically characterized by x-ray diffraction, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. These analyses showed that an increase in rGO content decreases the crystallinity of the samples. In order to study the VOCs sensing properties, the sensitivity and selectivity of the samples were tested with different VOCs vapors including ethanol, methanol, toluene, benzene, and formic acid in the temperature range of 200-400°C. The results show that the α-Fe2O3/rGO nanocomposites are more selective to ethanol than the other vapors, while an increase in rGO content decreases the sensitivity of the samples. The α-Fe2O3/rGO (3%)-based ethanol sensor also shows a good stability with respect to relative humidity in the range of 20-50% with a 1-ppm detection limit at the operating temperature of 280°C.

  18. VOLATILE ORGANIC ANALYSIS BY DIRECT AQUEOUS INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatographic environmental analysis by direct aqueous injection (DAI) was studied for 24 volatile organic analytes (VOAs). Internal standardization was used to determine the precision of analyzing these compounds by DAI. Aequous samples were directly introduced to a gas ch...

  19. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  20. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS EXPOSURE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined...

  1. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS EXPOSURE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined...

  2. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions by Agricultural Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormeno, E.; Farres, S.; Gentner, D.; Park, J.; McKay, M.; Karlik, J.; Goldstein, A.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) participate in ozone and aerosol formation, and comprise a substantial fraction of reactive VOC emission inventories. In the agriculturally intensive Central Valley of California, emissions from crops may substantially influence regional air quality, but emission potentials have not been extensively studied with advanced instrumentation for many important crops. Because crop emissions may vary according to the species, and California emission inventories are constructed via a bottom-up approach, a better knowledge of the emission rate at the species-specific level is critical for reducing uncertainties in emission inventories and evaluating emission model performance. In the present study we identified and quantified the BVOCs released by dominant agricultural crops in California. A screening study to investigate both volatile and semivolatile BVOC fractions (oxygenated VOCs, isoprene, monoterepenes, sesquiterpenes, etc.) was performed for 25 crop species (at least 3 replicates plants each), including branch enclosures of woody species (e.g. peach, mandarin, grape, pistachio) and whole plant enclosures for herbaceous species (e.g. onion, alfalfa, carrot), through a dynamic cuvette system with detection by PTRMS, in-situ GCMS/FID, and collection on carbon-based adsorbents followed by extraction and GCMS analysis. Emission data obtained in this study will allow inclusion of these crops in BVOC emission inventories and air quality simulations.

  3. Analyzing method on biogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J. H.; Wang, M. X.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. P.; Guenther, A. B.

    2002-02-01

    In order to analyze biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, an automated gas chromatography is developed and employed at the laboratory of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) during January to July, 2000. A small refrigerator was used so as to remove water in the air sample from gas line, and get accurate concentrations of volatile organic compounds. At 5degreesC, good water removing efficiency can be obtained at controlled flow rate. Air samples were collected around the building of Mesa Lab. of NCAR and analyzed by this gas chromatography system. This paper reports this gas chromatography system and results of air samples. The experimental results show that this gas chromatography system has a good reproducibility and stability, and main interesting volatile organic compounds such as isoprene, monoterpenes have an evident diurnal variation.

  4. Catalyst for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Schyryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing volatile organic compounds to carbon dioxide and water with the minimal addition of energy. A mixture of the volatile organic compound and an oxidizing agent (e.g. ambient air containing the volatile organic compound) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  5. Waste gas monitor reduces wasted volatile anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Euliano, T Y; van Oostrom, J H; van der Aa, J

    1999-07-01

    The increasing focus on health care costs requires that all physicians evaluate practice behaviors. The primary emphasis in anesthesia has been limiting the use of expensive medications and interventions. Reducing waste is another approach, and volatile anesthetics are an appropriate target in that simple reduction of fresh gas-flow (FGF) rates is effective. A monitor that measures and displays the cost of wasted volatile anesthetic was developed and used to determine if real-time display of the cost would result in decreased FGF rates, which, in turn, would decrease wasted anesthetic. The waste gas monitor (WGM) measures flow rate at the anesthesia machine's scavenger port, integrates this with agent concentration, and displays the calculated cost, real-time, on a portable computer screen. The WGM equipment was attached to the anesthesia machine in the gynecologic surgery operating room (OR) and those cases performed under general endotracheal anesthesia and lasting longer than one hour were eligible for inclusion. First year anesthesiology residents assigned to the study OR as part of a non-specialty rotation, were the subjects of the study. For each resident, after data were collected from at least two eligible baseline cases (Baseline Phase, WGM not visible and resident unaware of its presence), the monitor was introduced and data collection continued for at least three more eligible cases (Visible Phase). Nine residents were initially enrolled, but due to scheduling difficulties only five residents completed the protocol. Data from cases using the WGM demonstrated a 50% decrease (3.58 +/- 1.34 l/min vs. 1.78 +/- 0.51 l/min (p = 0.009)) in the scavenger flow rates, which resulted in a 48% ($5.28 +/- 0.68 vs. $2.72 +/- 0.80 (p = 0.002)) decrease in hourly cost of wasted volatile anesthetic. There was no difference between the Baseline and Visible phases with regard to use of nitrous oxide or intravenous anesthetic agents. CONCLUSIONS. The WGM decreased wasted

  6. Analysis of volatile organic compounds. [trace amounts of organic volatiles in gas samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for reproducibly analyzing trace amounts of a large number of organic volatiles existing in a gas sample. Direct injection of the trapped volatiles into a cryogenic percolum provides a sharply defined plug. Applications of the method include: (1) analyzing the headspace gas of body fluids and comparing a profile of the organic volatiles with standard profiles for the detection and monitoring of disease; (2) analyzing the headspace gas of foods and beverages and comparing the profile with standard profiles to monitor and control flavor and aroma; and (3) analyses for determining the organic pollutants in air or water samples.

  7. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) CHAPTER 31.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) was originally coined to refer, as a class, to carbon-containing chemicals that participate in photochemical reactions in the ambient (outdoor) are. The regulatory definition of VOCs used by the U.S. EPA is: Any compound of carbon, ex...

  8. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) CHAPTER 31.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) was originally coined to refer, as a class, to carbon-containing chemicals that participate in photochemical reactions in the ambient (outdoor) are. The regulatory definition of VOCs used by the U.S. EPA is: Any compound of carbon, ex...

  9. Volatile organic compound emissions from silage systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols with other impor...

  10. Volatile organic compound remedial action project

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews a proposed project that is planned to reduce the levels of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants present in the Mound domestic water supply. The potable and industrial process water supply for Mound is presently obtained from a shallow aquifer via on-site production wells. The present levels of VOCs in the water supply drawn from the on-site wells are below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) permissible for drinking water under Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA; 40 CFR 141); however, Mound has determined that remedial measures should be taken to further reduce the VOC levels. The proposed project action is the reduction of the VOC levels in the water supply using packed tower aeration (PTA). This document is intended to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and associated Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508) as implemented through U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5440.1D and supporting DOE NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662), as amended (54 FR 12474; 55 FR 37174), and as modified by the Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN) 15-90 and associated guidance. As required, this EA provides sufficient information on the probable environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives to support a DOE decision either to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  11. History of Martian volatiles - Implications for organic synthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.

    1971-01-01

    A theoretical reconstruction of the history of Martian volatiles indicates that Mars probably possessed a substantial reducing atmosphere at the outset of its history, and that its present tenuous and more oxidized atmosphere is the result of extensive chemical evolution. As a consequence, it is probable that Martian atmospheric chemical conditions, now hostile with respect to abiotic organic synthesis in the gas phase, were initially favorable. Evidence indicating the chronology and degradational history of Martian surface features, surface mineralogy, bulk volatile content, internal mass distribution, and thermal history suggests that Mars catastrophically developed a substantial reducing atmosphere as the result of rapid accretion.

  12. TMVOC, simulator for multiple volatile organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Battistelli, Alfredo

    2003-03-25

    TMVOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase non-isothermal flow of water, soil gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. It is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. TMVOC is designed for applications to contamination problems that involve hydrocarbon fuel or organic solvent spills in saturated and unsaturated zones. It can model contaminant behavior under ''natural'' environmental conditions, as well as for engineered systems, such as soil vapor extraction, groundwater pumping, or steam-assisted source remediation. TMVOC is upwards compatible with T2VOC (Falta et al., 1995) and can be initialized from T2VOC-style initial conditions. The main enhancements in TMVOC relative to T2VOC are as follows: a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals can be modeled; any and all combinations of the three phases water-oil-gas are treated; several non-condensible gases may be present; diffusion is treated in all phases in a manner that is fully coupled with phase partitioning. This paper gives a brief summary of the methodology used in TMVOC as well as highlighting some implementation issues. Simulation of a NAPL spill and subsequent remediation is discussed for a 2-D vertical section of a saturated-unsaturated flow problem.

  13. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. Peat samples originated from two wildlife reserves located near the coast of North Carolina, U.S. Gas and particulate organics were quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (~60 %) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. Speciated organic PM2.5 mass was dominated by the following compound classes: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for PM2.5 organic acids including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12 %) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed 2-3 % of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3 % of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Total HAP VOC and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions. This p

  14. Key volatile organic compounds emitted from swine nursery house

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. Q.; Choi, H. L.; Zhu, K.; Lee, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    This study was carried out to quantify the concentration and emission levels of key volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - sulfides, indolics, phenolics and volatile fatty acids (VFA) - emitted from swine nursery house, and assess the effect of microclimate (including temperature, relative humidity and air speed) on the key odorous compounds. Samples were collected from the Experimental Farm of Seoul National University in Suwon, South Korea. And the collection took place for four seasons and the sampling time was fixed at 10:30 in the morning. The application of one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni t analyses revealed that, most of the odorous compound concentrations, such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), indole, p-cresol and all the volatile fatty acids were lowest during the summer ( P < 0.01). Meanwhile, negative correlations were observed between temperature and odorants, as well as air speed and odorants. A possible reason was that high ventilation transferred most of the odors out of the house during the summer. From the whole year data, non-linear multiple regressions were conducted and the equations were proposed depending upon the relationships between microclimate parameters and odorous compounds. The equations were applied in hope of easily calculating the concentrations of the odorous compounds in the commercial farms. The results obtained in this study should be used for reducing the volatile organic compounds by controlling microclimate parameters and also could be helpful in setting a guideline for good management practices in nursery house.

  15. Volatile Organic Compounds in the Global Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, D.; Bottenheim, J.; Galbally, I. E.; Lewis, A.; Milton, M. J. T.; Penkett, S.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Reimann, S.; Tans, P.; Thiel, S.

    2009-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) include saturated, unsaturated, and other substituted hydrocarbons. VOCs play an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere by influencing ozone and hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations and the conversion rates of nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Elevated levels of VOCs and NO x have led to an approximate doubling of ozone in the lower troposphere over the past couple of centuries, making tropospheric ozone the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane. Because of ozone's strong oxidizing properties, increases in tropospheric ozone are a concern for living systems on Earth. Ozone stresses and damages vegetation, resulting in a reduction of terrestrial CO2 sequestration. VOCs also serve as a source of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which influences the solar radiation budget and cloud droplet nucleation. Through these complex interactions, VOCs play an important role in air quality and climate.

  16. Volatile organic compounds from leaves litter.

    PubMed

    Isidorov, Valery; Jdanova, Maria

    2002-09-01

    Qualitative composition of volatile emissions of litter of five species of deciduous trees was investigated by GC-MS. The list of identified substances contains more than 70 organic compounds of various classes. It was established that the composition of components emitted by the litter into the gas phase greatly differs from that of essential oils extracted by hydrodistillation from turned leaves collected from trees during fall. It is suggested that most compounds found in litter emissions are products of vital activity of microorganisms decomposing it. The reported data indicate that after the vegetative period is over the decomposition processes of litter are important seasonal sources of reactive organic compounds under the forest canopy.

  17. CNS depressant effects of volatile organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Evans, E B; Balster, R L

    1991-01-01

    Volatile chemicals used widely as solvents can produce acute effects on the nervous system and behavior after inhalation exposure, and many are subject to abuse. This review considers the nature of the acute effects of volatile organic solvents by comparing their actions to those of classical CNS depressant drugs such as the barbiturates, benzodiazepines and ethanol. Like CNS depressant drugs, selected inhalants have been shown to have biphasic effects on motor activity, disrupt psychomotor performance, have anticonvulsant effects, produce biphasic drug-like effects on rates of schedule-controlled operant behavior, increase rates of punished responding, enhance the effects of depressant drugs, serve as reinforcers in self-administration studies and share discriminative stimulus effects with barbiturates and ethanol. Toluene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, as well as subanesthetic concentrations of halothane, have been the most extensively studied; however, it is unclear whether important differences may exist among solvents in their ability to produce a depressant profile of acute effects. The possibility that selected solvents can have acute effects similar to those of depressant drugs may shed light on the nature of their acute behavioral toxicology and on their abuse.

  18. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2002-06-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  19. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in

  20. Volatilization of organic compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathburn, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Mass-transfer coefficients for the volatilization of ethylene and propane were correlated with the hydraulic and geometric properties of seven streams, and predictive equations were developed. The equations were evaluated using a normalized root-mean-square error as the criterion of comparison. The two best equations were a two-variable equation containing the energy dissipated per unit mass per unit time and the average depth of flow and a three-variable equation containing the average velocity, the average depth of flow, and the slope of the stream. Procedures for adjusting the ethylene and propane coefficients for other organic compounds were evaluated. These procedures are based on molecular diffusivity, molecular diameter, or molecular weight. Because of limited data, none of these procedures have been extensively verified. Therefore, until additional data become available, it is suggested that the mass-transfer coefficient be assumed to be inversely proportional to the square root of the molecular weight.

  1. Volatile organic monitor for industrial effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Stuart, A.D.; Loyola, V.M.

    1993-07-01

    1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have created the need for instruments capable of monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in public air space in an unattended and low cost manner. The purpose of the study was to develop and demonstrate the capability to do long term automatic and unattended ambient air monitoring using an inexpensive portable analytic system at a commercial manufacturing plant site. A gas chromatograph system personal computer hardware, meteorology tower & instruments, and custom designed hardware and software were developed. Comparison with an EPA approved method was performed. The system was sited at an aircraft engines manufacturing site and operated in a completely unattended mode for 60 days. Two VOCs were monitored every 30 minutes during the 24hr day. Large variation in the concentration from 800ppb to the limits of detection of about 10ppb were observed. Work to increase the capabilities of the system is ongoing.

  2. Chemistry of secondary organic aerosol: Formation and evolution of low-volatility organics in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jesse H.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), particulate matter composed of compounds formed from the atmospheric transformation of organic species, accounts for a substantial fraction of tropospheric aerosol. The formation of low-volatility (semivolatile and possibly nonvolatile) compounds that make up SOA is governed by a complex series of reactions of a large number of organic species, so the experimental characterization and theoretical description of SOA formation presents a substantial challenge. In this review we outline what is known about the chemistry of formation and continuing transformation of low-volatility species in the atmosphere. The primary focus is chemical processes that can change the volatility of organic compounds: (1) oxidation reactions in the gas phase, (2) reactions in the particle phase, and (3) continuing chemistry (in either phase) over several generations. Gas-phase oxidation reactions can reduce volatility by the addition of polar functional groups or increase it by the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds; key branch points that control volatility are the initial attack of the oxidant, reactions of alkylperoxy (RO2) radicals, and reactions of alkoxy (RO) radicals. Reactions in the particle phase include oxidation reactions as well as accretion reactions, non-oxidative processes leading to the formation of high-molecular-weight species. Organic carbon in the atmosphere is continually subject to reactions in the gas and particle phases throughout its atmospheric lifetime (until lost by physical deposition or oxidized to CO or CO2), implying continual changes in volatility over the timescales of several days. The volatility changes arising from these chemical reactions must be parameterized and included in models in order to gain a quantitative and predictive understanding of SOA formation.

  3. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  4. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  5. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  6. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  7. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  8. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  9. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  10. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  11. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  12. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  13. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  14. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  15. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  16. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  17. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  19. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  20. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  1. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  2. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  3. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  4. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  5. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  6. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  7. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  9. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  10. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  11. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  12. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  13. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  14. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  15. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  16. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  17. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  18. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  19. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  20. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  1. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  2. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  3. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  5. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  6. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  7. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  8. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  9. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  10. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  11. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  12. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  13. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  14. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  15. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  16. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  17. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  18. BIOCONCENTRATION FACTORS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of air and leaves were taken at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas campus and analyzed for volatile organic compounds using vacuum distillation coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The data were used to estimate the bioconcentration of volatile organic compo...

  19. Tropospheric volatile organic compounds in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Ling, Z H; Cheng, H R; Simpson, I J; Lyu, X P; Wang, X M; Shao, M; Lu, H X; Ayoko, G; Zhang, Y L; Saunders, S M; Lam, S H M; Wang, J L; Blake, D R

    2017-01-01

    Photochemical smog, characterized by high concentrations of ozone (O3) and fine particles (PM2.5) in the atmosphere, has become one of the top environmental concerns in China. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), one of the key precursors of O3 and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (an important component of PM2.5), have a critical influence on atmospheric chemistry and subsequently affect regional and global climate. Thus, VOCs have been extensively studied in many cities and regions in China, especially in the North China Plain, the Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta regions where photochemical smog pollution has become increasingly worse over recent decades. This paper reviews the main studies conducted in China on the characteristics and sources of VOCs, their relationship with O3 and SOA, and their removal technology. This paper also provides an integrated literature review on the formulation and implementation of effective control strategies of VOCs and photochemical smog, as well as suggestions for future directions of VOCs study in China.

  20. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Humans Indoors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaochen; Misztal, Pawel K; Nazaroff, William W; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-12-06

    Research on the sources of indoor airborne chemicals has traditionally focused on outdoor air, building materials, furnishings, and activities such as smoking, cooking, and cleaning. Relatively little research has examined the direct role of occupant emissions, even though this source clearly contributes to indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and influences indoor chemistry. In this work, we quantify occupant-related gaseous VOC emissions in a university classroom using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Time-resolved concentrations of VOCs in room air and supply air were measured continuously during occupied and unoccupied periods. The emission factor for each human-emitted VOC was determined by dividing the occupant-associated source rate by the corresponding occupancy. Among the most abundant species detected were compounds associated with personal care products. Also prominent were human metabolic emissions, such as isoprene, methanol, acetone, and acetic acid. Additional sources included human skin oil oxidation by ozone, producing compounds such as 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO). By mass, human-emitted VOCs were the dominant source (57%) during occupied periods in a well-ventilated classroom, with ventilation supply air the second most important (35%), and indoor nonoccupant emissions the least (8%). The total occupant-associated VOC emission factor was 6.3 mg h(-1) per person.

  1. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water. PMID:8933027

  2. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

    1996-10-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water.

  3. 78 FR 22197 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans for Tennessee: Revisions to Volatile Organic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Volatile Organic Compound Definition AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Withdrawal of... the definition of ``Volatile Organic Compound'' (VOC). EPA is considering this comment and will..., Intergovernmental relations, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: April 5...

  4. Effectiveness of porous covers for control of ammonia, reduced sulfur compounds, total hydrocarbons, selected volatile organic compounds, and odor from hog manure storage lagoons.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Shekhar; Ongwandee, Maneerat; Morrison, Glenn; Fitch, Mark; Surampalli, Rao

    2007-06-01

    Anaerobic lagoons are a major source of odor at concentrated animal feeding operations. Seven different kinds of artificial (geotextile and polyethylene foam) and natural (straw and redwood) permeable lagoon covers were evaluated for their potential to reduce odorous emissions generated by anaerobic waste lagoons. A novel floating sampling raft was constructed and used to simultaneously evaluate the effectiveness of lagoon covers on an operating swine waste lagoon. The air collected from the raft was evaluated for odor, total reduced sulfur (TRS) compounds, ammonia, total hydrocarbons, dimethyldisulfide, and trimethylamine. The emission rates from the lagoon were highly variable both temporally and spatially. All of the lagoon covers substantially reduced TRS emissions and odor. Geotextile fabric and a recycled foam cover exhibited the greatest reduction in total hydrocarbon emissions; natural covers were less effective. Because of consistently low emission rates of ammonia, no statistically significant reduction of ammonia emissions were observed from any of the lagoon covers.

  5. Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćapraz, Ö.; Deniz, A.; Öztürk, A.; Incecik, S.; Toros, H.; Coşkun, M.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul Ö. Çapraz1, A. Deniz1,3, A. Ozturk2, S. Incecik1, H. Toros1 and, M. Coskun1 (1) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Meteorology, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (2) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical, Chemical Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (3) Marmara Clean Air Center, Ministry of Environment and Urbanization, Nişantaşı, 34365, İstanbul, Turkey. One of the major problems of megacities is air pollution. Therefore, investigations of air quality are increasing and supported by many institutions in recent years. Air pollution in Istanbul contains many components that originate from a wide range of industrial, heating, motor vehicle, and natural emissions sources. VOC, originating mainly from automobile exhaust, secondhand smoke and building materials, are one of these compounds containing some thousands of chemicals. In spite of the risks to human health, relatively little is known about the levels of VOC in Istanbul. In this study, ambient air quality measurements of 32 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in Kağıthane (Golden Horn) region in Istanbul during the winter season of 2011 in order to develop the necessary scientific framework for the subsequent developments. Kağıthane creek valley is the source part of the Golden Horn and one of the most polluted locations in Istanbul due to its topographical form and pollutant sources in the region. In this valley, horizontal and vertical atmospheric motions are very weak. The target compounds most commonly found were benzene, toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons ranged between 1.0 and 10.0 parts per billion, by volume (ppbv). Ambient air levels of halogenated hydrocarbons appeared to exhibit unique spatial variations and no single factor seemed to explain trends for this group of

  6. Quantifying commuter exposures to volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayne, Ashleigh

    Motor-vehicles can be a predominant source of air pollution in cities. Traffic-related air pollution is often unavoidable for people who live in populous areas. Commuters may have high exposures to traffic-related air pollution as they are close to vehicle tailpipes. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one class of air pollutants of concern because exposure to VOCs carries risk for adverse health effects. Specific VOCs of interest for this work include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), which are often found in gasoline and combustion products. Although methods exist to measure time-integrated personal exposures to BTEX, there are few practical methods to measure a commuter's time-resolved BTEX exposure which could identify peak exposures that could be concealed with a time-integrated measurement. This study evaluated the ability of a photoionization detector (PID) to measure commuters' exposure to BTEX using Tenax TA samples as a reference and quantified the difference in BTEX exposure between cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed. To determine the suitability of two measurement methods (PID and Tenax TA) for use in this study, the precision, linearity, and limits of detection (LODs) for both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were determined in the laboratory with standard BTEX calibration gases. Volunteers commuted from their homes to their work places by cycling or driving while wearing a personal exposure backpack containing a collocated PID and Tenax TA sampler. Volunteers completed a survey and indicated if the windows in their vehicle were open or closed. Comparing pairs of exposure data from the Tenax TA and PID sampling methods determined the suitability of the PID to measure the BTEX exposures of commuters. The difference between BTEX exposures of cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed in Fort Collins was determined. Both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were precise and linear when evaluated in the

  7. 40 CFR 60.442 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.442 Section 60.442 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.442 Standard for volatile...

  8. 40 CFR 60.442 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.442 Section 60.442 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.442 Standard for volatile...

  9. 40 CFR 60.442 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.442 Section 60.442 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.442 Standard for volatile...

  10. 40 CFR 60.442 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.442 Section 60.442 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.442 Standard for volatile...

  11. 40 CFR 60.442 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.442 Section 60.442 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.442 Standard for volatile...

  12. Effect of traffic restriction on reducing ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs): Observation-based evaluation during a traffic restriction drill in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yanli; Yang, Weiqiang; Huang, Zuzhao; Wang, Yujun; Zhang, Zhou; He, Quanfu; Lü, Sujun; Huang, Zhonghui; Bi, Xinhui; Wang, Xinming

    2017-07-01

    Traffic restriction (TR) is a widely adopted control measure in case of heavy air pollution particularly in urban areas, yet it is hard to evaluate the effect of TR on reducing VOC emissions based on monitoring data since ambient VOC mixing ratios are influenced not only by source emissions but also by meteorological conditions and atmospheric degradation. Here we collected air samples for analysis of VOCs before, during and after a TR drill carried out in Guangzhou in September 2010 at both a roadside and a rooftop (∼50 m above the ground) site. TR measures mainly included the ;odd-even license; rule and banning high-emitting ;yellow label; vehicles. The mixing ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) did not show significant changes at the roadside site with total NMHCs of 39.0 ± 11.8 ppbv during non-TR period and 39.1 ± 14.8 ppbv during TR period, whereas total NMHCs decreased from 30.4 ± 14.3 ppbv during the non-TR period to 22.1 ± 10.6 ppbv during the TR period at rooftop site. However, the ratios of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzene and toluene against carbon monoxide (MTBE/CO, T/CO and B/CO) at the both sampling sites dropped significantly. The ratios of toluene to benzene (T/B) instead increased significantly. Changes in these ratios all consistently indicated reduced input from traffic emissions particularly gasoline vehicles. Source attribution by positive matrix factorization (PMF) confirmed that during the TR period gasoline vehicles contributed less VOCs in percentages while industrial sources, biomass burning and LPG shared larger percentages. Assuming that emissions from industrial sources remained unchanged during the TR and non-TR periods, we further used the PMF-retrieved contribution percentages to deduce the reduction rate of traffic-related VOC emissions, and obtained a reduction rate of 31% based on monitoring data at the roadside site and of 34% based on the monitoring data at the rooftop site. Considering VOC emissions from all

  13. Penicillium expansum volatiles reduce pine weevil attraction to host plants.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Muhammad; Rajarao, Gunaratna Kuttuva; Nordenhem, Henrik; Nordlander, Göran; Borg-Karlson, Anna Karin

    2013-01-01

    The pine weevil Hylobius abietis (L.) is a severe pest of conifer seedlings in reforested areas of Europe and Asia. To identify minimally toxic and ecologically sustainable compounds for protecting newly planted seedlings, we evaluated the volatile metabolites produced by microbes isolated from H. abietis feces and frass. Female weevils deposit feces and chew bark at oviposition sites, presumably thus protecting eggs from feeding conspecifics. We hypothesize that microbes present in feces/frass are responsible for producing compounds that deter weevils. Here, we describe the isolation of a fungus from feces and frass of H. abietis and the biological activity of its volatile metabolites. The fungus was identified by morphological and molecular methods as Penicillium expansum Link ex. Thom. It was cultured on sterilized H. abietis frass medium in glass flasks, and volatiles were collected by SPME and analyzed by GC-MS. The major volatiles of the fungus were styrene and 3-methylanisole. The nutrient conditions for maximum production of styrene and 3-methylanisole were examined. Large quantities of styrene were produced when the fungus was cultured on grated pine bark with yeast extract. In a multi-choice arena test, styrene significantly reduced male and female pine weevils' attraction to cut pieces of Scots pine twigs, whereas 3-methylanisole only reduced male weevil attraction to pine twigs. These studies suggest that metabolites produced by microbes may be useful as compounds for controlling insects, and could serve as sustainable alternatives to synthetic insecticides.

  14. Volatile organic compounds in Gulf of Mexico sediments

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC), concentrations and compositions were documented for estuarine, coastal, shelf, slope, and deep water sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. VOC were measured (detection limit >0.01 ppb) using a closed-loop stripping apparatus with gas chromatography (GC) and flame ionization, flame photometric, and mass spectrometric detectors. The five primary sources of Gulf of Mexico sediment VOC are: (1) planktonic and benthic fauna and flora; (2) terrestrial material from riverine and atmospheric deposition; (3) anthropogenic inputs: (4) upward migration of hydrocarbons; and (5) transport by bottom currents or slumping. Detected organo-sulfur compounds include alkylated sulfides, thiophene, alkylated thiophenes, and benzothiophenes. Benzothiophenes are petroleum related. Low molecular weight organo-sulfur compounds result from the biological oxidation of organic matter. A lack of organosulfur compounds in the reducing environment of the Orca Basin may result from a lack of free sulfides which are necessary for their production.

  15. SEPARATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS BY PERVAPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation is gradually becoming an accepted and practical method for the recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous process and waste streams. As the technolog has matured, new applications for pervaporation have emerged. One such application is the separati...

  16. SEPARATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS BY PERVAPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation is gradually becoming an accepted and practical method for the recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous process and waste streams. As the technolog has matured, new applications for pervaporation have emerged. One such application is the separati...

  17. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to <2m above ground level. Emissions at leaf scale are well documented and widely presented, and are not discussed here. Instead we describe some details of recent research on rhizosphere bVOCs, and bVOCs associated with pollination of flowers. Although bVOC emissions from soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the

  18. Biodiversity of volatile organic compounds from five French ferns.

    PubMed

    Fons, Françoise; Froissard, Didier; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Buatois, Bruno; Rapior, Sylvie

    2010-10-01

    Five French ferns belonging to different families were investigated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) by GC-MS using organic solvent extraction. Fifty-five VOC biosynthesized from the shikimic, lipidic and terpenic pathways including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and carotenoid-type compounds were identified. The main volatile compound of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. (Pteridaceae) was (E)-2-decenal with a plastic or "stink bug" odor. The volatile profiles of Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth (Woodsiaceae) and Blechnum spicant (L.) Roth (Blechnaceae) showed similarities, with small amounts of isoprenoids and the same main volatile compounds, i.e., 2-phenylethanal (odor of lilac and hyacinth) and 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom-like odor). The main volatile compound of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott (Dryopteridaceae) was (E)-nerolidol with a woody or fresh bark note. Polyketides, as acylfilicinic acids, were mainly identified in this fern. Oreopteris limbosperma (Bellardi ex. All.) J. Holub (Thelypteridaceae), well-known for its lemon smell, contained the highest biodiversity of VOC. Eighty percent of the volatiles was issued from the terpenic pathway. The main volatiles were (E)-nerolidol, alpha-terpineol, beta-caryophyllene and other minor monoterpenes (for example, linalool, pinenes, limonene, and gamma-terpinen-7-al). It was also the fern with the highest number of carotenoid-type derivatives, which were identified in large amounts. Our results were of great interest underlying new industrial valorisation for ferns based on their broad spectrum of volatiles.

  19. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2003-07-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward

  20. Gas chromatography of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1973-01-01

    System has been used for problems such as analysis of volatile metabolities in human blood and urine, analysis of air pollutants, and in tobacco smoke chemistry. Since adsorbent is reusable after porper reconditioning, method is both convenient and economical. System could be used for large scale on-site sampling programs in which sample is shipped to central location for analysis.

  1. Biosynthesis, function and metabolic engineering of plant volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Dudareva, Natalia; Klempien, Antje; Muhlemann, Joëlle K; Kaplan, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Plants synthesize an amazing diversity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that facilitate interactions with their environment, from attracting pollinators and seed dispersers to protecting themselves from pathogens, parasites and herbivores. Recent progress in -omics technologies resulted in the isolation of genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of many volatiles and contributed to our understanding of regulatory mechanisms involved in VOC formation. In this review, we largely focus on the biosynthesis and regulation of plant volatiles, the involvement of floral volatiles in plant reproduction as well as their contribution to plant biodiversity and applications in agriculture via crop-pollinator interactions. In addition, metabolic engineering approaches for both the improvement of plant defense and pollinator attraction are discussed in light of methodological constraints and ecological complications that limit the transition of crops with modified volatile profiles from research laboratories to real-world implementation.

  2. Fate of Volatile Organic Compounds in Constructed Wastewater Treatment Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefe, S.H.; Barber, L.B.; Runkel, R.L.; Ryan, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    The fate of volatile organic compounds was evaluated in a wastewater-dependent constructed wetland near Phoenix, AZ, using field measurements and solute transport modeling. Numerically based volatilization rates were determined using inverse modeling techniques and hydraulic parameters established by sodium bromide tracer experiments. Theoretical volatilization rates were calculated from the two-film method incorporating physicochemical properties and environmental conditions. Additional analyses were conducted using graphically determined volatilization rates based on field measurements. Transport (with first-order removal) simulations were performed using a range of volatilization rates and were evaluated with respect to field concentrations. The inverse and two-film reactive transport simulations demonstrated excellent agreement with measured concentrations for 1,4-dichlorobenzene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane, and trichloromethane and fair agreement for dibromochloromethane, bromo-dichloromethane, and toluene. Wetland removal efficiencies from inlet to outlet ranged from 63% to 87% for target compounds.

  3. Belowground volatiles facilitate interactions between plant roots and soil organisms.

    PubMed

    Wenke, Katrin; Kai, Marco; Piechulla, Birgit

    2010-02-01

    Many interactions between organisms are based on the emission and perception of volatiles. The principle of using volatile metabolites as communication signals for chemo-attractant or repellent for species-specific interactions or mediators for cell-to-cell recognition does not stop at an apparently unsuitable or inappropriate environment. These infochemicals do not only diffuse through the atmosphere to process their actions aboveground, but belowground volatile interactions are similarly complex. This review summarizes various eucaryotes (e.g., plant (roots), invertebrates, fungi) and procaryotes (e.g., rhizobacteria) which are involved in these volatile-mediated interactions. The soil volatiles cannot be neglected anymore, but have to be considered in the future as valuable infochemicals to understand the entire integrity of the ecosystems.

  4. Analysis of volatile organic compounds from illicit cocaine samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, W.H.; Wright, B.W.

    1994-07-01

    Detection of illicit cocaine hydrochloride shipments can be improved if there is a greater understanding of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds present. This study provides preliminary data concerning the volatile organic compounds detected in a limited Set of cocaine hydrochloride samples. In all cases, cocaine was one of the major volatile compounds detected. Other tropeines were detected in almost all samples. Low concentrations of compounds that may be residues of processing solvents were observed in some samples. The equilibrium emissivity of. cocaine from cocaine hydrochloride was investigated and a value of 83 parts-per-trillion was determined.

  5. Subjective reactions to volatile organic compounds as air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølhave, Lars; Grønkjær, John; Larsen, Søren

    Human subjective reactions to indoor air pollution in the form of volatile organic compounds in five concentrations ⩽ mg m -3 were examined in a climate chamber under controlled conditions in a balanced experimental design. The reactions of 25 subjects were registered in two questionnaires containing 25 and six questions and on a linear analogue rating scale. Each subject was tested for one day including four runs in each of the five treatments of 50 min duration. Dose effects were found for perceived odour intensity at 3 mgm -3. Air quality, need for ventilation, irritation of eye and nose showed significant effect at 8 mg m -3. Significant reduced well being was reported at 25 mgm -3. The analyses indicated that lower threshold for some of these effects would have been found if more subjects or longer exposure-times had been used. Gender, age, occupational education and smoking habits were co-factors for many of the symptoms reported.

  6. Source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sarkhosh, Maryam; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Yunesian, Masud; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Borji, Saeedeh Hemmati; Bajgirani, Ali Ghiami

    2013-04-01

    Identifying the sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is key issue to reducing ground-level ozone and PAN. A multivariate receptor model (Unmix) was used for the determination of the contributions of VOCs sources in Tehran-Iran. Concentrations of ambient C2-C10 VOCs were measured continuously and online at the center of Tehran city during the winter of 2012. A high correlation coefficient existed between measured and predicted values (R (2) = 0.99), indicating that the data were well modeled. Five possible VOCs source categories were identified and mobile sources such as vehicle exhaust (61 %) and fuel evaporation (12 %) more than half of the total VOC concentration. City gas and CNG sources, biogenic source, and industrial solvent source categories accounted for 17 %, 8 % and 2 % of the total VOC, respectively. Result showed Unmix for VOCs source apportionment can be used to analyze and generate air pollution control strategies and policies.

  7. Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon

    SciTech Connect

    Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

    1999-07-01

    This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

  8. Determination of non-volatile and volatile organic acids in Korean traditional fermented soybean paste (Doenjang).

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shruti; Choi, Tae Bong; Park, Hae-Kyong; Kim, Myunghee; Lee, In Koo; Kim, Jong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Organic acids are formed in food as a result of metabolism of large molecular mass compounds. These organic acids play an important role in the taste and aroma of fermented food products. Doenjang is a traditional Korean fermented soybean paste product that provides a major source of protein. The quantitative data for volatile and non-volatile organic acid contents of 18 samples of Doenjang were determined by comparing the abundances of each peak by gas (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean values of volatile organic acids (acetic acid, butyric acid, propionic acid and 3-methyl butanoic acid), determined in 18 Doenjang samples, were found to be 91.73, 29.54, 70.07 and 19.80 mg%, respectively, whereas the mean values of non-volatile organic acids, such as oxalic acid, citric acid, lactic acid and succinic acid, were noted to be 14.69, 5.56, 9.95 and 0.21 mg%, respectively. Malonic and glutaric acids were absent in all the tested samples of Doenjang. The findings of this study suggest that determination of organic acid contents by GC and HPLC can be considered as an affective approach to evaluate the quality characteristics of fermented food products.

  9. Detection of volatile organic peroxides in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Hong, J; Maguhn, J; Freitag, D; Kettrup, A

    2001-12-01

    A supercritical fluid extraction cell filled with adsorbent (Carbotrap and Carbotrap C) was used directly as a sampling tube to enrich volatile organic compounds in air. After sampling, the analytes were extracted by supercritical fluid CO2 with methanol as modifier. Collected organic peroxides were then determined by a RP-HPLC method developed and validated previously using post-column derivatization and fluorescence detection. Some volatile organic peroxides were found in indoor air in a new car and a newly decorated kitchen in the lower microg m(-3) range. tert-Butyl perbenzoate, di-tert-butyl peroxide, and tert-butylcumyl peroxide could be identified.

  10. Reducing the babel in plant volatile communication: using the forest to see the trees.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Y; Borges, R M

    2010-09-01

    While plants of a single species emit a diversity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to attract or repel interacting organisms, these specific messages may be lost in the midst of the hundreds of VOCs produced by sympatric plants of different species, many of which may have no signal content. Receivers must be able to reduce the babel or noise in these VOCs in order to correctly identify the message. For chemical ecologists faced with vast amounts of data on volatile signatures of plants in different ecological contexts, it is imperative to employ accurate methods of classifying messages, so that suitable bioassays may then be designed to understand message content. We demonstrate the utility of 'Random Forests' (RF), a machine-learning algorithm, for the task of classifying volatile signatures and choosing the minimum set of volatiles for accurate discrimination, using data from sympatric Ficus species as a case study. We demonstrate the advantages of RF over conventional classification methods such as principal component analysis (PCA), as well as data-mining algorithms such as support vector machines (SVM), diagonal linear discriminant analysis (DLDA) and k-nearest neighbour (KNN) analysis. We show why a tree-building method such as RF, which is increasingly being used by the bioinformatics, food technology and medical community, is particularly advantageous for the study of plant communication using volatiles, dealing, as it must, with abundant noise.

  11. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  12. Volatile organic sulfur compounds in a stratified lake.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haiying; Mylon, Steven E; Benoit, Gaboury

    2007-03-01

    Three volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon disulfide (CS(2)), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), were detected in the stratified water column of a lake (Linsley Pond) in Connecticut. The compounds DMS and DMDS appeared in both the oxic and the anoxic portions of the water column, CS(2) was primarily found in anoxic hypolimnion. Algal metabolism and/or bacterial degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids or other organic materials are potential sources of VOSCs in the oxic lake water. Reactions of hydrogen sulfide with organic compounds and microbial degradation of organic matter may be responsible for the production of VOSCs in the anoxic lake water. The vertical distribution patterns of these three VOSCs varied from month to month in the summer, but the daily profiles obtained in one 5-day period in the summer displayed consistency. No clear diurnal pattern for any of the three VOSCs was observed. Based on observation that these VOSCs were not present in surface and near surface waters of Linsley Pond, freshwater inputs of reduced sulfur compounds to the atmosphere may be insignificant.

  13. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. Peat samples originated from two wildlife reserves located near the coast of North Carolina, U.S. Gas and particula...

  14. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. Peat samples originated from two wildlife reserves located near the coast of North Carolina, U.S. Gas and particula...

  15. Volatile Organic Compounds: Characteristics, distribution and sources in urban schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Nitika; Bartsch, Jennifer; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Salthammer, Tunga; Morawska, Lidia

    2015-04-01

    Long term exposure to organic pollutants, both inside and outside school buildings may affect children's health and influence their learning performance. Since children spend significant amount of time in school, air quality, especially in classrooms plays a key role in determining the health risks associated with exposure at schools. Within this context, the present study investigated the ambient concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in 25 primary schools in Brisbane with the aim to quantify the indoor and outdoor VOCs concentrations, identify VOCs sources and their contribution, and based on these; propose mitigation measures to reduce VOCs exposure in schools. One of the most important findings is the occurrence of indoor sources, indicated by the I/O ratio >1 in 19 schools. Principal Component Analysis with Varimax rotation was used to identify common sources of VOCs and source contribution was calculated using an Absolute Principal Component Scores technique. The result showed that outdoor 47% of VOCs were contributed by petrol vehicle exhaust but the overall cleaning products had the highest contribution of 41% indoors followed by air fresheners and art and craft activities. These findings point to the need for a range of basic precautions during the selection, use and storage of cleaning products and materials to reduce the risk from these sources.

  16. Sonochemical decomposition of volatile and non-volatile organic compounds--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Goel, Mukesh; Hongqiang, Hu; Mujumdar, Arun S; Ray, Madhumita Bhowmick

    2004-11-01

    Sonochemical degradation which combines destruction of the target compounds by free radical reaction and thermal cleavage is one of the recent advanced oxidation processes (AOP) and proven to be effective for removing low concentration organic pollutants from aqueous streams. This work describes the degradation of several organic compounds of varying volatility in aqueous solution in two types of ultrasonic reactors. The process variables studied include initial concentration of the organics, temperature, and type of saturated gas. The effects of additional oxidant and electrolyte were also examined. A kinetic model was tested to determine its ability to predict the degradation rate constant of different volatile organic compounds at different initial conditions. A figure of merit for the electrical energy consumption for the two types of ultrasonic reactors is also presented.

  17. Effect of Inorganic Salts on the Volatility of Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Particulate phase reactions between organic and inorganic compounds may significantly alter aerosol chemical properties, for example, by suppressing particle volatility. Here, chemical processing upon drying of aerosols comprised of organic (acetic, oxalic, succinic, or citric) acid/monovalent inorganic salt mixtures was assessed by measuring the evaporation of the organic acid molecules from the mixture using a novel approach combining a chemical ionization mass spectrometer coupled with a heated flow tube inlet (TPD-CIMS) with kinetic model calculations. For reference, the volatility, i.e. saturation vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy, of the pure succinic and oxalic acids was also determined and found to be in agreement with previous literature. Comparison between the kinetic model and experimental data suggests significant particle phase processing forming low-volatility material such as organic salts. The results were similar for both ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride mixtures, and relatively more processing was observed with low initial aerosol organic molar fractions. The magnitude of low-volatility organic material formation at an atmospherically relevant pH range indicates that the observed phenomenon is not only significant in laboratory conditions but is also of direct atmospheric relevance. PMID:25369247

  18. Effect of inorganic salts on the volatility of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Silja A K; McNeill, V Faye; Riipinen, Ilona

    2014-12-02

    Particulate phase reactions between organic and inorganic compounds may significantly alter aerosol chemical properties, for example, by suppressing particle volatility. Here, chemical processing upon drying of aerosols comprised of organic (acetic, oxalic, succinic, or citric) acid/monovalent inorganic salt mixtures was assessed by measuring the evaporation of the organic acid molecules from the mixture using a novel approach combining a chemical ionization mass spectrometer coupled with a heated flow tube inlet (TPD-CIMS) with kinetic model calculations. For reference, the volatility, i.e. saturation vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy, of the pure succinic and oxalic acids was also determined and found to be in agreement with previous literature. Comparison between the kinetic model and experimental data suggests significant particle phase processing forming low-volatility material such as organic salts. The results were similar for both ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride mixtures, and relatively more processing was observed with low initial aerosol organic molar fractions. The magnitude of low-volatility organic material formation at an atmospherically relevant pH range indicates that the observed phenomenon is not only significant in laboratory conditions but is also of direct atmospheric relevance.

  19. Volatile organic compounds and some very volatile organic compounds in new and recently renovated buildings in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothweiler, Heinz; Wäger, Patrick A.; Schlatter, Christian

    Indoor air in new of recently renovated buildings was analysed by using different sorbents and analytical methods. Increased values of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) were found on Tenax TA (1.6-31.7 mg m -3). Compared to older buildings, the amount of oxygen-containing compounds (aldehydes, ketones, alcohols) especially was elevated. High hexanal concentrations were measured in a significant amount of the houses. Differences of compound patterns were found from building to building. Complaints about discomfort and negative health effects are expected due to volatile organic compounds (VOC) and very volatile organic compounds (VVOC), as well as from low natural ventilation rates in some newly occupied buildings. Odorous compounds (naphthalene, higher aldehydes and alcohols, capronic acid, etc.) were found mainly, but some irritants and suspected sensitizing agents were also found. At the present state of our investigation chemicals causing other known toxic effects do not seem to increase the toxic risk substantially.

  20. 77 FR 38761 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Organic Compounds; Consumer Products AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... addition of a new rule that sets volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions limits and other restrictions on... recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: June 11, 2012. Susan Hedman,...

  1. Volatility of secondary organic aerosol from the ozonolysis of monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byong-Hyoek; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Engelhart, Gabriella J.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2011-05-01

    The volatility of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene, at low and intermediate RH, and at low and high NO x conditions was investigated using a thermodenuder (TD). More than 90% of the α-pinene and β-pinene SOA volume (for 200 nm particles) and approximately 75% of the limonene SOA evaporated at 70 °C for a centerline residence time of approximately 16 s in the heated zone. Practically all the SOA in all systems evaporated at approximately 90 °C. The relative humidity during the formation of SOA had a small effect on its volatility (changes in the evaporated fraction were less than 10%). NO x concentrations had a significant impact on the volatility of α-pinene and β-pinene SOA (reductions of the evaporated fraction by approximately 30%), but a negligible effect on the volatility of limonene SOA. High NO x levels resulted in more volatile SOA than low NO x conditions due to the presence of relatively volatile nitrate containing species at high NO x. The behavior of the SOA in the thermodenuder can be reproduced using an aerosol dynamics model based on the volatility basis-set approach and SOA yield parameters derived in previous smog chamber studies if appropriate values of the mass accommodation coefficient and heat of vaporization (Δ Hvap) are chosen. Use of either a very low effective accommodation coefficient (0.002-0.01) and a heat of vaporization depending on the saturation concentration, or an effective accommodation coefficient of 0.05 for the initial stages of the evaporation and 1 afterward, with a low volatility-independent value of the Δ Hvap, is needed for the simulation of the SOA evaporation.

  2. Qualitative analysis of volatile organic compounds on biochar.

    PubMed

    Spokas, Kurt A; Novak, Jeffrey M; Stewart, Catherine E; Cantrell, Keri B; Uchimiya, Minori; Dusaire, Martin G; Ro, Kyoung S

    2011-10-01

    Qualitative identification of sorbed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on biochar was conducted by headspace thermal desorption coupled to capillary gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry. VOCs may have a mechanistic role influencing plant and microbial responses to biochar amendments, since VOCs can directly inhibit/stimulate microbial and plant processes. Over 70 biochars encompassing a variety of parent feedstocks and manufacturing processes were evaluated and were observed to possess diverse sorbed VOC composition. There were over 140 individual chemical compounds thermally desorbed from some biochars, with hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) and fast pyrolysis biochars typically possessing the greatest number of sorbed volatiles. In contrast, gasification, thermal or chemical processed biochars, soil kiln mound, and open pit biochars possessed low to non-detectable levels of VOCs. Slow pyrolysis biochars were highly variable in terms of their sorbed VOC content. There were no clear feedstock dependencies to the sorbed VOC composition, suggesting a stronger linkage with biochar production conditions coupled to post-production handling and processing. Lower pyrolytic temperatures (⩽350°C) produced biochars with sorbed VOCs consisting of short carbon chain aldehydes, furans and ketones; elevated temperature biochars (>350°C) typically were dominated by sorbed aromatic compounds and longer carbon chain hydrocarbons. The presence of oxygen during pyrolysis also reduced sorbed VOCs. These compositional results suggest that sorbed VOCs are highly variable and that their chemical dissimilarity could play a role in the wide variety of plant and soil microbial responses to biochar soil amendment noted in the literature. This variability in VOC composition may argue for VOC characterization before land application to predict possible agroecosystem effects.

  3. Volatile organic compounds of whole grain soft winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aroma from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is an indicator of grain soundness and also an important quality attribute of grain foods. To identify the inherent VOCs of wheat grain unaffected by fungal infestation and other extrinsic factors, grains of nine soft wheat varieties were collected at...

  4. Novel collection method for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dogs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host derived chemical cues are an important aspect of arthropod attraction to potential hosts. Host cues that act over longer distances include CO2, heat, and water vapor, while cues such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act over closer distances. Domestic dogs are important hosts for disease cy...

  5. MICROBIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES AND EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results from a study that examined microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions from six fungi and one bacterial species (Streptomyces spp.) commonly found in indoor environments. Data are presented on peak emission rates from inoculated agar plate...

  6. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Photochemical smog is a major air pollution problem and a significant cause of premature death in the U.S. Smog forms in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are emitted primarily from industry and motor vehicles in the U.S. However, dairy farms may be an important source in so...

  7. [Emission control way of volatile organic compounds in industry].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Zhang, Guo-Ning; Wei, Yu-Xia; Zou, Lan; Zhang, Ming-Hui

    2011-12-01

    Due to the volatile nature, the way of controlling way of VOCs was different from other atmospheric pollutants. By analyzing the emission characteristics of VOCs, four kinds of control way were proposed, which were the source control, organized emission control, fugitive emission control and the total amount control, and the control modes of each control way were also analyzed and compared.

  8. Speciation of volatile organic compounds from poultry production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The air consent agreement between EPA and large animal feeding operations (AFO) is designed to determine at what level compounds are being emitted from these facilities. However, the methodology used for quantifying total non-methane hydrocarbons and speciation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) n...

  9. Influence of volatile organic compounds on Fusarium graminearum mycotoxin production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are involved in a diverse range of ecological interactions. Due to their low molecular weight, lipophilic nature, and high vapor pressure at ambient temperatures, they can serve as airborne signaling molecules that are capable of mediating inter and intraspecies com...

  10. LEAVES AS INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in leaves is primarily a product of airborne exposures and dependent upon bioconcentration factors and release rates. The bioconcentration factors for VOCs in grass are found to be related to their partitioning between octan...

  11. Qualitative analysis of volatile organic compounds on biochar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Qualitative identification of sorbed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on biochar was conducted by headspace thermal desorption coupled to capillary gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry. VOCs may have a mechanistic role influencing plant and microbial responses to biochar amendments, since VOCs ca...

  12. LEAVES AS INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in leaves is primarily a product of airborne exposures and dependent upon bioconcentration factors and release rates. The bioconcentration factors for VOCs in grass are found to be related to their partitioning between octan...

  13. MICROBIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES AND EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results from a study that examined microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions from six fungi and one bacterial species (Streptomyces spp.) commonly found in indoor environments. Data are presented on peak emission rates from inoculated agar plate...

  14. Volatile organic compound emissions from dairy facilities in central California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dairy facilities are thought to be an important contributor to high ozone levels in central California, but emissions inventories from these sources contain significant uncertainties. In this work, VOC emissions were measured at two central Califor...

  15. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS MEASURED IN DEARS PASSIVE SAMPLERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A suite of 27 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored in personal exposures, indoors and outdoors of participant's residences, and at a central community site during the DEARS summer 2004 monitoring season. The list of VOCs focused on compounds typically associated with ...

  16. VOA - MS Dunbar works with the Volatile Organics Analyzer (VOA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-03

    STS089-390-036 (22-31 Jan 1998) --- Astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar, payload commander, checks out the Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) in the Spacehab Double Module aboard the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. VOA was among a number of experiments monitored by the crew on Spacehab, while other payloads and experiments were stowed and conducted in Endeavour?s cabin.

  17. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS MEASURED IN DEARS PASSIVE SAMPLERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A suite of 27 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored in personal exposures, indoors and outdoors of participant's residences, and at a central community site during the DEARS summer 2004 monitoring season. The list of VOCs focused on compounds typically associated with ...

  18. Measuring Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Silage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are considered to be important precursors to smog and ozone production. An experimental protocol was developed to obtain undisturbed silage samples from silage storages. Samples were placed in a wind tunnel where temperature, humidity, and air flow were cont...

  19. Predicting the emission of volatile organic compounds from silage systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major VOC emission source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols wit...

  20. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), necessary reactants for photochemical smog formation, are emitted from numerous sources. Limited available data suggest that dairy farms emit VOCs with cattle feed, primarily silage, being the primary source. Process-based models of VOC transfer within and from si...

  1. Preparation of spiked soils by vapor fortification for volatile organic compounds analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, A.D.

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes a vapor fortification method for preparing quality assurance/quality control soils for volatile organic compound analysis. Treatment of soils with volatile organic compounds occurs in a closed container in a manner somewhat analogous to the way the vadose zone often becomes contaminated. One advantage of this method for preparing soils for quality assurance/quality control purposes is that the efficiency of various extraction methods can be reliably compared. Furthermore, by substantially reducing the error due to sample inhomogeneity, the error associated with the determinative step can also be properly evaluated. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Quantifying the volatility of organic aerosol in the southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Provat K.; Khlystov, Andrey; Yahya, Khairunnisa; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Grieshop, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    The volatility of organic aerosols (OA) has emerged as a property of primary importance in understanding their atmospheric life cycle, and thus abundance and transport. However, quantitative estimates of the thermodynamic (volatility, water solubility) and kinetic parameters dictating ambient-OA gas-particle partitioning, such as saturation concentrations (C∗), enthalpy of evaporation (ΔHvap), and evaporation coefficient (γe), are highly uncertain. Here, we present measurements of ambient-OA volatility at two sites in the southeastern US, one at a rural setting in Alabama dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in June-July 2013, and another at a more anthropogenically influenced urban location in North Carolina during October-November 2013. These measurements applied a dual-thermodenuder (TD) system, in which temperature and residence times are varied in parallel to constrain equilibrium and kinetic aerosol volatility properties. Gas-particle partitioning parameters were determined via evaporation kinetic model fits to the dual-TD observations. OA volatility parameter values derived from both datasets were similar despite the fact that measurements were collected in distinct settings and seasons. The OA volatility distributions also did not vary dramatically over the campaign period or strongly correlate with OA components identified via positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometer data. A large portion (40-70 %) of measured ambient OA at both sites was composed of very-low-volatility organics (C∗ ≤ 0.1 µg m-3). An effective ΔHvap of bulk OA of ˜ 80-100 kJ mol-1 and a γe value of ˜ 0.5 best describe the evaporation observed in the TDs. This range of ΔHvap values is substantially higher than that typically assumed for simulating OA in atmospheric models (30-40 kJ mol-1). TD data indicate that γe is on the order of 0.1 to 0.5, indicating that repartitioning

  3. EVALUATION OF CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND IN INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) conducts and sponsors research on technology to reduce or eliminate emissions of potentially toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial/commercial sources. The r...

  4. EVALUATION OF CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND IN INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) conducts and sponsors research on technology to reduce or eliminate emissions of potentially toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial/commercial sources. The r...

  5. Multiple microbial activities for volatile organic compounds reduction by biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Civilini, Marcello

    2006-07-01

    In the northeast of Italy, high volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions originate from small-medium companies producing furniture. In these conditions it is difficult to propose a single, efficient, and economic system to reduce pollution. Among the various choices, the biofiltration method could be a good solution, because microbial populations possess multiple VOC degradation potentials used to oxidize these compounds to CO2. Starting from the air emissions of a typical industrial wood-painting plant, a series of experiments studied in vitro microbial degradation of each individual VOC. Isolated strains were then added to a laboratory-scale biofiltration apparatus filled with an organic matrix, and the different VOC behavior demonstrated the potential of single and/or synergic microbial removal actions. When a single substrate was fed, the removal efficiency of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated reactor was 1.1, 1.17, and 0.33 g m(-3) hr(-1), respectively, for xylene, toluene, and ethoxy propyl acetate. A VOC mixture composed of butyl acetate, ethyl acetate, diacetin alcohol, ethoxy propanol acetate, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, toluene, and xylene was then fed into a 2-m(3) reactor treating 100 m3 hr(-1) of contaminated air. The reactor was filled with the same mixture of organic matrix, enriched with all of the isolated strains together. During reactor study, different VOC loading rates were used, and the behavior was evaluated continuously. After a short acclimation period, the removal efficiency was > 65% at VOC load of 150-200 g m(-3) hr(-1). Quantification of removal efficiencies and VOC speciation confirmed the relationship among removal efficiencies, compound biodegradability, and the dynamic transport of each mixture component within the organic matrix. Samples of the fixed bed were withdrawn at different intervals and the heterogeneous microbial community evaluated for both total and differential compound counts.

  6. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Šetka, Milena; Drbohlavová, Jana; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC) is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols. PMID:28287435

  7. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors.

    PubMed

    Šetka, Milena; Drbohlavová, Jana; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2017-03-10

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC) is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols.

  8. [Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC): definition, classification and properties].

    PubMed

    Cicolella, A

    2008-02-01

    The term volatile organic compounds includes a wide variety of chemical substances with the common feature of being carbon compounds that are volatile at ambient temperature. They can be classified into different families defined by their chemical formulae, each of which possesses common properties, although there may be major differences in terms of toxicity. For that reason the effects of VOC on health have to be considered both in an individual way and also from a global viewpoint on account of their common toxic properties and the role they play in the formation of environmental photo-oxidative pollutants, both outdoors and indoors.

  9. Metal organic frameworks as sorption media for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds at ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vellingiri, Kowsalya; Szulejko, Jan E.; Kumar, Pawan; Kwon, Eilhann E.; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash; Boukhvalov, Danil W.; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we investigated the sorptive behavior of a mixture of 14 volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (four aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, p-xylene, and styrene), six C2-C5 volatile fatty acids (VFAs), two phenols, and two indoles) against three metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), i.e., MOF-5, Eu-MOF, and MOF-199 at 5 to 10 mPa VOC partial pressures (25 °C). The selected MOFs exhibited the strongest affinity for semi-volatile (polar) VOC molecules (skatole), whereas the weakest affinity toward was volatile (non-polar) VOC molecules (i.e., benzene). Our experimental results were also supported through simulation analysis in which polar molecules were bound most strongly to MOF-199, reflecting the presence of strong interactions of Cu2+ with polar VOCs. In addition, the performance of selected MOFs was compared to three well-known commercial sorbents (Tenax TA, Carbopack X, and Carboxen 1000) under the same conditions. The estimated equilibrium adsorption capacity (mg.g−1) for the all target VOCs was in the order of; MOF-199 (71.7) >Carboxen-1000 (68.4) >Eu-MOF (27.9) >Carbopack X (24.3) >MOF-5 (12.7) >Tenax TA (10.6). Hopefully, outcome of this study are expected to open a new corridor to expand the practical application of MOFs for the treatment diverse VOC mixtures. PMID:27324522

  10. Metal organic frameworks as sorption media for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellingiri, Kowsalya; Szulejko, Jan E.; Kumar, Pawan; Kwon, Eilhann E.; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash; Boukhvalov, Danil W.; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, we investigated the sorptive behavior of a mixture of 14 volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (four aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, p-xylene, and styrene), six C2-C5 volatile fatty acids (VFAs), two phenols, and two indoles) against three metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), i.e., MOF-5, Eu-MOF, and MOF-199 at 5 to 10 mPa VOC partial pressures (25 °C). The selected MOFs exhibited the strongest affinity for semi-volatile (polar) VOC molecules (skatole), whereas the weakest affinity toward was volatile (non-polar) VOC molecules (i.e., benzene). Our experimental results were also supported through simulation analysis in which polar molecules were bound most strongly to MOF-199, reflecting the presence of strong interactions of Cu2+ with polar VOCs. In addition, the performance of selected MOFs was compared to three well-known commercial sorbents (Tenax TA, Carbopack X, and Carboxen 1000) under the same conditions. The estimated equilibrium adsorption capacity (mg.g-1) for the all target VOCs was in the order of; MOF-199 (71.7) >Carboxen-1000 (68.4) >Eu-MOF (27.9) >Carbopack X (24.3) >MOF-5 (12.7) >Tenax TA (10.6). Hopefully, outcome of this study are expected to open a new corridor to expand the practical application of MOFs for the treatment diverse VOC mixtures.

  11. Removal of volatile organic compounds from paper coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Dirk; Warnecke, Hans-Joachim; Pruess, Jan

    1997-08-01

    From the chemical point of view paper coatings are mainly polymer dispersions. Polymer dispersions are constituted in multitude fields, for example as dispersion coatings or adhesives. As far as no additional treatment is done, polymer materials as well as polymer agents contain non polymer, volatile organic components that may arise from: (1) incomplete polymerization of the applied monomers, (2) primary materials containing non polymerizable components, (3) undesirable side reactions during the synthesis. Requirements for the removal of volatile substances from polymer dispersion are given by several reasons: (1) low molecular substances deteriorate the product characteristics (viscosity, thermal stability and others), (2) in order to comply with legislative standards, volatile organic compounds have to be removed from dispersions, especially when applied to large surfaces (e.g. in surface refining in paper and leather industries as well as on coating). The removal of volatile organic compounds (deodorization) can be realized in continuous or discontinuous processes. In contrast to highly developed process technology, the process itself is not well understood, especially mass transport phenomena between the gas phase and the aqueous polymer dispersion are insufficiently and controversially discussed in the literature. Two processes, their advantages and disadvantages and the description by mathematical- mechanistic models are presented in this paper.

  12. Can volatile organic compounds be markers of sea salt?

    PubMed

    Silva, Isabel; Coimbra, Manuel A; Barros, António S; Marriott, Philip J; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2015-02-15

    Sea salt is a handmade food product that is obtained by evaporation of seawater in saltpans. During the crystallisation process, organic compounds from surroundings can be incorporated into sea salt crystals. The aim of this study is to search for potential volatile markers of sea salt. Thus, sea salts from seven north-east Atlantic Ocean locations (France, Portugal, Continental Spain, Canary Islands, and Cape Verde) were analysed by headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 165 compounds were detected, ranging from 32 to 71 compounds per salt. The volatile composition revealed the variability and individuality of each salt, and a set of ten compounds were detected in all samples. From these, seven are carotenoid-derived compounds that can be associated with the typical natural surroundings of ocean hypersaline environment. These ten compounds are proposed as potential volatile markers of sea salt.

  13. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components) mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al. (2009) using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets") are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap). We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions, on the order of 50-80% when the most realistic ΔHvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ΔHvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ΔHvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (ΔHvap = 50 kJ/mol) and lowest for the high (ΔHvap = 150 kJ/mol) assumptions. This difference arises from the high ΔHvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ΔHvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009) has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the high and variable ΔHvap assumptions. Our results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20

  14. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components) mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al.~(2009) using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets") are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap). We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions; on the order of 50-80% when the most realistic ΔHvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ΔHvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ΔHvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (ΔHvap = 50 kJ/mol) and lowest for the high (ΔHvap = 150 kJ/mol) assumptions. This difference arises from the high ΔHvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ΔHvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009) has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the high and variable ΔHvap assumptions. Our results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20

  15. Diffusivity measurements of volatile organics in levitated viscous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Field measurements indicating that atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state have spurred numerous studies addressing low diffusivities of water in glassy aerosols. The focus of these studies is on kinetic limitations of hygroscopic growth and the plasticizing effect of water. In contrast, much less is known about diffusion limitations of organic molecules and oxidants in viscous matrices. These may affect atmospheric chemistry and gas-particle partitioning of complex mixtures with constituents of different volatility. In this study, we quantify the diffusivity of a volatile organic in a viscous matrix. Evaporation of single particles generated from an aqueous solution of sucrose and small amounts of volatile tetraethylene glycol (PEG-4) is investigated in an electrodynamic balance at controlled relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The evaporative loss of PEG-4 as determined by Mie resonance spectroscopy is used in conjunction with a radially resolved diffusion model to retrieve translational diffusion coefficients of PEG-4. Comparison of the experimentally derived diffusivities with viscosity estimates for the ternary system reveals a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relationship, which has often been invoked to infer diffusivity from viscosity. The evaporation of PEG-4 shows pronounced RH and temperature dependencies and is severely depressed for RH ≲ 30 %, corresponding to diffusivities < 10-14 cm2 s-1 at temperatures < 15 °C. The temperature dependence is strong, suggesting a diffusion activation energy of about 300 kJ mol-1. We conclude that atmospheric volatile organic compounds can be subject to severe diffusion limitations in viscous organic aerosol particles. This may enable an important long-range transport mechanism for organic material, including pollutant molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  16. A large source of low-volatility secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Ehn, Mikael; Thornton, Joel A; Kleist, Einhard; Sipilä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Pullinen, Iida; Springer, Monika; Rubach, Florian; Tillmann, Ralf; Lee, Ben; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Andres, Stefanie; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Rissanen, Matti; Jokinen, Tuija; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kontkanen, Jenni; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kurtén, Theo; Nielsen, Lasse B; Jørgensen, Solvejg; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Canagaratna, Manjula; Maso, Miikka Dal; Berndt, Torsten; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wahner, Andreas; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Wildt, Jürgen; Mentel, Thomas F

    2014-02-27

    Forests emit large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. Their condensable oxidation products can form secondary organic aerosol, a significant and ubiquitous component of atmospheric aerosol, which is known to affect the Earth's radiation balance by scattering solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. The quantitative assessment of such climate effects remains hampered by a number of factors, including an incomplete understanding of how biogenic VOCs contribute to the formation of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol. The growth of newly formed particles from sizes of less than three nanometres up to the sizes of cloud condensation nuclei (about one hundred nanometres) in many continental ecosystems requires abundant, essentially non-volatile organic vapours, but the sources and compositions of such vapours remain unknown. Here we investigate the oxidation of VOCs, in particular the terpene α-pinene, under atmospherically relevant conditions in chamber experiments. We find that a direct pathway leads from several biogenic VOCs, such as monoterpenes, to the formation of large amounts of extremely low-volatility vapours. These vapours form at significant mass yield in the gas phase and condense irreversibly onto aerosol surfaces to produce secondary organic aerosol, helping to explain the discrepancy between the observed atmospheric burden of secondary organic aerosol and that reported by many model studies. We further demonstrate how these low-volatility vapours can enhance, or even dominate, the formation and growth of aerosol particles over forested regions, providing a missing link between biogenic VOCs and their conversion to aerosol particles. Our findings could help to improve assessments of biosphere-aerosol-climate feedback mechanisms, and the air quality and climate effects of biogenic emissions generally.

  17. Modeling the transport of volatile organics in variably saturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, B.E.; Sykes, J.F. )

    1989-01-01

    The understanding of the processes of dissolution, volatilization, and gas-liquid partitioning in porous media is very limited. The few models which attempt to characterize the transport of volatile organics such as petroleum products and halogenated hydrocarbon solvents in variably saturated media all assume that mass transfer processes are at equilibrium. In addition, gas phase advection is neglected by assuming that gas phase pressures are uniformly atmospheric and that density gradients are negligible. In this study a model was developed to solve for water phase flow and transport and density dependent gas phase flow and transport. Simple expressions for dissolution, volatilization, and gas-liquid partitioning, employing the concept of an overall mass transfer coefficient, were incorporated into the model. The transport of trichloroethylene in a variably saturated vertical cross section, under a variety of conditions, was simulated. Results of the simulations appeared qualitatively correct. The importance of gas phase processes in increasing subsurface contamination from volatile organics, and in dissipating residual amounts of these substances, was demonstrated. The lack of similar analytical and/or numerical models, or suitable experimental studies, excluded the possibility of validating, or verifying, the model.

  18. 75 FR 57412 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic... ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative Code section...

  19. Volatile organic silicon compounds: the most undesirable contaminants in biogases.

    PubMed

    Ohannessian, Aurélie; Desjardin, Valérie; Chatain, Vincent; Germain, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Recently a lot of attention has been focused on volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiC) present in biogases. They induce costly problems due to silicate formation during biogas combustion in valorisation engine. The cost of converting landfill gas and digester gas into electricity is adversely affected by this undesirable presence. VOSiC in biogases spark off formation of silicate deposits in combustion chambers. They engender abrasion of the inner surfaces leading to serious damage, which causes frequent service interruptions, thus reducing the economic benefit of biogases. It is already known that these VOSiC originate from polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS) hydrolysis. PDMS (silicones) are used in a wide range of consumer and industrial applications. PDMS are released into the environment through landfills and wastewater treatment plants. There is a lack of knowledge concerning PDMS biodegradation during waste storage. Consequently, understanding PDMS behaviour in landfill cells and in sludge digester is particularly important. In this article, we focused on microbial degradation of PDMS through laboratory experiments. Preliminary test concerning anaerobic biodegradation of various PDMS have been investigated. Results demonstrate that the biotic step has an obvious influence on PDMS biodegradation. IWA Publishing 2008.

  20. Production of volatile organic compounds by cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, M.; Abe, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    Phytoplankton are known to produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to environmental problems such as global warming and decomposition of stratospheric ozone. For example, picophytoplankton, such as Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, are distributed in freshwater and oceans worldwide, accounting for a large proportion of biomass and primary production in the open ocean. However, to date, little is known about the production of VOCs by picophytoplankton. In this study, VOCs production by cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. (NIES-981) was investigated. Synechococcus sp. was obtained from the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Japan, and cultured at 24°C in autoclaved f/2-Si medium under 54 ± 3 µE m-2 s-1 (1 E = 1 mol of photons) with a 12-h light and 12-h dark cycle. VOCs concentrations were determined using a purge-and-trap gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Agilent 5973). The concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a) were also determined using a fluorometer (Turner TD-700). Bromomethane (CH3Br) and isoprene were produced by Synechococcus sp. Isoprene production was similar to those of other phytoplankton species reported earlier. Isoprene was produced when Chl a was increasing in the early stage of the incubation period (5-15 days of incubation time, exponential phase), but CH3Br was produced when Chl a was reduced in the late stage of the incubation period (30-40 days of incubation time, death phase).

  1. Volatile organic compounds in fourteen U.S. retail stores.

    PubMed

    Nirlo, E L; Crain, N; Corsi, R L; Siegel, J A

    2014-10-01

    Retail buildings have a potential for both short-term (customer) and long-term (occupational) exposure to indoor pollutants. However, little is known about volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the retail sector and influencing factors, such as ventilation, in-store activities, and store type. We measured VOC concentrations and ventilation rates in 14 retail stores in Texas and Pennsylvania. With the exception of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, VOCs were present in retail stores at concentrations well below health guidelines. Indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 4.6 ppb to 67 ppb. The two mid-sized grocery stores in the sample had the highest levels of ethanol and acetaldehyde, with concentrations up to 2.6 ppm and 92 ppb, respectively, possibly due to the preparation of dough and baking activities. Indoor-to-outdoor concentration ratios indicated that indoor sources were the main contributors to indoor VOC concentrations for the majority of compounds. There was no strong correlation between ventilation and VOC concentrations across all stores. However, increasing the air exchange rates at two stores led to lower indoor VOC concentrations, suggesting that ventilation can be used to reduce concentrations for some specific stores. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzón, Jessica P.; Huertas, José I.; Magaña, Miguel; Huertas, María E.; Cárdenas, Beatriz; Watanabe, Takuro; Maeda, Tsuneaki; Wakamatsu, Shinji; Blanco, Salvador

    2015-10-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is one of the most polluted megacities in North America. Therefore, it is an excellent benchmark city to understand atmospheric chemistry and to implement pilot countermeasures. Air quality in the MCMA is not within acceptable levels, mainly due to high ground levels of ozone (O3). Tropospheric O3 is a secondary pollutant formed from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of nitrogen oxides and sunlight. To gain a better understanding of O3 formation in megacities, evaluate the effectiveness of already-implemented countermeasures, and identify new cost-effective alternatives to reduce tropospheric O3 concentrations, researchers and environmental authorities require updated concentrations for a broader range of VOCs. Moreover, in an effort to protect human health and the environment, it is important to understand which VOCs exceed reference safe values or most contribute to O3 formation, as well as to identify the most probable emission sources of those VOCs. In this work, 64 VOCs, including 36 toxic VOCs, were measured at four sites in the MCMA during 2011-2012. VOCs related to liquefied petroleum gas leakages exhibited the highest concentrations. Toxic VOCs with the highest average concentrations were acetone and ethanol. The toxic VOC benzene represented the highest risk to Mexican citizens, and toluene contributed the most to O3 formation. Correlation analysis indicated that the measured VOCs come from vehicular emissions and solvent-related industrial sources.

  3. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

  4. Protocol for the collection and analysis of volatile POHCs (Principal Organic Hazardous Constituents) using VOST (Volatile Organic Sampling Train)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, E. M.

    1984-03-01

    An operating protocol for sampling and analysis of voltatile organic constituents of flue gas from hazardous waste incinerators or other similar combustor systems using the Volatile Organic Sampling Train (VOST) is presented. It is intended to be used for guidance by personnel of the regulatory groups, personnel associated with engineering research and development, and the regulated community. The document is in two parts. Part A describes the key components of the train, the procedures for preparing the sorbent materials, and procedures for sample collection using the VOST. Part B describes the procedures for analyzing VOST sorbent cartridges for volatile principal organic hazardous constituents (POHCs) using purge-trap-desorb gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (P-T-D GC/MS). Quality control procedures are presented in both parts.

  5. 78 FR 24990 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...), several volatile organic compound (VOC) rules that were submitted by the Ohio Environmental Protection... emissions from stationary sources, storage of volatile organic liquids, industrial cleaning solvents,...

  6. 78 FR 11119 - Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds-Exclusion of trans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 RIN 2060-AQ38 Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds...: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The EPA is proposing to revise the definition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs..., Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: February 4, 2013. Lisa...

  7. Biogenic volatile organic compounds in the Earth system.

    PubMed

    Laothawornkitkul, Jullada; Taylor, Jane E; Paul, Nigel D; Hewitt, C Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds produced by plants are involved in plant growth, development, reproduction and defence. They also function as communication media within plant communities, between plants and between plants and insects. Because of the high chemical reactivity of many of these compounds, coupled with their large mass emission rates from vegetation into the atmosphere, they have significant effects on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere. Hence, biogenic volatile organic compounds mediate the relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Alteration of this relationship by anthropogenically driven changes to the environment, including global climate change, may perturb these interactions and may lead to adverse and hard-to-predict consequences for the Earth system.

  8. Distribution of volatile organic chemicals in outdoor and indoor air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Jitendra J.; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The EPA volatile organic chemistry (VOC) national ambient data base (Shah, 1988) is discussed. The 320 chemicals included in the VOC data base are listed. The methods used to obtain the data are reviewed and the availability, accessibility, and operation of the data base are examined. Tables of the daily outdoor concentrations for 66 chemicals and the daily indoor concentrations for 35 chemicals are presented.

  9. Distribution of volatile organic chemicals in outdoor and indoor air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Jitendra J.; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The EPA volatile organic chemistry (VOC) national ambient data base (Shah, 1988) is discussed. The 320 chemicals included in the VOC data base are listed. The methods used to obtain the data are reviewed and the availability, accessibility, and operation of the data base are examined. Tables of the daily outdoor concentrations for 66 chemicals and the daily indoor concentrations for 35 chemicals are presented.

  10. Analyses of volatile organic compounds from human skin

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, M.; Wysocki, C.J.; Leyden, J.J.; Spielman, A.I.; Sun, X.; Preti, G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Human skin emits a variety of volatile metabolites, many of them odorous. Much previous work has focused upon chemical structure and biogenesis of metabolites produced in the axillae (underarms), which are a primary source of human body odour. Nonaxillary skin also harbours volatile metabolites, possibly with different biological origins than axillary odorants. Objectives To take inventory of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the upper back and forearm skin, and assess their relative quantitative variation across 25 healthy subjects. Methods Two complementary sampling techniques were used to obtain comprehensive VOC profiles, viz., solid-phase micro extraction and solvent extraction. Analyses were performed using both gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Results Nearly 100 compounds were identified, some of which varied with age. The VOC profiles of the upper back and forearm within a subject were, for the most part, similar, although there were notable differences. Conclusions The natural variation in nonaxillary skin odorants described in this study provides a baseline of compounds we have identified from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Although complex, the profiles of volatile constituents suggest that the two body locations share a considerable number of compounds, but both quantitative and qualitative differences are present. In addition, quantitative changes due to ageing are also present. These data may provide future investigators of skin VOCs with a baseline against which any abnormalities can be viewed in searching for biomarkers of skin diseases. PMID:18637798

  11. New graphene fiber coating for volatile organic compounds analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, GuoJuan; Guo, XiaoXi; Wang, ShuLing; Wang, XueLan; Zhou, YanPing; Xu, Hui

    2014-10-15

    In the work, a novel graphene-based solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed for the analysis of trace amount of volatile organic compounds in human exhaled breath vapor. The graphene fiber coating was prepared by a one-step hydrothermal reduction reaction. The fiber with porous and wrinkled structure exhibited excellent extraction efficiency toward eight studied volatile organic compounds (two n-alkanes, five n-aldehydes and one aromatic compound). Meanwhile, remarkable thermal and mechanical stability, long lifespan and low cost were also obtained for the fiber. Under the optimal conditions, the developed method provided low limits of detection (1.0-4.5ngL(-1)), satisfactory reproducibility (3.8-13.8%) and acceptable recoveries (93-122%). The method was applied successfully to the analysis of breath samples of lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. The unique advantage of this approach includes simple setup, non-invasive analysis, cost-efficient and sufficient sensitivity. The proposed method supply us a new possibility to monitor volatile organic compounds in human exhaled breath samples.

  12. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Ingrid J.; Black, Robert R.; Geron, Chris D.; Aurell, Johanna; Hays, Michael D.; Preston, William T.; Gullett, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, volatile and semi-volatile organic compound (VOCs and SVOCs) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. The peat samples originated from two National Wildlife Refuges on the coastal plain of North Carolina, U.S.A. Gas- and particle-phase organic compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (∼60%) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. In the fine particle mass (PM2.5), the following organic compound classes were dominant: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for the organic acids in PM2.5 including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12%) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed to 2-3% of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3% of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Total HAP VOC and particulate PAH emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions.

  13. Diffusivity Measurements of Volatile Organics in Levitated Viscous Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Field measurements indicating that atmospheric secondary aerosol (SOA) particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state have spurred numerous studies addressing low water diffusivities in glassy aerosols, focusing on kinetic limitations to hygroscopic growth and the plasticizing effect of water. Less is known about diffusion limitations of organic molecules and oxidants in viscous matrices and how these might affect atmospheric chemistry and gas-particle phase partitioning of complex mixtures with constituents of different volatility. Often viscosity data has been used to infer diffusivity via the Stokes- Einstein relationship even though strong deviations from this relationship have been observed for matrices of high viscosity. In this study, we provide a quantitative estimate for the diffusivity of a volatile organic in a viscous matrix. Evaporation of single particles generated from an aqueous solution of sucrose and a small quantity of volatile tetraethylene glycol (PEG-4) is investigated in an electrodynamic balance at controlled relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions, thereby varying the viscosity of the sucrose matrix. The evaporative loss of tetraethylene glycol as determined by Mie resonance spectroscopy is used in conjunction with a diffusion model to retrieve translational diffusion coefficients of tetraethylene glycol. The evaporation of PEG-4 shows a pronounced RH and temperature dependence and is severely depressed for RH 30% corresponding to diffusivities < 10-14 cm2/s at temperatures as high as 15 °C, implying that atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) can be subject to severe diffusion limitations in glassy SOA. Comparison of the experimentally derived diffusivities with viscosity estimates for the ternary system reveals a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relationship.

  14. Expanding the modular ester fermentative pathways for combinatorial biosynthesis of esters from volatile organic acids.

    PubMed

    Layton, Donovan S; Trinh, Cong T

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic acids are byproducts of fermentative metabolism, for example, anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass or organic wastes, and are often times undesired inhibiting cell growth and reducing directed formation of the desired products. Here, we devised a general framework for upgrading these volatile organic acids to high-value esters that can be used as flavors, fragrances, solvents, and biofuels. This framework employs the acid-to-ester modules, consisting of an AAT (alcohol acyltransferase) plus ACT (acyl CoA transferase) submodule and an alcohol submodule, for co-fermentation of sugars and organic acids to acyl CoAs and alcohols to form a combinatorial library of esters. By assembling these modules with the engineered Escherichia coli modular chassis cell, we developed microbial manufacturing platforms to perform the following functions: (i) rapid in vivo screening of novel AATs for their catalytic activities; (ii) expanding combinatorial biosynthesis of unique fermentative esters; and (iii) upgrading volatile organic acids to esters using single or mixed cell cultures. To demonstrate this framework, we screened for a set of five unique and divergent AATs from multiple species, and were able to determine their novel activities as well as produce a library of 12 out of the 13 expected esters from co-fermentation of sugars and (C2-C6) volatile organic acids. We envision the developed framework to be valuable for in vivo characterization of a repertoire of not-well-characterized natural AATs, expanding the combinatorial biosynthesis of fermentative esters, and upgrading volatile organic acids to high-value esters. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1764-1776. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Transport, behavior, and fate of volatile organic compounds in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds with chemical and physical properties that allow the compounds to move freely between the water and air phases of the environment. VOCs are widespread in the environment because of this mobility. Many VOCs have properties making them suspected or known hazards to the health of humans and aquatic organisms. Consequently, understanding the processes affecting the concentration and distribution VOCs in the environment is necessary. The U.S. Geological Survey selected 55 VOCs for study. This report reviews the characteristics of the various process that could affect the transport, behavior, and fate of these VOCs in streams.

  16. [Generic method for determination of volatile organic solvents in cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Da, Jing; Huang, Xianglu; Wang, Gangli; Cao, Jin; Zhang, Qingsheng

    2014-11-01

    A generic screening, confirmation and determination method was established based on 36 commonly used volatile organic solvents in cosmetics by headspace gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method included a database for pilot screening and identifi- cation of those solvents and their quantitative method. Pilot screening database was composed by two sections, one was household section built by two columns with opposite polarities (col- umn VF-1301 ms and DB-5 ms) using retention index in different column systems as qualitative parameter, and the other was NIST MS search version 2.0. Meanwhile, the determination method of the 36 volatile solvents was developed with GC-MS. Cosmetic samples were dissolved in water and transferred to a headspace vial. After 30 min equilibration at 60 °C, the samples were analyzed by GC-MS equipped with a capillary chromatographic column VF-1301 ms. The external calibration was used for quantification. The limits of detection were from 0.01 to 3.3 μg/g, and the recoveries were from 60.77% to 126.6%. This study provided a generic method for pilot screening, identification, and quantitation of volatile organic solvents in cosmetics, and may solve the problem that different analytical methods need to be developed for different targeted compounds and pilot screening for potential candidate solvent residues.

  17. 78 FR 11618 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Tennessee: Revisions to Volatile Organic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Organic Compound Definition AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... from the definition of ``Volatile Organic Compound''. EPA is approving this SIP revision because...

  18. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Facilities in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, A. S.; Ogunjemiyo, S. O.; Trabue, S.; Middala, S. R.; Ashkan, S.; Scoggin, K.; Vu, K. K.; Addala, L.; Olea, C.; Nana, L.; Scruggs, A. K.; Steele, J.; Shelton, T. C.; Osborne, B.; McHenry, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dairy facilities are thought to be an important contributor to high ozone levels in Central California, but emissions inventories from these sources contain significant uncertainties. In this work, VOC emissions were measured at two Central California dairies during 2010 and 2011. Isolation flux chambers were used to measure direct emissions from specific dairy sources, and upwind/downwind ambient profiles were measured from ground level up to heights of 60 m. Samples were collected using a combination of canisters and sorbent tubes, and were analyzed by GC-MS. Additional in-situ measurements were made using infra-red photoaccoustic detectors and Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. Temperature and ozone profiles up to 250 m above ground level were also measured using a tethersonde. Substantial fluxes of a number of VOCs including alcohols, volatile fatty acids and esters were observed at both sites. Implications of these measurements for regional air quality will be discussed.

  19. Peat fires and air quality: volatile organic compounds and particulates.

    PubMed

    Blake, D; Hinwood, A L; Horwitz, P

    2009-07-01

    There are numerous localized peat deposits on the Swan Coastal Plain, an urban and rural bioregion otherwise dominated by wetland ecosystems in southwestern Australia. Hydrological change is significant in the bioregion: urban development encroaches on wetlands, groundwater extraction provides the city population with most of its water, and rainfall declines will not recharge aquifers in the future. The wetland processes which contribute to the formation of these peat deposits have therefore changed and are becoming vulnerable to fire events with residents increasingly exposed to peat smoke. There is an imperative to characterise this peat smoke to determine if exposures are harmful or toxic, and opportunities to do so in this setting arise due to the absence of bushfire smoke which has confounded other international studies. We have measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate concentrations from an opportunistic assessment of two peat fires. SUMMA canister grab samples and a portable GCMS were used to determine the VOCs with high 1h benzene concentrations of 16 and 30 ppm v/v. PM10 and PM2.5 particulate data were collected using an Osiris continuous analyser with 24h concentrations recorded at varying time periods (within a 5 months timeframe) ranging from 1h maximums of between 23-37 microgm(-3) for PM10 and 50.5-106 microgm(-3) for PM2.5. While the 24h averages were generally below national air quality standards, elevated 1h concentrations were observed on numerous occasions and on most days. Given the proximity of residential development to many peat deposits, a drying climate and the increased risk of arson in peri-urban environments, the health impacts of exposure to peat smoke need to be determined and if necessary measures developed to prevent exposure (which would include maintaining wetland sediment integrity so as to reduce its vulnerability to fire).

  20. Exposure to volatile organic compounds in healthcare settings

    PubMed Central

    LeBouf, Ryan F; Virji, M Abbas; Saito, Rena; Henneberger, Paul K; Simcox, Nancy; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify and summarise volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure profiles of healthcare occupations. Methods Personal (n=143) and mobile area (n=207) evacuated canisters were collected and analysed by a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to assess exposures to 14 VOCs among 14 healthcare occupations in five hospitals. Participants were volunteers identified by their supervisors. Summary statistics were calculated by occupation. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the 14 analyte inputs to five orthogonal factors and identify occupations that were associated with these factors. Linear regressions were used to assess the association between personal and mobile area samples. Results Exposure profiles differed among occupations; ethanol had the highest geometric mean (GM) among nursing assistants (~4900 and ~1900 μg/m3, personal and area), and 2-propanol had the highest GM among medical equipment preparers (~4600 and ~2000 μg/m3, personal and area). The highest total personal VOC exposures were among nursing assistants (~9200 μg/m3), licensed practical nurses (~8700 μg/m3) and medical equipment preparers (~7900 μg/m3). The influence of the PCA factors developed from personal exposure estimates varied by occupation, which enabled a comparative assessment of occupations. For example, factor 1, indicative of solvent use, was positively correlated with clinical laboratory and floor stripping/waxing occupations and tasks. Overall, a significant correlation was observed (r=0.88) between matched personal and mobile area samples, but varied considerably by analyte (r=0.23–0.64). Conclusions Healthcare workers are exposed to a variety of chemicals that vary with the activities and products used during activities. These VOC profiles are useful for estimating exposures for occupational hazard ranking for industrial hygienists as well as epidemiological studies. PMID:25011549

  1. Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in anoxic environments.

    PubMed

    Lomans, B P; Pol, A; Op den Camp, H J M

    2002-01-01

    Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) is investigated due to the impact these compounds are thought to have on environmental processes like global temperature control, acid precipitation and the global sulfur cycle. Moreover, in several kinds of industries like composting plants and the paper industry VOSC are released causing odor problems. Waste streams containing these compounds must be treated in order to avoid the release of these compounds to the atmosphere. This paper describes the general mechanisms for the production and degradation of methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS), two ubiquitous VOSC in anaerobic environments. Slurry incubations indicated that methylation of sulfide and MT resulting in MT and DMS, respectively, is one of the major mechanisms for VOSC in sulfide-rich anaerobic environments. An anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for the formation of MT and DMS through the anaerobic methylation of H2S and MT was isolated from a freshwater pond after enrichment with syringate as a methyl group donating compound and sole carbon source. In spite of the continuous formation of MT and DMS, steady state concentrations are generally very low. This is due to the microbial degradation of these compounds. Experiments with sulfate-rich and sulfate-amended sediment slurries demonstrated that besides methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria can also degrade MT and DMS, provided that sulfate is available. A methanogen was isolated that is able to grow on DMS as the sole carbon source. A large survey of sediments slurries of various origin demonstrated that both isolates are commonly occurring inhabitants of anaerobic environments.

  2. Measuring concentrations of volatile organic compounds in vinyl flooring.

    PubMed

    Cox, S S; Little, J C; Hodgson, A T

    2001-08-01

    The initial solid-phase concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a key parameter influencing the emission characteristics of many indoor materials. Solid-phase measurements are typically made using solvent extraction or thermal headspace analysis. The high temperatures and chemical solvents associated with these methods can modify the physical structure of polymeric materials and, consequently, affect mass transfer characteristics. To measure solid-phase concentrations under conditions resembling those in which the material would be installed in an indoor environment, a new technique was developed for measuring VOC concentrations in vinyl flooring (VF) and similar materials. A 0.09-m2 section of new VF was punched randomly to produce -200 0.78-cm2 disks. The disks were milled to a powder at -140 degrees C to simultaneously homogenize the material and reduce the diffusion path length without loss of VOCs. VOCs were extracted from the VF particles at room temperature by fluidized-bed desorption (FBD) and by direct thermal desorption (DTD) at elevated temperatures. The VOCs in the extraction gas from FBD and DTD were collected on sorbent tubes and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven VOCs emitted by VF were quantified. Concentration measurements by FBD ranged from 5.1 microg/g VF for n-hexadecane to 130 microg/g VF for phenol. Concentrations measured by DTD were higher than concentrations measured by FBD. Differences between FBD and DTD results may be explained using free-volume and dual-mobility sorption theory, but further research is necessary to more completely characterize the complex nature of a diffusant in a polymer matrix.

  3. Solubility of volatile organic compounds in aqueous ammonia solution.

    PubMed

    Görgényi, Miklós; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman; Király, Zoltán

    2005-05-01

    The Ostwald solubility coefficient, L of 17 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the gas phase into water and dilute aqueous ammonia solutions was determined by the equilibrium partitioning in closed system-solid phase micro extraction (EPICS-SPME) method at 303 K and at 0-2.5 mol dm(-3) ammonia concentrations. Ammonia increased the solubility of all VOCs nearly linearly, but to a different extent. The difference in the solubility values in aqueous ammonia solutions (Lmix) compared to pure water (L) is explained on the basis of a Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER) equation made applicable for solvent mixtures, logLmix - logL = x((sNH3 - sH2O)pi2H + (aNH3 - aH2O)Sigma2H + (bNH3 - bH2O)Sigmabeta2H + (vNH3 - VH2O)Vx). sNH3 - sH2O, aNH3 - aH2O, bNH3 - bH2O, vNH3 - vH2O are the differences of solvent parameters, x is the mole fraction, pi2H is the solute dipolarity-polarizability, Sigmaalpha2H is the effective hydrogen bond acidity of the solute, Sigmabeta2H is the effective hydrogen bond basicity of the solute and Vx, the McGowan characteristic volume. The most significant term was v, the phase hydrophobicity. The solubility behavior was explained by the change in structure of the aqueous solution: the presence of ammonia reduces the cavity effect. These findings show that the presence of compounds such as ammonia, frequently observed in environmental waters, especially wastewaters, affect the fugacity of VOCs, having consequences for the environmental partitioning of VOCs and having technical consequences towards wastewater treatment technologies.

  4. Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Non-traditional Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, N. M.; Presto, A. A.; Robinson, A. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from 'traditional' precursors such as monoterpenes and alkylbenzenes has received substantial attention for the past decade. These traditional sources have relatively high emissions into the atmosphere, but they are also relatively volatile. As a consequence, the oxidation products from those precursors must be more than one million times less volatile in order to form SOA. We have recently begun to investigate the role of 'nontraditional' SOA precursors with much lower volatility than the traditional precursors. These intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOC) are typically co-emitted with traditional primary organic aerosol (POA) sources at elevated temperatures, including biomass burning and internal combustion processes. While their emissions are much lower than the traditional precursors, the volatility reduction required of the reaction products is much less drastic, making high-yield SOA formation much more likely. Here we describe the formation of SOA from two precursors in the CMU environmental chamber - heptadecane and pentacosane - under high- and low-NOx conditions. Analysis of the resulting SOA with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer coupled to a thermodenuder allows us to asses the oxidation state and volatility distribution of the condensible products, revealing a high degree of oxidation under high-NOx conditions where most of the organics remain in the vapor phase for at least 2 generations of oxidation chemistry, but a lower (though progressive) degree of oxidation under other conditions. These results will be place in context using a two-dimensional volatility basis set that incorporates both the volatility distribution and oxidation state of complex organic mixtures.

  5. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Joan W.; Inamdar, Arati A.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties. PMID:26402705

  6. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Joan W; Inamdar, Arati A

    2015-09-22

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that "volatoxin" might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  7. Volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone from radioactive wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Ronald J.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.; Luo, Wentai

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are often comingled with low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW), but little is known about subsurface VOC emanations from LLRW landfills. The current study systematically quantified VOCs associated with LLRW over an 11-yr period at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. Unsaturated-zone gas samples of VOCs were collected by adsorption on resin cartridges and analyzed by thermal desorption and GC/MS. Sixty of 87 VOC method analytes were detected in the 110-m-thick unsaturated zone surrounding a LLRW disposal facility. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were detected in 100% of samples collected. Chlorofluorocarbons are powerful greenhouse gases, deplete stratospheric ozone, and are likely released from LLRW facilities worldwide. Soil-gas samples collected from a depth of 24 m and a horizontal distance 100 m south of the nearest waste-disposal trench contained >60,000 ppbv total VOCs, including >37,000 ppbv CFCs. Extensive sampling in the shallow unsaturated zone (0–2 m deep) identified areas where total VOC concentrations exceeded 5000 ppbv at the 1.5-m depth. Volatile organic compound concentrations exceeded background levels up to 300 m from the facility. Maximum vertical diffusive fluxes of total VOCs were estimated to be 1 g m-2 yr-1. Volatile organic compound distributions were similar but not identical to those previously determined for tritium and elemental mercury. To our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize the unsaturated zone distribution of VOCs emanating from a LLRW landfill. Our results may help explain anomalous transport of radionuclides at the ADRS and elsewhere.

  8. Volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone from radioactive wastes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ronald J; Andraski, Brian J; Stonestrom, David A; Luo, Wentai

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are often comingled with low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW), but little is known about subsurface VOC emanations from LLRW landfills. The current study systematically quantified VOCs associated with LLRW over an 11-yr period at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. Unsaturated-zone gas samples of VOCs were collected by adsorption on resin cartridges and analyzed by thermal desorption and GC/MS. Sixty of 87 VOC method analytes were detected in the 110-m-thick unsaturated zone surrounding a LLRW disposal facility. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were detected in 100% of samples collected. Chlorofluorocarbons are powerful greenhouse gases, deplete stratospheric ozone, and are likely released from LLRW facilities worldwide. Soil-gas samples collected from a depth of 24 m and a horizontal distance 100 m south of the nearest waste-disposal trench contained >60,000 ppbv total VOCs, including >37,000 ppbv CFCs. Extensive sampling in the shallow unsaturated zone (0-2 m deep) identified areas where total VOC concentrations exceeded 5000 ppbv at the 1.5-m depth. Volatile organic compound concentrations exceeded background levels up to 300 m from the facility. Maximum vertical diffusive fluxes of total VOCs were estimated to be 1 g m yr. Volatile organic compound distributions were similar but not identical to those previously determined for tritium and elemental mercury. To our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize the unsaturated zone distribution of VOCs emanating from a LLRW landfill. Our results may help explain anomalous transport of radionuclides at the ADRS and elsewhere.

  9. Volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds in suburban Paris: variability, origin and importance for SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Helal, W.; Borbon, A.; Sauvage, S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Freutel, F.; Crippa, M.; Afif, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand-Jolibois, R.; Fronval, I.; Grand, N.; Leonardis, T.; Lopez, M.; Michoud, V.; Miet, K.; Perrier, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Schneider, J.; Siour, G.; Zapf, P.; Locoge, N.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of gaseous and particulate organic carbon were performed during the MEGAPOLI experiments, in July 2009 and January-February 2010, at the SIRTA observatory in suburban Paris. Measurements comprise primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs), of both anthropogenic and biogenic origins, including C12-C16 n-alkanes of intermediate volatility (IVOCs), suspected to be efficient precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The time series of gaseous carbon are generally consistent with times series of particulate organic carbon at regional scale, and are clearly affected by meteorology and air mass origin. Concentration levels of anthropogenic VOCs in urban and suburban Paris were surprisingly low (2-963 ppt) compared to other megacities worldwide and to rural continental sites. Urban enhancement ratios of anthropogenic VOC pairs agree well between the urban and suburban Paris sites, showing the regional extent of anthropogenic sources of similar composition. Contrary to other primary anthropogenic VOCs (aromatics and alkanes), IVOCs showed lower concentrations in winter (< 5 ppt) compared to summer (13-27 ppt), which cannot be explained by the gas-particle partitioning theory. Higher concentrations of most oxygenated VOCs in winter (18-5984 ppt) suggest their dominant primary anthropogenic origin. The respective role of primary anthropogenic gaseous compounds in regional SOA formation was investigated by estimating the SOA mass concentration expected from the anthropogenic VOCs and IVOCs (I / VOCs) measured at SIRTA. From an integrated approach based on emission ratios and SOA yields, 38 % of the SOA measured at SIRTA is explained by the measured concentrations of I / VOCs, with a 2% contribution by C12-C16 n-alkane IVOCs. From the results of an alternative time-resolved approach, the average IVOC contribution to SOA formation is estimated to be 7%, which is half of the average contribution of the traditional aromatic compounds (15%). Both

  10. Global simulation of aromatic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera Perez, David; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of chemical compounds in the atmosphere, the organic group plays a key role in the tropospheric chemistry. Specifically the subgroup called aromatics is of great interest. Aromatics are the predominant trace gases in urban areas due to high emissions, primarily by vehicle exhausts and fuel evaporation. They are also present in areas where biofuel is used (i.e residential wood burning). Emissions of aromatic compounds are a substantial fraction of the total emissions of the volatile organic compounds (VOC). Impact of aromatics on human health is very important, as they do not only contribute to the ozone formation in the urban environment, but they are also highly toxic themselves, especially in the case of benzene which is able to trigger a range of illness under long exposure, and of nitro-phenols which cause detrimental for humans and vegetation even at very low concentrations. The aim of this work is to assess the atmospheric impacts of aromatic compounds on the global scale. The main goals are: lifetime and budget estimation, mixing ratios distribution, net effect on ozone production and OH loss for the most emitted aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene and trimethylbenzenes). For this purpose, we use the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model to build the global atmospheric budget for the most emitted and predominant aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. A set of emissions was prepared in order to include biomass burning, vegetation and anthropogenic sources of aromatics into the model. A chemical mechanism based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) was developed to describe the chemical oxidation in the gas phase of these aromatic compounds. MCM have been reduced in terms of number of chemical equation and species in order to make it affordable in a 3D model. Additionally other features have been added, for instance the production of HONO via ortho

  11. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during malting and beer manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Nigel B.; Costigan, Gavin T.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Woodfield, Michael J.

    Estimates have been made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during different stages of beer manufacture. The estimates are based on recent measurements and plant specification data supplied by manufacturers. Data were obtained for three main manufacturing processes (malting, wort processing and fermentation) for three commercial beer types. Some data on the speciation of emitted compounds have been obtained. Based on these measurements, an estimate of the total unabated VOC emission. from the U.K. brewing industry was calculated as 3.5 kta -1, over 95% of which was generated during barley malting. This value does not include any correction for air pollution control.

  12. Stability of volatile organics in environmental soil samples. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.; Johnson, L.H.; Holladay, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on data generated for the purpose of establishing the stability of 19 volatile organic compounds in environmental soil samples. The study was carried out over a 56 day (for two soils) and a 111 day (for one reference soil) time frame and took into account as many variables as possible within the constraints of budget and time. The objectives of the study were: 1) to provide a data base which could be used to provide guidance on pre-analytical holding times for regulatory purposes; and 2) to provide a basis for the evaluation of data which is generated outside of the currently allowable holding times.

  13. Stability of volatile organics in environmental soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.; Johnson, L.H.; Holladay, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on data generated for the purpose of establishing the stability of 19 volatile organic compounds in environmental soil samples. The study was carried out over a 56 day (for two soils) and a 111 day (for one reference soil) time frame and took into account as many variables as possible within the constraints of budget and time. The objectives of the study were: 1) to provide a data base which could be used to provide guidance on pre-analytical holding times for regulatory purposes; and 2) to provide a basis for the evaluation of data which is generated outside of the currently allowable holding times.

  14. Efficiency of urease and nitrification inhibitors in reducing ammonia volatilization from diverse nitrogen fertilizers applied to different soil types and wheat straw mulching.

    PubMed

    San Francisco, Sara; Urrutia, Oscar; Martin, Vincent; Peristeropoulos, Angelos; Garcia-Mina, Jose Maria

    2011-07-01

    Some authors suggest that the absence of tillage in agricultural soils might have an influence on the efficiency of nitrogen applied in the soil surface. In this study we investigate the influence of no-tillage and soil characteristics on the efficiency of a urease inhibitor (N-(n-butyl)thiophosphoric triamide, NBPT) and a nitrification inhibitor (diciandiamide, DCD) in decreasing ammonia volatilization from urea and ammonium nitrate (AN), respectively. The results indicate that ammonia volatilization in soils amended with urea was significantly higher than in those fertilized with AN. Likewise, the main soil factors affecting ammonia volatilization from urea are clay and sand soil contents. While clay impedes ammonia volatilization, sand favours it. The presence of organic residues on soil surface (no-tillage) tends to increase ammonia volatilization from urea, although this fact depended on soil type. The presence of NBPT in urea fertilizer significantly reduced soil ammonia volatilization. This action of NBPT was negatively affected by acid soil pH and favoured by soil clay content. The presence of organic residues on soil surface amended with urea increased ammonia volatilization, and was particularly high in sandy compared with clay soils. Application of NBPT reduced ammonia volatilization although its efficiency is reduced in acid soils. Concerning AN fertilization, there were no differences in ammonia volatilization with or without DCD in no-tillage soils. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Adsorption of selected volatile organic vapors on multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yang-hsin; Li, Mei-syue

    2008-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes are expected to play an important role in sensing, pollution treatment and separation techniques. This study examines the adsorption behaviors of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), n-hexane, benzene, trichloroethylene and acetone on two multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), CNT1 and CNT2. Among these VOCs, acetone exhibits the highest adsorption capacity. The highest adsorption enthalpies and desorption energies of acetone were also observed. The strong chemical interactions between acetone and both MWCNTs may be the result from chemisorption on the topological defects. The adsorption heats of trichloroethylene, benzene, and n-hexane are indicative of physisorption on the surfaces of both MWCNTs. CNT2 presents a higher adsorption capacity than CNT1 due to the existence of an exterior amorphous carbon layer on CNT2. The amorphous carbon enhances the adsorption capacity of organic chemicals on carbon nanotubes. The morphological and structure order of carbon nanotubes are the primary affects on the adsorption process of organic chemicals.

  16. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hodzic, Alma; Jimenez, Jose L.; Madronich, Sasha; Canagaratna, M. R.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2010-06-21

    It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of traditional anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors. In this study, the 3D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to quantify the contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic vapors (S/IVOC) in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to explicitly include the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA), their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007) ("ROB") and Grieshop et al. (2009) ("GRI") are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. For the first time, 3D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data, but also against and oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (3-6 times) with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009), both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. The predicted anthropogenic POA levels are found to agree within 20% with the observed HOA concentrations for both the ROB and GRI simulations, consistent with the interpretation of the emissions inventory by previous studies. The impact of biomass burning POA within the city is underestimated in comparison to the AMS BBOA, presumably due to insufficient nighttime smoldering emissions. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The production from anthropogenic and biomass burning

  17. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: Potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hodzic, A.; Kleinman, L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Madronich, S.; Canagaratna, M. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Fast, J.

    2010-06-01

    It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors, at least using current mechanisms and parameterizations. In this study, the 3-D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to estimate the potential contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic precursors (S/IVOC) in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to include explicitly the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA), their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007) ('ROB') and Grieshop et al. (2009) ('GRI') are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. The 3-D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data, and for the first time also with oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (2-4 times) with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009), both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The predicted production from anthropogenic and biomass burning S/IVOC represents 40-60% of the total measured SOA at the surface during the day and is somewhat larger than that from commonly measured aromatic VOCs, especially at the T1 site at the edge of the city. The SOA production from the continued multi-generation S/IVOC oxidation products continues actively downwind. Similar

  18. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Madronich, S.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kleinman, L.; Fast, J.

    2010-06-01

    It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors, at least using current mechanisms and parameterizations. In this study, the 3-D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to estimate the potential contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic precursors (S/IVOC) in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to include explicitly the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA), their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007) ("ROB") and Grieshop et al. (2009) ("GRI") are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. The 3-D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data, and for the first time also with oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (2-4 times) with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009), both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The predicted production from anthropogenic and biomass burning S/IVOC represents 40-60% of the total measured SOA at the surface during the day and is somewhat larger than that from commonly measured aromatic VOCs, especially at the T1 site at the edge of the city. The SOA production from the continued multi-generation S/IVOC oxidation products continues actively downwind. Similar

  19. Volatile organic compounds associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Correa, Ricardo; Coronado, Lorena M; Garrido, Anette C; Durant-Archibold, Armando A; Spadafora, Carmenza

    2017-05-02

    In order to identify new ways to prevent transmission of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, efforts have been made to understand how insects are attracted to humans. Vector-host interaction studies have shown that several volatile compounds play an important role in attracting mosquitoes to human targets. A headspace solid-phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HSPME GC-MS) analysis of the volatile organic composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs) and supernatants of ultracentrifugation (SNUs) was carried out in Plasmodium falciparum-infected cultures with high and low parasitemias. A list of 18 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was obtained from the EVs of both infected and uninfected RBCs with 1,2,3-Propanetriol, diacetate (diacetin) increased in the infected EVs, regardless of the parasitemia of the culture. The supernatant analysis, however, gave off 56 VOCs, with pentane 2,2,4-trimethyl being present in all the SNUs of uninfected erythrocytes but absent from the parasite-infected ones. Standing out in this study was hexanal, a reported insect attractant, which was the only VOC present in all samples from SNUs from infected erythrocytes and absent from uninfected ones, suggesting that it originates during parasite infection. The hexanal compound, reportedly a low-level component found in healthy human samples such as breath and plasma, had not been found in previous analyses of P. falciparum-infected patients or cultures. This compound has been reported as an Anopheles gambiae attractant in plants. While the compound could be produced during infection by the malaria parasite in human erythrocytes, the A. gambiae attraction could be used by the parasite as a strategy for transmission.

  20. Identification of volatile organic compounds in human cerumen

    PubMed Central

    Prokop-Prigge, Katharine A.; Thaler, Erica; Wysocki, Charles J.; Preti, George

    2014-01-01

    We report here the initial examination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emanating from human earwax (cerumen). Recent studies link a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette, sub-family C, member 11 gene (ABCC11) to the production of different types of axillary odorants and cerumen. ABCC11 encodes an ATP-driven efflux pump protein that plays an important function in ceruminous apocrine glands of the auditory canal and the secretion of axillary odor precursors. The type of cerumen and underarm odor produced by East Asians differ markedly from that produced by non-Asians. In this initial report we find that both groups emit many of the same VOCs but differ significantly in the amounts produced. The principal odorants are volatile organic C2-to-C6 acids. The physical appearance of cerumen from the two groups also matches previously reported ethnic differences, viz., cerumen from East Asians appears dry and white while that from non-Asians is typically wet and yellowish-brown. PMID:24572763

  1. Identification of volatile organic compounds in human cerumen.

    PubMed

    Prokop-Prigge, Katharine A; Thaler, Erica; Wysocki, Charles J; Preti, George

    2014-03-15

    We report here the initial examination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emanating from human earwax (cerumen). Recent studies link a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette, sub-family C, member 11 gene (ABCC11) to the production of different types of axillary odorants and cerumen. ABCC11 encodes an ATP-driven efflux pump protein that plays an important function in ceruminous apocrine glands of the auditory canal and the secretion of axillary odor precursors. The type of cerumen and underarm odor produced by East Asians differ markedly from that produced by non-Asians. In this initial report we find that both groups emit many of the same VOCs but differ significantly in the amounts produced. The principal odorants are volatile organic C2-to-C6 acids. The physical appearance of cerumen from the two groups also matches previously reported ethnic differences, viz., cerumen from East Asians appears dry and white while that from non-Asians is typically wet and yellowish-brown.

  2. Evaporation of volatile organic compounds from human skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Rachna M; Miller, Matthew A; Kasting, Gerald B

    2013-08-01

    The specific evaporation rates of 21 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from either human skin or a glass substrate mounted in modified Franz diffusion cells were determined gravimetrically. The diffusion cells were positioned either on a laboratory bench top or in a controlled position in a fume hood, simulating indoor and outdoor environments, respectively. A data set of 54 observations (34 skin and 20 glass) was assembled and subjected to a correlation analysis employing 5 evaporative mass transfer relationships drawn from the literature. Models developed by Nielsen et al. (Prediction of isothermal evaporation rates of pure volatile organic compounds in occupational environments: a theoretical approach based on laminar boundary layer theory. Ann Occup Hyg 1995;39:497-511.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Peress, Estimate evaporative losses from spills. Chem Eng Prog 2003; April: 32-34.) were found to be the most effective at correlating observed and calculated evaporation rates under the various conditions. The U.S. EPA model was selected for further use based on its simplicity. This is a turbulent flow model based only on vapor pressure and molecular weight of the VOC and the effective air flow rate u. Optimum values of u for the two laboratory environments studied were 0.23 m s(-1) (bench top) and 0.92 m s(-1) (fume hood).

  3. Transport, behavior, and fate of volatile organic compounds in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds with chemical and physical properties that allow the compounds to move freely between the water and air phases of the environment. VOCs are widespread in the environment because of this mobility. Many VOCs have properties that make them suspected or known hazards to the health of humans and aquatic organisms. Consequently, understanding the processes affecting the concentration and distribution of VOCs in the environment is necessary. The transport, behavior, and fate of VOCs in streams are determined by combinations of chemical, physical, and biological processes. These processes are volatilization, absorption, wet and dry deposition, microbial degradation, sorption, hydrolysis, aquatic photolysis, oxidation, chemical reaction, biocon-centration, advection, and dispersion. The relative importance of each of these processes depends on the characteristics of the VOC and the stream. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program selected 55 VOCs for study. This article reviews the characteristics of the various processes that could affect the transport, behavior, and fate of these VOCs in streams.

  4. Emerging site characterization technologies for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.; Last, G.V.

    1992-05-01

    A Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) expedited response action (ERA) has been initiated at Hanford Site`s 200 West Area for the removal of carbon tetrachloride from the unsaturated soils. In coordination with the ERA, innovative technology demonstrations are being conducted as part of DOE`s Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration in an effort to improve upon baseline technologies. Improved methods for accessing, sampling, and analyzing soil and soil-vapor contaminants is a high priority. Sonic drilling is being evaluated as an alternative to cable-tool drilling, while still providing the advantages of reliability, containment, and waste minimization. Applied Research Associates, Inc. used their cone penetrometer in the 200 West Area to install a permanent soil-gas monitoring probe and to collect soil-gas profile data. However, successful application of this technology will require the development of an improved ability to penetrate coarse gravel units. A Science and Engineering Associates Membrane Instrumentation and Sampling Technique (SEAMIST) system designed for collecting in situ soil samples and air permeability data in between drilling runs at variable depths is being tested in 200 West Area boreholes. Analytical technologies scheduled for testing include supercritical fluid extraction and analysis for non- and semi-volatile organic co-contaminants and an unsaturated flow apparatus developed by Washington State University for the measurement of transport parameters.

  5. Emerging site characterization technologies for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.; Last, G.V.

    1992-05-01

    A Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) expedited response action (ERA) has been initiated at Hanford Site's 200 West Area for the removal of carbon tetrachloride from the unsaturated soils. In coordination with the ERA, innovative technology demonstrations are being conducted as part of DOE's Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration in an effort to improve upon baseline technologies. Improved methods for accessing, sampling, and analyzing soil and soil-vapor contaminants is a high priority. Sonic drilling is being evaluated as an alternative to cable-tool drilling, while still providing the advantages of reliability, containment, and waste minimization. Applied Research Associates, Inc. used their cone penetrometer in the 200 West Area to install a permanent soil-gas monitoring probe and to collect soil-gas profile data. However, successful application of this technology will require the development of an improved ability to penetrate coarse gravel units. A Science and Engineering Associates Membrane Instrumentation and Sampling Technique (SEAMIST) system designed for collecting in situ soil samples and air permeability data in between drilling runs at variable depths is being tested in 200 West Area boreholes. Analytical technologies scheduled for testing include supercritical fluid extraction and analysis for non- and semi-volatile organic co-contaminants and an unsaturated flow apparatus developed by Washington State University for the measurement of transport parameters.

  6. Diagnosing gastrointestinal illnesses using fecal headspace volatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Daniel K; Leggett, Cadman L; Wang, Kenneth K

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from stool are the components of the smell of stool representing the end products of microbial activity and metabolism that can be used to diagnose disease. Despite the abundance of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane that have already been identified in human flatus, the small portion of trace gases making up the VOCs emitted from stool include organic acids, alcohols, esters, heterocyclic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and alkanes, among others. These are the gases that vary among individuals in sickness and in health, in dietary changes, and in gut microbial activity. Electronic nose devices are analytical and pattern recognition platforms that can utilize mass spectrometry or electrochemical sensors to detect these VOCs in gas samples. When paired with machine-learning and pattern recognition algorithms, this can identify patterns of VOCs, and thus patterns of smell, that can be used to identify disease states. In this review, we provide a clinical background of VOC identification, electronic nose development, and review gastroenterology applications toward diagnosing disease by the volatile headspace analysis of stool. PMID:26819529

  7. Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from PVC floor coverings.

    PubMed

    Wiglusz, R; Igielska, B; Sitko, E; Nikel, G; Jarnuszkiewicz, I

    1998-01-01

    In this study 29 PVC floor coverings were tested for emission of vinyl chloride (VC) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A study on the effect of higher temperature on emission of VOCs from newly manufactured PVC flooring was also carried out. The study was conducted in climatic chamber, according to Polish Standard PN-89/Z-04021. GC method was used for analyzing of the compounds emitted. VC was not emitted from any of the floorings tested. Other VOCs were emitted in different concentrations. The influence of temperature on emission was conducted at temperatures of 23 degrees C and 35 degrees C from 2 hrs up to 180 days after introduction of materials in the chamber. The increase of temperature caused increase of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) emission during 24 hrs of experiment. Then the emission was comparable for both temperatures. After 9 days emission of identified and unidentified compounds (TVOC) showed a rapid decay and stayed on very low level during a few months. The study conducted showed that PVC floorings after 10 days of installation in the room should not be source of indoor air contamination.

  8. Diagnosing gastrointestinal illnesses using fecal headspace volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel K; Leggett, Cadman L; Wang, Kenneth K

    2016-01-28

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from stool are the components of the smell of stool representing the end products of microbial activity and metabolism that can be used to diagnose disease. Despite the abundance of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane that have already been identified in human flatus, the small portion of trace gases making up the VOCs emitted from stool include organic acids, alcohols, esters, heterocyclic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and alkanes, among others. These are the gases that vary among individuals in sickness and in health, in dietary changes, and in gut microbial activity. Electronic nose devices are analytical and pattern recognition platforms that can utilize mass spectrometry or electrochemical sensors to detect these VOCs in gas samples. When paired with machine-learning and pattern recognition algorithms, this can identify patterns of VOCs, and thus patterns of smell, that can be used to identify disease states. In this review, we provide a clinical background of VOC identification, electronic nose development, and review gastroenterology applications toward diagnosing disease by the volatile headspace analysis of stool.

  9. Enhancing antioxidant activity of sesamol at frying temperature by addition of additives through reducing volatility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Additives were evaluated to investigate their effects on volatility of sesamol at frying temperature with the hypothesis that the interaction between an additive and sesamol would reduce sesamol volatility. Twenty-two additive:sesamol combinations were examined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) un...

  10. Photocatalytic destruction of volatile organic compounds in water. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Oluic, S.

    1991-12-10

    Ground water at the Anniston Army Depot in Anniston, Alabama has been found to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds. Recent research has indicated that advanced oxidation processes, namely hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by ultraviolet light radiation, can be successful in destroying these contaminants. In this process hydrogen peroxide is decomposed by ultraviolet radiation producing hydroxyl free radicals which in turn oxidize the organic compounds present. A series of batch tests and flow through experiments using this oxidation process was performed on a synthetic wastewater that closely duplicated contaminant concentration levels found at Anniston. These contaminants, 1,2 dichloroethene, trichloroethene, dichloromethane and benzene, were found readily destructed by the UV/H2O2 process both individually and in mixtures during batch testing and in flow-through experiments. All experimentation was performed utilizing a thin film reactor.

  11. Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Piccot, S.D.; Watson, J.J.; Jones, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. It includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. These classes represent general classes of VOC compounds that possess different chemical reactivities in the atmosphere. The inventory shows total global anthropogenic VOC emissions of about 110,000 Gg/yr, about 10% lower than global VOC inventories developed by other researchers. The study identifies the U.S. as the largest emitter (21% of the total global VOC), followed by the USSR, China, India, and Japan. Globally, fuel wood combustion and savanna burning were among the largest VOC emission sources, accounting for over 35% of the total global VOC emissions. The production and use of gasoline, refuse disposal activities, and organic chemical and rubber manufacturing were also found to be significant sources of global VOC emissions.

  12. Oceanic Emissions and Atmospheric Depositions of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Blomquist, B.; Beale, R.; Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) affect the tropospheric oxidative capacity due to their ubiquitous abundance and relatively high reactivity towards the hydroxyal radical. Over the ocean and away from terrestrial emission sources, oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) make up a large fraction of VOCs as airmasses age and become more oxidized. In addition to being produced or destroyed in the marine atmosphere, OVOCs can also be emitted from or deposited to the surface ocean. Here we first present direct air-sea flux measurements of three of the most abundant OVOCs - methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde, by the eddy covariance technique from two cruises in the Atlantic: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The OVOC mixing ratios were quantified by a high resolution proton-reaction-transfer mass spectrometer with isotopically labeled standards and their air-sea (net) fluxes were derived from the eddy covariance technique. Net methanol flux was consistently from the atmosphere to the surface ocean, while acetone varied from supersaturation (emission) in the subtropics to undersaturation (deposition) in the higher latitudes of the North Atlantic. The net air-sea flux of acetaldehyde is near zero through out the Atlantic despite the apparent supersaturation of this compound in the surface ocean. Knowing the dissolved concentrations and in situ production rates of these compounds in seawater, we then estimate their bulk atmospheric depositions and oceanic emissions. Lastly, we summarize the state of knowledge on the air-sea transport of a number of organic gasses, and postulate the magnitude and environmental impact of total organic carbon transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere.

  13. Screening of ground water samples for volatile organic compounds using a portable gas chromatograph

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchmiller, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    A portable gas chromatograph was used to screen 32 ground water samples for volatile organic compounds. Seven screened samples were positive; four of the seven samples had volatile organic substances identified by second-column confirmation. Four of the seven positive, screened samples also tested positive in laboratory analyses of duplicate samples. No volatile organic compounds were detected in laboratory analyses of samples that headspace screening indicated to be negative. Samples that contained volatile organic compounds, as identified by laboratory analysis, and that contained a volatile organic compound present in a standard of selected compounds were correctly identified by using the portable gas chromatography. Comparisons of screened-sample data with laboratory data indicate the ability to detect selected volatile organic compounds at concentrations of about 1 microgram per liter in the headspace of water samples by use of a portable gas chromatography. -Author

  14. A method for the combined measurement of volatile and condensable organic AMC in semiconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles M.; Zaloga, Emily C.; Lobert, Jürgen M.

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring airborne molecular contamination (AMC) at the parts per trillion (ppt) level in cleanroom environments, scanner applications and compressed gas lines is essential for processes, equipment and yield-control. For the operation of EUV tools, in particular, volatile organic contamination is known to have as much impact as condensable organic compounds, which requires a suitable sampling and measurement methodology. Some of the current industry standards use sample traps comprised of porous 2,6-diphenylene-oxide polymer resin, such as Tenax®, for measuring volatile organic (<6 C-atoms, approximately IPA/acetone to toluene) and condensable organic (>6 C atoms, about toluene and higher) AMC. Inherent problems associated with these traps are a number of artifacts and chemical reactions that reduce accuracy of reported organic AMC concentrations. The break-down of the polymeric material forms false positive artifacts when used in the presence of reactive gases, such as nitrous acid and ozone, which attack and degrade the polymer to form detectable AMC. Most importantly, these traps have poor capture efficiency for volatile organic compounds (VOC). To address the disadvantages of polymer-based sample traps, we developed a method based on carbonaceous, multi-layered adsorbent traps to replace the 2,6-diphenylene-oxide polymer resin sample trap type. Along with the new trap's ability to retain volatile organics, the trap was found to provide artifact-free results. With industry trends towards detecting more contaminants while continuously reducing required reporting limits for those compounds, artifact-free and accurate detection of AMC is needed at the parts per quadrillion (ppq) level. The proposed, multi-layered trap substantially increases laboratory productivity and reduces cost by eliminating the need to analyze condensable and volatile organic compounds in two separate methods. In our studies, even some organic compounds with six C-atoms, that are part of

  15. Poly(L-aspartic acid) derivative soluble in a volatile organic solvent for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nam Muk; Oh, Kyung Taek; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Eun Seong

    2012-09-01

    In order to develop a novel functional poly(L-amino acid) that can dissolve in volatile organic solvents, we prepared poly[L-aspartic acid-g-(3-diethylaminopropyl)]-b-poly(ethylene glycol) [poly(L-Asp-g-DEAP)-b-PEG] via the conjugation of 3-diethylaminopropyl (DEAP) to carboxylate groups of poly(L-Asp) (M(n) 4 K)-b-PEG (M(n) 2 K). This poly(L-aspartic acid) derivative evidenced a relatively high solubility in volatile organic solvents such as dichloromethane, chloroform, and acetone. We fabricated a model nanostructure (i.e., polymeric micelle) using poly(L-Asp-g-DEAP)-b-PEG by the film rehydration method, which involves the simple removal of the volatile organic solvent (dichloromethane) used to dissolve polymer, reducing concerns about organic solvents remaining in a nano-sized particle. Interestingly, this micelle showed the pH-stimulated release of encapsulated model drug [i.e., doxorubicin (DOX)] due to the protonation of DEAP according to the pH of the solution. We expect that this poly(L-aspartic acid) derivative promises to provide pharmaceutical potential for constituting a new stimuli-sensitive drug carrier for various drug molecules.

  16. Volatility of organic aerosol and its components in the Megacity of Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciga, A.; Karnezi, E.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Psichoudaki, M.; Engelhart, G. J.; Lee, B.-H.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-08-01

    Using a mass transfer model and the volatility basis set, we estimate the volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA) components during summer and winter in Paris, France as part of the collaborative project MEGAPOLI. The concentrations of the OA components as a function of temperature were measured combining data from a thermodenuder and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) had similar volatility distributions for the summer and winter campaigns with half of the material in the saturation concentration bin of 10 μg m-3 and another 35-40 % consisting of low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs and ELVOCs, respectively). The winter cooking OA (COA) was more than an order of magnitude less volatile than the summer COA. The low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA) factor detected in the summer had the lowest volatility of all the derived factors and consisted almost exclusively of ELVOCs. The volatility for the semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) was significantly higher than that of the LV-OOA, containing both semi-volatile organic components (SVOCs) and LVOCs. The oxygenated OA (OOA) factor in winter consisted of SVOCs (45 %), LVOCs (25 %) and ELVOCs (30 %). The volatility of marine OA (MOA) was higher than that of the other factors containing around 60 % SVOCs. The biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor contained components with a wide range of volatilities with significant contributions from both SVOCs (50 %) and LVOCs (30 %). Finally, combining the O : C ratio and volatility distributions of the various factors, we incorporated our results into the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS). Our results show that the factors cover a broad spectrum of volatilities with no direct link between the average volatility and average O : C of the OA components. Agreement between our findings and previous publications is encouraging for our understanding of the

  17. 75 FR 40760 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Volatile Organic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... Organic Compound Site-Specific State Implementation Plan for Abbott Laboratories AGENCY: Environmental... the three fluid bed dryers previously had a five tons volatile organic compound (VOC) per year..., Volatile organic compounds. Dated: June 30, 2010. Walter W. Kovalick Jr., Acting Regional...

  18. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design...

  19. 75 FR 57390 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Volatile Organic... definition of ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative Code (AAC) section 335-3... organic compounds) have different levels of reactivity; they do not react at the same speed, or do...

  20. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design...

  1. 75 FR 24404 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Organic Compound Automobile Refinishing Rules for Indiana AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile refinishing rules to all persons in Indiana who sell or..., Volatile organic compounds. Dated: March 31, 2010. Walter W. Kovalick Jr., Acting Regional...

  2. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design...

  3. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design...

  4. Formation of organic nanoparticles by electrospinning of volatile microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Dvores, Michelle P; Marom, Gad; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2012-05-01

    This study presents a method for one-step formation of poly(ethylene oxide) nanofibers incorporating nanoparticles of a poorly water-soluble compound. Using the new method reported here, nanofiber-nanoparticle composites are fabricated in one step by electrospinning of an oil-in-water microemulsion, in which a model material, propylparaben, has been dissolved within the volatile dispersed phase in the presence of a high-molecular-weight polymer. The approach is based on nanoscale confinement to the dispersed phase of an oil-in-water microemulsion with a volatile oil phase, in which the poorly water-soluble materials are dissolved. Thus, when the thermodynamically stable oil-in-water microemulsion is combined with the rapid evaporation of solvent inherent in the electrospinning process, the droplets are converted into organic nanoparticles embedded within a polymeric nanofiber. In addition to possessing process simplicity, this method exhibits a very high percentage of nanoparticle loading with desirable active material properties. Specifically, the diameter of the nanofibers is in the range of 60-185 nm, and propylparaben exists within the nanofiber as nanocrystals of 30-120 nm. These dimensions suggest that the nanofiber-nanocrystal composites could serve as a delivery system for water-insoluble materials.

  5. Measurement of volatile organic compounds in human blood.

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, D L; Bonin, M A; Cardinali, F L; McCraw, J M; Wooten, J V

    1996-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are an important public health problem throughout the developed world. Many important questions remain to be addressed in assessing exposure to these compounds. Because they are ubiquitous and highly volatile, special techniques must be applied in the analytical determination of VOCs. The analytical methodology chosen to measure toxicants in biological materials must be well validated and carefully carried out; poor quality assurance can lead to invalid results that can have a direct bearing on treating exposed persons. The pharmacokinetics of VOCs show that most of the internal dose of these compounds is quickly eliminated, but there is a fraction that is only slowly removed, and these compounds may bioaccumulate. VOCs are found in the general population at the high parts-per-trillion range, but some people with much higher levels have apparently been exposed to VOC sources away from the workplace. Smoking is the most significant confounder to internal dose levels of VOCs and must be considered when evaluating suspected cases of exposure. PMID:8933028

  6. First Characterisation of Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Banana Plants

    PubMed Central

    Berhal, Chadi; De Clerck, Caroline; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Levicek, Carolina; Boullis, Antoine; Kaddes, Amine; Jijakli, Haïssam M.; Verheggen, François; Massart, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana while cooking cultivars are widely consumed locally around the banana belt production area. Many plants, if not all, produce Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as a means of communication with their environment. Although flower and fruit VOCs have been studied for banana, the VOCs produced by the plant have never been identified despite their importance in plant health and development. A volatile collection methodology was optimized to improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of VOCs analysis from banana plants. We have identified 11 VOCs for the Cavendish, mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene (87.90 ± 11.28 ng/μl), methyl salicylate (33.82 ± 14.29) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (29.60 ± 11.66), and 14 VOCs for the Pacific Plantain cultivar, mainly (Z,E)-α-farnesene (799.64 ± 503.15), (E,E)-α-farnesene (571.24 ± 381.70) and (E) β ocimene (241.76 ± 158.49). This exploratory study paves the way for an in-depth characterisation of VOCs emitted by Musa plants. PMID:28508885

  7. First Characterisation of Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Banana Plants.

    PubMed

    Berhal, Chadi; De Clerck, Caroline; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Levicek, Carolina; Boullis, Antoine; Kaddes, Amine; Jijakli, Haïssam M; Verheggen, François; Massart, Sébastien

    2017-05-16

    Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana while cooking cultivars are widely consumed locally around the banana belt production area. Many plants, if not all, produce Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as a means of communication with their environment. Although flower and fruit VOCs have been studied for banana, the VOCs produced by the plant have never been identified despite their importance in plant health and development. A volatile collection methodology was optimized to improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of VOCs analysis from banana plants. We have identified 11 VOCs for the Cavendish, mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene (87.90 ± 11.28 ng/μl), methyl salicylate (33.82 ± 14.29) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (29.60 ± 11.66), and 14 VOCs for the Pacific Plantain cultivar, mainly (Z,E)-α-farnesene (799.64 ± 503.15), (E,E)-α-farnesene (571.24 ± 381.70) and (E) β ocimene (241.76 ± 158.49). This exploratory study paves the way for an in-depth characterisation of VOCs emitted by Musa plants.

  8. Wildlife ecological screening levels for inhalation of volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Patricia; Lutz, Jill; Markwiese, James; Ryti, Randall; Mirenda, Rich

    2007-06-01

    For most chemicals, evaluation of ecological risk typically does not address inhalation because ingestion dominates exposure. However, burrowing ecological receptors have an increased exposure potential from inhalation at sites contaminated with volatile chemicals in the subsurface. Evaluation of ecological risk from contaminants like volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) is constrained by a lack of relevant ecological screening levels (ESLs). To address this need, inhalation ESLs were developed for 16 VOCs: Acetone, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chloromethane, dichlorodifluoromethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, methylene chloride, tetrachloroethene, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethene, trichlorofluoromethane, and total xylene. These ESLs are based on Botta's pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae) as a representative fossorial receptor. The ESLs are presented with an emphasis on the process for developing inhalation toxicity reference values to illustrate the selection of suitable toxicity data and effect levels from the literature. The resulting ESLs provide a quantitative method for evaluating ecological risk of VOCs through comparison to relevant exposure data such as direct burrow-air measurements. The toxicity reference value development and ESL calculation processes and assumptions detailed here are provided as bases from which risk assessors can use or refine to suit site-specific needs with respect to toxicity and exposure inputs.

  9. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Abrell, L.; Kurc, S. A.; Huxman, T.; Ortega, J.; Guenther, A.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from the CREosote ATmosphere Interactions through Volatile Emissions (CREATIVE 2009) field study in southern Arizona aimed at quantifying emission rates of VOCs from creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) during the summer 2009 monsoon season. This species was chosen because of its vast distribution in North and South American deserts and because its resins have been reported to contain a rich set of volatile organic compounds (VOC). While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitations. However, during the North American monsoon, a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June (<5 mm precipitation) to a rainy July (>80 mm) occurs over large areas of the Sonoran desert in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. We observed a strong diurnal pattern of branch emissions and ambient concentrations of an extensive suite of VOCs with maxima in early afternoon. These include VOCs typically observed in forest sites (oxygenated VOCs and volatile isoprenoids) as well as a large number of other compounds, some of which have not been previously described from any plant including 1-chloro-2-methoxy-benzene and isobutyronitrile. Although generally considered to be derived from anthropogenic sources, we observed emissions of aromatic compounds including benzene, and a broad range of phenolics. Dimethyl sulfide emissions from creosotebush were higher than reported from any previously studied plant suggesting that terrestrial ecosystems should be reconsidered as an important source of this climatically important gas. We also present direct, primary emission measurements of isoprene and its apparent oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and 3-methyl furan (the later three compounds are typically assumed to form from secondary reactions within the atmosphere), as well as a group of compounds considered

  10. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Abrell, L.; Kurc, S. A.; Huxman, T.; Ortega, J.; Guenther, A.

    2010-07-01

    The emission of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from plants impacts both climate and air quality by fueling atmospheric chemistry and by contributing to aerosol particles. While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitations. However, during the North American monsoon, a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June (<5 mm precipitation) to a rainy July (>80 mm) occurs over large areas of the Sonoran desert in the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico. We present results from the CREosote ATmosphere Interactions through Volatile Emissions (CREATIVE 2009) field study in Southern Arizona aimed at quantifying emission rates of VOCs from creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) during the summer 2009 monsoon season. This species was chosen because of its vast distribution in North and South American deserts and because its resins have been reported to contain a rich set of VOCs. We observed a strong diurnal pattern with branch emissions and ambient concentrations of an extensive suite of VOCs with maxima in early afternoon. These include VOCs typically observed in forest sites (oxygenated VOCs and volatile isoprenoids) as well as a large number of other compounds, some of which have not been previously described from any plant including 1-chloro-2-methoxy-benzene and isobutyronitrile. Although generally considered to be derived from anthropogenic sources, we observed emissions of aromatic compounds including benzene, and a broad range of phenolics. Dimethyl sulfide emissions from creosotebush were higher than reported from any previously studied plant suggesting that terrestrial ecosystems should be reconsidered as an important source of this climatically important gas. We also present direct, primary emission measurements of isoprene and its apparent oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and 3-methyl furan

  11. 78 FR 11583 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Tennessee: Revisions to Volatile Organic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Organic Compound Definition AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule... compounds excluded from the definition of ``Volatile Organic Compound'' (VOC). EPA is approving this SIP... atmospheric photochemical reactions. Compounds of carbon (or organic compounds) have different levels...

  12. 78 FR 29032 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Tennessee: Revisions to Volatile Organic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... Organic Compound Definition AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... excluded from the definition of ``Volatile Organic Compound'' (VOC). EPA is approving this SIP revision... atmospheric photochemical reactions. Compounds of carbon (or organic compounds) have different levels...

  13. Development and mining of a volatile organic compound database.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Morita, Aki Hirai; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Muto, Ai; Nishioka, Takaaki; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are small molecules that exhibit high vapor pressure under ambient conditions and have low boiling points. Although VOCs contribute only a small proportion of the total metabolites produced by living organisms, they play an important role in chemical ecology specifically in the biological interactions between organisms and ecosystems. VOCs are also important in the health care field as they are presently used as a biomarker to detect various human diseases. Information on VOCs is scattered in the literature until now; however, there is still no available database describing VOCs and their biological activities. To attain this purpose, we have developed KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology Database, which contains the information on the relationships between VOCs and their emitting organisms. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology is also linked with the KNApSAcK Core and KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database to provide further information on the metabolites and their biological activities. The VOC database can be accessed online.

  14. Development and Mining of a Volatile Organic Compound Database

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md.; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Morita, Aki Hirai; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Muto, Ai; Nishioka, Takaaki; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are small molecules that exhibit high vapor pressure under ambient conditions and have low boiling points. Although VOCs contribute only a small proportion of the total metabolites produced by living organisms, they play an important role in chemical ecology specifically in the biological interactions between organisms and ecosystems. VOCs are also important in the health care field as they are presently used as a biomarker to detect various human diseases. Information on VOCs is scattered in the literature until now; however, there is still no available database describing VOCs and their biological activities. To attain this purpose, we have developed KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology Database, which contains the information on the relationships between VOCs and their emitting organisms. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology is also linked with the KNApSAcK Core and KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database to provide further information on the metabolites and their biological activities. The VOC database can be accessed online. PMID:26495281

  15. Role of Aerosol Liquid Water in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Volatile Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Faust, Jennifer A; Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2017-02-07

    A key mechanism for atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation occurs when oxidation products of volatile organic compounds condense onto pre-existing particles. Here, we examine effects of aerosol liquid water (ALW) on relative SOA yield and composition from α-pinene ozonolysis and the photooxidation of toluene and acetylene by OH. Reactions were conducted in a room-temperature flow tube under low-NOx conditions in the presence of equivalent loadings of deliquesced (∼20 μg m(-3) ALW) or effloresced (∼0.2 μg m(-3) ALW) ammonium sulfate seeds at exactly the same relative humidity (RH = 70%) and state of wall conditioning. We found 13% and 19% enhancements in relative SOA yield for the α-pinene and toluene systems, respectively, when seeds were deliquesced rather than effloresced. The relative yield doubled in the acetylene system, and this enhancement was partially reversible upon drying the prepared SOA, which reduced the yield by 40% within a time scale of seconds. We attribute the high relative yield of acetylene SOA on deliquesced seeds to aqueous partitioning and particle-phase reactions of the photooxidation product glyoxal. The observed range of relative yields for α-pinene, toluene, and acetylene SOA on deliquesced and effloresced seeds suggests that ALW plays a complicated, system-dependent role in SOA formation.

  16. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 d...

  17. Source apportionment of ambient volatile organic compounds in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Shao, Min; Liu, Ying; Lu, Sihua; Kuster, William; Goldan, Paul; Xie, Shaodong

    2007-06-15

    The ambient air quality standard for ozone is frequently exceeded in Beijing in summer and autumn. Source apportionments of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are precursors of ground-level ozone formation, can be helpful to the further study of tropospheric ozone formation. In this study, ambient concentrations of VOCs were continuously measured with a time resolution of 30 min in August 2005 in Beijing. By using positive matrix factorization (PMF), eight sources for the selected VOC species were extracted. Gasoline-related emissions (the combination of gasoline exhaust and gas vapor), petrochemicals, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contributed 52, 20, and 11%, respectively, to total ambient VOCs. VOC emissions from natural gas (5%), painting (5%), diesel vehicles (3%), and biogenic emissions (2%) were also identified. The gasoline-related, petrochemical, and biogenic sources were estimated to be the major contributors to ozone formation potentials in Beijing.

  18. Laboratory methods for volatile organic compounds evolved in mineralization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, W.J.; Arnold, S.M.; Moran, B.N.

    1995-11-01

    A system to study mineralization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed using commercially available solid-phase VOC traps and impingers to collect CO{sub 2} as well as VOCs breaking out from the solid-phase trap. The efficiencies of VOC traps containing activated charcoal (AC) or graphitized carbon black (GCB) for absorbing [{sup 14}C]trichloroethylene ([{sup 14}C]TCE) and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} were evaluated, and approaches for minimizing VOC losses from reaction vessels were established. Mass balances showed AC and GCB absorbed similar amounts of [{sup 14}C]TCE. However, GCB had no detectable {sup 14}CO{sub 2} retention, whereas AC absorbed about 7% of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Because {sup 14}CO{sub 2} absorption could influence the interpretation of mineralization experiments, GCB was concluded to be the better VOC-trapping matrix.

  19. Apparatus for sensing volatile organic chemicals in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Kottenstette, Richard; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2005-06-07

    A chemical-sensing apparatus is formed from the combination of a chemical preconcentrator which sorbs and concentrates particular volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and one or more chemiresistors that sense the VOCs after the preconcentrator has been triggered to release them in concentrated form. Use of the preconcentrator and chemiresistor(s) in combination allows the VOCs to be detected at lower concentration than would be possible using the chemiresistor(s) alone and further allows measurements to be made in a variety of fluids, including liquids (e.g. groundwater). Additionally, the apparatus provides a new mode of operation for sensing VOCs based on the measurement of decay time constants, and a method for background correction to improve measurement precision.

  20. Identification of volatile organic compounds in flowers of Astragalus lagopoides.

    PubMed

    Movafeghi, Ali; Delazar, Abbas; Amini, Majid; Asnaashari, Solmaz

    2012-01-01

    Composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in flowers of Astragalus lagopoides was studied using a hydrodistillation extraction procedure coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The analyses allowed the identification of a number of 25 compounds, among which the presence of several bioactive aromatic derivatives such as guaiacol, eugenol, linalool, α- and 4-terpineol as well as nerol was attention-grabbing. Moreover, some other compounds like cyclohexane, 2-bromoethyl with repellent function also appeared to be present in the flower. As a result, the floral VOCs profile of A. lagopoides might reflect an adaptation to attract specialised pollinator insects. These findings provide important information for advances in understanding the ecological and evolutionary perspectives of pollination biology of the giant genus Astragalus.

  1. Exposure of humans to a volatile organic mixture. 2. Sensory

    SciTech Connect

    Hudnell, H.K.; Otto, D.A.; House, D.E.; Molhave, L.

    1992-01-01

    Time-course functions for symptoms of the sick building syndrome were derived from 66 healthy males exposed to clean air and a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture in separate sessions. The mixture contained 22 VOCs (25 mg/cu m total concentration) commonly found air-borne in new or recently renovated buildings. Subjects rated the intensity of perceived irritation, odor, and other variables before and twice during 2.75 hr exposure periods. Eye and throat irritation, headache, and drowsiness increased or showed no evidence of adaptation during exposure, whereas odor intensity decreased by 30%. These results indicate that irritation intensity and other symptoms are not related in any simple fashion to odor intensity, suggesting that the symptoms may not be a psychosomatic response to detection of an aversive odor. Instead, subthreshold levels of VOCs may interact additively or hyperadditively and stimulate trigeminal nerve receptors.

  2. Catalytic oxidation process cleans volatile organics from exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Haggin, J.

    1994-06-27

    Unsteady-state catalytic oxidation is the basis of a technology now becoming available in the US for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial exhaust streams. The technology originated in Russia and is being developed for the US market by Monsanto Enviro-Chem Systems, St. Louis. At least 149 of the 189 pollutants identified by EPA are VOCs. EPA estimates that the initial cost to industry for equipment to remove the hazardous materials will be about $350 million. The expected annual maintenance bill to treat the major pollution sources is about $182 million. Catalytic oxidizers are applicable to most, but not all, VOC removal applications. The advantages in most cases are VOC removal efficiencies of at least 99%, half the energy requirement of other systems, low operating temperatures, stable operation with variable flow rates and VOC concentrations, and low capital and operating costs.

  3. [Binding of Volatile Organic Compounds to Edible Biopolymers].

    PubMed

    Misharina, T A; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I; Medvedeva, I B

    2016-01-01

    Capillary gas chromatography was used to study the influence of the composition and structure of different edible polymers (polysaccharides, vegetable fibers, and animal protein gelatin) on the binding of essential oil components. The retention of volatile organic compounds on biopolymers was shown to depend on their molecule structure and the presence, type, and position of a functional group. The maximum extent of the binding was observed for nonpolar terpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, and the minimum extent was observed for alcohols. The components of essential oils were adsorbed due mostly to hydrophobic interactions. It was shown that the composition and structure of a compound, its physico-chemical state, and the presence of functional groups influence the binding. Gum arabic and guar gum were found to bind nonpolar compounds to a maximum and minimum extent, respectively. It was demonstrated the minimum adsorption ability of locust bean gum with respect to all studied compounds.

  4. Measurement of volatile organic chemicals at selected sites in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Viezee, W.; Sitton, B.; Ferek, R.

    1992-01-01

    Urban air concentrations of 24 selected volatile organic chemicals that may be potentially hazardous to human health and environment were measured during field experiments conducted at two California locations, at Houston, and at Denver. Chemicals measured included chlorofluorocarbons, halomethanes, haloethanes, halopropanes, chloroethylenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons. With emphasis on California sites, data from these studies are analyzed and interpreted with respect to variabilities in ambient air concentrations, diurnal changes, relation to prevailing meteorology, sources and trends. Except in a few instances, mean concentrations are typically between 0 and 5 ppb. Significant variabilities in atmospheric concentrations associated with intense sources and adverse meteorological conditions are shown to exist. In addition to short-term variability, there is evidence of systematic diurnal and seasonal trends. In some instances it is possible to detect declining trends resulting from the effectiveness of control strategies.

  5. Volatile Organic Compound Optical Fiber Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Elosua, Cesar; Matias, Ignacio R.; Bariain, Candido; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) detection is a topic of growing interest with applications in diverse fields, ranging from environmental uses to the food or chemical industries. Optical fiber VOC sensors offering new and interesting properties which overcame some of the inconveniences found on traditional gas sensors appeared over two decades ago. Thanks to its minimum invasive nature and the advantages that optical fiber offers such as light weight, passive nature, low attenuation and the possibility of multiplexing, among others, these sensors are a real alternative to electronic ones in electrically noisy environments where electronic sensors cannot operate correctly. In the present work, a classification of these devices has been made according to the sensing mechanism and taking also into account the sensing materials or the different methods of fabrication. In addition, some solutions already implemented for the detection of VOCs using optical fiber sensors will be described with detail.

  6. Volatile organic components in the Skylab 4 spacecraft atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebich, H. M.; Bertsch, W.; Zlatkis, A.; Schneider, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    The volatile organic components in the spacecraft cabin atmosphere of Skylab 4 were trapped on a solid adsorbent at various times during the mission. In post-flight analyses, more than 300 compounds in concentrations from less than 1 ppb up to 8000 ppb could be detected by high-resolution gas chromatography. In the samples of the 11th, 47th, and 77th day of the mission, approximately 100 components in the molecular weight range from 58 to 592 were identified by mass spectrometry. Besides components known from other environments, such as alkanes, alkenes, and alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons, components typical of the human metabolism, such as ketones and alcohols, were found. Other typical components in the spacecraft atmosphere included fluorocarbons and various silicone compounds, mostly normal and cyclic methylsiloxanes.

  7. Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Pressley, S.; Allwine, Eugene J.; Westberg, Halvor; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.

    2005-10-19

    Direct measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that include all anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in urban areas are a missing requirement to evaluate emission inventories and constrain current photochemical modelling practices. Here we demonstrate the use of micrometeorological techniques coupled with fast-response sensors to measure urban VOC fluxes from a neighborhood of Mexico City, where the spatial variability of surface cover and roughness is high. Fluxes of olefins, methanol, acetone, toluene and C2-benzenes were measured and compared with the local gridded emission inventory. VOC fluxes exhibited a clear diurnal pattern with a strong relationship to vehicular traffic. Recent photochemical modeling results suggest that VOC emissions are significantly underestimated in Mexico City1, but the measured VOC fluxes described here indicate that the official emission inventory2 is essentially correct. Thus, other explanations are needed to explain the photochemical modelling results.

  8. Alveolar air volatile organic compound extractor for clinical breath sampling.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Geethanga; Beyette, Fred R

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar air Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) extractor is a handheld breath-sampling device for clinical breath analysis. The device consists two main components: (1) An alveolar air separator, (2) A VOC extractor. The alveolar air separator splits exhaled air based on total exhaled air volume directing alveolar air towards the VOC extractor and dead space air to into an exhaust channel. The VOC extractor collects the VOCs from alveolar air into a modified Sold Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) filament. Feasibility of using the SPME filament to collect a quantifiable breath sample directly from exhaled breath is experimentally validated. Exhaled breath acetone is quantified using alveolar air VOC extractor and a GC/MS system.

  9. Organic volatile sulfur compounds in inland aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    The speciation, concentration, and fluxes of organic volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in a wide variety of inland aquatic systems wee studied. Dissolved VSCs were sparged from water samples, trapped cryogenically, and quantified by gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Species detected and mean surface water concentrations were: carbonyl sulfide (COS), 0.091-7.6 nM; methanethiol (MSH), undetected-180 nM; dimethyl sulfide (DMS), 0.48-1290 nM; carbon disulfide (CS[sub 2]), undetected-69 nM; dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), undetected-68 nM. The range in surface water concentrations of over five orders of magnitude was influenced principally by lake depth and sulfate concentration ([SO[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  10. [Definition and Control Indicators of Volatile Organic Compounds in China].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Zou, Lan; Li, Xiao-qian; Che, Fei; Zhao, Guo-hua; Li, Gang; Zhang, Guo-ning

    2015-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the most complex of a wide range of pollutants that harms human health and ecological environment. However, various countries around the world differ on its definition and control indicators. Its definition, control indicators and monitoring methods of our country and local standards were also different. Based on detailed analysis of the definitions and control indicators of VOCs, the recommendations were proposed: the definition of VOCs should be different according to the different concerns between "air quality management" and "pollution emissions management"; base on different control way from production source, technological process, terminal emission, total discharge control, the control indicators system consists of 10 indicators; to formulate industry VOCs emissions standards, the most effective control way and indicators should be chosen according to characteristics of production process, way of VOCs emissions and possible control measures, etc.

  11. Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

    2012-03-22

    The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

  12. Investigation of michelson interferometer for volatile organic compound sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuarman; Rivai, Muhammad; Arief Sardjono, Tri; Purwanto, Djoko

    2017-05-01

    The sensor device is required to monitor harmful gases in the environments and industries. Many volatile organic compounds adsorbed on the sensor material will result in changes of the optical properties including the refractive index and the film thickness. This study designed and realized a vapor detection device using the principle of Michelson Interferometer. The laser light beamed with a wavelength of 620 nm was divided by using a beam splitter. Interference occurredwhen the two separated lights were recombined. The phase difference between the two beams determined whether the interference would destruct or construct each other to produce the curved fringes. The vapor samples used in these experiments were ethanol and benzene. The results showed that the ethanol concentration of 1611-32210 ppm produced a fringe shift of 197 pixels, while the concentration of benzene of 964-19290 ppm produced a fringe shift of 273 pixels.

  13. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds & their photochemical transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhujun; Hohaus, Thorsten; Tillmann, Ralf; Andres, Stefanie; Kuhn, Uwe; Rohrer, Franz; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic activities emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) into the atmosphere. While it is known that land vegetation accounts for 90% of the global VOC emissions, only a few molecules' emission factors are understood. Through VOCs atmospheric oxidation intermediate products are formed. The detailed chemical mechanisms involved are insufficiently known to date and need to be understood for air quality management and climate change predictions. In an experiment using a PTR-ToF-MS with the new-built plant chamber SAPHIR-PLUS in Forschungszentrum Juelich, biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from Quercus ilex trees were measured. The BVOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes, minor emissions of isoprene and methanol were also observed with the overall emission pattern typical for Quercus ilex trees in the growing season. Monoterpenes and isoprene emissions showed to be triggered by light. Additionally, their emissions showed clear exponential temperature dependence under constant light condition as reported in literature. As a tracer for leaf growth, methanol emission showed an abrupt increase at the beginning of light exposure. This is explained as instantaneous release of methanol produced during the night once stomata of leaves open upon light exposure. Emission of methanol showed a near linear increase with temperature in the range of 10 to 35 °C. BVOC were transferred from the plant chamber PLUS to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR, where their oxidation products from O3 oxidation were measured with PTR-ToF-MS. Gas phase oxidation products such as acetone and acetaldehyde were detected. A quantitative analysis of the data will be presented, including comparison of observations to the Master Chemical Mechanism model.

  14. Arsenic speciation and volatilization from flooded paddy soils amended with different organic matters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai; Jia, Yan; Sun, Guo-Xin; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2012-02-21

    Arsenic (As) methylation and volatilization in soil can be increased after organic matter (OM) amendment, though the factors influencing this are poorly understood. Herein we investigate how amended OM influences As speciation as well as how it alters microbial processes in soil and soil solution during As volatilization. Microcosm experiments were conducted on predried and fresh As contaminated paddy soils to investigate microbial mediated As speciation and volatilization under different OM amendment conditions. These experiments indicated that the microbes attached to OM did not significantly influence As volatilization. The arsine flux from the treatment amended with 10% clover (clover-amended treatment, CT) and dried distillers grain (DDG) (DDG-amended treatment, DT2) were significantly higher than the control. Trimethylarsine (TMAs) was the dominant species in arsine derived from CT, whereas the primary arsine species from DT2 was TMAs and arsine (AsH(3)), followed by monomethylarsine (MeAsH(2)). The predominant As species in the soil solutions of CT and DT2 were dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA) and As(V), respectively. OM addition increased the activities of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria (harboring aroA-like genes), though they did not increase or even decrease the abundance of arsenite oxidizers. In contrast, the abundance of arsenate reducers (carrying the arsC gene) was increased by OM amendment; however, significant enhancement of activity of arsenate reducers was observed only in CT. Our results demonstrate that OM addition significantly increased As methylation and volatilization from the investigated paddy soil. The physiologically active bacteria capable of oxidization, reduction, and methylation of As coexisted and mediated the As speciation in soil and soil solution.

  15. EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND AND HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR U.S. AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of an evaluation of carbon paper adsorption catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) as control technologies to reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from paint spray booths.

  16. EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND AND HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR U.S. AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of an evaluation of carbon paper adsorption catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) as control technologies to reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from paint spray booths.

  17. Application of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission control.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, P M; Dawande, S D

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum products have wide range of volatility and are required to be stored in bulk. The evaporation losses are significant and it is a economic as well as environmental concern, since evaporative losses of petroleum products cause increased VOC in ambient air. Control of these losses poses a major problem for the storage tank designers. Ever rising cost of petroleum products further adds to the gravity of the problem. Condensation is one of the technologies for reducing volatile organic compounds emissions. Condensation is effected by condenser, which is basically a heat exchanger and the heat exchanger configuration plays an important role. The horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger is a promising configuration that finds an application in VOC control. This paper attempts to understand underlying causes of emissions and analyse the option of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger as vent condenser.

  18. Chemical oxidation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.D.; Siegrist, R.L.; Cline, S.R.

    1995-06-01

    Subsurface contamination with fuel hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is prevalent throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and in many sites managed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program. The most commonly reported chlorinated hydrocarbons (occurring > 50% of DOE contaminated sites) were trichloroethylene (TCE), 1, 1, 1,-trichloroethane (TCA), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with concentrations in the range of 0.2 {mu}g/kg to 12,000 mg/kg. The fuel hydrocarbons most frequently reported as being present at DOE sites include aromatic compounds and polyaromatic compounds such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and naphthalene. The primary sources of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are coal waste from coal fired electric power plants used at many of these facilities in the past and gasoline spills and leaks. Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) can migrate within the subsurface for long periods of time along a variety of pathways including fractures, macropores, and micropores. Diffusion of contaminants in the non-aqueous, aqueous, and vapor phase can occur from the fractures and macropores into the matrix of fine-textured media. As a result of these contamination processes, removal of contaminants from the subsurface and the delivery of treatment agents into and throughout contaminated regions are often hindered, making rapid and extensive remediation difficult.

  19. A survey of household products for volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Thomas M.; Steele, David H.; Hammerstrom, Karen; Remmers, Janet

    A total of 1159 common household products were analysed for 31 volatile organic compounds as potential sources of indoor air pollution. The products were distributed among 65 product categories within 8 category classes: automotive products (14.4% of the products); household cleaners/polishes (9.6%); paint-related products (39.9%); fabric and leather treatments (7.9%); cleaners for electronic equipment (6.0%); oils, greases and lubricants (9.6%); adhesive-related products (6.6%); and miscellaneous products (6.1%). The study was conducted in two parts. In the first part, or the original study, the products were reanalysed for methylene chloride and five other chlorocarbons using purge-and-trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and a data base containing the analytical results was developed. Because full mass spectra were taken, the original set of GC/MS data also contained information regarding other volatile chemicals in the products. However, this additional data was not reported at that time. In the second part of the study, the GC/MS data were reanalysed to determine the presence and concentrations of an additional 25 volatile chemicals. The 31 chemicals included in both parts of this study were: carbon tetrachloride; methylene chloride; tetrachloroethylene; 1,1,1-trichloroethane; trichlorethylene; 1,1,2-tricholorotrifluoroethane; acetone; benzene; 2-butanone; chlorobenzene; chloroform; cyclohexane; 1,2-dichloroethane; 1,4-dioxane; ethylbenzene; n-hexane; d-limonene; methylcyclohexane; methylcyclopentane; methyl isobutyl ketone; n-nonane; n-octane; α-pinene; propylene oxide; styrene; 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane; tetrahydrofuran; toluene; m-mxylene; o-xylene; and p-xylene. Of the 31 chemicals, toluene, the xylenes and methylene chloride were found to occur most frequently—in over 40% of the products tested. Chemicals that were typically found in relatively high concentrations in the samples (i.e. greater than 20% w/w) included acetone, 2-butanone

  20. Organics, Isotopes, and Volatiles in Gale Crater Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Solid samples analyzed by the Curiosity rover on the long traverse from the Gale crater floor to the flanks of Mt. Sharp spread a range of environments from fluvial to lacustrine to eolian, and span 100 m of stratigraphic thickness. The diverse chemical and isotopic composition of organic compounds and inorganic volatiles revealed in these samples analyzed over a period of more than 2 Mars years is described with an emphasis on the search for organics, the chemical environments and physical-chemical processes that respectively preserve or destroy organics, and unexpectedly large variations in H, S, and Cl isotopes. In addition to a set of aromatic and aliphatic chorine containing organic compounds thermally released from the Cumberland mudstone drilled early in the mission compounds [Freissinet et al., 2015], additional S-containing organics have been identified in the Mojave drill sample in the Pahrump Hills section that was characterized in detail over a 5 month period. This set of S and Cl containing compounds is definitively identified by gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) analyses. In addition, fragments of other organic compounds are evident in the evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments implemented by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument and utilization of SAM's derivatization agent has revealed the presence of high molecular weight compounds. Two factors complicate the search for organic compounds preserved from ancient Mars. First the nearly ubiquitous oxychlorine compounds such as perchlorates decompose on heating in the SAM ovens in the EGA experiments and there is evidence that the hot O2 released combusts organic compounds to produce CO2. Secondly, the cosmic radiation that penetrates through the thin Mars atmosphere meters into the surface transforms near surface organic compounds over time. Fortunately, the SAM mass spectrometer can measure spallogenic (3He and 21Ne) and neutron-capture (36Ar) noble gases to secure an estimate of the

  1. Experimental investigation of reduced volatile formation by high-temperature interactions among meteorite constituent materials, water, and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Samejima, Taro; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    Late heavy bombardment (LHB) of extraterrestrial objects supplied carbon with metals to the prebiotic Earth. The early oceans were the major target of these impacts, followed by interactions among the atmosphere, oceanic water, and meteorite constituent materials under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions. Post-impact reactions of these hypervelocity impacts have the potential to produce reduced volatiles and organic compounds, including amino acids. Therefore, understanding the reactions in post-impact plumes is of great importance for the investigation of prebiotic organic compounds. The composition of post-impact plumes has been investigated with thermochemical calculations. However, experimental evidence is still needed to understand the reactions in dynamic systems of post-impact plumes. The present study investigates the effects of reaction temperature and availability of water on products from iron, nickel, graphite, nitrogen, and water in a dynamic gas flow system to investigate reactions in post-impact plumes. Results of this study indicate the formation of CO, H2, NH3, and HCN by hypervelocity oceanic impacts of iron-rich extraterrestrial objects. The formation of methane was limited in the present experiments, suggesting that the quenching rate is an influential factor for methane formation in post-impact plumes. Availability of water vapor in the plume was also an influential factor for the formation of reduced volatiles that controlled the CO formation rate from graphite. These results provide experimental evidence for the formation of reduced volatiles in post-impact plumes, which influenced the formation of prebiotic organic compounds.

  2. Volatile organic compound emission profiles of four common arctic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedel-Petersen, Ida; Schollert, Michelle; Nymand, Josephine; Rinnan, Riikka

    2015-11-01

    The biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from plants impact atmosphere and climate. The species-specific emissions, and thereby the atmospheric impact, of many plant species are still unknown. Knowledge of BVOC emission from arctic plants is particularly limited. The vast area and relatively high leaf temperature give the Arctic potential for emissions that cannot be neglected. This field study aimed to elucidate the BVOC emission profiles for four common arctic plant species in their natural environment during the growing season. BVOCs were sampled from aboveground parts of Empetrum hermaphroditum, Salix glauca, Salix arctophila and Betula nana using the dynamic enclosure technique and collection of volatiles in adsorbent cartridges, analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sampling occurred three times: in late June/early July, in mid-July and in early August. E. hermaphroditum emitted the least BVOCs, dominated by sesquiterpenes (SQTs) and non-isoprenoid BVOCs. The Salix spp. emitted the most, dominated by isoprene. The emissions of B. nana were composed of about two-thirds non-isoprenoid BVOCs, with moderate amounts of monoterpenes (MTs) and SQTs. The total B. nana emissions and the MT and SQT emissions standardized to 30 °C were highest in the first measurement in early July, while the other species had the highest emissions in the last measurement in early August. As climate change is expected to increase plant biomass and change vegetation composition in the Arctic, the BVOC emissions from arctic ecosystems will also change. Our results suggest that if the abundance of deciduous shrubs like Betula and Salix spp. increases at the expense of slower growing evergreens like E. hermaphroditum, there is the potential for increased emissions of isoprene, MTs and non-isoprenoid BVOCs in the Arctic.

  3. Bioactive volatile organic compounds from Antarctic (sponges) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Romoli, Riccardo; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Fondi, Marco; Orlandini, Valerio; Mengoni, Alessio; Emiliani, Giovanni; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; de Pascale, Donatella; Michaud, Luigi; Lo Giudice, Angelina; Fani, Renato

    2013-09-25

    Antarctic bacteria represent a reservoir of unexplored biodiversity, which, in turn, might be correlated to the synthesis of still undescribed bioactive molecules, such as antibiotics. In this work we have further characterized a panel of four marine Antarctic bacteria able to inhibit the growth of human opportunistic multiresistant pathogenic bacteria belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (responsible for the 'cepacia' syndrome in Cystic Fibrosis patients) through the production of a set of microbial Volatile Organic Compounds (mVOCs). A list of 30 different mVOCs synthesized under aerobic conditions by Antarctic bacteria was identified by GC-SPME analysis. Cross-streaking experiments suggested that Antarctic bacteria might also synthesize non-volatile molecules able to enhance the anti-Burkholderia activity. The biosynthesis of such a mixture of mVOCs was very probably influenced by both the presence/absence of oxygen and the composition of media used to grow the Antarctic strains. The antimicrobial activity exhibited by Antarctic strains also appeared to be more related to their taxonomical position rather than to the sampling site. Different Bcc bacteria were differently sensitive to the 'Antarctic' mVOCs and this was apparently related neither to the taxonomical position of the different strains nor to their source. The genome sequence of three new Antarctic strains was determined revealing that only P. atlantica TB41 possesses some genes belonging to the nrps-pks cluster. The comparative genomic analysis performed on the genome of the four strains also revealed the presence of a few genes belonging to the core genome and involved in the secondary metabolites biosynthesis. Data obtained suggest that the antimicrobial activity exhibited by Antarctic bacteria might rely on a (complex) mixture of mVOCs whose relative concentration may vary depending on the growth conditions. Besides, it is also possible that the biosynthesis of these compounds might occur

  4. Speciation of volatile organic compounds from poultry production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Li, Hong; Burns, Robert; Xin, Hongwei; Hatfield, Jerry

    2010-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from poultry production are leading source of air quality problems. However, little is known about the speciation and levels of VOCs from poultry production. The objective of this study was the speciation of VOCs from a poultry facility using evacuated canisters and sorbent tubes. Samples were taken during active poultry production cycle and between production cycles. Levels of VOCs were highest in areas with birds and the compounds in those areas had a higher percentage of polar compounds (89%) compared to aliphatic hydrocarbons (2.2%). In areas without birds, levels of VOCs were 1/3 those with birds present and compounds had a higher total percentage of aliphatic hydrocarbons (25%). Of the VOCs quantified in this study, no single sampling method was capable of quantifying more than 55% of compounds and in several sections of the building each sampling method quantified less than 50% of the quantifiable VOCs. Key classes of chemicals quantified using evacuated canisters included both alcohols and ketones, while sorbent tube samples included volatile fatty acids and ketones. The top five compounds made up close to 70% of VOCs and included: 1) acetic acid (830.1 μg m -3); 2) 2,3-butanedione (680.6 μg m -3); 3) methanol (195.8 μg m -3); 4) acetone (104.6 μg m -3); and 5) ethanol (101.9 μg m -3). Location variations for top five compounds averaged 49.5% in each section of the building and averaged 87% for the entire building.

  5. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  6. 40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.542a Section 60.542a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  7. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  8. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  9. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  10. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  11. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  12. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart II of... - Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits for Marine Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits... (Surface Coating) Pt. 63, Subpt. II, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart II of Part 63—Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP... 571 728 Mist 610 2,235 Navigational aids 550 1,597 Nonskid 340 571 728 Nuclear 420 841 1,069...

  14. 40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.542a Section 60.542a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart II of... - Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits for Marine Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits... (Surface Coating) Pt. 63, Subpt. II, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart II of Part 63—Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP... 571 728 Mist 610 2,235 Navigational aids 550 1,597 Nonskid 340 571 728 Nuclear 420 841 1,069...

  17. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart II of... - Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits for Marine Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits... (Surface Coating) Pt. 63, Subpt. II, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart II of Part 63—Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP... 571 728 Mist 610 2,235 Navigational aids 550 1,597 Nonskid 340 571 728 Nuclear 420 841 1,069...

  19. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  20. 40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.542a Section 60.542a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.542a Section 60.542a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  2. 40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.542a Section 60.542a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  4. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  5. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  6. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  7. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  8. Formation of highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds from anthropogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Ugo; Baltensperger, Urs; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; El Haddad, Imad; Frege, Carla; Klein, Felix; Rossi, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs) from biogenic volatile organic compounds are important for new particle formation and early particle growth (e.g., Ehn et al., 2014). The formation mechanism has extensively been studied for biogenic precursors like alpha-pinene and was shown to proceed through an initial reaction with either OH radicals or ozone followed by radical propagation in a mechanism that involves O2 attack and hydrogen abstraction (Crounse et al., 2013). While the same processes can be expected for anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOC), few studies have investigated these so far. Here we present the formation of HOMs from a variety of aromatic compounds after reaction with OH. All the compounds analyzed show HOM formation. AVOC could therefore play an important role in new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas. References Crounse, J.D. et al., Autoxidation of organic compounds in the atmosphere. J. Phys.Chem. Lett. 4, 3513-3520 (2013). Ehn, M., et al. A large source of low-volatility secondary organic aerosol, Nature 506, 476-479 (2014).

  9. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires.

    PubMed

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Centritto, Mauro; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Volatile organic compounds in storm water from a parking lot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, T.J.; Fallon, J.D.; Rutherford, D.W.; Hiatt, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    A mass balance approach was used to determine the most important nonpoint source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in storm water from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g., gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important nonpoint sources of VOCs, with each being important for different VOCs. The atmosphere is an important source of soluble, oxygenated VOCs (e.g., acetone), and the parking lot surface is an important source for the more hydrophobic VOCs (e.g., benzene). VOCs on the parking lot surface appear to be concentrated in oil and grease and organic material in urban particles (e.g., vehicle soot). Except in the case of spills, asphalt does not appear to be an important source of VOCs. The uptake isotherm of gaseous methyl tert-butyl ether on urban particles indicates a mechanism for dry deposition of VOCs from the atmosphere. This study demonstrated that a mass balance approach is a useful means of understanding non-point-source pollution, even for compounds such as VOCs, which are difficult to sample.

  11. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  12. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires

    PubMed Central

    CICCIOLI, PAOLO; CENTRITTO, MAURO; LORETO, FRANCESCO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. PMID:24689733

  13. Removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.E.; Mohaghegh, S.D.; Madabhushi, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most significant air pollution control challenges being faced by the Federal and State agencies and the chemical process industries is the control of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are discharged from process industries as major components of mixed organic wastes which contaminate the environment. Among these wastes, benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene are classified as major pollutants with high frequencies of occurrence on the EPA list of priority pollutants. Biofiltration, a recent air pollution control technology, is the removal and decomposition of contaminants present in emissions of non hazardous substances using a biologically activated medium. Biofiltration involves contacting the contaminated emission gas stream with microorganisms in a filter media. Biofiltration utilizes microorganisms immobilized in the form of a biofilm layer on an adsorptive filter media. Compared to other technologies, biofiltration is inexpensive, reliable and requires no post treatment. The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of both Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) and Biologically Activated Carbon (BAC) for the removal of benzene and toluene.

  14. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in compost samples: A potential tool to determine appropriate composting time.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengxiang; Pan, Zaifa; Hong, Chunlai; Wang, Weiping; Chen, Xiaoyang; Xue, Zhiyong; Yao, Yanlai

    2016-12-01

    Changes in volatile organic compound contents in compost samples during pig manure composting were studied using a headspace, solid-phase micro-extraction method (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS). Parameters affecting the SPME procedure were optimized as follows: the coating was carbon molecular sieve/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) fiber, the temperature was 60°C and the time was 30min. Under these conditions, 87 compounds were identified from 17 composting samples. Most of the volatile components could only be detected before day 22. However, benzenes, alkanes and alkenes increased and eventually stabilized after day 22. Phenol and acid substances, which are important factors for compost quality, were almost undetectable on day 39 in natural compost (NC) samples and on day 13 in maggot-treated compost (MC) samples. Our results indicate that the approach can be effectively used to determine the composting times by analysis of volatile substances in compost samples. An appropriate composting time not only ensures the quality of compost and reduces the loss of composting material but also reduces the generation of hazardous substances. The appropriate composting times for MC and NC were approximately 22days and 40days, respectively, during the summer in Zhejiang.

  15. 77 FR 38725 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Organic Compounds; Consumer Products AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final... more stringent than, EPA's national consumer products rule, ``National Volatile Organic Compound... requirement for floor wax strippers that ensures that product packaging clearly indicates ``light/medium''...

  16. 76 FR 4835 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Organic Compound Reinforced Plastics Composites Production Operations Rule AGENCY: Environmental... control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from reinforced plastic composites production... plastic composites production operations. This rule is approvable because it satisfies the requirements...

  17. Simultaneous Microwave Extraction and Separation of Volatile and Non-Volatile Organic Compounds of Boldo Leaves. From Lab to Industrial Scale

    PubMed Central

    Petigny, Loïc; Périno, Sandrine; Minuti, Matteo; Visinoni, Francesco; Wajsman, Joël; Chemat, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Microwave extraction and separation has been used to increase the concentration of the extract compared to the conventional method with the same solid/liquid ratio, reducing extraction time and separate at the same time Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from non-Volatile Organic Compounds (NVOC) of boldo leaves. As preliminary study, a response surface method has been used to optimize the extraction of soluble material and the separation of VOC from the plant in laboratory scale. The results from the statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions were: microwave power 200 W, extraction time 56 min and solid liquid ratio of 7.5% of plants in water. Lab scale optimized microwave method is compared to conventional distillation, and requires a power/mass ratio of 0.4 W/g of water engaged. This power/mass ratio is kept in order to upscale from lab to pilot plant. PMID:24776762

  18. Large drought-induced variations in oak leaf volatile organic compound emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Geron, Chris; Gu, Lianhong; Daly, Ryan; Harley, Peter; Rasmussen, Rei; Seco, Roger; Guenther, Alex; Karl, Thomas

    2015-12-17

    Here, leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri's Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower – NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). June measurements, prior to the onset of severe drought, showed isoprene emission rates and leaf temperature responses similar to those previously reported in the literature and used in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission models. During the peak of the drought in August, isoprene emission rates were substantially reduced, and response to temperature was dramatically altered, especially for the species in the red oak subgenus (Erythrobalanus).

  19. Volatile organic compound control technologies for compliance with the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Wax, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical industry sources in the U.S. emit 1,800,000 tons/year of volatile organic compounds (VOC), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone (smog). Concern with VOC emissions is heightened because many of these also are among the 189 toxic air pollutants listed in the Clean Air Act. This brief overview will cover the VOC problem, particularly as it is reflected in Clean Air Act requirements for reduced VOC emissions from small chemical businesses. Specific topics to be discussed include the HON rule, state RACT rules, and the general strategies and control technologies which will allow cost-effective compliance with these rules.

  20. Development of a surface acoustic wave sensor for in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Wright, Jerome L.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Rawlinson, Kim Scott; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that is designed to be operated continuously and in situ to detect volatile organic compounds. A ruggedized stainless-steel package that encases the SAW device and integrated circuit board allows the sensor to be deployed in a variety of media including air, soil, and even water. Polymers were optimized and chosen based on their response to chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene), which are common groundwater contaminants. Initial testing indicates that a running-average data-logging algorithm can reduce the noise and increase the sensitivity of the in-situ sensor.

  1. Effects of Chemical Aging on Global Secondary Organic Aerosol using the Volatility Basis Set Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R.; Jo, D.; Kim, M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Hodzic, A.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) constitutes significant mass fractions (20-90%) of total dry fine aerosols in the atmosphere. However, global models of OA have shown large discrepancies when compared to the observations because of the limited capability to simulate secondary OA (SOA). For reducing the discrepancies between observations and models, recent studies have shown that chemical aging reactions in the atmosphere are important because they can lead to decreases in organic volatility, resulting in increase of SOA mass yields. To efficiently simulate chemical aging of SOA in the atmosphere, we implemented the volatility basis set approach in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). We present full-year simulations and their comparisons with multiple observations - global aerosol mass spectrometer dataset, the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments from the United States, the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme dataset and water-soluble organic carbon observation data collected over East Asia. Using different input parameters in the model, we also explore the uncertainty of the SOA simulation for which we use an observational constraint to find the optimized values with which the model reduces the discrepancy from the observations. Finally, we estimate the effect of OA on climate using our best simulation results.

  2. Implementation of a solvent management program to control paint shop volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Floer, M.M.; Hicks, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    The majority of automobile assembly plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are generated from painting operations. Typical paint operations generate more than 90 percent of the total plant emissions and, up to, 50 percent can be released by cleaning sources. Plant practices which contribute to the release of VOC emissions include the cleaning of paint lines and equipment, tanks, spray booths, floors and vehicles. Solvents continue to be the largest contributing source of VOC emissions in an automotive paint shop. To reduce overall VOC emissions, environmental regulations and guidelines were introduced under the Clean Air Act; Pollution Prevention and Waste Minimization programs, Control Techniques, and special air permit conditions. The introduction of these regulations and guidelines has driven industry toward continual refinement of their present cleaning methods while pursuing new techniques and technologies. Industry has also shown a proactive approach by introducing new waterborne and powder coating paint technologies to reduce overall emissions. As new paint technologies are developed and introduced, special attention must be given to the types of materials utilized for cleaning. The development and implementation of a solvent management program allows a facility to standardize a program to properly implement materials, equipment, technologies and work practices to reduce volatile organic compound emissions, meet strict cleaning requirements posed by new paint technologies and produce a vehicle which meets the high quality standards of the customer. This paper will assess the effectiveness of a solvent management program by examining pollution prevention initiatives and data from four different painting operations.

  3. Biofiltration for control of volatile organic compounds (VOCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, D.F.; Govind, R.

    1995-10-01

    Air biofiltration is a promising technology for control of air emissions of biodegradable volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In conjunction with vacuum extraction of soils or air stripping of ground water, it can be used to mineralize VOCs removed from contaminated soil or groundwater. The literature describes three major biological systems for treating contaminated air bioscrubbers, biotrickling filters and biofilters. Filter media can be classified as: bioactive fine or irregular particulates, such as soil, peat, compost or mixtures of these materials; pelletized, which are randomly packed in a bed; and structured, such as monoliths with defined or variable passage size and geometry. The media can be made of sorbing and non-absorbing materials. Non-bioactive pelletized and structured media require recycled solutions of nutrients and buffer for efficient microbial activity and are thus called biotrickling filters. Extensive work has been conducted to improve biofiltration by EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory and the University of Cincinnati in biofilters using pelletized and structured media and improved operational approaches. Representative VOCs in these studies included compounds with a range of aqueous solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. The compounds include iso-pentane, toluene, methylene chloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), ethyl benzene, chlorobenzene and perchloroethylene (PCE) and alpha ({alpha}-) pinene. Comparative studies were conducted with peat/compost biofilters using isopentane and {alpha}-pinene. Control studies were also conducted to investigate adsorption/desorption of contaminants on various media using mercuric chloride solution to insure the absence of bioactivity.

  4. Source identification of volatile organic compounds in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiang; Hopke, Philip K; Karl, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    The complexity of the volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture in the Houston area makes studies of the air quality in that area very challenging. In this paper, a novel factor analysis model, where the normal chemical mass balance model was augmented by a parallel equation that accounted for wind speed and direction, temperature, and weekend/weekday effects, was fitted with a multilinear engine (ME) to provide identification and apportionment of the VOC sources at the La Porte Municipal Airport site in Houston during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) 2000. The analysis determined the profiles and contributions of nine sources and the corresponding wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and weekend factors. The reasonableness of these results not only suggests the high resolving power of the expanded factor analysis model for source apportionment but also provides the novel and effective auxiliary information for more specific source identification. In addition, a new approach to estimate the measurement uncertainty and the details of determining the source number and dealing with missing values are also presented as important parts of the data analysis process. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the expanded model to identify sources in complex VOC systems and extract useful information for locating VOC emitters and controlling their emissions in the Houston area.

  5. Measurements of volatile organic compounds over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. G.; Oram, D. E.; Reeves, C. E.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we describe measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) made using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) aboard the UK Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Measurements during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign. Observations were made during approximately 85 h of flying time between 17 July and 17 August 2006, above an area between 4° N and 18° N and 3° W and 4° E, encompassing ocean, mosaic forest, and the Sahel desert. High time resolution observations of counts at mass to charge (m/z) ratios of 42, 59, 69, 71, and 79 were used to calculate mixing ratios of acetonitrile, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and benzene respectively using laboratory-derived humidity-dependent calibration factors. Strong spatial associations between vegetation and isoprene and its oxidation products were observed in the boundary layer, consistent with biogenic emissions followed by rapid atmospheric oxidation. Acetonitrile, benzene, and acetone were all enhanced in airmasses which had been heavily influenced by biomass burning. Benzene and acetone were also elevated in airmasses with urban influence from cities such as Lagos, Cotonou, and Niamey. The observations provide evidence that both deep convection and mixing associated with fair-weather cumulus were responsible for vertical redistribution of VOC emitted from the surface. Profiles over the ocean showed a depletion of acetone in the marine boundary layer, but no significant decrease for acetonitrile.

  6. Measurements of volatile organic compounds over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. G.; Oram, D. E.; Reeves, C. E.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we describe measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) made using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) aboard the UK Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Measurements during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign. Observations were made during approximately 85 h of flying time between 17 July and 17 August 2006, above an area between 4° N and 18° N and 3° W and 4° E, encompassing ocean, mosaic forest, and the Sahel desert. High time resolution observations of counts at mass to charge (m/z) ratios of 42, 59, 69, 71, and 79 were used to calculate mixing ratios of acetonitrile, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and benzene, respectively using laboratory-derived humidity-dependent calibration factors. Strong spatial associations between vegetation and isoprene and its oxidation products were observed in the boundary layer, consistent with biogenic emissions followed by rapid atmospheric oxidation. Acetonitrile, benzene, and acetone were all enhanced in airmasses which had been heavily influenced by biomass burning. Benzene and acetone were also elevated in airmasses with urban influence from cities such as Lagos, Cotonou, and Niamey. The observations provide evidence that both deep convection and mixing associated with fair-weather cumulus were responsible for vertical redistribution of VOCs emitted from the surface. Profiles over the ocean showed a depletion of acetone in the marine boundary layer, but no significant decrease for acetonitrile.

  7. Volatile organic compounds adsorption onto neat and hybrid bacterial cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, Violeta Alexandra; Pârvulescu, Oana Cristina; Dobre, Tănase

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption dynamics of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) vapour from air streams onto fixed bed adsorbent were measured and simulated under various operation conditions. Isopropanol (IPA) and n-hexane (HEX) were selected as representatives of polar and nonpolar VOCs, whereas bacterial cellulose (BC) and BC incorporated with magnetite nanoparticles (M/BC), were tested as adsorbents. An experimental study emphasizing the influence of air superficial velocity (0.7 cm/s and 1.7 cm/s), operation temperature (30 °C and 40 °C), adsorbate and adsorbent type, on fixed bed saturation curves was conducted. Optimal adsorption performances evaluated in terms of saturation adsorption capacity were obtained for the adsorption of polar compound (IPA) onto M/BC composite (0.805 g/g) and of nonpolar compound (HEX) onto neat BC (0.795 g/g), respectively, at high values of air velocity and operation temperature. A mathematical model including mass balance of VOC species, whose parameters were fitted based on experimental data, was developed in order to predict the fixed bed saturation curves. A 23 statistical model indicating a significant increase in adsorption performances with process temperature was validated under the experimental conditions.

  8. Factors controlling volatile organic compounds in dwellings in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, M; Galbally, I E; Molloy, S B; Selleck, P W; Keywood, M D; Lawson, S J; Powell, J C; Gillett, R W; Dunne, E

    2016-04-01

    This study characterized indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and investigated the effects of the dwelling characteristics, building materials, occupant activities, and environmental conditions on indoor VOC concentrations in 40 dwellings located in Melbourne, Australia, in 2008 and 2009. A total of 97 VOCs were identified. Nine VOCs, n-butane, 2-methylbutane, toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, d-limonene, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetic acid, accounted for 68% of the sum of all VOCs. The median indoor concentrations of all VOCs were greater than those measured outdoors. The occupant density was positively associated with indoor VOC concentrations via occupant activities, including respiration and combustion. Terpenes were associated with the use of household cleaning and laundry products. A petroleum-like indoor VOC signature of alkanes and aromatics was associated with the proximity of major roads. The indoor VOC concentrations were negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with ventilation. Levels of VOCs in these Australian dwellings were lower than those from previous studies in North America and Europe, probably due to a combination of an ongoing temporal decrease in indoor VOC concentrations and the leakier nature of Australian dwellings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Cost effective passive sampling device for volatile organic compounds monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thammakhet, Chongdee; Muneesawang, Vilailuk; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    A laboratory-built passive sampler was developed as a simple and cost effective device for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX). Common glass bottles (screw cap, 10 ml, 67.6×10.6 mm ID), packed with 75 mg of activated Tenax TA, were used as passive samplers. After exposed to real sample, the adsorbent was desorbed using a laboratory-built thermal desorption device. The analytes were purged to fill a sampling loop and then injected by a gas sampling valve to a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (FID). All parameters, i.e. , desorption time, purge flow rate, gas chromatograph conditions were optimized to obtain high sensitivity, resolution and short analysis time. The system was calibrated by BTX standard gas and the linear regression coefficient of greater than 0.99 was obtained with detection limits 0.3, 0.2 and 0.7 μg m -3 for benzene, toluene and xylene, respectively. The proposed method was implemented for the monitoring of BTX at 10 gasoline stations in Hat Yai, Thailand. The concentrations were found in the range of N.D.-19, 12-200 and 23-200 μg m -3 for benzene, toluene and xylene, respectively.

  10. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J. P.; Friedli, H.; Guenther, A. B.; Hanson, D.; Harley, P.; Karl, T.

    2006-01-01

    Leaf and woody plant tissue (Pinus ponderosa, Eucalyptus saligna, Quercus gambelli, Saccharum officinarum and Oriza sativa) were heated from 30 to 300°C and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions were identified and quantified. Major VOC emissions were mostly oxygenated and included acetic acid, furylaldehyde, acetol, pyrazine, terpenes, 2,3-butadione, phenol and methanol, as well as smaller emissions of furan, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile and benzaldehyde. Total VOC emissions from distillation and pyrolysis were on the order of 10 gC/kgC dry weight of vegetation, as much as 33% and 44% of CO2 emissions (gC(VOC)/gC(CO2)) measured during the same experiments, in air and nitrogen atmospheres, respectively.

    The emissions are similar in identity and quantity to those from smoldering combustion of woody tissue and of different character than those evolved during flaming combustion. VOC emissions from the distillation of pools and endothermic pyrolysis under low turbulence conditions may produce flammable concentrations near leaves and may facilitate the propagation of wildfires. VOC emissions from charcoal production are also related to distillation and pyrolysis; the emissions of the highly reactive VOCs from production are as large as the carbon monoxide emissions.

  11. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J. P.; Friedli, H.; Guenther, A. B.; Hanson, D.; Harley, P.; Karl, T.

    2005-09-01

    Leaf and woody plant tissue (Pinus ponderosa, Eucalyptus saligna, Quercus gambelli, Saccharum officinarum and Oriza sativa) were heated from 30 to 300°C and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions were identified and quantified. Major VOC emissions were acetic acid, furylaldehyde, methyl acetate, pyrazine, terpenes, 2,3-butadione, phenol and methanol, as well as smaller emissions of furan, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile and benzaldehyde. Total VOC emissions from distillation and pyrolysis were on the order of 10 mgC/gC dry weight of vegetation, as much as 33% and 44% of CO2 emissions (gC(VOC)/gC(CO2)) measured during the same experiments, in air and nitrogen atmospheres, respectively. The emissions are similar in identity and quantity to those from smoldering combustion of woody tissue and of different character than those evolved during flaming combustion. VOC emissions from the distillation of pools and the pyrolysis of vegetation heated under low turbulence conditions produces concentrations near leaves that reach the lower limits of flammability and the emissions may be important in the propagation of wildfires. VOC emissions from charcoal production are also related to distillation and pyrolysis; the emissions of the highly reactive VOCs from production are as large as the carbon monoxide emissions.

  12. Membrane bioreactor for control of volatile organic compound emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Ergas, S.J.; McGrath, M.S.

    1997-06-01

    A membrane bioreactor system that overcomes many of the limitations of conventional compost biofilters is described. The system utilizes microporous hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes for mass transfer of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the gas phase to a microbially active liquid phase. The reactor design provides a high biomass concentration, a method for wasting biomass, and a method for addition of pH buffers, nutrients, cometabolites, and/or other amendments. A theoretical model is developed, describing mass transfer and biodegradation in the membrane bioreactor. Reactor performance was determined in a laboratory scale membrane bioreactor over a range of gas loading rates using toluene as a model VOC. Toluene removal efficiency was greater than 98% at an inlet concentration of 100 ppm, and a gas residence time of less than 2 s. Factors controlling bioreactor performance were determined through both experiments and theoretical modeling to include: compound Henry`s law constant, membrane specific surface area, gas and VOC loading rates, liquid phase turbulence, and biomass substrate utilization rate.

  13. Remediation of ground water containing volatile organic compounds and tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.N.; Folsom, E.N.

    1994-03-01

    The Trailer 5475 (T-5475) East Taxi Strip Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California was used as a taxi strip by the US Navy to taxi airplanes to the runway from 1942 to 1947. Solvents were used in some unpaved areas adjacent to the East Taxi Strip for cleaning airplanes. From 1953 through 1976, the area was used to store and treat liquid waste. From 1962 to 1976 ponds were constructed and used for evaporation of liquid waste. As a result, the ground water in this area contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and tritium. The ground water in this area is also known to contain hexavalent chromium that is probably naturally occurring. Therefore, LLNL has proposed ``pump-and-treat`` technology above grade in a completely closed loop system. The facility will be designed to remove the VOCs and hexavalent chromium, if any, from the ground water, and the treated ground water containing tritium will be reinjected where it will decay naturally in the subsurface. Ground water containing tritium will be reinjected into areas with equal or higher tritium concentrations to comply with California regulations.

  14. Real time analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in centenarians.

    PubMed

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Di Giulio, Camillo

    2015-04-01

    Centenarians are a model to study human longevity and the physiological process of aging. A plethora of studies on this model show the complexity of the system. Laboratory studies fail to find a biomarker of senescence. The real time exhaled breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been suggested as a new biomarker to detect and monitor physiological processes in the respiratory system. VOCs exhaled by centenarians have not been studied in the general population and across-age-groups. In the present study we investigated, in real time, the breath properties and VOC exhaled content in healthy centenarians as compared with non-centenarian seniors and young healthy subjects. We found distinctly different breath pattern and distribution profiles of VOCs in the centenarians. Thus, the VOCs measurement allowed to discriminate the differences between the age-groups. We propose a VOCs fingerprint as a biomarker underlying the physiological mechanisms of aging and longevity. Longevity should be considered physiologically as a new phase of life, characteristic of the well adapted subject. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Volatile organic compounds in selected micro-environments.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Berko, H N; Farrar, D; Galbally, I E; Weeks, I A

    2006-04-01

    A program of sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air was undertaken in selected locations and micro-environments in Perth, Western Australia to characterise concentrations of target VOCs and to determine the relative strength of the contributing sources to ambient air in different micro-environments in a major Australian city. Twenty-seven locations were sampled and, of the forty-one target compounds, 26 VOCs were detected in the samples collected. The highest concentrations were recorded for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes (BTEX), chloroform and styrene. The maximum 12-h toluene and benzene concentrations observed were from a basement carpark and were 24.7 parts per billion (ppb) and 5.6 ppb, respectively. The maximum xylenes concentration was 29.4 ppb and occurred in a nightclub where styrene was also detected. A factor analysis of the data was undertaken. Two key factors emerge that appear to be associated with petroleum and motor vehicles and environmental tobacco smoke. A third significant occurrence was a high concentration of chloroform that was observed at a sports centre complex with a swimming pool text and was uncorrelated with other compounds in the data set. This study indicates that locations associated with motor vehicles and petrol fuel, tobacco and wood smoke and chlorinated water represent the major risks for personal exposure to VOCs in Perth.

  16. Characterization of volatile organic compounds from different cooking emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wang, Gang; Lang, Jianlei; Wen, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqi; Yao, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Cooking fume is regarded as one of the main sources of urban atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its chemical characteristics would be different among various cooking styles. In this study, VOCs emitted from four different Chinese cooking styles were collected. VOCs concentrations and emission characteristics were analyzed. The results demonstrated that Barbecue gave the highest VOCs concentrations (3494 ± 1042 μg/m3), followed by Hunan cuisine (494.3 ± 288.8 μg/m3), Home cooking (487.2 ± 139.5 μg/m3), and Shandong cuisine (257.5 ± 98.0 μg/m3). The volume of air drawn through the collection hood over the stove would have a large impact on VOCs concentration in the exhaust. Therefore, VOCs emission rates (ER) and emission factors (EF) were also estimated. Home cooking had the highest ER levels (12.2 kg/a) and Barbecue had the highest EF levels (0.041 g/kg). The abundance of alkanes was higher in Home cooking, Shandong cuisine and Hunan cuisine with the value of 59.4%-63.8%, while Barbecue was mainly composed of alkanes (34.7%) and alkenes (39.9%). The sensitivity species of Home cooking and Hunan cuisine were alkanes, and that of Shandong cuisine and Barbecue were alkenes. The degree of stench pollution from cooking fume was lighter.

  17. Volatile organic compound monitoring by photo acoustic radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1995-12-01

    Two methods for sampling and analyzing volatile organics in subsurface pore gas were developed for use at the Hazardous Waste Disposal Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One is Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TDGCMS), the other is Photoacoustic Radiometry (PAR). Presented here are two years worth of experience and lessons learned as both techniques matured. The sampling technique is equally as important as the analysis method. PAR is a nondispersive infrared technique utilizing band pass filters in the region from 1 to 15 {mu}m. A commercial instrument, the Model 1302 Multigas Analyzer, made by Bruel and Kjaer, was adapted for field use. To use the PAR there must be some a priori knowledge of the constellation of analytes to be measured. The TDGCMS method is sensitive to 50 analytes. Hence TDGCMS is used in an initial survey of the site to determine what compounds are present and at what concentration. Once the major constituents of the soil-gas vapor plume are known the PAR can be configured to monitor for the five analytes of most interest. The PAR can analyse a sample in minutes, while in the field. The PAR is also quite precise in controlled situations.

  18. Proton Transfer Rate Coefficient Measurements of Selected Volatile Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, G.; Popović, S.; Vušković, L.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed an apparatus based on the selected ion flow tube (SIFT)footnote D. Smith and N.G. Adams, Ads. At. Mol. Phys. 24, 1 (1987). that allows the study of proton transfer between various positive ions and volatile organic molecules. Reactions in the flow tube occur at pressures of approximately 300 mTorr, eliminating the requirement of thermal beam production. The proton donor molecule H_3O^+ has been produced using several types of electrical discharges in water vapor, such as a capacitively coupled RF discharge and a DC hollow cathode discharge. Presently we are developing an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge using the components of a standard microwave oven that has the advantages of simple design and operation, as well as low cost. We will be presenting the results of the microwave cavity ion source to produce H_3O^+, and compare it to the other studied sources. In addition, we will be presenting a preliminary measurement of the proton transfer rate coefficient in the reaction of H_3O^+ with acetone and methanol.

  19. Modeling Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from New Carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.C.; Hodgson, A.T.; Gadgil, A.J.

    1993-02-01

    A simple model is proposed to account for observed emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new carpets. The model assumes that the VOCs originate predominantly in a uniform slab of polymer backing material. Parameters for the model (the initial concentration of a VOC in the polymer, a diffusion coefficient and an equilibrium polymer/air partition coefficient) are obtained from experimental data produced by a previous chamber study. The diffusion coefficients generally decrease as the molecular weight of the VOCs increase, while the polymer/air partition coefficients generally increase as the vapor pressure of the compounds decrease. In addition, for two of the study carpets that have a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) backing, the diffusion and partition coefficients are similar to independently reported values for SBR. The results suggest that predictions of VOCs emissions from new carpets may be possible based solely on a knowledge of the physical properties of the relevant compounds and the carpet backing material. However, a more rigorous validation of the model is desirable.

  20. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from new carpets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    A simple model is proposed to account for observed emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new carpets. The model assumes that the VOCs originate predominantly in a uniform slab of polymer backing material. Parameters for the model (the initial concentration of a VOC in the polymer, a diffusion coefficient and an equilibrium polymer/air partition coefficient) are obtained from experimental data produced by a previous chamber study. The diffusion coefficients generally decrease as the molecular weight of the VOCs increase, while the partition coefficients generally increase as the vapor pressure of the compounds decreases. In addition, for two of the study carpets that have a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) backing, the diffusion and partition coefficients are similar to independently reported values for SBR. The results suggest that prediction of VOC emissions from new carpets may be possible based solely on a knowledge of the physical properties of the relevant compounds and the carpet backing material. However, a more rigorous validation of the model is desirable.

  1. Indoor carpet as an adsorptive reservoir for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Won, D.; Corsi, R.L.; Rynes, M.

    1999-07-01

    Carpet is recognized as a potential source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air. However, carpet systems can also serve as adsorptive sinks with the potential for reductions in peak VOC concentrations and subsequent re-emission of VOCs over prolonged periods of time. A series of experiments involving eight VOCs, and several carpet systems and environmental conditions were completed using a set of parallel chambers to characterize carpet systems as sinks of VOCs. A linear adsorption and desorption model was used to describe interactions between VOCs and carpet. New carpet fibers treated with stain protection generally accounted for only a very small fraction of mass sorbed to carpet. Most of the sorbed mass for carpet systems was accounted for by either the underlying pad or a combination of the pad and structural backing. Methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was the only compound to exhibit greater sorption to nylon fibers than to other carpet components. Vapor pressure was observed to be one of the properties that can be related to sorption parameters. Variations in relative humidity (RH) had a significant effect on the degree of sorption for a highly soluble VOC (isopropanol). However, RH had no apparent effect on other VOCs. Air exchange rates (0.5, 2.1, 3.2 /hr) and inlet concentrations (2.5, 5, 15 ppm) generally had little effect on sorption.

  2. Nanoenabled microelectromechanical sensor for volatile organic chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga, Chiara; Rinaldi, Matteo; Khamis, Samuel M.; Johnson, A. T.; Piazza, Gianluca

    2009-06-01

    A nanoenabled gravimetric chemical sensor prototype based on the large scale integration of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as nanofunctionalization layer for aluminum nitride contour-mode resonant microelectromechanical (MEM) gravimetric sensors has been demonstrated. The capability of two distinct single strands of DNA bound to SWNTs to enhance differently the adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as dinitroluene (simulant for explosive vapor) and dymethyl-methylphosphonate (simulant for nerve agent sarin) has been verified experimentally. Different levels of sensitivity (17.3 and 28 KHz μm2/fg) due to separate frequencies of operation (287 and 450 MHz) on the same die have also been shown to prove the large dynamic range of sensitivity attainable with the sensor. The adsorption process in the ss-DNA decorated SWNTs does not occur in the bulk of the material, but solely involves the surface, which permits to achieve 50% recovery in less than 29 s.

  3. Constituents of volatile organic compounds of evaporating essential oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lo, Cho-Ching; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-12-01

    Essential oils containing aromatic compounds can affect air quality when used indoors. Five typical and popular essential oils—rose, lemon, rosemary, tea tree and lavender—were investigated in terms of composition, thermal characteristics, volatile organic compound (VOC) constituents, and emission factors. The activation energy was 6.3-8.6 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.8, and the frequency factor was 0.01-0.24 min -1. Toluene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene and m-diethylbenzene were the predominant VOCs of evaporating gas of essential oils at 40 °C. In addition, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m-diethylbenzene, and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene revealed high emission factors during the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis procedures. The sequence of the emission factors of 52 VOCs (137-173 mg g -1) was rose ≈ rosemary > tea tree ≈ lemon ≈ lavender. The VOC group fraction of the emission factor of aromatics was 62-78%, paraffins were 21-37% and olefins were less than 1.5% during the TG process. Some unhealthy VOCs such as benzene and toluene were measured at low temperature; they reveal the potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  4. Volatile organic compounds exposure and cardiovascular effects in hair salons.

    PubMed

    Ma, C-M; Lin, L-Y; Chen, H-W; Huang, L-C; Li, J-F; Chuang, K-J

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and cardiovascular effects among hairdressing assistants has not been well characterized. To investigate whether or not exposure to VOCs was associated with autonomic dysfunction, inflammation and oxidative stress in hairdressing assistants. We recruited 62 young healthy assistants working in different hair salons in Taipei. Blood samples were taken from each assistant and heart rate variability (HRV) indices were recorded. VOCs were measured at each assistant's workplace. Mixed-effects models were used to examine the association between blood markers, HRV and VOCs. Exposure to VOCs was associated with increases in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as well as decreases in HRV indices. The effect of VOCs exposure on the health parameters measured in this study was greatest during the days on which the subjects were working. Occupational exposure to VOCs in hair salons can lead to increases in serum CRP and 8-OHdG levels and decreases in HRV indices. Time spent away from the workplace could modify the effects these exposures have on the health parameters described above in these assistants.

  5. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-03-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total U.S. VOC emissions. The 'Toxic-Release Inventory' of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing, refrigerant production, and wood products production. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase 1 report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. The Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient, and economically priced.

  6. Characterization of volatile organic chemical emissions from carpet cushions

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, V.H.; Bhooshan, B.; Chen, S.B.; Sonenthal, J.S.; Hodgson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is investigating chemical emissions from carpet systems in order to determine whether the emissions may be responsible for the numerous health complaints associated with carpet installation. As part of this effort, a study was conducted to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the air by five major product types of new carpet cushions. Cushion samples were tested in small-volume dynamic chambers over a six-hour exposure period. Airborne VOCs collected on multisorbent samplers were identified using sensitive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A separate chamber method was developed to screen polyurethane cushions for emissions of toluene diisocyanates (TDI). Over 100 VOCs, spanning a broad range of chemical classes, were emitted from 17 carpet cushions. The pattern of emitted VOCs varied between and among product types, which reflects probable differences in manufacturing processes and ingredients. No significant quantities of TDI or formaldehyde were released by any cushions. Emission profiles were characterized for total VOCs and for the predominant individual VOCs. As a group, the synthetic fiber cushion samples emitted the lowest quantities of VOCs. Cushion samples purchased from carpet retailers released lesser amounts of VOCs than samples of the same cushion types obtained directly from the manufacturing mills. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Indoor chemistry. Ozone, volatile organic compounds, and carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Weschler, C.J. ); Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D. )

    1992-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been measured in a freshly carpeted 20-m[sup 3] stainless-steel room in both the absence and presence of ozone (ozone concentrations ranging from 30 to 50 ppb, with one experiment conducted at 400 ppb). Four different types of carpeting were exposed, and in each set of experiments, the room was ventilated at 1 air exchange/h. The gas-phase concentrations of selected carpet emissions (e.g., 4-phenylcyclohexene, 4-vinylcyclohexene, and styrene) significantly decreased in the presence of ozone. Conversely, the concentrations of other compounds (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and aldehydes with between 5 and 10 carbons) significantly increased. Furthermore, the total concentration of VOCs increased markedly in the presence of ozone. The additional VOCs appear to have been generated by reactions between ozone and relatively nonvolatile compounds associated with the carpets. These studies suggest that VOCs measured within a building at elevated ozone levels (>30 ppb) may differ from those measured at lower ozone levels (<10 ppb). 12 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. A novel nanostructure for ultrasensitive volatile organic compound sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huaizhou; Rizal, Binod; Ren, Zhifeng; Naughton, Michael J.; Chiles, Thomas C.; Cai, Dong

    2011-03-01

    We have developed an arrayed nanocoaxial structure for the ultrasensitive sensing detection and identification of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by dielectric impedance spectroscopy. VOC molecules are absorbed into porous dielectric material in the annulus between nanoscale coax electrodes. A theoretical expression for the basic adsorption mechanism agrees with the experimental results. Detection sensitivities at parts-per-billion levels were demonstrated for a variety of VOCs. A limit-of-detection of ethanol reached ~ 100 parts-per-trillion, following a Freundlich power-law isotherm across four decades of ethanol concentration. A linear dependence on VOC dielectric constant was observed. Dielectric impedance nanospectroscopy was also performed by scanning frequency from 10 mHz to 1 MHz, with distinctive spectra of different VOCs discovered. These were utilized to conduct colorimetric identification of VOCs. The results suggest our novel nanocoaxial sensor can be used as a sensitive, broadband, and multimodal sensing platform for chemical detection. The National Cancer Institute CA137681, the Department of Navy, the National Science Foundation PHY-0804718, and the Seaver Institute. Emails: caid@bc.edu; naughton@bc.edu.

  9. Methods in plant foliar volatile organic compounds research1

    PubMed Central

    Materić, Dušan; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Morgan, Geraint; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Plants are a major atmospheric source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These secondary metabolic products protect plants from high-temperature stress, mediate in plant–plant and plant–insect communication, and affect our climate globally. The main challenges in plant foliar VOC research are accurate sampling, the inherent reactivity of some VOC compounds that makes them hard to detect directly, and their low concentrations. Plant VOC research relies on analytical techniques for trace gas analysis, usually based on gas chromatography and soft chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Until now, these techniques (especially the latter one) have been developed and used primarily by physicists and analytical scientists, who have used them in a wide range of scientific research areas (e.g., aroma, disease biomarkers, hazardous compound detection, atmospheric chemistry). The interdisciplinary nature of plant foliar VOC research has recently attracted the attention of biologists, bringing them into the field of applied environmental analytical sciences. In this paper, we review the sampling methods and available analytical techniques used in plant foliar VOC research to provide a comprehensive resource that will allow biologists moving into the field to choose the most appropriate approach for their studies. PMID:26697273

  10. Screening for emphysema via exhaled volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, S M; Gietema, H A; Blanchet, L; Kruitwagen, C L J J; Munnik, P; van Klaveren, R J; Lammers, J W J; Buydens, L; Harren, F J M; Zanen, P

    2011-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema risk groups are well defined and screening allows for early identification of disease. The capability of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to detect emphysema, as found by computed tomography (CT) in current and former heavy smokers participating in a lung cancer screening trial, was investigated. CT scans, pulmonary function tests and breath sample collections were obtained from 204 subjects. Breath samples were analyzed with a proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) to obtain VOC profiles listed as ions at various mass-to-charge ratios (m/z). Using bootstrapped stepwise forward logistic regression, we identified specific breath profiles as a potential tool for the diagnosis of emphysema, of airflow limitation or gas-exchange impairment. A marker for emphysema was found at m/z 87 (tentatively attributed to 2-methylbutanal). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) of this marker to diagnose emphysema was 0.588 (95% CI 0.453-0.662). Mass-to-charge ratios m/z 52 (most likely chloramine) and m/z 135 (alkyl benzene) were linked to obstructive disease and m/z 122 (most probably alkyl homologs) to an impaired diffusion capacity. ROC areas were 0.646 (95% CI 0.562-0.730) and 0.671 (95% CI 0.524-0.710), respectively. In the screening setting, exhaled VOCs measured by PTR-MS constitute weak markers for emphysema, pulmonary obstruction and impaired diffusion capacity.

  11. Volatile organic emissions from adhesives with indoor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Girman, J.R.; Hodgson, A.T.; Newton, A.S.; Winkes, A.W.

    1984-02-01

    Studies have shown that volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted from building materials are a potentially important source of indoor air pollution. In this study, we investigated emissions of VOC from both solvent- and water-based adhesives. Adhesives were applied to an inert substrate and dried for at least a week. VOC were cryogenically trapped and identified by GC-MS or sorbent trapped, solvent extracted, and quantified by GC-FID. Among the compounds emitted by adhesives were toluene, styrene, and a variety of normal, branched, and cyclic alkanes. The measured emission rates ranged from below the limit of detection for some adhesives to a total alkane emission rate of over 700 ..mu..g g/sup -1/h/sup -1/ for a water-based adhesive. A simple, well-mixed tank model was used to assess the potential impacts of the adhesives studied and to demonstrate that adhesives can be significant sources of VOC. 8 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  12. Emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds from semiconductor manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Chein, HungMin; Chen, Tzu Ming

    2003-08-01

    A huge amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is produced and emitted with waste gases from semiconductor manufacturing processes, such as cleaning, etching, and developing. VOC emissions from semiconductor factories located at Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsin-chu, Taiwan, were measured and characterized in this study. A total of nine typical semiconductor fabricators (fabs) were monitored over a 12-month period (October 2000-September 2001). A flame ionization analyzer was employed to measure the VOC emission rate continuously in a real-time fashion. The amount of chemical use was adopted from the data that were reported to the Environmental Protection Bureau in Hsin-chu County as per the regulation of the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. The VOC emission factor, defined as the emission rate (kg/month) divided by the amount of chemical use (L/month), was determined to be 0.038 +/- 0.016 kg/L. A linear regression equation is proposed to fit the data with the correlation coefficient (R2)=0.863. The emission profiles of VOCs, which were drawn using the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer analysis method, show that isopropyl alcohol is the dominant compound in most of the fabs.

  13. Mapping of volatile organic chemicals in New Jersey water systems.

    PubMed

    Cohn, P; Savrin, J; Fagliano, J

    1999-01-01

    To characterize volatile organic chemical (VOC) contamination in public water in New Jersey from 1978 through 1990, detailed GIS maps were developed, along with descriptive text and an associated contaminant database, broken into half-year periods. All water providers that served more than 500 service connections were mapped. Contamination status for nine VOCs, including total trihalomethanes (THMs), was estimated for about 90% of the state's population. Many water systems were partitioned into smaller subsystems in order to map service areas that were more homogeneous with regard to water quality in order to minimize exposure misclassification. Data used for this work included test results taken by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection or the water utilities (raw, plant, and distribution system samples), an analysis of probable water use and water flow (based on pumpage, population, system architecture, and advice from the water systems), and information on service area extensions during the period. Using GIS applications, these maps and databases were used to estimate the size of the population exposed to contaminants over time, demonstrating a dramatic decrease in exposed population after the New Jersey Safe Drinking Water Act was signed in 1984.

  14. Evaluation of Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Megacities and Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmons, L. K.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Riemer, D. D.; Lamarque, J.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Mirage Science Team; Arctas Science Team

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a critical role in determining air quality through their impact on ozone production and other pollutants. Tropospheric chemistry models use a variety of treatments for the lumping of VOCs in their chemical mechanisms, as a compromise between detailed treatment and computational speed. However, emission inventories are frequently provided for only total VOCs with little or no information on how to split the emissions among the model species, introducing additional uncertainty to the model simulations. Global model simulations using the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART-4) and several different emission inventories are evaluated through detailed comparison to aircraft and surface observations. In particular, correlations between measured VOCs and CO are used to test the emission inventory emission ratios of the modeled VOC species. For example, megacity VOC emissions will be evaluated with surface measurements in Mumbai, Shanghai and Tokyo, as well as aircraft measurements from the NSF/MIRAGE experiment downwind of Mexico City. Wildfire emissions in Siberia, Canada and California will be evaluated using airborne observations of the NASA/ARCTAS experiment.

  15. Methods in plant foliar volatile organic compounds research.

    PubMed

    Materić, Dušan; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Morgan, Geraint; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Plants are a major atmospheric source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These secondary metabolic products protect plants from high-temperature stress, mediate in plant-plant and plant-insect communication, and affect our climate globally. The main challenges in plant foliar VOC research are accurate sampling, the inherent reactivity of some VOC compounds that makes them hard to detect directly, and their low concentrations. Plant VOC research relies on analytical techniques for trace gas analysis, usually based on gas chromatography and soft chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Until now, these techniques (especially the latter one) have been developed and used primarily by physicists and analytical scientists, who have used them in a wide range of scientific research areas (e.g., aroma, disease biomarkers, hazardous compound detection, atmospheric chemistry). The interdisciplinary nature of plant foliar VOC research has recently attracted the attention of biologists, bringing them into the field of applied environmental analytical sciences. In this paper, we review the sampling methods and available analytical techniques used in plant foliar VOC research to provide a comprehensive resource that will allow biologists moving into the field to choose the most appropriate approach for their studies.

  16. Volatile organic compounds in foods: a five year study.

    PubMed

    Fleming-Jones, Mary Ellen; Smith, Robert E

    2003-12-31

    A purge and trap procedure was used with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination to analyze 70 foods for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The results from analyses over a 5 year period (1996-2000) are reported. VOCs were found in at least one sample of all foods tested, although no single compound was found in each of the foods. The total amount of VOCs found in a single food item over the 5 year period ranged from 24 to 5328 ppb, with creamed corn (canned) the lowest and cheddar cheese the highest. Benzene was found in all foods except American cheese and vanilla ice cream. Benzene levels ranged from 1 to 190 ppb, with the highest level found in fully cooked ground beef. Benzene was found in 12 samples of cooked ground beef, with an average of 40 ppb. Benzene levels above 100 ppb were also seen in at least one sample each of a cola (138 ppb), raw bananas (132 ppb), and cole slaw (102 ppb). This compares to a maximum contaminant level of 5 ppb set by the U.S. EPA for drinking water.

  17. Novel collection method for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dogs.

    PubMed

    Holderman, Chris J; Kaufman, Phillip E; Booth, Matthew M; Bernier, Ulrich R

    2017-09-01

    Host derived chemical cues are an important aspect of arthropod attraction to potential hosts. Host cues that act over longer distances include CO2, heat, and water vapor, while cues such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act over closer distances. Domestic dogs are important hosts for disease cycles that include dog heartworm disease vectored by mosquitoes, however the host VOCs utilized by vectors are not well known. Herein we present a novel method that sampled VOCs from a dog host. A Tenax TD stainless steel tube was held near a dog's fur and skin, which collected VOCs that were later desorbed and tentatively identified using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrospectrometer (GC-MS). Background air chemicals were subtracted from the dog sample, resulting in 182 differentiated compounds, a majority of which were identified by ionization fragmentation patterns. Four dogs were sampled and shared 41 of the identified chemicals. VOCs were representative of aliphatics, aromatics, aldehydes, alcohols and carboxylic acids. This chemical characterization method has the potential to identify both individuals and breeds of dogs in addition to other potential uses such as disease diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of volatile organic compounds from bacteria on nematodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, You-Yao; Lu, Hao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Li, Guo-Hong

    2015-09-01

    The five studied bacterial strains could produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that kill nematodes. Based on their 16S rRNA sequences, these strains were identified as Pseudochrobactrum saccharolyticum, Wautersiella falsenii, Proteus hauseri, Arthrobacter nicotianae, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. The bacterial VOCs were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and subsequently identified by GC/MS analysis. The VOCs covered a wide range of aldehydes, ketones, alkyls, alcohols, alkenes, esters, alkynes, acids, ethers, as well as heterocyclic and phenolic compounds. Among the 53 VOCs identified, 19 candidates, produced by different bacteria, were selected to test their nematicidal activity (NA) against Caenorhabditis elegans and Meloidogyne incognita. The seven compounds with the highest NAs were acetophenone, S-methyl thiobutyrate, dimethyl disulfide, ethyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate, nonan-2-one, 1-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, and butyl isovalerate. Among them, S-methyl thiobutyrate showed a stronger NA than the commercial insecticide dimethyl disulfide. It was reported for the first time here that the five bacterial strains as well as S-methyl thiobutyrate, ethyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate, 1-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, and butyl isovalerate possess NA. These strains and compounds might provide new insights in the search for novel nematicides.

  19. Source apportionment modeling of volatile organic compounds in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankow, J.F.; Asher, W.E.; Zogorski, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    It often is of interest to understand the relative importance of the different sources contributing to the concentration cw of a contaminant in a stream; the portions related to sources 1, 2, 3, etc. are denoted cw,1, cw,2, cw,3, etc. Like c w, 'he fractions ??1, = cw,1/c w, ??2 = cw,2/cw, ??3 = cw,3/cw, etc. depend on location and time. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can undergo absorption from the atmosphere into stream water or loss from stream water to the atmosphere, causing complexities affecting the source apportionment (SA) of VOCs in streams. Two SA rules are elaborated. Rule 1: VOC entering a stream across the air/water interface exclusively is assigned to the atmospheric portion of cw. Rule 2: VOC loss by volatilization, flow loss to groundwater, in-stream degradation, etc. is distributed over cw,1 cw,2, c w,3, etc. in proportion to their corresponding ?? values. How the two SA rules are applied, as well as the nature of the SA output for a given case, will depend on whether transport across the air/water interface is handled using the net flux F convention or using the individual fluxes J convention. Four hypothetical stream cases involving acetone, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzene, chloroform, and perchloroethylene (PCE) are considered. Acetone and MTBE are sufficiently water soluble from air for a domestic atmospheric source to be capable of yielding cw values approaching the common water quality guideline range of 1 to 10 ??g/L. For most other VOCs, such levels cause net outgassing (F > 0). When F > 0 in a given section of stream, in the net flux convention, all of the ??j, for the compound remain unchanged over that section while cw decreases. A characteristic time ??d can be calculated to predict when there will be differences between SA results obtained by the net flux convention versus the individual fluxes convention. Source apportionment modeling provides the framework necessary for comparing different strategies for mitigating

  20. Source apportionment of volatile organic compounds measured in Edmonton, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Aklilu, Yayne-Abeba; Brown, Steven G.; Lyder, David A.

    2013-12-01

    From 2003 to 2009, whole air samples were collected at two sites in Edmonton and analyzed for over 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs were sampled in the downtown area (Central site) and an industrial area on the eastern side of the city (East site). Concentrations of most VOCs were highest at the East site, with an average total VOC mass concentration of 221 μg m-3. The average total VOC mass concentration at the Central site was 65 μg m-3. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization receptor model (EPA PMF) was used to apportion ambient concentrations of VOCs into eleven factors, which were associated with emissions sources. On average, 94 and 99% of the measured mass were apportioned by PMF at the East and Central site, respectively. Factors include transportation combustion (gasoline and diesel), industrial sources (industrial evaporative, industrial feedstock, gasoline production/storage, industrial chemical use), mixed mobile and industrial (gasoline evaporative, fugitive butane), a biogenic source, a natural gas related source, and a factor that was associated with global background pollutants transported into the area. Transportation sources accounted for more than half of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the Central site, but less than 10% of the reconstructed mass concentration at the East site. By contrast, industrial sources accounted for ten times more of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site than at the Central site and were responsible for approximately 75% of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration observed at the East site. Of the six industrial factors identified at the East site, four were linked to petrochemical industry production and storage. The two largest contributors to the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site were associated with fugitive emissions of volatile species (butanes, pentanes, hexane, and cyclohexane); together, these two factors

  1. Volatile organic compounds in ambient air of Mumbai—India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anjali; Joseph, A. E.; Devotta, S.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major group of air pollutants which play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry. These contribute to toxic oxidants which are harmful to ecosystem, human health and atmosphere. The variability of pollutants is an important factor in determining human exposure to these chemicals. Data on levels of VOCs in developing countries, including India, are lacking. The present work deals with the estimation of target VOCs at 15 locations of five categories in Mumbai. The categories are residential, industrial, commercial, traffic intersections and petrol refueling stations. The monitoring was carried out during peak hours in the morning and evening, once every month, during May 2001 to April 2002. The study focused on target VOCs as defined by USEPA. Concentrations of benzene, at all the locations, were found to be much above the guidelines values prescribed by World Health Organization (WHO) for ambient air quality. All other VOCs were observed to be below the WHO guideline values. The results show that levels of VOCs in Mumbai were high. There is need for a regular monitoring schedule of VOCs in the urban environment. Variability studies are important to assess the exposure potential of pollutants which are an important parameter for health impact studies. This study also presents the variability of VOCs in the urban area of Mumbai. Variability was divided into measurement spatial, temporal and temporal-spatial interaction components. The temporal component along with temporal-spatial interaction component were the major contributors to variability. VOCs associated with mobile source emissions and emissions from marine source were found to be distributed uniformly in the urban atmosphere in Mumbai. the need for continuous monitoring, to capture short term peak concentrations and averages, is evident.

  2. Volatile Organic Compounds in the Global Atmosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, D.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Galbally, I.; Lewis, A. C.; Masarie, K.; Milton, M.; Penkett, S.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Reimann, S.; Steinbrecher, R.; Tans, P. P.; Thiel, S.

    2010-12-01

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) - Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) has been guiding the implementation of a global program for the monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC). Essential features are 1. regular, in-situ, high temporal resolution measurements of VOC at surface stations, 2. VOC analyses in samples collected within flask sampling networks for wide geographical coverage, and 3. a concerted calibration and data quality control effort. A centerpiece of the flask sampling component builds upon the US NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory - Global Cooperative Air Sampling Network. Nine non-methane hydrocarbon species (NMHC; ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane, iso-pentane, n-pentane, isoprene, benzene, toluene) are currently analyzed by an automated gas chromatography system at the University of Colorado’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) in pairs of samples collected bi-weekly at 41 global background monitoring sites. Since the implementation of this program in 2004 more than 7000 measurements have been obtained. The obtained data allow elucidating the geographical and seasonal behavior of atmospheric NMHC, as well as interannual variations. Results show a wide dynamic range of mixing ratio changes. Concentration maxima and seasonal cycles are most pronounced in regions of highest emission sources and highest changes in the seasonal OH radical sink, i.e. the northern high and mid-latitudes. Seasonal southern hemisphere (SH) maxima are ~7 times and ~20 times lower for ethane and propane than in the northern hemisphere, which mainly reflects the smaller source strength of these gases in the SH. The richness of information in these data will help constraining the variability in global atmospheric oxidation chemistry and regional budgets of greenhouse gases, such as of methane and CO2, and most certainly stimulate further interests and applications in many fields of atmospheric chemistry and climate research

  3. A general, cryogenically-based analytical technique for the determination of trace quantities of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, R. A.; Cofer, W. R., III; Edahl, R. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical technique for the determination of trace (sub-ppbv) quantities of volatile organic compounds in air was developed. A liquid nitrogen-cooled trap operated at reduced pressures in series with a Dupont Nafion-based drying tube and a gas chromatograph was utilized. The technique is capable of analyzing a variety of organic compounds, from simple alkanes to alcohols, while offering a high level of precision, peak sharpness, and sensitivity.

  4. Biochar application reduce ammonia volatilization in a soil-plant system: A closed chamber experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sanchita; Donner, Erica; Smith, Euan; Lombi, Enzo

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) volatilization is considered as one of the major mechanisms responsible for the loss of nitrogen (N) from soil-plant systems worldwide. About 10-30% of N can be lost as NH3 volatilization, which constitutes a significant economic loss. In recent years carbon-based materials such as biochar have created a great research interest because of their ability to increase soil fertility by reducing nutrient loss and pollutants bioavailability in soil. Most of the studies so far have investigated how biochar addition can reduce NH3 volatilization from soils but less information is available for soil-plant systems. In this research, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum, variety: Calingiri) were grown in a calcareous soil (pH 8, calcarosol) inside a closed chamber system to assess both ammonia volatilization and plant N uptake. In this specialized glass chamber air was passed through an inlet where the flow rate was maintained using an air pump (3.5 L min-1). The air outlet was passed through a sulphuric acid trap which was used to capture the volatilized NH3 from the chamber. Plants were watered using the inlet to maintain 50% field capacity throughout the incubation. Two different biochar samples were used in this study: a poultry manure biochar (PM-BC) and a green waste compost biochar (GW-BC) produced at 250 ˚C. Five different application rates were tested (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2%). The soil was mixed with biochar samples, water, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S for one week before sowing. After one week of germination, plants were transferred to the chamber for further three weeks incubation for NH3 volatilization measurement. The study identified that biochar application reduced the NH3 volatilization and increase the plant biomass. Biochar application at 0.5 and 2% decreased the NH3 volatilization by 36 and 48% respectively. The N uptake of the plants also increased from 2.9 to 28% at 0.5 and 2% application rates respectively. The dry biomass of the plant also increased

  5. Microcantilever sensors coated with a sensitive polyaniline layer for detecting volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Steffens, C; Leite, F L; Manzoli, A; Sandovall, R D; Fatibello, O; Herrmann, P S P

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a silicon cantilever sensor coated with a conducting polymer layer. The mechanical response (deflection) of the bimaterial (the coated microcantilever) was investigated under the influence of several volatile compounds-methanol, ethanol, acetone, propanol, dichloroethane, toluene and benzene. The variations in the deflection of the coated and uncoated microcantilevers when exposed to volatile organic compounds were evaluated, and the results indicated that the highest sensitivity was obtained with the coated microcantilever and methanol. The uncoated microcantilever was not sensitive to the volatile organic compounds. An increase in the concentration of the volatile organic compound resulted in higher deflections of the microcantilever sensor. The sensor responses were reversible, sensible, rapid and proportional to the volatile concentration.

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  7. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...

  10. Enhancing antioxidant activity of sesamol at frying temperature by addition of additives through reducing volatility.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hong-Sik; Winkler-Moser, Jill K; Vermillion, Karl; Liu, Sean X

    2014-11-01

    Additives were evaluated to investigate their effects on volatility of sesamol at frying temperature with the hypothesis that the interaction between an additive and sesamol would reduce sesamol volatility. Twenty-two additive : sesamol combinations were examined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) under nitrogen in neat form and in soybean oil. The results indicate that these additives could bind to or interact with sesamol and consequently reduced its volatility. (1) H NMR study provided evidence for hydrogen bonding between sesamol and a hydroxyl group, an amino group, and ether groups. Subsequent heating tests were conducted to investigate the effect of the reduced volatility of sesamol on antioxidant activity in soybean oil at 180 °C. Oxidation of soybean oil was monitored with gel permeation chromatography for formation of polymerized triacylglycerols and with (1) H NMR for loss of olefinic and bisallylic protons. Sesamol retained in soybean oil during the heating process was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. A strong correlation between the retained sesamol and the antioxidant activity was observed. The mixture of 830 ppm sesamol and mono-/diglycerides, polysorbate 20 or l-carnosine showed much improved antioxidant activity compared to sesamol itself and slightly better antioxidant activity than 200 ppm tert-butylhydroquinone. It is believed that this method can also be used for many other antioxidants for which volatility is a problem. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Removal of volatile organic compounds by natural materials during composting of poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Turan, N G; Akdemir, A; Ergun, O N

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to reduce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during composting of poultry litter. The natural zeolite, expanded perlite, pumice and expanded vermiculite as the natural materials were used for the reducing of VOCs. Composting was performed in a laboratory scale in-vessel composting plant. Poultry litter was composted for 100 d with volumetric ratio of natural materials:poultry litter of 1:10. The VOCs were tested using the FT-IR method by VOCs analyzer. Studies showed that VOCs generation was the greatest in the control treatment without any natural materials. The natural materials significantly reduced VOCs. At the end of the processes, removal efficiency was 79.73% for NZ treatment, 54.59% for EP treatment, 88.22% for P treatment and 61.53% for EV treatment. Potential of removal for VOCs on poultry litter matrix using natural materials was in order of: P>NZ>EV>EP.

  12. Non-random species loss in bacterial communities reduces antifungal volatile production.

    PubMed

    Hol, W H Gera; Garbeva, Paolina; Hordijk, Cornelis; Hundscheid, P J; Gunnewiek, Paulien J A Klein; Van Agtmaal, Maaike; Kuramae, Eiko E; De Boer, Wietse

    2015-08-01

    The contribution of low-abundance microbial species to soil ecosystems is easily overlooked because there is considerable overlap between metabolic abilities (functional redundancy) of dominant and subordinate microbial species. Here we studied how loss of less abundant soil bacteria affected the production of antifungal volatiles, an important factor in the natural control of soil-borne pathogenic fungi. We provide novel empirical evidence that the loss of soil bacterial species leads to a decline in the production of volatiles that suppress root pathogens. By using dilution-to-extinction for seven different soils we created bacterial communities with a decreasing number of species and grew them under carbon-limited conditions. Communities with high bacterial species richness produced volatiles that strongly reduced the hyphal growth of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. For most soil origins loss of bacterial species resulted in loss of antifungal volatile production. Analysis of the volatiles revealed that several known antifungal compounds were only produced in the more diverse bacterial communities. Our results suggest that less abundant bacterial species play an important role in antifungal volatile production by soil bacterial communities and, consequently, in the natural suppression of soil-borne pathogens.

  13. The impact of plants on the reduction of volatile organic compounds in a small space.

    PubMed

    Song, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Yong-Shik; Sohn, Jang-Yeul

    2007-11-01

    This study aims at examining the reduction of indoor air contaminants by plants placed in an indoor space. Field measurements were performed using Aglaonema brevispathum, Pachira aquatica, and Ficus benjamiana, which were verified as air-purifying plants by NASA. Three conditions for the amount of plants and positions were used in two separate rooms whose dimensions are identical. The concentration of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) was monitored three hours after the plants were placed and three days after the plants were placed. The variations of concentration of Benzene, Toluene, Etylbenzene, and Xylene (BTEX), as well as Formaldehyde, which are all known as the major elements of Volatile Organic Compounds were monitored. The amount of reduction in concentration of Toluene and Formaldehyde was monitored 3 hours and 3 days after the plants were placed in the space. The reduction in the concentration of Benzene, Toluene, Etylbenzene, Xylene, and Formaldehyde was significantly greater when plants were present. When plants were placed near a window, the reduction of concentration was greater. The more plants were used, the more a reduction of indoor air contaminants occurred. The effect of reducing the concentration of air contaminants increased when the amount of plants increased, and when the plants were placed in sunny area. The concentration of Toluene was reduced by 45.6 microg/m(3) when 10% of the model space was occupied by Aglaonema brevispathum.

  14. Bioactivity of volatile organic compounds produced by Pseudomonas tolaasii

    PubMed Central

    Lo Cantore, Pietro; Giorgio, Annalisa; Iacobellis, Nicola S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas tolaasii is the main bacterial pathogen of several mushroom species. In this paper we report that strains of P. tolaasii produce volatile substances inducing in vitro mycelia growth inhibition of Pleurotus ostreatus and P. eryngii, and Agaricus bisporus and P. ostreatus basidiome tissue blocks brown discoloration. P. tolaasii strains produced the volatile ammonia but not hydrogen cyanide. Among the volatiles detected by GC–MS, methanethiol, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and 1-undecene were identified. The latter, when assayed individually as pure compounds, led to similar effects noticed when P. tolaasii volatiles natural blend was used on mushrooms mycelia and basidiome tissue blocks. Furthermore, the natural volatile mixture resulted toxic toward lettuce and broccoli seedling growth. In contrast, pure volatiles showed different activity according to their nature and/or doses applied. Indeed, methanethiol resulted toxic at all the doses used, while DMDS toxicity was assessed till a quantity of 1.25 μg, below which it caused, together with 1-undecene (≥10 μg), broccoli growth increase. PMID:26500627

  15. Potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol in the Mexico City region

    SciTech Connect

    Hodzic, A.; Kleinman, L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Madronich, S.; Canagaratna, M. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Fast, J.

    2010-03-01

    It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors, at least using current mechanisms and parameterizations. In this study, the 3-D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to quantify the contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic vapors (S/IVOC) in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to include explicitly the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA), their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007) ('ROB') and Grieshop et al. (2009) ('GRI') are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. The 3-D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data, and for the first time also with oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (3–6 times) with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009), both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. The predicted anthropogenic POA levels are found to agree within 20% with the observed HOA concentrations for both the ROB and GRI simulations, consistent with the interpretation of the emissions inventory by previous studies. The impact of biomass burning POA within the city is underestimated in comparison to the AMS BBOA, presumably due to insufficient nighttime smoldering emissions. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The

  16. Potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol in the Mexico City region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Madronich, S.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kleinman, L.; Fast, J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors, at least using current mechanisms and parameterizations. In this study, the 3-D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to quantify the contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic vapors (S/IVOC) in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to include explicitly the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA), their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007) ("ROB") and Grieshop et al. (2009) ("GRI") are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. The 3-D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data, and for the first time also with oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (3-6 times) with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009), both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. The predicted anthropogenic POA levels are found to agree within 20% with the observed HOA concentrations for both the ROB and GRI simulations, consistent with the interpretation of the emissions inventory by previous studies. The impact of biomass burning POA within the city is underestimated in comparison to the AMS BBOA, presumably due to insufficient nighttime smoldering emissions. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The

  17. Production of volatile organic compounds in cultures of cryptophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, T.; Kurihara, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are known to be produced by macroalgae, phytoplankton and bacteria in the ocean. Some phytoplankton species are known for the production of VOCs such as halomethanes and isoprene in cultures. To discuss the diversity of VOCs production among phytoplankton species, we incubated the strains of cryptophytes and measured concentrations of VOCs and chlorophyll a. Because VOCs productions of cryptophytes were poorly understood, we selected them to cover the lack of data for VOCs production. Phytoplankton cultures were grown in autoclaved f/2-Si medium with GF/F filtered aged seawater. Culture temperature and light conditions were 24.1 ± 0.2°C and 78 ± 4 μE m-2 s-1 (1 E = 1 mol of photons) from full-spectrum vita-lite fluorescent lamp (12 h light:12 h dark cycle). VOCs concentrations in the medium were measured using a purge and trap (Tekmar PT 5000J)- gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N)- mass spectrometer (Agilent 5973N). The concentrations of chlorophyll a was also measured using fluorometer (Turner TD-700). Isoprene concentrations were increased to 290 pmol L-1 during the exponential phase in Rhodomonas salina culture. Isoprene production rate was 0.78 μmol g chl.a-1 day-1. This value is within the range of isoprene production by other phytoplankton species reported in the previous paper. As for halomethanes, dibromomethane concentrations were increased during the incubation time. Some iodohalomethanes were also increased during the death phase. We are currently examining the production of halomethanes in other strains of Cryptophyta.

  18. Volatile organic compound emissions from dry mill fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Brady, Daniel; Pratt, Gregory C

    2007-09-01

    Ethanol fuel production is growing rapidly in the rural Midwest, and this growth presents potential environmental impacts. In 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) entered into enforcement actions with 12 fuel ethanol plants in Minnesota. The enforcement actions uncovered underreported emissions and resulted in consent decrees that required pollution control equipment be installed. A key component of the consent decrees was a requirement to conduct emissions tests for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the goal of improving the characterization and control of emissions. The conventional VOC stack test method was thought to underquantify total VOC emissions from ethanol plants. A hybrid test method was also developed that involved quantification of individual VOC species. The resulting database of total and speciated VOC emissions from 10 fuel ethanol plants is relatively small, but it is the most extensive to date and has been used to develop and gauge compliance with permit limits and to estimate health risks in Minnesota. Emissions were highly variable among facilities and emissions units. In addition to the variability, the small number of samples and the presence of many values below detection limits complicate the analysis of the data. To account for these issues, a nested bootstrap procedure on the Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate means and upper confidence limits. In general, the fermentation scrubbers and fluid bed coolers emitted the largest mass of VOC emissions. Across most facilities and emissions units ethanol was the pollutant emitted at the highest rate. Acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and ethyl acetate were also important emissions from some units. Emissions of total VOCs, ethanol, and some other species appeared to be a function of the beer feed rate, although the relationship was not reliable enough to develop a production rate-based emissions factor.

  19. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (primarily oxygenated species) from pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstine, Wayne; Galbally, Ian; Ye, Yuerong; Hooper, Martin

    1998-05-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from pasture at a site in southeastern Victoria, Australia, were monitored over a 2 year period using a static chamber technique. Fluxes up to 23,000 μg(C) m-2 h-1 were detected, with the higher fluxes originating from clover rather than from grass species. Gas Chromatographic analyses indicated that emissions from both grass and clover were high in oxygenated hydrocarbons including methanol, ethanol, propanone, butanone, and ethanal, and extremely low in isoprene and monoterpenes. In the case of clover, butanone made up 45-50% of the total emissions. When grass and clover were freshly mown, there were significantly enhanced emissions of VOCs. These enhanced emissions included both those oxygenates emitted from uncut pasture and also C6-oxygenates, including (Z)-3-hexenal, (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-3-hexen-l-ol, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate. Emissions from the undisturbed pasture increased markedly with temperature and the intensity of solar radiation, peaking at midday and ceasing at night. The fluxes, when normalized to a temperature of 30°C and a light intensity of 1000 μE m-2 s-1 were, for grass and clover respectively, about one eighth and two fifths of the equivalent fluxes reported to occur from U.S. woodlands. The annual integrated emission from the pasture was approximately 1.9 g(C) m-2 or 1.3 mg(C) g-1 (dry matter). The large transient fluxes that occurred following physical damaging of the pasture, when integrated over time, could be of the same order as those emissions that were observed from undisturbed pasture. In the case of methanol, and perhaps ethanol, the emissions from grasslands may be significant global sources of these gases.

  20. Diagnosing Tibetan pollutant sources via volatile organic compound observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyan; He, Qiusheng; Song, Qi; Chen, Laiguo; Song, Yongjia; Wang, Yuhang; Lin, Kui; Xu, Zhencheng; Shao, Min

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric transport of black carbon (BC) from surrounding areas has been shown to impact the Tibetan environment, and clarifying the geographical source and receptor regions is crucial for providing guidance for mitigation actions. In this study, 10 trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sampled across Tibet are chosen as proxies to diagnose source regions and related transport of pollutants to Tibet. The levels of these VOCs in Tibet are higher than those in the Arctic and Antarctic regions but much lower than those observed at many remote and background sites in Asia. The highest VOC level is observed in the eastern region, followed by the southern region and the northern region. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) model found that three factors-industry, biomass burning, and traffic-present different spatial distributions, which indicates that different zones of Tibet are influenced by different VOC sources. The average age of the air masses in the northern and eastern regions is estimated to be 3.5 and 2.8 days using the ratio of toluene to benzene, respectively, which indicates the foreign transport of VOC species to those regions. Back-trajectory analyses show that the Afghanistan-Pakistan-Tajikistan region, Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), and Meghalaya-Myanmar region could transport industrial VOCs to different zones of Tibet from west to east. The agricultural bases in northern India could transport biomass burning-related VOCs to the middle-northern and eastern zones of Tibet. High traffic along the unique national roads in Tibet is associated with emissions from local sources and neighboring areas. Our study proposes international joint-control efforts and targeted actions to mitigate the climatic changes and effects associated with VOCs in Tibet, which is a climate sensitive region and an important source of global water.

  1. Urinary Volatile Organic Compounds for the Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Tanzeela; Aggio, Raphael; White, Paul; De Lacy Costello, Ben; Persad, Raj; Al-Kateb, Huda; Jones, Peter; Probert, Chris S.; Ratcliffe, Norman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emanating from urine samples to determine whether they can be used to classify samples into those from prostate cancer and non-cancer groups. Participants were men referred for a trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy because of an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) level or abnormal findings on digital rectal examination. Urine samples were collected from patients with prostate cancer (n = 59) and cancer-free controls (n = 43), on the day of their biopsy, prior to their procedure. VOCs from the headspace of basified urine samples were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction and analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Classifiers were developed using Random Forest (RF) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classification techniques. PSA alone had an accuracy of 62–64% in these samples. A model based on 4 VOCs, 2,6-dimethyl-7-octen-2-ol, pentanal, 3-octanone, and 2-octanone, was marginally more accurate 63–65%. When combined, PSA level and these four VOCs had mean accuracies of 74% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. With repeated double cross-validation, the mean accuracies fell to 71% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. Results from VOC profiling of urine headspace are encouraging and suggest that there are other metabolomic avenues worth exploring which could help improve the stratification of men at risk of prostate cancer. This study also adds to our knowledge on the profile of compounds found in basified urine, from controls and cancer patients, which is useful information for future studies comparing the urine from patients with other disease states. PMID:26599280

  2. Identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds from a dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipy, Jenny; Rumburg, Brian; Mount, George; Westberg, Hal; Lamb, Brian

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to odor and air quality problems have been identified from the Washington State University Knott Dairy Farm using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Eighty-two VOCs were identified at a lactating cow open stall and 73 were detected from a slurry wastewater lagoon. These compounds included alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, ethers, aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, terpenes, other hydrocarbons, amines, other nitrogen containing compounds, and sulfur-containing compounds. The concentration of VOCs directly associated with cattle waste increased with ambient air temperature, with the highest concentrations present during the summer months. Concentrations of most detected compounds were below published odor detection thresholds. Emission rates of ethanol (1026±513 μg cow -1 s -1) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) (13.8±10.3 μg cow -1 s -1) were measured from the lactating stall area using an atmospheric tracer method and concentrations were plotted using data over a 2-year period. Emission rates of acetone (3.03±0.85 ng cow -1 s -1), 2-butanone (145±35 ng cow -1 s -1), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.46±1.11 ng cow -1 s -1), 2-methyl-3-pentanone (25.1±8.0 ng cow -1 s -1), DMS (2.19±0.92 ng cow -1 s -1), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) (16.1±3.9 ng cow -1 s -1) were measured from the slurry waste lagoon using a laboratory emission chamber.

  3. Geographical variation in the exhaled volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Amal, Haitham; Leja, Marcis; Broza, Yoav Y; Tisch, Ulrike; Funka, Konrads; Liepniece-Karele, Inta; Skapars, Roberts; Xu, Zhen-Qin; Liu, Hu; Haick, Hossam

    2013-12-01

    Breath-gas analysis has demonstrated that concentration profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) could be used for detecting a variety of diseases, among them gastric cancer (GC) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Here, we explore how geographical variation affects the disease-specific changes in the chemical composition of breath samples, as compared to control states (less severe gastric conditions). Alveolar exhaled breath samples from 260 patients were collected at two remotely different geographic locations (China and Latvia), following similar breath-collection protocols. Each cohort included 130 patients that were matched in terms of diagnosis (37 GC/32 PUD/61 controls), average age, gender ratio and smoking habits. Helicobacter Pylori infection, which is a major cause for GC and PUD, was found in part of the patients, as well as in part of the controls, at both locations. The breath samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, using the same equipment and protocol-of-experiment. We observed similar characteristic differences in the chemical composition of the breath samples between the study groups at the two locations, even though the exact composition of the breath samples differed. Both in China and Latvia, the GC patients and controls could be distinguished by differences in the average levels of 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one; PUD patients were distinguished from controls by the levels of aromatic compounds and alcohols; GC and PUD patients could not be distinguished at either site. This pilot study indicates the limitations of chemical breath-gas analysis alone for identifying gastric diseases based on the concentration profiles of separate VOCs in international patient cohorts. We assume that these limitations would apply to other diseases as well. The presented data could potentially be useful for developing an alternative, universally applicable diagnostic method that relies on the detection of changes in the collective patterns of

  4. Identification and Quantification of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipy, J.; Mount, G.; Westberg, H.; Rumburg, B.

    2003-12-01

    Livestock operations in the United States are an escalating environmental concern. The increasing density of livestock within a farm results in an increased emission of odorous gases, which have gained considerable attention by the public in recent years (National Research Council (NRC), 2002). Odorous compounds such as ammonia (NH3), volatile organic compounds (VOC's), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were reported to have a major effect on the quality of life of local residents living near livestock facilities (NRC, 2002). There has been little data collected related to identification and quantification of gaseous compounds collected from open stall dairy operations in the United States. The research to be presented identifies and quantifies VOCs produced from a dairy operation that contribute to odor and other air quality problems. Many different VOCs were identified in the air downwind of an open lactating cow stall area and near a waste lagoon at the Washington State University dairy using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis techniques. Identified compounds were very diverse and included many alcohols, aldehydes, amines, aromatics, esters, ethers, a fixed gas, halogenated hydrocarbons, hydrocarbons, ketones, other nitrogen containing compounds, sulfur containing compounds, and terpenes. The VOCs directly associated with cattle waste were dependent on ambient temperature, with the highest emissions produced during the summer months. Low to moderate wind speeds were ideal for VOC collection. Concentrations of quantified compounds were mostly below odor detection thresholds found in the literature, however the combined odor magnitude of the large number of compounds detected was most likely above any minimum detection threshold.

  5. Passive remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds using barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Looney, B.B.; Dilek, C.A.E.; Riha, B.; Rohay, V.J.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, is to demonstrate new subsurface characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. The interbedded clay and sand layers at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS) are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). Characterization studies show that the bulk of the contamination is located in the approximately 40 m thick vadose zone. The most successful strategy for removing contaminants of this type from this environment is vapor extraction alone or in combination with other methods such as air sparging or enhanced bioremediation. Preliminary work at the IDS has indicated that natural pressure differences between surface and subsurface air caused by surface barometric fluctuations can produce enough gas flow to make barometric pumping a viable method for subsurface remediation. Air flow and pressure were measured in wells that are across three stratigraphic intervals in the vadose zone` The subsurface pressures were correlated to surface pressure fluctuations but were damped and lagging in phase corresponding to depth and stratum permeability. Piezometer wells screened at lower elevations exhibited a greater phase lag and damping than wells screened at higher elevations where the pressure wave from barometric fluctuations passes through a smaller number of low permeable layers. The phase lag between surface and subsurface pressures results in significant fluxes through these wells. The resultant air flows through the subsurface impacts CVOC fate and transport. With the appropriate controls (e.g. solenoid valves) a naturally driven vapor extraction system can be implemented requiring negligible operating costs yet capable of a large CVOC removal rate (as much as 1--2 kg/day in each well at the IDS).

  6. Transport of volatile organic compounds across the capillary fringe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Physical experiments were conducted to investigate the transport of a dissolved volatile organic compound (trichloroethylene, TCE) from shallow groundwater to the unsaturated zone under a variety of conditions including changes in the soil moisture profile and water table position. Experimental data indicated that at moderate groundwater velocities (0.1 m/d), vertical mechanical dispersion was negligible and molecular diffusion was the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Under these conditions, TCE concentrations decreased nearly 3 orders of magnitude across the capillary fringe and soil gas concentrations remained low relative to those of underlying groundwater. Data collected during a water table drop showed a short-term increase in concentrations throughout most of the unsaturated zone, but these concentrations quickly declined and approached initial values after the water table was returned to its original level. In the deep part of the unsaturated zone, the water table drop resulted in a long-term decrease in concentrations, illustrating the effects of hysteresis in the soil moisture profile. A two-dimensional random walk advection-diffusion model was developed to simulate the experimental conditions, and numerical simulations agreed well with experimental data. A simpler, one-dimensional finite-difference diffusion-dispersion model was also developed. One-dimensional simulations based on molecular diffusion also agreed well with experimental data. Simulations which incorporated mechanical dispersion tended to overestimate flux across the capillary fringe. Good agreement between the one- and two-dimensional models suggested that a simple, one-dimensional approximation of vertical transport across the capillary fringe can be useful when conditions are appropriate.

  7. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, Anna; Huang, Lin; Saccon, Marina; Rudolph, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada) in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age, [OH]dt) of the different VOC. It is found that [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine [OH]dt would result in values for [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  8. Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric; Lootah, Nadia

    The gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system has been used to identify major volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sources in the UAE (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E). VOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the VOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. UAE is located at the edge of the Persian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in neighbouring Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Iran. VOCs emerging from these industries can be transported to the UAE with jet streams. The analysis of the collected air samples at three locations in Sharjah, UAE during the autumn and winter seasons indicates the presence of more than 100 VOC species. The concentrations of these species vary in magnitudes but the most prominent are: acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. The possible tracers for various emission sources have also been identified such as 2-methylpentane, 1, 3-butadiene and 2, 2-dimethlybutane for vehicle exhaust, the light hydrocarbons, namely n-butane, trans-2-butene, and n-pentane for gasoline vapor, and n-nonane, n-decane, and n-undecane for diesel vapor and asphalt application processes. As various emission sources are characterized by overlapping VOC species, the ratio of possible VOC tracers are used to quantify the contribution of different sources. Our aim in this paper is to explore and discuss possible impacts of transported emissions on the local VOC emission inventory from various sources for the UAE. This work is partially supported by Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at the American University of Sharjah, U.A.E.

  9. Toxicity of brominated volatile organics to freshwater biota.

    PubMed

    Binet, Monique T; Stauber, Jenny L; Adams, Merrin S; Rhodes, Stuart; Wech, Janine

    2010-09-01

    As part of a larger study investigating the fate and effects of brominated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated groundwaters discharging to surface waters, the toxicity of 1,2 dibromoethene (DBE) and 1,1,2-tribromoethene (TriBE) to freshwater aquatic biota was investigated. Their toxicity to bacteria (Microtox(R)), microalgae (Chlorella sp.), cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia), duckweed (Lemna sp.) and midges (Chironomus tepperi) was determined after careful optimization of the test conditions to minimize chemical losses throughout the tests. In addition, concentrations of DBE and TriBE were carefully monitored throughout the bioassays to ensure accurate calculation of toxicity values. 1,2-Dibromoethene showed low toxicity to most species, with concentrations to cause 50% lethality or effect (LC/EC50 values) ranging from 28 to 420 mg/L, 10% lethality or effect (LC/EC10 values) ranging from 18 to 94 mg/L and no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) ranging from 22 to 82 mg/L. 1,1,2-Tribromoethene was more toxic than DBE, with LC/EC50 values of 2.4 to 18 mg/L, LC/EC10 values of 0.94 to 11 mg/L and NOECs of 0.29 to 13 mg/L. Using these limited data, together with data from the only other published study on TriBE, moderate-reliability water quality guidelines (WQGs) were estimated from species sensitivity distributions. The proposed guideline trigger values for 95% species protection with 50% confidence were 2 mg/L for DBE and 0.03 mg/L for TriBE. The maximum concentrations of DBE and TriBE in nearby surface waters (3 and 1 microg /L, respectively) were well below these WQGs, so the risk to the freshwater environment receiving contaminated groundwater inflows was considered to be low, with hazard quotients <1 for both VOCs. Environ.

  10. Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, Hermanni; Bäck, Jaana; Pumpanen, Jukka; Pihlatie, Mari; Hakola, Hannele; Hellén, Heidi; Aalto, Juho; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Kajos, Maija K.; Kolari, Pasi; Taipale, Risto; Vesala, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere and thus affect also Earth's radiation balance (Kulmala et al. 2004). We have studied boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes with chamber and snow gradient techniques we were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in VOC fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. Our results reveal that VOCs from soil are mainly emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Soil fungi showed high emissions of lighter VOCs, like acetone, acetaldehyde and methanol, from isolates. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of other trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not show correlations with the VOC fluxes. These results indicate that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor account for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This emphasises that forest floor compartment should be taken into

  11. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Hunter, J. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Franklin, J. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kroll, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires detailed measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the amount and chemical composition of aircraft I/SVOC emissions remain poorly characterized. Here we characterize I/SVOC emissions from aircraft, using a novel instrument for the online, quantitative measurement of the mass loading and composition of low-volatility organic vapors. Emissions from the NASA DC8 aircraft were sampled on the ground, 143 m downwind of the engines and characterized as a function of engine power from ground idle (~4% maximum rated thrust) through 85% power. Results show that I/SVOC emissions are highest during engine-idle operating conditions, with decreasing but non-zero I/SVOC emissions at higher engine powers. Comparison of I/SVOC emissions with total hydrocarbon (THC) measurements, VOC measurements, and an established emissions profile indicates that I/SVOCs comprise 10-20% of the total organic gas phase emissions at idle, and an increasing fraction of the total gas phase organic emissions at higher powers. Positive matrix factorization of online mass spectra is used to identify three distinct types of I/SVOC emissions: aliphatic, aromatic and oxygenated. The volatility and chemical composition of the emissions suggest that unburned fuel is the dominant source of I/SVOCs at idle, while pyrolysis products make up an increasing fraction of the I/SVOCs at higher powers. Oxygenated I/SVOC emissions were detected at lower engine powers (≤30%) and may be linked to cracked, partially oxidized or unburned fuel components.

  12. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Hunter, J. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Franklin, J. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kroll, J. H.

    2013-08-01

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the amount and chemical composition of aircraft I/SVOC emissions remain poorly characterized. Here we characterize I/SVOC emissions from aircraft, using a novel instrument for the online, quantitative measurement of the mass loading and composition of low-volatility organic vapors. Emissions from the NASA DC8 aircraft were sampled on the ground 143 m downwind of the engines and characterized as a function of engine power from idle (4% maximum rated thrust) through 85% power. Results show that I/SVOC emissions are highest during engine idle operating conditions, with decreasing but non-zero I/SVOC emissions at higher engine powers. Comparison of I/SVOC emissions with total hydrocarbon (THC) measurements, VOC measurements, and an established emissions profile indicates that I/SVOCs comprise 10-20% of the total organic gas-phase emissions at idle, and an increasing fraction of the total gas-phase organic emissions at higher powers. Positive matrix factorization of online mass spectra is used to identify three distinct types of I/SVOC emissions: aliphatic, aromatic and oxygenated. The volatility and chemical composition of the emissions suggest that unburned fuel is the dominant source of I/SVOCs at idle, while pyrolysis products make up an increasing fraction of the I/SVOCs at higher powers. Oxygenated I/SVOC emissions were detected at lower engine powers (≤30%) and may be linked to cracked, partially oxidized or unburned fuel components.

  13. Modeling long-term uptake and re-volatilization of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) across the soil-atmosphere interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhongwen; Haberer, Christina; Maier, Uli; Beckingham, Barbara; Amos, Richard T; Grathwohl, Peter

    2015-12-15

    Soil-atmosphere exchange is important for the environmental fate and atmospheric transport of many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). This study focuses on modeling the vapor phase exchange of semi-volatile hydrophobic organic pollutants between soil and the atmosphere using the multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P. MIN3P is typically applied to simulate aqueous and vapor phase transport and reaction processes in the subsurface. We extended the code to also include an atmospheric boundary layer where eddy diffusion takes place. The relevant processes and parameters affecting soil-atmosphere exchange were investigated in several 1-D model scenarios and at various time scales (from years to centuries). Phenanthrene was chosen as a model compound, but results apply for other hydrophobic organic compounds as well. Gaseous phenanthrene was assumed to be constantly supplied to the system during a pollution period and a subsequent regulation period (with a 50% decline in the emission rate). Our results indicate that long-term soil-atmosphere exchange of phenanthrene is controlled by the soil compartment - re-volatilization thus depends on soil properties. A sensitivity analysis showed that accumulation and transport in soils in the short term is dominated by diffusion, whereas in the long term groundwater recharge and biodegradation become relevant. As expected, sorption causes retardation and slows down transport and biodegradation. If atmospheric concentration is reduced (e.g. after environmental regulations), re-volatilization from soil to the atmosphere occurs only for a relatively short time period. Therefore, the model results demonstrate that soils generally are sinks for atmospheric pollutants. The atmospheric boundary layer is only relevant for time scales of less than one month. The extended MIN3P code can also be applied to simulate fluctuating concentrations in the atmosphere, for instance due to temperature changes in the topsoil. Copyright

  14. Estimates of the organic aerosol volatility in a boreal forest using two independent methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Juan; Äijälä, Mikko; Häme, Silja A. K.; Hao, Liqing; Duplissy, Jonathan; Heikkinen, Liine M.; Nie, Wei; Mikkilä, Jyri; Kulmala, Markku; Prisle, Nønne L.; Virtanen, Annele; Ehn, Mikael; Paasonen, Pauli; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Riipinen, Ilona; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti

    2017-03-01

    The volatility distribution of secondary organic aerosols that formed and had undergone aging - i.e., the particle mass fractions of semi-volatile, low-volatility and extremely low volatility organic compounds in the particle phase - was characterized in a boreal forest environment of Hyytiälä, southern Finland. This was done by interpreting field measurements using a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) with a kinetic evaporation model. The field measurements were performed during April and May 2014. On average, 40 % of the organics in particles were semi-volatile, 34 % were low-volatility organics and 26 % were extremely low volatility organics. The model was, however, very sensitive to the vaporization enthalpies assumed for the organics (ΔHVAP). The best agreement between the observed and modeled temperature dependence of the evaporation was obtained when effective vaporization enthalpy values of 80 kJ mol-1 were assumed. There are several potential reasons for the low effective enthalpy value, including molecular decomposition or dissociation that might occur in the particle phase upon heating, mixture effects and compound-dependent uncertainties in the mass accommodation coefficient. In addition to the VTDMA-based analysis, semi-volatile and low-volatility organic mass fractions were independently determined by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) data. The factor separation was based on the oxygenation levels of organics, specifically the relative abundance of mass ions at m/z 43 (f43) and m/z 44 (f44). The mass fractions of these two organic groups were compared against the VTDMA-based results. In general, the best agreement between the VTDMA results and the PMF-derived mass fractions of organics was obtained when ΔHVAP = 80 kJ mol-1 was set for all organic groups in the model, with a linear correlation coefficient of around 0.4. However, this still indicates that only

  15. Field screening of volatile and semi-volatile organic pollutants using a heated, portable micro gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, M.W.; Gonzalez, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    A heated, portable silicon micromachined gas chromatograph was designed, developed and recently utilized in the characterization of volatile and some semi-volatile organic compound distribution in soil at a site in the Midwest. The use of this system in the field allowed for the rapid, on-site characterization and field screening of gasoline range VOCs and semi-volatiles (e.g., benzene, toluene, ethylebenzene, and xylene; and naphthalene) and chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents in soil and assisted in the geological mapping of environmental hot spots. The sample inlet and introduction system of the micro GC is heatable to 110 C to further extend the application range of the micro GC to samples with high moisture content, high concentration of condensable vapors, and semi-volatile compounds. Data will be presented on the use of the heated system in the characterization of the site with details provided regarding the advantages of individual compound characterization, sampling for screening purposes, and environmental screening in the field (to locate hot spots) and in mobile laboratories (to prevent overloading of GC/MS systems).

  16. Comparison of receptor models for source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Dai, Wei; Shao, Min; Liu, Ying; Lu, Sihua; Kuster, William; Goldan, Paul

    2008-11-01

    Identifying the sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is key to reducing ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Several receptor models have been developed to apportion sources, but an intercomparison of these models had not been performed for VOCs in China. In the present study, we compared VOC sources based on chemical mass balance (CMB), UNMIX, and positive matrix factorization (PMF) models. Gasoline-related sources, petrochemical production, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) were identified by all three models as the major contributors, with UNMIX and PMF producing quite similar results. The contributions of gasoline-related sources and LPG estimated by the CMB model were higher, and petrochemical emissions were lower than in the UNMIX and PMF results, possibly because the VOC profiles used in the CMB model were for fresh emissions and the profiles extracted from ambient measurements by the two-factor analysis models were "aged".

  17. Regulations and research related to volatile organic compounds (VOCs): Meeting the ozone standard nationwide by 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ponder, W.H.

    1993-07-01

    The paper gives an overview of the regulatory requiremets related to ambient ozone and discusses the related research programs of the Organics Control Branch of EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL). The programs are part of AEERL's comprehensive research program to identify and demonstrate prevention and control approaches for reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. VOCs react in the atmosphere to form ozone at ground level. Failure to attain the ambient ozone standard is one of the most pressing air pollution problems in the U.S. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 include stringent requirements to ensure attainment of the ozone standard in some areas as early as 1993, and attainment in all areas by 2010.

  18. Air ionization as a control technology for off-gas emissions of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Szulejko, Jan E; Kumar, Pawan; Kwon, Eilhann E; Adelodun, Adedeji A; Reddy, Police Anil Kumar

    2017-06-01

    High energy electron-impact ionizers have found applications mainly in industry to reduce off-gas emissions from waste gas streams at low cost and high efficiency because of their ability to oxidize many airborne organic pollutants (e.g., volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) to CO2 and H2O. Applications of air ionizers in indoor air quality management are limited due to poor removal efficiency and production of noxious side products, e.g., ozone (O3). In this paper, we provide a critical evaluation of the pollutant removal performance of air ionizing system through comprehensive review of the literature. In particular, we focus on removal of VOCs and odorants. We also discuss the generation of unwanted air ionization byproducts such as O3, NOx, and VOC oxidation intermediates that limit the use of air-ionizers in indoor air quality management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of the Effect of Two Volatile Organic Compounds on Barley Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kaddes, Amine; Parisi, Olivier; Berhal, Chadi; Ben Kaab, Sofiene; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Nasraoui, Bouzid; Jijakli, M Haissam; Massart, Sébastien; De Clerck, Caroline

    2016-08-26

    This study aimed to determine the effect of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) on some pathogens, these VOCs were emitted during interactions of barley with Fusarium culmorum Schltdl and/or Cochliobolus sativus Shoemaker, two common root rot pathogens. Our work shows that two organic esters: methyl propanoate (MP) and methyl prop-2-enoate (MA) significantly reduced the development of fungi in vitro. Additional tests showed that the esters significantly inhibited spore germination of these pathogens. The activity of these VOCs on a wide range of fungal and bacterial pathogens was also tested in vitro and showed inhibitory action. The effect of the VOCs on infected barley seeds also showed plantlets growing without disease symptoms. MA and MP seem to have potential value as alternative plant protection compounds against barley bioagressors.

  20. Indoor Semi-volatile Organic Compounds (i-SVOC) Version 1.0

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    i-SVOC Version 1.0 is a general-purpose software application for dynamic modeling of the emission, transport, sorption, and distribution of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in indoor environments.

  1. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES FROM MIXED DECIDUOUS AND CONIFEROUS FORESTS IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regio...

  2. Fact Sheets for the Architectural Coating Rule for Volatile Organic Compounds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains an August 1998 fact sheet with information regarding the National Volatile Organic Compounds Emission Standards for Architectural Coatings Rule. This page also contains information on applicability and compliance for this rule.

  3. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM FUNCTION IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic solvents such as toluene (TOL) and trichloroethylene perturb nervous system function and share characteristic effects with other central nervous system depressants such as anesthetic gasses, ethanol, benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recently, mechanistic studies...

  4. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR AND BLOOD FROM THE GENERAL POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The relationships between levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in blood and air have not been well characterized in the general population where exposure concentrations are generally at ppb levels. Objectives: This study investigates relationships between ...

  5. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES FROM MIXED DECIDUOUS AND CONIFEROUS FORESTS IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regio...

  6. IMPROVED METHOD FOR THE STORAGE OF GROUND WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING VOLATILE ORGANIC ANALYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of volatile organic analytes from water samples by the Teflon septum surface used with standard glass 40-ml sample collection vials was investigated. Analytes tested included alkanes, isoalkanes, olefins, cycloalkanes, a cycloalkene, monoaromatics, a polynuclear arom...

  7. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM FUNCTION IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic solvents such as toluene (TOL) and trichloroethylene perturb nervous system function and share characteristic effects with other central nervous system depressants such as anesthetic gasses, ethanol, benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recently, mechanistic studies...

  8. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE Ca2+ CHANNEL FUNCTION BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms underlying the acute neurophysiological and behavioral effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remain to be elucidated. However, the function of neuronal ion channels is perturbed by VOCs. The present study examined effects of toluene (TOL), trichloroethylene ...

  9. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE Ca2+ CHANNEL FUNCTION BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms underlying the acute neurophysiological and behavioral effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remain to be elucidated. However, the function of neuronal ion channels is perturbed by VOCs. The present study examined effects of toluene (TOL), trichloroethylene ...

  10. Analysis of breath volatile organic compounds as a screening tool for detection of Tuberculosis in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    • Keywords: bovine tuberculosis; Mycobacterium bovis; breath analysis; volatile organic compound; gas chromatography; mass spectrometry; NaNose • Introduction: This presentation describes two studies exploring the use of breath VOCs to identify Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle. • Methods: ...

  11. HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS AND MICELLAR PARTITIONING OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into surfactant micelles affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibrium of VOCs in surfactant solutions. This partitioning will complicate removal of VOCs from surfactant solutions by standard separation processes. Headspace expe...

  12. EVALUATION OF SOLID ADSORBENTS FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micrometeorological flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) usually require that large volumes of air be collected (whole air samples) or focused during the sampling process (cryogenic trapping or gas-solid partitioning on adsorbents) in order to achiev...

  13. Exposure of humans to a volatile organic mixture. 1. Behavioral assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, D.A.; Hudnell, H.K.; House, D.E.; Moelhave, L.; Counts, W.

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to a low-level mixture of volatile organic compounds, typical of those found in new buildings, has been reported to impair neurobehavioral function in persons who have experienced sick building syndrome (SBS). Sixty-six healthy young males who had no history of chemical sensitivity were exposed for 2.75 h to a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds at 0 and 25 mg/cu m. Even though subjects reported more fatigue and more mental confusion following exposure to volatile organic compounds than to clean air, performance on 13 neurobehavioral tests was not affected. Practice or learning effects were observed if administration of many behavioral tests were repeated. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship of exposure to volatile organic chemicals, neurobehavioral performance, and subject characteristics, e.g., age, gender, and chemical sensitivity.

  14. IMPROVED METHOD FOR THE STORAGE OF GROUND WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING VOLATILE ORGANIC ANALYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of volatile organic analytes from water samples by the Teflon septum surface used with standard glass 40-ml sample collection vials was investigated. Analytes tested included alkanes, isoalkanes, olefins, cycloalkanes, a cycloalkene, monoaromatics, a polynuclear arom...

  15. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR AND BLOOD FROM THE GENERAL POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The relationships between levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in blood and air have not been well characterized in the general population where exposure concentrations are generally at ppb levels. Objectives: This study investigates relationships between ...

  16. EVALUATION OF SOLID ADSORBENTS FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micrometeorological flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) usually require that large volumes of air be collected (whole air samples) or focused during the sampling process (cryogenic trapping or gas-solid partitioning on adsorbents) in order to achiev...

  17. HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS AND MICELLAR PARTITIONING OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into surfactant micelles affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibrium of VOCs in surfactant solutions. This partitioning will complicate removal of VOCs from surfactant solutions by standard separation processes. Headspace expe...

  18. 78 FR 55234 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Compound Emission Control Measures for Industrial Solvent Cleaning for Northwest Indiana AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: On May 29, 2012, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) submitted revisions to its volatile organic compound...

  19. A novel technology to increase antioxidant activity of an antioxidant by reducing volatility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During frying, an antioxidant is lost by reaction with radicals for its antioxidant activity, but it is also lost by decomposition and evaporation before it is able to exert antioxidant activity. Some low molecular weight antioxidants are often so volatile that they show much reduced antioxidant act...

  20. Determination on Monod kinetic coefficients for volatile hydrophobic organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Jaffe, P.R.

    1996-06-20

    A new procedure is presented to determine Monod kinetic coefficients and the microbial yield coefficient for volatile hydrophobic compounds such as phenanthrene. Batch experiments were conducted with a mixed culture capable of degrading phenanthrene. The phenanthrene disappearance and carbon dioxide production were monitored with time. A maximum likelihood estimator was formulated to fit the set of equations that describe the system to the measured data. The model takes into account a number of processes such as partition onto the apparatus, volatilization, and partition onto the biomass. The parameters required to describe these processes were obtained by independent experiments. The yield coefficient could be determined within a small range. However, the specific growth rate and the half-saturation constant were found to vary widely, with pairs of them describing the system adequately. It was shown that partition and volatilization processes can significantly affect the determination of the yield and Monod kinetic coefficients and need to be taken into account.

  1. Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

    2012-07-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in Northern Michigan. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart II of... - Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits for Marine Coatings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP) Limits... (Surface Coating) Pt. 63, Subpt. II, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart II of Part 63—Volatile Organic HAP (VOHAP... exempt compounds) Grams/liter solids d t ≥4.5 °C t <4.5 °C e General use 340 571 728 Specialty: Air flask...

  3. A Push-Pull Test to Measure Volatilization Fluxes of Organic Pollutants without Flux Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. C.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization of organic contaminants is a potentially significant removal mechanism from wetlands, but field measurements are scarce and the physiochemical controls on volatilization from wetland soils remain poorly understood. It has been established that volatilization rates of certain pollutants are enhanced by vegetation and are strongly correlated with evapotranspiration (ET). These observations rely on flux chambers measurements, which are characterized by significant uncertainty due the chamber's effects on the meteorological variables around the plant and consequent impact on the biophysical processes governing ET and plant uptake of soil contaminants. Here we present data from a mesocosm study using a modified single-well push-pull test to measure in-situ volatilization rates from inundated soils vegetated with the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia, as well as from unplanted soil. This new method uses a test solution containing the volatile tracers sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), helium (He), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to estimate first-order volatilization rates and examine the relationship between physiochemical properties and volatilization rates. The test also yields an estimate for the volume of subsurface gas bubbles, which is used to derive a retardation factor for the effect of interphase partitioning on the estimation of kinetic parameters. We evaluate models to partition observed fluxes into different pathways for plant-mediated volatilization: transpirational uptake and consequent volatilization, and gas-phase diffusion through porous root aerenchyma. Those models are then used to scale tracer-derived volatilization fluxes to priority organic pollutants including benzene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. We also discuss the implementation of this method at field scales to estimate volatilization as a component of phytoremediation applications.

  4. Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) in 2006: Repair, Revalidation, and Restart of Elektron Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in August 2001 and was the first instrument to provide near real-time measurement of volatile organic compounds in a spacecraft atmosphere. The VOA performed an analysis of the ISS air approximately twice a month for most of its operation through May 2003. This intermittent operation, caused by a software interface issue with the ISS communication bus, slowed the validation of the VOA. However, operational validation was completed in 2003 when analysis of air samples collected in grab sample containers (GSCs) compared favorably with simultaneous VOA runs (1). The VOA has two channels that provide redundant function, albeit at slightly reduced performance, when only one channel is operating (2). Most target compounds can be detected on both channels. In January 2003, the VOA identified a malfunction in the channel 2 preconcentrator and it shut down that channel. The anomaly profile suggested that a fuse might have failed, but the root cause could not be determined. In May 2003, channel 1 was shut down when the detector s elevated temperature could not longer be maintained. Since both VOA channels were now deactivated, VOA operations ended until an in-flight repair could be planned and executed. This paper describes the process to repair the VOA and to revalidate it for operations, and then an account is given of the VOA s contribution following a contingency event on ISS.

  5. Photodecomposition of volatile organic compounds using TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jwo, Ching-Song; Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jnug; Lin, Chi-Hsiang

    2007-06-01

    This study examined the photodecomposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using TiO2 catalyst fabricated by the Submerged Arc Nanoparticle Synthesis System (SANSS). TiO2 catalyst was employed to decompose volatile organic compounds and compare with Degussa-P25 TiO2 in terms of decomposition efficiency. In the electric discharge manufacturing process, a Ti bar, applied as the electrode, was melted and vaporized under high temperature. The vaporized Ti powders were then rapidly quenched under low-temperature and low-pressure conditions in deionized water, thus nucleating and forming nanocrystalline powders uniformly dispersed in the base solvent. The average diameter of the TiO2 nanoparticles was 20 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the nanoparticles in the deionized water were Anatase type TiO2. It was found that gaseous toluene exposed to UV irradiation produced intermediates that were even harder to decompose. After 60-min photocomposition, Degussa-P25 TiO2 reduced the concentration of gaseous toluene to 8.18% while the concentration after decomposition by SANSS TiO2 catalyst dropped to 0.35%. Under UV irradiation at 253.7 +/- 184.9 nm, TiO2 prepared by SANSS can produce strong chemical debonding energy, thus showing great efficiency, superior to that of Degussa-P25 TiO2, in decomposing gaseous toluene and its intermediates.

  6. The Venus flytrap attracts insects by the release of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Scheerer, Ursel; Kruse, Jörg; Burzlaff, Tim; Honsel, Anne; Alfarraj, Saleh; Georgiev, Plamen; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Ghirardo, Andrea; Kreuzer, Ines; Hedrich, Rainer; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-02-01

    Does Dionaea muscipula, the Venus flytrap, use a particular mechanism to attract animal prey? This question was raised by Charles Darwin 140 years ago, but it remains unanswered. This study tested the hypothesis that Dionaea releases volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to allure prey insects. For this purpose, olfactory choice bioassays were performed to elucidate if Dionaea attracts Drosophila melanogaster. The VOCs emitted by the plant were further analysed by GC-MS and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The bioassays documented that Drosophila was strongly attracted by the carnivorous plant. Over 60 VOCs, including terpenes, benzenoids, and aliphatics, were emitted by Dionaea, predominantly in the light. This work further tested whether attraction of animal prey is affected by the nutritional status of the plant. For this purpose, Dionaea plants were fed with insect biomass to improve plant N status. However, although such feeding altered the VOC emission pattern by reducing terpene release, the attraction of Drosophila was not affected. From these results it is concluded that Dionaea attracts insects on the basis of food smell mimicry because the scent released has strong similarity to the bouquet of fruits and plant flowers. Such a volatile blend is emitted to attract insects searching for food to visit the deadly capture organ of the Venus flytrap.

  7. The Venus flytrap attracts insects by the release of volatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Honsel, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Does Dionaea muscipula, the Venus flytrap, use a particular mechanism to attract animal prey? This question was raised by Charles Darwin 140 years ago, but it remains unanswered. This study tested the hypothesis that Dionaea releases volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to allure prey insects. For this purpose, olfactory choice bioassays were performed to elucidate if Dionaea attracts Drosophila melanogaster. The VOCs emitted by the plant were further analysed by GC-MS and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The bioassays documented that Drosophila was strongly attracted by the carnivorous plant. Over 60 VOCs, including terpenes, benzenoids, and aliphatics, were emitted by Dionaea, predominantly in the light. This work further tested whether attraction of animal prey is affected by the nutritional status of the plant. For this purpose, Dionaea plants were fed with insect biomass to improve plant N status. However, although such feeding altered the VOC emission pattern by reducing terpene release, the attraction of Drosophila was not affected. From these results it is concluded that Dionaea attracts insects on the basis of food smell mimicry because the scent released has strong similarity to the bouquet of fruits and plant flowers. Such a volatile blend is emitted to attract insects searching for food to visit the deadly capture organ of the Venus flytrap. PMID:24420576

  8. Semi-volatile secondary organic aerosol in urban atmospheres: meeting a measurement challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Delbert J.; Long, Russell W.; Modey, William K.; Eatough, Norman L.

    Ammonium nitrate and semi-volatile organic compounds are significant components of fine particles in urban atmospheres. These components, however, are not properly determined with current US EPA accepted methods such as the PM 2.5 FRM or other single filter samplers due to significant losses of semi-volatile material (SVM) from particles collected on the filter during sampling. Continuous PM 2.5 mass measurements are attempted using methods such as the R&P TEOM monitor. This method, however, heats the sample to remove particle-bound water which also results in evaporation of SVM. Research at Brigham Young University has resulted in samplers for both the integrated and continuous measurement of total PM 2.5, including the SVM. The PC-BOSS is a charcoal diffusion denuder based sampler for the determination of fine particulate chemical composition including the semi-volatile organic material. The RAMS is a modified TEOM monitor which includes diffusion denuders and Nafion dryers to remove gas phase material which can be absorbed by a charcoal sorbent filter. The RAMS then uses a "sandwich filter" consisting of a conventional particle collecting Teflon coated TX40 filter, followed by an activated charcoal sorbent filter which retains any semi-volatile ammonium nitrate or organic material lost from the particles collected on the TEOM monitor Teflon coated filter, thus allowing for determination of total PM 2.5 mass including the SVM. Recent research conducted by Brigham Young University using these two samplers has indicated the following about semi-volatile organic aerosol: The majority of semi-volatile fine particulate organic material is secondary organic aerosol. This semi-volatile organic aerosol is not retained on the heated filter of a regular TEOM monitor and hence is not measured by this sampling technique. In addition, secondary ammonium nitrate is also lost. Much of the semi-volatile organic aerosol is also lost during sampling from single filter samplers

  9. Photocatalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds using fluorescent visible light.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Yannick; Klvana, Danilo; Guy, Christophe; Kirchnerova, Jitka

    2002-07-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a highly attractive alternative technology for purification and deodorization of indoor air. The main objectives of this study were to demonstrate that a common fluorescent visible light (FVL) lamp can be used to effectively remove by PCO low concentrations of VOCs from slightly contaminated air and to provide some fundamental and technical details on the process. The target VOC was n-butanol, which is a standard reference odorant. Its PCO was studied under a long residence time in a 3.7-L cylindrical reactor with commercial titanium dioxide (TiO2) as the reference photocatalyst and using mostly FVL for illumination. For comparison only, a UV (black) light lamp was used. The gas-phase products were detected and quantified online by gas chromatography (GC). The effects of reactor residence time, of inlet concentration, and of the relative light intensity on the efficiency of the process were also evaluated. At a high n-butanol concentration (0.1 vol %), butanal and propanal were identified as the intermediate products of the process; ethanal appeared when the initial concentration was < or = 850 ppm(v). This indicates that PCO leading to CO2 and H2O is relatively slow and proceeds in a stepwise manner. Although the efficiency of the process with an FVL lamp was significantly lower than when using a UV black light, complete PCO of low concentrations was achieved for 100 ppm(v). In a search for a material with photoactivation extended to higher wavelengths or increased photoactivity, several samples of transition metal- or silver ion-doped (2 atomic %) TiO2 as well as SrTi(1-x-)Fe(x)O3 (x = 0.1 and 0.15) perovskites were included in the study. None of these materials was more active than pure TiO2. The results of this study open new horizons in the area of in door air quality (IAQ) control.

  10. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  11. Diffusive transport of volatile organic compounds through geomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWatters, Rebecca Sheila

    The diffusive transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through geomembranes is examined. The key diffusive parameters: diffusion ( Dg), partitioning (Sgf) and permeation (Pg) coefficients, for transport from both vapour and aqueous phases are evaluated. Consideration is given to different types of geomembrane, exposure to cold climatic conditions, and aged geomembranes exhumed after 3 and 25 years. Laboratory sorption and diffusion tests are performed and modeling is used to infer diffusive parameters from experimental data. The transport of VOCs through polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) geomembranes from both aqueous and vapour phases is evaluated by Purge & Trap-GC/MS. Results indicate that VOC transport through geomembranes in a simulated landfill environment is identical despite the phase they originate from. Subsequently, this finding is confirmed by examining diffusion of vapour-phase VOCs using Solid Phase Microextraction-GC/FID. Diffusive transport of VOCs through traditional PVC, LLDPE and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes is compared with that through two novel co-extruded geomembranes, one with a polyamide inner core, the other an ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) inner core. Both co-extruded geomembranes show a 10-200-fold decrease in Pg values and therefore improved diffusive resistance to VOCs compared to the traditional geomembranes. EVOH also shows a 5-12-fold decrease in Pg values compared to an HDPE geomembrane. The effects of cold environments on the diffusion of VOCs are studied. Five geomembranes are exposed to simulated cold climatic conditions in the laboratory. Results from diffusion tests run at 2-24°C indicate Dg and Pg decrease with temperature. The temperature and diffusion coefficients relationship follow the Arrhenius equation. Activation energies of diffusion are calculated specific to each geomembrane and contaminant. An HPDE geomembrane taken from a field site in the Canadian Arctic

  12. Exposure to volatile organic compounds: Comparison among different transportation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Duc Hoai; Van Langenhove, Herman; Chigbo, Stephen Izuchukwu; Amare, Abebech Nuguse; Demeestere, Kristof; Walgraeve, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The increasing trend of promoting public transportation (bus tram, metro, train) and more environmental friendly and sustainable non fossil-fuel alternatives (walking, cycling etc) as substitutes for auto vehicles brings forward new questions with regard to pollutant levels to which commuters are exposed. In this study, three transportation modes (tram, auto vehicle and bicycle) are studied and concentration levels of 84 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, oxygen containing hydrocarbons, terpenes and halogenated compounds) are measured along a route in the city of Ghent, Belgium. The concentration levels are obtained by active sampling on Tenax TA sorbent tubes followed by thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) using deuterated toluene as an internal standard. The median total VOC concentrations for the tram mode (33 μg/m³) is 1.7 times higher than that of the bicycle mode (20 μg/m³) and 1.5 times higher than for the car mode (22 μg/m³). It is found that aromatic hydrocarbons account for a significant proportion in the total VOCs concentration (TVOCs) being as high as 41-57%, 59-72% and 58-72% for the tram, car and bicycle respectively. In all transportation modes, there was a high (r > 0.6) degree of correlation between BTEX compounds, isopropylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. When comparing time weighed average concentrations along a fixed route in Ghent, it is found that commuters using the tram mode experience the highest TVOCs concentration levels. However, next to the concentration level to which commuters are exposed, the physical activity level involving the mode of transportation is important to assess the exposure to toxic VOCs. It is proven that the commuter using a bicycle (4.3 ± 1.5 μg) inhales seven and nine times more benzene compared to the commuter using the car and tram respectively, when the same route is followed.

  13. Volatile Organic Compound Investigation Results, 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Robert E.; Williams, Bruce A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2008-07-07

    Unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were discovered while drilling in the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site’s 300 Area during 2006. The discovery involved an interval of relatively finer-grained sediment within the unconfined aquifer, an interval that is not sampled by routine groundwater monitoring. Although VOC contamination in the unconfined aquifer has been identified and monitored, the concentrations of newly discovered contamination are much higher than encountered previously, with some new results significantly higher than the drinking water standards. The primary contaminant is trichloroethene, with lesser amounts of tetrachloroethene. Both chemicals were used extensively as degreasing agents during the fuels fabrication process. A biological degradation product of these chemicals, 1,2-dichloroethene, was also detected. To further define the nature and extent of this contamination, additional characterization drilling was undertaken during 2007. Four locations were drilled to supplement the information obtained at four locations drilled during the earlier investigation in 2006. The results of the combined drilling indicate that the newly discovered contamination is limited to a relatively finer-grained interval of Ringold Formation sediment within the unconfined aquifer. The extent of this contamination appears to be the area immediately east and south of the former South Process Pond. Samples collected from the finer-grained sediment at locations along the shoreline confirm the presence of the contamination near the groundwater/river interface. Contamination was not detected in river water that flows over the area where the river channel potentially incises the finer-grained interval of aquifer sediment. The source for this contamination is not readily apparent. A search of historical documents and the Hanford Waste Information Data System did not provide definitive clues as to waste disposal operations and

  14. Acidification of In-Storage-Psychrophilic-Anaerobic-Digestion (ISPAD) process to reduce ammonia volatilization: Model development and validation.

    PubMed

    Madani-Hosseini, Mahsa; Mulligan, Catherine N; Barrington, Suzelle

    2016-06-01

    In-Storage-Psychrophilic-Anaerobic-Digestion (ISPAD) is an ambient temperature treatment system for wastewaters stored for over 100days under temperate climates, which produces a nitrogen rich digestate susceptible to ammonia (NH3) volatilization. Present acidification techniques reducing NH3 volatilization are not only expensive and with secondary environmental effects, but do not apply to ISPAD relying on batch-to-batch inoculation. The objectives of this study were to identify and validate sequential organic loading (OL) strategies producing imbalances in acidogen and methanogen growth, acidifying ISPAD content one week before emptying to a pH of 6, while also preserving the inoculation potential. This acidification process is challenging as wastewaters often offer a high buffering capacity and ISPAD operational practices foster low microbial populations. A model simulating the ISPAD pH regime was used to optimize 3 different sequential OLs to decrease the ISPAD pH to 6.0. All 3 strategies were compared in terms of biogas production, volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, microbial activity, glucose consumption, and pH decrease. Laboratory validation of the model outputs confirmed that a sequential OL of 13kg glucose/m(3) of ISPAD content over 4days could indeed reduce the pH to 6.0. Such OL competes feasibly with present acidification techniques. Nevertheless, more research is required to explain the 3-day lag between the model results and the experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass spectra deconvolution of low, medium, and high volatility biogenic secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Kostenidou, Evangelia; Lee, Byong-Hyoek; Engelhart, Gabriella J; Pierce, Jeffrey R; Pandis, Spyros N

    2009-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) consists of compounds with a wide range of volatilities and its ambient concentration is sensitive to this volatility distribution. Recent field studies have shown that the typical mass spectrum of ambient oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) as measured by the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is quite different from the SOA mass spectra reported in smog chamber experiments. Part of this discrepancy is due to the dependence of SOA composition on the organic aerosol concentration. High precursor concentrations lead to higher concentrations of the more volatile species in the produced SOA while at lower concentrations the less volatile compounds dominate the SOA composition. alpha-Pinene, beta-pinene, d-limonene, and beta-caryophyllene ozonolysis experiments were performed at moderate concentration levels. Using a thermodenuder the more volatile SOA species were removed achieving even lower SOA concentration. The less volatile fraction was then chemically characterized by an AMS. The signal fraction of m/z44, and thus the concentration of C02+, is significantly higher for the less volatile SOA. High NO(x) conditions result in less oxidized SOA than low NO(x) conditions, while increasing relative humidity levels results in more oxidized products for limonene but has little effect on alpha-and beta-pinene SOA. Combining a smog chamber with a thermodenuder model employing the volatility basis-set framework, the AMS SOA mass spectrum for each experiment and for each precursor is deconvoluted into low, medium, and high volatility component mass spectra. The spectrum of the surrogate component with the lower volatility is quite similar to that of ambient OOA.

  16. Volatilization of low vapor pressure--volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

  17. Volatility of source apportioned wintertime organic aerosol in the city of Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louvaris, Evangelos E.; Florou, Kalliopi; Karnezi, Eleni; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Gkatzelis, Georgios I.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2017-06-01

    The volatility distribution of ambient organic aerosol (OA) and its components was measured during the winter of 2013 in the city of Athens combining a thermodenuder (TD) and a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of both the ambient and the thermodenuder AMS-spectra resulted in a four-factor solution for the OA, namely: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), cooking OA (COA), and oxygenated OA (OOA). The thermograms of the four factors were analyzed and the corresponding volatility distributions were estimated using the volatility basis set (VBS). All four factors included compounds with a wide range of effective volatilities from 10 to less than 10-4 μg m-3 at 298 K. Almost 40% of the HOA consisted of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) with the semi-volatile compounds (SVOCs) representing roughly 30%, while the remaining 30% consisted of extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs). BBOA was more volatile than the HOA factor on average, with 10% ELVOCs, 40% LVOCs, and 50% SVOCs. 10% of the COA consisted of ELVOCs, another 65% LVOCs, and 50% SVOCs. Finally, the OOA was the least volatile factor and included 40% ELVOCs, 25% LVOCs, and 35% SVOCs. Combining the volatility distributions and the O:C ratios of the various factors, we placed our results in the 2D-VBS analysis framework of Donahue et al. (2012). HOA and BBOA are in the expected region but also include an ELVOC component. COA is in similar range as HOA, but on average is half an order of magnitude more volatile. The OOA in these wintertime conditions had a moderate O:C ratio and included both semi-volatile and extremely low volatility components. The above results are sensitive to the assumed values of the effective vaporization enthalpy and the accommodation coefficient. A reduction of the accommodation coefficient by an order of magnitude or the reduction of the vaporization enthalpy by 20 kJ mol-1

  18. Modeling total reduced sulfur and sulfur dioxide emissions from a kraft recovery boiler using an artificial neural network, and, Investigating volatile organic compounds in an urban intermountain valley using a TD/GC/MS methodology and intrinsic tracer molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Christopher Louis

    2000-11-01

    Back-propagation neural networks were trained to predict total reduced sulfur (TRS) and SO2 emissions from kraft recovery boiler operational data. A 0.721 coefficient of correlation was achieved between actual and predicted sulfur emissions on test data withheld from network training. The artificial neural network (ANN) models found an inverse, linear relationship between TRS/SO2 emissions and percent opacity. A number of relationships among operating parameters and sulfur emissions were identified by the ANN models. These relationships were used to formulate strategies for reducing sulfur emissions. Disagreement between ANN model predictions on a subsequent data set revealed an additional scenario for sulfur release not present in the training data. ANN modeling was demonstrated to be an effective tool for analyzing process variables when balancing productivity and environmental concerns. Five receptor sites distributed in the Missoula Valley, Montana, were employed to investigate possible VOC (benzene, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-/p-xylene, o-xylene, naphthalene, acetone, chloroform, α-pinene, β-pinene, p-cymene and limonene) sources. The most dominant source of VOCs was found to be vehicle emissions. Furthermore, anthropogenic sources of terpenoids overwhelmed biogenic emissions, on a local scale. Difficulties correlating wind direction and pollutant levels could be explained by wind direction variability, low wind speed and seasonally dependent meteorological factors. Significant evidence was compiled to support the use of p-cymene as a tracer molecule for pulp mill VOC emissions. Apportionment techniques using o-xylene and p-cymene as tracers for automobile and pulp mill emissions, respectively, were employed to estimate each source's VOC contribution. Motor vehicles were estimated to contribute between 56 and 100 percent of the aromatic pollutants in the Missoula Valley airshed, depending upon the sampling location. Pulp mill emissions

  19. Organic nitrate aerosol formation via NO3 + biogenic volatile organic compounds in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, B. R.; Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Brown, S. S.; Wild, R. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Day, D. A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Hu, W.; de Gouw, J.; Koss, A.; Cohen, R. C.; Duffey, K. C.; Romer, P.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Takahama, S.; Thornton, J. A.; Lee, B. H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Nguyen, T. B.; Teng, A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Olson, K.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Gas- and aerosol-phase measurements of oxidants, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and organic nitrates made during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS campaign, Summer 2013) in central Alabama show that a nitrate radical (NO3) reaction with monoterpenes leads to significant secondary aerosol formation. Cumulative losses of NO3 to terpenes are correlated with increase in gas- and aerosol-organic nitrate concentrations made during the campaign. Correlation of NO3 radical consumption to organic nitrate aerosol formation as measured by aerosol mass spectrometry and thermal dissociation laser-induced fluorescence suggests a molar yield of aerosol-phase monoterpene nitrates of 23-44 %. Compounds observed via chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) are correlated to predicted nitrate loss to BVOCs and show C10H17NO5, likely a hydroperoxy nitrate, is a major nitrate-oxidized terpene product being incorporated into aerosols. The comparable isoprene product C5H9NO5 was observed to contribute less than 1 % of the total organic nitrate in the aerosol phase and correlations show that it is principally a gas-phase product from nitrate oxidation of isoprene. Organic nitrates comprise between 30 and 45 % of the NOy budget during SOAS. Inorganic nitrates were also monitored and showed that during incidents of increased coarse-mode mineral dust, HNO3 uptake produced nitrate aerosol mass loading at a rate comparable to that of organic nitrate produced via NO3 + BVOCs.

  20. Improved exposure estimation in soil screening and clean-up criteria for volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    DeVaull, George E

    2017-02-18

    Soil clean-up criteria define acceptable concentrations of organic chemical constituents for exposed humans. These criteria sum the estimated soil exposure over multiple pathways. Assumptions for ingestion, dermal contact, and dust exposure generally presume a chemical persists in surface soils at a constant concentration level for the entire exposure duration. For volatile chemicals this is an unrealistic assumption. A calculation method is presented for surficial soil criteria which include volatile depletion of chemical for these uptake pathways. The depletion estimates compare favorably with measured concentration profiles and with field measurements of soil concentration. Corresponding volatilization estimates compare favorably with measured data for a wide range of volatile and semi-volatile chemicals, including instances with and without the presence of a mixed-chemical residual phase. Selected examples show application of the revised factors in estimating screening levels for benzene in surficial soils. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Geographical traceability of Italian white truffle (Tuber magnatum Pico) by the analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gioacchini, Anna Maria; Menotta, Michele; Guescini, Michele; Saltarelli, Roberta; Ceccaroli, Paola; Amicucci, Antonella; Barbieri, Elena; Giomaro, Giovanna; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2008-10-01

    Results are presented that were obtained on the geographic traceability of the white truffle Tuber magnatum Pico. Solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) was employed to characterize the volatile profile of T. magnatum white truffle produced in seven geographical areas of Italy. The main components of the volatile fraction were identified using SPME-GC/MS. Significant differences in the proportion of volatile constituents from truffles of different geographical areas were detected. The results suggest that, besides genetic factors, environmental conditions influence the formation of volatile organic compounds. The mass spectra of the volatile fraction of the samples were used as fingerprints to characterize the geographical origin. Next, stepwise factorial discriminant analysis afforded a limited number of characteristic fragment ions that allowed a geographical classification of the truffles studied.

  2. Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

    2012-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in northern Michigan. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Notably, reaction of isoprene with NO3 leading to isoprene nitrate formation was found to be significant (~8% of primary organic nitrate production) during the daytime, and monoterpene reactions with NO3 were simulated to comprise up to ~83% of primary organic nitrate production at night. Lastly, forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

  3. Characterizing the Chemical Complexity of Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds from Biomass Burning in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernis, R. A.; Yee, L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Kreisberg, N. M.; de Sá, S. S.; Liu, Y.; Martin, S. T.; Alexander, L.; Palm, B. B.; Hu, W.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Artaxo, P.; Viegas, J.; Manzi, A. O.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols are a source of great uncertainty in radiative forcing predictions and have poorly understood impacts on human health. In many environments, biomass burning contributes a significant source of primary aerosol as well as reactive gas-phase precursors that can form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). One class of these precursors, semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), has been shown to have a large contribution to the amount of SOA formed from fire emissions. At present, SVOC emissions from biomass burning are poorly constrained and understanding their contributions to SOA formation is an important research challenge. In the Amazonian dry season, biomass burning is a major source of gases and aerosols reducing regional air quality. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/5 field campaign, we deployed the Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas Chromatograph (SV-TAG) instrument at the rural T3 site, 60 km to the west of Manaus, Brazil to measure hourly concentrations of SVOCs in the gas and particle phases. This comprehensive technique detects thousands of compounds, enabling the discovery of previously unidentified compounds. In this work we explore compounds for which a correlation with well-known biomass burning tracers is observed to discover the identities of new tracers. We discuss contributions to the total organic aerosol from well-known, rarely reported and newly-identified biomass burning tracers. We find that levoglucosan, perhaps the most commonly used particle phase biomass burning tracer, contributed 0.6% and 0.3% of total organic aerosol in the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  4. Influence of adjunct cultures on volatile free fatty acids in reduced-fat Edam cheeses.

    PubMed

    Tungjaroenchai, W; White, C H; Holmes, W E; Drake, M A

    2004-10-01

    The effects of the adjunct cultures Lactococcus lactis ssp. diacetylactis, Brevibacterium linens BL2, Lactobacillus helveticus LH212, and Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 23272 on volatile free fatty acid production in reduced-fat Edam cheese were studied. Lipase activity evaluation using p-nitrophenyl fatty acid ester substrates indicated that L. lactis ssp. diacetylactis showed the highest activity among the 4 adjunct cultures. Full-fat and 33% reduced-fat control cheeses (no adjunct) were made along with 5 treatments of reduced-fat cheeses, which included individual, and a mixture of the adjunct cultures. Volatile free fatty acids of cheeses were analyzed using static headspace analysis with 4-bromofluorobenzene as an internal standard. Changes in volatile free fatty acid concentrations were found in headspace gas of cheeses after 3-and 6-mo ripening. Acetic acid was the most abundant acid detected throughout ripening. Full-fat cheese had the highest relative amount of propionic acid among the cheeses. Certain adjunct cultures had a definite role in lipolysis at particular times. Reduced-fat cheese with L. lactis ssp. diacetylactis at 3-mo showed the highest levels of butyric, isovaleric, n-valeric, iso-caproic, and n-caproic acid. Reduced-fat cheese with Lactobacillus reuteri at 6 mo produced the highest relative concentration of isocaproic, n-caproic, and heptanoic, and the highest relative concentration of total acids.

  5. Volatile organic compounds from feces and their potential for diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Garner, Catherine E; Smith, Stephen; de Lacy Costello, Ben; White, Paul; Spencer, Robert; Probert, Chris S J; Ratcliffe, Norman M

    2007-06-01

    Little is known about the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in feces and their potential health consequences. Patients and healthcare professionals have observed that feces often smell abnormal during gastrointestinal disease. The aim of this work was to define the volatiles emitted from the feces of healthy donors and patients with gastrointestinal disease. Our hypotheses were that i) VOCs would be shared in health; ii) VOCs would be constant in individuals; and iii) specific changes in VOCs would occur in disease. Volatile emissions in health were defined in a cohort and a longitudinal study. Subsequently, the pattern of volatiles found in the cohort study were compared to that found from patients with ulcerative colitis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium difficile. Volatiles from feces were collected by solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the cohort study, 297 volatiles were identified. In all samples, ethanoic, butanoic, pentanoic acids, benzaldehyde, ethanal, carbon disulfide, dimethyldisulfide, acetone, 2-butanone, 2,3-butanedione, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, indole, and 4-methylphenol were found. Forty-four compounds were shared by 80% of subjects. In the longitudinal study, 292 volatiles were identified, with some inter and intra subject variations in VOC concentrations with time. When compared to healthy donors, volatile patterns from feces of patients with ulcerative colitis, C. difficile, and C. jejuni were each significantly different. These findings could lead the way to the development of a rapid diagnostic device based on VOC detection.

  6. Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds by Weight-Detectable Sensors coated with Metal-Organic Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Yamagiwa, Hiroki; Sato, Seiko; Fukawa, Tadashi; Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Ryutaro; Mihara, Takashi; Kimura, Mutsumi

    2014-01-01

    Detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using weight-detectable quartz microbalance and silicon-based microcantilever sensors coated with crystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films is described in this paper. The thin films of two MOFs were grown from COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers onto the gold electrodes of sensor platforms. The MOF layers worked as the effective concentrators of VOC gases, and the adsorption/desorption processes of the VOCs could be monitored by the frequency changes of weight-detectable sensors. Moreover, the MOF layers provided VOC sensing selectivity to the weight-detectable sensors through the size-selective adsorption of the VOCs within the regulated nanospace of the MOFs. PMID:25175808

  7. RT-MATRIX: Measuring Total Organic Carbon by Photocatalytic Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inevitably accumulate in enclosed habitats such as the International Space Station and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a result of human metabolism, material off-gassing, and leaking equipment. Some VOCs can negatively affect the quality of the crew's life, health, and performance; and consequently, the success of the mission. Air quality must be closely monitored to ensure a safe living and working environment. Currently, there is no reliable air quality monitoring system that meets NASA's stringent requirements for power, mass, volume, or performance. The ultimate objective of the project -- the development of a Real-Time, Miniaturized, Autonomous Total Risk Indicator System (RT.MATRIX).is to provide a portable, dual-function sensing system that simultaneously determines total organic carbon (TOC) and individual contaminants in air streams.

  8. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds in porous metal-organic frameworks functionalized by polyoxometalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Feng-Ji; Liu, Shu-Xia; Liang, Da-Dong; Ren, Guo-Jian; Wei, Feng; Chen, Ya-Guang; Su, Zhong-Min

    2011-11-01

    The functionalization of porous metal-organic frameworks (Cu 3( BTC) 2) was achieved by incorporating Keggin-type polyoxometalates (POMs), and further optimized via alkali metal ion-exchange. In addition to thermal gravimetric analysis, IR, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and powder X-ray diffraction, the adsorption properties were characterized by N 2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) adsorption measurements, including short-chain alcohols ( C<4), cyclohexane, benzene, and toluene. The adsorption enthalpies estimated by the modified Clausius-Clapeyron equation provided insight into the impact of POMs and alkali metal cations on the adsorption of VOCs. The introduction of POMs not only improved the stability, but also brought the increase of adsorption capacity by strengthening the interaction with gas molecules. Furthermore, the exchanged alkali metal cations acted as active sites to interact with adsorbates and enhanced the adsorption of VOCs.

  9. Effects of airborne volatile organic compounds on plants.

    PubMed

    Cape, J N

    2003-01-01

    Routine measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air have shown that average concentrations are very much smaller than those used in laboratory experiments designed to study the effects of VOCs on plants. However, maximum hourly concentrations of some VOCs can be 100 times larger than the average, even in rural air. Experimental studies have rarely extended for longer than a few days, so there is little information on potential long-term effects of exposure to small concentrations. This review considers the available evidence for long-term effects, based on laboratory and field data. Previous reviews of the literature from Germany and the USA are cited, prior to an assessment of the effects of individual VOCs. Although hydrocarbons from vehicle exhausts have been implicated in the observed effects on roadside vegetation, the evidence suggests that it is the nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gases that are mostly responsible. There is evidence that aromatic hydrocarbons can be metabolised in plants, although the fate of the metabolites is not known. There is a large literature on the effects of ethylene, because of its role as a plant hormone. Effects have been reported in the field, in response to industrial emissions, and dose-response experiments over several weeks in laboratory studies have clearly identified the potential for effects at ambient concentrations. The main responses are morphological (e.g. epinasty), which may be reversible, and on the development of flowers and fruit. Effects on seed production may be positive or negative, depending on the exposure concentration. Chlorinated hydrocarbons have been identified as potentially harmful to vegetation, but only one long-term experiment has studied dose-response relationships. As for ethylene, the most sensitive indication of effect was on seed production, although long-term accumulation of trichloroacetic acid in tissue may also be a problem. There is little evidence of the direct effects of

  10. Volatile organic compounds at swine facilities: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ji-Qin; Robarge, Wayne P; Xiao, Changhe; Heber, Albert J

    2012-10-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are regulated aerial pollutants that have environmental and health concerns. Swine operations produce and emit a complex mixture of VOCs with a wide range of molecular weights and a variety of physicochemical properties. Significant progress has been made in this area since the first experiment on VOCs at a swine facility in the early 1960s. A total of 47 research institutions in 15 North American, European, and Asian countries contributed to an increasing number of scientific publications. Nearly half of the research papers were published by U.S. institutions. Investigated major VOC sources included air inside swine barns, in headspaces of manure storages and composts, in open atmosphere above swine wastewater, and surrounding swine farms. They also included liquid swine manure and wastewater, and dusts inside and outside swine barns. Most of the sample analyses have been focusing on identification of VOC compounds and their relationship with odors. More than 500 VOCs have been identified. About 60% and 10% of the studies contributed to the quantification of VOC concentrations and emissions, respectively. The largest numbers of VOC compounds with reported concentrations in a single experimental study were 82 in air, 36 in manure, and 34 in dust samples. The relatively abundant VOC compounds that were quantified in at least two independent studies included acetic acid, butanoic acid (butyric acid), dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, iso-valeric, p-cresol, propionic acid, skatole, trimethyl amine, and valeric acid in air. They included acetic acid, p-cresol, iso-butyric acid, butyric acid, indole, phenol, propionic acid, iso-valeric acid, and skatole in manure. In dust samples, they were acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, valeric acid, p-cresol, hexanal, and decanal. Swine facility VOCs were preferentially bound to smaller-size dusts. Identification and quantification of VOCs were restricted by using instruments based on

  11. Measurement of the temperature dependent partitioning of semi-volatile organics onto aerosol near roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Brook, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Evans, G. J.; Jeong, C.; Sheppard, A.; Lu, G.; Gordon, M.; Mihele, C.

    2010-12-01

    The volatility of the organic aerosol fraction has received a great deal of attention recently in light of new volatility-based modelling approaches and due to the inability of current models to fully account for secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this regard, evaporation of primary organic aerosol species and their subsequent oxidation may contribute significantly to SOA downwind of sources. This implies that moderate ambient temperature fluctuations can significantly increase or decrease the aerosol bound fraction of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility (SVOC + IVOC) compounds. In order to examine the importance of these more volatile organic components, a temperature controlled inlet was developed with the ability to heat and cool the aerosol in 2 C increments to 15 C above or below ambient temperature. The inlet was coupled to an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and deployed on a mobile platform upwind and downwind of a major Southern Ontario highway as part of the Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions near Roadways (FEVER 2010) campaign. Preliminary results suggest that changes in temperature of 5-10 C can alter the partitioning of volatile organic aerosol components by up to 30%. Although the largest affect was observed 10-13 meters downwind of the vehicle emissions, a measurable affect was observed beyond 500 m and in aerosol upwind of the highway. These results suggest that a significant pool of semi-volatile organics exist, which can condense onto particles at slightly lower temperatures or evaporate to the gas phase and be further oxidized. The nature of these organic species at locations upwind and downwind of vehicle emissions will be discussed.

  12. Growth promotion of Lactuca sativa in response to volatile organic compounds emitted from diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Fincheira, Paola; Venthur, Herbert; Mutis, Ana; Parada, Maribel; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    Agrochemicals are currently used in horticulture to increase crop production. Nevertheless, their indiscriminate use is a relevant issue for environmental and legal aspects. Alternative tools for reducing fertilizers and synthetic phytohormones are being investigated, such as the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as growth inducers. Some soil bacteria, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus, stimulate Arabidopsis and tobacco growth by releasing VOCs, but their effects on vegetables have not been investigated. Lactuca sativa was used as model vegetable to investigate bacterial VOCs as growth inducers. We selected 10 bacteria strains, belonging to Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Serratia genera that are able to produce 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (acetoin), a compound with proven growth promoting activity. Two-day old-seedlings of L. sativa were exposed to VOCs emitted by the selected bacteria grown in different media cultures for 7 days. The results showed that the VOCs released from the bacteria elicited an increase in the number of lateral roots, dry weight, root growth and shoot length, depending on the media used. Three Bacillus strains, BCT53, BCT9 and BCT4, were selected according to its their growth inducing capacity. The BCT9 strain elicited the greatest increases in dry weight and primary root length when L. sativa seedlings were subjected to a 10-day experiment. Finally, because acetoin only stimulated root growth, we suggest that other volatiles could be responsible for the growth promotion of L. sativa. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that bacteria volatiles can be used as growth-inducers as alternative or complementary strategies for application in horticulture species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Biotic and Abiotic Transformation of a Volatile Organics Plume in a Semi-Arid Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, J.E.; Singletary, M.A.; Miller, D.R.

    1999-04-08

    An evaluation of biotic and abiotic attenuation processes potentially important to chlorinated and non-chlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) fate and transport in the 148 meter thick vadose zone beneath the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was conducted. A unique feature of this evaluation is the comparison of two estimates of VOC mass present in the soil gas, pore-water, and solid phases (but not including mass as non-aqueous phase liquid [NAPL]) of the vadose zone in 1993. One estimate, 1,800 kg, was obtained from vadose zone transport modeling that incorporated molecular diffusion and volatilization to the atmosphere, but not biotic or chemical processes. The other estimate, 2,120 kg, was obtained from the sum of VOC mass physically removed during soil vapor extraction and an estimate of VOC mass remaining in the vadose zone in 1998, both adjusted to exclude NAPL mass. This comparison indicates that biogeochemical processes were at best slightly important to historical VOC plume development. Some evidence of aerobic degradation of non-chlorinated VOCs and abiotic transformation of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane was identified. Despite potentially amenable site conditions, no evidence was found of cometabolic and anaerobic transformation pathways. Relying principally on soil-gas analytical results, an upper-bound estimate of 21% mass reduction due to natural biogeochemical processes was developed. Although available information for the CWL indicates that natural attenuation processes other than volatilization to the atmosphere did not effective y enhance groundwater protection, these processes could be important in significantly reducing groundwater contamination and exposure risks at other sites. More laboratory and field research is required to improve our collective ability to characterize and exploit natural VOC attenuation processes, especially with respect to the combination of relatively thick and dry vadose zones and chlorinated VOCs.

  14. Volatile organic compounds in pesticide formulations: Methods to estimate ozone formation potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali, Mazyar; McConnell, Laura L.; Hapeman, Cathleen J.; Nguyen, Anh; Schmidt, Walter F.; Howard, Cody J.

    2011-05-01

    The environmental fate and toxicity of active ingredients in pesticide formulations has been investigated for many decades, but relatively little research has been conducted on the fate of pesticide co-formulants or inerts. Some co-formulants are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and can contribute to ground-level ozone pollution. Effective product assessment methods are required to reduce emissions of the most reactive VOCs. Six emulsifiable concentrate pesticide products were characterized for percent VOC by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). TGA estimates exceeded GC-MS by 10-50% in all but one product, indicating that for some products a fraction of active ingredient is released during TGA or that VOC contribution was underestimated by GC-MS. VOC profiles were examined using TGA-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) evolved gas analysis and were compared to GC-MS results. The TGA-FTIR method worked best for products with the simplest and most volatile formulations, but could be developed into an effective product screening tool. An ozone formation potential ( OFP) for each product was calculated using the chemical composition from GC-MS and published maximum incremental reactivity ( MIR) values. OFP values ranged from 0.1 to 3.1 g ozone g -1 product. A 24-h VOC emission simulation was developed for each product assuming a constant emission rate calculated from an equation relating maximum flux rate to vapor pressure. Results indicate 100% VOC loss for some products within a few hours, while other products containing less volatile components will remain in the field for several days after application. An alternate method to calculate a product OFP was investigated utilizing the fraction of the total mass of each chemical emitted at the end of the 24-h simulation. The ideal assessment approach will include: 1) unambiguous chemical composition information; 2) flexible simulation models to estimate emissions under

  15. A volatile organics concentrator for use in monitoring Space Station water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehntholt, Daniel J.; Bodek, Itamar; Valentine, James R.; Trabanino, Rudy; Vincze, Johanna E.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    The process used to identify, select, and design an approach to the isolation and concentration of volatile organic compounds from a water sample prior to chemical analysis in a microgravity environment is discerned. The trade analysis leading to the recommended volatile organics concentrator (VOC) concept to be tested in a breadboard device is presented. The system covers the areas of gases, volatile separation from water, and water removal/gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer interface. Five options for potential use in the VOC and GC/MS system are identified and ranked, and also nine options are presented for separation of volatiles from the water phase. Seven options for use in the water removal/GC column and MS interface are also identified and included in the overall considerations. A final overall recommendation for breadboard VOC testing is given.

  16. The development of a volatile organics concentrator for use in monitoring Space Station water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodek, Itamar; Ehntholt, Daniel J.; Stolki, Thomas J.; Valentine, James R.; Trabanino, Rudy; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    A breadboard concept of a volatile organics concentrator (VOC) is manufactured and tested for optimized water-quality analysis in a space environment. The VOC system is attached to a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to analyze the volatile chemicals relevant to the operation of Space Station Freedom. The preliminary tests include: (1) comparisons with analyses based on direct on-column injections of standards; (2) analyses of iodinated volatile organics; (3) comparisons of nitrogen vs helium as the chromatography carrier gas; and (4) measurements of collection efficiency. The VOC can analyze EPA method-624 analytes at comparable detection using flame-ionization detection and can analyze volatile iodinated compounds. The breadboard has good reproducibility and can use nitrogen as a carrier gas; good results are noted for the collection and concentration levels and for water removal.

  17. Recovery of several volatile organic compounds from simulated water samples: Effect of transport and storage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, L.C.; Schroder, L.J.; Brooks, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Solutions containing volatile organic compounds were prepared in organic-free water and 2% methanol and submitted to two U.S. Geological Survey laboratories. Data from the determination of volatile compounds in these samples were compared to analytical data for the same volatile compounds that had been kept in solutions 100 times more concentrated until immediately before analysis; there was no statistically significant difference in the analytical recoveries. Addition of 2% methanol to the storage containers hindered the recovery of bromomethane and vinyl chloride. Methanol addition did not enhance sample stability. Further, there was no statistically significant difference in results from the two laboratories, and the recovery efficiency was more than 80% in more than half of the determinations made. In a subsequent study, six of eight volatile compounds showed no significant loss of recovery after 34 days.

  18. The development of a volatile organics concentrator for use in monitoring Space Station water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodek, Itamar; Ehntholt, Daniel J.; Stolki, Thomas J.; Valentine, James R.; Trabanino, Rudy; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    A breadboard concept of a volatile organics concentrator (VOC) is manufactured and tested for optimized water-quality analysis in a space environment. The VOC system is attached to a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to analyze the volatile chemicals relevant to the operation of Space Station Freedom. The preliminary tests include: (1) comparisons with analyses based on direct on-column injections of standards; (2) analyses of iodinated volatile organics; (3) comparisons of nitrogen vs helium as the chromatography carrier gas; and (4) measurements of collection efficiency. The VOC can analyze EPA method-624 analytes at comparable detection using flame-ionization detection and can analyze volatile iodinated compounds. The breadboard has good reproducibility and can use nitrogen as a carrier gas; good results are noted for the collection and concentration levels and for water removal.

  19. Large drought-induced variations in oak leaf volatile organic compound emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012

    DOE PAGES

    Geron, Chris; Gu, Lianhong; Daly, Ryan; ...

    2015-12-17

    Here, leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri's Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower – NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). June measurements, prior to the onset of severe drought, showed isoprene emission rates and leaf temperature responses similar to those previously reported in the literature and used in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission models. During the peak of the drought in August, isoprene emission rates were substantially reduced, and response to temperature was dramatically altered, especially for themore » species in the red oak subgenus (Erythrobalanus).« less

  20. Environmental guideline for the reduction of volatile organic compound emissions from the plastics processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to environmental regulatory agencies, manufacturers, and operators of plastics processing plants regarding the means of reducing emissions containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are released to the environment in the course of production. Sectors covered by the guideline are expanded polystyrene, cellular polyethylene foams, polyvinyl chloride, and reinforced plastics and composites made from thermoset polyester resins. The guideline focuses on the reduction of VOC emissions from processing and clean-up operations, the handling and storage of VOC-containing materials, and the handling and disposal of wastes. The guideline contains material, equipment, process, and operating standards for plastics processing facilities, record keeping and training standards, recommended operating practices, and testing protocols.

  1. Improved method for the storage of groundwater samples containing volatile organic analytes

    PubMed

    Kovacs; Kampbell

    1999-04-01

    The sorption of volatile organic analytes from water samples by the Teflon septum surface used with standard glass 40-ml sample collection vials was investigated. Analytes tested included alkanes, isoalkanes, olefins, cycloalkanes, a cycloalkene, monoaromatics, a polynuclear aromatic, and two chloroethenes. Both laboratory prepared test mix solutions and petroleum contaminated groundwater from three field sites were tested. A rapid loss of n-alkane and isoalkane concentrations (>10%) was observed within 24 h when stored at room temperature. Aliphatic losses were also observed (>10%) over a 21-day holding period when samples were held at 4 degrees C. Loss of the less sorptive analytes was demonstrated by exposing analyte solutions to greater Teflon surface areas. The demonstrated sorption of aliphatics from water samples by Teflon-lined septa indicates that the accuracy of volatile petroleum hydrocarbon determinations may be reduced by the traditional storage method. An alternative storage protocol is reported combining a lead foil septum surface and 1% (w/w) tribasic sodium phosphate dodecahydrate (Na3PO4. 12H2O) preservative. This method prevented loss of the test analytes, including alkanes and isoalkanes for at least 21 days at room temperature.

  2. Current Challenges in Volatile Organic Compounds Analysis as Potential Biomarkers of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kamila; Podmore, Ian

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial in reducing mortality among people suffering from cancer. There is a lack of characteristic early clinical symptoms in most forms of cancer, which highlights the importance of investigating new methods for its early detection. One of the most promising methods is the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are a diverse group of carbon-based chemicals that are present in exhaled breath and biofluids and may be collected from the headspace of these matrices. Different patterns of VOCs have been correlated with various diseases, cancer among them. Studies have also shown that cancer cells in vitro produce or consume specific VOCs that can serve as potential biomarkers that differentiate them from noncancerous cells. This review identifies the current challenges in the investigation of VOCs as potential cancer biomarkers, by the critical evaluation of available matrices for the in vivo and in vitro approaches in this field and by comparison of the main extraction and detection techniques that have been applied to date in this area of study. It also summarises complementary in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies conducted to date in order to try to identify volatile biomarkers of cancer. PMID:26317039

  3. Comparison of Methanol and Tetraglyme as Extraction Solvents for Determination of Volatile Organics in Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    determining volatile organics in soil can be classified into thefollowing groups: 1. Static or dynamic headspace analysis 2. Solvent extraction-direct...methods based on the dynamic headspace method whereby the volatiles are stripped from a soil/water slurry using a conventional purge-and-trap instrument...651. Brazell, R.S. and MP. Maskarinec (1981) Dynamic headspace analysis of solid waste materials. Journal of High Resolution Chromatography and

  4. Real-time and online screening method for materials emitting volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changhyuk; Sul, Yong Tae; Pui, David Y. H.

    2016-09-01

    In the semiconductor industry, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the cleanroom air work as airborne molecular contamination, which reduce the production yield of semiconductor chips by forming nanoparticles and haze on silicon wafers and photomasks under ultraviolet irradiation during photolithography processes. Even though VOCs in outdoor air are removed by gas filters, VOCs can be emitted from many kinds of materials used in cleanrooms, such as organic solvents and construction materials (e.g., adhesives, flame retardants and sealants), threatening the production of semiconductors. Therefore, finding new replacements that emit lower VOCs is now essential in the semiconductor industry. In this study, we developed a real-time and online method to screen materials for developing the replacements by converting VOCs into nanoparticles under soft X-ray irradiation. This screening method was applied to measure VOCs emitted from different kinds of organic solvents and adhesives. Our results showed good repeatability and high sensitivity for VOCs, which come from aromatic compounds, some alcohols and all tested adhesives (Super glue and cleanroom-use adhesives). In addition, the overall trend of measured VOCs from cleanroom-use adhesives was well matched with those measured by a commercial thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which is a widely used off-line method for analyzing VOCs. Based on the results, this screening method can help accelerate the developing process for reducing VOCs in cleanrooms.

  5. Chemically-resolved volatility measurements of organic aerosol fom different sources.

    PubMed

    Huffman, J A; Docherty, K S; Mohr, C; Cubison, M J; Ulbrich, I M; Ziemann, P J; Onasch, T B; Jimenez, J L

    2009-07-15

    A newly modified fast temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) was coupled to a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer for rapid determination of chemically resolved volatility of organic aerosols (OA) emitted from individual sources. The TD-AMS system was used to characterize primary OA (POA) from biomass burning, trash burning surrogates (paper and plastic), and meat cooking as well as chamber-generated secondary OA (SOA) from alpha-pinene and gasoline vapor. Almost all atmospheric models represent POA as nonvolatile, with no allowance for evaporation upon heating or dilution, or condensation upon cooling. Our results indicate that all OAs observed show semivolatile behavior and that most POAs characterized here were at least as volatile as SOA measured in urban environments. Biomass-burning OA (BBOA) exhibited a wide range of volatilities, but more often showed volatility similar to urban OA. Paper-burning resembles some types of BBOA because of its relatively high volatility and intermediate atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio, while meat-cooking OAs (MCOA) have consistently lower volatility than ambient OA. Chamber-generated SOA under the relatively high concentrations used intraditional experiments was significantly more volatile than urban SOA, challenging extrapolation of traditional laboratory volatility measurements to the atmosphere. Most OAs sampled show increasing O/C ratio and decreasing H/C (hydrogen-to-carbon) ratio with temperature, further indicating that more oxygenated OA components are typically less volatile. Future experiments should systematically explore a wider range of mass concentrations to more fully characterize the volatility distributions of these OAs.

  6. Measurements of volatile organic compounds in car showrooms in the province of Varese (Northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Geiss, O; Barrero-Moreno, J; Kotzias, D

    2011-02-01

    Car dealer showrooms furnished with desk areas are a work place whose occupants may be exposed to evaporative emissions from the exhibited cars. The aim of the study was to identify and quantify the main organic compounds present in car dealer showrooms as a result of evaporative emissions from the exhibited cars and to evaluate the personal exposure concentrations of car vendors working in these areas. A total of 19 volatile organic compounds (aromatic compounds, aldehydes and terpenes) were investigated and quantified. Additionally, levels of the same chemicals were measured in the private houses of the car vendors for comparison purposes. All measurements were taken using passive samplers over a consecutive time period of 5 days. Concentrations in the showrooms were on average 12 times higher than the ambient concentration around the showrooms and 10 times higher than the concentrations measured in the private houses of the vendors. Benzene concentrations inside the showrooms ranged from 11 to 93.2 μg/m(3). The personal exposure concentrations of the vendors reached time-weighted levels up to 57.3 μg/m(3) with minimum values around 10 μg/m(3). The results of the study show the significant contributing factor of work place emissions on the vendors' overall exposure load. The high concentrations of some volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including benzene, that were measured in the showrooms highlight the need to safeguard the vendors' health. Measures for reducing personal exposure concentrations could include removing the vendors' desks from the showroom where the cars are exhibited, optimizing the ventilation inside the showrooms and minimizing evaporative emissions from the cars. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Mapping Asian anthropogenic emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds to multiple chemical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Zhang, Q.; Streets, D. G.; He, K. B.; Cheng, Y. F.; Emmons, L. K.; Huo, H.; Kang, S. C.; Lu, Z.; Shao, M.; Su, H.; Yu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-06-01

    An accurate speciation mapping of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) emissions has an important impact on the performance of chemical transport models (CTMs) in simulating ozone mixing ratios and secondary organic aerosols. Taking the INTEX-B Asian NMVOC emission inventory as the case, we developed an improved speciation framework to generate model-ready anthropogenic NMVOC emissions for various gas-phase chemical mechanisms commonly used in CTMs in this work, by using an explicit assignment approach and updated NMVOC profiles. NMVOC profiles were selected and aggregated from a wide range of new measurements and the SPECIATE database v.4.2. To reduce potential uncertainty from individual measurements, composite profiles were developed by grouping and averaging source profiles from the same category. The fractions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC) were corrected during the compositing process for those profiles which used improper sampling and analyzing methods. Emissions of individual species were then lumped into species in different chemical mechanisms used in CTMs by applying mechanism-dependent species mapping tables, which overcomes the weakness of inaccurate mapping in previous studies. Emission estimates for individual NMVOC species differ between one and three orders of magnitude for some species when different sets of profiles are used, indicating that source profile is the most important source of uncertainties of individual species emissions. However, those differences are diminished in lumped species as a result of the lumping in the chemical mechanisms. Gridded emissions for eight chemical mechanisms at 30 min × 30 min resolution as well as the auxiliary data are available at http://mic.greenresource.cn/intex-b2006. The framework proposed in this work can be also used to develop speciated NMVOC emissions for other regions.

  8. Mapping Asian anthropogenic emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds to multiple chemical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Zhang, Q.; Streets, D. G.; He, K. B.; Cheng, Y. F.; Emmons, L. K.; Huo, H.; Kang, S. C.; Lu, Z.; Shao, M.; Su, H.; Yu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate speciation mapping of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) emissions has an important impact on the performance of chemical transport models (CTMs) in simulating ozone mixing ratios and secondary organic aerosols. In this work, we developed an improved speciation framework to generate model-ready anthropogenic Asian NMVOC emissions for various gas-phase chemical mechanisms commonly used in CTMs by using an explicit assignment approach and updated NMVOC profiles, based on the total NMVOC emissions in the INTEX-B Asian inventory for the year 2006. NMVOC profiles were selected and aggregated from a wide range of new measurements and the SPECIATE database. To reduce potential uncertainty from individual measurements, composite profiles were developed by grouping and averaging source profiles from the same category. The fractions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC) were corrected during the compositing process for those profiles which used improper sampling and analyzing methods. Emissions of individual species were then lumped into species in different chemical mechanisms used in CTMs by applying mechanism-dependent species mapping tables, which overcomes the weakness of inaccurate mapping in previous studies. Gridded emissions for eight chemical mechanisms are developed at 30 min × 30 min resolution using various spatial proxies and are provided through the website: http://mic.greenresource.cn/intex-b2006. Emission estimates for individual NMVOC species differ between one and three orders of magnitude for some species when different sets of profiles are used, indicating that source profile is the most important source of uncertainties of individual species emissions. However, those differences are diminished in lumped species as a result of the lumping in the chemical mechanisms.

  9. Volatilization of organic compounds in an aerated stirred-tank reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Libra, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Volatilization must be considered as a removal mechanism when treating waste-waters containing volatile organic compounds (VOC's). This study investigated the simultaneous mass transfer of oxygen and three organic compounds in an aerated stirred tank reactor to determine if the ratio of the two mass transfer coefficients, K{sub L}a{sub VOC}/k{sub L}a{sub O2}, can be used to predict volatilization rates for semi-volatile compounds. This work expands the range of compound volatility and the types of waters investigated to semi-volatile organic compounds in water containing an anionic surfactant over a larger power range than previously studied. The mass transfer coefficients of oxygen and three VOC's: toluene, dichloromethane, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene, were determined in three water systems: tap water, tap water with an anionic surfactant, dodecyl sodium sulfate (DSS), and tap water with biomass (k{sub L}a{sub O2} only). A steady state method was used. Experiments were made to span the range of mass transfer coefficients found in both municipal and industrial wastewater treatment processes. The results were analyzed using dimensional analysis.

  10. Enantiomer distribution of major chiral volatile organic compounds in selected types of herbal honeys.

    PubMed

    Pažitná, Alexandra; Džúrová, Jana; Spánik, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    In this article, volatile organic compounds in 14 honey samples (rosemary, eucalyptus, orange, thyme, sage, and lavender) were identified. Volatile organic compounds were extracted using a solid phase microextraction method followed by gas chromatography connected with mass spectrometry analysis. The studied honey samples were compared based on their volatile organic compounds composition. In total, more than 180 compounds were detected in the studied samples. The detected compounds belong to various chemical classes such as terpenes, alcohols, acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters, norisoprenoids, benzene and furane derivatives, and organic compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen heteroatom. Ten chiral compounds (linalool, trans-linalool oxide, cis-linalool oxide, 4-terpineol, α-terpineol, hotrienol, and four stereoisomers of lilac aldehydes) were selected for further chiral separation.

  11. 75 FR 82363 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... Emission Control Measures for Lithographic and Letterpress Printing in Cleveland AGENCY: Environmental... printing volatile organic compound (VOC) rule for approval into the Ohio State Implementation Plan (SIP... organize comments by referencing a Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section number. 3. Explain why...

  12. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  13. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-13

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  14. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks. PMID:27733773

  15. Monitoring Volatile Organic Tank Waste Using Cermet Microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Edward G. Gatliff, Ph.D.; Laura R. Skubal, Ph.D.; Michael C. Vogt, Ph.D.

    2006-03-13

    Presently, very few inexpensive technologies exist in the marketplace that can determine the contents of tank waste or monitor the chemistry of tank constituents in near-real time. The research addressed this problem by developing and assessing ceramic-metallic based microsensors for determining the constituents of a liquid organic storage tank by examining the gases in the headspace of the tank. Overall, the WBO and YSZ sensors responded well to the chemicals in this study. Responses to various concentrations were distinguishable visually. This is a clear indication that pattern recognition tools will be effective in resolving the constituents and concentrations. In tests, such as the test with acetophenone, one sensor, the WBO sensor is not extremely effective. However, the other sensor, the YSZ sensor, is effective in resolving the concentrations. This supports the need to use an array of sensors, as one sensor may be reactive to a compound while another may not. In the course of this research, several interesting phenomena surfaced. New sensors, that were fabricated but not used in a contaminant gas, seemed to function more effectively and predictably if a ?conditioning? step was imposed upon them prior to use in square wave voltammetry. A conditioning step consists of running cyclic voltammetry prior to running square wave voltammetry. This step tends to ?cleanse? the sensor surface by providing a full -1.0 V to +1.0V sweep and both oxidizing and reducing compounds on the sensor surface. [Note: squarewave voltammetry will simply oxidize or reduce compounds ? it will not induce both reactions.] This sweep is essential for recovery between samples.

  16. Effect of minerals on activity of microbial uricase to reduce ammonia volatilization in poultry manure.

    PubMed

    Kim, W K; Patterson, P H

    2003-02-01

    Inhibition of microbial uricase in poultry manure is critical to reduce NH3 volatilization, because hydrolysis of uric acid by microbial uricase is the first step in the production of NH3 gas in poultry manure. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of minerals on uricase activity and NH3 volatilization from poultry manure. In Experiment 1, an in vitro enzyme assay was used to evaluate the effects of Zn, Cu, Mg, and Mn on the activity of microbial uricase. There were three treatments: uricase, uricase + minerals, and uricase preincubated with minerals. Uric acid concentration was measured at 293 nm with a spectrophotometer. The results indicated that Zn and Cu greatly blocked the activity of microbial uricase (>90% inhibition), whereas Mg and Mn were less inhibitory. Experiment 2 was designed to evaluate the effect of ZnSO4 on the growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms by an in vitro assay. There were three treatments: control, ZnSO4 (10 mM), and ZnSO4 (50 mM). The results indicated that ZnSO4 significantly reduced the number of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms compared to the control. In Experiment 3, an NH3-trapping system was used to evaluate the effect of different levels of ZnSO4 on NH3 volatilization and nitrogen retention in poultry manure. Poultry manure (300 g) was mixed with 0, 0.15, 0.3, 1.5, 3, or 6 g ZnSO4 to create manure concentrations of Zn at 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, or 2% (wt/wt), respectively. The 1 and 2% ZnSO4 treatments significantly increased manure uric acid and total nitrogen retention by reducing NH3 volatilization compared to the control during the 3-wk incubation.

  17. Incremental Reactivity Effects of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacarab, M.; Li, L.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Two surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were developed to create a controlled reactivity environment simulating different urban atmospheres with varying levels of anthropogenic (e.g. Los Angeles reactivity) and biogenic (e.g. Atlanta reactivity) influences. Traditional chamber experiments focus on the oxidation of one or two volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors, allowing the reactivity of the system to be dictated by those compounds. Surrogate ROG mixtures control the overall reactivity of the system, allowing for the incremental aerosol formation from an added VOC to be observed. The surrogate ROG mixtures were developed based on that used to determine maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for O3 formation from VOC precursors in a Los Angeles smog environment. Environmental chamber experiments were designed to highlight the incremental aerosol formation in the simulated environment due to the addition of an added anthropogenic (aromatic) or biogenic (terpene) VOC. All experiments were conducted in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT dual 90m3 environmental chambers. It was found that the aerosol precursors behaved differently under the two altered reactivity conditions, with more incremental aerosol being formed in the anthropogenic ROG system than in the biogenic ROG system. Further, the biogenic reactivity condition inhibited the oxidation of added anthropogenic aerosol precursors, such as m-xylene. Data will be presented on aerosol properties (density, volatility, hygroscopicity) and bulk chemical composition in the gas and particle phases (from a SYFT Technologies selected ion flow tube mass spectrometer, SIFT-MS, and Aerodyne high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS, respectively) comparing the two controlled reactivity systems and single precursor VOC/NOx studies. Incremental aerosol yield data at different controlled reactivities provide a novel and valuable insight in the attempt to extrapolate environmental chamber

  18. Volatile organic compounds profile during milk fermentation by Lactobacillus pentosus and correlations between volatiles flavor and carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pan, D D; Wu, Z; Peng, T; Zeng, X Q; Li, H

    2014-02-01

    Flavor, as one of the most important properties determining the acceptability and preference of fermented milks, is influenced by compositional and processing factors. In this study, we focused on the volatile organic compounds related to flavor during milk fermentation by Lactobacillus pentosus according to electronic nose analysis. Xylose (1% addition) metabolized by Lb. pentosus strongly affects the flavor of yogurt, with the potent volatile organic compounds of ethanol (3.08%), 2,3-butanedione (7.77%), and acetic acid (22.70%) detected using solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Sensoryanalysis also showed skimmed yogurt fermented by Lb. pentosus with 1% xylose had the unique scores of sourness (acetic acid) and butter flavor (2,3-butanedione). Furthermore, α-acetolactate synthase and α-acetolactate decarboxylase in carbohydrate metabolism play important roles in milk fermentation. Under preferable conditions (pH 5.5, 42 °C) for α-acetolactate synthase and α-acetolactate decarboxylase, the relative content of potent flavor compound 2,3-butanedione was 10.13%, which was 2.55% higher than common culture condition (pH 4.5, 37 °C), revealing that xylose metabolized by Lb. pentosus has potential values for the milk product industry, such as the acceptability and preference of fermented milk product.

  19. Determination of the solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds in water using volatile-tracer assisted headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Barnes, Donald G

    2016-02-26

    This study reports a new headspace gas chromatographic method (HS-GC) for the determination of water solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds (LVLOs). The HS-GC analysis was performed on a set of aqueous solutions containing a range of concentrations of toluene-spiked (as a tracer) LVLOs, from under-saturation to over-saturation. A plot of the toluene tracer GC signal vs. the concentration of the LVLO results in two lines of different slopes that intersect at the concentration corresponding to the compound's solubility in water. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good precision (RSD <6.3%) and good accuracy, in which the relative deference between the data measured by the HS-GC method and the reference method were within 6.0%. The HS-GC method is simple and particularly suitable for measuring the solubility of LVLOs at elevated temperatures. This approach should be of special interest to those concerned about the impact of the presence of low-volatility organic liquids in waters of environmental and biological systems.

  20. Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds Content Using Novel Ash and Total Solids Analysis for Chemical Agent Resistant Coating Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds Content Using Novel Ash and Total Solids Analysis for Chemical Agent Resistant Coating Systems...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-4625 October 2008 Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds Content Using Novel Ash and...To) 25 November 2006–17 July 2008 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds

  1. Effects of NOx on the volatility of secondary organic aerosol from isoprene photooxidation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Kollman, Matthew S; Song, Chen; Shilling, John E; Ng, Nga L

    2014-02-18

    The effects of NOx on the volatility of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from isoprene photooxidation are investigated in environmental chamber experiments. Two types of experiments are performed. In HO2-dominant experiments, organic peroxy radicals (RO2) primarily react with HO2. In mixed experiments, RO2 reacts through multiple pathways, including with NO, NO2, and HO2. The volatility and oxidation state of isoprene SOA are sensitive to and exhibit a nonlinear dependence on NOx levels. Depending on the NOx levels, the SOA formed in mixed experiments can be of similar or lower volatility compared to that formed in HO2-dominant experiments. The dependence of SOA yield, volatility, and oxidation state on the NOx level likely arises from gas-phase RO2 chemistry and succeeding particle-phase oligomerization reactions. The NOx level also plays a strong role in SOA aging. While the volatility of SOA in mixed experiments does not change substantially over time, SOA becomes less volatile and more oxidized as oxidation progresses in HO2-dominant experiments.

  2. Volatile organic compounds released by blowfly larvae and pupae: new perspectives in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Frederickx, C; Dekeirsschieter, J; Brostaux, Y; Wathelet, J-P; Verheggen, F J; Haubruge, E

    2012-06-10

    To evaluate postmortem intervals (PMIs), one should take into account the determined age of necrophagous flies present on the cadaver. However, PMI determination needs further improvement, and rapid and accurate approaches have therefore to be developed. While previous studies have focussed on insect cuticular hydrocarbons, here we explore the volatile profile released by larvae and pupae of Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae). We monitored changes in volatile compounds daily, by headspace solid-phase microextraction, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Branched and unbranched hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters and acids were identified, and the volatile profile was shown to vary, in both composition and quantity, with the age of the larva/pupa under investigation. We concluded, based on the analysis of the released volatile organic compounds, that it is possible to increase the accuracy of the estimated PMI, through improved estimation of the age of blowflies present on the cadaver.

  3. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Nga Lee; Brown, Steven S.; Archibald, Alexander T.; Atlas, Elliot; Cohen, Ronald C.; Crowley, John N.; Day, Douglas A.; Donahue, Neil M.; Fry, Juliane L.; Fuchs, Hendrik; Griffin, Robert J.; Guzman, Marcelo I.; Herrmann, Hartmut; Hodzic, Alma; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Jimenez, José L.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Lee, Ben H.; Luecken, Deborah J.; Mao, Jingqiu; McLaren, Robert; Mutzel, Anke; Osthoff, Hans D.; Ouyang, Bin; Picquet-Varrault, Benedicte; Platt, Ulrich; Pye, Havala O. T.; Rudich, Yinon; Schwantes, Rebecca H.; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Stutz, Jochen; Thornton, Joel A.; Tilgner, Andreas; Williams, Brent J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models.

    This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in instrumentation and models, and in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry. Building on this current understanding, the second half of the review outlines impacts of NO3-BVOC chemistry on air quality and climate, and suggests critical research needs to better constrain this interaction to improve the predictive capabilities of atmospheric models.

  4. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Nga Lee; Brown, Steven S.; Archibald, Alexander T.; Atlas, Elliot; Cohen, Ronald C.; Crowley, John N.; Day, Douglas A.; Donahue, Neil M.; Fry, Juliane L.; Fuchs, Hendrik; Griffin, Robert J.; Guzman, Marcelo I.; Herrmann, Hartmut; Hodzic, Alma; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Jimenez, José L.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Lee, Ben H.; Luecken, Deborah J.; Mao, Jingqiu; McLaren, Robert; Mutzel, Anke; Osthoff, Hans D.; Ouyang, Bin; Picquet-Varrault, Benedicte; Platt, Ulrich; Pye, Havala O. T.; Rudich, Yinon; Schwantes, Rebecca H.; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Stutz, Jochen; Thornton, Joel A.; Tilgner, Andreas; Williams, Brent J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2017-02-01

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry-climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in instrumentation and models, and in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry. Building on this current understanding, the second half of the review outlines impacts of NO3-BVOC chemistry on air quality and climate, and suggests critical research needs to better constrain this interaction to improve the predictive capabilities of atmospheric models.

  5. Actions taken in response to the potential for volatile organics in RLWTF influent tanks

    SciTech Connect

    DEL SIGNORE, JOHN C.

    2007-01-01

    Positive USQD-RL W -06.0729-JPS, titled "Potential for Volatile Organics in RLW" was signed Friday, 09-08-06, at 1600. It resulted from a Potentially Inadequate Safety Analysis (PISA) for the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) at Technical Area 50. The PISA posits that an unspecified accident occurs at a generator facility, and that said accident does not ignite the volatile organic liquid, but results instead in the release of a large volume of volatile organic liquid into an RLW drain. Once in the drain, the liquid flows unimpeded into the RLWTF influent tanks. After entering the influent tanks, a spark causes a deflagration or explosion. This report documents actions taken in response to the PISA.

  6. Organic Aerosol Volatility Parameterizations and Their Impact on Atmospheric Composition and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their importance and ubiquity in the atmosphere, organic aerosols are still very poorly parameterized in global models. This can be explained by two reasons: first, a very large number of unconstrained parameters are involved in accurate parameterizations, and second, a detailed description of semi-volatile organics is computationally very expensive. Even organic aerosol properties that are known to play a major role in the atmosphere, namely volatility and aging, are poorly resolved in global models, if at all. Studies with different models and different parameterizations have not been conclusive on whether the additional complexity improves model simulations, but the added diversity of the different host models used adds an unnecessary degree of variability in the evaluation of results that obscures solid conclusions. Aerosol microphysics do not significantly alter the mean OA vertical profile or comparison with surface measurements. This might not be the case for semi-volatile OA with microphysics.

  7. Volatile organic compounds effective diffusion coefficients and fluxes estimation through two types of construction material.

    PubMed

    De Biase, C; Loechel, S; Putzmann, T; Bittens, M; Weiss, H; Daus, B

    2014-06-01

    Accumulation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that migrate inside buildings from underlying contaminated soils and groundwater poses human health risks. VOCs intrusion into buildings driven only by diffusion was reproduced by a laboratory-scale experiment. Effective diffusion coefficients and fluxes of a group of selected chlorinated solvents and BTEX through two types of isolation material - that is, concrete (anhydrite screed) and geo-membrane - were estimated. The laboratory experiment indicated that the diffusive transfer of pollutants through sediments into indoor air of buildings cannot be prevented by building sealing material, but it could be attenuated to a certain degree by concrete and up to non-detectable levels by the geo-membrane. Effective diffusion coefficients through concrete and geo-membrane ranged from 3.17 × 10(-2) to 5.90 × 10(-5) cm(2) /s and from 5.47 × 10(-6) to 5.50 × 10(-8) cm(2) /s, respectively. The vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings has special relevance in human health risk assessment. Prediction of indoor air VOCs concentration by applying numerical or analytical models eventually fails due to the lack of input parameters, such as the VOCs effective diffusion coefficient through building material used as foundation or isolation material. Passive migration of VOCs from contaminated sites into indoor air through construction and isolation materials has not been extensively investigated. Our findings showed that the mass flux through building material is not negligible, but it could be reduced partly, and to a minimum, with the utilization of concrete and geo-membranes, respectively. As a result of our investigation, effective diffusion coefficients of BTEX and chlorinated solvents, as well as the correlation between specific compounds’ parameters and the estimated effective diffusion coefficient, are provided. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Volatile organic compounds of polyethylene vinyl acetate plastic are toxic to living organisms.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tingzhu Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic products readily evaporate; as a result, hazardous gases enter the ecosystem, and cause cancer in humans and other animals. Polyethylene vinyl acetate (PEVA) plastic has recently become a popular alternative to PVC since it is chlorine-free. In order to determine whether PEVA is harmful to humans, this research employed the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus as a model to compare their oxygen intakes while they were exposed to the original stock solutions of PEVA, PVC or distilled water at a different length of time for one day, four days or eight days. During the exposure periods, the oxygen intakes in both PEVA and PVC groups were much higher than in the distilled water group, indicating that VOCs in both PEVA and PVC were toxins that stressed L. variegatus. Furthermore, none of the worms fully recovered during the24-hr recovery period. Additionally, the L. variegatus did not clump together tightly after four or eight days' exposure to either of the two types of plastic solutions, which meant that both PEVA and PVC negatively affected the social behaviors of these blackworms. The LD50 tests also supported the observations above. For the first time, our results have shown that PEVA plastic has adverse effects on living organisms, and therefore it is not a safe alternative to PVC. Further studies should identify specific compounds causing the adverse effects, and determine whether toxic effect occurs in more complex organisms, especially humans.

  9. Photodegradation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles as a Source of Small, Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Malecha, Kurtis T; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2016-09-20

    We investigated the photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles by near-UV radiation and photoproduction of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) from various types of SOA. We used a smog chamber to generate SOA from α-pinene, guaiacol, isoprene, tetradecane, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene under high-NOx, low-NOx, or ozone oxidation conditions. The SOA particles were collected on a substrate, and the resulting material was exposed to several mW of near-UV radiation (λ ∼ 300 nm) from a light-emitting diode. Various OVOCs, including acetic acid, formic acid, acetaldehyde, and acetone were observed during photodegradation, and their SOA-mass-normalized fluxes were estimated with a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). All the SOA, with the exception of guaiacol SOA, emitted OVOCs upon irradiation. Based on the measured OVOC emission rates, we estimate that SOA particles would lose at least ∼1% of their mass over a 24 h period during summertime conditions in Los Angeles, California. This condensed-phase photochemical process may produce a few Tg/year of gaseous formic acid, the amount comparable to its primary sources. The condensed-phase SOA photodegradation processes could therefore measurably affect the budgets of both particulate and gaseous atmospheric organic compounds on a global scale.

  10. Feasibility of Photosensitized Reactions with Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles in the Presence of Volatile Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Malecha, Kurtis T; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2017-07-06

    The ability of a complex mixture of organic compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to act as a photosensitizer in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was investigated. Different types of SOAs were produced in a smog chamber by oxidation of various biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs. The SOA particles were collected from the chamber onto an inert substrate, and the resulting material was exposed to 365 nm radiation in an air flow containing ∼200 ppbv of limonene vapor. The mixing ratio of limonene and other VOCs in the flow was observed with a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). The photosensitized uptake of limonene was observed for several SOA materials, with a lower limit for the reactive uptake coefficient on the scale of ∼10(-5). The lower limit for the uptake coefficient under conditions of Los Angeles, California on the summer solstice at noon was estimated to be on the order of ∼10(-6). Photoproduction of oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) resulting from photodegradation of the SOA material also occurred in parallel with the photosensitized uptake of limonene. The estimated photosensitized limonene uptake rates by atmospheric SOA particles and vegetation surfaces appear to be too small to compete with the atmospheric oxidation of limonene by the hydroxyl radical or ozone. However, these processes could play a role in the leaf boundary layer where concentrations of oxidants are depleted and concentrations of VOCs are enhanced relative to the free atmosphere.

  11. Multisorbent tubes for collecting volatile organic compounds in spacecraft air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. L.; Beck, S. W.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    2000-01-01

    The sampling capability of Tenax-TA tubes, used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's solid sorbent air sampler to trap and concentrate contaminants from air aboard spacecraft, was improved by incorporating two sorbents within the tubes. Existing tubes containing only Tenax-TA allowed highly volatile compounds to "break through" during collection of a 1.5 L air sample. First the carbon molecular sieve-type sorbents Carboxen 569 and Carbosieve S-III were tested for their ability to quantitatively trap the highly volatile compounds. Breakthrough volumes were determined with the direct method, whereby low ppm levels of methanol or Freon 12 in nitrogen were flowed through the sorbent tubes at 30 mL/min, and breakthrough was detected by gas chromatography. Breakthrough volumes for methanol were about 9 L/g on Carboxen 569 and 11 L/g on Carbosieve S-III; breakthrough volumes for Freon 12 were about 7 L/g on Carboxen 569 and > 26 L/g on Carbosieve S-III. Next, dual-bed tubes containing either Tenax-TA/Carbosieve S-III, Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569, or Carbotrap/Carboxen 569 to a 10-component gas mixture were exposed, in dry and in humidified air (50% relative humidity), and percentage recoveries of each compound were determined. The Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569 combination gave the best overall recoveries (75-114% for the 10 compounds). Acetaldehyde had the lowest recovery (75%) of the 10 compounds, but this value was still an improvement over either the other two sorbent combinations or the original single-sorbent tubes.

  12. Multisorbent tubes for collecting volatile organic compounds in spacecraft air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. L.; Beck, S. W.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    2000-01-01

    The sampling capability of Tenax-TA tubes, used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's solid sorbent air sampler to trap and concentrate contaminants from air aboard spacecraft, was improved by incorporating two sorbents within the tubes. Existing tubes containing only Tenax-TA allowed highly volatile compounds to "break through" during collection of a 1.5 L air sample. First the carbon molecular sieve-type sorbents Carboxen 569 and Carbosieve S-III were tested for their ability to quantitatively trap the highly volatile compounds. Breakthrough volumes were determined with the direct method, whereby low ppm levels of methanol or Freon 12 in nitrogen were flowed through the sorbent tubes at 30 mL/min, and breakthrough was detected by gas chromatography. Breakthrough volumes for methanol were about 9 L/g on Carboxen 569 and 11 L/g on Carbosieve S-III; breakthrough volumes for Freon 12 were about 7 L/g on Carboxen 569 and > 26 L/g on Carbosieve S-III. Next, dual-bed tubes containing either Tenax-TA/Carbosieve S-III, Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569, or Carbotrap/Carboxen 569 to a 10-component gas mixture were exposed, in dry and in humidified air (50% relative humidity), and percentage recoveries of each compound were determined. The Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569 combination gave the best overall recoveries (75-114% for the 10 compounds). Acetaldehyde had the lowest recovery (75%) of the 10 compounds, but this value was still an improvement over either the other two sorbent combinations or the original single-sorbent tubes.

  13. Multisorbent tubes for collecting volatile organic compounds in spacecraft air.

    PubMed

    Matney, M L; Beck, S W; Limero, T F; James, J T

    2000-01-01

    The sampling capability of Tenax-TA tubes, used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's solid sorbent air sampler to trap and concentrate contaminants from air aboard spacecraft, was improved by incorporating two sorbents within the tubes. Existing tubes containing only Tenax-TA allowed highly volatile compounds to "break through" during collection of a 1.5 L air sample. First the carbon molecular sieve-type sorbents Carboxen 569 and Carbosieve S-III were tested for their ability to quantitatively trap the highly volatile compounds. Breakthrough volumes were determined with the direct method, whereby low ppm levels of methanol or Freon 12 in nitrogen were flowed through the sorbent tubes at 30 mL/min, and breakthrough was detected by gas chromatography. Breakthrough volumes for methanol were about 9 L/g on Carboxen 569 and 11 L/g on Carbosieve S-III; breakthrough volumes for Freon 12 were about 7 L/g on Carboxen 569 and > 26 L/g on Carbosieve S-III. Next, dual-bed tubes containing either Tenax-TA/Carbosieve S-III, Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569, or Carbotrap/Carboxen 569 to a 10-component gas mixture were exposed, in dry and in humidified air (50% relative humidity), and percentage recoveries of each compound were determined. The Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569 combination gave the best overall recoveries (75-114% for the 10 compounds). Acetaldehyde had the lowest recovery (75%) of the 10 compounds, but this value was still an improvement over either the other two sorbent combinations or the original single-sorbent tubes.

  14. Quasi-unipolar pentacene films embedded with fullerene for non-volatile organic transistor memories

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Juhee; Lee, Sungpyo; Lee, Moo Hyung; Kang, Moon Sung

    2015-02-09

    Quasi-unipolar non-volatile organic transistor memory (NOTM) can combine the best characteristics of conventional unipolar and ambipolar NOTMs and, as a result, exhibit improved device performance. Unipolar NOTMs typically exhibit a large signal ratio between the programmed and erased current signals but also require a large voltage to program and erase the memory cells. Meanwhile, an ambipolar NOTM can be programmed and erased at lower voltages, but the resulting signal ratio is small. By embedding a discontinuous n-type fullerene layer within a p-type pentacene film, quasi-unipolar NOTMs are fabricated, of which the signal storage utilizes both electrons and holes while the electrical signal relies on only hole conduction. These devices exhibit superior memory performance relative to both pristine unipolar pentacene devices and ambipolar fullerene/pentacene bilayer devices. The quasi-unipolar NOTM exhibited a larger signal ratio between the programmed and erased states while also reducing the voltage required to program and erase a memory cell. This simple approach should be readily applicable for various combinations of advanced organic semiconductors that have been recently developed and thereby should make a significant impact on organic memory research.

  15. Volatile and intermediate-volatility organic compounds in sub-urban Paris: variability, origin and importance for SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Helal, W.; Borbon, A.; Sauvage, S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Freutel, F.; Crippa, M.; Afif, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand-Jolibois, R.; Fronval, I.; Grand, N.; Leonardis, T.; Lopez, M.; Michoud, V.; Miet, K.; Perrier, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Schneider, J.; Siour, G.; Zapf, P.; Locoge, N.

    2014-02-01

    Measurements of gaseous and particulate organic carbon were performed during the MEGAPOLI experiments, in July 2009 and January-February 2010, at the SIRTA observatory in sub-urban Paris. Measurements of primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs), of both anthropogenic and biogenic origins, including for the first time C12-C16 n-alkanes of intermediate volatility (IVOCs), suspected to be efficient precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The time series of gaseous carbon are generally consistent with times series of particulate organic carbon at regional scales and are clearly affected by meteorology and air mass origin. Concentration levels of anthropogenic VOCs in urban and sub-urban Paris were surprisingly low (2-963 ppt) compared to other megacities worldwide and to rural continental sites. Urban enhancement ratios of anthropogenic VOC pairs agree well between the urban and sub-urban Paris sites, showing the regional extent of anthropogenic sources of similar composition. Contrary to other primary anthropogenic VOCs (aromatics and alkanes), IVOCs showed lower concentrations in winter (< 5 ppt) compared to summer (13-27 ppt) in agreement with a gas-particle partitioning in favor of their transfer to the particle phase in winter. Higher concentrations of most oxygenated VOCs in winter (18-5984 ppt) suggest their dominant primary anthropogenic origin. The respective role of primary anthropogenic gaseous compounds in regional SOA formation was investigated by estimating the SOA mass concentration expected from the anthropogenic VOCs and IVOCs (I / VOCs) measured at SIRTA. From an approach based on emissions inferred from the I / VOC concentrations times the SOA formation yields', the so-called integrated approach conducted in this study, 46% of the SOA measured at SIRTA is explained by our measured concentrations of I / VOC, with 10% explained by only C12-C16 IVOCs. From results of an alternative time-resolved approach, the explained variability

  16. Thermal engine driven heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Drake, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for separating volatile organic compounds from a stream of process gas. An internal combustion engine drives a plurality of refrigeration systems, an electrical generator and an air compressor. The exhaust of the internal combustion engine drives an inert gas subsystem and a heater for the gas. A water jacket captures waste heat from the internal combustion engine and drives a second heater for the gas and possibly an additional refrigeration system for the supply of chilled water. The refrigeration systems mechanically driven by the internal combustion engine effect the precipitation of volatile organic compounds from the stream of gas.

  17. Studies on volatile organic compounds of Tuber borchii and T. asa-foetida.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Maurizio; Rana, Gian Luigi; Racioppi, Rocco; Laurita, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Ascomata of two truffle species, Tuber borchii and T. asa-foetida, both naturally growing in woodlands of the Basilicata region (southern Italy), were identified on the basis of ascospore morphology and compared under a volatile organic compound profile to determine the particular volatile organic compounds that characterize each taxon. Solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the samples showed the presence of 1-methyl-1,3-butadiene as a primary component in both truffles. T. asa-foetida showed a compound, toluene, not present in T. borchii, which creates the penetrating "solvent" smell of the truffle.

  18. Simulating the oxygen content of ambient organic aerosol with the 2D volatility basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Fountoukis, C.; Pandis, S. N.

    2011-08-01

    A module predicting the oxidation state of organic aerosol (OA) has been developed using the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) framework. This model is an extension of the 1D-VBS framework and tracks saturation concentration and oxygen content of organic species during their atmospheric lifetime. The host model, a one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model, is used to simulate air parcels arriving at Finokalia, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May 2008 (FAME-08). Extensive observations were collected during this campaign using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a thermodenuder to determine the chemical composition and volatility, respectively, of the ambient OA. Although there are several uncertain model parameters, the consistently high oxygen content of OA measured during FAME-08 (O:C = 0.8) can help constrain these parameters and elucidate OA formation and aging processes that are necessary for achieving the high degree of oxygenation observed. The base-case model reproduces observed OA mass concentrations (measured mean = 3.1 μg m-3, predicted mean = 3.3 μg m-3) and O:C (predicted O:C = 0.78) accurately. A suite of sensitivity studies explore uncertainties due to (1) the anthropogenic secondary OA (SOA) aging rate constant, (2) assumed enthalpies of vaporization, (3) the volatility change and number of oxygen atoms added for each generation of aging, (4) heterogeneous chemistry, (5) the oxidation state of the first generation of compounds formed from SOA precursor oxidation, and (6) biogenic SOA aging. Perturbations in most of these parameters do impact the ability of the model to predict O:C well throughout the simulation period. By comparing measurements of the O:C from FAME-08, several sensitivity cases including a high oxygenation case, a low oxygenation case, and biogenic SOA aging case are found to unreasonably depict OA aging, keeping in mind that this study does not consider possibly important processes

  19. Can Halogen Enrichment in Reduced Enstatite Chondrites Provide Clues to Volatile Accretion in the Early Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, P. L.; Burgess, R.; Busemann, H.; Ruzié, L.; Joachim, B.; Ballentine, C.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how the Earth obtained and ultimately retained its volatiles is important for our overall understanding of large scale planetary evolution. Numerous models exist for the heterogeneous accretion of volatiles to early Earth, but accounting for all elements through accretion of typical planetary building blocks (e.g., CI chondrites) is difficult. Proto-planetary collisions resulting in the accretion of volatile-poor material under reducing conditions followed by accretion of volatile-rich material under oxidizing conditions has been suggested in such models [e.g., 1]. The heavy halogens (Cl, Br and I), a group of moderately volatile elements, are excellent tracers of planetary processing due to their low abundance and incompatible nature. Therefore characterizing halogen abundance and distribution in materials that accreted to form the planets, e.g., primitive meteorites, is crucial. One group of primitive meteorites, the enstatite chondrites (EC's), are amongst the most reduced materials in the solar system as evidenced by their unique mineral assemblage. Yet despite forming under ultra-reducing conditions, they are enriched in the moderately volatile elements, such as the halogens. The ECs are of particular interest owing to their oxygen isotopic composition which plots along the terrestrial fractionation line, linking them isotopically to the Earth-Moon system. These samples can thus potentially provide clues on the accretion of moderately volatile element rich material under reducing conditions, such as it may have existed during the early stages of Earth's accretion. Chlorine, Br and I concentrations in ECs were determined through step-heating small neutron-irradiated samples (0.3 to 3.3 mg) and measured by mass spectrometry using the noble gas proxy isotopes 38ArCl/Cl, 80KrBr/Br and 128XeI/I. The EH chondrites are consistently enriched in the heavy halogens (up to 330 ppm Cl, 2290 ppb Br and 180 ppb I), compared to other ordinary and carbonaceous

  20. Analysis of volatile organic compounds of ‘Fuji’ apples following electron beam irradiation and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyun-Pa; Shim, Sung-Lye; Lee, Sun-Im; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kim, Kyong-Su

    2012-08-01

    The volatile organic compounds of non-irradiated and electron-beam irradiated 'Fuji' apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) at 0, 0.5, and 1 kGy were isolated through simultaneous distillation extractions and analyzed using gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. A total of 53 volatile organic compounds were characterized in 0 and 1 kGy irradiated samples, whereas two more compounds related to ketone and terpenoid group were identified in 0.5 kGy irradiated samples. The contents of volatile compounds were 24.33, 36.49, and 35.28 mg/kg in 0, 0.5, and 1 kGy irradiated samples, respectively. The major compounds identified were butanol, hexanal, [E]-2-hexenal, and hexanol in all samples. The relative content of alcohol increased after 30 days of storage in all samples, whereas that of aldehyde decreased. Although the contents of some volatile compounds were changed by electron-beam irradiation, the total yield and major flavor compounds of irradiated 'Fuji' apples were similar to, or even greater than, those of the control. Therefore, the application of e-beam irradiation if required for microbial decontamination of 'Fuji' apples is an acceptable method as it does not bring about any major quantitative changes of volatile organic compounds.