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Sample records for reductase confers enhanced

  1. Enhanced Ascorbate Regeneration Via Dehydroascorbate Reductase Confers Tolerance to Photo-Oxidative Stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Tseng; Chiou, Chih-Wen; Chu, Yen-Lin; Hsiao, Yu; Tseng, Yu-Fei; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hsien-Jung; Chang, Hsin-Yang; Lee, Tse-Min

    2016-10-01

    The role of ascorbate (AsA) recycling via dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) in the tolerance of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to photo-oxidative stress was examined. The activity of DHAR and the abundance of the CrDHAR1 (Cre10.g456750) transcript increased after moderate light (ML; 750 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) or high light (HL; 1,800 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) illumination, accompanied by dehydroascorbate (DHA) accumulation, decreased AsA redox state, photo-inhibition, lipid peroxidation, H2O2 overaccumulation, growth inhibition and cell death. It suggests that DHAR and AsA recycling is limiting under high-intensity light stress. The CrDHAR1 gene was cloned and its recombinant CrDHAR1 protein was a monomer (25 kDa) detected by Western blot that exhibits an enzymatic activity of 965 µmol min(-1)( )mg(-1) protein. CrDHAR1 was overexpressed driven by a HSP70A:RBCS2 fusion promoter or down-regulated by artificial microRNA (amiRNA) to examine whether DHAR-mediated AsA recycling is critical for the tolerance of C. reinahartii cells to photo-oxidative stress. The overexpression of CrDHAR1 increased DHAR protein abundance and enzyme activity, AsA pool size, AsA:DHA ratio and the tolerance to ML-, HL-, methyl viologen- or H2O2-induced oxidative stress. The CrDHAR1-knockdown amiRNA lines that have lower DHAR expression and AsA recycling ability were sensitive to high-intensity illumination and oxidative stress. The glutathione pool size, glutathione:oxidized glutathione ratio and glutathione reductase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were increased in CrDHAR1-overexpressing cells and showed a further increase after high-intensity illumination but decreased in wild-type cells after light stress. The present results suggest that increasing AsA regeneration via enhanced DHAR activity modulates the ascorbate-glutathione cycle activity in C. reinhardtii against photo-oxidative stress.

  2. The Xerophyta viscosa aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) confers enhanced drought and salinity tolerance to transgenic tobacco plants by scavenging methylglyoxal and reducing the membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Preeti; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash; Roy, Suchandra Deb; Hohn, Thomas; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2013-06-01

    We report the efficacy of an aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) enzyme from Xerophyta viscosa Baker in enhancing the prospects of plant's survival under abiotic stress. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing ALDRXV4 cDNA showed alleviation of NaCl and mannitol-induced abiotic stress. The transgenic plants survived longer periods of water deficiency and salinity stress and exhibited improved recovery after rehydration as compared to the wild type plants. The increased synthesis of aldose reductase in transgenic plants correlated with reduced methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde accumulation and an elevated level of sorbitol under stress conditions. In addition, the transgenic lines showed better photosynthetic efficiency, less electrolyte damage, greater water retention, higher proline accumulation, and favorable ionic balance under stress conditions. Together, these findings suggest the potential of engineering aldose reductase levels for better performance of crop plants growing under drought and salt stress conditions.

  3. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  4. Overexpression of human NADPH:cytochrome c (P450) reductase confers enhanced sensitivity to both tirapazamine (SR 4233) and RSU 1069.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A. V.; Saunders, M. P.; Chinje, E. C.; Talbot, D. C.; Harris, A. L.; Strafford, I. J.

    1997-01-01

    P450 reductase (NADPH: cytochrome c (P450) reductase, EC 1.6.2.4) plays an important role in the reductive activation of the bioreductive drug tirapazamine (SR4233). Thus, in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines, expression of P450 reductase correlated with both the hypoxic toxicity and the metabolism of tirapazamine [Patterson et al (1995) Br J Cancer 72: 1144-1150]. To examine this dependence in more detail, the MDA231 cell line, which has the lowest activity of P450 reductase in our breast cell line panel, was transfected with the human P450 reductase cDNA. Isolated clones expressed a 78-kDa protein, which was detected with anti-P450 reductase antibody, and were shown to have up to a 53-fold increase in activity of the enzyme. Using six stable transfected clones covering the 53-fold range of activity of P450 reductase, it was shown that the enzyme activity correlated directly with both hypoxic and aerobic toxicity of tirapazamine, and metabolism of the drug under hypoxic conditions. No metabolism was detected under aerobic conditions. For RSU1069, toxicity was also correlated with P450 reductase activity, but only under hypoxic conditions. Measurable activity of P450 reductase was found in a selection of 14 primary human breast tumours. Activity covered an 18-fold range, which was generally higher than that seen in cell lines but within the range of activity measured in the transfected clones. These results suggest that if breast tumours have significant areas of low oxygen tension, then they are likely to be highly sensitive to the cytotoxic action of tirapazamine and RSU 1069. Images Figure 1 PMID:9374381

  5. Enhanced silver nanoparticle synthesis by optimization of nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Gopalram, Shubaash; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Deepak, Venkataraman; Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructure materials are attracting a great deal of attention because of their potential for achieving specific processes and selectivity, especially in biological and pharmaceutical applications. The generation of silver nanoparticles using optimized nitrate reductase for the reduction of Ag(+) with the retention of enzymatic activity in the complex is being reported. This report involves the optimization of enzyme activity to bring about enhanced nanoparticle synthesis. Response surface methodology and central composite rotary design (CCRD) were employed to optimize a fermentation medium for the production of nitrate reductase by Bacillus licheniformis at pH 8. The four variables involved in the study of nitrate reductase were Glucose, Peptone, Yeast extract and KNO(3). Glucose had a significant effect on nitrate reductase production. The optimized medium containing (%) Glucose: 1.5, Peptone: 1, Yeast extract: 0.35 and KNO(3): 0.35 resulted in a nitrate reductase activity of 452.206 U/ml which is same as that of the central level. The medium A (showing least nitrate reductase activity) and the medium B (showing maximum nitrate reductase activity) were compared for the synthesis. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the particles exhibited a peak at 431 nm and the A(431) for the medium B was 2-fold greater than that of the medium A. The particles were also characterized using TEM. The particles synthesized using the optimized enzyme activity ranged from 10 to 80 nm and therefore can be extended to various medicinal applications.

  6. A salt-inducible chloroplastic monodehydroascorbate reductase from halophyte Avicennia marina confers salt stress tolerance on transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Kumaresan; George, Suja; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2010-10-01

    Plant growth and productivity are adversely affected by various abiotic stress factors. In our previous study, we used Avicennia marina, a halophytic mangrove, as a model plant system for isolating genes functioning in salt stress tolerance. A large scale random EST sequencing from a salt stressed leaf tissue cDNA library of one month old A. marina plants resulted in identification of a clone showing maximum homology to Monodehydroascorbate reductase (Am-MDAR). MDAR plays a key role in regeneration of ascorbate from monodehydroascorbate for ROS scavenging. In this paper, we report the cellular localization and the ability to confer salt stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco of this salt inducible Am-MDAR. A transit peptide at the N-terminal region of Am-MDAR suggested that it encodes a chloroplastic isoform. The chloroplastic localization was confirmed by stable transformation and expression of the Am-MDAR-GFP fusion protein in tobacco. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing Am-MDAR survived better under conditions of salt stress compared to untransformed control plants. Assays of enzymes involved in ascorbate-glutathione cycle revealed an enhanced activity of MDAR and ascorbate peroxidase whereas the activity of dehyroascorbate reductase was reduced under salt stressed and unstressed conditions in Am-MDAR transgenic lines. The transgenic lines showed an enhanced redox state of ascorbate and reduced levels of malondialdehyde indicating its enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress. The results of our studies could be used as a starting point for genetic engineering of economically important plants tolerant to salt stress.

  7. Prokaryotic arsenate reductase enhances arsenate resistance in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tao, Xuanyu; Wu, Gaofeng; Li, Xiangkai; Liu, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-known heavy metal toxicant in the environment. Bioremediation of heavy metals has been proposed as a low-cost and eco-friendly method. This article described some of recent patents on transgenic plants with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Further, to test whether genetic modification of mammalian cells could render higher arsenic resistance, a prokaryotic arsenic reductase gene arsC was transfected into human liver cancer cell HepG2. In the stably transfected cells, the expression level of arsC gene was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that arsC was expressed in HepG2 cells and the expression was upregulated by 3 folds upon arsenate induction. To further test whether arsC has function in HepG2 cells, the viability of HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells exposed to arsenite or arsenate was compared to that of HepG2-pCI cells without arsC gene. The results indicated that arsC increased the viability of HepG2 cells by 25% in arsenate, but not in arsenite. And the test of reducing ability of stably transfected cells revealed that the concentration of accumulated trivalent arsenic increased by 25% in HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells. To determine the intracellular localization of ArsC, a fusion vector with fluorescent marker pEGFP-N1-ArsC was constructed and transfected into.HepG2. Laser confocal microscopy showed that EGFP-ArsC fusion protein was distributed throughout the cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that prokaryotic arsenic resistant gene arsC integrated successfully into HepG2 genome and enhanced arsenate resistance of HepG2, which brought new insights of arsenic detoxification in mammalian cells.

  8. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency enhances resistance against cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fodil-Cornu, N; Kozij, N; Wu, Q; Rozen, R; Vidal, S M

    2009-10-01

    Folates provide one-carbon units for nucleotide synthesis and methylation reactions. A common polymorphism in the MTHFR gene (677C --> T) results in reduced enzymatic activity, and is associated with an increased risk for neural tube defects and cardiovascular disease. The high prevalence of this polymorphism suggests that it may have experienced a selective advantage under environmental pressure, possibly an infectious agent. To test the hypothesis that methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype influences the outcome of infectious disease, we examined the response of Mthfr-deficient mice against mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Acute MCMV infection of Mthfr(-/-) mice resulted in early control of cytokine secretion, decreased viral titer and preservation of spleen immune cells, in contrast to Mthfr wild-type littermates. The phenotype was abolished in MTHFR transgenic mice carrying an extra copy of the gene. Infection of primary fibroblasts with MCMV showed a decrease in viral replication and in the number of productively infected cells in Mthfr(+/-) fibroblasts compared with wild-type cells. These results indicate that Mthfr deficiency protects against MCMV infection in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that human genetic variants may provide an advantage in the host response against certain pathogens.

  9. JS-K, a Nitric Oxide Prodrug, Has Enhanced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cells with Knockdown of Thioredoxin Reductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Edes, Kornelia; Cassidy, Pamela; Shami, Paul J.; Moos, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The selenoenzyme thioredoxin reductase 1 has a complex role relating to cell growth. It is induced as a component of the cellular response to potentially mutagenic oxidants, but also appears to provide growth advantages to transformed cells by inhibiting apoptosis. In addition, selenocysteine-deficient or alkylated forms of thioredoxin reductase 1 have also demonstrated oxidative, pro-apoptotic activity. Therefore, a greater understanding of the role of thioredoxin reductase in redox initiated apoptotic processes is warranted. Methodology The role of thioredoxin reductase 1 in RKO cells was evaluated by attenuating endogenous thioredoxin reductase 1 expression with siRNA and then either inducing a selenium-deficient thioredoxin reductase or treatment with distinct redox challenges including, hydrogen peroxide, an oxidized lipid, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenol, and a nitric oxide donating prodrug. Thioredoxin redox status, cellular viability, and effector caspase activity were measured. Conclusions/Significance In cells with attenuated endogenous thioredoxin reductase 1, a stably integrated selenocysteine-deficient form of the enzyme was induced but did not alter either the thioredoxin redox status or the cellular growth kinetics. The oxidized lipid and the nitric oxide donor demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity when thioredoxin reductase 1 was knocked-down; however, the effect was more pronounced with the nitric oxide prodrug. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that attenuation of the thioredoxin-system can promote apoptosis in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. PMID:20098717

  10. Genomic Rearrangements Leading to Overexpression of Aldo-Keto Reductase YafB of Escherichia coli Confer Resistance to Glyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minsuk; Lee, Junghoon; Lee, Changhan

    2012-01-01

    Glyoxal is toxic and mutagenic α-oxoaldehyde generated in vivo as an oxidation by-product of sugar metabolism. We selected glyoxal-resistant mutants from an Escherichia coli strain lacking major glyoxal-detoxifying genes, gloA and yqhD, by growing cells in medium containing a lethal concentration of glyoxal. The mutants carried diverse genomic rearrangements, such as multibase deletions and recombination, in the upstream region of the yafB gene, encoding an aldo-keto reductase. Since these genomic lesions create transcriptional fusions of the yafB gene to the upstream rrn regulon or eliminate a negative regulatory site, the mutants generally enhanced an expression of the yafB gene. Glyoxal resistances of the mutants are correlated with the levels of yafB transcripts as well as the activities of aldo-keto reductase. An overproduction of YafB in the glyoxal-resistant mutant lacking the putative NsrR-binding site provides evidence that the yafB gene is negatively regulated by this protein. We also observed that the expression of yafB is enhanced with an increased concentration of glyoxal as well as a mutation in the fnr gene, encoding a putative regulator. The bindings of NsrR and Fnr to the yafB promoter were also demonstrated by gel mobility shift assays. PMID:22328670

  11. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity. PMID:26635848

  12. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity.

  13. The elicitor-inducible alfalfa isoflavone reductase promoter confers different patterns of developmental expression in homologous and heterologous transgenic plants.

    PubMed Central

    Oommen, A; Dixon, R A; Paiva, N L

    1994-01-01

    In legumes, the synthesis of infection- and elicitor-inducible antimicrobial phytoalexins occurs via the isoflavonoid branch of the phenylpropanoid pathway. To study transcriptional regulation of isoflavonoid pathway-specific genes, we have isolated the gene encoding isoflavone reductase (IFR), which is the enzyme that catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of the phytoalexin medicarpin in alfalfa. Chimeric gene fusions were constructed between 765- and 436-bp promoter fragments of the IFR gene and the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and transferred to alfalfa and tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Both promoter fragments conferred elicitor-mediated expression in cell suspension cultures derived from transgenic plants of both species and fungal infection-mediated expression in leaves of transgenic alfalfa. Developmental expression directed by both promoter fragments in transgenic alfalfa was observed only in the root meristem, cortex, and nodules, which is consistent with the accumulation of endogenous IFR transcripts. However, in transgenic tobacco, expression from the 765-bp promoter was observed in vegetative tissues (root meristem and cortex, inner vascular tissue of stems and petioles, leaf tips, and stem peripheries adjacent to petioles) and in reproductive tissues (stigma, placenta, base of the ovary, receptacle, seed, tapetal layer, and pollen grains), whereas the 436-bp promoter was expressed only in fruits, seed, and pollen. These data indicate that infection/elicitor inducibility of the IFR promoter in both species and developmental expression in alfalfa are determined by sequences downstream of position -436, whereas sequences between -436 and -765 confer a complex pattern of strong ectopic developmental expression in the heterologous species that lacks the isoflavonoid pathway. PMID:7866024

  14. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  15. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  16. Immunization with Fasciola hepatica thioredoxin glutathione reductase failed to confer protection against fasciolosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, Gabriela; Bottini, Gualberto; Basika, Tatiana; Alonzo, Pablo; Salinas, Gustavo; Carmona, Carlos

    2016-07-15

    The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica remains an important agent of food-borne trematode disease producing great economic losses due to its negative effect on productivity of livestock grazing in temperate areas. The prevailing control strategy based on anthelmintic drugs is unsustainable due to widespread resistance hence vaccination appears as an attractive option to pursue. In this study we evaluate the effect of vaccination in calves with a functional recombinant thioredoxin glutathione reductase (rFhTGR) from liver fluke, a critical antioxidant enzyme at the crossroads of the thioredoxin and glutathione metabolism in flatworms. The recombinant enzyme produced in Escherichia coli was tested in two vaccination experiments; in the first trial rFhTGR was administered in combination with Freund́s Incomplete Adjuvant (FIA) in a three-inoculation scheme on weeks 0, 4 and 8; in the second trial rFhTGR was given mixed with Adyuvac 50 or Alum as adjuvants on weeks 0 and 4. In both cases calves were challenged with metacercariae (400 in the first and 500 in the second trial) 2 weeks after the last inoculation. Our results demonstrate that two or three doses of the vaccine induced a non-significant reduction in worm counts of 8.2% (FIA), 3.8% (Adyuvac 50) and 23.0% (Alum) compared to adjuvant controls indicating that rFhTGR failed to induce a protective immunity in challenged calves. All vaccine formulations induced a mixed IgG1/IgG2 response but no booster was observed after challenge. No correlations between antibody titres and worm burdens were found.

  17. Organizational Enhancement. Symposium 30. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This document contains four papers on organizational enhancement and human resource development (HRD). "Motivation to Improve Work through Learning in Human Resource Development" (Sharon S. Naquin, Elwood F. Holton III) argues that HRD's traditional conceptualization of motivation should be expanded to incorporate motivation to use…

  18. Nitrosylation of c heme in cd(1)-nitrite reductase is enhanced during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2014-08-29

    The reduction of nitrite into nitric oxide (NO) in denitrifying bacteria is catalyzed by nitrite reductase. In several species, this enzyme is a heme-containing protein with one c heme and one d1 heme per monomer (cd1NiR), encoded by the nirS gene. For many years, the evidence of a link between NO and this hemeprotein represented a paradox, given that NO was known to tightly bind and, possibly, inhibit hemeproteins, including cd1NiRs. It is now established that, during catalysis, cd1NiRs diverge from "canonical" hemeproteins, since the product NO rapidly dissociates from the ferrous d1 heme, which, in turn, displays a peculiar "low" affinity for NO (KD=0.11 μM at pH 7.0). It has been also previously shown that the c heme reacts with NO at acidic pH but c heme nitrosylation was not extensively investigated, given that in cd1NiR it was considered a side reaction, rather than a genuine process controlling catalysis. The spectroscopic study of the reaction of cd1NiR and its semi-apo derivative (containing the sole c heme) with NO reported here shows that c heme nitrosylation is enhanced during catalysis; this evidence has been discussed in order to assess the potential of c heme nitrosylation as a regulatory process, as observed for cytochrome c nitrosylation in mammalian mitochondria.

  19. Overexpression of quinone reductase from Salix matsudana Koidz enhances salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Song, Xixi; Fang, Jie; Han, Xiaojiao; He, Xuelian; Liu, Mingying; Hu, Jianjun; Zhuo, Renying

    2016-01-15

    Quinone reductase (QR) is an oxidative-related gene and few studies have focused on its roles concerning salt stress tolerance in plants. In this study, we cloned and analyzed the QR gene from Salix matsudana, a willow with tolerance of moderate salinity. The 612-bp cDNA corresponding to SmQR encodes 203 amino acids. Expression of SmQR in Escherichia coli cells enhanced their tolerance under salt stress. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing SmQR exhibited higher salt tolerance as compared with WT, with higher QR activity and antioxidant enzyme activity as well as higher chlorophyll content, lower methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content and electric conductivity under salt stress. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining also indicated that the transgenic plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species compared to WT when exposed to salt stress. Overall, our results suggested that SmQR plays a significant role in salt tolerance and that this gene may be useful for biotechnological development of plants with improved tolerance of salinity.

  20. International conference on microbial enhancement of oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, E.C.; Clark, J.B.

    1983-02-01

    An International Conference on Microbial Enhancement of Oil Recovery (MEOR) was held May 16-21, 1982 at Afton, Oklahoma. Its objective was to bring together microbiologists and engineers from around the world who are trying to develop methods for the application of microbial systems to the petroleum industry (32 scientists from 12 foreign countries attended). The conference generated 32 papers, nine poster presentations, and a short course on the fundamentals of petroleum reservoir geology. It showed that a new, more fundamental, approach is being taken in the search for ways to apply microbes to oil recovery. Great effort is being expended by microbiologists to understand the complex subsurface environment of a petroleum reservoir in relation to microbial metabolism; and by engineers to understand the fundamental activities of microbes before attempting to bring the two systems together. The conference was organized into seven formal sessions and three informal poster sessions that followed consecutively during the five days of the conference. A review of the papers revealed that they fall naturally into the following four divisions which are used in the organization of the proceedings: (1) microbes and their metabolites; (2) transport of bacteria in porous geological materials; (3) application to heavy oils; (4) MEOR field applications. All papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  1. Thioredoxin reductase 1 knockdown enhances selenazolidine cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells via mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Poerschke, Robyn L.; Moos, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase (TR1) is a selenoprotein that is involved in cellular redox status control and deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Many cancers, including lung, overexpress TR1, making it a potential cancer therapy target. Previous work has shown that TR1 knockdown enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer treatments, as well as certain selenocompounds. However, it is unknown if TR1 knockdown produces similar effect on the sensitivity of human lung cancer cells. To further elucidate the role of TR1 in the mechanism of selenocompounds in lung cancer, a lentiviral microRNA delivery system to knockdown TR1 expression in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells was utilized. Cell viability was assessed after 48 hr treatment with the selenocysteine prodrug selenazolidines 2-butylselenazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (BSCA) and 2-cyclohexylselenazolidine-4-(R)-carboxylic acid (ChSCA), selenocystine (SECY), methylseleninic acid (MSA), 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate (p-XSC), and selenomethionine (SEM). TR1 knockdown increased the cytotoxicity of BSCA, ChSCA, and SECY but did not sensitize cells to MSA, SEM, or p-XSC. GSH and TR1 depletion together decreased cell viability, while no change was observed with GSH depletion alone. Reactive oxygen species generation was induced only in TR1 knockdown cells treated with the selenazolidines or SECY. These three compounds also decreased total intracellular glutathione levels and oxidized thioredoxin, but in a TR1 independent manner. TR1 knockdown increased selenazolidine and SECY-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, as well as DNA strand breaks and AIF translocation from the mitochondria. These results indicate the ability of TR1 to modulate the cytotoxic effects of BSCA, ChSCA and SECY in human lung cancer cells through mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:20920480

  2. Overexpression of the FRO2 ferric chelate reductase confers tolerance to growth on low iron and uncovers posttranscriptional control.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Erin L; Campbell, Nathan H; Grotz, Natasha; Prichard, Charis L; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2003-11-01

    The Arabidopsis FRO2 gene encodes the low-iron-inducible ferric chelate reductase responsible for reduction of iron at the root surface. Here, we report that FRO2 and IRT1, the major transporter responsible for high-affinity iron uptake from the soil, are coordinately regulated at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. FRO2 and IRT1 are induced together following the imposition of iron starvation and are coordinately repressed following iron resupply. Steady-state mRNA levels of FRO2 and IRT1 are also coordinately regulated by zinc and cadmium. Like IRT1, FRO2 mRNA is detected in the epidermal cells of roots, consistent with its proposed role in iron uptake from the soil. FRO2 mRNA is detected at high levels in the roots and shoots of 35S-FRO2 transgenic plants. However, ferric chelate reductase activity is only elevated in the 35S-FRO2 plants under conditions of iron deficiency, indicating that FRO2 is subject to posttranscriptional regulation, as shown previously for IRT1. Finally, the 35S-FRO2 plants grow better on low iron as compared with wild-type plants, supporting the idea that reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron is the rate-limiting step in iron uptake.

  3. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  4. Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Accumulation by Overexpression of an N-Terminally Truncated 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Gene in the Basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderic acids produced by Ganoderma lucidum, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, exhibit antitumor and antimetastasis activities. Genetic modification of G. lucidum is difficult but critical for the enhancement of cellular accumulation of ganoderic acids. In this study, a homologous genetic transformation system for G. lucidum was developed for the first time using mutated sdhB, encoding the iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, as a selection marker. The truncated G. lucidum gene encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) was overexpressed by using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system. The results showed that the mutated sdhB successfully conferred carboxin resistance upon transformation. Most of the integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA) appeared as a single copy in the genome. Moreover, deregulated constitutive overexpression of the HMGR gene led to a 2-fold increase in ganoderic acid content. It also increased the accumulation of intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and the upregulation of downstream genes such as those of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase. This study demonstrates that transgenic basidiomycete G. lucidum is a promising system to achieve metabolic engineering of the ganoderic acid pathway. PMID:22941092

  5. Nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd accumulation in Panax notoginseng roots by affecting root cell wall properties.

    PubMed

    Kan, Qi; Wu, Wenwei; Yu, Wenqian; Zhang, Jiarong; Xu, Jin; Rengel, Zed; Chen, Limei; Cui, Xiuming; Chen, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen is a traditional medicinal herb in China. However, the high capacity of its roots to accumulate cadmium (Cd) poses a potential risk to human health. Although there is some evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating Cd toxicity, the origin of Cd-induced NO and its function in plant responses to Cd remain unknown. In this study, we examined NO synthesis and its role in Cd accumulation in P. notoginseng roots. Cd-induced NO production was significantly decreased by application of the nitrate reductase inhibitor tungstate but not the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (N(G)-methyl-l-arginine acetate), indicating that nitrate reductase is the major contributor to Cd-induced NO production in P. notoginseng roots. Under conditions of Cd stress, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) increased Cd accumulation in root cell walls but decreased Cd translocation to the shoot. In contrast, the NO scavenger cPTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) and tungstate both significantly decreased NO-increased Cd retention in root cell walls. The amounts of hemicellulose 1 and pectin, together with pectin methylesterase activity, were increased with the addition of SNP but were decreased by cPTIO and tungstate. Furthermore, increases or decreases in hemicellulose 1 and pectin contents as well as pectin methylesterase activity fit well with the increased or decreased retention of Cd in the cell walls of P. notoginseng roots. The results suggest that nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd retention in P. notoginseng roots by modulating the properties of the cell wall.

  6. Expression of an isoflavone reductase-like gene enhanced by pollen tube growth in pistils of Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    van Eldik, G J; Ruiter, R K; Colla, P H; van Herpen, M M; Schrauwen, J A; Wullems, G J

    1997-03-01

    Successful sexual reproduction relies on gene products delivered by the pistil to create an environment suitable for pollen tube growth. These compounds are either produced before pollination or formed during the interactions between pistil and pollen tubes. Here we describe the pollination-enhanced expression of the cp100 gene in pistils of Solanum tuberosum. Temporal analysis of gene expression revealed an enhanced expression already one hour after pollination and lasts more than 72 h. Increase in expression also occurred after touching the stigma and was not restricted to the site of touch but spread into the style. The predicted CP100 protein shows similarity to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but belongs to a family of IFR-like NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases present in various plant species.

  7. Enhanced nitrite reductase activity associated with the haptoglobin complexed hemoglobin dimer: functional and antioxidative implications.

    PubMed

    Roche, Camille J; Dantsker, David; Alayash, Abdu I; Friedman, Joel M

    2012-06-30

    The presence of acellular hemoglobin (Hb) within the circulation is generally viewed as a pathological state that can result in toxic consequences. Haptoglobin (Hp), a globular protein found in the plasma, binds with high avidity the αβ dimers derived from the dissociation of Hb tetramer and thus helps clear free Hb. More recently there have been compelling indications that the redox properties of the Hp bound dimer (Hb-Hp) may play a more active role in controlling toxicity by limiting the potential tissue damage caused by propagation of the free-radicals generated within the heme containing globin chains. The present study further examines the potential protective effect of Hp through its impact on the production of nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite through nitrite reductase activity of the Hp bound αβ Hb dimer. The presented results show that the Hb dimer in the Hb-Hp complex has oxygen binding, CO recombination and spectroscopic properties consistent with an Hb species having properties similar to but not exactly the same as the R quaternary state of the Hb tetramer. Consistent with these observations is the finding that the initial nitrite reductase rate for Hb-Hp is approximately ten times that of HbA under the same conditions. These results in conjunction with the earlier redox properties of the Hb-Hp are discussed in terms of limiting the pathophysiological consequences of acellular Hb in the circulation.

  8. Overexpression of Mycothiol Disulfide Reductase Enhances Corynebacterium glutamicum Robustness by Modulating Cellular Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Proteins under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Si, Meiru; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Bing; Wei, Dawei; Chen, Keqi; Yang, Xu; Xiao, He; Shen, Xihui

    2016-01-01

    Mycothiol (MSH) is the dominant low-molecular-weight thiol (LMWT) unique to high-(G+C)-content Gram-positive Actinobacteria, such as Corynebacterium glutamicum, and is oxidised into its disulfide form mycothiol disulfide (MSSM) under oxidative conditions. Mycothiol disulfide reductase (Mtr), an NADPH-dependent enzyme, reduces MSSM to MSH, thus maintaining intracellular redox homeostasis. In this study, a recombinant plasmid was constructed to overexpress Mtr in C. glutamicum using the expression vector pXMJ19-His6. Mtr-overexpressing C. glutamicum cells showed increased tolerance to ROS induced by oxidants, bactericidal antibiotics, alkylating agents, and heavy metals. The physiological roles of Mtr in resistance to oxidative stresses were corroborated by decreased ROS levels, reduced carbonylation damage, decreased loss of reduced protein thiols, and a massive increase in the levels of reversible protein thiols in Mtr-overexpressing cells exposed to stressful conditions. Moreover, overexpression of Mtr caused a marked increase in the ratio of reduced to oxidised mycothiol (MSH:MSSM), and significantly enhanced the activities of a variety of antioxidant enzymes, including mycothiol peroxidase (MPx), mycoredoxin 1 (Mrx1), thioredoxin 1 (Trx1), and methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA). Taken together, these results indicate that the Mtr protein functions in C. glutamicum by protecting cells against oxidative stress. PMID:27383057

  9. Overexpression of Rosa rugosa anthocyanidin reductase enhances tobacco tolerance to abiotic stress through increased ROS scavenging and modulation of ABA signaling.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ping; Shen, Yuxiao; Jin, Shuangxia; Huang, Shasha; Cheng, Xu; Wang, Zhen; Li, Penghui; Zhao, Jian; Bao, Manzhu; Ning, Guogui

    2016-04-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) and plays a role in the plant stress response. However, the mechanism by which ANR confers stress tolerance in plants is not understood. Here, we report the isolation of RrANR, the homologous gene from rose, and NtABF, an ABA-response related transcription factor gene from tobacco. These genes were characterized regarding their functions in stress responses through the use of transgenic, transcriptomic and physiological analyses. Over-expression of RrANR in tobacco resulted in an increased accumulation of both PAs and abscisic acid (ABA), and also enhanced stress tolerance. Transcriptomic analysis of these transgenic tobacco lines indicated that RrANR overexpression induced global transcriptomic changes, including these involved in oxidation/reduction, hormone response and secondary metabolism. Genes related to ABA biosynthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging were up-regulated in RrANR transgenic lines, and these effects were phenocopied by the direct treatment of tobacco plants with PAs and ABA. Transcriptomic data from each of these treatments identified the upregulation of a putative NtABF. Furthermore, the up-regulation of NtABF in RrANR transformants or in PAs- and ABA-treated tobacco plants was associated with enhanced stress tolerance. Overexpression of NtABF in transgenic tobacco mimicked the effects of RrANR-transgenic plants with regard to the up-regulation of ROS-scavenging genes and an increase in oxidative tolerance. Taken together, our findings indicate that overexpression of RrANR results in an increase in plant tolerance to oxidative stress via increased scavenging of ROS and modulation of the ABA signaling pathway.

  10. Radiosensitization of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Ribonucleotide Reductase: Enhanced Radiation Response at Low-Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kunos, Charles A.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Pink, John; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To test whether pharmacologic inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) by 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC no. 663249) enhances radiation sensitivity during low-dose-rate ionizing radiation provided by a novel purpose-built iridium-192 cell irradiator. Methods and Materials: The cells were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (11, 23, 37, 67 cGy/h) using a custom-fabricated cell irradiator or to high-dose-rate radiation (330 cGy/min) using a conventional cell irradiator. The radiation sensitivity of human cervical (CaSki, C33-a) cancer cells with or without RNR inhibition by 3-AP was evaluated using a clonogenic survival and an RNR activity assay. Alteration in the cell cycle distribution was monitored using flow cytometry. Results: Increasing radiation sensitivity of both CaSki and C33-a cells was observed with the incremental increase in radiation dose rates. 3-AP treatment led to enhanced radiation sensitivity in both cell lines, eliminating differences in cell cytotoxicity from the radiation dose rate. RNR blockade by 3-AP during low-dose-rate irradiation was associated with low RNR activity and extended G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: We conclude that RNR inhibition by 3-AP impedes DNA damage repair mechanisms that rely on deoxyribonucleotide production and thereby increases radiation sensitivity of human cervical cancers to low-dose-rate radiation.

  11. Ferric reductase activity of low molecular weight human milk fraction is associated with enhanced iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pullakhandam, Raghu; Nair, Madhavan Krishnapillai; Kasula, Sunanda; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Thippande, Tippeswamy Gowda

    2008-09-19

    It is known that the fractional absorption of extrinsic iron from human milk is higher in infants and adults. A low molecular weight milk fraction has been proposed to increase the bioavailability of iron from human milk. Nevertheless, the mechanisms remained elusive. Here in we demonstrate ferric reductase activity (Km7.73x10(-6)M) in low molecular weight human milk fraction (10kF, filtrate derived from ultra filtration of milk whey through 10kDa cutoff membrane), which increased ferric iron solubility and iron uptake in Caco-2 cells. The 10kF fraction was as effective as ascorbic acid (1:20 iron to ascorbic acid) in increasing the ferric iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Further, gel filtration chromatography on peptide column led to co-elution of ferric reductase and iron solubilization activities at an apparent molecular mass of <1500Da. Interestingly, only these fractions containing ferric reductase activity also stimulated the uptake of iron in Caco-2 cells. Thus, it is concluded that human milk possesses ferric reductase activity and is associated with ferric iron solubilization and enhanced absorption.

  12. EPRI-DOE Conference on Environmentally-Enhanced Hydropower Turbines: Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, T.

    2011-12-01

    The EPRI-DOE Conference on Environmentally-Enhanced Hydropower Turbines was a component of a larger project. The goal of the overall project was to conduct the final developmental engineering required to advance the commercialization of the Alden turbine. As part of this effort, the conference provided a venue to disseminate information on the status of the Alden turbine technology as well as the status of other advanced turbines and research on environmentally-friendly hydropower turbines. The conference was also a product of a federal Memorandum of Understanding among DOE, USBR, and USACE to share technical information on hydropower. The conference was held in Washington, DC on May 19 and 20, 2011 and welcomed over 100 attendees. The Conference Organizing Committee included the federal agencies with a vested interest in hydropower in the U.S. The Committee collaboratively assembled this conference, including topics from each facet of the environmentally-friendly conventional hydropower research community. The conference was successful in illustrating the readiness of environmentally-enhanced hydropower technologies. Furthermore, the topics presented illustrated the need for additional deployment and field testing of these technologies in an effort to promote the growth of environmentally sustainable hydropower in the U.S. and around the world.

  13. Overexpression of the pepper transcription factor CaPF1 in transgenic Virginia pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) confers multiple stress tolerance and enhances organ growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Charles, Thomas M; Newton, Ronald J

    2005-11-01

    Transcription factors play an important role in regulating gene expression in response to stress and pathogen tolerance. We describe here that overexpression of an ERF/AP2 pepper transcription factor (CaPF1) in transgenic Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana Mill.) confers tolerance to heavy metals Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc, to heat, and to pathogens Bacillus thuringiensis and Staphylococcus epidermidis, as by the survival rate of transgenic plants and the number of decreasing pathogen cells in transgenic tissues. Measurement of antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APOX), glutathione reductase (GR), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities demonstrated that the level of the enzyme activities was higher in transgenic Virginia pine plants overexpressing the CaPF1 gene, which may protect cells from the oxidative damage caused by stresses, compared to the controls. Constitutive overexpression of CaPF1 gene enhanced organ growth by increasing organ size and cell numbers in transgenic Virginia pine plants over those in control plants.

  14. Enhancement of methotrexate resistance and dihydrofolate reductase gene amplification by treatment of mouse 3T6 cells with hydroxyurea.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P C; Tlsty, T D; Schimke, R T

    1983-01-01

    We investigated various parameters associated with the initial selection of mouse 3T6 cells for resistance to single concentrations of methotrexate and characterized resistant colonies for the presence of additional (amplified) copies of the dihydrofolate reductase gene. Our results indicate that the frequency of occurrence of dihydrofolate reductase gene amplification varies with the selecting concentration of methotrexate and is highly variable between clonally derived sublines of mouse 3T6 cells. Second, we increased the frequency of occurrence of cells with amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes by transiently inhibiting DNA synthesis with hydroxyurea before the selection of cells in single concentrations of methotrexate. This effect was dependent on the concentration of hydroxyurea, the time of exposure to the drug, and the time interval between the removal of hydroxyurea and the selection of cells in methotrexate. Images PMID:6877240

  15. Broadband enhanced graphene photodetector with fractal metasurface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di; Fang, Jieran; DeVault, Clayton T.; Chung, Ting-Fung; Chen, Yong P.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    Graphene has been demonstrated to be a promising photo-detection material because of its ultra-broadband absorption, compatibility with CMOS technology, and dynamic tunability. There are multiple known photo-detection mechanisms in graphene, among which the photovoltaic effect has the fastest response time thus is the prioritized candidate for ultrafast photodetector. There have been numerous efforts to enhance the intrinsically low sensitivity in graphene photovoltaic detectors using metallic plasmonic structures, but such plasmonic enhancements are mostly narrowband and polarization dependent. In this work, we propose a gold Cayley-tree fractal metasurface design that has a multi-band resonance, to realize broadband and polarization-insensitive plasmonic enhancement in graphene photovoltaic detectors. When illuminated with visible light, the fractal metasurface exhibits multiple hotspots at the metal-graphene interface, where the electric field of the incident electromagnetic wave is enhanced and contributes to generating excess electron-hole pairs in graphene. The large metal-graphene interface length in the fractal metasurface also helps to harvest at a higher efficiency the electron-hole pairs by built-in electric field due to metal-graphene potential gradient. To demonstrate the concept, we carried out experiment using Ar-Kr CW laser, an optical chopper, and lock-in amplifier. We obtained experimentally an almost constant ten-fold enhancement of photocurrent generated on the fractal metasurface compared to that generated on the plain gold-graphene edge, at all tested wavelengths (488 nm, 514 nm, 568 nm, and 647 nm). We also observed an unchanged photoresponse with respect to incident light polarization angles, which is a result of the highly symmetric geometry of the fractal metasurface.

  16. Constitutive expression of CaPLA1 conferred enhanced growth and grain yield in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Youl; Kim, Eun Yu; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipids are not only important components of cell membranes, but participate in diverse processes in higher plants. In this study, we generated Capsicum annuum phospholipiase A1 (CaPLA1) overexpressing transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants under the control of the maize ubiquitin promoter. The T4 CaPLA1-overexpressing rice plants (Ubi:CaPLA1) had a higher root:shoot mass ratio than the wild-type plants in the vegetative stage. Leaf epidermal cells from transgenic plants had more cells than wild-type plants. Genes that code for cyclin and lipid metabolic enzymes were up-regulated in the transgenic lines. When grown under typical paddy field conditions, the transgenic plants produced more tillers, longer panicles and more branches per panicle than the wild-type plants, all of which resulted in greater grain yield. Microarray analysis suggests that gene expressions that are related with cell proliferation, lipid metabolism, and redox state were widely altered in CaPLA1-overexpressing transgenic rice plants. Ubi:CaPLA1 plants had a reduced membrane peroxidation state, as determined by malondialdehyde and conjugated diene levels and higher peroxidase activity than wild-type rice plants. Furthermore, three isoprenoid synthetic genes encoding terpenoid synthase, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase were up-regulated in CaPLA1-overexpressing plants. We suggest that constitutive expression of CaPLA1 conferred increased grain yield with enhanced growth in transgenic rice plants by alteration of gene activities related with cell proliferation, lipid metabolism, membrane peroxidation state and isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  17. Surface-enhanced coherent Raman scattering (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potma, Eric O.; Fast, Alex; Syme, Christropher D.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a coherent Raman scattering microscope that combines total internal reflection illumination with surface plasmon resonance. The excitation geometry is based on an objective-type Kretschmann configuration, which allows widefield excitation of surface plasmon polariton modes in a thin gold film on a glass substrate. The surface plasmon fields enhance the excitation efficiency, enabling image acquisition at 10 frames/s. Since the evanescent field extends only over a length scale of ~100 nm, structures close the substrate surface are observed while bulk contributions are suppressed. We discuss the operational principles of this microscope in detail and point out its applications in cell biology.

  18. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-01-01

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  19. Hollow metal nanostructures for enhanced plasmonics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genç, Aziz; Patarroyo, Javier; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Duchamp, Martial; Gonzalez, Edgar; Bastus, Neus G.; Houben, Lothar; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal; Puntes, Victor F.; Arbiol, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Complex metal nanoparticles offer a great playground for plasmonic nanoengineering, where it is possible to cover plasmon resonances from ultraviolet to near infrared by modifying the morphologies from solid nanocubes to nanoframes, multiwalled hollow nanoboxes or even nanotubes with hybrid (alternating solid and hollow) structures. We experimentally show that structural modifications, i.e. void size and final morphology, are the dominant determinants for the final plasmonic properties, while compositional variations allow us to get a fine tuning. EELS mappings of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) reveal an enhanced plasmon field inside the voids of hollow AuAg nanostructures along with a more homogeneous distributions of the plasmon fields around the nanostructures. With the present methodology and the appropriate samples we are able to compare the effects of hybridization at the nanoscale in hollow nanostructures. Boundary element method (BEM) simulations also reveal the effects of structural nanoengineering on plasmonic properties of hollow metal nanostructures. Possibility of tuning the LSPR properties of hollow metal nanostructures in a wide range of energy by modifying the void size/shell thickness is shown by BEM simulations, which reveals that void size is the dominant factor for tuning the LSPRs. As a proof of concept for enhanced plasmonic properties, we show effective label free sensing of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with some of our hollow nanostructures. In addition, the different plasmonic modes observed have also been studied and mapped in 3D.

  20. Nano-enhanced optical delivery into targeted cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Weldon; Pradhan, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Nano-enhanced optical field of gold nanoparticles allowed the use of a continuous wave (cw) laser beam for efficient delivery of exogenous impermeable materials into targeted cells. Using this Nano-enhanced Optical Delivery (NOD) method, we show that large molecules could be delivered with low power cw laser with exposure time ~ 1sec. At such low power (and exposure), the non-targeted cells (not bound to gold nanoparticles) were not adversely affected by the laser beam. Further, by varying the size of the gold nanoparticles, cells could be exclusively sensitized to selective wavelengths of laser beam. In contrast other nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles were found to have lower cytotoxicity, making it better suited for clinical NOD. Further, as compared with pulsed lasers, cw (diode) lasers are compact, easy-to-use and therefore, NOD using cw laser beam has significant translational potential for delivery of impermeable bio-molecules to tissues in different organs. We will present optimization of NOD parameters for delivering different molecules to different cells. Success of this NOD method may lead to a new clinical approach for treating AMD and RP patients with geographic atrophy in retina.

  1. A new transgenic rice line exhibiting enhanced ferric iron reduction and phytosiderophore production confers tolerance to low iron availability in calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Shimochi, Erika; Hamada, Tatsuro; Senoura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Aung, May Sann; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ogo, Yuko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a critical agricultural problem, especially in calcareous soil, which is distributed worldwide. Rice plants take up Fe(II) from soil through a OsIRT1 transporter (Strategy I-related system) and also take up Fe(III) via a phytosiderophore-based system (Strategy II system). However, rice plants are susceptible to low-Fe conditions because they have low Fe(III) reduction activity and low-level phytosiderophore secretion. Previously, we produced transgenic rice plants expressing a mutationally reconstructed yeast ferric chelate reductase, refre1/372, under the control of the OsIRT1 promoter. This transgenic rice line exhibited higher Fe(III) chelate reductase activity and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In addition, we produced transgenic rice overexpressing the Fe deficiency-inducible transcription factor, OsIRO2, which regulates the expression of various genes involved in the strategy II Fe(III) uptake system, including OsNAS1, OsNAAT1, OsDMAS1, OsYSL15, and TOM1. This transgenic rice exhibited improved phytosiderophore secretion ability and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In the present research, transgenic rice plants that possess both the OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 and the 35S promoter-OsIRO2 (RI lines) were produced to enhance both Strategy I Fe(II) reductase ability and Strategy II phytosiderophore productivity. RI lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to Fe-deficient conditions at the early and middle-late stages of growth in calcareous soil, compared to both the non-transgenic line and lines harboring either OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 or 35S promoter-OsIRO2 alone. RI lines also exhibited a 9-fold higher yield than the non-transgenic line. Moreover, we successfully produced Fe-deficiency-tolerant Tachisugata rice, which is a high-biomass variety used as fodder. Collectively, our results demonstrate that combined enhancement of two Fe uptake systems in rice is highly effective in conferring tolerance to low Fe availability in calcareous soil.

  2. A new transgenic rice line exhibiting enhanced ferric iron reduction and phytosiderophore production confers tolerance to low iron availability in calcareous soil

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Tatsuro; Senoura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Aung, May Sann; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ogo, Yuko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a critical agricultural problem, especially in calcareous soil, which is distributed worldwide. Rice plants take up Fe(II) from soil through a OsIRT1 transporter (Strategy I-related system) and also take up Fe(III) via a phytosiderophore-based system (Strategy II system). However, rice plants are susceptible to low-Fe conditions because they have low Fe(III) reduction activity and low-level phytosiderophore secretion. Previously, we produced transgenic rice plants expressing a mutationally reconstructed yeast ferric chelate reductase, refre1/372, under the control of the OsIRT1 promoter. This transgenic rice line exhibited higher Fe(III) chelate reductase activity and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In addition, we produced transgenic rice overexpressing the Fe deficiency-inducible transcription factor, OsIRO2, which regulates the expression of various genes involved in the strategy II Fe(III) uptake system, including OsNAS1, OsNAAT1, OsDMAS1, OsYSL15, and TOM1. This transgenic rice exhibited improved phytosiderophore secretion ability and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In the present research, transgenic rice plants that possess both the OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 and the 35S promoter-OsIRO2 (RI lines) were produced to enhance both Strategy I Fe(II) reductase ability and Strategy II phytosiderophore productivity. RI lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to Fe-deficient conditions at the early and middle-late stages of growth in calcareous soil, compared to both the non-transgenic line and lines harboring either OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 or 35S promoter-OsIRO2 alone. RI lines also exhibited a 9-fold higher yield than the non-transgenic line. Moreover, we successfully produced Fe-deficiency-tolerant Tachisugata rice, which is a high-biomass variety used as fodder. Collectively, our results demonstrate that combined enhancement of two Fe uptake systems in rice is highly effective in conferring tolerance to low Fe availability in calcareous soil. PMID

  3. Electrochemical tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Sabanés, Natalia; Domke, Katrin F.

    2016-09-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) in air and ultra-high vacuum (UHV) has been refined over the years through the study of various adsorbates in different experimental configurations. Developing the technique toward more realistic working conditions would render possible the investigation of more complex solid/liquid systems like bio-membranes or energy conversion and storage devices, providing a powerful tool to characterize nanoscale electrochemical processes occurring at the interface with high sensitivity and resolution. However, the extension to solid/liquid interfaces and electrochemical conditions still remains a challenge and few reports have been published. We have built an electrochemical TERS setup with side-illumination geometry that adapts easily to different experimental conditions such as opacity, shape and dimensions of the sample. The instrument features a specially designed solid/liquid sample holder that is implemented in a standard commercial STM. The experimental scheme can, in principle, be adapted to upgrade classic air TERS setups for work in liquids. Here, we show potential-dependent EC-TER spectra of a monolayer of adenine adsorbed on Au(111). The intensity of the ring-breathing mode at 735 cm-1 decreases with increasing sample potential and is recovered again upon potential reversal. The intensity variation is attributed to orientational changes of adenine upon (dis)charging of the Au substrate.

  4. Overexpression and enhanced specific activity of aldoketo reductases (AKR1B1 & AKR1B10) in human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ashok; Kumar, P Uday; Srinivasulu, M; Triveni, B; Sharada, K; Ismail, Ayesha; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in India is on the rise and is rapidly becoming the primary cancer in Indian women. The aldoketo reductase (AKR) family has more than 190 proteins including aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and aldose reductase like protein (AKR1B10). Apart from liver cancer, the status of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 with respect to their expression and activity has not been reported in other human cancers. We studied the specific activity and expression of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 in breast non tumor and tumor tissues and in the blood. Fresh post-surgical breast cancer and non-cancer tissues and blood were collected from the subjects who were admitted for surgical therapy. Malignant, benign and pre-surgical chemotherapy samples were evaluated by histopathology scoring. Expression of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 was carried out by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) while specific activity was determined spectrophotometrically. The specific activity of AKR1B1 was significantly higher in red blood cells (RBC) in all three grades of primary surgical and post-chemotherapy samples. Specific activity of both AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 increased in tumor samples compared to their corresponding non tumor samples (primary surgical and post-chemotherapy). Immunoblotting and IHC data also indicated overexpression of AKR1B1 in all grades of tumors compared to their corresponding non tumor samples. There was no change in the specific activity of AKR1B1 in benign samples compared to all grades of tumor and non-tumors.

  5. Insights into the Enhanced in vivo Fitness of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Driven by a Fluoroquinolone Resistance-Conferring Mutant DNA Gyrase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-05

    Insights into the Enhanced in vivo Fitness of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Driven by a Fluoroquinolone Resistance-Conferring Mutant DNA Gyrase...gonorrhoeae Driven by a Fluoroquinolone Resistance-Conferring Mutant DNA Gyrase" Name of Candidate: MAJ Jonathan D’ Ambrozio Doctor of Philosophy Degree...gonorrhoeae Driven by a Fluoroquinolone Resistance-Conferring Mutant DNA Gyrase" is appropriately acknowledged and, bey9nd brief excerpts, is with

  6. Aldo-keto reductases AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3 may enhance progesterone metabolism in ovarian endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Hevir, N; Vouk, K; Sinkovec, J; Ribič-Pucelj, M; Rižner, T Lanišnik

    2011-05-30

    Endometriosis is a very common disease that is characterized by increased formation of estradiol and disturbed progesterone action. This latter is usually explained by a lack of progesterone receptor B (PR-B) expression, while the role of pre-receptor metabolism of progesterone is not yet fully understood. In normal endometrium, progesterone is metabolized by reductive 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (20α-HSDs), 3α/β-HSDs and 5α/β-reductases. The aldo-keto reductases 1C1 and 1C3 (AKR1C1 and AKR1C3) are the major reductive 20α-HSDs, while the oxidative reaction is catalyzed by 17β-HSD type 2 (HSD17B2). Also, 3α-HSD and 3β-HSD activities have been associated with the AKR1C isozymes. Additionally, 5α-reductase types 1 and 2 (SRD5A1, SRD5A2) and 5β-reductase (AKR1D1) are responsible for the formation of 5α- and 5β-reduced pregnanes. In this study, we examined the expression of PR-AB and the progesterone metabolizing enzymes in 31 specimens of ovarian endometriosis and 28 specimens of normal endometrium. Real-time PCR analysis revealed significantly decreased mRNA levels of PR-AB, HSD17B2 and SRD5A2, significantly increased mRNA levels of AKR1C1, AKR1C2, AKR1C3 and SRD5A1, and negligible mRNA levels of AKR1D1. Immunohistochemistry staining of endometriotic tissue compared to control endometrium showed significantly lower PR-B levels in epithelial cells and no significant differences in stromal cells, there were no significant differences in the expression of AKR1C3 and significantly higher AKR1C2 levels were seen only in stromal cells. Our expression analysis data at the mRNA level and partially at the cellular level thus suggest enhanced metabolism of progesterone by SRD5A1 and the 20α-HSD and 3α/β-HSD activities of AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3.

  7. Identification of long chain specific aldehyde reductase and its use in enhanced fatty alcohol production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Zia; Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-09-01

    Long chain fatty alcohols have wide application in chemical industries and transportation sector. There is no direct natural reservoir for long chain fatty alcohol production, thus many groups explored metabolic engineering approaches for its microbial production. Escherichia coli has been the major microbial platform for this effort, however, terminal endogenous enzyme responsible for converting fatty aldehydes of chain length C14-C18 to corresponding fatty alcohols is still been elusive. Through our in silico analysis we selected 35 endogenous enzymes of E. coli having potential of converting long chain fatty aldehydes to fatty alcohols and studied their role under in vivo condition. We found that deletion of ybbO gene, which encodes NADP(+) dependent aldehyde reductase, led to >90% reduction in long chain fatty alcohol production. This feature was found to be strain transcending and reinstalling ybbO gene via plasmid retained the ability of mutant to produce long chain fatty alcohols. Enzyme kinetic study revealed that YbbO has wide substrate specificity ranging from C6 to C18 aldehyde, with maximum affinity and efficiency for C18 and C16 chain length aldehyde, respectively. Along with endogenous production of fatty aldehyde via optimized heterologous expression of cyanobaterial acyl-ACP reductase (AAR), YbbO overexpression resulted in 169mg/L of long chain fatty alcohols. Further engineering involving modulation of fatty acid as well as of phospholipid biosynthesis pathway improved fatty alcohol production by 60%. Finally, the engineered strain produced 1989mg/L of long chain fatty alcohol in bioreactor under fed-batch cultivation condition. Our study shows for the first time a predominant role of a single enzyme in production of long chain fatty alcohols from fatty aldehydes as well as of modulation of phospholipid pathway in increasing the fatty alcohol production.

  8. Enhanced 2,3-Butanediol Production by Optimizing Fermentation Conditions and Engineering Klebsiella oxytoca M1 through Overexpression of Acetoin Reductase.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sukhyeong; Kim, Taeyeon; Woo, Han Min; Lee, Jinwon; Kim, Yunje; Um, Youngsoon

    2015-01-01

    Microbial production of 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BDO) has been attracting increasing interest because of its high value and various industrial applications. In this study, high production of 2,3-BDO using a previously isolated bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca M1 was carried out by optimizing fermentation conditions and overexpressing acetoin reductase (AR). Supplying complex nitrogen sources and using NaOH as a neutralizing agent were found to enhance specific production and yield of 2,3-BDO. In fed-batch fermentations, 2,3-BDO production increased with the agitation speed (109.6 g/L at 300 rpm vs. 118.5 g/L at 400 rpm) along with significantly reduced formation of by-product, but the yield at 400 rpm was lower than that at 300 rpm (0.40 g/g vs. 0.34 g/g) due to acetoin accumulation at 400 rpm. Because AR catalyzing both acetoin reduction and 2,3-BDO oxidation in K. oxytoca M1 revealed more than 8-fold higher reduction activity than oxidation activity, the engineered K. oxytoca M1 overexpressing the budC encoding AR was used in fed-batch fermentation. Finally, acetoin accumulation was significantly reduced by 43% and enhancement of 2,3-BDO concentration (142.5 g/L), yield (0.42 g/g) and productivity (1.47 g/L/h) was achieved compared to performance with the parent strain. This is by far the highest titer of 2,3-BDO achieved by K. oxytoca strains. This notable result could be obtained by finding favorable fermentation conditions for 2,3-BDO production as well as by utilizing the distinct characteristic of AR in K. oxytoca M1 revealing the nature of reductase.

  9. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR17A1) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Degrades the Rice Field Herbicide Butachlor and Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Chhavi; Sen, Sonia; Yadav, Shivam; Rai, Shweta; Rai, Lal Chand

    2015-01-01

    Present study deals with the identification of a novel aldo/keto reductase, AKR17A1 from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and adds on as 17th family of AKR superfamily drawn from a wide variety of organisms. AKR17A1 shares many characteristics of a typical AKR such as— (i) conferring tolerance to multiple stresses like heat, UV-B, and cadmium, (ii) excellent activity towards known AKR substrates (isatin and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde), and (iii) obligate dependence on NADPH as a cofactor for enzyme activity. The most novel attribute of AKR17A1, first reported in this study, is its capability to metabolize butachlor, a persistent rice field herbicide that adversely affects agro-ecosystem and non-target organisms. The AKR17A1 catalyzed- degradation of butachlor resulted into formation of 1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid and 2,6 bis (1,1, dimethylethyl) 4,-methyl phenol as the major products confirmed by GC-MS analysis. PMID:26372161

  10. A nanotherapy strategy significantly enhances anticryptosporidial activity of an inhibitor of bifunctional thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase from Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Iyidogan, Pinar; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Cisneros, José A; Czyzyk, Daniel; Ranjan, Amalendu Prakash; Jorgensen, William L; White, A Clinton; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Anderson, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a gastrointestinal disease caused by protozoans of the genus Cryptosporidium, is a common cause of diarrheal diseases and often fatal in immunocompromised individuals. Bifunctional thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase (TS-DHFR) from Cryptosporidium hominis (C. hominis) has been a molecular target for inhibitor design. C. hominis TS-DHFR inhibitors with nM potency at a biochemical level have been developed however drug delivery to achieve comparable antiparasitic activity in Cryptosporidium infected cell culture has been a major hurdle for designing effective therapies. Previous mechanistic and structural studies have identified compound 906 as a nM C. hominis TS-DHFR inhibitor in vitro, having μM antiparasitic activity in cell culture. In this work, proof of concept studies are presented using a nanotherapy approach to improve drug delivery and the antiparasitic activity of 906 in cell culture. We utilized PLGA nanoparticles that were loaded with 906 (NP-906) and conjugated with antibodies to the Cryptosporidium specific protein, CP2, on the nanoparticle surface in order to specifically target the parasite. Our results indicate that CP2 labeled NP-906 (CP2-NP-906) reduces the level of parasites by 200-fold in cell culture, while NP-906 resulted in 4.4-fold decrease. Moreover, the anticryptosporidial potency of 906 improved 15 to 78-fold confirming the utility of the antibody conjugated nanoparticles as an effective drug delivery strategy.

  11. Directed evolution and structural analysis of NADPH-dependent Acetoacetyl Coenzyme A (Acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase from Ralstonia eutropha reveals two mutations responsible for enhanced kinetics.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Motohashi, Ren; Ikeda, Koji; Tobitani, Kota; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2013-10-01

    NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-coenzyme A (acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase (PhaB) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)], along with β-ketothiolase (PhaA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (PhaC). In this study, PhaB from Ralstonia eutropha was engineered by means of directed evolution consisting of an error-prone PCR-mediated mutagenesis and a P(3HB) accumulation-based in vivo screening system using Escherichia coli. From approximately 20,000 mutants, we obtained two mutant candidates bearing Gln47Leu (Q47L) and Thr173Ser (T173S) substitutions. The mutants exhibited kcat values that were 2.4-fold and 3.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. In fact, the PhaB mutants did exhibit enhanced activity and P(3HB) accumulation when expressed in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum. Comparative three-dimensional structural analysis of wild-type PhaB and highly active PhaB mutants revealed that the beneficial mutations affected the flexibility around the active site, which in turn played an important role in substrate recognition. Furthermore, both the kinetic analysis and crystal structure data supported the conclusion that PhaB forms a ternary complex with NADPH and acetoacetyl-CoA. These results suggest that the mutations affected the interaction with substrates, resulting in the acquirement of enhanced activity.

  12. Nitrate reductase-mediated early nitric oxide burst alleviates oxidative damage induced by aluminum through enhancement of antioxidant defenses in roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengliang; Lu, Lingli; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Wenjing; Yu, Yan; Liu, Xiaoxia; Hu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2014-03-01

    • Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in the physiological processes of plants. The role of NO release in the tolerance strategies of roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum) under aluminum (Al) stress was investigated using two genotypes with different Al resistances. • An early NO burst at 3 h was observed in the root tips of the Al-tolerant genotype Jian-864, whereas the Al-sensitive genotype Yang-5 showed no NO accumulation at 3 h but an extremely high NO concentration after 12 h. Stimulating NO production at 3 h in the root tips of Yang-5 with the NO donor relieved Al-induced root inhibition and callose production, as well as oxidative damage and ROS accumulation, while elimination of the early NO burst by NO scavenger aggravated root inhibition in Jian-864. • Synthesis of early NO in roots of Jian-864 was mediated through nitrate reductase (NR) but not through NO synthase. Elevated antioxidant enzyme activities were induced by Al stress in both wheat genotypes and significantly enhanced by NO donor, but suppressed by NO scavenger or NR inhibitor. • These results suggest that an NR-mediated early NO burst plays an important role in Al resistance of wheat through modulating enhanced antioxidant defense to adapt to Al stress.

  13. Methylseleninic acid (MSA) inhibits 17β-estradiol-induced cell growth in breast cancer T47D cells via enhancement of the antioxidative thioredoxin/ thioredoxin reductase system.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Tomofumi; Miura, Kiyoshi; Sakazaki, Fumitoshi; Nakamuro, Katsuhiko; Ueno, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the cell growth inhibitory mechanism of human breast cancer cells caused by selenium (Se) compounds. In the presence of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) at physiological concentrations, growth of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive T47D cells was markedly inhibited by 1 × 10(-6) mol/L methylseleninic acid (MSA) with no Se related toxicity.Under conditions where cell growth was inhibited, MSA decreased ERα mRNA levels and subsequent protein levels; further decreasing expression of estrogen-responsive finger protein (Efp) which is a target gene product of ERα and promotes G2/M progression of the cell cycle. Therefore, the decline in Efp expression is presumed to be involved in G2 arrest. Coincidentally, the antioxidative thioredoxin/ thioredoxin reductase (Trx/TrxR) system in cells was enhanced by the synergistic action of E(2) and MSA. It has been reported that ROS-induced oxidative stress enhanced ERα expression. E(2) increased production of intracellular ROS in T47D cells. Meanwhile, MSA significantly decreased E(2)-induced ROS accumulation. From these results, activation of the Trx/TrxR system induced by the coexistence of MSA and E(2) suppresses oxidative stress and decreases expression of ERα, and finally induces the growth arrest of T47D cells through disruption of ERα signaling.

  14. Short hairpin RNA targeted to dihydrofolate reductase enhances the immunoglobulin G expression in gene-amplified stable Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suh-Chin; Hong, Willy W L; Liu, Jin-Hwang

    2008-09-08

    The dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr)/methotrexate (MTX) selection is a common method to conduct gene amplification in stable clones of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We previously reported the use of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector targeted to the dhfr gene resulted in improving the intracellular antigen expression in gene-amplified stable CHO cells [Hong, W.W., Wu, S.C., 2007. A novel RNA silencing vector to improve antigen expression and stability in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Vaccine 25 (20), 4103-4111]. Here we investigated the use of the dhfr-targeted shRNA vector for immunoglobulin G (IgG) expression in gene-amplified stable CHO cells. With the use of the dhfr-targeted shRNA vector, the gene-amplified CHO/dhFr(-) cells were found to increase IgG expression at 1.0 microM MTX by more than 100% and to improve the genomic stability of IgG expression in MTX-free cultures by approximately 30%. The use of the dhfr-targeted shRNA vector can enhance the IgG expression in the gene-amplified stable CHO cells and uphold the IgG expression in MTX-free cultures. Utilizing the dhfr-targeted shRNA vector may provide an alternative way to maneuver CHO cell factories for IgG production in cultures.

  15. Enhanced heterologous expression of two Streptomyces griseolus cytochrome P450s and Streptomyces coelicolor ferredoxin reductase as potentially efficient hydroxylation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Haitham A; Ward, John M

    2003-01-01

    The herbicide-inducible, soluble cytochrome P450s CYP105A1 and CYP105B1 and their adjacent ferredoxins, Fd1 and Fd2, of Streptomyces griseolus were expressed in Escherichia coli to high levels. Conditions for high-level expression of active enzyme able to catalyze hydroxylation have been developed. Analysis of the expression levels of the P450 proteins in several different E. coli expression hosts identified E. coli BL21 Star(DE3)pLysS as the optimal host cell to express CYP105B1 as judged by CO difference spectra. Examination of the codons used in the CYP1051A1 sequence indicated that it contains a number of codons corresponding to rare E. coli tRNA species. The level of its expression was improved in the modified forms of E. coli BL21(DE3), which contain extra copies of rare codon E. coli tRNA genes. The activity of correctly folded cytochrome P450s was further enhanced by cloning a ferredoxin reductase from Streptomyces coelicolor downstream of CYP105A1 and CYP105B1 and their adjacent ferredoxins. Expression of CYP105A1 and CYP105B1 was also achieved in Streptomyces lividans 1326 by cloning the P450 genes and their ferredoxins into the expression vector pBW160. S. lividans 1326 cells containing CYP105A1 or CYP105B1 were able efficiently to dealkylate 7-ethoxycoumarin.

  16. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species.

  17. Enhancing Heat Tolerance of the Little Dogwood Cornus canadensis L. f. with Introduction of a Superoxide Reductase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xing-Min; Liu, Xiang; Ji, Mikyoung; Hoffmann, William A.; Grunden, Amy; Xiang, Qiu-Yun J.

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be accelerated under various biotic and abiotic stresses causing lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and DNA damage. Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a novel antioxidant enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus and is employed by this anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon for efficient detoxification of ROS. In this study, SOR was introduced into a flowering plant Cornus canadensis to enhance its heat tolerance and reduce heat induced damage. A fusion construct of the SOR gene and Green Fluorescent Protein gene (GFP) was introduced into C. canadensis using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Heat tolerance of the GFP-SOR expressing transgenic plants was investigated by observing morphological symptoms of heat injury and by examining changes in photosynthesis, malondialdehyde (MDA), and proline levels in the plants. Our results indicate that the expression of the P. furiosus SOR gene in the transgenic plants alleviated lipid peroxidation of cell membranes and photoinhibition of PS II, and decreased the accumulation of proline at 40°C. After a series of exposures to increasing temperatures, the SOR transgenic plants remained healthy and green whereas most of the non-transgenic plants dried up and were unable to recover. While it had previously been reported that expression of SOR in Arabidopsis enhanced heat tolerance, this is the first report of the successful demonstration of improved heat tolerance in a non-model plant resulting from the introduction of P. furiosus SOR. The study demonstrates the potential of SOR for crop improvement and that inherent limitations of plant heat tolerance can be ameliorated with P. furiosus SOR. PMID:26858741

  18. 75 FR 2552 - NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH State-of-the-Science Conference: Enhancing Use and Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH State-of-the-Science...

  19. The Science of Enhanced Student Engagement and Employability: Introducing the Psychology Stream of the Inaugural HEA STEM Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulme, Julie; Taylor, Jacqui; Davies, Mark N. O.; Banister, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Higher Education Academy (HEA) is committed to enhancing the quality of learning and teaching for all university students in the UK, and the inaugural conference for the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects, held in April 2012 at Imperial College, London, aimed to showcase research and evidence-based educational…

  20. NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON URBAN STORM WATER: ENHANCING PROGRAMS AT THE LOCAL LEVEL - PROCEEDINGS CHICAGO, IL FEBRUARY 17-20, 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide array of effective storm water management and resource protection tools have been developed for urban environments, but their implementation continues to be hampered by a lack of technology transfer opportunities. At the national conference Urban Storm Water: Enhancing Pro...

  1. An Evolutionary Fitness Enhancement Conferred by the Circadian System in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peijun; Woelfle, Mark A.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are found in a wide variety of organisms from cyanobacteria to mammals. Many believe that the circadian clock system evolved as an adaption to the daily cycles in light and temperature driven by the rotation of the earth. Studies on the cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, have confirmed that the circadian clock in resonance with environmental cycles confers an adaptive advantage to cyanobacterial strains with different clock properties when grown in competition under light-dark cycles. The results thus far suggest that in a cyclic environment, the cyanobacterial strains whose free running periods are closest to the environmental period are the most fit and the strains lacking a functional circadian clock are at a competitive disadvantage relative to strains with a functional clock. In contrast, the circadian system provides little or no advantage to cyanobacteria grown in competition in constant light. To explain the potential mechanism of this clock-mediated enhancement in fitness in cyanobacteria, several models have been proposed; these include the limiting resource model, the diffusible inhibitor model and the cell-to-cell communication model. None of these models have been excluded by the currently available experimental data and the mechanistic basis of clock-mediated fitness enhancement remains elusive. PMID:23626410

  2. Aldose reductase inhibitor counteracts the enhanced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-10 and improves corneal wound healing in galactose-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takafumi; Tomomatsu, Takeshi; Matsumura, Takehiro; Takihara, Yuji; Inatani, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the effect of an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) and the role of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-10 on recovery after corneal epithelium removal in a rat diabetic keratopathy model. Methods Three-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the following diets for 6 weeks: normal MF chow (MF), 50% galactose (Gal), and 50% Gal containing 0.01% ARI (Gal +ARI). The corneal epithelium was removed using n-heptanol, and the area of epithelial defects was photographed and measured every 24 h. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression profile of MMP-10 and integrin α3. Results Compared to the MF control group, the amount of galactitol in the Gal group increased approximately 200-fold, which was reduced to sevenfold by ARI treatment. The area of corneal erosion in the Gal group was significantly larger than in the MF group at 72 h and thereafter (p<0.01, unpaired t test). The expression level of MMP-10 was enhanced at both the protein and mRNA levels by exposure to a high concentration of Gal, while integrin α3 expression decreased at the protein level but remained unchanged at the mRNA level. Delayed epithelial wound healing and alterations in the expression levels of MMP-10 and integrin α3 were normalized by ARI. The corneal erosion closure rate was significantly decreased with topical recombinant MMP-10. Conclusions These studies confirm that the increased expression of MMP-10 induced by Gal feeding is counteracted by ARI treatment and suggest a role of MMP-10 in modulating corneal epithelial wound healing. PMID:24339723

  3. Selenium pretreatment upregulates the antioxidant defense and methylglyoxal detoxification system and confers enhanced tolerance to drought stress in rapeseed seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Fujita, Masayuki

    2011-12-01

    In order to observe the possible regulatory role of selenium (Se) in relation to the changes in ascorbate (AsA) glutathione (GSH) levels and to the activities of antioxidant and glyoxalase pathway enzymes, rapeseed (Brassica napus) seedlings were grown in Petri dishes. A set of 10-day-old seedlings was pretreated with 25 μM Se (Sodium selenate) for 48 h. Two levels of drought stress (10% and 20% PEG) were imposed separately as well as on Se-pretreated seedlings, which were grown for another 48 h. Drought stress, at any level, caused a significant increase in GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) content; however, the AsA content increased only under mild stress. The activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was not affected by drought stress. The monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and glutathione reductase (GR) activity increased only under mild stress (10% PEG). The activity of dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glyoxalase I (Gly I) activity significantly increased under any level of drought stress, while catalase (CAT) and glyoxalase II (Gly II) activity decreased. A sharp increase in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and lipid peroxidation (MDA content) was induced by drought stress. On the other hand, Se-pretreated seedlings exposed to drought stress showed a rise in AsA and GSH content, maintained a high GSH/GSSG ratio, and evidenced increased activities of APX, DHAR, MDHAR, GR, GST, GPX, CAT, Gly I, and Gly II as compared with the drought-stressed plants without Se. These seedlings showed a concomitant decrease in GSSG content, H(2)O(2), and the level of lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that the exogenous application of Se increased the tolerance of the plants to drought-induced oxidative damage by enhancing their antioxidant defense and methylglyoxal detoxification systems.

  4. Enhancement of fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis accompanied by enhanced biliary but not very-low-density lipoprotein lipid secretion following sustained pravastatin blockade of hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Carrella, M; Fong, L G; Loguercio, C; Del Piano, C

    1999-05-01

    A 3-week treatment of rats with pravastatin (PV) augmented biliary cholesterol and phospholipid output 3.6- and 2.2-fold over controls, while bile acid (BA) output and kinetics were unchanged. No major changes were detected in hepatic and serum cholesterol concentrations despite the PV inhibitory property on hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase. To evaluate the mechanisms of this adaptive phenomenon, several parameters of hepatic lipid homeostasis were assessed. Biliary cholesterol changes could not be attributed to an increased influx of lipoprotein cholesterol to the liver and bile. Hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor content, as inferred from Western blot analysis, was unchanged, as was the biliary excretion of labeled cholesterol derived from chylomicron remnants. In vivo 3H2O-incorporation studies showed an 80% increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis, evidence for bypass of the PV block. Remarkably, fatty acid synthesis was also stimulated twofold, providing substrate for hepatic triglycerides, which were slightly enhanced. However, serum triglycerides decreased 52% associated with a 22% decrease in hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion. Thus, the biochemical adaptation following PV treatment produces complex alterations in hepatic lipid metabolism. An enhanced supply of newly synthesized cholesterol and fatty acids in association with a limited VLDL secretion rate augments the biliary lipid secretion pathway in this experimental model.

  5. Neuroprotective role for carbonyl reductase?

    PubMed

    Maser, Edmund

    2006-02-24

    Oxidative stress is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and Creutzfeld-Jakob diseases or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Reactive oxygen species seem to play a significant role in neuronal cell death in that they generate reactive aldehydes from membrane lipid peroxidation. Several neuronal diseases are associated with increased accumulation of abnormal protein adducts of reactive aldehydes, which mediate oxidative stress-linked pathological events, including cellular growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. Combining findings on neurodegeneration and oxidative stress in Drosophila with studies on the metabolic characteristics of the human enzyme carbonyl reductase (CR), it is clear now that CR has a potential physiological role for neuroprotection in humans. Several lines of evidence suggest that CR represents a significant pathway for the detoxification of reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and that CR in humans is essential for neuronal cell survival and to confer protection against oxidative stress-induced brain degeneration.

  6. 75 FR 45606 - Department of Commerce Measuring and Enhancing Services Trade Data Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... intangible assets, and accuracy of service price indices. The target audience for the conference includes... kick-off event for its services trade data initiative. DOC is working to ensure that the measurement...

  7. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  8. Enhancing activity and selectivity in a series of pyrrol-1-yl-1-hydroxypyrazole-based aldose reductase inhibitors: The case of trifluoroacetylation.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Nikolaos; Chatzopoulou, Maria; Ballekova, Jana; Cappiello, Mario; Moschini, Roberta; Balestri, Francesco; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Ragno, Rino; Stefek, Milan; Nicolaou, Ioannis

    2017-04-21

    Aldose reductase (ALR2) has been the target of therapeutic intervention for over 40 years; first, for its role in long-term diabetic complications and more recently as a key mediator in inflammation and cancer. However, efforts to prepare small-molecule aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) have mostly yielded carboxylic acids with rather poor pharmacokinetics. To address this limitation, the 1-hydroxypyrazole moiety has been previously established as a bioisostere of acetic acid in a group of aroyl-substituted pyrrolyl derivatives. In the present work, optimization of this new class of ARIs was achieved by the addition of a trifluoroacetyl group on the pyrrole ring. Eight novel compounds were synthesized and tested for their inhibitory activity towards ALR2 and selectivity against aldehyde reductase (ALR1). All compounds proved potent and selective inhibitors of ALR2 (IC50/ALR2 = 0.043-0.242 μΜ, Selectivity index = 190-858), whilst retaining a favorable physicochemical profile. The most active (4g) and selective (4d) compounds were further evaluated for their ability to inhibit sorbitol formation in rat lenses ex vivo and to exhibit substrate-specific inhibition.

  9. The X-ray crystal structure of APR-B, an atypical adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase from Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Clare E M; Hughes, Richard K; McManus, Michael T; Lawson, David M; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2013-11-15

    Sulfonucleotide reductases catalyse the first reductive step of sulfate assimilation. Their substrate specificities generally correlate with the requirement for a [Fe4S4] cluster, where adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductases possess a cluster and 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductases do not. The exception is the APR-B isoform of APS reductase from the moss Physcomitrella patens, which lacks a cluster. The crystal structure of APR-B, the first for a plant sulfonucleotide reductase, is consistent with a preference for APS. Structural conservation with bacterial APS reductase rules out a structural role for the cluster, but supports the contention that it enhances the activity of conventional APS reductases.

  10. Interactive Computer Graphics Enhancements to a Rural Academic Audio Conference Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munro, Herb

    Several of the problems typically associated with efforts to extend higher education opportunities to rural communities--including small class size, lack of qualified instructors, and maintenance of quality standards--are successfully addressed by an audio conference network. Students in remote locations can participate in classes offered through…

  11. Enhancement of sterol synthesis by the monoterpene perillyl alcohol is unaffected by competitive 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Branch, S K; Broitman, S A

    1999-06-01

    Monoterpenes such as limonene and perillyl alcohol (PA) are currently under investigation for their chemotherapeutic properties which have been tied to their ability to affect protein isoprenylation. Because PA affects the synthesis of isoprenoids, such as ubiquinone, and cholesterol is the end product of the synthetic pathway from which this isoprenoid pathway branches, we investigated the effects of this compound upon cholesterol metabolism in the colonic adenocarcinoma cell line SW480. PA (1 mM) inhibited incorporation of 14C-mevalonate into 21-26 kDa proteins by 25% in SW480 cells. Cholesterol (CH) biosynthesis was assessed by measuring the incorporation of 14C-acetate and 14C-mevalonate into 27-carbon-sterols. Cells treated with PA (1 mM) exhibited a fourfold increase in the incorporation of 14C-acetate but not 14C-mevalonate into cholesterol. Mevinolin (lovastatin), an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA(HMG-CoA) reductase, at 2 microM concentration, inhibited CH synthesis from 14C-acetate by 80%. Surprisingly, concurrent addition of mevinolin and PA did not significantly alter the stimulatory effects of PA. As observed differences in 14C-acetate and 14C-mevalonate precursor labeling could indicate PA affects early pathway events, the effects of this monoterpene on HMG-CoA reductase activity were evaluated. Unexpectedly, 1 mM PA did not stimulate activity of this enzyme. Consistent with its action as a reversibly bound inhibitor, in washed microsomes, 2 microM mevinolin pretreatment increased reductase protein expression causing a 12.7 (+/- 2.4)-fold compensatory HMG-CoA reductase activity increase; concurrent treatment with 1 mM PA attenuated this to a 5.3 (+/- 0.03)-fold increase. Gas chromatographic analysis confirmed CH was the major lipid present in the measured thin-layer chromatography spot. Since 14C-acetate incorporation into free fatty acid and phospholipid pools was not significantly affected by PA treatment, nonspecific changes in whole

  12. Enhancement of cardenolide and phytosterol levels by expression of an N-terminally truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase in Transgenic digitalis minor.

    PubMed

    Sales, Ester; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Pathway engineering in medicinal plants attains a special significance in Digitalis species, the main industrial source of cardiac glycosides, steroidal metabolites derived from mevalonic acid via the triterpenoid pathway. In this work, the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, coding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the MVA pathway, was expressed in the cardenolide-producing plant Digitalis minor. Transgenic plants were morphologically indistinguishable from control wild plants and displayed the same developmental pattern. Constitutive expression of HMG1 resulted in an increased sterol and cardenolide production in both in vitro- and greenhouse-grown plants. This work demonstrates that transgenic D. minor plants are a valuable system to study and achieve metabolic engineering of the cardenolide pathway and in consequence for the genetic improvement of Digitalis species.

  13. Transgenic expression of TaMYB2A confers enhanced tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinguo; Jia, Dongsheng; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hongying; Tian, Shanjun; Zhang, Xiaoke; Jia, Jizeng; Jing, Ruilian

    2011-09-01

    Osmotic stresses such as drought, salinity, and cold are major environmental factors that limit agricultural productivity. Transcription factors play essential roles in abiotic stress signaling in plants. Three TaMYB2 members were identified and designated TaMYB2A, TaMYB2B, and TaMYB2D based on their genomic origins. The cis-regulatory elements in the promoter regions were compared, and their diverse expression patterns under different abiotic stress conditions were identified. TaMYB2A was further characterized because of its earlier response to stresses. Subcellular localization revealed that TaMYB2A localized in the nucleus. To examine the role of TaMYB2A under various environmental stresses, transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying TaMYB2A controlled by the CaMV 35S promoter were generated and subjected to severe abiotic stress. TaMYB2A transgenics had enhanced tolerance to drought, salt, and freezing stresses, which were confirmed by the enhanced expressions of abiotic stress-responsive genes and several physiological indices, including decreased rate of water loss, enhanced cell membrane stability, improved photosynthetic potential, and reduced osmotic potential. TaMYB2A is a multifunctional regulatory factor. Its overexpression confers enhanced tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses while having no obvious negative effects on phenotype under well-watered and stressed conditions; thus, TaMYB2A has the potential for utilization in transgenic breeding to improve abiotic stress tolerances in crops.

  14. Fumarate Reductase Activity of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Aue, B. J.; Diebel, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Some characteristics of a fumarate reductase from Streptococcus faecalis are described. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.4; optimal activity was observed when the ionic strength of the phosphate buffer was adjusted to 0.088. The Km value of the enzyme for reduced flavin mononucleotide was 2 × 10−4 m as determined with a 26-fold preparation. In addition to fumarate, the enzyme reduced maleate and mesaconate. No succinate dehydrogenase activity was detected, but succinate did act as an inhibitor of the fumarate reductase activity. Other inhibitors were malonate, citraconate, and trans-, trans-muconate. Metal-chelating agents did not inhibit the enzyme. A limited inhibition by sulfhydryl-binding agents was observed, and the preparations were sensitive to air oxidation and storage. Glycine, alanine, histidine, and possibly lysine stimulated fumarate reductase activity in the cell-free extracts. However, growth in media supplemented with glycine did not enhance fumarate reductase activity. The enzymatic activity appears to be constitutive. PMID:4960892

  15. An Arabidopsis soil-salinity-tolerance mutation confers ethylene-mediated enhancement of sodium/potassium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Caifu; Belfield, Eric J; Cao, Yi; Smith, J Andrew C; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2013-09-01

    High soil Na concentrations damage plants by increasing cellular Na accumulation and K loss. Excess soil Na stimulates ethylene-induced soil-salinity tolerance, the mechanism of which we here define via characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant displaying transpiration-dependent soil-salinity tolerance. This phenotype is conferred by a loss-of-function allele of ethylene overproducer1 (ETO1; mutant alleles of which cause increased production of ethylene). We show that lack of ETO1 function confers soil-salinity tolerance through improved shoot Na/K homeostasis, effected via the ethylene resistant1-constitutive triple response1 ethylene signaling pathway. Under transpiring conditions, lack of ETO1 function reduces root Na influx and both stelar and xylem sap Na concentrations, thereby restricting root-to-shoot delivery of Na. These effects are associated with increased accumulation of respiratory burst oxidase homolog F (RBOHF)-dependent reactive oxygen species in the root stele. Additionally, lack of ETO1 function leads to significant enhancement of tissue K status by an RBOHF-independent mechanism associated with elevated high-affinity K(+) TRANSPORTER5 transcript levels. We conclude that ethylene promotes soil-salinity tolerance via improved Na/K homeostasis mediated by RBOHF-dependent regulation of Na accumulation and RBOHF-independent regulation of K accumulation.

  16. OsSGL, a Novel DUF1645 Domain-Containing Protein, Confers Enhanced Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanchun; Wang, Manling; Zhou, Huina; Li, Mingjuan; Huang, Lifang; Yin, Xuming; Zhao, Guoqiang; Lin, Fucheng; Xia, Xinjie; Xu, Guoyun

    2016-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental factor that limits plant growth and crop productivity. Genetic engineering is an effective approach to improve drought tolerance in various crops, including rice (Oryza sativa). Functional characterization of relevant genes is a prerequisite when identifying candidates for such improvements. We investigated OsSGL (Oryza sativa Stress tolerance and Grain Length), a novel DUF1645 domain-containing protein from rice. OsSGL was up-regulated by multiple stresses and localized to the nucleus. Transgenic plants over-expressing or hetero-expressing OsSGL conferred significantly improved drought tolerance in transgenic rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. The overexpressing plants accumulated higher levels of proline and soluble sugars but lower malondialdehyde (MDA) contents under osmotic stress. Our RNA-sequencing data demonstrated that several stress-responsive genes were significantly altered in transgenic rice plants. We unexpectedly observed that those overexpressing rice plants also had extensive root systems, perhaps due to the altered transcript levels of auxin- and cytokinin-associated genes. These results suggest that the mechanism by which OsSGL confers enhanced drought tolerance is due to the modulated expression of stress-responsive genes, higher accumulations of osmolytes, and enlarged root systems.

  17. OsSGL, a Novel DUF1645 Domain-Containing Protein, Confers Enhanced Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Rice and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanchun; Wang, Manling; Zhou, Huina; Li, Mingjuan; Huang, Lifang; Yin, Xuming; Zhao, Guoqiang; Lin, Fucheng; Xia, Xinjie; Xu, Guoyun

    2016-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental factor that limits plant growth and crop productivity. Genetic engineering is an effective approach to improve drought tolerance in various crops, including rice (Oryza sativa). Functional characterization of relevant genes is a prerequisite when identifying candidates for such improvements. We investigated OsSGL (Oryza sativa Stress tolerance and Grain Length), a novel DUF1645 domain-containing protein from rice. OsSGL was up-regulated by multiple stresses and localized to the nucleus. Transgenic plants over-expressing or hetero-expressing OsSGL conferred significantly improved drought tolerance in transgenic rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. The overexpressing plants accumulated higher levels of proline and soluble sugars but lower malondialdehyde (MDA) contents under osmotic stress. Our RNA-sequencing data demonstrated that several stress-responsive genes were significantly altered in transgenic rice plants. We unexpectedly observed that those overexpressing rice plants also had extensive root systems, perhaps due to the altered transcript levels of auxin- and cytokinin-associated genes. These results suggest that the mechanism by which OsSGL confers enhanced drought tolerance is due to the modulated expression of stress-responsive genes, higher accumulations of osmolytes, and enlarged root systems. PMID:28083013

  18. Plasmon enhanced upconversion for applications in solar energy harvesting (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wounjhang

    2016-09-01

    Rare-earth activated upconversion material is receiving renewed attention for their potential applications in bioimaging and solar energy conversion. Plasmon resonance can enhance the upconversion efficiency but the enhancement mechanism remained unclear due to the inherent complexity of upconversion process. In this study, we synthesized NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and modified the surface with an amphiphilic polymer, (poly(maleic anhydride-alt-octadecene) (PMAO), which makes UCNPs water-soluble and negatively charged. This in turn enables electrostatic self-assembly of UCNPs. We fabricated silver nanograting using laser-interference lithography and deposited 3 monolayers of UNCPs by polyelectrolyte-mediated layer-by-layer self-assembly process. It is noted that all the fabrication processes are scalable. We then conducted a comprehensive photoluminescence (PL) and transient PL spectroscopy. We observed up to 39x enhancement in PL intensity. A combination of numerical simulations, rate equation analysis and transient PL spectroscopy revealed that the total enhancement is made of 3.1x absorption enhancement and 2.7x energy transfer rate enhancement. The absorption enhancement makes the most contribution because the upconverted PL intensity varies quadratically with the absorption. This study represents the first experimental observation of plasmon enhanced energy transfer rate in UCNPs. It contributes to the long debate on the plasmon enhancement of Förster energy transfer process. Finally, we developed a new numerical modeling tool that can faithfully simulate the highly non-uniform light absorption and carrier generation in the plasmon enhanced photovoltaic devices. We used the tool to precisely predict the performance of photovoltaic devices incorporating plasmon enhanced upconversion and offer guidelines for upconversion photovoltaic devices.

  19. Gene Gun Bombardment with DNA-Coated Golden Particles Enhanced the Protective Effect of a DNA Vaccine Based on Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yan; Zhao, Bin; Han, Yanhui; Zhang, Juan; Li, Xuezhen; Qiu, Chunhui; Wu, Xiujuan; Hong, Yang; Ai, Dezhou; Lin, Jiaojiao; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with Schistosoma species, remains an important parasitic zoonosis. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjTGR) plays an important role in the development of the parasite and for its survival. Here we present a recombinant plasmid DNA vaccine, pVAX1/SjTGR, to estimate its protection against S. japonicum in BALB/c mice. The DNA vaccine administrated by particle bombardment induced higher protection than by intramuscular injection. All animals vaccinated with pVAX1/SjTGR developed significant specific anti-SjTGR antibodies than control groups. Moreover, animals immunized by gene gun exhibited a splenocyte proliferative response, with an increase in IFN-γ and IL-4. The recombinant plasmid administrated by gene gun achieved a medium protective efficacy of 27.83–38.83% (P < 0.01) of worm reduction and 40.38–44.51% (P < 0.01) of liver egg count reduction. It suggests that different modes of administering a DNA vaccine can influence the protective efficacy induced by the vaccine. Interestingly, from the enzymatic activity results, we found that worms obtained from pVAX1/SjTGR-vaccinated animals expressed lower enzymatic activity than the control group and the antibodies weakened the enzymatic activity of SjTGR in vitro, too. It implies that the high-level antibodies may contribute to the protective effects. PMID:23509820

  20. Enhanced surveillance for the Third United Nations Conference on Small Island Developing States, Apia, Samoa, September 2014

    PubMed Central

    Saketa, Salanieta; Durand, Alexis; Vaai-Nielsen, Saine; Leong-Lui, Tile Ah; Naseri, Take; Matalima, Ailuai; Amosa, Filipina; Mercier, Alize; Lepers, Christelle; Lal, Vjesh; Wojcik, Richard; Lewis, Sheri; Roth, Adam; Souares, Yvan; Merilles, Onofre Edwin; Hoy, Damian

    2017-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Samoa, in partnership with the Pacific Community, successfully implemented enhanced surveillance for the high-profile Third United Nations Conference on Small Island Developing States held concurrently with the popular local Teuila festival during a widespread chikungunya outbreak in September 2014. Samoa’s weekly syndromic surveillance system was expanded to 12 syndromes and 10 sentinel sites from four syndromes and seven sentinel sites; sites included the national hospital, four private health clinics and three national health service clinics. Daily situation reports were produced and were disseminated through PacNet (the e-mail alert and communication tool of the Pacific Public Health Surveillance Network) together with daily prioritized line lists of syndrome activity to facilitate rapid response and investigation by the Samoan EpiNet team. Standard operating procedures for surveillance and response were introduced, together with a sustainability plan, including a monitoring and evaluation framework, to facilitate the transition of the mass gathering surveillance improvements to routine surveillance. The enhanced surveillance performed well, providing vital disease early warning and health security assurance. A total of 2386 encounters and 708 syndrome cases were reported. Influenza-like illness was the most frequently seen syndrome (17%). No new infectious disease outbreaks were recorded. The experience emphasized: (1) the need for a long lead time to pilot the surveillance enhancements and to maximize their sustainability; (2) the importance of good communication between key stakeholders; and (3) having sufficient staff dedicated to both surveillance and response.

  1. Giant field enhancement in anisotropic epsilon-near-zero films (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamandi, Mohammad; Guclu, Caner; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    We investigated anisotropic epsilon-near-zero (AENZ) films under TM-polarized plane wave incidence and found they possess peculiar properties. In particular we studied uniaxially anisotropic films where either the permittivity along the surface normal or along the transverse plane tends to zero while the other one does not. Previously, numerous applications of isotropic epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) films including radiation pattern tailoring, enhanced harmonic generation, optical bistability and energy squeezing have been studied. A notable property of these materials is the capability of enhancing electric field. In this paper the capability of AENZ films in local electric field enhancement has been quantified and several AENZ conditions are reported with superior performance in comparison to (isotropic) ENZ films. Specifically, sensitivity to film thickness and losses, and the range of angles of incidence have been elaborated with the aim of achieving large electric field enhancement in the film. It has been proved that in comparison to the (isotropic) ENZ case the AENZ film's field enhancement is not only much larger but it also occurs for a wider range of angles of incidence. Furthermore the field enhancement in AENZ does not exhibit significant dependence on the film thickness unlike the isotropic case. The effect of loss on the value of the field enhancement is also investigated emphasizing the advantages of AENZ versus ENZ. Realization of AENZ materials can be done by a multilayered media made of a stack of conductive and insulator layers or by stacking semiconductor layers. This giant field enhancement is an important target in nonlinear optics for applications like second harmonic generation and other applications like light generation

  2. Oxidation of structural cysteine residues in thioredoxin 1 by aromatic arsenicals enhances cancer cell cytotoxicity caused by the inhibition of thioredoxin reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lu, Jun; Ren, Xiaoyuan; Du, Yatao; Zheng, Yujuan; Ioannou, Panayiotis V; Holmgren, Arne

    2015-12-01

    Thioredoxin systems, composed of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin (Trx) and NADPH, play important roles in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and redox signaling. Recently the cytosolic Trx1 system has been shown to be a cellular target of arsenic containing compounds. To elucidate the relationship of the structure of arsenic compounds with their ability of inhibiting TrxR1 and Trx1, and cytotoxicity, we have investigated the reaction of Trx1 system with seven arsenic trithiolates: As(Cys)3, As(GS)3, As(Penicillamine)3, As(Mercaptoethanesulfonate)3, As(Mercaptopurine)3, As(2-mercaptopyridine)3 and As(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)3. The cytotoxicity of these arsenicals was consistent with their ability to inhibit TrxR1 in vitro and in cells. Unlike other arsenicals, As(Mercaptopurine)3 which did not show inhibitory effects on TrxR1 had very weak cytotoxicity, indicating that TrxR1 is a reliable drug target for arsenicals. Moreover, the two aromatic compounds As(2-mercaptopyridine)3 and As(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)3 showed stronger cytotoxicity than the others. As(2-mercaptopyridine)3 which selectively oxidized two structural cysteines (Cys62 and Cys69) in Trx1 showed mild improvement in cytotoxicity. As(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)3 oxidized all the Cys residues in Trx1, exhibiting the strongest cytotoxicity. Oxidation of Trx1 by As(2-mercaptopyridine)3 and As(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)3 affected electron transfer from NADPH and TrxR1 to peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1), which could result in the reactive oxygen species elevation and trigger cell death process. These results suggest that oxidation of structural cysteine residues in Trx1 by aromatic group in TrxR1-targeting drugs may sensitize tumor cells to cell death, providing a novel approach to regulate cellular redox signaling and also a basis for rational design of new anticancer agents.

  3. P212A Mutant of Dihydrodaidzein Reductase Enhances (S)-Equol Production and Enantioselectivity in a Recombinant Escherichia coli Whole-Cell Reaction System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pyung-Gang; Kim, Joonwon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, EunOk; Pandey, Bishnu Prasad

    2016-01-01

    (S)-Equol, a gut bacterial isoflavone derivative, has drawn great attention because of its potent use for relieving female postmenopausal symptoms and preventing prostate cancer. Previous studies have reported on the dietary isoflavone metabolism of several human gut bacteria and the involved enzymes for conversion of daidzein to (S)-equol. However, the anaerobic growth conditions required by the gut bacteria and the low productivity and yield of (S)-equol limit its efficient production using only natural gut bacteria. In this study, the low (S)-equol biosynthesis of gut microorganisms was overcome by cloning the four enzymes involved in the biosynthesis from Slackia isoflavoniconvertens into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The reaction conditions were optimized for (S)-equol production from the recombinant strain, and this recombinant system enabled the efficient conversion of 200 μM and 1 mM daidzein to (S)-equol under aerobic conditions, achieving yields of 95% and 85%, respectively. Since the biosynthesis of trans-tetrahydrodaidzein was found to be a rate-determining step for (S)-equol production, dihydrodaidzein reductase (DHDR) was subjected to rational site-directed mutagenesis. The introduction of the DHDR P212A mutation increased the (S)-equol productivity from 59.0 mg/liter/h to 69.8 mg/liter/h in the whole-cell reaction. The P212A mutation caused an increase in the (S)-dihydrodaidzein enantioselectivity by decreasing the overall activity of DHDR, resulting in undetectable activity for (R)-dihydrodaidzein, such that a combination of the DHDR P212A mutant with dihydrodaidzein racemase enabled the production of (3S,4R)-tetrahydrodaidzein with an enantioselectivity of >99%. PMID:26801575

  4. All-dielectric nanostructures for low-loss field enhanced spectroscopy and imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Taka-aki; Tsuchimoto, Yuta; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Hara, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    Dielectric nanostructures with high refractive index and low optical loss have attracted considerable attention as an alternative to plasmonic nanostructures. We experimentally demonstrated to control the visible electromagnetic resonances of Si-based core-shell nanostructures by thermally varying the core-shell ratio. We also found a Fano resonance which was generated by the interference between the electric and magnetic dipole moments excited in the core-shell nanostructures. The all-dielectric nanostructures realized low energy loss and high electromagnetic field enhancement comparable with that exhibited by plasmonic nanostructures. These unique optical properties would enable us to demonstrate effective field-enhanced spectroscopy and imaging with low heat generation.

  5. First Toronto Conference on Database Users. Systems that Enhance User Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doszkocs, Tamas E.; Toliver, David

    1987-01-01

    The first of two papers discusses natural language searching as a user performance enhancement tool, focusing on artificial intelligence applications for information retrieval and problems with natural language processing. The second presents a conceptual framework for further development and future design of front ends to online bibliographic…

  6. MED13-dependent signaling from the heart confers leanness by enhancing metabolism in adipose tissue and liver.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Grueter, Chad E; Kusminski, Christine M; Holland, William L; Bookout, Angie L; Satapati, Santosh; Kong, Y Megan; Burgess, Shawn C; Malloy, Craig R; Scherer, Philipp E; Newgard, Christopher B; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-12-01

    The heart requires a continuous supply of energy but has little capacity for energy storage and thus relies on exogenous metabolic sources. We previously showed that cardiac MED13 modulates systemic energy homeostasis in mice. Here, we sought to define the extra-cardiac tissue(s) that respond to cardiac MED13 signaling. We show that cardiac overexpression of MED13 in transgenic (MED13cTg) mice confers a lean phenotype that is associated with increased lipid uptake, beta-oxidation and mitochondrial content in white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver. Cardiac expression of MED13 decreases metabolic gene expression in the heart but enhances them in WAT. Although exhibiting increased energy expenditure in the fed state, MED13cTg mice metabolically adapt to fasting. Furthermore, MED13cTg hearts oxidize fuel that is readily available, rendering them more efficient in the fed state. Parabiosis experiments in which circulations of wild-type and MED13cTg mice are joined, reveal that circulating factor(s) in MED13cTg mice promote enhanced metabolism and leanness. These findings demonstrate that MED13 acts within the heart to promote systemic energy expenditure in extra-cardiac energy depots and point to an unexplored metabolic communication system between the heart and other tissues.

  7. A single amino acid substitution confers enhanced methylation activity of mammalian Dnmt3b on chromatin DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Gao, Ge; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, He; Ye, Zhiqiang; Huang, Shichao; Huang, Jinyan; Kang, Jiuhong

    2010-10-01

    Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are paralogous enzymes responsible for de novo DNA methylation but with distinguished biological functions. In mice, disruption of Dnmt3b but not Dnmt3a causes global DNA hypomethylation, especially in repetitive sequences, which comprise the large majority of methylated DNA in the genome. By measuring DNA methylation activity of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b homologues from five species, we found that mammalian Dnmt3b possessed significantly higher methylation activity on chromatin DNA than Dnmt3a and non-mammalian Dnmt3b. Sequence comparison and mutagenesis experiments identified a single amino acid substitution (I662N) in mammalian Dnmt3b as being crucial for its high chromatin DNA methylation activity. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated this substitution markedly enhanced the binding of Dnmt3b to nucleosomes and hence increased the chromatin DNA methylation activity. Moreover, this substitution was crucial for Dnmt3b to efficiently methylate repetitive sequences, which increased dramatically in mammalian genomes. Consistent with our observation that Dnmt3b evolved more rapidly than Dnmt3a during the emergence of mammals, these results demonstrated that the I662N substitution in mammalian Dnmt3b conferred enhanced chromatin DNA methylation activity and contributed to functional adaptation in the epigenetic system.

  8. Arabidopsis enhanced drought tolerance1/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 confers drought tolerance in transgenic rice without yield penalty.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linhui; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Shimei; Wang, Yuping; Zhu, Qisheng; Li, Shigui; Xiang, Chengbin

    2013-07-01

    Enhancing drought tolerance without yield decrease has been a great challenge in crop improvement. Here, we report the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor Enhanced Drought Tolerance/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (EDT1/HDG11) was able to confer drought tolerance and increase grain yield in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The improved drought tolerance was associated with a more extensive root system, reduced stomatal density, and higher water use efficiency. The transgenic rice plants also had higher levels of abscisic acid, proline, soluble sugar, and reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme activities during stress treatments. The increased grain yield of the transgenic rice was contributed by improved seed setting, larger panicle, and more tillers as well as increased photosynthetic capacity. Digital gene expression analysis indicated that AtEDT1/HDG11 had a significant influence on gene expression profile in rice, which was consistent with the observed phenotypes of transgenic rice plants. Our study shows that AtEDT1/HDG11 can improve both stress tolerance and grain yield in rice, demonstrating the efficacy of AtEDT1/HDG11 in crop improvement.

  9. MED13-dependent signaling from the heart confers leanness by enhancing metabolism in adipose tissue and liver

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Grueter, Chad E; Kusminski, Christine M; Holland, William L; Bookout, Angie L; Satapati, Santosh; Kong, Y Megan; Burgess, Shawn C; Malloy, Craig R; Scherer, Philipp E; Newgard, Christopher B; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-01-01

    The heart requires a continuous supply of energy but has little capacity for energy storage and thus relies on exogenous metabolic sources. We previously showed that cardiac MED13 modulates systemic energy homeostasis in mice. Here, we sought to define the extra-cardiac tissue(s) that respond to cardiac MED13 signaling. We show that cardiac overexpression of MED13 in transgenic (MED13cTg) mice confers a lean phenotype that is associated with increased lipid uptake, beta-oxidation and mitochondrial content in white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver. Cardiac expression of MED13 decreases metabolic gene expression in the heart but enhances them in WAT. Although exhibiting increased energy expenditure in the fed state, MED13cTg mice metabolically adapt to fasting. Furthermore, MED13cTg hearts oxidize fuel that is readily available, rendering them more efficient in the fed state. Parabiosis experiments in which circulations of wild-type and MED13cTg mice are joined, reveal that circulating factor(s) in MED13cTg mice promote enhanced metabolism and leanness. These findings demonstrate that MED13 acts within the heart to promote systemic energy expenditure in extra-cardiac energy depots and point to an unexplored metabolic communication system between the heart and other tissues. See also: M Nakamura & J Sadoshima (December 2014) PMID:25422356

  10. Chondroitinase ABC Enhances Pericontusion Axonal Sprouting But Does Not Confer Robust Improvements in Behavioral Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Yevgeniya A.; Hovda, David A.; Sutton, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in enduring functional deficits. Strategies aimed at promoting plasticity within the injured brain may aid in enhancing functional outcome. We have previously shown that spontaneous pericontusional axon sprouting occurs within 7–14 days after controlled cortical impact injury in the adult rat, but ultimately fails due to an increasingly growth-inhibitory environment. We therefore sought to determine whether acute infusion of chondroitinase ABC into the site of the cortical contusion, to further reduce pericontusional growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), would enhance and prolong the sprouting response. We also wanted to determine if chondroitinase-enhanced sprouting would ameliorate the behavioral deficits in forelimb function that occur in this model. Acute chondroitinase infusion decreased intact CSPGs and significantly increased pericontusional cortical grey and white matter growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-positive axon sprouting at 7 days post-injury. A return of intact CSPGs at later time points likely contributed to the absence of persistently increased levels of axon sprouting by 14–21 days post-injury. There was no overall benefit on forelimb function during the time of maximal sprouting or at any subsequent times in three of four behavioral outcome measures. However, there was a chondroitinase-induced improvement in recovery from unskilled limb use deficits on the staircase forelimb reaching test toward sham-injured values at 28 days, which was not achieved by the vehicle-treated rats, indicating that there is some minor functional benefit of the increased sprouting induced by chondroitinase treatment. The current results, together with data from spinal cord injury models after chondroitinase intervention, suggest that a combinatorial approach with the addition of neurotrophins and rehabilitation would result in more robust axon sprouting and consequently improve behavioral

  11. GmCLC1 Confers Enhanced Salt Tolerance through Regulating Chloride Accumulation in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Peipei; Wang, Longchao; Liu, Ailin; Yu, Bingjun; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The family of chloride channel proteins that mediate Cl- transportation play vital roles in plant nutrient supply, cellular action potential and turgor pressure adjustment, stomatal movement, hormone signal recognition and transduction, Cl- homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. The anionic toxicity, mainly caused by chloride ions (Cl-), on plants under salt stress remains poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the function of soybean Cl-/H+ antiporter GmCLC1 under salt stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, soybean, and yeast. We found that GmCLC1 enhanced salt tolerance in transgenic A. thaliana by reducing the Cl- accumulation in shoots and hence released the negative impact of salt stress on plant growth. Overexpression of GmCLC1 in the hairy roots of soybean sequestered more Cl- in their roots and transferred less Cl- to their shoots, leading to lower relative electrolyte leakage values in the roots and leaves. When either the soybean GmCLC1 or the yeast chloride transporter gene, GEF1, was transformed into the yeast gef1 mutant, and then treated with different chloride salts (MnCl2, KCl, NaCl), enhanced survival rate was observed. The result indicates that GmCLC1 and GEF1 exerted similar effects on alleviating the stress of diverse chloride salts on the yeast gef1 mutant. Together, this work suggests a protective function of GmCLC1 under Cl- stress. PMID:27504114

  12. Loss of Dfg5 glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein confers enhanced heat tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nasution, Olviyani; Lee, Jaok; Srinivasa, Kavitha; Choi, In-Geol; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Eunjung; Choi, Wonja; Kim, Wankee

    2015-08-01

    The protein product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DFG5 gene is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored plasma membrane protein and a putative glycosidase/glycosyltransferase that links other GPI-anchored proteins to β-glucans in the cell wall. Upon exposure to heat (41°C), DFG5 deletion mutant dfg5Δ displayed significantly enhanced heat tolerance as well as lowered level of reactive oxygen species and decreased membrane permeability compared with those in the control (BY4741). Comparative transcriptome profiles of BY4741 and dfg5Δ revealed that 38 and 23 genes were up- and down-regulated in dfg5Δ respectively. Of the 23 down-regulated genes, 11 of 13 viable deletion mutants were identified to be tolerant to heat, suggesting that the down-regulation of those genes might have contributed to the enhanced heat tolerance in dfg5Δ. Deletion of DFG5 caused slight activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 in the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway and Slt2 in the cell wall integrity pathway. Therefore, a model is proposed on the signal transduction pathways associated with deletion of DFG5 upon heat stress.

  13. Optical control of exciton states and enhanced valley Zeeman splitting in WS2(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioseoglou, George; Currie, Marc; Hanbicki, Aubrey T.; Paradisanos, Ioannis; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Fotakis, Costas; Jonker, Berrend T.

    2016-10-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, MX2 (M = Mo, W and X = S, Se), are direct-gap semiconductors with many interesting properties capable of producing an all-surface material applicable to sensing, single-atom storage and other quantum-based technologies. Here we report on the optical control of single layers of MX2 such that the photoluminescence (PL) is solely from the trion state. After trion isolation, changes in the Raman spectra were observed: there is a decrease in the intensity of the out of plane mode and an enhancement of the 2LA mode. The effect is reversible, and our results suggest that the changes of the strength of a particular excitonic state are due to surface interactions with ambient environment. In addition, spatial non-uniformity is probed by studying variations of strain and the PL emission as a function of position on our sample. The boundaries of mechanically exfoliated MX2 as well as boundaries intentionally created via fs laser ablation were investigated. The edges exhibit significant Raman shifts as well as remarkably enhanced PL emission compared to their respective central area. Finally, we probe the degree of circular polarization of the emitted PL as a function of the photo-excitation energy and temperature to elucidate spin-dependent inter- and intra-valley relaxation mechanisms. This work was supported by the FP7-REGPOT-2012-2013-1, under grant agreement 316165.

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: biochemical characterization and medical significance.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Elizabeth E

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylenetetrahydofolate (CH2-H4folate) to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (CH3-H4folate). The enzyme employs a noncovalently-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which accepts reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H and transfers them to CH2-H4folate. The reaction provides the sole source of CH3-H4folate, which is utilized by methionine synthase in the synthesis of methionine from homocysteine. MTHFR plays a key role in folate metabolism and in the homeostasis of homocysteine; mutations in the enzyme lead to hyperhomocyst(e)inemia. A common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and depression in adults, and of neural tube defects in the fetus. The mutation also confers protection for certain types of cancers. This review presents the current knowledge of the enzyme, its biochemical characterization, and medical significance.

  15. Enhancing research in academic radiology departments: recommendations of the 2003 Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Alderson, Philip O; Bresolin, Linda B; Becker, Gary J; Thrall, James H; Dunnick, N Reed; Hillman, Bruce J; Lee, Joseph K T; Nagy, Edward C

    2004-08-01

    Opportunities for funded radiologic research are greater than ever, and the amount of federal funding coming to academic radiology departments is increasing. Even so, many medical school-based radiology departments have little or no research funding. Accordingly, a consensus panel was convened to discuss ways to enhance research productivity and broaden the base of research strength in as many academic radiology departments as possible. The consensus panel included radiologists who have leadership roles in some of the best-funded research departments, radiologists who direct other funded research programs, and radiologists with related expertise. The goals of the consensus panel were to identify the attributes associated with successful research programs and to develop an action plan for radiology research based on these characteristics.

  16. Over-expression of microRNA169 confers enhanced drought tolerance to tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Zou, Zhe; Gong, Pengjuan; Zhang, Junhong; Ziaf, Khurram; Li, Hanxia; Xiao, Fangming; Ye, Zhibiao

    2011-02-01

    Plant miRNA regulates multiple developmental and physiological processes, including drought responses. We found that the accumulation of Sly-miR169 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) was induced by drought stress. Consequently, Sly-miR169 targets, namely, three nuclear factor Y subunit genes (SlNF-YA1/2/3) and one multidrug resistance-associated protein gene (SlMRP1), were significantly down-regulated by drought stress. Constitutive over-expression of a miR169 family member, Sly-miR169c, in tomato plant can efficiently down-regulate the transcripts of the target genes. Compared with non-transgenic plants, transgenic plants over-expressing Sly-miR169c displayed reduced stomatal opening, decreased transpiration rate, lowered leaf water loss, and enhanced drought tolerance. Our study is the first to provide evidence that the Sly-miR169c negatively regulates stomatal movement in tomato drought responses.

  17. Context-dependent enhancer selection confers alternate modes of notch regulation on argos.

    PubMed

    Housden, Benjamin E; Terriente-Felix, Ana; Bray, Sarah J

    2014-02-01

    Wiring between signaling pathways differs according to context, as exemplified by interactions between Notch and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways, which are cooperative in some contexts but antagonistic in others. To investigate mechanisms that underlie different modes of cross talk, we have focused on argos, an EGFR pathway regulator in Drosophila melanogaster which is upregulated by Notch in adult muscle progenitors but is repressed in the wing. Results show that the alternate modes of cross talk depend on the engagement of enhancers with opposite regulatory logic, which are selected by context-determining factors. This is likely to be a general mechanism for enabling the wiring between these pathways to switch according to context.

  18. Salicylic acid confers enhanced resistance to Glomerella leaf spot in apple.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Shi, Xiangpeng; Li, Baohua; Zhang, Qingming; Liang, Wenxing; Wang, Caixia

    2016-09-01

    Glomerella leaf spot (GLS) caused by Glomerella cingulata is a newly emergent disease that results in severe defoliation and fruit spots in apple. Currently, there are no effective means to control this disease except for the traditional fungicide sprays. Induced resistance by elicitors against pathogens infection is a widely accepted eco-friendly strategy. In the present study, we investigated whether exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) could improve resistance to GLS in a highly susceptible apple cultivar (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. 'Gala') and the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with SA, at 0.1-1.0 mM, induced strong resistance against GLS in 'Gala' apple leaves, with SA treated leaves showing significant reduction in lesion numbers and disease index. Concurrent with the enhanced disease resistance, SA treatment markedly increased the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and defence-related enzyme activities, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). As expected, SA treatment also induced the expression levels of five pathogenesis-related (PR) genes including PR1, PR5, PR8, Chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase. Furthermore, the most pronounced and/or rapid increase was observed in leaves treated with SA and subsequently inoculated with G. cingulata compared to the treatment with SA or inoculation with the pathogen. Together, these results suggest that exogenous SA triggered increase in reactive oxygen species levels and the antioxidant system might be responsible for enhanced resistance against G. cingulata in 'Gala' apple leaves.

  19. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  20. AtTGA4, a bZIP transcription factor, confers drought resistance by enhancing nitrate transport and assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Chen, Dandan; Min, Donghong; Li, Weiwei; Xu, Zhaoshi; Zhou, Yongbin; Li, Liancheng; Chen, Ming; Ma, Youzhi

    2015-02-13

    To cope with environmental stress caused by global climate change and excessive nitrogen application, it is important to improve water and nitrogen use efficiencies in crop plants. It has been reported that higher nitrogen uptake could alleviate the damaging impact of drought stress. However, there is scant evidence to explain how nitrogen uptake affects drought resistance. In this study we observed that bZIP transcription factor AtTGA4 (TGACG motif-binding factor 4) was induced by both drought and low nitrogen stresses, and that overexpression of AtTGA4 simultaneously improved drought resistance and reduced nitrogen starvation in Arabidopsis. Following drought stress there were higher nitrogen and proline contents in transgenic AtTGA4 plants than in wild type controls, and activity of the key enzyme nitrite reductase (NIR) involved in nitrate assimilation processes was also higher. Expressions of the high-affinity nitrate transporter genes NRT2.1 and NRT2.2 and nitrate reductase genes NIA1 and NIA2 in transgenic plants were all higher than in wild type indicating that higher levels of nitrate transport and assimilation activity contributed to enhanced drought resistance of AtTGA4 transgenic plants. Thus genetic transformation with AtTGA4 may provide a new approach to simultaneously improve crop tolerance to drought and low nitrogen stresses.

  1. Fano coil-type resonances: a plasmonic tool for magnetic field enhancement (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaro, Simone; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Toma, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Spintronics and spin-based technology rely on the ultra-fast unbalance of the electronic spin population in quite localized spatial regions. However, as a matter of fact, the low susceptibility of conventional materials at high frequencies strongly limits these phenomena, rendering the efficiency of magnetically active devices insufficient for application purposes. Among the possible strategies which can be envisaged, plasmonics offers a direct approach to increase the effect of local electronic unbalancing processes. By confining and enhancing free radiation in nm-size spatial regions, plasmonic nano-assemblies have demonstrated to support very intense electric and magnetic hot-spots. In particular, very recent studies have proven the fine control of magnetic fields in Fano resonance condition. The near-field-induced out-of-phase oscillation of localized surface plasmons has manifested itself with the arising of magnetic sub-diffractive hot-spots. Here, we show how this effect can be further boosted in the mid-infrared regime via the introduction of higher order plasmonic modes. The investigated system, namely Moon Trimer Resonator, combines the high efficiency of a strongly coupled nano-assembly in Fano interferential condition with the elevated tunability of the quadrupolar resonance supported by a moon-like geometry. The fine control of the apical gap in this unique nanostructure, characterizes a plasmonic device able to tune its resonance without any consequence on the magnetic hot-spot size, thus enabling an efficient squeezing in the infrared.

  2. Deep rooting conferred by DEEPER ROOTING 1 enhances rice yield in paddy fields

    PubMed Central

    Arai-Sanoh, Yumiko; Takai, Toshiyuki; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Nakano, Hiroshi; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kondo, Motohiko; Uga, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the effect of deep rooting on grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa L.) in an irrigated paddy field with or without fertilizer, we used the shallow-rooting IR64 and the deep-rooting Dro1-NIL (a near-isogenic line homozygous for the Kinandang Patong allele of DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1) in the IR64 genetic background). Although total root length was similar in both lines, more roots were distributed within the lower soil layer of the paddy field in Dro1-NIL than in IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. At maturity, Dro1-NIL showed approximately 10% higher grain yield than IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. Higher grain yield of Dro1-NIL was mainly due to the increased 1000-kernel weight and increased percentage of ripened grains, which resulted in a higher harvest index. After heading, the uptake of nitrogen from soil and leaf nitrogen concentration were higher in Dro1-NIL than in IR64. At the mid-grain-filling stage, Dro1-NIL maintained higher cytokinin fluxes from roots to shoots than IR64. These results suggest that deep rooting by DRO1 enhances nitrogen uptake and cytokinin fluxes at late stages, resulting in better grain filling in Dro1-NIL in a paddy field in this study. PMID:24988911

  3. From photoluminescence to thermal emission: Thermally-enhanced PL (TEPL) for efficient PV (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manor, Assaf; Kruger, Nimrod; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Rotschild, Carmel

    2016-09-01

    The Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit of 40% for single-junction photovoltaic (PV) cells is mainly caused by the heat dissipation accompanying the process of electro-chemical potential generation. Concepts such as solar thermo-photovoltaics (STPV) aim to harvest this heat loss by the use of a primary absorber which acts as a mediator between the sun and the PV, spectrally shaping the light impinging on the cell. However, this approach is challenging to realize due to the high operating temperatures of above 2000K required in order to generate high thermal emission fluxes. After over thirty years of STPV research, the record conversion efficiency for STPV device stands at 3.2% for 1285K operating temperature. In contrast, we recently demonstrated how thermally-enhanced photoluminescence (TEPL) is an optical heat-pump, in which photoluminescence is thermally blue-shifted upon heating while the number of emitted photons is conserved. This process generates energetic photon-rates which are comparable to thermal emission in significantly reduced temperatures, opening the way for a TEPL based energy converter. In such a device, a photoluminescent low bandgap absorber replaces the STPV thermal absorber. The thermalization heat induces a temperature rise and a blue-shifted emission, which is efficiently harvested by a higher bandgap PV. We show that such an approach can yield ideal efficiencies of 70% at 1140K, and realistic efficiencies of almost 50% at moderate concentration levels. As an experimental proof-of-concept, we demonstrate 1.4% efficient TEPL energy conversion of an Nd3+ system coupled to a GaAs cell, at 600K.

  4. Label-free direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of nucleic acids (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrini, Luca; Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Xie, Hainan; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Recently, plasmonic-based biosensing has experienced an unprecedented level of attention, with a particular focus on the nucleic acid detection, offering efficient solutions to engineer simple, fast, highly sensitive sensing platforms while overcoming important limitations of PCR and microarray techniques. In the broad field of plasmonics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has arisen as a powerful analytical tool for detection and structural characterization of biomolecules. Today applications of SERS to nucleic acid analysis largely rely on indirect strategies, which have been demonstrated very effective for pure sensing purposes but completely dismiss the exquisite structural information provided by the direct acquisition of the biomolecular vibrational fingerprint. Contrarily, direct label-free SERS of nucleic acid shows an outstanding potential in terms of chemical-specific information which, however, remained largely unexpressed mainly because of the inherent poor spectral reproducibility and/or limited sensitivity. To address these limitations, we developed a fast and affordable high-throughput screening direct SERS method for gaining detailed genomic information on nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and for the characterization and quantitative recognition of DNA interactions with exogenous agents. The simple strategy relies on the electrostatic adhesion of DNA/RNA onto positively-charged silver colloids that promotes the nanoparticle aggregation into stable clusters yielding intense and reproducible SERS spectra at picogram level (i.e. the analysis can be performed without the necessity of amplification steps thus providing realistic direct information of the nucleic acid in its native state). We anticipate this method to gain a vast impact and set of applications in different fields, including medical diagnostics, genomic screening, drug discovery, forensic science and even molecular electronics.

  5. Cell-Associated Flagella Enhance the Protection Conferred by Mucosally-Administered Attenuated Salmonella Paratyphi A Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Orit; Galen, James E.; Tennant, Sharon; Simon, Raphael; Blackwelder, William C.; Silverman, David J.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A, the agent of paratyphoid A fever, poses an emerging public health dilemma in endemic areas of Asia and among travelers, as there is no licensed vaccine. Integral to our efforts to develop a S. Paratyphi A vaccine, we addressed the role of flagella as a potential protective antigen by comparing cell-associated flagella with exported flagellin subunits expressed by attenuated strains. Methodology S. Paratyphi A strain ATCC 9150 was first deleted for the chromosomal guaBA locus, creating CVD 1901. Further chromosomal deletions in fliD (CVD 1901D) or flgK (CVD 1901K) were then engineered, resulting in the export of unpolymerized FliC, without impairing its overall expression. The virulence of the resulting isogenic strains was examined using a novel mouse LD50 model to accommodate the human-host restricted S. Paratyphi A. The immunogenicity of the attenuated strains was then tested using a mouse intranasal model, followed by intraperitoneal challenge with wildtype ATCC 9150. Results Mucosal (intranasal) immunization of mice with strain CVD 1901 expressing cell-associated flagella conferred superior protection (vaccine efficacy [VE], 90%) against a lethal intraperitoneal challenge, compared with the flagellin monomer-exporting mutants CVD 1901K (30% VE) or CVD 1901D (47% VE). The superior protection induced by CVD 1901 with its cell-attached flagella was associated with an increased IgG2a∶IgG1 ratio of FliC-specific antibodies with enhanced opsonophagocytic capacity. Conclusions Our results clearly suggest that enhanced anti-FliC antibody-mediated clearance of S. Paratyphi A by phagocytic cells, induced by vaccines expressing cell-associated rather than exported FliC, might be contributing to the vaccine-induced protection from S. Paratyphi A challenge in vivo. We speculate that an excess of IgG1 anti-FliC antibodies induced by the exported FliC may compete with the IgG2a subtype and block

  6. Regulation of Nitrate Reductase Activity in Corn (Zea mays L.) Seedlings by Endogenous Metabolites 1

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, L. E.; Hageman, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Primary and secondary metabolites of inorganic nitrogen metabolism were evaluated as inhibitors of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) induction in green leaf tissue of corn seedlings. Nitrite, nitropropionic acid, ammonium ions, and amino acids were not effective as inhibitors of nitrate reductase activity or synthesis. Increasing α-amino nitrogen and protein content of intact corn seedlings by culture techniques significantly enhanced rather than decreased the potential for induction of nitrate reductase activity in excised seedlings. Secondary metabolites, derived from phenylalanine and tyrosine, were tested as inhibitors of induction of nitrate reductase. Of the 9 different phenylpropanoid compounds tested, only coumarin, trans-cinnamic and trans-o-hydroxycinnamic acids inhibited induction of nitrate reductase. While coumarin alone exhibited a relatively greater inhibitory effect on enzyme induction than on general protein synthesis (the latter measured by incorporation of labeled amino acids), this differential effect may have been dependent upon unequal rates of synthesis and accumulation with respect to the initial levels of nitrate reductase and general proteins. Because of the short half-life of nitrate reductase, inhibitors of protein synthesis in general could still achieve differential regulation of nitrogen metabolism. Coumarin did not inhibit nitrate reductase activity when added directly to the assay mixture at 5 mm. Carbamyl phosphate and its chemical derivative, cyanate, were found to be competitive (with nitrate) inhibitors of nitrate reductase. The data suggest that cyanate is the active inhibitor in the carbamyl phosphate preparations. PMID:16656715

  7. Potential use of aldose reductase inhibitors to prevent diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Zenon, G J; Abobo, C V; Carter, B L; Ball, D W

    1990-06-01

    Reviewed are (1) the biochemical basis and pathophysiology of diabetic complications and (2) the structure-activity relationships, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and adverse effects of aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs). ARIs are a new class of drugs potentially useful in preventing diabetic complications, the most widely studied of which have been cataracts and neuropathy. ARIs inhibit aldose reductase, the first, rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol metabolic pathway. In nonphysiological hyperglycemia the activity of hexokinase becomes saturated while that of aldose reductase is enhanced, resulting in intracellular accumulation of sorbitol. Because sorbitol does not readily penetrate the cell membrane it can persist within cells, which may lead to diabetic complications. ARIs are a class of structurally dissimilar compounds that include carboxylic acid derivatives, flavonoids, and spirohydantoins. The major pharmacologic action of an ARI involves competitive binding to aldose reductase and consequent blocking of sorbitol production. ARIs delay cataract formation in animals, but the role of aldose reductase in cataract formation in human diabetics has not been established. The adverse effects of ARIs include hypersensitivity reactions. Although the polyol pathway may not be solely responsible for diabetic complications, studies suggest that therapy with ARIs could be beneficial. Further research is needed to determine the long-term impact and adverse effects of ARIs in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  8. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  9. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  10. Visual Literacy--Enhancing Human Potential. Readings from the 15th Annual Conference of the International Visual Literacy Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D., Ed.; And Others

    This document includes 46 papers presented at the International Visual Literacy Association Conference on topics ranging from prehistoric cave paintings to technology of the future. Major sections are devoted to research and theory, education, computer technology, and phototherapy. Emphasis is on increased understanding of opportunities available…

  11. Androgen Regulation of 5α-Reductase Isoenzymes in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Prostate Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Ding, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhengxin; Lu, Jing-Fang; Maity, Sankar N.; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kim, Jeri

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme 5α-reductase, which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), performs key functions in the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway. The three isoenzymes of 5α-reductase identified to date are encoded by different genes: SRD5A1, SRD5A2, and SRD5A3. In this study, we investigated mechanisms underlying androgen regulation of 5α-reductase isoenzyme expression in human prostate cells. We found that androgen regulates the mRNA level of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in a cell type–specific manner, that such regulation occurs at the transcriptional level, and that AR is necessary for this regulation. In addition, our results suggest that AR is recruited to a negative androgen response element (nARE) on the promoter of SRD5A3 in vivo and directly binds to the nARE in vitro. The different expression levels of 5α-reductase isoenzymes may confer response or resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitors and thus may have importance in prostate cancer prevention. PMID:22194926

  12. MTAP deletion confers enhanced dependency on the PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase in cancer cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The discovery of cancer dependencies has the potential to inform therapeutic strategies and to identify putative drug targets. Integrating data from comprehensive genomic profiling of cancer cell lines and from functional characterization of cancer cell dependencies, we discovered that loss of the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) confers a selective dependence on protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and its binding partner WDR77. MTAP is frequently lost due to its proximity to the commonly deleted tumor suppressor gene, CDKN2A.

  13. Properties of the arsenate reductase of plasmid R773.

    PubMed

    Gladysheva, T B; Oden, K L; Rosen, B P

    1994-06-14

    Resistance to toxic oxyanions in Escherichia coli is conferred by the ars operon carried on plasmid R773. The gene products of this operon catalyze extrusion of antimonials and arsenicals from cells of E. coli, thus providing resistance to those toxic oxyanions. In addition, resistance to arsenate is conferred by the product of the arsC gene. In this report, purified ArsC protein was shown to catalyze reduction of arsenate to arsenite. The enzymatic activity of the ArsC protein required glutaredoxin as a source of reducing equivalents. Other reductants, including glutathione and thioredoxin, were not effective electron donors. A spectrophotometric assay was devised in which arsenate reduction was coupled to NADPH oxidation. The results obtained with the coupled assay corresponded to those found by direct reduction of radioactive arsenate to arsenite. The only substrate of the reaction was arsenate (Km = 8 mM); other oxyanions including phosphate, sulfate, and antimonate were not reduced. Phosphate and sulfate were weak inhibitors, while the product, arsenite, was a stronger inhibitor (Ki = 0.1 mM). Arsenate reductase activity exhibited a pH optimum of 6.3-6.8. These results indicate that the ArsC protein is a novel reductase, and elucidation of its enzymatic mechanism should be of interest.

  14. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  15. Molybdenum effector of fumarate reductase repression and nitrate reductase induction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, S; Lin, E C

    1987-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the presence of nitrate prevents the utilization of fumarate as an anaerobic electron acceptor. The induction of the narC operon encoding the nitrate reductase is coupled to the repression of the frd operon encoding the fumarate reductase. This coupling is mediated by nitrate as an effector and the narL product as the regulatory protein (S. Iuchi and E. C. C. Lin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:3901-3905, 1987). The protein-ligand complex appears to control narC positively but frd negatively. In the present study we found that a molybdenum coeffector acted synergistically with nitrate in the regulation of frd and narC. In chlD mutants believed to be impaired in molybdate transport (or processing), full repression of phi(frd-lac) and full induction of phi(narC-lac) by nitrate did not occur unless the growth medium was directly supplemented with molybdate (1 microM). This requirement was not clearly manifested in wild-type cells, apparently because it was met by the trace quantities of molybdate present as a contaminant in the mineral medium. In chlB mutants, which are known to accumulate the Mo cofactor because of its failure to be inserted as a prosthetic group into proteins such as nitrate reductase, nitrate repression of frd and induction of narC were also intensified by molybdate supplementation. In this case a deficiency of the molybdenum coeffector might have resulted from enhanced feedback inhibition of molybdate transport (or processing) by the elevated level of the unutilized Mo cofactor. In addition, mutations in chlE, which are known to block the synthesis of the organic moiety of the Mo cofactor, lowered the threshold concentration of nitrate (< 1 micromole) necessary for frd repression and narC induction. These changes could be explained simply by the higher intracellular nitrate attainable in cells lacking the ability to destroy the effector. PMID:3301812

  16. Convening a conference--facilitating networking among delegates.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Ellen; Millar, Sheri; Thomas, Fiona

    2007-08-01

    This article provides conference convenors and delegates with suggestions to enhance networking by delegates attending conferences. Our suggestions are based on a literature search (which revealed very little); what we have found to work well at the research conferences we have convened; conference evaluations; and our experiences at conferences we have attended.

  17. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  18. An interferon alpha2 mutant optimized by phage display for IFNAR1 binding confers specifically enhanced antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Kalie, Eyal; Jaitin, Diego A; Abramovich, Renne; Schreiber, Gideon

    2007-04-13

    All alpha-interferons (IFNalpha) bind the IFNAR1 receptor subunit with low affinity. Increasing the binding affinity was shown to specifically increase the antiproliferative potency of IFNalpha2. Here, we constructed a phage display library by randomizing three positions on IFNalpha2 previously shown to confer weak binding to IFNAR1. The tightest binding variant selected, comprised of mutations H57Y, E58N, and Q61S (YNS), was shown to bind IFNAR1 60-fold tighter compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, and 3-fold tighter compared with IFNbeta. Binding of YNS to IFNAR2 was comparable with wild-type IFNalpha2. The YNS mutant conferred a 150-fold higher antiproliferative potency in WISH cells compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, whereas its antiviral activity was increased by only 3.5-fold. The high antiproliferative activity was related to an induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding assays, and to specific gene induction, particularly TRAIL. To determine the potency of the YNS mutant in a xenograft cancer model, we injected it twice a week to nude mice carrying transplanted MDA231 human breast cancer cells. After 5 weeks, no tumors remained in mice treated with YNS, whereas most mice treated with wild-type IFNalpha2 showed visible tumors. Histological analysis of these tumors showed a significant anti-angiogenic effect of YNS, compared with wild-type IFNalpha2. This work demonstrates the application of detailed biophysical understanding in the process of protein engineering, yielding an interferon variant with highly increased biological potency.

  19. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and sensing of protein monolayers using high performance enhancing substrates and a mobile phone (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Aykutlu; Ayas, Sencer; Bakan, Gokhan; Ozgur, Erol; Guner, Hasan; Celebi, Kemal

    2016-09-01

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy has greatly benefited from the electromagnetic field enhancement offered by plasmonic surfaces. However, because of the localized nature of plasmonic fields, such field enhancements are limited to nm-scale volumes. Here, we demonstrate that a relatively small, but spatially-uniform field enhancement can yield a superior infrared detection performance compared to the plasmonic field enhancement exhibited by optimized infrared nanoantennas. A specifically designed CaF2/Al thin film surface is shown to enable observation of stronger vibrational signals from the probe material, with wider bandwidth and a deeper spatial extent of the field enhancement as compared to optimized plasmonic surfaces. It is demonstrated that the surface structure presented here can enable chemically specific and label-free detection of organic monolayers using surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy. Also, a low cost hand held infrared absorption measurement setup is demonstrated using a miniature bolometric sensor and a mobile phone. A specifically designed grating in combination with an IR light source yields an IR spectrometer covering 7-12 um range, with about 100 cm-1 resolution. Combining the enhancing substrates with the spectroscopy setup, low cost, high sensitivity mobile infrared sensing is enabled. The results have implications in homeland security and environmental monitoring as well as chemical analysis.

  20. Mutations in Nonessential eIF3k and eIF3l Genes Confer Lifespan Extension and Enhanced Resistance to ER Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kirthi C.; Droste, Rita; Kim, Dennis H.

    2016-01-01

    The translation initiation factor eIF3 is a multi-subunit protein complex that coordinates the assembly of the 43S pre-initiation complex in eukaryotes. Prior studies have demonstrated that not all subunits of eIF3 are essential for the initiation of translation, suggesting that some subunits may serve regulatory roles. Here, we show that loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the conserved eIF3k and eIF3l subunits of the translation initiation complex eIF3 result in a 40% extension in lifespan and enhanced resistance to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in Caenorhabditis elegans. In contrast to previously described mutations in genes encoding translation initiation components that confer lifespan extension in C. elegans, loss-of-function mutations in eif-3.K or eif-3.L are viable, and mutants show normal rates of growth and development, and have wild-type levels of bulk protein synthesis. Lifespan extension resulting from EIF-3.K or EIF-3.L deficiency is suppressed by a mutation in the Forkhead family transcription factor DAF-16. Mutations in eif-3.K or eif-3.L also confer enhanced resistance to ER stress, independent of IRE-1-XBP-1, ATF-6, and PEK-1, and independent of DAF-16. Our data suggest a pivotal functional role for conserved eIF3k and eIF3l accessory subunits of eIF3 in the regulation of cellular and organismal responses to ER stress and aging. PMID:27690135

  1. Overexpression of MpCYS4, A Phytocystatin Gene from Malus prunifolia (Willd.) Borkh., Enhances Stomatal Closure to Confer Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Apple

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yanxiao; Li, Mingjun; Yang, Yingli; Sun, Xun; Wang, Na; Liang, Bowen; Ma, Fengwang

    2017-01-01

    Phytocystatins (PhyCys) comprise a group of inhibitors for cysteine proteinases in plants. They play a wide range of important roles in regulating endogenous processes and protecting plants against various environmental stresses, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we detailed the biological functions of MpCYS4, a member of cystatin genes isolated from Malus prunifolia. This gene was activated under water deficit, heat (40°C), exogenous abscisic acid (ABA), or methyl viologen (MV) (Tan et al., 2014a). At cellular level, MpCYS4 protein was found to be localized in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Recombinant MpCYS4 cystatin expressed in Escherichia coli was purified and it exhibited cysteine protease inhibitor activity. Transgenic overexpression of MpCYS4 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and apple (Malus domestica) led to ABA hypersensitivity and series of ABA-associated phenotypes, such as enhanced ABA-induced stomatal closing, altered expression of many ABA/stress-responsive genes, and enhanced drought tolerance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MpCYS4 is involved in ABA-mediated stress signal transduction and confers drought tolerance at least in part by enhancing stomatal closure and up-regulating the transcriptional levels of ABA- and drought-related genes. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which phytocystatins influence plant growth, development, and tolerance to stress. PMID:28174579

  2. Overexpression of MpCYS4, A Phytocystatin Gene from Malus prunifolia (Willd.) Borkh., Enhances Stomatal Closure to Confer Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Apple.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanxiao; Li, Mingjun; Yang, Yingli; Sun, Xun; Wang, Na; Liang, Bowen; Ma, Fengwang

    2017-01-01

    Phytocystatins (PhyCys) comprise a group of inhibitors for cysteine proteinases in plants. They play a wide range of important roles in regulating endogenous processes and protecting plants against various environmental stresses, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we detailed the biological functions of MpCYS4, a member of cystatin genes isolated from Malus prunifolia. This gene was activated under water deficit, heat (40°C), exogenous abscisic acid (ABA), or methyl viologen (MV) (Tan et al., 2014a). At cellular level, MpCYS4 protein was found to be localized in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Recombinant MpCYS4 cystatin expressed in Escherichia coli was purified and it exhibited cysteine protease inhibitor activity. Transgenic overexpression of MpCYS4 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and apple (Malus domestica) led to ABA hypersensitivity and series of ABA-associated phenotypes, such as enhanced ABA-induced stomatal closing, altered expression of many ABA/stress-responsive genes, and enhanced drought tolerance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MpCYS4 is involved in ABA-mediated stress signal transduction and confers drought tolerance at least in part by enhancing stomatal closure and up-regulating the transcriptional levels of ABA- and drought-related genes. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which phytocystatins influence plant growth, development, and tolerance to stress.

  3. Structural basis for cyclopropanation by a unique enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Dheeraj; Hale, Wendi A.; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Gu, Liangcai; Sherman, David H.; Gerwick, William H.; Håkansson, Kristina; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    The natural product curacin A, a potent anticancer agent, contains a rare cyclopropane group. The five enzymes for cyclopropane biosynthesis are highly similar to enzymes that generate a vinyl chloride moiety in the jamaicamide natural product. The structural biology of this remarkable catalytic adaptability is probed with high-resolution crystal structures of the curacin cyclopropanase (CurF ER), an in vitro enoyl reductase (JamJ ER), and a canonical curacin enoyl reductase (CurK ER). The JamJ and CurK ERs catalyze NADPH-dependent double bond reductions typical of enoyl reductases (ERs) of the medium chain dehydrogenase reductase (MDR) superfamily. Cyclopropane formation by CurF ER is specified by a short loop which, when transplanted to JamJ ER, confers cyclopropanase activity on the chimeric enzyme. Detection of an adduct of NADPH with the model substrate crotonyl-CoA provides indirect support for a recent proposal of a C2-ene intermediate on the reaction pathway of MDR enoyl-thioester reductases. PMID:26526850

  4. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  5. Conference Report: Improving College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, C. Douglas; Claxton, Charles S.

    The conference report includes an explanation of the conference plan, a description of the highlights, and descriptions of each session. Among the session topics are: faculty development; instructional improvement in the community college, with emphasis on developmental education; conditions that enhance learning; improving the lecture; evaluating…

  6. The evolution of prestige: freely conferred deference as a mechanism for enhancing the benefits of cultural transmission.

    PubMed

    Henrich, J; Gil-White, F J.

    2001-05-01

    This paper advances an "information goods" theory that explains prestige processes as an emergent product of psychological adaptations that evolved to improve the quality of information acquired via cultural transmission. Natural selection favored social learners who could evaluate potential models and copy the most successful among them. In order to improve the fidelity and comprehensiveness of such ranked-biased copying, social learners further evolved dispositions to sycophantically ingratiate themselves with their chosen models, so as to gain close proximity to, and prolonged interaction with, these models. Once common, these dispositions created, at the group level, distributions of deference that new entrants may adaptively exploit to decide who to begin copying. This generated a preference for models who seem generally "popular." Building on social exchange theories, we argue that a wider range of phenomena associated with prestige processes can more plausibly be explained by this simple theory than by others, and we test its predictions with data from throughout the social sciences. In addition, we distinguish carefully between dominance (force or force threat) and prestige (freely conferred deference).

  7. Sub-nanometer-gap tip-enhanced nanoimaging of few-layer MoS2(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronine, Dmitri V.

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties with promising applications in flexible devices, catalysis and sensing. Optical imaging of TMDs using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy can reveal the effects of structure, strain, doping, defects, edge states, grain boundaries and surface functionalization. However, Raman signals are inherently weak and so far have been limited in spatial resolution in TMDs to a few hundred nanometres which is much larger than the intrinsic scale of these effects. Here we overcome the diffraction limit by using resonant tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) of few-layer MoS2, and obtain nanoscale optical images with 20 nm spatial resolution. This becomes possible due to electric field enhancement in an optimized subnanometre-gap resonant tip-substrate configuration. We investigate the limits of signal enhancement by varying the tip-sample gap with sub-Angstrom precision and observe a quantum quenching behavior, as well as a Schottky-Ohmic transition, for subnanometre gaps, which enable surface mapping based on this new contrast mechanism. This quantum regime of plasmonic gap-mode enhancement with a few nanometre thick MoS2 junction may be used for designing new quantum optoelectronic devices and sensors.

  8. Enhancement by lithium of cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed gene transcription conferred by TORC on the CREB basic leucine zipper domain

    PubMed Central

    Böer, Ulrike; Eglins, Julia; Krause, Doris; Schnell, Susanne; Schöfl, Christof; Knepel, Willhart

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the action of lithium salts in the treatment of bipolar disorder is not well understood. As their therapeutic action requires chronic treatment, adaptive neuronal processes are suggested to be involved. The molecular basis of this are changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein). CREB contains a transactivation domain, in which Ser119 is phosphorylated upon activation, and a bZip (basic leucine zipper domain). The bZip is involved in CREB dimerization and DNA-binding, but also contributes to CREB transactivation by recruiting the coactivator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). In the present study, the effect of lithium on CRE (cAMP response element)/CREB-directed gene transcription was investigated. Electrically excitable cells were transfected with CRE/CREB-driven luciferase reporter genes. LiCl (6 mM or higher) induced an up to 4.7-fold increase in 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated CRE/CREB-directed transcription. This increase was not due to enhanced Ser119 phosphorylation or DNA-binding of CREB. Also, the known targets inositol monophosphatase and GSK3β (glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β) were not involved as specific GSK3β inhibitors and inositol replenishment did not mimic and abolish respectively the effect of lithium. However, lithium no longer enhanced CREB activity when the CREB-bZip was deleted or the TORC-binding site inside the CREB-bZip was specifically mutated (CREB-R300A). Otherwise, TORC overexpression conferred lithium responsiveness on CREB-bZip or the CRE-containing truncated rat somatostatin promoter. This indicates that lithium enhances cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed transcription, conferred by TORC on the CREB-bZip. We thus support the hypothesis that lithium salts modulate CRE/CREB-dependent gene transcription and suggest the CREB coactivator TORC as a new molecular target of lithium. PMID:17696880

  9. Co-expression of xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance in chimeric sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Feng, Rui-Jun; Wang, Suo-Min; Wang, Chun-Mei; Bao, Ai-Ke; Wei, Li; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that limit the growth and productivity of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). To improve sugar beet's salinity tolerance, the ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 genes encoding tonoplast Na(+)/H(+) antiporter and H(+)-PPase from xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum were co-expressed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. It is showed here that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance to the transformed sugar beet plants compared with the wild-type (WT) plants. The chimeric plants grew well in the presence of high salinity (400 mM NaCl), whereas WT plants displayed chlorosis and died within 8 days. Compared to WT plants, the chimeric plants co-expressing ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 accumulated more proline, Na(+) and K(+) in their leaves and petioles when exposed to high salinity, which caused lower solute potential, retained more water and thus subjected to lesser cell membrane damage. Interestingly, the chimeric plants accumulated higher sucrose, glucose and fructose contents in their storage roots than WT plants in the absence or presence of high salinity. Our results suggested that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 improved the osmoregulatory capacity in chimeric sugar beet through increased compartmentalization of ions into the vacuoles by enhancing the activity of proton pumps and thus mitigated Na(+)-toxicity for plants.

  10. Overexpression of horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum Lam.Verdc.) NAC transcriptional factor (MuNAC4) in groundnut confers enhanced drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pandurangaiah, Merum; Lokanadha Rao, G; Sudhakarbabu, O; Nareshkumar, A; Kiranmai, K; Lokesh, U; Thapa, Ganesh; Sudhakar, Chinta

    2014-08-01

    The NAC family being the largest plant-specific transcription factors functions in diverse and vital physiological processes during development. NAC proteins are known to be crucial in imparting tolerance to plants against abiotic stresses, such as drought and salinity, but the functions of most of them are still elusive. In this study, we report for the first time expression of the MuNAC4, a member of NAC transcription factor from horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) conferring drought tolerance. The groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) transgenics were generated using recombinant MuNAC4 binary vector transformation approach. Molecular analysis of these transgenic lines confirmed the stable gene integration and expression of the MuNAC4 gene. Twelve lines of T5 generation exhibited significantly enhanced tolerance to drought stress with proliferated lateral root growth as compared to wild types. Transgenics exposed to long-term desiccation stress assays showed increased lateral roots and greenish growth. The physiological parameters analysis also suggests that overexpression of MuNAC4 plays a significant role in improving the water stress tolerance of transgenic groundnut, reducing the damage to membrane structures and enhancing osmotic adjustment and antioxidative enzyme regulation under stress. This study validates MuNAC4 as an important candidate gene for future phytoengineering approaches for drought tolerance in crop plants.

  11. Arabidopsis Enhanced Drought Tolerance1/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 Confers Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Rice without Yield Penalty1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linhui; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Shimei; Wang, Yuping; Zhu, Qisheng; Li, Shigui; Xiang, Chengbin

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing drought tolerance without yield decrease has been a great challenge in crop improvement. Here, we report the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor Enhanced Drought Tolerance/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (EDT1/HDG11) was able to confer drought tolerance and increase grain yield in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The improved drought tolerance was associated with a more extensive root system, reduced stomatal density, and higher water use efficiency. The transgenic rice plants also had higher levels of abscisic acid, proline, soluble sugar, and reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme activities during stress treatments. The increased grain yield of the transgenic rice was contributed by improved seed setting, larger panicle, and more tillers as well as increased photosynthetic capacity. Digital gene expression analysis indicated that AtEDT1/HDG11 had a significant influence on gene expression profile in rice, which was consistent with the observed phenotypes of transgenic rice plants. Our study shows that AtEDT1/HDG11 can improve both stress tolerance and grain yield in rice, demonstrating the efficacy of AtEDT1/HDG11 in crop improvement. PMID:23735506

  12. Malate Synthesis and Secretion Mediated by a Manganese-Enhanced Malate Dehydrogenase Confers Superior Manganese Tolerance in Stylosanthes guianensis1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhijian; Sun, Lili; Liu, Pandao; Liu, Guodao; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity is a major constraint limiting plant growth on acidic soils. Superior Mn tolerance in Stylosanthes spp. has been well documented, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, superior Mn tolerance in Stylosanthes guianensis was confirmed, as reflected by a high Mn toxicity threshold. Furthermore, genetic variation of Mn tolerance was evaluated using two S. guianensis genotypes, which revealed that the Fine-stem genotype had higher Mn tolerance than the TPRC2001-1 genotype, as exhibited through less reduction in dry weight under excess Mn, and accompanied by lower internal Mn concentrations. Interestingly, Mn-stimulated increases in malate concentrations and exudation rates were observed only in the Fine-stem genotype. Proteomic analysis of Fine-stem roots revealed that S. guianensis Malate Dehydrogenase1 (SgMDH1) accumulated in response to Mn toxicity. Western-blot and quantitative PCR analyses showed that Mn toxicity resulted in increased SgMDH1 accumulation only in Fine-stem roots, but not in TPRC2001-1. The function of SgMDH1-mediated malate synthesis was verified through in vitro biochemical analysis of SgMDH1 activities against oxaloacetate, as well as in vivo increased malate concentrations in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), soybean (Glycine max) hairy roots, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with SgMDH1 overexpression. Furthermore, SgMDH1 overexpression conferred Mn tolerance in Arabidopsis, which was accompanied by increased malate exudation and reduced plant Mn concentrations, suggesting that secreted malate could alleviate Mn toxicity in plants. Taken together, we conclude that the superior Mn tolerance of S. guianensis is achieved by coordination of internal and external Mn detoxification through malate synthesis and exudation, which is regulated by SgMDH1 at both transcription and protein levels. PMID:25378694

  13. Plant-derived compatible solutes proline betaine and betonicine confer enhanced osmotic and temperature stress tolerance to Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Abdallah; Hoffmann, Tamara; Kempf, Bettina; Xie, Xiulan; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2014-10-01

    L-Proline is a widely used compatible solute and is employed by Bacillus subtilis, through both synthesis and uptake, as an osmostress protectant. Here, we assessed the stress-protective potential of the plant-derived L-proline derivatives N-methyl-L-proline, L-proline betaine (stachydrine), trans-4-L-hydroxproline and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline betaine (betonicine) for cells challenged by high salinity or extremes in growth temperature. l-Proline betaine and betonicine conferred salt stress protection, but trans-4-L-hydroxyproline and N-methyl-L-proline was unable to do so. Except for L-proline, none of these compounds served as a nutrient for B. subtilis. L-Proline betaine was a considerably better osmostress protectant than betonicine, and its import strongly reduced the l-proline pool produced by B. subtilis under osmotic stress conditions, whereas a supply of betonicine affected the L-proline pool only modestly. Both compounds downregulated the transcription of the osmotically inducible opuA operon, albeit to different extents. Mutant studies revealed that L-proline betaine was taken up via the ATP-binding cassette transporters OpuA and OpuC, and the betaine-choline-carnitine-transporter-type carrier OpuD; betonicine was imported only through OpuA and OpuC. L-Proline betaine and betonicine also served as temperature stress protectants. A striking difference between these chemically closely related compounds was observed: L-proline betaine was an excellent cold stress protectant, but did not provide heat stress protection, whereas the reverse was true for betonicine. Both compounds were primarily imported in temperature-challenged cells via the high-capacity OpuA transporter. We developed an in silico model for the OpuAC-betonicine complex based on the crystal structure of the OpuAC solute receptor complexed with L-proline betaine.

  14. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductases.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Steven A; Walker, Alexander M; Vermerris, Wilfred; Sattler, Scott E; Kang, ChulHee

    2017-02-01

    Cinnamoyl-coenzyme A reductase (CCR) catalyzes the reduction of hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters using NADPH to produce hydroxycinnamyl aldehyde precursors in lignin synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity of cinnamoyl-CoA reductases from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a strategic plant for bioenergy production, were deduced from crystal structures, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic and thermodynamic analyses. Although SbCCR1 displayed higher affinity for caffeoyl-CoA or p-coumaroyl-CoA than for feruloyl-CoA, the enzyme showed significantly higher activity for the latter substrate. Through molecular docking and comparisons between the crystal structures of the Vitis vinifera dihydroflavonol reductase and SbCCR1, residues threonine-154 and tyrosine-310 were pinpointed as being involved in binding CoA-conjugated phenylpropanoids. Threonine-154 of SbCCR1 and other CCRs likely confers strong substrate specificity for feruloyl-CoA over other cinnamoyl-CoA thioesters, and the T154Y mutation in SbCCR1 led to broader substrate specificity and faster turnover. Through data mining using our structural and biochemical information, four additional putative CCR genes were discovered from sorghum genomic data. One of these, SbCCR2, displayed greater activity toward p-coumaroyl-CoA than did SbCCR1, which could imply a role in the synthesis of defense-related lignin. Taken together, these findings provide knowledge about critical residues and substrate preference among CCRs and provide, to our knowledge, the first three-dimensional structure information for a CCR from a monocot species.

  15. Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase-Dependent Redox Networks in Platyhelminth Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Mariana; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Platyhelminth parasites cause chronic infections that are a major cause of disability, mortality, and economic losses in developing countries. Maintaining redox homeostasis is a major adaptive problem faced by parasites and its disruption can shift the biochemical balance toward the host. Platyhelminth parasites possess a streamlined thiol-based redox system in which a single enzyme, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), a fusion of a glutaredoxin (Grx) domain to canonical thioredoxin reductase (TR) domains, supplies electrons to oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thioredoxin (Trx). TGR has been validated as a drug target for schistosomiasis. Recent Advances: In addition to glutathione (GSH) and Trx reduction, TGR supports GSH-independent deglutathionylation conferring an additional advantage to the TGR redox array. Biochemical and structural studies have shown that the TR activity does not require the Grx domain, while the glutathione reductase and deglutathionylase activities depend on the Grx domain, which receives electrons from the TR domains. The search for TGR inhibitors has identified promising drug leads, notably oxadiazole N-oxides. Critical Issues: A conspicuous feature of platyhelminth TGRs is that their Grx-dependent activities are temporarily inhibited at high GSSG concentrations. The mechanism underlying the phenomenon and its biological relevance are not completely understood. Future Directions: The functional diversity of Trxs and Grxs encoded in platyhelminth genomes remains to be further assessed to thoroughly understand the TGR-dependent redox network. Optimization of TGR inhibitors and identification of compounds targeting other parasite redox enzymes are good options to clinically develop relevant drugs for these neglected, but important diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 735–745. PMID:22909029

  16. Sulfate supply influences compartment specific glutathione metabolism and confers enhanced resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus during a hypersensitive response

    PubMed Central

    Király, Lóránt; Künstler, András; Höller, Kerstin; Fattinger, Maria; Juhász, Csilla; Müller, Maria; Gullner, Gábor; Zechmann, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Sufficient sulfate supply has been linked to the development of sulfur induced resistance or sulfur enhanced defense (SIR/SED) in plants. In this study we investigated the effects of sulfate (S) supply on the response of genetically resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN) to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Plants grown with sufficient sulfate (+S plants) developed significantly less necrotic lesions during a hypersensitive response (HR) when compared to plants grown without sulfate (−S plants). In +S plants reduced TMV accumulation was evident on the level of viral RNA. Enhanced virus resistance correlated with elevated levels of cysteine and glutathione and early induction of a Tau class glutathione S-transferase and a salicylic acid-binding catalase gene. These data indicate that the elevated antioxidant capacity of +S plants was able to reduce the effects of HR, leading to enhanced virus resistance. Expression of pathogenesis-related genes was also markedly up-regulated in +S plants after TMV-inoculation. On the subcellular level, comparison of TMV-inoculated +S and −S plants revealed that +S plants contained 55–132 % higher glutathione levels in mitochondria, chloroplasts, nuclei, peroxisomes and the cytosol than −S plants. Interestingly, mitochondria were the only organelles where TMV-inoculation resulted in a decrease of glutathione levels when compared to mock-inoculated plants. This was particularly obvious in −S plants, where the development of necrotic lesions was more pronounced. In summary, the overall higher antioxidative capacity and elevated activation of defense genes in +S plants indicate that sufficient sulfate supply enhances a preexisting plant defense reaction resulting in reduced symptom development and virus accumulation. PMID:22122784

  17. Epothilone B Confers Radiation Dose Enhancement in DAB2IP Gene Knock-Down Radioresistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Zhaolu; Raghavan, Pavithra; Xie Daxing; Boike, Thomas; Burma, Sandeep; Chen, David; Chakraborty, Arup; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Saha, Debabrata

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In metastatic prostate cancer, DOC-2/DAB2 interactive protein (DAB2IP) is often downregulated and has been reported as a possible prognostic marker to predict the risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). Our preliminary results show that DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells are radioresistant. In this study, we investigated the anticancer drug Epothilone B (EpoB) for the modulation of radiosensitivity in DAB2IP-deficient human PCa cells. Methods and Materials: We used a stable DAB2IP-knock down human PCa cell line, PC3 shDAB2IP, treated with EpoB, ionizing radiation (IR), or the combined treatment of EpoB and IR. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined by surviving fraction, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. For in vivo studies, the PC3shDAB2IP xenograft model was used in athymic nude mice. Results: Treatment with EpoB at IC{sub 50} dose (33.3 nM) increased cellular radiosensitivity in the DAB2IP-deficient cell line with a dose enhancement ratio of 2.36. EpoB delayed the DSB repair kinetics after IR and augmented the induction of apoptosis in irradiated cells after G{sub 2}/M arrest. Combined treatment of EpoB and radiation enhanced tumor growth delay with an enhancement factor of 1.2. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a significant radiation dose enhancement using EpoB in DAB2IP-deficient prostate cancer cells. This radiosensitization can be attributed to delayed DSB repair, prolonged G{sub 2} block, and increased apoptosis in cells entering the cell cycle after G{sub 2}/M arrest.

  18. Hydroxyurea-resistant vaccinia virus: overproduction of ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Slabaugh, M.B.; Mathews, C.K.

    1986-11-01

    Repeated passage of vaccinia virus in increasing concentrations of hydroxyurea followed by plaque purification resulted in the isolation of variants capable of growth in 5 mM hydroxyurea, a drug concentration which inhibited the reproduction of wild-type vaccinia virus 1000-fold. Analyses of viral protein synthesis by using (/sup 35/S)methionine pulse-labeling at intervals throughout the infection cycle revealed that all isolates overproduced a 34,000-molecular-weight (MW) early polypeptide. Measurement of ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase activity after infection indicated that 4- to 10-fold more activity was induced by hydroxyurea-resistant viruses than by the wild-type virus. A two-step partial purification resulted in a substantial enrichment for the 34,000-MW protein from extracts of wild-type and hydroxyurea-resistant-virus-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. In the presence of the drug, the isolates incorporated (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA earlier and a rate substantially greater than that of the wild type, although the onset of DNA synthesis was delayed in both cases. The drug resistance trait was markedly unstable in all isolates. In the absence of selective pressure, plaque-purified isolated readily segregated progeny that displayed a wide range of resistance phenotypes. The results of this study indicate that vaccinia virus encodes a subunit of ribonucleotide reductase which is 34,000-MW early protein whose overproduction confers hydroxyurea resistance on reproducing viruses.

  19. Enhancing Scientific Collaboration, Transparency, and Public Access: Utilizing the Second Life Platform to Convene a Scientific Conference in 3-D Virtual Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, B. W.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies reveal a general mistrust of science as well as a distorted perception of the scientific method by the public at-large. Concurrently, the number of science undergraduate and graduate students is in decline. By taking advantage of emergent technologies not only for direct public outreach but also to enhance public accessibility to the science process, it may be possible to both begin a reversal of popular scientific misconceptions and to engage a new generation of scientists. The Second Life platform is a 3-D virtual world produced and operated by Linden Research, Inc., a privately owned company instituted to develop new forms of immersive entertainment. Free and downloadable to the public, Second Life offers an imbedded physics engine, streaming audio and video capability, and unlike other "multiplayer" software, the objects and inhabitants of Second Life are entirely designed and created by its users, providing an open-ended experience without the structure of a traditional video game. Already, educational institutions, virtual museums, and real-world businesses are utilizing Second Life for teleconferencing, pre-visualization, and distance education, as well as to conduct traditional business. However, the untapped potential of Second Life lies in its versatility, where the limitations of traditional scientific meeting venues do not exist, and attendees need not be restricted by prohibitive travel costs. It will be shown that the Second Life system enables scientific authors and presenters at a "virtual conference" to display figures and images at full resolution, employ audio-visual content typically not available to conference organizers, and to perform demonstrations or premier three-dimensional renderings of objects, processes, or information. An enhanced presentation like those possible with Second Life would be more engaging to non- scientists, and such an event would be accessible to the general users of Second Life, who could have an

  20. Overexpression of OsEm1 encoding a group I LEA protein confers enhanced drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Lai, Yongmin; Wu, Xi; Wu, Gang; Guo, Changkui

    2016-09-16

    Drought is the greatest threat for crops, including rice. In an effort to identify rice genes responsible for drought tolerance, a drought-responsive gene OsEm1 encoding a group I LEA protein, was chosen for this study. OsEm1 was shown at vegetative stages to be responsive to various abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, cold and the hormone ABA. In this study, we generated OsEm1-overexpressing rice plants to explore the function of OsEm1 under drought conditions. Overexpression of OsEm1 increases ABA sensitivity and enhances osmotic tolerance in rice. Compared with wild type, the OsEm1-overexpressing rice plants showed enhanced plant survival ratio at the vegetative stage; moreover, over expression of OsEm1 in rice increased the expression of other LEA genes, including RAB16A, RAB16C, RAB21, and LEA3, likely protecting organ integrity against harsh environments. Interestingly, the elevated level of OsEm1 had no different phenotype compared with wild type under normal condition. Our findings suggest that OsEm1 is a positive regulator of drought tolerance and is potentially promising for engineering drought tolerance in rice.

  1. Gene duplication confers enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein for endosperm modification in quality protein maize.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Shi, Junpeng; Sun, Chuanlong; Gong, Hao; Fan, Xingming; Qiu, Fazhan; Huang, Xuehui; Feng, Qi; Zheng, Xixi; Yuan, Ningning; Li, Changsheng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Deng, Yiting; Wang, Jiechen; Pan, Guangtang; Han, Bin; Lai, Jinsheng; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-05-03

    The maize opaque2 (o2) mutant has a high nutritional value but it develops a chalky endosperm that limits its practical use. Genetic selection for o2 modifiers can convert the normally chalky endosperm of the mutant into a hard, vitreous phenotype, yielding what is known as quality protein maize (QPM). Previous studies have shown that enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein in QPM is essential for endosperm modification. Taking advantage of genome-wide association study analysis of a natural population, linkage mapping analysis of a recombinant inbred line population, and map-based cloning, we identified a quantitative trait locus (qγ27) affecting expression of 27-kDa γ-zein. qγ27 was mapped to the same region as the major o2 modifier (o2 modifier1) on chromosome 7 near the 27-kDa γ-zein locus. qγ27 resulted from a 15.26-kb duplication at the 27-kDa γ-zein locus, which increases the level of gene expression. This duplication occurred before maize domestication; however, the gene structure of qγ27 appears to be unstable and the DNA rearrangement frequently occurs at this locus. Because enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein is critical for endosperm modification in QPM, qγ27 is expected to be under artificial selection. This discovery provides a useful molecular marker that can be used to accelerate QPM breeding.

  2. An evolutionarily conserved Myostatin proximal promoter/enhancer confers basal levels of transcription and spatial specificity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grade, Carla Vermeulen Carvalho; Salerno, Mônica Senna; Schubert, Frank R; Dietrich, Susanne; Alvares, Lúcia Elvira

    2009-10-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass, and Mstn mutations are responsible for the double muscling phenotype observed in many animal species. Moreover, Mstn is a positive regulator of adult muscle stem cell (satellite cell) quiescence, and hence, Mstn is being targeted in therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying Mstn regulation, we searched for the gene's proximal enhancer and promoter elements, using an evolutionary approach. We identified a 260-bp-long, evolutionary conserved region upstream of tetrapod Mstn and teleost mstn b genes. This region contains binding sites for TATA binding protein, Meis1, NF-Y, and for CREB family members, suggesting the involvement of cAMP in Myostatin regulation. The conserved fragment was able to drive reporter gene expression in C2C12 cells in vitro and in chicken somites in vivo; both normally express Mstn. In contrast, the reporter construct remained silent in the avian neural tube that normally does not express Mstn. This suggests that the identified element serves as a minimal promoter, harboring some spatial specificity. Finally, using bioinformatic approaches, we identified additional genes in the human genome associated with sequences similar to the Mstn proximal promoter/enhancer. Among them are genes important for myogenesis. This suggests that Mstn and these genes may form a synexpression group, regulated by a common signaling pathway.

  3. Osmotic Stress Confers Enhanced Cell Integrity to Hydrostatic Pressure but Impairs Growth in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2

    PubMed Central

    Scoma, Alberto; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Alcanivorax is a hydrocarbonoclastic genus dominating oil spills worldwide. While its presence has been detected in oil-polluted seawaters, marine sediment and salt marshes under ambient pressure, its presence in deep-sea oil-contaminated environments is negligible. Recent laboratory studies highlighted the piezosensitive nature of some Alcanivorax species, whose growth yields are highly impacted by mild hydrostatic pressures (HPs). In the present study, osmotic stress was used as a tool to increase HP resistance in the type strain Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2. Control cultures grown under standard conditions of salinity and osmotic pressure with respect to seawater (35.6 ppt or 1136 mOsm kg-1, respectively) were compared with cultures subjected to hypo- and hyperosmosis (330 and 1720 mOsm kg-1, or 18 and 62 ppt in salinity, equivalent to brackish and brine waters, respectively), under atmospheric or increased HP (0.1 and 10 MPa). Osmotic stress had a remarkably positive impact on cell metabolic activity in terms of CO2 production (thus, oil bioremediation) and O2 respiration under hyperosmosis, as acclimation to high salinity enhanced cell activity under 10 MPa by a factor of 10. Both osmotic shocks significantly enhanced cell protection by reducing membrane damage under HP, with cell integrities close to 100% under hyposmosis. The latter was likely due to intracellular water-reclamation as no trace of the piezolyte ectoine was found, contrary to hyperosmosis. Notably, ectoine production was equivalent at 0.1 MPa in hyperosmosis-acclimated cells and at 10 MPa under isosmotic conditions. While stimulating cell metabolism and enhancing cell integrity, osmotic stress had always a negative impact on culture growth and performance. No net growth was observed during 4-days incubation tests, and CO2:O2 ratios and pH values indicated that culture performance in terms of hydrocarbon degradation was lowered by the effects of osmotic stress alone or combined with increased HP

  4. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  5. Gene duplication confers enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein for endosperm modification in quality protein maize

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjun; Shi, Junpeng; Sun, Chuanlong; Gong, Hao; Fan, Xingming; Qiu, Fazhan; Huang, Xuehui; Feng, Qi; Zheng, Xixi; Yuan, Ningning; Li, Changsheng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Deng, Yiting; Wang, Jiechen; Pan, Guangtang; Han, Bin; Lai, Jinsheng; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-01-01

    The maize opaque2 (o2) mutant has a high nutritional value but it develops a chalky endosperm that limits its practical use. Genetic selection for o2 modifiers can convert the normally chalky endosperm of the mutant into a hard, vitreous phenotype, yielding what is known as quality protein maize (QPM). Previous studies have shown that enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein in QPM is essential for endosperm modification. Taking advantage of genome-wide association study analysis of a natural population, linkage mapping analysis of a recombinant inbred line population, and map-based cloning, we identified a quantitative trait locus (qγ27) affecting expression of 27-kDa γ-zein. qγ27 was mapped to the same region as the major o2 modifier (o2 modifier1) on chromosome 7 near the 27-kDa γ-zein locus. qγ27 resulted from a 15.26-kb duplication at the 27-kDa γ-zein locus, which increases the level of gene expression. This duplication occurred before maize domestication; however, the gene structure of qγ27 appears to be unstable and the DNA rearrangement frequently occurs at this locus. Because enhanced expression of 27-kDa γ-zein is critical for endosperm modification in QPM, qγ27 is expected to be under artificial selection. This discovery provides a useful molecular marker that can be used to accelerate QPM breeding. PMID:27092004

  6. Comparative hydrogen-deuterium exchange for a mesophilic vs thermophilic dihydrofolate reductase at 25 °C: identification of a single active site region with enhanced flexibility in the mesophilic protein.

    PubMed

    Oyeyemi, Olayinka A; Sours, Kevin M; Lee, Thomas; Kohen, Amnon; Resing, Katheryn A; Ahn, Natalie G; Klinman, Judith P

    2011-09-27

    The technique of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been applied to a mesophilic (E. coli) dihydrofolate reductase under conditions that allow direct comparison to a thermophilic (B. stearothermophilus) ortholog, Ec-DHFR and Bs-DHFR, respectively. The analysis of hydrogen-deuterium exchange patterns within proteolytically derived peptides allows spatial resolution, while requiring a series of controls to compare orthologous proteins with only ca. 40% sequence identity. These controls include the determination of primary structure effects on intrinsic rate constants for HDX as well as the use of existing 3-dimensional structures to evaluate the distance of each backbone amide hydrogen to the protein surface. Only a single peptide from the Ec-DHFR is found to be substantially more flexible than the Bs-DHFR at 25 °C in a region located within the protein interior at the intersection of the cofactor and substrate-binding sites. The surrounding regions of the enzyme are either unchanged or more flexible in the thermophilic DHFR from B. stearothermophilus. The region with increased flexibility in Ec-DHFR corresponds to one of two regions previously proposed to control the enthalpic barrier for hydride transfer in Bs-DHFR [Oyeyemi et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 10074].

  7. Plant growth-promoting fungus Penicillium spp. GP15-1 enhances growth and confers protection against damping-off and anthracnose in the cucumber.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Motaher; Sultana, Farjana; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF) have the potential to confer several benefits to plants in terms of growth and protection against pests and pathogens. In the present study, we tested whether a PGPF isolate, Penicillium spp. GP15-1 (derived from zoysiagrass rhizospheres), stimulates growth and disease resistance in the cucumber plant. The use of the barley grain inoculum GP15-1 significantly enhanced root and shoot growth and biomass of cucumber plants. A root colonization study revealed that GP15-1 was a very rapid and efficient root colonizer and was isolated in significantly higher frequencies from the upper root parts than from the middle and lower root parts during the first 14 d of seedling growth. Inoculating the cucumber seedlings with GP15-1 significantly reduced the damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and the disease suppression effects of GP15-1 were considerably influenced by the inoculum potential of both GP15-1 and the pathogen. Treatment with the barley grain inoculum or a cell-free filtrate of GP15-1 increased systemic resistance against leaf infection by the anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum orbiculare, resulting in a significant decrease in lesion number and size. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of internal transcribed spacer sequences of the genomic DNA of GP15-1 revealed that the fungal isolate is a strain of either Penicillium neoechinulatum or Penicillium viridicatum.

  8. CXCL12/CXCR4 axis induced miR-125b promotes invasion and confers 5-fluorouracil resistance through enhancing autophagy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinfeng; Shi, Wenna; Zhang, Yuhang; Wang, Xiaohui; Sun, Shiyue; Song, Zhiyu; Liu, Man; Zeng, Qiao; Cui, Shuxiang; Qu, Xianjun

    2017-01-01

    The activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is associated with potential progression of cancer, such as invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis and cancer progression have been poorly explored. We hypothesized that miRNAs might be critical downstream mediators of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis involved in cancer invasion and chemoresistance in CRC. In human CRC cells, we found that the activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promoted epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and concurrent upregulation of miR-125b. Overexpression of miR-125b robustly triggered EMT and cancer invasion, which in turn enhanced the expression of CXCR4. Importantly, the reciprocal positive feedback loop between CXCR4 and miR-125b further activated the Wnt/β-catenin signaling by targeting Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. There was a negative correlation of the expression of miR-125b with APC mRNA in paired human colorectal tissue specimens. Further experiments indicated a role of miR-125b in conferring 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance in CRC probably through increasing autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. MiR-125b functions as an important downstream mediator upon the activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis that involved in EMT, invasion and 5-FU resistance of CRC. These findings shed a new insight into the role of miR-125b and provide a potential therapeutic target in CRC. PMID:28176874

  9. A ginseng PgTIP1 gene whose protein biological activity related to Ser(128) residue confers faster growth and enhanced salt stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Cai, Weiming

    2015-05-01

    Water movement across cellular membranes is mostly regulated by aquaporins. A tonoplast intrinsic protein PgTIP1 from Panax ginseng has been found to play an important role in plant growth and development, and also in the response of plants to abiotic stress. However, the regulation of its function and activity remains unknown. To answer this question, mutated forms of PgTIP1 were made by replacing Ser(128) with Ala (named S128A) or Asp (named S128D), and also by replacing Thr(54) with Ala (named T54A) or Asp (named T54D). Then, wild type or mutated PgTIP1 was expressed in yeast and water transport was monitored in protoplasts. The substitution of Ser(128) abolished the water channel activity of PgTIP1, while the substitution of Thr(54) did not inhibit its activity. Moreover, the overexpression of PgTIP1 but not S128A or S128D in Arabidopsis significantly increased plant growth as determined by biomass production, it also had a beneficial effect on salt stress tolerance. Importantly, the overexpression of PgTIP1 led to the altered expression of stress-related genes, which made the plants more tolerant to salt stress. Our results demonstrated that PgTIP1 conferred faster growth and enhanced tolerance to salt in Arabidopsis, and that its biological activity related to Ser(128) residue.

  10. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK5, enhances abscisic acid sensitivity and confers drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kai; Liang, Shan; Wu, Zhen; Bi, Chao; Yu, Yong-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) have been reported to regulate many developmental and defense process, but only a few members have been functionally characterized. In the present study, our observations suggest that one of the RLKs, a membrane-localized cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK5, is involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of CRK5 increases ABA sensitivity in ABA-induced early seedling growth arrest and promotion of stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening. Interestingly, and importantly, overexpression of CRK5 enhances plant drought tolerance without affecting plant growth at the mature stages and plant productivity. Transgenic lines overexpressing a mutated form of CRK5, CRK5 K372E with the change of the 372nd conserved amino acid residue from lysine to glutamic acid in its kinase domain, result in wild-type ABA and drought responses, supporting the role of CRK5 in ABA signaling. The loss-of-function mutation of the CRK5 gene does not affect the ABA response, while overexpression of two homologs of CRK5, CRK4 and CRK19, confers ABA responses, suggesting that these CRK members function redundantly. We further showed that WRKY18, WRKY40 and WRKY60 transcription factors repress the expression of CRK5, and that CRK5 likely functions upstream of ABI2 in ABA signaling. These findings help in understanding the complex ABA signaling network. PMID:27406784

  11. Overexpression of a bHLH1 Transcription Factor of Pyrus ussuriensis Confers Enhanced Cold Tolerance and Increases Expression of Stress-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cong; Huang, Xiao-San; Li, Kong-Qing; Yin, Hao; Li, Lei-Ting; Yao, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are involved in arrays of physiological and biochemical processes. However, knowledge concerning the functions of bHLHs in cold tolerance remains poorly understood. In this study, a PubHLH1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. PubHLH1 was upregulated by cold, salt, and dehydration, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PubHLH1 had the transactivational activity and localized in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of PubHLH1 in transgenic tobacco conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress. The transgenic lines had higher survival rates, higher chlorophyll, higher proline contents, lower electrolyte leakages and MDA when compared with wild type (WT). In addition, transcript levels of eight genes associated with ROS scavenging, regulation, and stress defense were higher in the transgenic plants relative to the WT under the chilling stress. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PubHLH1 played a key role in cold tolerance and, at least in part, contributed to activation of stress-responsive genes. PMID:27092159

  12. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... About half of these individuals adopt a male gender role in adolescence or early adulthood. Related Information ... 1730-5. Citation on PubMed Cohen-Kettenis PT. Gender change in 46,XY persons with 5alpha-reductase- ...

  13. Co-expression of xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance in chimeric sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Feng, Rui-Jun; Wang, Suo-Min; Wang, Chun-Mei; Bao, Ai-Ke; Wei, Li; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that limit the growth and productivity of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). To improve sugar beet’s salinity tolerance, the ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 genes encoding tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter and H+-PPase from xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum were co-expressed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. It is showed here that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 confers enhanced salinity tolerance to the transformed sugar beet plants compared with the wild-type (WT) plants. The chimeric plants grew well in the presence of high salinity (400 mM NaCl), whereas WT plants displayed chlorosis and died within 8 days. Compared to WT plants, the chimeric plants co-expressing ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 accumulated more proline, Na+ and K+ in their leaves and petioles when exposed to high salinity, which caused lower solute potential, retained more water and thus subjected to lesser cell membrane damage. Interestingly, the chimeric plants accumulated higher sucrose, glucose and fructose contents in their storage roots than WT plants in the absence or presence of high salinity. Our results suggested that co-expression of ZxNHX and ZxVP1-1 improved the osmoregulatory capacity in chimeric sugar beet through increased compartmentalization of ions into the vacuoles by enhancing the activity of proton pumps and thus mitigated Na+-toxicity for plants. PMID:26284097

  14. Mycobacterium indicus pranii as a booster vaccine enhances BCG induced immunity and confers higher protection in animal models of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Mohd; Khatri, Rahul; Singh, Bindu; Gupta, Ananya; Kumar, Arvind; Bhaskar, Sangeeta

    2016-12-01

    BCG, the only approved vaccine protects against severe form of childhood tuberculosis but its protective efficacy wanes in adolescence. BCG has reduced the incidence of infant TB considerably in endemic areas; therefore prime-boost strategy is the most realistic measure for control of tuberculosis in near future. Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) shares significant antigenic repertoire with Mtb and BCG and has been shown to impart significant protection in animal models of tuberculosis. In this study, MIP was given as a booster to BCG vaccine which enhanced the BCG mediated immune response, resulting in higher protection. MIP booster via aerosol route was found to be more effective in protection than subcutaneous route of booster immunization. Pro-inflammatory cytokines like IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-17 were induced at higher level in infected lungs of 'BCG-MIP' group both at mRNA expression level and in secretory form when compared with 'only BCG' group. BCG-MIP groups had increased frequency of multifunctional T cells with high MFI for IFN-γ and TNF-α in Mtb infected mice. Our data demonstrate for the first time, potential application of MIP as a booster to BCG vaccine for efficient protection against tuberculosis. This could be very cost effective strategy for efficient control of tuberculosis.

  15. Cbx3/HP1γ deficiency confers enhanced tumor-killing capacity on CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Michael; Ha, Ngoc; Pham, Duc-Hung; Frederick, Megan; Sharma, Bandana; Naruse, Chie; Asano, Masahide; Pipkin, Matthew E.; George, Rani E.; Thai, To-Ha

    2017-01-01

    Cbx3/HP1γ is a histone reader whose function in the immune system is not completely understood. Here, we demonstrate that in CD8+ T cells, Cbx3/HP1γ insufficiency leads to chromatin remodeling accompanied by enhanced Prf1, Gzmb and Ifng expression. In tumors obtained from Cbx3/HP1γ-insufficient mice or wild type mice treated with Cbx3/HP1γ-insufficient CD8+ T cells, there is an increase of CD8+ effector T cells expressing the stimulatory receptor Klrk1/NKG2D, a decrease in CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) as well as CD25+ CD4+ T cells expressing the inhibitory receptor CTLA4. Together these changes in the tumor immune environment may have mitigated tumor burden in Cbx3/HP1γ-insufficient mice or wild type mice treated with Cbx3/HP1γ-insufficient CD8+ T cells. These findings suggest that targeting Cbx3/HP1γ can represent a rational therapeutic approach to control growth of solid tumors. PMID:28220815

  16. Stress-induced expression of choline oxidase in potato plant chloroplasts confers enhanced tolerance to oxidative, salt, and drought stresses.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Raza; Kim, Myoung Duck; Back, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Hee-Sik; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Murata, Norio; Chung, Won-Il; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2008-04-01

    Transgenic potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Superior) with the ability to synthesize glycinebetaine (GB) in chloroplasts (referred to as SC plants) were developed via the introduction of the bacterial choline oxidase (codA) gene under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter. SC1 and SC2 plants were selected via the evaluation of methyl viologen (MV)-mediated oxidative stress tolerance, using leaf discs for further characterization. The GB contents in the leaves of SC1 and SC2 plants following MV treatment were found to be 0.9 and 1.43 micromol/g fresh weight by HPLC analysis, respectively. In addition to reduced membrane damage after oxidative stress, the SC plants evidenced enhanced tolerance to NaCl and drought stress on the whole plant level. When the SC plants were subjected to two weeks of 150 mM NaCl stress, the photosynthetic activity of the SC1 and SC2 plants was attenuated by 38 and 27%, respectively, whereas that of non-transgenic (NT) plants was decreased by 58%. Under drought stress conditions, the SC plants maintained higher water contents and accumulated higher levels of vegetative biomass than was observed in the NT plants. These results indicate that stress-induced GB production in the chloroplasts of GB non-accumulating plants may prove useful in the development of industrial transgenic plants with increased tolerance to a variety of environmental stresses for sustainable agriculture applications.

  17. Disruption of the Arabidopsis Defense Regulator Genes SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 Confers Enhanced Freezing Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin-Fang; Xu, Le; Tan, Wei-Juan; Chen, Liang; Qi, Hua; Xie, Li-Juan; Chen, Mo-Xian; Liu, Bin-Yi; Yu, Lu-Jun; Yao, Nan; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Shu, Wensheng; Xiao, Shi

    2017-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, three lipase-like regulators, SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4, act downstream of resistance protein-associated defense signaling. Although the roles of SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 in biotic stress have been extensively studied, little is known about their functions in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we show that SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 are involved in the regulation of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. With or without cold acclimation, the sag101, eds1, and pad4 single mutants, as well as their double mutants exhibited similarly enhanced tolerance to freezing temperatures. Upon cold exposure, the sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants showed increased transcript levels of C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTORs and their regulons, compared with wild type. Moreover, freezing-induced cell death and accumulation of hydrogen peroxide were ameliorated in sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants. The sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants had much lower salicylic acid (SA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents than wild type and exogenous application of SA and DAG compromised the freezing tolerance of the mutants. Furthermore, SA suppressed the cold-induced expression of DGATs and DGKs in wild-type leaves. These findings indicate that SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 are involved in freezing response in Arabidopsis, at least in part, by modulating the homeostasis of SA and DAG. PMID:26149542

  18. Expression of Rice Chitinase Gene in Genetically Engineered Tomato Confers Enhanced Resistance to Fusarium Wilt and Early Blight

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Nyla; Chaudhary, Zubeda; Gulfraz, Muhammad; Rashid, Hamid; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study reporting the evaluation of transgenic lines of tomato harboring rice chitinase (RCG3) gene for resistance to two important fungal pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) causing fusarium wilt and Alternaria solani causing early blight (EB). In this study, three transgenic lines TL1, TL2 and TL3 of tomato Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Riogrande genetically engineered with rice chitinase (RCG 3) gene and their R1 progeny was tested for resistance to Fol by root dip method and A. solani by detached leaf assay. All the R0 transgenic lines were highly resistant to these fungal pathogens compared to non-transgenic control plants. The pattern of segregation of three independent transformant for Fol and A. solani was also studied. Mendelian segregation was observed in transgenic lines 2 and 3 while it was not observed in transgenic line 1. It was concluded that introduction of chitinase gene in susceptible cultivar of tomato not only enhanced the resistance but was stably inherited in transgenic lines 2 and 3. PMID:26361473

  19. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  20. Selenium in thioredoxin reductase: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Brian M; Eckenroth, Brian E; Flemer, Stevenson; Hondal, Robert J

    2008-12-02

    Most high M(r) thioredoxin reductases (TRs) have the unusual feature of utilizing a vicinal disulfide bond (Cys(1)-Cys(2)) which forms an eight-membered ring during the catalytic cycle. Many eukaryotic TRs have replaced the Cys(2) position of the dyad with the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). Here we demonstrate that Cys- and Sec-containing TRs are distinguished by the importance each class of enzymes places on the eight-membered ring structure in the catalytic cycle. This hypothesis was explored by studying the truncated enzyme missing the C-terminal ring structure in conjunction with oxidized peptide substrates to investigate the reduction and opening of this dyad. The peptide substrates were identical in sequence to the missing part of the enzyme, containing either a disulfide or selenylsulfide linkage, but were differentiated by the presence (cyclic) and absence (acyclic) of the ring structure. The ratio of these turnover rates informs that the ring is only of modest importance for the truncated mouse mitochondrial Sec-TR (ring/no ring = 32), while the ring structure is highly important for the truncated Cys-TRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans (ring/no ring > 1000). All three enzymes exhibit a similar dependence upon leaving group pK(a) as shown by the use of the acyclic peptides as substrates. These two factors can be reconciled for Cys-TRs if the ring functions to simultaneously allow for attack by a nearby thiolate while correctly positioning the leaving group sulfur atom to accept a proton from the enzymic general acid. For Sec-TRs the ring is unimportant because the lower pK(a) of the selenol relative to a thiol obviates its need to be protonated upon S-Se bond scission and permits physical separation of the selenol and the general acid. Further study of the biochemical properties of the truncated Cys and Sec TR enzymes demonstrates that the chemical advantage conferred on the eukaryotic enzyme by a selenol is the ability to

  1. Partnerships and Linkages for Success. Enhancing the Employment Potential of Persons with Disabilities. Report of the Los Angeles Regional Conference (September 25-27, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sylvia, Ed.; Asbury, Charles A., Ed.

    This report provides highlights from a conference that focused on strategies for assisting minority youth with disabilities to face labor market challenges. An introduction lists conference objectives. Section I contains a profile of the high school students with disabilities who participated in the workshops. The profile includes demographic…

  2. Osmoregulation and salinity tolerance in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica: seawater exposure confers enhanced tolerance to freezing and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Michael A; Benoit, Joshua B; Lopez-Martinez, Giancarlo; Denlinger, David L; Lee, Richard E

    2009-09-01

    Summer storms along the Antarctic Peninsula can cause microhabitats of the terrestrial midge Belgica antarctica to become periodically inundated with seawater from tidal spray. As microhabitats dry, larvae may be exposed to increasing concentrations of seawater. Alternatively, as a result of melting snow or following rain, larvae may be immersed in freshwater for extended periods. The present study assessed the tolerance and physiological response of B. antarctica larvae to salinity exposure, and examined the effect of seawater acclimation on their subsequent tolerance of freezing, dehydration and heat shock. Midge larvae tolerated extended exposure to hyperosmotic seawater; nearly 50% of larvae survived a 10-day exposure to 1000 mOsm kg(-1) seawater and approximately 25% of larvae survived 6 days in 2000 mOsm kg(-1) seawater. Exposure to seawater drastically reduced larval body water content and increased hemolymph osmolality. By contrast, immersion in freshwater did not affect water content or hemolymph osmolality. Hyperosmotic seawater exposure, and the accompanying osmotic dehydration, resulted in a significant correlation between the rate of oxygen consumption and larval water content and induced the de novo synthesis and accumulation of several organic osmolytes. A 3-day exposure of larvae to hyperosmotic seawater increased freezing tolerance relative to freshwater-acclimated larvae. Even after rehydration, the freezing survival of larvae acclimated to seawater was greater than freshwater-acclimated larvae. Additionally, seawater exposure increased the subsequent tolerance of larvae to dehydration. Our results further illustrate the similarities between these related, yet distinct, forms of osmotic stress and add to the suite of physiological responses used by larvae to enhance survival in the harsh and unpredictable Antarctic environment.

  3. Brassica RNA binding protein ERD4 is involved in conferring salt, drought tolerance and enhancing plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Archana N; Tamirisa, Srinath; Rao, K V; Kumar, Vinay; Suprasanna, P

    2016-03-01

    'Early responsive to dehydration' (ERD) genes are a group of plant genes having functional roles in plant stress tolerance and development. In this study, we have isolated and characterized a Brassica juncea 'ERD' gene (BjERD4) which encodes a novel RNA binding protein. The expression pattern of ERD4 analyzed under different stress conditions showed that transcript levels were increased with dehydration, sodium chloride, low temperature, heat, abscisic acid and salicylic acid treatments. The BjERD4 was found to be localized in the chloroplasts as revealed by Confocal microscopy studies. To study the function, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated and analyzed for various morphological and physiological parameters. The overexpressing transgenic lines showed significant increase in number of leaves with more leaf area and larger siliques as compared to wild type plants, whereas RNAi:ERD4 transgenic lines showed reduced leaf number, leaf area, dwarf phenotype and delayed seed germination. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing BjERD4 gene also exhibited enhanced tolerance to dehydration and salt stresses, while the knockdown lines were susceptible as compared to wild type plants under similar stress conditions. It was observed that BjERD4 protein could bind RNA as evidenced by the gel-shift assay. The overall results of transcript analysis, RNA gel-shift assay, and transgenic expression, for the first time, show that the BjERD4 is involved in abiotic stress tolerance besides offering new clues about the possible roles of BjERD4 in plant growth and development.

  4. Development of microfluidic devices for in situ investigation of cells using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yu-Han; Galvan, Daniel D.; Yu, Qiuming

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has immerged as a power analytical and sensing technique for many applications in biomedical diagnosis, life sciences, food safety, and environment monitoring because of its molecular specificity and high sensitivity. The inactive Raman scattering of water molecule makes SERS a suitable tool for studying biological systems. Microfluidic devices have also attracted a tremendous interest for the aforementioned applications. By integrating SERS-active substrates with microfluidic devices, it offers a new capability for in situ investigation of biological systems, their dynamic behaviors, and response to drugs or microenvironment changes. In this work, we designed and fabricated a microfluidic device with SERS-active substrates surrounding by cell traps in microfluidic channels for in situ study of live cells using SERS. The SERS-active substrates are quasi-3D plasmonic nanostructure array (Q3D-PNA) made in h-PDMS/PMDS with physically separated gold film with nanoholes op top and gold nanodisks at the bottom of nanowells. 3D finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) electromagnetic simulations were performed to design Q3D-PNAs with the strongest local electric fields (hot spots) at the top or bottom water/Au interfaces for sensitive analysis of cells and small components, respectively. The Q3D-PNAs with the hot spots on top and bottom were placed at the up and down stream of the microfluidic channel, respectively. Each Q3D-PNA pattern was surrounded with cell trapping structures. The microfluidic device was fabricated via soft lithography. We demonstrated that normal (COS-7) and cancer (HpeG2) cells were captured on the Q3D-PNAs and investigated in situ using SERS.

  5. Enhancing sensitivity of high resolution optical coherence tomography using an optional spectrally encoded extended source (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaojun; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-03-01

    High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) is of critical importance to disease diagnosis because it is capable of providing detailed microstructural information of the biological tissues. However, a compromise usually has to be made between its spatial resolutions and sensitivity due to the suboptimal spectral response of the system components, such as the linear camera, the dispersion grating, and the focusing lenses, etc. In this study, we demonstrate an OCT system that achieves both high spatial resolutions and enhanced sensitivity through utilizing a spectrally encoded source. The system achieves a lateral resolution of 3.1 μm and an axial resolution of 2.3 μm in air; when with a simple dispersive prism placed in the infinity space of the sample arm optics, the illumination beam on the sample is transformed into a line source with a visual angle of 10.3 mrad. Such an extended source technique allows a ~4 times larger maximum permissible exposure (MPE) than its point source counterpart, which thus improves the system sensitivity by ~6dB. In addition, the dispersive prism can be conveniently switched to a reflector. Such flexibility helps increase the penetration depth of the system without increasing the complexity of the current point source devices. We conducted experiments to characterize the system's imaging capability using the human fingertip in vivo and the swine eye optic never disc ex vivo. The higher penetration depth of such a system over the conventional point source OCT system is also demonstrated in these two tissues.

  6. A synthetic antimicrobial peptide BTD-S expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana confers enhanced resistance to Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Shen, Hao; Wang, Ming; Fan, Kai; Bibi, Noreen; Ni, Mi; Yuan, Shuna; Wang, Xuede

    2016-08-01

    BTD-S is a synthetic non-cyclic θ-defensin derivative which was previously designed in our laboratory based on baboon θ-defensins (BTDs). It shows robust antimicrobial activity against economically important phytopathogen, Verticillium dahliae. Here, we deduced the coding nucleotide sequence of BTD-S and introduced the gene into wild-type (ecotype Columbia-0) Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Results demonstrated that BTD-S-transgenic lines displayed in bioassays inhibitory effects on the growth of V. dahliae in vivo and in vitro. Based on symptom severity, enhanced resistance was found in a survey of BTD-S-transgenic lines. Besides, crude protein extracts from root tissues of BTD-S-transformed plants significantly restricted the growth of fungal hyphae and the germination of conidia. Also, fungal biomass over time determined by real-time PCR demonstrated the overgrowth of V. dahliae in wild-type plants 2-3 weeks after inoculation, while almost no fungal DNA was detected in aerial tissues of their transgenic progenitors. The result suggested that fungus failed to invade and progress acropetally up to establish a systemic infection in BTD-S-transgenic plants. Moreover, the assessment of basal defense responses was performed in the leaves of WT and BTD-S-transgenic plants. The mitigated oxidative stress and low antioxidase level in BTD-S-transgenic plants revealed that BTD-S acts via permeabilizing target microbial membranes, which is in a category different from hypersensitive response-dependent defense. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BTD-S is a promising gene to be explored for transgenic engineering for plant protection against Verticillium wilt.

  7. Involvement of elevated proline accumulation in enhanced osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis conferred by chimeric repressor gene silencing technology.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Daisuke; Kurusu, Takamitsu; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Tada, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis plants transformed with a chimeric repressor for 6 transcription factors (TFs), including ADA2b, Msantd, DDF1, DREB26, AtGeBP, and ATHB23, that were converted by Chimeric REpressor gene Silencing Technology (CRES-T), show elevated salt and osmotic stress tolerance compared with wild type (WT) plants. However, the roles of TFs in salt and osmotic signaling remain largely unknown. Their hyper-osmotic stress tolerance was evaluated using 3 criteria: germination rate, root length, and rate of seedlings with visible cotyledons at the germination stage. All CRES-T lines tested exhibited better performance than WT, at least for one criterion under stress conditions. Under 600 mM mannitol stress, 3-week-old CRES-T lines accumulated proline, which is a major compatible solute involved in osmoregulation, at higher levels than WT. Expression levels of the delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase gene in CRES-T lines were similar to or lower than those in WT. In contrast, expression of the proline dehydrogenase (PHD) gene in DREB26-SRDX was significantly downregulated and that in ADA2b-SRDX and AtGeBP-SRDX was also rather downregulated compared with that in WT. Although plants at different stages were used for stress tolerance test and proline measurement in this study, we previously reported that 4 out of the 6 CRES-T lines showed better growth than WT after 4 weeks of incubation under 400 mM mannitol. These results suggest that proline accumulation caused by PHD gene suppression may be involved in enhanced osmotic stress tolerance in the CRES-T lines, and that these TFs may be involved in regulating proline metabolism in Arabidopsis.

  8. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  9. Identification of the Arabidopsis CHL3 gene as the nitrate reductase structural gene NIA2.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, J Q; Crawford, N M

    1991-01-01

    Chlorate, the chlorine analog of nitrate, is a herbicide that has been used to select mutants impaired in the process of nitrate assimilation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mutations at any one of eight distinct loci confer resistance to chlorate. The molecular identities of the genes at these loci are not known; however, one of these loci--chl3--maps very near the nitrate reductase structural gene NIA2. Through the isolation, characterization, and genetic analysis of new chlorate-resistant mutants generated by gamma irradiation, we have been able to demonstrate that the CHL3 gene and the NIA2 gene are identical. Three new chlorate-resistant mutants were identified that had deletions of the entire NIA2 gene. These nia2 null mutants were viable and still retained 10% of wild-type nitrate reductase activity in the leaves of the plants. All three deletion mutations were found to be new alleles of chl3. Introduction of the NIA2 gene back into these chl3 mutants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation partially complemented their mutant phenotype. From these data, we conclude that Arabidopsis has at least two functional nitrate reductase genes and that the NIA2 gene product accounts for the majority of the leaf nitrate reductase activity and chlorate sensitivity of Arabidopsis plants. PMID:1840922

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa enhances the formation of an electron-transfer complex with a copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6.

    PubMed

    Kukimoto, M; Nishiyama, M; Tanokura, M; Murphy, M E; Adman, E T; Horinouchi, S

    1996-09-23

    Kinetic analysis of electron transfer between azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and copper-containing nitrite reductase (NIR) from Akaligenes faecalis S-6 was carried out to investigate the specificity of electron transfer between copper-containing proteins. Apparent values of kcat and Km of NIR for azurin were 300-fold smaller and 172-fold larger than those for the physiological redox partner, pseudoazurin from A. faecalis S-6, respectively, suggesting that the electron transfer between azurin and NIR was less specific than that between pseudoazurin and NIR. One of the major differences in 3-D structure between these redox proteins, azurin and pseudoazurin, is the absence and presence of lysine residues near their type 1 copper sites, respectively. Three mutated azurins, D11K, P36K, and D11K/P36K, were constructed to evaluate the importance of lysine residues in the interaction with NIR. The redox potentials of D11K, P36K, and D11K/P36K azurins were higher than that of wild-type azurin by 48, 7, and 55 mV, respectively. As suggested by the increase in the redox potential, kinetic analysis of electron transfer revealed reduced ability of electron transfer in the mutated azurins. On the other hand, although each of the single mutations caused modest effects on the decrease in the Km value, the simultaneous mutations of D11K and P36K caused significant decrease in the Km value when compared to that for wild-type azurin. These results suggest that the introduction of two lysine residues into azurin facilitated docking to NIR.

  11. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  12. Chicken muscle aldose reductase: purification, properties and relationship to other chicken aldo/keto reductases.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D G; Davidson, W S

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme that catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of a wide range of aromatic and hydroxy-aliphatic aldehydes was purified from chicken breast muscle. This enzyme shares many properties with mammalian aldose reductases including molecular weight, relative substrate specificity, Michaelis constants, an inhibitor specificity. Therefore, it seems appropriate to call this enzyme an aldose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21). Chicken muscle aldose reductase appears to be kinetically identical to an aldose reductase that has been purified from chicken kidney (Hara et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 133, 207-214) and to hen muscle L-glycol dehydrogenase (Bernado et al., Biochim. biophys. Acta 659, 189-198). The association of this aldose reductase with muscular dystrophy in the chick is discussed.

  13. Expression of the ZNT1 Zinc Transporter from the Metal Hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens Confers Enhanced Zinc and Cadmium Tolerance and Accumulation to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Fen; Hassan, Zeshan; Talukdar, Sangita; Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G M

    2016-01-01

    Prompt regulation of transition metal transporters is crucial for plant zinc homeostasis. NcZNT1 is one of such transporters, found in the metal hyperaccumulator Brassicaceae species Noccaea caerulescens. It is orthologous to AtZIP4 from Arabidopsis thaliana, an important actor in Zn homeostasis. We examined if the NcZNT1 function contributes to the metal hyperaccumulation of N. caerulescens. NcZNT1 was found to be a plasma-membrane located metal transporter. Constitutive overexpression of NcZNT1 in A. thaliana conferred enhanced tolerance to exposure to excess Zn and Cd supply, as well as increased accumulation of Zn and Cd and induction of the Fe deficiency response, when compared to non-transformed wild-type plants. Promoters of both genes were induced by Zn deficiency in roots and shoots of A. thaliana. In A. thaliana, the AtZIP4 and NcZNT1 promoters were mainly active in cortex, endodermis and pericycle cells under Zn deficient conditions. In N. caerulescens, the promoters were active in the same tissues, though the activity of the NcZNT1 promoter was higher and not limited to Zn deficient conditions. Common cis elements were identified in both promoters by 5' deletion analysis. These correspond to the previously determined Zinc Deficiency Responsive Elements found in A. thaliana to interact with two redundantly acting transcription factors, bZIP19 and bZIP23, controlling the Zn deficiency response. In conclusion, these results suggest that NcZNT1 is an important factor in contributing to Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation in N. caerulescens. Differences in cis- and trans-regulators are likely to account for the differences in expression between A. thaliana and N. caerulescens. The high, constitutive NcZNT1 expression in the stele of N. caerulescens roots implicates its involvement in long distance root-to-shoot metal transport by maintaining a Zn/Cd influx into cells responsible for xylem loading.

  14. Functional analysis of rice NPR1-like genes reveals that OsNPR1/NH1 is the rice orthologue conferring disease resistance with enhanced herbivore susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuexing; Zhong, Sihui; Li, Qun; Zhu, Zengrong; Lou, Yonggen; Wang, Linyou; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Muyang; Li, Qiaoli; Yang, Donglei; He, Zuhua

    2007-03-01

    The key regulator of salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance, NPR1, is functionally conserved in diverse plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa L.). Investigation in depth is needed to provide an understanding of NPR1-mediated resistance and a practical strategy for the improvement of disease resistance in the model crop rice. The rice genome contains five NPR1-like genes. In our study, three rice homologous genes, OsNPR1/NH1, OsNPR2/NH2 and OsNPR3, were found to be induced by rice bacterial blight Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and rice blast Magnaporthe grisea, and the defence molecules benzothiadiazole, methyl jasmonate and ethylene. We confirmed that OsNPR1 is the rice orthologue by complementing the Arabidopsis npr1 mutant. Over-expression of OsNPR1 conferred disease resistance to bacterial blight, but also enhanced herbivore susceptibility in transgenic plants. The OsNPR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm and moved into the nucleus after redox change. Mutations in its conserved cysteine residues led to the constitutive localization of OsNPR1(2CA)-GFP in the nucleus and also abolished herbivore hypersensitivity in transgenic rice. Different subcellular localizations of OsNPR1 antagonistically regulated SA- and jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, but not SA and JA levels, indicating that OsNPR1 might mediate antagonistic cross-talk between the SA- and JA-dependent pathways in rice. This study demonstrates that rice has evolved an SA-mediated systemic acquired resistance similar to that in Arabidopsis, and also provides a practical approach for the improvement of disease resistance without the penalty of decreased herbivore resistance in rice.

  15. Proceedings of the American Academy of Nursing Conference on Using Innovative Technology to Decrease Nursing Demand and Enhance Patient Care Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Includes an introduction and 13 papers that address the following: nursing shortages; the role of technology in improving patient safety and care, simulating practice environments, and improving efficiency; and recommendations of conference participants. Many papers contain references. (JOW)

  16. Fluorescent analogues of methotrexate: characterization and interaction with dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A A; Kempton, R J; Anstead, G M; Freisheim, J H

    1983-01-18

    The dansylated derivatives of lysine and ornithine analogues of methotrexate exhibit fluorescence properties characteristic of the dansyl moiety with an excitation at 328 nm and an emission maximum at 580 nm in aqueous media. As in the case of dansyl amino acids, the fluorescence emission is dependent upon the polarity of the medium. In solvents of low dielectric constant there is an enhancement of the dansyl fluorescence intensity as well as a shift to shorter wavelengths. The dansylated analogues show a reduction in the quantum yields as compared to N epsilon-dansyl-L-lysine and 5-(N,N-dimethylamino)-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid. The absorption spectra of the two dansyl analogues are similar to the spectra of the parent basic amino acid precursors but with reduced molar extinction values. The two fluorescent analogues of methotrexate were found to be potent inhibitors of purified dihydrofolate reductases from Lactobacillus casei and from chicken liver. The binding of these fluorescent analogues to either dihydrofolate reductase resulted in 10-15-nm blue shift of the ligand emission maxima and a 2-5-fold enhancement of the emission. These fluorescent properties of the bound ligands indicate a possible interaction of the dansyl moiety with a region on the enzyme molecule which is more hydrophobic relative to the surrounding solvent.

  17. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  18. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  19. The tyrosyl free radical in ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Gräslund, A; Sahlin, M; Sjöberg, B M

    1985-01-01

    The enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase, catalyses the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, a reaction essential for DNA synthesis in all living cells. The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase, which is the prototype of all known eukaryotic and virus-coded enzymes, consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins B1 and B2. The B2 subunit contains an antiferromagnetically coupled pair of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of an electron, has its unpaired spin density delocalized in the aromatic ring of tyrosine. Effects of iron-radical interaction indicate a relatively close proximity between the iron center and the radical. The EPR signal of the radical can be studied directly in frozen packed cells of E. coli or mammalian origin, if the cells are made to overproduce ribonucleotide reductase. The hypothetic role of the tyrosyl free radical in the enzymatic reaction is not yet elucidated, except in the reaction with the inhibiting substrate analogue 2'-azido-CDP. In this case, the normal tyrosyl radical is destroyed with concomitant appearance of a 2'-azido-CDP-localized radical intermediate. Attempts at spin trapping of radical reaction intermediates have turned out negative. In E. coli the activity of ribonucleotide reductase may be regulated by enzymatic activities that interconvert a nonradical containing form and the fully active protein B2. In synchronized mammalian cells, however, the cell cycle variation of ribonucleotide reductase, studied by EPR, was shown to be due to de novo protein synthesis. Inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase are of medical interest because of their ability to control DNA synthesis. One example is hydroxyurea, used in cancer therapy, which selectively destroys the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:3007085

  20. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  1. Expression of the ZNT1 Zinc Transporter from the Metal Hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens Confers Enhanced Zinc and Cadmium Tolerance and Accumulation to Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Prompt regulation of transition metal transporters is crucial for plant zinc homeostasis. NcZNT1 is one of such transporters, found in the metal hyperaccumulator Brassicaceae species Noccaea caerulescens. It is orthologous to AtZIP4 from Arabidopsis thaliana, an important actor in Zn homeostasis. We examined if the NcZNT1 function contributes to the metal hyperaccumulation of N. caerulescens. NcZNT1 was found to be a plasma-membrane located metal transporter. Constitutive overexpression of NcZNT1 in A. thaliana conferred enhanced tolerance to exposure to excess Zn and Cd supply, as well as increased accumulation of Zn and Cd and induction of the Fe deficiency response, when compared to non-transformed wild-type plants. Promoters of both genes were induced by Zn deficiency in roots and shoots of A. thaliana. In A. thaliana, the AtZIP4 and NcZNT1 promoters were mainly active in cortex, endodermis and pericycle cells under Zn deficient conditions. In N. caerulescens, the promoters were active in the same tissues, though the activity of the NcZNT1 promoter was higher and not limited to Zn deficient conditions. Common cis elements were identified in both promoters by 5’ deletion analysis. These correspond to the previously determined Zinc Deficiency Responsive Elements found in A. thaliana to interact with two redundantly acting transcription factors, bZIP19 and bZIP23, controlling the Zn deficiency response. In conclusion, these results suggest that NcZNT1 is an important factor in contributing to Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation in N. caerulescens. Differences in cis- and trans-regulators are likely to account for the differences in expression between A. thaliana and N. caerulescens. The high, constitutive NcZNT1 expression in the stele of N. caerulescens roots implicates its involvement in long distance root-to-shoot metal transport by maintaining a Zn/Cd influx into cells responsible for xylem loading. PMID:26930473

  2. Isolation, sequence identification and tissue expression profile of two novel soybean (glycine max) genes-vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, G Y

    2009-09-01

    The complete mRNA sequences of two soybean (glycine max) genes-vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase, were amplified using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. The sequence analysis of these two genes revealed that soybean vestitone reductase gene encodes a protein of 327 amino acids which has high homology with the vestitone reductase of Medicago sativa (77%). The soybean chalcone reductase gene encodes a protein of 314 amino acids that has high homology with the chalcone reductase of kudzu vine (88%) and medicago sativa (83%). The expression profiles of the soybean vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase genes were studied and the results indicated that these two soybean genes were differentially expressed in detected soybean tissues including leaves, stems, roots, inflorescences, embryos and endosperm. Our experiment established the foundation for further research on these two soybean genes.

  3. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  4. A mutant of barley lacking NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lea, P. )

    1989-04-01

    A mutant of barley, LaPr 88/29, deficient in peroxisomal NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been identified. Compared to the wild type the activities of NADH-HPR and NADPH-HPR were severely reduced but the mutant was still capable of fixing CO{sub 2} at rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type in air. Although lacking an enzyme in the main photorespiratory pathway, there appeared to be little disruption to photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C) serine were similar in both mutant and wild type. LaPr 88/29 has been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase (GR) and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-HPR activity is due to the NADH-HPR enzyme. Immunological studies, using antibodies raised against spinach HPR, have shown that the NADH-dependent enzyme protein is absent in LaPr 88/29 but there appears to be enhanced synthesis of the NADPH-dependent enzyme protein.

  5. Increased nitrite reductase activity of fetal versus adult ovine hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Arlin B.; Tiso, Mauro; Verma, Shilpa T.; Lo, Jennifer; Joshi, Mahesh S.; Azarov, Ivan; Longo, Lawrence D.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Power, Gordon G.

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nitrite, NO2−, serves as a circulating reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity that is activated during physiological and pathological hypoxia. One of the intravascular mechanisms for nitrite conversion to NO is a chemical nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin. The rate of NO production from this reaction is increased when hemoglobin is in the R conformation. Because the mammalian fetus exists in a low-oxygen environment compared with the adult and is exposed to episodes of severe ischemia during the normal birthing process, and because fetal hemoglobin assumes the R conformation more readily than adult hemoglobin, we hypothesized that nitrite reduction to NO may be enhanced in the fetal circulation. We found that the reaction was faster for fetal than maternal hemoglobin or blood and that the reactions were fastest at 50–80% oxygen saturation, consistent with an R-state catalysis that is predominant for fetal hemoglobin. Nitrite concentrations were similar in blood taken from chronically instrumented normoxic ewes and their fetuses but were elevated in response to chronic hypoxia. The findings suggest an augmented nitrite reductase activity of fetal hemoglobin and that the production of nitrite may participate in the regulation of vascular NO homeostasis in the fetus. PMID:19028797

  6. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase. PMID:28116039

  7. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin - A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-02-15

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC50- and Ki-values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects.

  8. Biocatalytic Asymmetric Alkene Reduction: Crystal Structure and Characterization of a Double Bond Reductase from Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The application of biocatalysis for the asymmetric reduction of activated C=C is a powerful tool for the manufacture of high-value chemical commodities. The biocatalytic potential of “-ene” reductases from the Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE) family of oxidoreductases is well-known; however, the specificity of these enzymes toward mainly small molecule substrates has highlighted the need to discover “-ene” reductases from different enzymatic classes to broaden industrial applicability. Here, we describe the characterization of a flavin-free double bond reductase from Nicotiana tabacum (NtDBR), which belongs to the leukotriene B4 dehydrogenase (LTD) subfamily of the zinc-independent, medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily of enzymes. Using steady-state kinetics and biotransformation reactions, we have demonstrated the regio- and stereospecificity of NtDBR against a variety of α,β-unsaturated activated alkenes. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of typical LTD substrates and several classical OYE-like substrates, NtDBR also exhibited complementary activity by reducing non-OYE substrates (i.e., reducing the exocyclic C=C double bond of (R)-pulegone) and in some cases showing an opposite stereopreference in comparison with the OYE family member pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) reductase. This serves to augment classical OYE “-ene” reductase activity and, coupled with its aerobic stability, emphasizes the potential industrial value of NtDBR. Furthermore, we also report the X-ray crystal structures of the holo-, binary NADP(H)-bound, and ternary [NADP+ and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde (9a)-bound] NtDBR complexes. These will underpin structure-driven site-saturated mutagenesis studies aimed at enhancing the reactivity, stereochemistry, and specificity of this enzyme. PMID:27547488

  9. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry

  10. Aldose reductases influence prostaglandin F2α levels and adipocyte differentiation in male mouse and human species.

    PubMed

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Loubeau, Gaëlle; Dani, Christian; Slim, Karem; Martin, Gwenaëlle; Volat, Fanny; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Aldose reductases (AKR1B) are widely expressed oxidoreductases whose physiological function remains elusive. Some isoforms are genuine prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) synthases, suggesting they might influence adipose homeostasis because PGF2α inhibits adipogenesis. This was shown by Akr1b7 gene ablation in the mouse, which resulted in increased adiposity related to a lower PGF2α content in fat. Yet humans have no ortholog gene for Akr1b7, so the role of aldose reductases in human adipose homeostasis remains to be explored. We analyzed expression of genes encoding human and mouse aldose reductase isoforms in adipose tissues and differentiating adipocytes to assess conserved mechanisms regulating PGF2α synthesis and adipogenesis. The Akr1b3 gene encoded the most abundant isoform in mouse adipose tissue, whereas Akr1b7 encoded the only isoform enriched in the stromal vascular fraction. Most mouse aldose reductase gene expression peaked in early adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells and diminished with differentiation. In contrast with its mouse ortholog Akr1b3, AKR1B1 expression increased throughout differentiation of human multipotent adipose-derived stem cells, paralleling PGF2α release, whereas PGF2α receptor (FP) levels collapsed in early differentiation. Pharmacological inhibition of aldose reductase using Statil altered PGF2α production and enhanced human multipotent adipose-derived stem adipocyte differentiation. As expected, the adipogenic effects of Statil were counteracted by an FP agonist (cloprostenol). Thus, in both species aldose reductase-dependent PGF2α production could be important in early differentiation to restrict adipogenesis. PGF2α antiadipogenic signaling could then be toned down through the FP receptor or aldose reductases down-regulation in human and mouse cells, respectively. Our data suggest that aldose reductase inhibitors could have obesogenic potential.

  11. Control of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Leys, E.J.; Kellems, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The authors used methotrexate-resistant mouse cells in which dihydrofolate reductase levels are approximately 500 times normal to study the effect of growth stimulation on dihydrofolate reductase gene expression. As a result of growth stimulation, the relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase protein synthesis increased threefold, reaching a maximum between 25 and 30 h after stimulation. The relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production (i.e., the appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm) increased threefold after growth stimulation and was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the relative steady-state level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid in the nucleus. However, the increase in the nuclear level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid was not accompanied by a significant increase in the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes. These data indicated that the relative rate of appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm depends on the relative stability of the dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid sequences in the nucleus and is not dependent on the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes.

  12. Augmentation of CFTR maturation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sawczak, Victoria; Zaidi, Atiya; Butler, Maya; Bennett, Deric; Getsy, Paulina; Zeinomar, Maryam; Greenberg, Zivi; Forbes, Michael; Rehman, Shagufta; Jyothikumar, Vinod; DeRonde, Kim; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Straub, Adam; Sun, Fei; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi; Randell, Scott; Kelley, Thomas J.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase regulates novel endogenous S-nitrosothiol signaling pathways, and mice deficient in GSNO reductase are protected from airways hyperreactivity. S-nitrosothiols are present in the airway, and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) tend to have low S-nitrosothiol levels that may be attributed to upregulation of GSNO reductase activity. The present study demonstrates that 1) GSNO reductase activity is increased in the cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o−) cells expressing mutant F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) compared with the wild-type CFBE41o− cells, 2) GSNO reductase expression level is increased in the primary human bronchial epithelial cells expressing mutant F508del-CFTR compared with the wild-type cells, 3) GSNO reductase colocalizes with cochaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop; Stip1) in human airway epithelial cells, 4) GSNO reductase knockdown with siRNA increases the expression and maturation of CFTR and decreases Stip1 expression in human airway epithelial cells, 5) increased levels of GSNO reductase cause a decrease in maturation of CFTR, and 6) a GSNO reductase inhibitor effectively reverses the effects of GSNO reductase on CFTR maturation. These studies provide a novel approach to define the subcellular location of the interactions between Stip1 and GSNO reductase and the role of S-nitrosothiols in these interactions. PMID:26637637

  13. Transgenic overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase improves cardiac performance

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Sarah G.; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Korte, Frederick Steven; Luo, Zhaoxiong; Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N.; Page, Jennifer L.; Brozovich, Frank; Weiss, Robert S.; Tian, Rong; Murry, Charles E.; Regnier, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cardiac myosin can use 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) as an energy substrate, that it enhances contraction and relaxation with minimal effect on calcium-handling properties in vitro, and that contractile enhancement occurs with only minor elevation of cellular [dATP]. Here, we report the effect of chronically enhanced dATP concentration on cardiac function using a transgenic mouse that overexpresses the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (TgRR), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in de novo deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Hearts from TgRR mice had elevated left ventricular systolic function compared with wild-type (WT) mice, both in vivo and in vitro, without signs of hypertrophy or altered diastolic function. Isolated cardiomyocytes from TgRR mice had enhanced contraction and relaxation, with no change in Ca2+ transients, suggesting targeted improvement of myofilament function. TgRR hearts had normal ATP and only slightly decreased phosphocreatine levels by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and they maintained rate responsiveness to dobutamine challenge. These data demonstrate long-term (at least 5-mo) elevation of cardiac [dATP] results in sustained elevation of basal left ventricular performance, with maintained β-adrenergic responsiveness and energetic reserves. Combined with results from previous studies, we conclude that this occurs primarily via enhanced myofilament activation and contraction, with similar or faster ability to relax. The data are sufficiently compelling to consider elevated cardiac [dATP] as a therapeutic option to treat systolic dysfunction. PMID:23530224

  14. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  15. Maize Lc transcription factor enhances biosynthesis of anthocyanins, distinct proanthocyanidins and phenylpropanoids in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Li, Houhua; Flachowsky, Henryk; Fischer, Thilo C; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Forkmann, Gert; Treutter, Dieter; Schwab, Wilfried; Hoffmann, Thomas; Szankowski, Iris

    2007-10-01

    Flavonoids are a large family of polyphenolic compounds with manifold functions in plants. Present in a wide range of vegetables and fruits, flavonoids form an integral part of the human diet and confer multiple health benefits. Here, we report on metabolic engineering of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathways in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) by overexpression of the maize (Zea mays L.) leaf colour (Lc) regulatory gene. The Lc gene was transferred into the M. domestica cultivar Holsteiner Cox via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation which resulted in enhanced anthocyanin accumulation in regenerated shoots. Five independent Lc lines were investigated for integration of Lc into the plant genome by Southern blot and PCR analyses. The Lc-transgenic lines contained one or two Lc gene copies and showed increased mRNA levels for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), chalcone synthase (CHS), flavanone 3 beta-hydroxylase (FHT), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), leucoanthocyanidin reductases (LAR), anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR). HPLC-DAD and LC-MS analyses revealed higher levels of the anthocyanin idaein (12-fold), the flavan 3-ol epicatechin (14-fold), and especially the isomeric catechin (41-fold), and some distinct dimeric proanthocyanidins (7 to 134-fold) in leaf tissues of Lc-transgenic lines. The levels of phenylpropanoids and their derivatives were only slightly increased. Thus, Lc overexpression in Malus domestica resulted in enhanced biosynthesis of specific flavonoid classes, which play important roles in both phytopathology and human health.

  16. Thioredoxin reductase 1 suppresses adipocyte differentiation and insulin responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaoxiao; Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Petrus, Paul; Conrad, Marcus; Rydén, Mikael; Arnér, Elias S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), encoded by Txnrd1, was suggested to modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in mice. Here we discovered that TrxR1 suppresses insulin responsiveness, anabolic metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. Immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Txnrd1 (Txnrd1−/−) displayed increased metabolic flux, glycogen storage, lipogenesis and adipogenesis. This phenotype coincided with upregulated PPARγ expression, promotion of mitotic clonal expansion and downregulation of p27 and p53. Enhanced Akt activation also contributed to augmented adipogenesis and insulin sensitivity. Knockdown of TXNRD1 transcripts accelerated adipocyte differentiation also in human primary preadipocytes. Furthermore, TXNRD1 transcript levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue from 56 women were inversely associated with insulin sensitivity in vivo and lipogenesis in their isolated adipocytes. These results suggest that TrxR1 suppresses anabolic metabolism and adipogenesis by inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways downstream of insulin stimulation. PMID:27346647

  17. Mechanism of inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with motexafin gadolinium (MGd)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahedi Avval, Farnaz; Berndt, Carsten; Pramanik, Aladdin; Holmgren, Arne

    2009-02-13

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is an expanded porphyrin anticancer agent which selectively targets tumor cells and works as a radiation enhancer, with promising results in clinical trials. Its mechanism of action is oxidation of intracellular reducing molecules and acting as a direct inhibitor of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). This paper focuses on the mechanism of inhibition of RNR by MGd. Our experimental data present at least two pathways for inhibition of RNR; one precluding subunits oligomerization and the other direct inhibition of the large catalytic subunit of the enzyme. Co-localization of MGd and RNR in the cytoplasm particularly in the S-phase may account for its inhibitory properties. These data can elucidate an important effect of MGd on the cancer cells with overproduction of RNR and its efficacy as an anticancer agent and not only as a general radiosensitizer.

  18. Go green: the anti-inflammatory effects of biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wegiel, Barbara; Otterbein, Leo E

    2012-01-01

    Biliverdin (BV) has emerged as a cytoprotective and important anti-inflammatory molecule. Conversion of BV to bilirubin (BR) is catalyzed by biliverdin reductase (BVR) and is required for the downstream signaling and nuclear localization of BVR. Recent data by others and us make clear that BVR is a critical regulator of innate immune responses resulting from acute insult and injury and moreover, that a lack of BVR results in an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype. In macrophages, BVR is regulated by its substrate BV which leads to activation of the PI3K-Akt-IL-10 axis and inhibition of TLR4 expression via direct binding of BVR to the TLR4 promoter. In this review, we will summarize recent findings on the role of BVR and the bile pigments in inflammation in context with its activity as an enzyme, receptor, and transcriptional regulator.

  19. What Good Are Conferences, Anyway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietro, David C.

    1996-01-01

    According to Frederick Herzberg's studies of employee motivation, humans are driven by motivating factors that allow them to grow psychologically and hygiene factors that help them meet physical needs. Good education conferences can enhance both factors by helping principals refocus their energies, exchange ideas with trusted colleagues, and view…

  20. FRUCTOSE-6-PHOSPHATE REDUCTASE FROM SALMONELLA GALLINARUM

    PubMed Central

    Zancan, Glaci T.; Bacila, Metry

    1964-01-01

    Zancan, Glaci T. (Universidade do Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil), and Metry Bacila. Fructose-6-phosphate reductase from Salmonella gallinarum. J. Bacteriol. 87:614–618. 1964.—A fructose-6-phosphate reductase present in cell-free extracts of Salmonella gallinarum was purified approximately 42 times. The optimal pH for this enzyme is 8.0. The enzyme is specific for fructose-6-phosphate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The dissociation constants are 1.78 × 10−4m for fructose-6-phosphate and 8.3 × 10−5m for NADH. The Q10, reaction order, and equilibrium constant were determined. The enzyme is sensitive to p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, but not to o-iodosobenzoic acid nor to N-ethylmaleimide. PMID:14127579

  1. Characterization of erythrose reductases from filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with putative erythrose reductase activity have been identified in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium graminearum by in silico analysis. The proteins found in T. reesei and A. niger had earlier been characterized as glycerol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase, respectively. Corresponding genes from all three fungi were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Subsequently, they were used to establish optimal enzyme assay conditions. All three enzymes strictly require NADPH as cofactor, whereas with NADH no activity could be observed. The enzymatic characterization of the three enzymes using ten substrates revealed high substrate specificity and activity with D-erythrose and D-threose. The enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger herein showed comparable activities, whereas the one from F. graminearum reached only about a tenth of it for all tested substrates. In order to proof in vivo the proposed enzyme function, we overexpressed the erythrose reductase-encoding gene in T. reesei. An increased production of erythritol by the recombinant strain compared to the parental strain could be detected. PMID:23924507

  2. Fumarate-Mediated Inhibition of Erythrose Reductase, a Key Enzyme for Erythritol Production by Torula corallina

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Koo, Bong-Seong; Kim, Sang-Yong

    2002-01-01

    Torula corallina, a strain presently being used for the industrial production of erythritol, has the highest erythritol yield ever reported for an erythritol-producing microorganism. The increased production of erythritol by Torula corallina with trace elements such as Cu2+ has been thoroughly reported, but the mechanism by which Cu2+ increases the production of erythritol has not been studied. This study demonstrated that supplemental Cu2+ enhanced the production of erythritol, while it significantly decreased the production of a major by-product that accumulates during erythritol fermentation, which was identified as fumarate by instrumental analyses. Erythrose reductase, a key enzyme that converts erythrose to erythritol in T. corallina, was purified to homogeneity by chromatographic methods, including ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. In vitro, purified erythrose reductase was significantly inhibited noncompetitively by increasing the fumarate concentration. In contrast, the enzyme activity remained almost constant regardless of Cu2+ concentration. This suggests that supplemental Cu2+ reduced the production of fumarate, a strong inhibitor of erythrose reductase, which led to less inhibition of erythrose reductase and a high yield of erythritol. This is the first report that suggests catabolite repression by a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate in T. corallina. PMID:12200310

  3. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26536144

  4. Methionine sulfoxide reductase contributes to meeting dietary methionine requirements

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Kim, Geumsoo; Levine, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases are present in all aerobic organisms. They contribute to antioxidant defenses by reducing methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. However, the actual in vivo roles of these reductases are not well defined. Since methionine is an essential amino acid in mammals, we hypothesized that methionine sulfoxide reductases may provide a portion of the dietary methionine requirement by recycling methionine sulfoxide. We used a classical bioassay, the growth of weanling mice fed diets varying in methionine, and applied it to mice genetically engineered to alter the levels of methionine sulfoxide reductase A or B1. Mice of all genotypes were growth retarded when raised on chow containing 0.10% methionine instead of the standard 0.45% methionine. Retardation was significantly greater in knockout mice lacking both reductases. We conclude that the methionine sulfoxide reductases can provide methionine for growth in mice with limited intake of methionine, such as may occur in the wild. PMID:22521563

  5. Chapman Conference on Rainfall Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.

    The Chapman Conference on Rainfall Fields, sponsored by AGU, was the first of its kind; it was devoted to strengthening scientific interaction between the North American and Latin American geophysics communities. It was hosted by Universidad Simon Bolivar and Instituto Internacional de Estudios Avanzados, in Caracas, Venezuela, during March 24-27, 1986. A total of 36 scientists from Latin America, the United States, Canada, and Europe participated. The conference, which was convened by I. Rodriguez-Iturbe (Universidad Simon Bolivar) and V. K. Gupta (University of Mississippi, University), brought together hydrologists, meteorologists, and mathematicians/statisticians in the name of enhancing an interdisciplinary focus on rainfall research.

  6. Structural Elucidation of Chalcone Reductase and Implications for Deoxychalcone Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bomati, Erin K.; Austin, Michael B.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    4,2′,4′,6′-tetrahydroxychalcone (chalcone) and 4,2′,4′-trihydroxychalcone (deoxychalcone) serve as precursors of ecologically important flavonoids and isoflavonoids. Deoxychalcone formation depends on chalcone synthase and chalcone reductase; however, the identity of the chalcone reductase substrate out of the possible substrates formed during the multistep reaction catalyzed by chalcone synthase remains experimentally elusive. We report here the three-dimensional structure of alfalfa chalcone reductase bound to the NADP+ cofactor and propose the identity and binding mode of its substrate, namely the non-aromatized coumaryl-trione intermediate of the chalcone synthase-catalyzed cyclization of the fully extended coumaryl-tetraketide thioester intermediate. In the absence of a ternary complex, the quality of the refined NADP+-bound chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for computer-assisted docking to evaluate the likelihood of possible substrates. Interestingly, chalcone reductase adopts the three-dimensional structure of the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. The aldo/keto reductase fold is structurally distinct from all known ketoreductases of fatty acid biosynthesis, which instead belong to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. The results presented here provide structural support for convergent functional evolution of these two ketoreductases that share similar roles in the biosynthesis of fatty acids/polyketides. In addition, the chalcone reductase structure represents the first protein structure of a member of the aldo/ketoreductase 4 family. Therefore, the chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for the homology modeling of other aldo/ketoreductase 4 family members, including the reductase involved in morphine biosynthesis, namely codeinone reductase. PMID:15970585

  7. Powdery Mildew Resistance Conferred by Loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 Protein Kinase Is Suppressed by a Missense Mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M.; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L.; Innes, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling. PMID:18815384

  8. Powdery mildew resistance conferred by loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 protein kinase is suppressed by a missense mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a regulator of abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L; Innes, Roger W

    2008-11-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling.

  9. Limited proteolysis of the nitrate reductase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Y; Ogura, N; Nakagawa, H

    1988-12-25

    The functional structure of assimilatory NADH-nitrate reductase from spinach leaves was studied by limited proteolysis experiments. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with trypsin, two stable products of 59 and 45 kDa were observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The fragment of 45 kDa was purified by Blue Sepharose chromatography. NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were associated with this 45-kDa fragment which contains FAD, heme, and NADH binding fragment. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, two major peaks were observed by high performance liquid chromatography size exclusion gel filtration. FMNH2-nitrate reductase and reduced methyl viologen-nitrate reductase activities were associated with the first peak of 170 kDa which consists of two noncovalently associated (75-90-kDa) fragments. NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity, however, was associated with the second peak which consisted of FAD and NADH binding sites. Incubation of the 45-kDa fragment with S. aureus V8 protease produced two major fragments of 28 and 14 kDa which contained FAD and heme, respectively. These results indicate that the molybdenum, heme, and FAD components of spinach nitrate reductase are contained in distinct domains which are covalently linked by exposed hinge regions. The molybdenum domain appears to be important in the maintenance of subunit interactions in the enzyme complex.

  10. Roles of aldo-keto reductases 1B10 and 1C3 and ATP-binding cassette transporter in docetaxel tolerance.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Saito, Haruhi; Endo, Satoshi; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Soda, Midori; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-12-01

    Docetaxel (DTX) is widely used for treatment of inveterate lung and prostate cancers, but its continuous administration elicits the hyposensitivity. Here, we established the DTX-resistant variants of human lung cancer A549 and androgen-independent prostate cancer Du145 cells and found that the resistance development provoked aberrant up-regulations of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1B10 and AKR1C3 in A549 and Du145 cells, respectively. In addition, the sensitivity to the DTX toxicity was significantly decreased and increased by overexpression and knockdown of the two AKR isoforms, respectively. Furthermore, the resistant cells exhibited a decreased level of reactive 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed during DTX treatment, and the decrease was alleviated by adding the AKR inhibitors, inferring that the two AKRs confer the chemoresistance through elevating the antioxidant properties. The development of DTX resistance was also associated with enhanced expression of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 among the ABC transporter isoforms. The combined treatment with inhibitors of the two AKRs and ABCB1 additively sensitized the resistant cells to DTX. Intriguingly, the AKR1B10 inhibitor also suppressed the lung cancer cross-resistance against cisplatin. The results suggest that combined treatment with AKRs (1B10 and 1C3) and ABCB1 inhibitors exerts overcoming effect against the cancer resistance to DTX and cisplatin, and can be used as the adjuvant therapy.

  11. Characterization of quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: enzymatic activity and active site structure.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Erina; Okada, Norihiro; Sato, Nozomi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide to generate nitrous oxide. We recently reported on the crystal structure of a quinol-dependent NOR (qNOR) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus [Y. Matsumoto, T. Tosha, A.V. Pisliakov, T. Hino, H. Sugimoto, S. Nagano, Y. Sugita and Y. Shiro, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 19 (2012) 238-246], and suggested that a water channel from the cytoplasm, which is not observed in cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR), functions as a pathway transferring catalytic protons. Here, we further investigated the functional and structural properties of qNOR, and compared the findings with those for cNOR. The pH optimum for the enzymatic reaction of qNOR was in the alkaline range, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa cNOR showed a higher activity at an acidic pH. The considerably slower reduction rate, and a correlation of the pH dependence for enzymatic activity and the reduction rate suggest that the reduction process is the rate-determining step for the NO reduction by qNOR, while the reduction rate for cNOR was very fast and therefore is unlikely to be the rate-determining step. A close examination of the heme/non-heme iron binuclear center by resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that qNOR has a more polar environment at the binuclear center compared with cNOR. It is plausible that a water channel enhances the accessibility of the active site to solvent water, creating a more polar environment in qNOR. This structural feature could control certain properties of the active site, such as redox potential, which could explain the different catalytic properties of the two NORs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  12. The Conference Facilitator Model: Improving the Value of Conference Attendance for Attendees and the Organization.

    PubMed

    Nebrig, Dawn; Munafo, Jennifer; Goddard, Julie; Tierney, Carol

    2015-09-01

    Healthcare leaders face a multitude of priorities demanding their attention and resources, from patient, employee safety and hospital-acquired conditions to predicting future revenue in the context of healthcare reform. Assessing value requires balancing outcomes and experience with cost. How does allocating funds for professional nursing conferences measure up? What is a valid return on investment when we send staff nurses to professional conferences, specifically the annual Magnet® conference? The following article describes how Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center answered these questions and redefined the expectations for conference attendees while enhancing the experience and the reportable outcomes for practice and the organization.

  13. Identification of gene knockdown targets conferring enhanced isobutanol and 1-butanol tolerance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a tunable RNAi screening approach.

    PubMed

    Crook, Nathan; Sun, Jie; Morse, Nicholas; Schmitz, Alexander; Alper, Hal S

    2016-12-01

    Improving yeast tolerance to 1-butanol and isobutanol is a step toward enabling high-titer production. To identify previously unknown genetic targets leading to increased tolerance, we establish a tunable RNA interference (RNAi) screening approach. Specifically, we optimized the efficiency and tunability of RNA interference library screening in yeast, ultimately enabling downregulation efficiencies from 0 to 94 %. Using this system, we identified the Hsp70 family as a key regulator of isobutanol tolerance in a single round of screening, with downregulation of these genes conferring up to 64 % increased growth in 12 g/L isobutanol. For 1-butanol, we find through two rounds of iterative screening that the combined downregulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and enolase improves growth up to 3100 % in 10 g/L 1-butanol. Collectively, this work improves the tunability of RNAi in yeast as demonstrated by the discovery of novel effectors for these complex phenotypes.

  14. Increased reactive oxygen species production during reductive stress: The roles of mitochondrial glutathione and thioredoxin reductases.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; Calmettes, Guillaume; Weiss, James N

    2015-01-01

    Both extremes of redox balance are known to cause cardiac injury, with mounting evidence revealing that the injury induced by both oxidative and reductive stress is oxidative in nature. During reductive stress, when electron acceptors are expected to be mostly reduced, some redox proteins can donate electrons to O2 instead, which increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the high level of reducing equivalents also concomitantly enhances ROS scavenging systems involving redox couples such as NADPH/NADP+ and GSH/GSSG. Here our objective was to explore how reductive stress paradoxically increases net mitochondrial ROS production despite the concomitant enhancement of ROS scavenging systems. Using recombinant enzymes and isolated permeabilized cardiac mitochondria, we show that two normally antioxidant matrix NADPH reductases, glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase, generate H2O2 by leaking electrons from their reduced flavoprotein to O2 when electron flow is impaired by inhibitors or because of limited availability of their natural electron acceptors, GSSG and oxidized thioredoxin. The spillover of H2O2 under these conditions depends on H2O2 reduction by peroxiredoxin activity, which may regulate redox signaling in response to endogenous or exogenous factors. These findings may explain how ROS production during reductive stress overwhelms ROS scavenging capability, generating the net mitochondrial ROS spillover causing oxidative injury. These enzymes could potentially be targeted to increase cancer cell death or modulate H2O2-induced redox signaling to protect the heart against ischemia/reperfusion damage.

  15. Enzyme toolbox: novel enantiocomplementary imine reductases.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Philipp N; Fademrecht, Silvia; Hofelzer, Sebastian; Pleiss, Jürgen; Leipold, Friedemann; Turner, Nicholas J; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-10-13

    Reducing reactions are among the most useful transformations for the generation of chiral compounds in the fine-chemical industry. Because of their exquisite selectivities, enzymatic approaches have emerged as the method of choice for the reduction of C=O and activated C=C bonds. However, stereoselective enzymatic reduction of C=N bonds is still in its infancy-it was only recently described after the discovery of enzymes capable of imine reduction. In our work, we increased the spectrum of imine-reducing enzymes by database analysis. By combining the currently available knowledge about the function of imine reductases with the experimentally uncharacterized diversity stored in protein sequence databases, three novel imine reductases with complementary enantiopreference were identified along with amino acids important for catalysis. Furthermore, their reducing capability was demonstrated by the reduction of the pharmaceutically relevant prochiral imine 2-methylpyrroline. These novel enzymes exhibited comparable to higher catalytic efficiencies than previously described enzymes, and their biosynthetic potential is highlighted by the full conversion of 2-methylpyrroline in whole cells with excellent selectivities.

  16. Crystal Structure of ChrR -- A Quinone Reductase with the Capacity to Reduce Chromate

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy S.; Poulain, S.; Hienerwadel, R.; Bremond, N.; Sylvester, M. D.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Berthomieu, C.; van der Lelie, D.; Matin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Escherichia coli ChrR enzyme is an obligatory two-electron quinone reductase that has many applications, such as in chromate bioremediation. Its crystal structure, solved at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, shows that it belongs to the flavodoxin superfamily in which flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is firmly anchored to the protein. ChrR crystallized as a tetramer, and size exclusion chromatography showed that this is the oligomeric form that catalyzes chromate reduction. Within the tetramer, the dimers interact by a pair of two hydrogen bond networks, each involving Tyr128 and Glu146 of one dimer and Arg125 and Tyr85 of the other; the latter extends to one of the redox FMN cofactors. Changes in each of these amino acids enhanced chromate reductase activity of the enzyme, showing that this network is centrally involved in chromate reduction.

  17. Soluble ascorbate free radical reductase in the human lens.

    PubMed

    Bando, M; Obazawa, H

    1994-01-01

    A major and a minor ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase were separated from the soluble fraction in the human lens cortex by DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange column chromatography. These AFR reductases also exhibited diaphorase activity using dichlorophenolindophenol and ferricyanide as electron acceptors. The major AFR reductase was partially purified by 5'AMP-Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography. This partially purified AFR reductase showed a single band of diaphorase activity in native polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. This activity band corresponded to the major protein observed in protein staining by Coomassie Brilliant Blue. However, the protein staining by Coomassie Brilliant Blue showed this activity band surrounded by diffused staining. Molecular weight of the partially purified AFR reductase was determined to be 32 kDa by gel filtration, and the apparent Km value for AFR was about 15 microM. This major lens AFR reductase could be distinguished from soluble Neurospora, Euglena and cucumber AFR reductases, and from two ubiquitous enzymes with reduction activity of AFR and/or foreign compounds, ie, NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and DT-diaphorase, by their molecular weights, Km values and/or ion-exchange chromatographic behaviors.

  18. Functional and Phylogenetic Divergence of Fungal Adenylate-Forming Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Daniel; Lackner, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    A key step in fungal l-lysine biosynthesis is catalyzed by adenylate-forming l-α-aminoadipic acid reductases, organized in domains for adenylation, thiolation, and the reduction step. However, the genomes of numerous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes contain an unexpectedly large number of additional genes encoding similar but functionally distinct enzymes. Here, we describe the functional in vitro characterization of four reductases which were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. The Ceriporiopsis subvermispora serine reductase Nps1 features a terminal ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) domain and thus belongs to a hitherto undescribed class of fungal multidomain enzymes. The second major class is characterized by the canonical terminal short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain and represented by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora Nps3 as the first biochemically characterized l-α-aminoadipic acid reductase of basidiomycete origin. Aspergillus flavus l-tyrosine reductases LnaA and LnbA are members of a distinct phylogenetic clade. Phylogenetic analysis supports the view that fungal adenylate-forming reductases are more diverse than previously recognized and belong to four distinct classes. PMID:25085485

  19. Loss of quinone reductase 2 function selectively facilitates learning behaviors.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Charles-Etienne; Bastianetto, Stephane; Brouillette, Jonathan; Tse, YiuChung; Boutin, Jean A; Delagrange, Philippe; Wong, TakPan; Sarret, Philippe; Quirion, Rémi

    2010-09-22

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with deficits in learning and memory with age as well as in Alzheimer's disease. Using DNA microarray, we demonstrated the overexpression of quinone reductase 2 (QR2) in the hippocampus in two models of learning deficits, namely the aged memory impaired rats and the scopolamine-induced amnesia model. QR2 is a cytosolic flavoprotein that catalyzes the reduction of its substrate and enhances the production of damaging activated quinone and ROS. QR2-like immunostaining is enriched in cerebral structures associated with learning behaviors, such as the hippocampal formation and the temporofrontal cortex of rat, mouse, and human brains. In cultured rat embryonic hippocampal neurons, selective inhibitors of QR2, namely S26695 and S29434, protected against menadione-induced cell death by reversing its proapoptotic action. S26695 (8 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited scopolamine-induced amnesia. Interestingly, adult QR2 knock-out mice demonstrated enhanced learning abilities in various tasks, including Morris water maze, object recognition, and rotarod performance test. Other behaviors related to anxiety (elevated plus maze), depression (forced swim), and schizophrenia (prepulse inhibition) were not affected in QR2-deficient mice. Together, these data suggest a role for QR2 in cognitive behaviors with QR2 inhibitors possibly representing a novel therapeutic strategy toward the treatment of learning deficits especially observed in the aged brain.

  20. Analysis of Arabidopsis thioredoxin-h isotypes identifies discrete domains that confer specific structural and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Jun; Chi, Yong Hun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Shin, Mi Rim; Lee, Eun Seon; Cha, Joon-Yung; Paeng, Seol Ki; Lee, Yuno; Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Woe Yeon; Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Kyun Oh; Lee, Keun Woo; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2013-11-15

    Multiple isoforms of Arabidopsis thaliana h-type thioredoxins (AtTrx-hs) have distinct structural and functional specificities. AtTrx-h3 acts as both a disulfide reductase and as a molecular chaperone. We prepared five representative AtTrx-hs and compared their protein structures and disulfide reductase and molecular chaperone activities. AtTrx-h2 with an N-terminal extension exhibited distinct functional properties with respect to other AtTrx-hs. AtTrx-h2 formed low-molecular-mass structures and exhibited only disulfide reductase activity, whereas the other AtTrx-h isoforms formed high-molecular-mass complexes and displayed both disulfide reductase and molecular chaperone activities. The domains that determine the unique structural and functional properties of each AtTrx-hs protein were determined by constructing a domain-swap between the N- and C-terminal regions of AtTrx-h2 and AtTrx-h3 (designated AtTrx-h-2N3C and AtTrx-h-3N2C respectively), an N-terminal deletion mutant of AtTrx-h2 [AtTrx-h2-N(∆19)] and site-directed mutagenesis of AtTrx-h3. AtTrx-h2-N(∆19) and AtTrx-h-3N2C exhibited similar properties to those of AtTrx-h2, but AtTrx-h-2N3C behaved more like AtTrx-h3, suggesting that the structural and functional specificities of AtTrx-hs are determined by their C-terminal regions. Hydrophobicity profiling and molecular modelling revealed that Ala100 and Ala106 in AtTrx-h3 play critical roles in its structural and functional regulation. When these two residues in AtTrx-h3 were replaced with lysine, AtTrx-h3 functioned like AtTrx-h2. The chaperone function of AtTrx-hs conferred enhanced heat-shock-resistance on a thermosensitive trx1/2-null yeast mutant.

  1. Polyamines Confer Salt Tolerance in Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.) by Reducing Sodium Uptake, Improving Nutrient Homeostasis, Antioxidant Defense, and Methylglyoxal Detoxification Systems.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Kamrun; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Rahman, Anisur; Alam, Md Mahabub; Mahmud, Jubayer-Al; Suzuki, Toshisada; Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The physiological roles of PAs (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) were investigated for their ability to confer salt tolerance (200 mM NaCl, 48 h) in mung bean seedlings (Vigna radiata L. cv. BARI Mung-2). Salt stress resulted in Na toxicity, decreased K, Ca, Mg, and Zn contents in roots and shoots, and disrupted antioxidant defense system which caused oxidative damage as indicated by increased lipid peroxidation, H2O2 content, [Formula: see text] generation rate, and lipoxygenase activity. Salinity-induced methylglyoxal (MG) toxicity was also clearly evident. Salinity decreased leaf chlorophyll (chl) and relative water content (RWC). Supplementation of salt affected seedlings with exogenous PAs enhanced the contents of glutathione and ascorbate, increased activities of antioxidant enzymes (dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) and glyoxalase enzyme (glyoxalase II), which reduced salt-induced oxidative stress and MG toxicity, respectively. Exogenous PAs reduced cellular Na content and maintained nutrient homeostasis and modulated endogenous PAs levels in salt affected mung bean seedlings. The overall salt tolerance was reflected through improved tissue water and chl content, and better seedling growth.

  2. Polyamines Confer Salt Tolerance in Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.) by Reducing Sodium Uptake, Improving Nutrient Homeostasis, Antioxidant Defense, and Methylglyoxal Detoxification Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Kamrun; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Rahman, Anisur; Alam, Md. Mahabub; Mahmud, Jubayer-Al; Suzuki, Toshisada; Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The physiological roles of PAs (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) were investigated for their ability to confer salt tolerance (200 mM NaCl, 48 h) in mung bean seedlings (Vigna radiata L. cv. BARI Mung-2). Salt stress resulted in Na toxicity, decreased K, Ca, Mg, and Zn contents in roots and shoots, and disrupted antioxidant defense system which caused oxidative damage as indicated by increased lipid peroxidation, H2O2 content, O2•- generation rate, and lipoxygenase activity. Salinity-induced methylglyoxal (MG) toxicity was also clearly evident. Salinity decreased leaf chlorophyll (chl) and relative water content (RWC). Supplementation of salt affected seedlings with exogenous PAs enhanced the contents of glutathione and ascorbate, increased activities of antioxidant enzymes (dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) and glyoxalase enzyme (glyoxalase II), which reduced salt-induced oxidative stress and MG toxicity, respectively. Exogenous PAs reduced cellular Na content and maintained nutrient homeostasis and modulated endogenous PAs levels in salt affected mung bean seedlings. The overall salt tolerance was reflected through improved tissue water and chl content, and better seedling growth. PMID:27516763

  3. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  4. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  5. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  6. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts from nine selected papers presented at the 1982 Association for Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference are provided. Copies of conference proceedings may be obtained for fifteen dollars from the Association. (MP)

  7. Unique C2V3 Sequence in HIV-1 Envelope Obtained from Broadly Neutralizing Plasma of a Slow Progressing Patient Conferred Enhanced Virus Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Rajesh; Das, Lipsa; Choudhary, Ipsita; Sharma, Deepak; Paranjape, Ramesh; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2012-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 usually develops in chronic infections. Here, we examined the basis of enhanced sensitivity of an env clone amplified from cross neutralizing plasma of an antiretroviral naïve chronically infected Indian patient (ID50 >600-fold higher compared to other autologous env clones). The enhanced autologous neutralization of pseudotyped viruses expressing the sensitive envelope (Env) was associated with increased sensitivity to reagents and monoclonal antibodies targeting distinct sites in Env. Chimeric viruses constructed by swapping fragments of sensitive Env into resistant Env backbone revealed that the presence of unique residues within C2V3 region of gp120 governed increased neutralization. The enhanced virus neutralization was also associated with low CD4 dependence as well as increased binding of Env trimers to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 and was independent of gp120 shedding. Our data highlighted vulnerabilities in the Env obtained from cross neutralizing plasma associated with the exposure of discontinuous neutralizing epitopes and enhanced autologous neutralization. Such information may aid in Env-based vaccine immunogen design. PMID:23056416

  8. [Comparison of Physico-chemical Aspects between E. coli and Human Dihydrofolate Reductase: an Equilibrium Unfolding Study].

    PubMed

    Thapliyal, Charu; Jain, Neha; Chaudhuri, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    A protein, differing in origin, may exhibit variable physicochemical behaviour, difference in sequence homology, fold and function. Thus studying structure-function relationship of proteins from altered sources is meaningful in the sense that it may give rise to comparative aspects of their sequence-structure-function relationship. Dihydrofolate reductase is an enzyme involved in cell cycle regulation. It is a significant enzyme as.a target for developing anticancer drugs. Hence, detailed understanding of structure-function relationships of wide variants of the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase would be important for developing an inhibitor or an antagonist against the enzyme involved in the cellular developmental processes. In this communication, we have reported the comparative structure-function relationship between E. coli and human dihydrofolate reductase. The differences in the unfolding behaviour of these two proteins have been investigated to understand various properties of these two proteins like relative' stability differences and variation in conformational changes under identical denaturing conditions. The equilibrium unfolding mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase proteins using guanidine hydrochloride as a denaturant in the presence of various types of osmolytes has been monitored using loss in enzymatic activity, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and an extrinsic fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid as probes. It has been observed that osmolytes, such as 1M sucrose, and 30% glycerol, provided enhanced stability to both variants of dihydrofolate reductase. Their level of stabilisation has been observed to be dependent on intrinsic protein stability. It was observed that 100 mM proline does not show any 'significant stabilisation to either of dihydrofolate reductases. In the present study, it has been observed that the human protein is relatively less stable than the E.coli counterpart.

  9. IL-10 enhances the phenotype of M2 macrophages induced by IL-4 and confers the ability to increase eosinophil migration.

    PubMed

    Makita, Naoyuki; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Murakawa, Masao; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    M2 macrophages have been subdivided into subtypes such as IL-4-induced M2a and IL-10-induced M2c in vitro. Although it was reported that IL-10 stimulation leads to an increase in IL-4Rα, the effect of IL-4 and IL-10 in combination with macrophage subtype differentiation remains unclear. Thus, we sought to clarify whether IL-10 enhanced the M2 phenotype induced by IL-4. In this study, we showed that IL-10 enhanced IL-4Rα expression in M-CSF-induced bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Global gene expression analysis of M2 macrophages induced by IL-4, IL-10 or IL-4 + IL-10 showed that IL-10 enhanced gene expression of M2a markers induced by IL-4 in M-CSF-induced BMDMs. Moreover, IL-4 and IL-10 synergistically induced CCL24 (Eotaxin-2) production. Enhanced CCL24 expression was also observed in GM-CSF-induced BMDMs and zymosan-elicited, thioglycolate-elicited and naive peritoneal macrophages. CCL24 is a CCR3 agonist and an eosinophil chemoattractant. In vitro, IL-4 + IL-10-stimulated macrophages produced a large amount of CCL24 and increased eosinophil migration, which was inhibited by anti-CCL24 antibody. We also showed that IL-4 + IL-10-stimulated (but not IL-4 or IL-10 alone) macrophages transferred into the peritoneum of C57BL/6J mice increased eosinophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity. These results demonstrate that IL-4 + IL-10-simulated macrophages have enhanced M2a macrophage-related gene expression, CCL24 production and eosinophil infiltration-inducing activity, thereby suggesting their contribution to eosinophil-related diseases.

  10. Reversal of clavulanate resistance conferred by a Ser-244 mutant of TEM-1 beta-lactamase as a result of a second mutation (Arg to Ser at position 164) that enhances activity against ceftazidime.

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, U; Manavathu, E K; Mobashery, S; Lerner, S A

    1994-01-01

    The mutation of Arg-244 to Ser (Arg-244-->Ser mutation) in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase has been shown to produce resistance to inactivation by clavulanate in the mutant enzyme and resistance to ampicillin plus clavulanate in a strain of Escherichia coli producing this enzyme. The Arg-164-->Ser mutation in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase (TEM-12 enzyme) is known to enhance the activity of the enzyme against ceftazidime, resulting in resistance to the drug in a strain producing the mutant enzyme (D. A. Weber, C. C. Sanders, J. S. Bakken, and J. P. Quinn, J. Infect. Dis. 162:460-465, 1990). The doubly mutated derivative of the TEM-1 enzyme (Ser-164/Ser-244) retains the characteristics of the Ser-164 mutant enzyme, i.e., enhanced activity against ceftazidime and sensitivity to inactivation by clavulanate. It also confers the same phenotype as the Ser-164 mutant enzyme, i.e., resistance to ceftazidime and ampicillin, with reversal of this resistance in the presence of clavulanate. Thus, the Arg-164-->Ser mutation in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase suppresses the effect of the Arg-244-->Ser mutation which, by itself, reduces the sensitivity of the enzyme to inactivation by clavulanate. PMID:8067751

  11. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  12. EDITORIAL: Conference program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    Some of the papers and talks given at the conference have not been published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The attached PDF file lists the full conference program and indicates (with an asterisk) those papers or talks which are not present in this volume.

  13. Youth Conference Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.

    This handbook is designed to provide practical aid to those who have charge of the planning and organization of a youth conference, Defined as a conference to provide practical information as well as information about possible responsibilities, risks, and consequences of actions, related to the chosen conference topic. Suggestions are given for…

  14. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  15. Overexpression of AtLEA3-3 confers resistance to cold stress in Escherichia coli and provides enhanced osmotic stress tolerance and ABA sensitivity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengshan; Liu, Fei; Ma, Miao; Gong, Jiao; Wang, Qiujun; Jia, Pengfei; Zheng, Guochang; Liu, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) group 3 proteins significantly respond to changes in environmental conditions. However, reports that demonstrate their biological role, especially in Arabidopsis, are notably limited. This study examines the functional roles of the Arabidopsis LEA group 3 proteins AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 in abiotic stress and ABA treatments. Expression of AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 is upregulated by ABA, high salinity, and osmotic stress. Results on the ectopic expression of AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 in E. coli suggest that both proteins play important roles in resistance to cold stress. Overexpression of AtLEA3-3 in Arabidopsis (AtLEA3-3-OE) confers salt and osmotic stress tolerance that is characterized during germination and early seedling establishment. However, AtLEA3-3-OE lines show sensitivity to ABA treatment during early seedling development. These results suggest that accumulation of AtLEA3-3 mRNA and/or proteins may help heterologous ABA re-initiate second dormancy during seedling establishment. Analysis of yellow fluorescent fusion proteins localization shows that AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 are mainly distributed in the ER and that AtLEA3-3 also localizes in the nucleus, and in response to salt, mannitol, cold, or BFA treatments, the localization of AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 is altered and becomes more condensed. Protein translocalization may be a positive and effective strategy for responding to abiotic stresses. Taken together, these results suggest that AtLEA3-3 has an important function during seed germination and seedling development of Arabidopsis under abiotic stress conditions.

  16. Inducible expression of Bs2 R gene from Capsicum chacoense in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) confers enhanced resistance to citrus canker disease.

    PubMed

    Sendín, Lorena Noelia; Orce, Ingrid Georgina; Gómez, Rocío Liliana; Enrique, Ramón; Grellet Bournonville, Carlos Froilán; Noguera, Aldo Sergio; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Marano, María Rosa; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Filippone, María Paula

    2017-04-01

    Transgenic expression of the pepper Bs2 gene confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) pathogenic strains which contain the avrBs2 avirulence gene in susceptible pepper and tomato varieties. The avrBs2 gene is highly conserved among members of the Xanthomonas genus, and the avrBs2 of Xcv shares 96% homology with the avrBs2 of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), the causal agent of citrus canker disease. A previous study showed that the transient expression of pepper Bs2 in lemon leaves reduced canker formation and induced plant defence mechanisms. In this work, the effect of the stable expression of Bs2 gene on citrus canker resistance was evaluated in transgenic plants of Citrus sinensis cv. Pineapple. Interestingly, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of epicotyls was unsuccessful when a constitutive promoter (2× CaMV 35S) was used in the plasmid construction, but seven transgenic lines were obtained with a genetic construction harbouring Bs2 under the control of a pathogen-inducible promoter, from glutathione S-transferase gene from potato. A reduction of disease symptoms of up to 70% was observed in transgenic lines expressing Bs2 with respect to non-transformed control plants. This reduction was directly dependent on the Xcc avrBs2 gene since no effect was observed when a mutant strain of Xcc with a disruption in avrBs2 gene was used for inoculations. Additionally, a canker symptom reduction was correlated with levels of the Bs2 expression in transgenic plants, as assessed by real-time qPCR, and accompanied by the production of reactive oxygen species. These results indicate that the pepper Bs2 resistance gene is also functional in a family other than the Solanaceae, and could be considered for canker control.

  17. I223R Mutation in Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Neuraminidase Confers Reduced Susceptibility to Oseltamivir and Zanamivir and Enhanced Resistance with H275Y

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Jaoudé, Georges; Scemla, Anne; Ribaud, Patricia; Mercier-Delarue, Séverine; Caro, Valérie; Enouf, Vincent; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; van der Werf, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance of pandemic A(H1N1)2009 (H1N1pdm09) virus to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) has remained limited. A new mutation I223R in the neuraminidase (NA) of H1N1pdm09 virus has been reported along with H275Y in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of I223R on oseltamivir and zanamivir susceptibility. Methods The NA enzymatic characteristics and susceptibility to NAIs of viruses harbouring the mutations I223R and H275Y alone or in combination were analyzed on viruses produced by reverse genetics and on clinical isolates collected from an immunocompromised patient with sustained influenza H1N1pdm09 virus shedding and treated by oseltamivir (days 0–15) and zanamivir (days 15–25 and 70–80). Results Compared with the wild type, the NA of recombinant viruses and clinical isolates with H275Y or I223R mutations had about two-fold reduced affinity for the substrate. The H275Y and I223R isolates showed decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir (246-fold) and oseltamivir and zanamivir (8.9- and 4.9-fold), respectively. Reverse genetics assays confirmed these results and further showed that the double mutation H275Y and I223R conferred enhanced levels of resistance to oseltamivir and zanamivir (6195- and 15.2-fold). In the patient, six days after initiation of oseltamivir therapy, the mutation H275Y conferring oseltamivir resistance and the I223R mutation were detected in the NA. Mutations were detected concomitantly from day 6–69 but molecular cloning did not show any variant harbouring both mutations. Despite cessation of NAI treatment, the mutation I223R persisted along with additional mutations in the NA and the hemagglutinin. Conclusions Reduced susceptibility to both oseltamivir and zanamivir was conferred by the I223R mutation which potentiated resistance to both NAIs when associated with the H275Y mutation in the NA. Concomitant emergence of the I223R and H275Y mutations under oseltamivir treatment underlines

  18. The neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to confer tolerance of neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells to the mitochondrial stressor rotenone

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Kristin Kathleen; Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2012-10-15

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 induces mitochondrial biogenesis in neuroprogenitor-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic reserve of the neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 confers tolerance to rotenone via an adaptive

  19. Ethylene could influence ferric reductase, iron transporter, and H+-ATPase gene expression by affecting FER (or FER-like) gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Carlos; Waters, Brian M; Romera, F Javier; García, María José; Morales, María; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    In previous works, it has been shown, by using ethylene inhibitors and precursors, that ethylene could participate in the regulation of the enhanced ferric reductase activity of Fe-deficient Strategy I plants. However, it was not known whether ethylene regulates the ferric reductase gene expression or other aspects related to this activity. This paper is a study of the effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the expression of the genes encoding the ferric reductases and iron transporters of Arabidopsis thaliana (FRO2 and IRT1) and Lycopersicon esculentum (=Solanum lycopersicum) (FRO1 and IRT1) plants. The effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the activity of the iron reductase and the iron transporter have been examined in parallel. Also studied were the effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the expression of the H(+)-ATPase genes of cucumber (CsHA1 and CsHA2) and the transcription factor genes of tomato (LeFER) and Arabidopsis (AtFRU or AtFIT1, an LeFER homologue) that regulate ferric reductase, iron transporter, and H(+)-ATPse activity. The results obtained suggest that ethylene participates in the regulation of ferric reductase, the iron transporter, and H(+)-ATPase gene expression by affecting the FER (or FER-like) levels.

  20. A role for N-myristoylation in protein targeting: NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase requires myristic acid for association with outer mitochondrial but not ER membranes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    N-myristoylation is a cotranslational modification involved in protein- protein interactions as well as in anchoring polypeptides to phospholipid bilayers; however, its role in targeting proteins to specific subcellular compartments has not been clearly defined. The mammalian myristoylated flavoenzyme NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase is integrated into ER and mitochondrial outer membranes via an anchor containing a stretch of 14 uncharged amino acids downstream to the NH2- terminal myristoylate glycine. Since previous studies suggested that the anchoring function could be adequately carried out by the 14 uncharged residues, we investigated a possible role for myristic acid in reductase targeting. The wild type (wt) and a nonmyristoylatable reductase mutant (gly2-->ala) were stably expressed in MDCK cells, and their localization was investigated by immunofluorescence, immuno-EM, and cell fractionation. By all three techniques, the wt protein localized to ER and mitochondria, while the nonmyristoylated mutant was found only on ER membranes. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that this altered steady state distribution was due to the mutant's inability to target to mitochondria, and not to its enhanced instability in that location. Both wt and mutant reductase were resistant to Na2CO3 extraction and partitioned into the detergent phase after treatment of a membrane fraction with Triton X-114, demonstrating that myristic acid is not required for tight anchoring of reductase to membranes. Our results indicate that myristoylated reductase localizes to ER and mitochondria by different mechanisms, and reveal a novel role for myristic acid in protein targeting. PMID:8978818

  1. Catalytic cycle of human glutathione reductase near 1 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Faber, H. Richard; Savvides, Savvas N.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Summary Efficient enzyme catalysis depends on exquisite details of structure beyond those resolvable in typical medium- and high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Here we report synchrotron-based cryocrystallographic studies of natural substrate complexes of the flavoenzyme human glutathione reductase (GR) at nominal resolutions between 1.1 and 0.95 Å that reveal new aspects of its mechanism. Compression in the active site causes overlapping van der Waals radii and distortion in the nicotinamide ring of the NADPH substrate, which enhances catalysis via stereoelectronic effects. The bound NADPH and redox-active disulfide are positioned optimally on opposite sides of the flavin for a 1,2-addition across a flavin double bond. The new structures extend earlier observations to reveal that the redox-active disulfide loop in GR is an extreme case of sequential peptide bonds systematically deviating from planarity, a net deviation of 53° across 5 residues. But this apparent strain is not a factor in catalysis as it is present in both oxidized and reduced structures. Intriguingly, the flavin bond lengths in oxidized GR are intermediate between those expected for oxidized and reduced flavin, but we present evidence that this may not be due to the protein environment but instead to partial synchrotron reduction of the flavin by the synchrotron beam. Finally, of more general relevance, we present evidence that the structures of synchrotron-reduced disulfide bonds cannot generally be used as reliable models for naturally reduced disulfide bonds. PMID:18638483

  2. Nitrate Reductase of Primary Roots of Red Spruce Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Yandow, Tim S.; Klein, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity (NRA) was found in primary roots, but not in foliage of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings. Nitrate induced NRA:NH4+ did not induce and slightly depressed NRA in older seedlings. Induction required 8 hours and, once induced, NRA decreased slowly in the absence of exogenous NO3−. Seedlings were grown in perlite with a complete nutrient solution containing NH4+ to limit NR induction. Established seedlings were stressed with nutrient solutions at pH 3, 4, or 5 supplemented with Cl− salts of Al, Cd, Pb, or Zn each at two concentrations. NRA in primary root tips was measured at 2, 14, 28, and 42 days. NRA induction was greatest at pH 3, and remained high during the period of study. NRA induction at pH 4 was lower. Metal ions suppressed NRA at pH 3 and 5, but enhanced NRA at pH 4. It is concluded that acidity and soluble metals in the root environment of red spruce are unlikely to be important factors in nitrogen transformations in red spruce roots. PMID:16664891

  3. Light regulates alternative splicing of hydroxypyruvate reductase in pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Mano, S; Hayashi, M; Nishimura, M

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) is a leaf peroxisomal enzyme that functions in the glycolate pathway of photorespiration in plants. We have obtained two highly similar cDNAs for pumpkin HPR (HPR1 and HPR2). It has been revealed that two HPR mRNAs might be produced by alternative splicing from a single type of pre-mRNA. The HPR1 protein, but not the HPR2 protein, was found to have a targeting sequence into leaf peroxisomes at the C-terminus, suggesting that alternative splicing controls the subcellular localization of the two HPR proteins. Immunoblot analysis and subcellular fractionation experiments showed that HPR1 and HPR2 proteins are localized in leaf peroxisomes and the cytosol, respectively. Moreover, indirect fluorescence microscopy and analyses of transgenic tobacco cultured cells and Arabidopsis thaliana expressing fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed the different subcellular localizations of the two HPR proteins. Both mRNAs were induced developmentally and by light, but with quantitative differences. Almost equal amounts of the mRNAs were detected in pumpkin cotyledons grown in darkness, but treatment with light greatly enhanced the production of HPR2 mRNA. These findings indicate that light regulates alternative splicing of HPR mRNA, suggesting the presence of a novel mechanism of mRNA maturation, namely light-regulated alternative splicing, in higher plants.

  4. A PB1 T296R substitution enhance polymerase activity and confer a virulent phenotype to a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijun; Cheng, Kaihui; Sun, Weiyang; Zhang, Xinghai; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Hualei; Zhang, Qianyi; Xin, Yue; Xue, Li; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Jing; Yang, Songtao; Qin, Chuan; Wilker, Peter R; Yue, Donghui; Chen, Hualan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-12-01

    While the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus has become established in the human population as a seasonal influenza virus, continued adaptation may alter viral virulence. Here, we passaged a 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (A/Changchun/01/2009) in mice. Serial passage in mice generated viral variants with increased virulence. Adapted variants displayed enhanced replication kinetics in vitro and vivo. Analysis of the variants genomes revealed 6 amino acid changes in the PB1 (T296R), PA (I94V), HA (H3 numbering; N159D, D225G, and R226Q), and NP (D375N). Using reverse genetics, we found that a PB1-T296R substitution found in all adapted viral variants enhanced viral replication kinetics in vitro and vivo, increased viral polymerase activity in human cells, and was sufficient for enhanced virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in mice. Therefore, we defined a novel influenza pathogenic determinant, providing further insights into the pathogenesis of influenza viruses in mammals.

  5. Parg deficiency confers radio-sensitization through enhanced cell death in mouse ES cells exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Hidenori; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Gunji, Akemi; Maeda, Daisuke; Hirai, Takahisa; Poetsch, Anna R; Harada, Hiromi; Yoshida, Tomoko; Sasai, Keisuke; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2013-05-24

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (Parg) is the main enzyme involved in poly(ADP-ribose) degradation. Here, the effects of Parg deficiency on sensitivity to low and high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation were investigated in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mouse Parg(-/-) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 deficient (Parp-1(-/-)) ES cells were used and responses to low and high LET radiation were assessed by clonogenic survival and biochemical and biological analysis methods. Parg(-/-) cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1(-/-) cells. Transient accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) was enhanced in Parg(-/-) cells. Augmented levels of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) from early phase were observed in Parg(-/-) ES cells. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was similar in wild-type and Parp-1(-/-) cells and apoptotic cell death process was mainly observed in the both genotypes. These results suggested that the enhanced sensitivity of Parg(-/-) ES cells to γ-irradiation involved defective repair of DNA double strand breaks. The effects of Parg and Parp-1 deficiency on the ES cell response to carbon-ion irradiation (LET13 and 70 keV/μm) and Fe-ion irradiation (200 keV/μm) were also examined. Parg(-/-) cells were more sensitive to LET 70 keV/μm carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1(-/-) cells. Enhanced apoptotic cell death also accompanied augmented levels of γ-H2AX in a biphasic manner peaked at 1 and 24h. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was not different between wild-type and Parg(-/-) cells. The augmented level of poly(ADP-ribose) accumulation was noted after carbon-ion irradiation compared to γ-irradiation even in the wild-type cells. An enhanced poly(ADP-ribose) accumulation was further observed in Parg(-/-) cells. Both Parg(-/-) cells and Parp-1(-/-) cells did not show sensitization to Fe-ion irradiation. Parg deficiency sensitizes mouse ES cells to a wide therapeutic range of LET radiation through the effects on

  6. The structure of apo and holo forms of xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase from Candida tenuis.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2002-07-16

    Xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase dependent on NADPH or NADH and belongs to the largely monomeric aldo-keto reductase superfamily of proteins. It catalyzes the first step in the assimilation of xylose, an aldose found to be a major constituent monosaccharide of renewable plant hemicellulosic material, into yeast metabolic pathways. It does this by reducing open chain xylose to xylitol, which is reoxidized to xylulose by xylitol dehydrogenase and metabolically integrated via the pentose phosphate pathway. No structure has yet been determined for a xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase or a family 2 aldo-keto reductase. The structures of the Candida tenuis xylose reductase apo- and holoenzyme, which crystallize in spacegroup C2 with different unit cells, have been determined to 2.2 A resolution and an R-factor of 17.9 and 20.8%, respectively. Residues responsible for mediating the novel dimeric interface include Asp-178, Arg-181, Lys-202, Phe-206, Trp-313, and Pro-319. Alignments with other superfamily members indicate that these interactions are conserved in other dimeric xylose reductases but not throughout the remainder of the oligomeric aldo-keto reductases, predicting alternate modes of oligomerization for other families. An arrangement of side chains in a catalytic triad shows that Tyr-52 has a conserved function as a general acid. The loop that folds over the NAD(P)H cosubstrate is disordered in the apo form but becomes ordered upon cosubstrate binding. A slow conformational isomerization of this loop probably accounts for the observed rate-limiting step involving release of cosubstrate. Xylose binding (K(m) = 87 mM) is mediated by interactions with a binding pocket that is more polar than a typical aldo-keto reductase. Modeling of xylose into the active site of the holoenzyme using ordered waters as a guide for sugar hydroxyls suggests a convincing mode of substrate binding.

  7. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  8. Parg deficiency confers radio-sensitization through enhanced cell death in mouse ES cells exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Hidenori; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Gunji, Akemi; Maeda, Daisuke; Hirai, Takahisa; Poetsch, Anna R.; Harada, Hiromi; Yoshida, Tomoko; Sasai, Keisuke; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •Parg{sup −/−} ES cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} ES cells. •Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. •Parg{sup −/−} cells showed defects in DSB repair after carbon-ion irradiation. •PAR accumulation was enhanced after carbon-ion irradiation compared to γ-irradiation. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (Parg) is the main enzyme involved in poly(ADP-ribose) degradation. Here, the effects of Parg deficiency on sensitivity to low and high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation were investigated in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mouse Parg{sup −/−} and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 deficient (Parp-1{sup −/−}) ES cells were used and responses to low and high LET radiation were assessed by clonogenic survival and biochemical and biological analysis methods. Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. Transient accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) was enhanced in Parg{sup −/−} cells. Augmented levels of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) from early phase were observed in Parg{sup −/−} ES cells. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was similar in wild-type and Parp-1{sup −/−} cells and apoptotic cell death process was mainly observed in the both genotypes. These results suggested that the enhanced sensitivity of Parg{sup −/−} ES cells to γ-irradiation involved defective repair of DNA double strand breaks. The effects of Parg and Parp-1 deficiency on the ES cell response to carbon-ion irradiation (LET13 and 70 keV/μm) and Fe-ion irradiation (200 keV/μm) were also examined. Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to LET 70 keV/μm carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. Enhanced apoptotic cell death also accompanied augmented levels of γ-H2AX in a biphasic manner peaked at 1 and 24 h. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was

  9. MAPK-mediated enhanced expression of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase confers the improved adaption to NaCl stress in a halotolerate peppermint (Mentha piperita L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Zhen, Zhen; Guo, Kai; Harvey, Paul; Li, Jishun; Yang, Hetong

    2016-03-01

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-H(+)-ATPase) has been proved to be of importance in maintenance of ion homeostasis inside plant cells under NaCl stress. In this study, the expression levels and salt-tolerate function of V-H(+)-ATPase genes were investigated in the roots and leaves of a halotolerate peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) Keyuan-1 treated with different concentrations of NaCl. Results showed that the expressions of V-H(+)-ATPase in the transcriptional, protein and activity levels were significantly enhanced in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1 compared to the wild-type (WT) peppermint under 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl treatment. Moreover, inhibition experiments exhibited that V-H(+)-ATPase activity played vital roles in the salt tolerance of peppermint Keyuan-1 to 150 mM NaCl stress through increasing the vacuolar H(+) pumping activity and Na(+) compartmentalization capacity. Furthermore, results of Western blots showed that the activity of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was significantly increased under different concentrations of NaCl in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1, which was much higher than that of WT peppermint. Further experiments with inhibitors suggested that this MAPK protein was responsible for the enhanced expression of V-H(+)-ATPase in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1. In response to NaCl stress, increase of cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) occurred upstream of MAPK activation in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1. In all, these findings demonstrated that increased V-H(+)-ATPase activity was positively correlated with the enhanced salt tolerance in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1, providing the theoretic basis for the further development and utilization of peppermint in saline areas.

  10. Insights into substrate specificity of geranylgeranyl reductases revealed by the structure of digeranylgeranylglycerophospholipid reductase from Thermoplasma acidophilum, an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Eguchi, Tadashi; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Rife, Christopher L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Weekes, Dana; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Archaeal membrane lipids consist of branched, saturated hydrocarbons distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes. Digeranylgeranylglycerophospholipid reductase (DGGR) catalyzes the hydrogenation process that converts unsaturated 2,3-di-O-geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate to saturated 2,3-di-O-phytanylglyceryl phosphate as a critical step in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids. The saturation of hydrocarbon chains confers the ability to resist hydrolysis and oxidation and helps archaea withstand extreme conditions. DGGR is a member of the geranylgeranyl reductase (GGR) family that is also widely distributed in bacteria and plants, where the family members are involved in the biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments. We have determined the crystal structure of DGGR from the thermophilic heterotrophic archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum at 1.6 Å resolution, in complex with FAD and a bacterial lipid. The DGGR structure can be assigned to the well-studied, para-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) SCOP superfamily of flavoproteins that include many aromatic hydroxylases and other enzymes with diverse functions. In the DGGR complex, FAD adopts the IN conformation (closed) previously observed in other PHBH flavoproteins. DGGR contains a large substrate-binding site that extends across the entire ligand-binding domain. Electron density corresponding to a bacterial lipid was found within this cavity. The cavity consists of a large opening that tapers down to two narrow curved tunnels that closely mimic the shape of the preferred substrate. We identified a sequence motif, PxxYxWxFP, that defines a specificity pocket in the structure and precisely aligns the double bond of the geranyl group with respect to the FAD cofactor, thus providing a structural basis for the substrate specificity of GGRs. DGGR is likely to share a common mechanism with other PHBH enzymes in which FAD switches between two conformations that correspond to the reductive and oxidative half

  11. Enantioselective imine reduction catalyzed by imine reductases and artificial metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Gamenara, Daniela; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2014-05-21

    Adding value to organic synthesis. Novel imine reductases enable the enantioselective reduction of imines to afford optically active amines. Likewise, novel bioinspired artificial metalloenzymes can perform the same reaction as well. Emerging proof-of-concepts are herein discussed.

  12. Exploration of Nitrate Reductase Metabolic Pathway in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Vinícius; Diniz, Carlos; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Barh, Debmalya

    2017-01-01

    Based on the ability of nitrate reductase synthesis, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is classified into two biovars: Ovis and Equi. Due to the presence of nitrate reductase, the Equi biovar can survive in absence of oxygen. On the other hand, Ovis biovar that does not have nitrate reductase is able to adapt to various ecological niches and can grow on certain carbon sources. Apart from these two biovars, some other strains are also able to carry out the reduction of nitrate. The enzymes that are involved in electron transport chain are also identified by in silico methods. Findings about pathogen metabolism can contribute to the identification of relationship between nitrate reductase and the C. pseudotuberculosis pathogenicity, virulence factors, and discovery of drug targets. PMID:28316974

  13. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease,...

  14. Synthetic fusion-protein containing domains of Bt Cry1Ac and Allium sativum lectin (ASAL) conferred enhanced insecticidal activity against major lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Tajne, Sunita; Boddupally, Dayakar; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-02-10

    Different transgenic crop plants, developed with δ-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and mannose-specific plant lectins, exhibited significant protection against chewing and sucking insects. In the present study, a synthetic gene (cry-asal) encoding the fusion-protein having 488 amino acids, comprising DI and DII domains from Bt Cry1Ac and Allium sativum agglutinin (ASAL), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Ligand blot analysis disclosed that the fusion-protein could bind to more number of receptors of brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) proteins of Helicoverpa armigera. Artificial diet bioassays revealed that 0.025 μg/g and 0.50 μg/g of fusion-protein were sufficient to cause 100% mortality in Pectinophora gossypiella and H. armigera insects, respectively. As compared to Cry1Ac, the fusion-protein showed enhanced (8-fold and 30-fold) insecticidal activity against two major lepidopteran pests. Binding of fusion-protein to the additional receptors in the midgut cells of insects is attributable to its enhanced entomotoxic effect. The synthetic gene, first of its kind, appears promising and might serve as a potential candidate for engineering crop plants against major insect pests.

  15. Enhanced expression of glutamine synthetase (GS1a) confers altered fibre and wood chemistry in field grown hybrid poplar (Populus tremula X alba) (717-1B4).

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather D; Cánovas, Francisco M; Man, Huimin; Kirby, Edward G; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2012-09-01

    Hybrid poplar (Populus tremula X P. alba) genetically engineered to express the pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene (GS1a) has been previously shown to display desirable field performance characteristics, including enhancements in growth and nitrogen use efficiency. Analysis of wood samples from a 3-year-old field trial of three independently transformed GS1a transgenic hybrid poplar lines revealed that, when compared with wild-type controls, ectopic expression of GS1a resulted in alterations in wood properties and wood chemistry. Included were significant enhancements in wood fibre length, wood density, microfibre angle, per cent syringyl lignin and elevated concentrations of wood sugars, specifically glucose, galactose, mannose and xylose. Total extractive content and acid-insoluble lignin were significantly reduced in wood of GS1a transgenics when compared with wild-type trees. Together, these cell wall characteristics resulted in improved wood pulping attributes, including improved lignin solubilization with no concurrent decrease in yield. Trees with increased GS1a expression have improved characteristics for pulp and paper production and hold potential as a feedstock for biofuels production.

  16. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems.

  17. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-09-15

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  18. Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract.

    PubMed

    Snow, Anson; Shieh, Biehuoy; Chang, Kun-Che; Pal, Arttatrana; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; Ruzycki, Philip; Palla, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G Bhanuprakesh; Petrash, J Mark

    2015-06-05

    Aldose reductase (AR) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic eye diseases, including cataract and retinopathy. However, not all diabetics develop ocular complications. Paradoxically, some diabetics with poor metabolic control appear to be protected against retinopathy, while others with a history of excellent metabolic control develop severe complications. These observations indicate that one or more risk factors may influence the likelihood that an individual with diabetes will develop cataracts and/or retinopathy. We hypothesize that an elevated level of AR gene expression could confer higher risk for development of diabetic eye disease. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the onset and severity of diabetes-induced cataract in transgenic mice, designated AR-TG, that were either heterozygous or homozygous for the human AR (AKR1B1) transgene construct. AR-TG mice homozygous for the transgene demonstrated a conditional cataract phenotype, whereby they developed lens vacuoles and cataract-associated structural changes only after induction of experimental diabetes; no such changes were observed in AR-TG heterozygotes or nontransgenic mice with or without experimental diabetes induction. We observed that nondiabetic AR-TG mice did not show lens structural changes even though they had lenticular sorbitol levels almost as high as the diabetic AR-TG lenses that showed early signs of cataract. Over-expression of AR led to increases in the ratio of activated to total levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK1/2), which are known to be involved in cell growth and apoptosis, respectively. After diabetes induction, AR-TG but not WT controls had decreased levels of phosphorylated as well as total ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. These results indicate that high AR expression in the context of hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency may constitute a risk factor that could predispose the

  19. Distribution of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activity among microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouji; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Yoda, Koji; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nimura-Matsune, Kaori; Mura, Kiyoshi; Tokue, Chiyoko; Katoh, Tetzuya; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2004-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) constitutes a large family of enzymes found in microorganisms, animals, and plants, but the detection of the activities of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductases (peroxiredoxin reductases) in cell extracts, and the purification based on peroxide reductase activity, have only been done in bacteria and Trypanosomatidae. A peroxiredoxin reductase (NADH oxidase) from a bacterium, Amphibacillus, displayed only poor activities in the presence of purified Prx from Saccharomyces or Synechocystis, while it is highly active in the presence of bacterial Prx. These results suggested that an enzyme system different from that in bacteria might exist for the reduction of Prx in yeast and cyanobacteria. Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activities were detected in cell extracts of Saccharomyces, Synechocystis, and Chlorella, and the enzyme activities of Saccharomyces and Chlorella were induced under vigorously aerated culture conditions and intensive light exposure conditions, respectively. Partial purification of Prx-linked peroxidase from the induced yeast cells indicated that the Prx-linked peroxidase system consists of two protein components, namely, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. This finding is consistent with the previous report on its purification based on its protein protection activity against oxidation [Chae et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 27670-27678 (1994)]. In this study we have confirmed that Prx-linked peroxidase activity are widely distributed, not only in bacteria species and Trypanosomatidae, but also in yeast and photosynthetic microorganisms, and showed reconstitution of the activity from partially purified interspecies components.

  20. Carbon-carbon double-bond reductases in nature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minmin; Hu, Haihong; Ma, Li; Zhou, Quan; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2014-08-01

    Reduction of C = C bonds by reductases, found in a variety of microorganisms (e.g. yeasts, bacteria, and lower fungi), animals, and plants has applications in the production of metabolites that include pharmacologically active drugs and other chemicals. Therefore, the reductase enzymes that mediate this transformation have become important therapeutic targets and biotechnological tools. These reductases are broad-spectrum, in that, they can act on isolation/conjugation C = C-bond compounds, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives, and nitro compounds. In addition, several mutations in the reductase gene have been identified, some associated with diseases. Several of these reductases have been cloned and/or purified, and studies to further characterize them and determine their structure in order to identify potential industrial biocatalysts are still in progress. In this study, crucial reductases for bioreduction of C = C bonds have been reviewed with emphasis on their principal substrates and effective inhibitors, their distribution, genetic polymorphisms, and implications in human disease and treatment.

  1. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant nitrate reductase expressed and purified from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Phillip; Probst, Corinna; Dammeyer, Thorben; Buchmeier, Sabine; Jänsch, Lothar; Wissing, Josef; Tinnefeld, Philip; Mendel, Ralf R; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Kruse, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We established an expression and purification procedure for recombinant protein production in Neurospora crassa (N. crassa). This Strep-tag® based system was successfully used for purifying recombinant N. crassa nitrate reductase (NR), whose enzymatic activity was compared to recombinant N. crassa NR purified from Escherichia coli. The purity of the two different NR preparations was similar but NR purified from N. crassa showed a significantly higher nitrate turnover rate. Two phosphorylation sites were identified for NR purified from the endogenous expression system. We conclude that homologous expression of N. crassa NR yields a higher active enzyme and propose that NR phosphorylation causes enhanced enzymatic activity.

  2. Identification of a functional antioxidant responsive element in the promoter of the Chinese hamster carbonyl reductase 3 (Chcr3) gene.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takeshi; Taketomi, Ayako; Nakabayashi, Toshikatsu; Nishinaka, Toru; Terada, Tomoyuki

    2015-07-01

    CHCR3, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, is a carbonyl reductase 3 enzyme in Chinese hamsters. Carbonyl reductase 3 in humans has been believed to involve the metabolism and/or pharmacokinetics of anthracycline drugs, and the mechanism underlying the gene regulation has been investigated. In this study, the nucleotide sequence of the Chcr3 promoter was originally determined, and its promoter activity was characterised. The proximal promoter region is TATA-less and GC-rich, similar to the promoter region of human carbonyl reductase 3. Cobalt stimulated the transcriptional activity of the Chcr3 gene. The results of a luciferase gene reporter assay demonstrated that cobalt-induced stimulation required an antioxidant responsive element. Forced expression of Nrf2, the transcription factor that binds to antioxidant responsive elements, enhanced the transcriptional activity of the Chcr3 gene. These results suggest that cobalt induces the expression of the Chcr3 gene via the Nrf2-antioxidant responsive element pathway.

  3. Enhancing caries resistance with a short-pulsed CO2 9.3-μm laser: a laboratory study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Rechmann, Beate M.; Groves, William H.; Le, Charles; Rapozo-Hilo, Marcia L.; Featherstone, John D. B.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to test whether irradiation with a new 9.3µm microsecond short-pulsed CO2-laser enhances enamel caries resistance with and without additional fluoride applications. 101 human enamel samples were divided into 7 groups. Each group was treated with different laser parameters (Carbon-dioxide laser, wavelength 9.3µm, 43Hz pulse-repetition rate, pulse duration between 3μs to 7μs (1.5mJ/pulse to 2.9mJ/pulse). Using a pH-cycling model and cross-sectional microhardness testing determined the mean relative mineral loss delta Z (∆Z) for each group. The pH-cycling was performed with or without additional fluoride. The CO2 9.3μm short-pulsed laser energy rendered enamel caries resistant with and without additional fluoride use.

  4. Conference Paper NFO-7:7th International Conference on Near-Field Optics and Related Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Prof.Dr. Lukas Novotny

    2004-10-18

    The seventh conference in the NFO conference series, held here in Rochester, provided to be the principal forum for advances in sub-wavelength optics, near-field optical microscopy, local field enhancement, instrumental developments and the ever-increasing range of applications. This conference brought together the diverse scientific communities working on the theory and application of near-field optics (NFO) and related techniques.

  5. Microsecond subdomain folding in dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Iwakura, Masahiro; Matthews, C Robert; Bilsel, Osman

    2011-07-08

    The characterization of microsecond dynamics in the folding of multisubdomain proteins has been a major challenge in understanding their often complex folding mechanisms. Using a continuous-flow mixing device coupled with fluorescence lifetime detection, we report the microsecond folding dynamics of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a two-subdomain α/β/α sandwich protein known to begin folding in this time range. The global dimensions of early intermediates were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer, and the dynamic properties of the local Trp environments were monitored by fluorescence lifetime detection. We found that substantial collapse occurs in both the locally connected adenosine binding subdomain and the discontinuous loop subdomain within 35 μs of initiation of folding from the urea unfolded state. During the fastest observable ∼550 μs phase, the discontinuous loop subdomain further contracts, concomitant with the burial of Trp residue(s), as both subdomains achieve a similar degree of compactness. Taken together with previous studies in the millisecond time range, a hierarchical assembly of DHFR--in which each subdomain independently folds, subsequently docks, and then anneals into the native conformation after an initial heterogeneous global collapse--emerges. The progressive acquisition of structure, beginning with a continuously connected subdomain and spreading to distal regions, shows that chain entropy is a significant organizing principle in the folding of multisubdomain proteins and single-domain proteins. Subdomain folding also provides a rationale for the complex kinetics often observed.

  6. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  7. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). 501.32... SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32 Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). (a) At any time following commencement of a...

  8. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1... Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a) The... to appear at a specified time and place for a conference prior to a hearing, or to submit...

  9. Band-offsets at BaTiO3/Cu2O heterojunction and enhanced photoelectrochemical response: theory and experiment(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dipika; Satsangi, Vibha R.; Dass Kaura, Sahab; Shrivastav, Rohit; Waghmare, Umesh V.

    2016-10-01

    Band-offsets at BaTiO3/Cu2O heterojunction and enhanced photoelectrochemical response: theory and experiment Dipika Sharmaa, Vibha R. Satsangib, Rohit Shrivastava, Umesh V. Waghmarec, Sahab Dassa aDepartment of Chemistry, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Agra-282 110 (India) bDepartment of Physics and Computer Sciences, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Agra-282 110 (India) cTheoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore-560 064 (India) * Phone: +91-9219695960. Fax: +91-562-2801226. E-mail: drsahabdas@gmail.com. Study on photoelectrochemical activity of pristine BaTiO3, Cu2O and BaTiO3/Cu2O heterojunction has been carried out using DFT based band offsets and charge carriers effective mass calculations and their experimental verification. The results of DFT calculations show that BaTiO3 and Cu2O have staggered type band alignment after the heterojunction formation and high mobility of electrons in Cu2O as compared to the electrons in BaTiO3. Staggered type band edges alignment and high mobility of electrons and holes improved the separation of photo-generated charge carriers in BaTiO3/Cu2O heterojunction. To validate the theoretical results experiments were carried out on pristine BaTiO3, Cu2O and BaTiO3/Cu2O heterojunction with varying thickness of Cu2O. All samples were characterized by X- Ray Diffractometer, SEM and UV-Vis spectrometry. Nanostructured thin films of pristine BaTiO3, Cu2O and BaTiO3/Cu2O heterojunction were used as photoelectrode in the photoelectrochemical cell for water splitting reaction. Maximum photocurrent density of 1.44 mA/cm2 at 0.90 V/SCE was exhibited by 442 nm thick BaTiO3/Cu2O heterojunction photoelectrode Increased photocurrent density and enhanced photoconversion efficiency, exhibited by the heterojunction may be attributed to improved conductivity and enhanced separation of the photogenerated carriers at the BaTiO3/Cu2O interface. The experimental results and first

  10. Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas enzymes activate metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivate metronidazole (nitroimidazole reductases).

    PubMed

    Pal, Dibyarupa; Banerjee, Sulagna; Cui, Jike; Schwartz, Aaron; Ghosh, Sudip K; Samuelson, John

    2009-02-01

    Infections with Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, and Trichomonas vaginalis, which cause diarrhea, dysentery, and vaginitis, respectively, are each treated with metronidazole. Here we show that Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas have oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase (ntr) genes which are homologous to those genes that have nonsense mutations in metronidazole-resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates. Entamoeba and Trichomonas also have nim genes which are homologous to those genes expressed in metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolates. Recombinant Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas nitroreductases used NADH rather than the NADPH used by Helicobacter, and two recombinant Entamoeba nitroreductases increased the metronidazole sensitivity of transformed Escherichia coli strains. Conversely, the recombinant nitroimidazole reductases (NIMs) of Entamoeba and Trichmonas conferred very strong metronidazole resistance to transformed bacteria. The Ehntr1 gene of the genome project HM-1:IMSS strain of Entamoeba histolytica had a nonsense mutation, and the same nonsense mutation was present in 3 of 22 clinical isolates of Entamoeba. While ntr and nim mRNAs were variably expressed by cultured Entamoeba and Trichomonas isolates, there was no relationship to metronidazole sensitivity. We conclude that microaerophilic protists have bacterium-like enzymes capable of activating metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivating metronidazole (NIMs). While Entamoeba and Trichomonas displayed some of the changes (nonsense mutations and gene overexpression) associated with metronidazole resistance in bacteria, these changes did not confer metronidazole resistance to the microaerophilic protists examined here.

  11. Oral ingestion of Capsaicin, the pungent component of chili pepper, enhances a discreet population of macrophages and confers protection from autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nevius, E; Srivastava, P K; Basu, S

    2012-01-01

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1) is expressed on immune cells as well as on sensory neurons. Here we report that VR1 can regulate immunological events in the gut in response to its ligand Capsaicin (CP), a nutritional factor, the pungent component of chili peppers. Oral administration of CP attenuates the proliferation and activation of autoreactive T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs) but not other lymph nodes, and protects mice from development of type 1 diabetes (T1D). This is a general phenomenon and not restricted to one particular strain of mice. Engagement of VR1 enhances a discreet population of CD11b(+)/F4/80(+) macrophages in PLN, which express anti-inflammatory factors interleukin (IL)-10 and PD-L1. This population is essential for CP-mediated attenuation of T-cell proliferation in an IL-10-dependent manner. Lack of VR1 expression fails to inhibit proliferation of autoreactive T cells, which is partially reversed in (VR1(+/+) → VR1(-/-)) bone marrow chimeric mice, implying the role of VR1 in crosstalk between neuronal and immunological responses in vivo. These findings imply that endogenous ligands of VR1 can have profound effect on gut-mediated immune tolerance and autoimmunity by influencing the nutrient-immune interactions.

  12. Blood test using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with colloidal silver nanoparticle substrate to detect polyps and colorectal cancer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Feng, Shangyuan; Tai, Isabella T.; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer and forth leading cause of cancer-related death. Early diagnosis is the key to long-term patient survival. Programmatic screening for the general population has shown to be cost-effective in reducing the incidence and mortality from CRC. Current CRC screening strategy relies on a broad range of test techniques such as fecal based tests and endoscopic exams. Occult blood tests like fecal immunochemical test is a cost effective way to detect CRC but have limited diagnostic values in detecting adenomatous polyp, the most treatable precursor to CRC. In the present work, we proposed the use of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with silver nanoparticles as substrate to analyze blood plasma for detecting both CRC and adenomatous polyps. Blood plasma samples collected from healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with adenomas and CRC were prepared with nanoparticles and measured using a real-time fiber optic probe based Raman system. The collected SERS spectra are analyzed with partial least squares-discriminant analysis. Classification of normal versus CRC plus adenomatous polyps achieved diagnostic sensitivity of 86.4% and specificity of 80%. This exploratory study suggests that blood plasma SERS analysis has potential to become a screening test for detecting both CRC and adenomas.

  13. Non-destructive optical clearing technique enhances optical coherence tomography (OCT) for real-time, 3D histomorphometry of brain tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Akshay; Chang, Theodore H.; Chou, Li-Dek; Ramalingam, Tirunelveli S.

    2016-03-01

    Evaluation of neurodegenerative disease often requires examination of brain morphology. Volumetric analysis of brain regions and structures can be used to track developmental changes, progression of disease, and the presence of transgenic phenotypes. Current standards for microscopic investigation of brain morphology are limited to detection of superficial structures at a maximum depth of 300μm. While histological techniques can provide detailed cross-sections of brain structures, they require complicated tissue preparation and the ultimate destruction of the sample. A non-invasive, label-free imaging modality known as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can produce 3-dimensional reconstructions through high-speed, cross-sectional scans of biological tissue. Although OCT allows for the preservation of intact samples, the highly scattering and absorbing properties of biological tissue limit imaging depth to 1-2mm. Optical clearing agents have been utilized to increase imaging depth by index matching and lipid digestion, however, these contemporary techniques are expensive and harsh on tissues, often irreversibly denaturing proteins. Here we present an ideal optical clearing agent that offers ease-of-use and reversibility. Similar to how SeeDB has been effective for microscopy, our fructose-based, reversible optical clearing technique provides improved OCT imaging and functional immunohistochemical mapping of disease. Fructose is a natural, non-toxic sugar with excellent water solubility, capable of increasing tissue transparency and reducing light scattering. We will demonstrate the improved depth-resolving performance of OCT for enhanced whole-brain imaging of normal and diseased murine brains following a fructose clearing treatment. This technique potentially enables rapid, 3-dimensional evaluation of biological tissues at axial and lateral resolutions comparable to histopathology.

  14. A proteomics approach to study the molecular basis of enhanced salt tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) conferred by the root mutualistic fungus Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, Mehdi; Khatabi, Behnam; Sepehri, Mozhgan; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam; Mardi, Mohsen; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2013-06-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-interacting mutualistic fungus capable of enhancing plant growth, increasing plant resistance to a wide variety of pathogens, and improving plant stress tolerance under extreme environmental conditions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which P. indica can improve plant tolerance to stresses will pave the way to identifying the major mechanisms underlying plant adaptability to environmental stresses. We conducted greenhouse experiments at three different salt levels (0, 100 and 300 mM NaCl) on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivar "Pallas" inoculated with P. indica. Based on the analysis of variance, P. indica had a significant impact on the barley growth and shoot biomass under normal and salt stress conditions. P. indica modulated ion accumulation in colonized plants by increasing the foliar potassium (K(+))/sodium (Na(+)) ratio, as it is considered a reliable indicator of salt stress tolerance. P. indica induced calcium (Ca(2+)) accumulation and likely influenced the stress signal transduction. Subsequently, proteomic analysis of the barley leaf sheath using two-dimensional electrophoresis resulted in detection of 968 protein spots. Of these detected spots, the abundance of 72 protein spots changed significantly in response to salt treatment and P. indica-root colonization. Mass spectrometry analysis of responsive proteins led to the identification of 51 proteins. These proteins belonged to different functional categories including photosynthesis, cell antioxidant defense, protein translation and degradation, energy production, signal transduction and cell wall arrangement. Our results showed that P. indica induced a systemic response to salt stress by altering the physiological and proteome responses of the plant host.

  15. Co-silencing of tomato S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase genes confers increased immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and enhanced tolerance to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Yafen; Liu, Shixia; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming

    2015-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), catalyzing the reversible hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) to adenosine and homocysteine, is a key enzyme that maintain the cellular methylation potential in all organisms. We report here the biological functions of tomato SlSAHHs in stress response. The tomato genome contains three SlSAHH genes that encode SlSAHH proteins with high level of sequence identity. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that SlSAHHs responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and Botrytis cinerea as well as to defense signaling hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-based knockdown of individual SlSAHH gene did not affect the growth performance and the response to Pst DC3000. However, co-silencing of three SlSAHH genes using a conserved sequence led to significant inhibition of vegetable growth. The SlSAHH-co-silenced plants displayed increased resistance to Pst DC3000 but did not alter the resistance to B. cinerea. Co-silencing of SlSAHHs resulted in constitutively activated defense responses including elevated SA level, upregulated expression of defense-related and PAMP-triggered immunity marker genes and increased callose deposition and H2O2 accumulation. Furthermore, the SlSAHH-co-silenced plants also exhibited enhanced drought stress tolerance although they had relatively small roots. These data demonstrate that, in addition to the functions in growth and development, SAHHs also play important roles in regulating biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants.

  16. A role for a menthone reductase in resistance against microbial pathogens in plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Lee, Byung Gil; Kim, Nak Hyun; Park, Yong; Lim, Chae Woo; Song, Hyun Kyu; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2008-09-01

    Plants elaborate a vast array of enzymes that synthesize defensive secondary metabolites in response to pathogen attack. Here, we isolated the pathogen-responsive CaMNR1 [menthone: (+)-(3S)-neomenthol reductase] gene, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, from pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that purified CaMNR1 and its ortholog AtSDR1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalyze a menthone reduction with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as a cofactor to produce neomenthol with antimicrobial activity. CaMNR1 and AtSDR1 also possess a significant catalytic activity for neomenthol oxidation. We examined the cellular function of the CaMNR1 gene by virus-induced gene silencing and ectopic overexpression in pepper and Arabidopsis plants, respectively. CaMNR1-silenced pepper plants were significantly more susceptible to Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria and Colletotrichum coccodes infection and expressed lower levels of salicylic acid-responsive CaBPR1 and CaPR10 and jasmonic acid-responsive CaDEF1. CaMNR1-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants exhibited enhanced resistance to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and the biotrophic pathogen Hyaloperonospora parasitica isolate Noco2, accompanied by the induction of AtPR1 and AtPDF1.2. In contrast, mutation in the CaMNR1 ortholog AtSDR1 significantly enhanced susceptibility to both pathogens. Together, these results indicate that the novel menthone reductase gene CaMNR1 and its ortholog AtSDR1 positively regulate plant defenses against a broad spectrum of pathogens.

  17. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November...

  18. Sulfite reductase protects plants against sulfite toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Rheinlands Ruhm') and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation.

  19. Environmental Adaptation of Dihydrofolate Reductase from Deep-Sea Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ohmae, Eiji; Gekko, Kunihiko; Kato, Chiaki

    2015-01-01

    In order to elucidate the molecular adaptation mechanisms of enzymes to the high hydrostatic pressure of the deep sea, we cloned, purified, and characterized more than ten dihydrofolate reductases (DHFRs) from bacteria living in deep-sea and ambient atmospheric pressure environments. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these DHFRs indicate the deep-sea bacteria are adapted to their environments after the differentiation of their genus from ancestors inhabiting atmospheric pressure environments. In particular, the backbone structure of the deep-sea DHFR from Moritella profunda (mpDHFR) almost overlapped with the normal homolog from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR). Thus, those of other DHFRs would also overlap on the basis of their sequence similarities. However, the structural stability of both DHFRs was quite different: compared to ecDHFR, mpDHFR was more thermally stable but less stable against urea and pressure unfolding. The smaller volume changes due to unfolding suggest that the native structure of mpDHFR has a smaller cavity and/or enhanced hydration compared to ecDHFR. High hydrostatic pressure reduced the enzymatic activity of many DHFRs, but three deep-sea DHFRs and the D27E mutant of ecDHFR exhibited pressure-dependent activation. The inverted activation volumes from positive to negative values indicate the modification of their structural dynamics, conversion of the rate-determining step of the enzymatic reaction, and different contributions of the cavity and hydration to the transition-state structure. Since the cavity and hydration depend on amino acid side chains, DHFRs would adapt to the deep-sea environment by regulating the cavity and hydration by substituting their amino acid side chains without altering their backbone structure. The results of this study clearly indicate that the cavity and hydration play important roles in the adaptation of enzymes to the deep-sea environment.

  20. RCDPM 1992 Conference Book of Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1992

    This booklet contains 51 abstracts of papers presented at the 1992 conference for the Research Council for Diagnostic and Prescriptive Mathematics (RCDPM). Topics covered include: the use of expressive writing to enhance metacognition, adult assessment, cooperative learning assessment, visualization in problem solving, deaf students' beliefs about…

  1. Uterine glutathione reductase activity: modulation by estrogens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, M; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Pedrón, N N; Hicks, J J

    1999-10-29

    The aim of this study was to determine whether glutathione reductase activity in uterine tissue is regulated by sex hormones. In spayed rats uterine glutathione reductase was significantly increased by exogenous estrogen (P< 0.01), progesterone (P< 0.01) or estrogen plus progesterone (P<0.01). When enzyme activity is expressed per mg protein, daily administration of estrogen or progesterone induces a progressive increase of this enzyme between 24 to 48 h or 24 to 72 h of treatment, respectively. Whereas the combination of both steroids causes an earlier and higher increase in glutathione reductase activity at 24 h of treatment. Estradiol singly or in combination with progesterone induced the highest protein concentration in the uterus. Whereas uterine DNA concentration is only significantly affected by estradiol. Our results suggest that uterine glutathione reductase is regulated by estradiol and progesterone and may be involved in maintaining levels of reduced glutathione in the uterus. This compound may be required for control of the redox state of thiol groups and in detoxification reactions involving H2O2 and electrophylic substances. The antioxidant action of estrogens is partially due to the stimulation of glutathione reductase.

  2. HMG-CoA reductase guides migrating primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, M; Broihier, H T; Moore, L A; Lehmann, R

    1998-12-03

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is best known for catalysing a rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis, but it also participates in the production of a wide variety of other compounds. Some clinical benefits attributed to inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase are now thought to be independent of any serum cholesterol-lowering effect. Here we describe a new cholesterol-independent role for HMG-CoA reductase, in regulating a developmental process: primordial germ cell migration. We show that in Drosophila this enzyme is highly expressed in the somatic gonad and that it is necessary for primordial germ cells to migrate to this tissue. Misexpression of HMG-CoA reductase is sufficient to attract primordial germ cells to tissues other than the gonadal mesoderm. We conclude that the regulated expression of HMG-CoA reductase has a critical developmental function in providing spatial information to guide migrating primordial germ cells.

  3. Bacterial morphinone reductase is related to Old Yellow Enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    French, C E; Bruce, N C

    1995-01-01

    Morphinone reductase, produced by Pseudomonas putida M10, catalyses the NADH-dependent saturation of the carbon-carbon double bond of morphinone and codeinone, and is believed to be involved in the metabolism of morphine and codeine. The structural gene encoding morphinone reductase, designated morB, was cloned from Ps. putida M10 genomic DNA by the use of degenerate oligonucleotide probes based on elements of the amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme. Sequence analysis and structural characteristics indicated that morphinone reductase is related to the flavoprotein alpha/beta-barrel oxidoreductases, and is particularly similar to Old Yellow Enzyme of Saccharomyces spp. and the related oestrogen-binding protein of Candida albicans. Expressed sequence tags from several plant species show high homology to these enzymes, suggesting the presence of a family of enzymes conserved in plants and fungi. Although related bacterial proteins are known, morphinone reductase appears to be more similar to the eukaryotic proteins. Morphinone reductase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and has potential applications for the industrial preparation of semisynthetic opiates. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:8554504

  4. Purification and properties of proline reductase from Clostridium sticklandii.

    PubMed

    Seto, B; Stadtman, T C

    1976-04-25

    Proline reductase of Clostridium sticklandii is a membrane-bound protein and is released by treatment with detergents. The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity and is estimated by gel filtration and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation to have a molecular weight of 298,000 to 327,000. A minimum molecular weight of 30,000 to 31,000 was calculated on the basis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and amino acid composition. Amino acid analysis showed a preponderance of acidic amino acids. No tryptophan was detected in the protein either spectrophotometrically or by amino acid analysis. A total of 20 sulfhydryl groups measured by titration of the reduced protein with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) is in agreement with 20 cystic acid residues determined in hydrolysates of performic acid-oxidized protein. No molybdenum, iron, or selenium was found in the pure protein. Although NADH is the physiological electron donor for the proline reductase complex, the purified 300,000 molecular weight reductase component is inactive in the presence of NADH in vitro. Dithiothreitol, in contrast, can serve as electron donor both for unpurified (putative proline reductase complex) and purified proline reductase in vitro.

  5. Annual Quality Assurance Conference Presentations by Johnathan Beck

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    25th Annual Quality Assurance Conference Presentation: Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts –Rules and Requirements and Presentation: Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2) Cryptosporidium Monitoring

  6. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes.…

  7. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas…

  8. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  9. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  10. Bioelectrocatalysts: engineered oxidoreductase system for utilization of fumarate reductase in chemical synthesis, detection, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Doo Hyun; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    2003-10-01

    Fumarate reductase was used as a model oxidoreductase to demonstrate continuous electrical cofactor reduction-oxidation during the bioelectrochemical synthesis and detection of chemicals. The enzyme preparation was immobilized onto a graphite felt electrode that was modified with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), neutral red, and fumarate reductase (which contained menaquinone) were covalently linked by peptide bonds to the CMC. The electron mediator neutral red allowed NAD and menaquinone to be recycled electrically during enzymatic chemical synthesis. Succinate detection by the bioelectrocatalyst was linear from 5 microM to 10 mM succinate. Fumarate synthesis using this bioelectrode was dependent on succinate utilization and resulted in proportional production of electricity and fumarate. Succinate synthesis using this bioelectrocatalyst was dependent on current and fumarate concentration. This bioelectrocatalyst system may enhance the utility of menaquinone- and/or pyridine nucleotide-linked oxidoreductases in diverse enzymatic fuel cells and sensors. It may also enhance the utility of oxidoreductase-based chemical synthesis systems because it eliminates the problem of cofactor recycling.

  11. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  12. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  13. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  14. The Anticancer Agent Chaetocin Is a Competitive Substrate and Inhibitor of Thioredoxin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Tibodeau, Jennifer D.; Benson, Linda M.; Isham, Crescent R.; Owen, Whyte G.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We recently reported that the antineoplastic thiodioxopiperazine natural product chaetocin potently induces cellular oxidative stress, thus selectively killing cancer cells. In pursuit of underlying molecular mechanisms, we now report that chaetocin is a competitive and selective substrate for the oxidative stress mitigation enzyme thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) with lower Km than the TrxR1 native substrate thioredoxin (Trx; chaetocin Km = 4.6 ± 0.6 μM, Trx Km = 104.7 ± 26 μM), thereby attenuating reduction of the critical downstream ROS remediation substrate Trx at achieved intracellular concentrations. Consistent with a role for TrxR1 targeting in the anticancer effects of chaetocin, overexpression of the TrxR1 downstream effector Trx in HeLa cells conferred resistance to chaetocin-induced, but not to doxorubicin-induced, cytotoxicity. As the TrxR/Trx pathway is of central importance in limiting cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS)—and as chaetocin exerts its selective anticancer effects via ROS imposition—the inhibition of TrxR1 by chaetocin has potential to explain its selective anticancer effects. These observations have important implications not just with regard to the mechanism of action and clinical development of chaetocin and related thiodioxopiperazines, but also with regard to the utility of molecular targets within the thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin pathway in the development of novel candidate antineoplastic agents. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1097–1106. PMID:18999987

  15. Ten steps to successful conference presentations.

    PubMed

    Hardicre, Jayne; Coad, Jane; Devitt, Patric

    Delivering an oral presentation at a conference can be a demanding yet exhilarating experience. It can create a variety of emotions such as excitement, joy and achievement--but for many the overriding emotions are those of anxiety, fear and dread. A certain amount of nervousness can enhance your performance but how can you avoid pre-presentation nerves developing into full-blown anxiety and fear. The key to successful conference presentation is meticulous preparation and practise. This article guides you through ten steps to help maximize your success and enjoyment.

  16. Synergy between broccoli sprout extract and selenium in the upregulation of thioredoxin reductase in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Wu, Kun; Howie, A Forbes; Beckett, Geoffrey J; Wang, Wei; Bao, Yongping

    2008-09-01

    Dietary isothiocyanates and selenium (Se) can up-regulate thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1) in cultured human HepG2 and MCF-7 cells [Zhang et al. (2003). Synergy between sulforaphane and selenium in the induction of thioredoxin reductase 1 requires both transcriptional and translational modulation. Carcinogenesis, 24, 497-503; Wang et al. (2005). Sulforaphane, erucin and iberin up-regulate thioredoxin reductase expression in human MCF-7 cells. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53, 1417-1421] at both the protein and mRNA levels. In this study, broccoli sprout extract (a rich source of the isothiocyanates sulforaphane and iberin) and Se interacted synergistically to induce TR1 in immortalised human hepatocytes. Broccoli sprout extracts containing 1.6, 4 and 8μM isothiocyanates were tested for their ability to induce TR1 at the protein and mRNA level. Although induction of TR1 mRNA by broccoli sprout extract (1.6-8μM) was only 1.7-2.2-fold, co-treatment with Se (0.2-1μM) enhanced the expression of TR1 mRNA (3.0-3.3-fold). Moreover, broccoli sprout extract induced the cellular concentration of TR1 and TR enzymatic activity, an induction that was augmented by Se addition. Thus, broccoli sprout extract (8μM) and Se induced cellular TR1 concentration and enzymatic activity 3.7- and 5-fold respectively, whereas, Se or broccoli sprout extract alone produced an induction of only approximately 2-fold. These data suggest that dietary isothiocyanates from broccoli sprouts and Se are important agents in the regulation of redox status in human liver cells. The synergistic effect between isothiocyanates and Se at physiologically-relevant concentrations on the induction of TR1 may play an important role in protection against oxidative stress.

  17. Selective non-steroidal inhibitors of 5 alpha-reductase type 1.

    PubMed

    Occhiato, Ernesto G; Guarna, Antonio; Danza, Giovanna; Serio, Mario

    2004-01-01

    The enzyme 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha R) catalyses the reduction of testosterone (T) into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The abnormal production of DHT is associated to pathologies of the main target organs of this hormone: the prostate and the skin. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostate cancer, acne, androgenetic alopecia in men, and hirsutism in women appear related to the DHT production. Two isozymes of 5 alpha-reductase have been cloned, expressed and characterized (5 alpha R-1 and 5 alpha R-2). They share a poor homology, have different chromosomal localization, enzyme kinetic parameters, and tissue expression patterns. Since 5 alpha R-1 and 5 alpha R-2 are differently distributed in the androgen target organs, a different involvement of the two isozymes in the pathogenesis of prostate and skin disorders can be hypothesized. High interest has been paid to the synthesis of inhibitors of 5 alpha-reductase for the treatment of DHT related pathologies, and the selective inhibition of any single isozyme represents a great challenge for medical and pharmaceutical research in order to have more specific drugs. At present, no 5 alpha R-1 inhibitor is marketed for the treatment of 5 alpha R-1 related pathologies but pharmaceutical research is very active in this field. This paper will review the major classes of 5 alpha R inhibitors focusing in particular on non-steroidal inhibitors and on structural features that enhance the selectivity versus the type 1 isozyme. Biological tests to assess the inhibitory activity towards the two 5 alpha R isozymes will be also discussed.

  18. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conferences; conference memorandum . 6101.11 Section 6101.11 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  19. Pneumocystis melanins confer enhanced organism viability.

    PubMed

    Icenhour, Crystal R; Kottom, Theodore J; Limper, Andrew H

    2006-06-01

    Pneumocystis continues to represent an important opportunistic fungal pathogen of those with compromised immunity. Thus, it is crucial to identify factors that affect its viability and pathogenicity. We previously reported the first identification of melanins in Pneumocystis. In the present study, we sought to further characterize these components and define the function for these melanins. Melanins extracted from Pneumocystis and melanized Pneumocystis cells were analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, revealing spectra consistent with melanins from other fungi. Immunofluorescence assays using anti-melanin monoclonal antibodies showed that melanins are widely present across Pneumocystis host species, including mouse-, ferret-, and human-derived Pneumocystis organisms, as well as Pneumocystis carinii derived from rat. Using immunoelectron microscopy, melanins were found to localize to the cell wall and cytoplasm of P. carinii cysts, as well as to intracystic bodies within mature cysts. Next, the role of melanins on the maintenance of Pneumocystis viability was determined by using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR measurement of the heat shock protein mRNA under adverse environmental conditions. Using a new method to promote the melanization of Pneumocystis, we observed that strongly melanized Pneumocystis retained viability to a greater degree when exposed to UV irradiation or desiccation compared to less-pigmented organisms. These studies support our previous identification of Pneumocystis melanins across the genus, further characterize these Pneumocystis components, and demonstrate that melanins protect Pneumocystis from environmental stressors.

  20. Second National Space Grant Conference report, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimsoth, Jeffrey T. (Editor); Dasch, E. Julius (Editor); Devon, Richard F. (Editor); Keffer, Lynne (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The conference goals were: (1) to provide a setting for Space Grant College/Consortia leaders to meet and discuss program plans; (2) to provide participants with updates on major NASA science and engineering programs and educational affairs activities; and (3) to hold workshops on themes of critical importance to the program. The conference agenda focused primarily on a series of 15 workshops in which program directors or their designees discussed components of the Space Grant Program. These components - outreach, pre-college education, publicity, and organization - were earlier incorporated in very specific ways within individual program plans. The conference, thus, afforded those attending an opportunity to exchange information and concerns regarding program elements while exploring ways to structure, enhance and perhaps broaden their program plans. Space Grant representatives also discussed with headquarters officials ways in which the Space Grant Program itself should be evaluated.

  1. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  2. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  3. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  4. Tackling conference carbon footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozier, Jim

    2016-12-01

    In reply to Margaret Harris's Lateral Thoughts article "Putting my foot down", which discussed the challenges of attending a conference with a physical disability (October p76) and a subsequent letter by Anna Wood (November p18).

  5. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  6. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  7. A detoxifying oxygen reductase in the anaerobic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Vicente, João B; Tran, Vy; Pinto, Liliana; Teixeira, Miguel; Singh, Upinder

    2012-09-01

    We report the characterization of a bacterial-type oxygen reductase abundant in the cytoplasm of the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Upon host infection, E. histolytica is confronted with various oxygen tensions in the host intestine, as well as increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species at the site of local tissue inflammation. Resistance to oxygen-derived stress thus plays an important role in the pathogenic potential of E. histolytica. The genome of E. histolytica has four genes that encode flavodiiron proteins, which are bacterial-type oxygen or nitric oxide reductases and were likely acquired by lateral gene transfer from prokaryotes. The EhFdp1 gene has higher expression in virulent than in nonvirulent Entamoeba strains and species, hinting that the response to oxidative stress may be one correlate of virulence potential. We demonstrate that EhFdp1 is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of E. histolytica and that the protein levels are markedly increased (up to ~5-fold) upon oxygen exposure. Additionally, we produced fully functional recombinant EhFdp1 and demonstrated that this enzyme is a specific and robust oxygen reductase but has poor nitric oxide reductase activity. This observation represents a new mechanism of oxygen resistance in the anaerobic protozoan pathogen E. histolytica.

  8. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  9. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  10. Obtaining partial purified xylose reductase from Candida guilliermondii

    PubMed Central

    Tomotani, Ester Junko; de Arruda, Priscila Vaz; Vitolo, Michele; de Almeida Felipe, Maria das Graças

    2009-01-01

    The enzymatic bioconversion of xylose into xylitol by xylose reductase (XR) is an alternative for chemical and microbiological processes. The partial purified XR was obtained by using the following three procedures: an agarose column, a membrane reactor or an Amicon Ultra-15 50K Centrifugal Filter device at yields of 40%, 7% and 67%, respectively. PMID:24031408

  11. Dissimilatory Nitrite Reductase Genes from Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Casciotti, Karen L.; Ward, Bess B.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase gene (nirK) was discovered in several isolates of β-subdivision ammonia-oxidizing bacteria using PCR and DNA sequencing. PCR primers Cunir3 and Cunir4 were designed based on published nirK sequences from denitrifying bacteria and used to amplify a 540-bp fragment of the nirK gene from Nitrosomonas marina and five additional isolates of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Amplification products of the expected size were cloned and sequenced. Alignment of the nucleic acid and deduced amino acid (AA) sequences shows significant similarity (62 to 75% DNA, 58 to 76% AA) between nitrite reductases present in these nitrifiers and the copper-containing nitrite reductase found in classic heterotrophic denitrifiers. While the presence of a nitrite reductase in Nitrosomonas europaea is known from early biochemical work, preliminary sequence data from its genome indicate a rather low similarity to the denitrifier nirKs. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial nitrifier nirK sequences indicates that the topology of the nirK tree corresponds to the 16S rRNA and amoA trees. While the role of nitrite reduction in the metabolism of nitrifying bacteria is still uncertain, these data show that the nirK gene is present in closely related nitrifying isolates from many oceanographic regions and suggest that nirK sequences retrieved from the environment may include sequences from ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:11319103

  12. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  15. Dihydrofolate reductase: A potential drug target in trypanosomes and leishmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccotto, Fabio; Martin, Andrew C. R.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    1998-05-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase has successfully been used as a drug target in the area of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-malarial chemotherapy. Little has been done to evaluate it as a drug target for treatment of the trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis. A crystal structure of Leishmania major dihydrofolate reductase has been published. In this paper, we describe the modelling of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei dihydrofolate reductases based on this crystal structure. These structures and models have been used in the comparison of protozoan, bacterial and human enzymes in order to highlight the different features that can be used in the design of selective anti-protozoan agents. Comparison has been made between residues present in the active site, the accessibility of these residues, charge distribution in the active site, and the shape and size of the active sites. Whilst there is a high degree of similarity between protozoan, human and bacterial dihydrofolate reductase active sites, there are differences that provide potential for selective drug design. In particular, we have identified a set of residues which may be important for selective drug design and identified a larger binding pocket in the protozoan than the human and bacterial enzymes.

  16. The Kinetics and Inhibition of the Enzyme Methemoglobin Reductase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, A. G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry experiment which involves the preparation and kinetics of an oxidation-reduction enzyme system, methemoglobin reductase. A crude enzyme extract is prepared and assayed spectrophotometrically. The enzyme system obeys Michaelis-Menton kinetics with respect to both substrate and the NADH cofactor. (MLH)

  17. [Malate oxidation by mitochondrial succinate:ubiquinone-reductase].

    PubMed

    Belikova, Iu O; Kotliar, A B

    1988-04-01

    Succinate:ubiquinone reductase was shown to catalyze the oxidation of L- and D-stereoisomers of malate by artificial electron acceptors and ubiquinone. The rate of malate oxidation by succinate:ubiquinone reductase is by two orders of magnitude lower than that for the natural substrate--succinate. The values of kinetic constants for the oxidation of D- and L-stereoisomers of malate are equal to: V infinity = 0.1 mumol/min/mg protein, Km = 2 mM and V infinity = 0.05 mumol/min/mg protein, Km = 2 mM, respectively. The malate dehydrogenase activity is fully inhibited by the inhibitors of the dicarboxylate-binding site of the enzyme, i.e., N-ethylmaleimide and malonate and is practically insensitive to carboxin, a specific inhibitor of the ubiquinone-binding center. The enol form of oxaloacetate was shown to be the product of malate oxidation by succinate:ubiquinone reductase. The kinetics of inhibition of the enzyme activity by the ketone and enol forms of oxaloacetate was studied. Both forms of oxaloacetate effectively inhibit the succinate:ubiquinone reductase reaction.

  18. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction. PMID:26412036

  19. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-28

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  20. [Inhibition of aldose reductase by Chinese herbal medicine].

    PubMed

    Mao, X M; Zhang, J Q

    1993-10-01

    Seven Chinese herbal drugs were screened for experimental inhibition of lens aldose reductase activity, among which quercetin exhibited potent enzyme-inhibitory activities in vitro. Its IC50 value was 3.44 x 10(-7) mol/L. It may be helpful in the prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic complications.

  1. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J. . E-mail: Robert.Hondal@uvm.edu

    2006-08-04

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k {sub cat} of 610 min{sup -1} and a K {sub m} of 610 {mu}M using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k {sub cat} is 25% of the k {sub cat} of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate.

  2. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  3. The polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, methionine synthase, methionine synthase reductase, and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results.

  4. The Polymorphisms in Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase, Methionine Synthase, Methionine Synthase Reductase, and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results. PMID:22719222

  5. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  6. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) gene in Saussurea medusa.

    PubMed

    Li, Houhua; Qiu, Jian; Chen, Fudong; Lv, Xiaofen; Fu, Chunxiang; Zhao, Dexiu; Hua, Xuejun; Zhao, Qiao

    2012-03-01

    Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), which catalyzes the reduction of dihydroflavonols to leucoanthocyanins, is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of anthocyanidins, proanthocyanidins, and other flavonoids of importance in plant development and human nutrition. This study isolated a full length cDNA encoding DFR, designated as SmDFR (GenBank Accession No. EF600682), by screening a cDNA library from a red callus line of Saussurea medusa, which is an endangered, traditional Chinese medicinal plant with high pharmacological value. SmDFR was functionally expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to confirm that SmDFR can readily reduce dihydroquercetin (DHQ) and dihydrokampferol (DHK), but it could not reduce dihydromyricetin (DHM). The deduced SmDFR structure shared extensive sequence similarity with previously characterized plant DFRs and phylogenetic analysis showed that it belonged to the plant DFR super-family. SmDFR also possessed flavanone 4-reductase (FNR) activity and can catalyze the conversion of eridictyol to luteoforol. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression level of SmDFR was higher in flowers compared with both leaves and roots. This work greatly enhances our knowledge of flavonoid biosynthesis in S. medusa and marks a major advance that could facilitate future genetic modification of S. medusa.

  7. Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity is stimulated by the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2011-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small polypeptide that modulates protein activity and regulates hormone signalling, abiotic and biotic responses in plants. Here we show that AtSIZ regulates nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis through its E3 SUMO ligase function. Dwarf plants of siz1-2 flower early, show abnormal seed development and have high salicylic acid content and enhanced resistance to bacterial pathogens. These mutant phenotypes are reverted to wild-type phenotypes by exogenous ammonium but not by nitrate, phosphate or potassium. Decreased nitrate reductase activity in siz1-2 plants resulted in low nitrogen concentrations, low nitric oxide production and high nitrate content in comparison with wild-type plants. The nitrate reductases, NIA1 and NIA2, are sumoylated by AtSIZ1, which dramatically increases their activity. Both sumoylated and non-sumoylated NIA1 and NIA2 can form dimers. Our results indicate that AtSIZ1 positively controls nitrogen assimilation by promoting sumoylation of NRs in Arabidopsis. PMID:21772271

  8. Role of Respiratory Nitrate Reductase in Ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens YT101 To Colonize the Rhizosphere of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Jean-François; Gourbiere, François; Potier, Patrick; Philippot, Laurent; Lensi, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Selection of the denitrifying community by plant roots (i.e., increase in the denitrifier/total heterotroph ratio in the rhizosphere) has been reported by several authors. However, very few studies to evaluate the role of the denitrifying function itself in the selection of microorganisms in the rhizosphere have been performed. In the present study, we compared the rhizosphere survival of the denitrifying Pseudomonas fluorescens YT101 strain with that of its isogenic mutant deficient in the ability to synthesize the respiratory nitrate reductase, coinoculated in nonplanted or planted soil. We demonstrated that under nonlimiting nitrate conditions, the denitrifying wild-type strain had an advantage in the ability to colonize the rhizosphere of maize. Investigations of the effect of the inoculum characteristics (density of the total inoculum and relative proportions of mutant and wild-type strains) on the outcome of the selection demonstrated that the selective effect of the plant was expressed only during the phase of bacterial multiplication and that the intensity of selection was dependent on the magnitude of this phase. Moreover, application of the de Wit replacement series technique to our results suggests that the advantage of the wild-type strain was maximal when the ratio between the two strains in the inoculum was close to 1:1. This work constitutes the first direct demonstration that the presence of a functional structural gene encoding the respiratory nitrate reductase confers higher rhizosphere competence to a microorganism. PMID:10966422

  9. Treatment of hirsutism with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J R

    1986-05-01

    Much os the evidence gathered from studies of 5 alpha-reductase activity levels and androgen metabolism in the skin of hirsute women and the excretion of androgen metabolites by hirsute women indicates that 5 alpha-reduced androgens are probably of primary importance in hirsutism. Unfortunately, until very recently, the lack of a suitable 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor made it very difficult to adequately test the hypothesis that such an inhibitor might be useful in the treatment of hirsutism and certain other androgen-related diseases. No substance was available which had good, unambiguous activity in vivo as a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor. A number of 4-azasteroids have now been found to possess excellent 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory activity both in vitro and in vivo. Among other properties, several of these compounds show little or no affinity for the androgen receptor of rat prostate cytosol, they attenuate the growth promoting effect of T, but not DHT, on the ventral prostate of castrated male rats, they cause a marked reduction in prostatic DHT concentration in acutely treated rats and dogs and they bring about a significant decline in prostate size in chronically treated rats and dogs. It is expected that, in the near future, one or more of these highly active 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors will be tested in the clinic as a treatment for hirsutism. The results of those studies will be awaited with a great deal of interest since they should considerably advance our understanding of this disease and possibly contribute to its control.

  10. Assimilatory nitrate reductase from the green alga Ankistrodesmus braunii.

    PubMed

    De la Rosa, M A

    1983-01-01

    Assimilatory nitrate reductase (NAD(P)H-nitrate oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.6.2) from the green alga Ankistrodesmus braunii can be purified to homogeneity by dye-ligand chromatography on blue-Sepharose. The purified enzyme, whose turnover number is 623 s-1, presents an optimum pH of 7.5 and Km values of 13 microM, 23 microM and 0.15 mM for NADH, NADPH and nitrate, respectively. The NADH-nitrate reductase activity exhibits an iso ping pong bi bi kinetic mechanism. The molecular weight of the native nitrate reductase is 467 400, while that of its subunits is 58 750. These values suggest an octameric structure for the enzyme, which has been confirmed by electron microscopy. As deduced from spectrophotometric and fluorimetric studies, the enzyme contains FAD and cytochrome b-557 as prosthetic groups. FAD is not covalently bound to the protein and is easily dissociated in diluted solutions from the enzyme. Its apparent Km value is 4 nM, indicative of a high affinity of the enzyme for FAD. The results of the quantitative analyses of prosthetic groups indicate that nitrate reductase contains four molecules of flavin, four heme irons, and two atoms of molybdenum. The three components act sequentially transferring electrons from reduced pyridine nucleotides to nitrate, thus forming a short electron transport chain along the protein. A mechanism is proposed for the redox interconversion of the nitrate reductase activity. Inactivation seems to occur by formation of a stable complex of reduced enzyme with cyanide or superoxide, while reactivation is a consequence of reoxidation of the inactive enzyme. Both reactions imply the transfer of only one electron.

  11. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N/sub 2/O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N/sub 2/O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N/sub 2/O reductase activity was inhibited by 0/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 ..mu..M) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 ..mu..M) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N/sub 2/O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater, estuarine, and alkaline-saline environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N/sub 2/O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N/sub 2/O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  12. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N2O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N2O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N2O reductase activity was inhibited by O2, C2H2, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 μM) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 μM) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N2O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater (Km = 2.17 μM), estuarine (Km = 14.5 μM), and alkaline-saline (Km = 501 μM) environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N2O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N2O per m2 per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N2O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N2O per m2 per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  13. Immunological evidence for eight spans in the membrane domain of 3- hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase: implications for enzyme degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have raised two monospecific antibodies against synthetic peptides derived from the membrane domain of the ER glycoprotein 3-hydroxy-3- methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. This domain, which was proposed to span the ER membrane seven times (Liscum, L., J. Finer- Moore, R. M. Stroud, K. L. Luskey, M. S. Brown, and J. L. Goldstein. 1985. J. Biol. Chem. 260:522-538), plays a critical role in the regulated degradation of the enzyme in the ER in response to sterols. The antibodies stain the ER of cells and immunoprecipitate HMG-CoA reductase and HMGal, a chimeric protein composed of the membrane domain of the reductase fused to Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, the degradation of which is also accelerated by sterols. We show that the sequence Arg224 through Leu242 of HMG-CoA reductase (peptide G) faces the cytoplasm both in cultured cells and in rat liver, whereas the sequence Thr284 through Glu302 (peptide H) faces the lumen of the ER. This indicates that a sequence between peptide G and peptide H spans the membrane of the ER. Moreover, by epitope tagging with peptide H, we show that the loop segment connecting membrane spans 3 and 4 is sequestered in the lumen of the ER. These results demonstrate that the membrane domain of HMG-CoA reductase spans the ER eight times and are inconsistent with the seven membrane spans topological model. The approximate boundaries of the proposed additional transmembrane segment are between Lys248 and Asp276. Replacement of this 7th span in HMGal with the first transmembrane helix of bacteriorhodopsin abolishes the sterol-enhanced degradation of the protein, indicating its role in the regulated turnover of HMG-CoA reductase within the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:1374417

  14. Identification and characterization of 2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A reductase, the prototype of a novel class of dearomatizing reductases.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Christian; Estelmann, Sebastian; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Müller, Michael; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Boll, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The enzymatic dearomatization of aromatic ring systems by reduction represents a highly challenging redox reaction in biology and plays a key role in the degradation of aromatic compounds under anoxic conditions. In anaerobic bacteria, most monocyclic aromatic growth substrates are converted to benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA), which is then dearomatized to a conjugated dienoyl-CoA by ATP-dependent or -independent benzoyl-CoA reductases. It was unresolved whether or not related enzymes are involved in the anaerobic degradation of environmentally relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this work, a previously unknown dearomatizing 2-naphthoyl-CoA reductase was purified from extracts of the naphthalene-degrading, sulphidogenic enrichment culture N47. The oxygen-tolerant enzyme dearomatized the non-activated ring of 2-naphthoyl-CoA by a four-electron reduction to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthoyl-CoA. The dimeric 150 kDa enzyme complex was composed of a 72 kDa subunit showing sequence similarity to members of the flavin-containing 'old yellow enzyme' family. NCR contained FAD, FMN, and an iron-sulphur cluster as cofactors. Extracts of Escherichia coli expressing the encoding gene catalysed 2-naphthoyl-CoA reduction. The identified NCR is a prototypical enzyme of a previously unknown class of dearomatizing arylcarboxyl-CoA reductases that are involved in anaerobic PAH degradation; it fundamentally differs from known benzoyl-CoA reductases.

  15. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  16. Nuclear Rocket Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center has a strong interest in nuclear rocket propulsion and provides active support of the graphite reactor program in such nonnuclear areas as cryogenics, two-phase flow, propellant heating, fluid systems, heat transfer, nozzle cooling, nozzle design, pumps, turbines, and startup and control problems. A parallel effort has also been expended to evaluate the engineering feasibility of a nuclear rocket reactor using tungsten-matrix fuel elements and water as the moderator. Both of these efforts have resulted in significant contributions to nuclear rocket technology. Many successful static firings of nuclear rockets have been made with graphite-core reactors. Sufficient information has also been accumulated to permit a reasonable Judgment as to the feasibility of the tungsten water-moderated reactor concept. We therefore consider that this technoIogy conference on the nuclear rocket work that has been sponsored by the Lewis Research Center is timely. The conference has been prepared by NASA personnel, but the information presented includes substantial contributions from both NASA and AEC contractors. The conference excludes from consideration the many possible mission requirements for nuclear rockets. Also excluded is the direct comparison of nuclear rocket types with each other or with other modes of propulsion. The graphite reactor support work presented on the first day of the conference was partly inspired through a close cooperative effort between the Cleveland extension of the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (headed by Robert W. Schroeder) and the Lewis Research Center. Much of this effort was supervised by Mr. John C. Sanders, chairman for the first day of the conference, and by Mr. Hugh M. Henneberry. The tungsten water-moderated reactor concept was initiated at Lewis by Mr. Frank E. Rom and his coworkers. The supervision of the recent engineering studies has been shared by Mr. Samuel J. Kaufman, chairman for the second day of the

  17. Genetic characterization of plasmid-associated triphenylmethane reductase in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Vikrant; Elhanafi, Driss; Osborne, Jason; Martinez, Mira Rakic; Kathariou, Sophia

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme triphenylmethane reductase (TMR) reduces toxic triphenylmethane dyes into colorless, nontoxic derivatives, and TMR-producing microorganisms have been proposed as bioremediation tools. Analysis of the genome of Listeria monocytogenes H7858 (1998-1999 hot dog outbreak) revealed that the plasmid (pLM80) of this strain harboring a gene cassette (bcrABC) conferring resistance to benzalkonium chloride (BC) and other quaternary ammonium disinfectants also harbored a gene (tmr) highly homologous to TMR-encoding genes from diverse Gram-negative bacteria. The pLM80-associated tmr was located two genes downstream of bcrABC as part of a putative IS1216 composite transposon. To confirm the role of tmr in triphenylmethane dye detoxification, we introduced various tmr-harboring fragments of pLM80 in a pLM80-cured derivative of strain H7550, from the same outbreak as H7858, and assessed the resistance of the constructs to the triphenylmethane dyes crystal violet (CV) and malachite green. Transcriptional and subcloning data suggest that the regulation of TMR is complex. Constructs harboring fragments spanning bcrABC and tmr were CV resistant, and in such constructs tmr transcription was induced by sublethal levels of either BC or CV. However, constructs harboring only tmr and its upstream intergenic region could also confer resistance to CV, albeit at lower levels. Screening a panel of BC-resistant L. monocytogenes strains revealed that all those harboring bcrABC and adjacent pLM80 sequences, including tmr, were resistant to CV and decolorized this dye. The findings suggest a potential role of TMR as a previously unknown adaptive attribute for environmental persistence of L. monocytogenes.

  18. Immunological approach to the regulation of nitrate reductase in Monoraphidium braunii.

    PubMed

    Díez, J; López-Ruiz, A

    1989-02-01

    The effects of different culture conditions on nitrate reductase activity and nitrate reductase protein from Monoraphidium braunii have been studied, using two different immunological techniques, rocket immunoelectrophoresis and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, to determine nitrate reductase protein. The nitrogen sources ammonium and glutamine repressed nitrate reductase synthesis, while nitrite, alanine, and glutamate acted as derepressors. There was a four- to eightfold increase of nitrate reductase activity and a twofold increase of nitrate reductase protein under conditions of nitrogen starvation versus growth on nitrate. Nitrate reductase synthesis was repressed in darkness. However, when Monoraphidium was grown under heterotrophic conditions with glucose as the carbon and energy source, the synthesis of nitrate reductase was maintained. With ammonium or darkness, changes in nitrate reductase activity correlated fairly well with changes in nitrate reductase protein, indicating that in both cases loss of activity was due to repression and not to inactivation of the enzyme. Experiments using methionine sulfoximine, to inhibit ammonium assimilation, showed that ammonium per se and not a product of its metabolism was the corepressor of the enzyme. The appearance of nitrate reductase activity after transferring the cells to induction media was prevented by cycloheximide and by 6-methylpurine, although in this latter case the effect was observed only in cells preincubated with the inhibitor for 1 h before the induction period.

  19. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki , Gang; David R. , Sarkanen; Simo , Ford; Joshua D.

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  20. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype, smoking habit, metastasis and oral cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Chia-Fang; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Tsou, Yung-An; Hua, Chun-Hung; Chang, Wen-Shin; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association and interaction of genotypic polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) with smoking habits and oral cancer in Taiwan. Two well-known polymorphic variants of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed in association with oral cancer risk, and their joint effects with individual smoking habits on oral cancer risk are discussed. In total, 620 oral cancer patients and 620 non-cancer controls in central Taiwan were recruited and genotyped. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between the oral cancer and control groups. The T allele of MTHFR C677T was significantly more frequently found in controls than in oral cancer patients. Joint effects of smoking and MTHFR C677T genotype significantly affected oral cancer susceptibility. The MTHFR C677T CT and TT genotypes in association with smoking conferred lower odds ratios of 0.66 and 0.54 (95% confidence interval=0.49-0.82 and 0.39-0.86), respectively. Those patients with MTHFR C677T CT and TT genotypes also had a lower risk of oral cancer metastasis. MTHFR C677T genotype may have joint effects with smoking on oral carcinogenesis, and may be a useful biomarker for prediction and prognosis of oral cancer.

  2. Characterization of an acetoin reductase/2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase from Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Liu, Zi-Yong; Liu, Zhen; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-11-01

    Acetoin reductase catalyzes the formation of 2,3-butanediol from acetoin. In Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528, the gene CLJU_c23220 encoding the putative Zn(2+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme, CLAR, can catalyze the conversion of acetoin to 2,3-butanediol with NADPH as the cofactor. Furthermore, the gene CLJU_c23220 was introduced into Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and the transformant was conferred the capacity of 2,3-butanediol production. In batch fermentation the transformant produced up to 3.1g/L of 2,3-butanediol, as well as acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE, 17.8 g/L) in amounts similar to those produced by the wild type strain. This study provides conclusive evidence at the protein level that CLJU_c23220 is the key gene responsible for the conversion of acetoin to 2,3-butanediol in C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528. Moreover, the C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was modified via one-step metabolic engineering to produce 2,3-butanediol without influencing the ABE production.

  3. The HIP1 binding site is required for growth regulation of the dihydrofolate reductase gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Means, A L; Slansky, J E; McMahon, S L; Knuth, M W; Farnham, P J

    1992-01-01

    The transcription rate of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene increases at the G1/S boundary of the proliferative cell cycle. Through analysis of transiently and stably transfected NIH 3T3 cells, we have now demonstrated that DHFR promoter sequences extending from -270 to +20 are sufficient to confer similar regulation on a reporter gene. Mutation of a protein binding site that spans sequences from -16 to +11 in the DHFR promoter resulted in loss of the transcriptional increase at the G1/S boundary. Purification of an activity from HeLa nuclear extract that binds to this region enriched for a 180-kDa polypeptide (HIP1). Using this HIP1 preparation, we have identified specific positions within the binding site that are critical for efficient protein-DNA interactions. An analysis of association and dissociation rates suggests that bound HIP1 protein can exchange rapidly with free protein. This rapid exchange may facilitate the burst of transcriptional activity from the DHFR promoter at the G1/S boundary. Images PMID:1545788

  4. The Interaction of Microsomal Cytochrome P450 2B4 with its Redox Partners, Cytochrome P450 Reductase and Cytochrome b5

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    1 Cytochrome P450 2B4 is a microsomal protein with a multi-step reaction cycle similar to that observed in the majority of other cytochromes P450. The cytochrome P450 2B4-substrate complex is reduced from the ferric to the ferrous form by cytochrome P450 reductase. After binding oxygen, the oxyferrous protein accepts a second electron which is provided by either cytochrome P450 reductase or cytochrome b5. In both instances, product formation occurs. When the second electron is donated by cytochrome b5, catalysis (product formation) is ∼ 10 to 100-fold faster than in the presence of cytochrome P450 reductase. This allows less time for side product formation (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide) and improves by ∼ 15% the coupling of NADPH consumption to product formation. Cytochrome b5 has also been shown to compete with cytochrome P450 reductase for a binding site on the proximal surface of cytochrome P450 2B4. These two different effects of cytochrome b5 on cytochrome P450 2B4 reactivity can explain how cytochrome b5 is able to stimulate, inhibit, or have no effect on cytochrome P450 2B4 activity. At low molar ratios (<1) of cytochrome b5 to cytochrome P450 reductase, the more rapid catalysis results in enhanced substrate metabolism. In contrast, at high molar ratios (>1) of cytochome b5 to cytochrome P450 reductase, cytochrome b5 inhibits activity by binding to the proximal surface of cytochrome P450 and preventing the reductase from reducing ferric cytochrome P450 to the ferrous protein, thereby aborting the catalytic reaction cycle. When the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of cytochrome b5 are equal, it will appear to have no effect on the enzymatic activity. It is hypothesized that cytochrome b5 stimulates catalysis by causing a conformational change in the active site, which allows the active oxidizing oxyferryl species of cytochrome P450 to be formed more rapidly than in the presence of reductase. PMID:21055385

  5. [A terminal phase patient who can return home because of a multi-professional conference--considerations for multi-professional conference].

    PubMed

    Omouchi, Chinatsu; Sato, Takae; Sekiguchi, Akemi; Yamazaki, Shunji; Inoue, Tomoko

    2005-12-01

    Palliative care has been provided in our sub-acute hospital ward and multi professional conferences have also taken place in order to enhance care. In this paper, we present a 72-year-old female who has suffered from relapse of lung cancer and was able to return home because of an execution of multi-professional conferences. We also present considerations that were carried out in multi-professional conferences. We found some of the important factors for carrying an efficient conference are advance preparations in ahead, punctuality of the conference, a conference place that is kept in the ward, coping with nurse calls and participation of nutritionists. A timely conference, sharing information among the team and the education about a dying process are some of the future subjects.

  6. Research on Women and Girls in the Justice System: Plenary Papers of the Conference on Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation--Enhancing Policy and Practice through Research, Volume 3 (1999). Research Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Beth E.; Tsenin, Kay; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    This publication presents three papers from a 1999 conference on criminal justice research and evaluation. The papers reveal real-life implications of research for a situation of growing urgency. Research has uncovered a link between the victimization of women and their criminal behavior. The papers propose that justice system practice can be…

  7. Aminoglycoside-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa deficient in cytochrome d, nitrite reductase, and aerobic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, L E; Kwan, S

    1981-01-01

    Two gentamicin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO 503 were selected after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis. Mutant PAO 2403 had significantly increased resistance to aminoglycoside but not to other antibiotics. Mutant PAO 2402 showed a similar spectrum of resistance but of lower magnitude. Both mutants showed no detectable cytochrome d and had a high frequency of reversion to a fully wild-type phenotype. PAO 2403 had a marked decrease and PAO 2402 had a moderate decrease in nitrite reductase activity. Both mutants had reduced uptake of gentamicin and dihydrostreptomycin. Mutant PAO 2403 showed a general decrease in transport rate of cationic compounds, whereas mutant PAO 2402 had only deficient glucose transport. Both mutants showed enhanced rates of glutamine transport and no change in glutamic acid transport. Other components of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were normal. These mutants involve ferrocytochrome C551 oxidoreductase formed only on anaerobic growth but illustrate transport defects in aerobically grown cells. PMID:6791588

  8. Synergistic effect of reductase and keratinase for facile synthesis of protein-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonali; Singh, Surinder P; Singh, Rajni

    2015-05-01

    We have synthesized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using chicken feathers (poultry waste) and Bacillus subtilis RSE163. Disulfide reductase and keratinase produced by Bacillus subtilis during the degradation of chicken feather has been used to reduce Au(3+) from HAuCl4 precursor to produce gold nanoparticles. The synthesized biogenic GNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and zeta potential measurements. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicated the presence of protein capping on synthesized GNPs, imparting multifunctionality to the GNP surface. Furthermore, the nontoxic nature of biogenic GNPs was insured by interaction with Escherichia coli (ATCC11103), where TEM images and enhancement of growth rate of E. coli in log phase signified their nontoxic nature. The results indicate that the synthesis of biocompatible GNPs using poultry waste may find potential applications in drug delivery and sensing.

  9. Thermal Adaptation of Dihydrofolate Reductase from the Moderate Thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The thermal melting temperature of dihydrofolate reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsDHFR) is ∼30 °C higher than that of its homologue from the psychrophile Moritella profunda. Additional proline residues in the loop regions of BsDHFR have been proposed to enhance the thermostability of BsDHFR, but site-directed mutagenesis studies reveal that these proline residues contribute only minimally. Instead, the high thermal stability of BsDHFR is partly due to removal of water-accessible thermolabile residues such as glutamine and methionine, which are prone to hydrolysis or oxidation at high temperatures. The extra thermostability of BsDHFR can be obtained by ligand binding, or in the presence of salts or cosolvents such as glycerol and sucrose. The sum of all these incremental factors allows BsDHFR to function efficiently in the natural habitat of G. stearothermophilus, which is characterized by temperatures that can reach 75 °C. PMID:24730604

  10. First CLIPS Conference Proceedings, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The first Conference of C Language Production Systems (CLIPS) hosted by the NASA-Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in August 1990 is presented. Articles included engineering applications, intelligent tutors and training, intelligent software engineering, automated knowledge acquisition, network applications, verification and validation, enhancements to CLIPS, space shuttle quality control/diagnosis applications, space shuttle and real-time applications, and medical, biological, and agricultural applications.

  11. Writing competitive research conference abstracts: AMEE Guide no. 108.

    PubMed

    Varpio, Lara; Amiel, Jonathan; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-09-01

    The ability to write a competitive research conference abstract is an important skill for medical educators. A compelling and concise abstract can convince peer reviewers, conference selection committee members, and conference attendees that the research described therein is worthy for inclusion in the conference program and/or for their attendance in the meeting. This AMEE Guide is designed to help medical educators write research conference abstracts that can achieve these outcomes. To do so, this Guide begins by examining the rhetorical context (i.e. the purpose, audience, and structure) of research conference abstracts and then moves on to describe the abstract selection processes common to many medical education conferences. Next, the Guide provides theory-based information and concrete suggestions on how to write persuasively. Finally, the Guide offers some writing tips and some proofreading techniques that all authors can use. By attending to the aspects of the research conference abstract addressed in this Guide, we hope to help medical educators enhance this important text in their writing repertoire.

  12. The respiratory arsenate reductase from Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afkar, E.; Lisak, J.; Saltikov, C.; Basu, P.; Oremland, R.S.; Stolz, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The respiratory arsenate reductase from the Gram-positive, haloalkaliphile, Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10 was purified and characterized. It is a membrane bound heterodimer (150 kDa) composed of two subunits ArrA (110 kDa) and ArrB (34 kDa), with an apparent Km for arsenate of 34 ??M and Vmax of 2.5 ??mol min-1 mg-1. Optimal activity occurred at pH 9.5 and 150 g l-1 of NaCl. Metal analysis (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) of the holoenzyme and sequence analysis of the catalytic subunit (ArrA; the gene for which was cloned and sequenced) indicate it is a member of the DMSO reductase family of molybdoproteins. ?? 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Chilson, Oscar P.; Kelly-Chilson, Anne E.; Schneider, Julie D.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) from Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and cultured rhizobia were compared with those of the enzyme in soybean nodule host cytosol. Reductase from host cytosol differed from that in bacteroids in: (a) the effect of pH on enzymic activity, (b) the capacity to catalyze both reduction of pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid and NAD+-dependent proline oxidation, (c) apparent affinities for pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid, and (d) sensitivities to inhibition by NADP+ and proline. The K1 for proline inhibition of P5CR in bacteroid cytosol was 1.8 millimolar. The properties of P5CR in B. japonicum and bacteroid cytosol were similar. The specific activities of P5CR in the cytosolic fractions of the nodule host and the bacteroid compartment were also comparable. PMID:16668837

  14. Characterization of 12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid Reductase in Corn

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Brady A.; Zimmerman, Don C.

    1986-01-01

    12-Oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase, an enzyme of the biosynthetic pathway that converts linolenic acid to jasmonic acid, has been characterized from the kernel and seedlings of corn (Zea mays L.). The molecular weight of the enzyme, estimated by gel filtration, was 54,000. Optimum enzyme activity was observed over a broad pH range, from pH 6.8 to 9.0. The enzyme had a Km of 190 micromolar for its substrate, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. The preferred reductant was NADPH, for which the enzyme exhibited a Km of 13 micromolar, compared with 4.2 millimolar for NADH. Reductase activity was low in the corn kernel but increased five-fold by the fifth day after germination and then gradually declined. PMID:16664582

  15. Regulation of AhFRO1, an Fe(III)-chelate reductase of peanut, during iron deficiency stress and intercropping with maize.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Duan, Lihong; Wu, Huilan; Yang, Rongxin; Ling, Hongqing; Li, Wen-Xue; Zhang, Fusuo

    2009-07-01

    Iron deficiency-induced chlorosis in peanut during anthesis was alleviated when peanut was intercropped with maize in field and pot experiments. Iron acquisition of graminaceous plants is characterized by the synthesis and secretion of the iron-chelating phytosiderophores. Compared to the roots of monocropped maize, the roots of maize intercropped with peanut always secreted higher amounts of phytosiderophores during peanut anthesis. For non-graminaceous plants, reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on the root surface is the rate-limiting step for mobilizing iron from soil. The full-length cDNA, AhFRO1, which is encoding an Fe(III)-chelate reductase, was isolated from peanut. AhFRO1 expression in yeast conferred Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity to the cells. Consistent with its function in iron uptake, AhFRO1 was determined to be a membrane protein by transient expression analysis. AhFRO1 mRNA accumulated under iron deficiency conditions. During pre-anthesis, the Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity and the transcript levels of AhFRO1 were similar in monocropped and intercropped peanut. When the iron deficiency-induced chlorosis developed in the monocropped peanuts, both the Fe(III)-chelate reductase activity of peanut and the transcript levels of AhFRO1 were higher in intercropped than in monocropped peanuts, which is consistent with the secretion of phytosiderophores by maize roots. We conclude that AhFRO1 in peanut and phytosiderophores from maize co-operate to improve the iron nutrition of peanut when intercropped with maize.

  16. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice... the conference is to discuss policy issues related to the reliability of the Bulk-Power System. A more... Webcast. Anyone with Internet access who desires to listen to this event can do so by navigating to...

  17. [Properties of a nitrite reductase inhibitor protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Karapetian, A V; Nalbandian, R M

    1993-08-01

    The amino acid composition and major physico-chemical properties of the "nonblue" copper protein isolated earlier from Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been determined. It has been found that the azurin oxidase, cytochrome c551 oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities of the enzyme are inhibited by this protein. The inhibition seems to be due to the protein interaction with the electron-accepting center of nitrite reductase.

  18. Turbomachinery controls conference (TCC) 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The proceedings of the Turbomachinery Controls Conference 1995 are presented. Eleven papers were presented at the conference. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the nine papers for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. ARC Conference Showcases Telecommunications Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1996-01-01

    The Appalachian Regional Commission's 1996 Conference, "Building Blocks for Using Telecommunications and Information Technology," held in Binghamton, New York, focused on the role of telecommunications in Appalachia in education and training, telemedicine, business, and government. Highlights conference presentations on special…

  20. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  1. Early diagnosis and management of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Odame, I; Donaldson, M D; Wallace, A M; Cochran, W; Smith, P J

    1992-01-01

    Two siblings of Pakistani origin, karyotype 46 XY, were born with predominantly female external genitalia with minute phallus, bifid scrotum, urogenital sinus, and palpable gonads. The older sibling at the age of 8 days showed an adequate testosterone response to human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) stimulation. The diagnosis of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency was made at age 6 years when no 5 alpha-reduced glucocorticoid metabolites were detectable in urine even after tetracosactrin (Synacthen) stimulation. In the younger sibling the diagnosis of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency was provisionally made at the early age of 3 days on the basis of high urinary tetrahydrocortisol (THF)/allotetrahydrocortisol (5 alpha-THF) ratio and this ratio increased with age confirming the diagnosis. Plasma testosterone: dihydrotestosterone (DHT) ratio before and after hCG stimulation was within normal limits at age 3 days but was raised at age 9 months. Topical DHT cream application to the external genitalia promoted significant phallic growth in both siblings and in the older sibling corrective surgery was facilitated. In prepubertal male pseudohermaphrodites with normal or raised testosterone concentrations, phallic growth in response to DHT cream treatment could be an indirect confirmation of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. Images Figure 1 PMID:1626992

  2. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Two Pseudomonas Flavoprotein Xenobiotic Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Blehert, David S.; Fox, Brian G.; Chambliss, Glenn H.

    1999-01-01

    The genes encoding flavin mononucleotide-containing oxidoreductases, designated xenobiotic reductases, from Pseudomonas putida II-B and P. fluorescens I-C that removed nitrite from nitroglycerin (NG) by cleavage of the nitroester bond were cloned, sequenced, and characterized. The P. putida gene, xenA, encodes a 39,702-Da monomeric, NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein that removes either the terminal or central nitro groups from NG and that reduces 2-cyclohexen-1-one but did not readily reduce 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). The P. fluorescens gene, xenB, encodes a 37,441-Da monomeric, NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein that exhibits fivefold regioselectivity for removal of the central nitro group from NG and that transforms TNT but did not readily react with 2-cyclohexen-1-one. Heterologous expression of xenA and xenB was demonstrated in Escherichia coli DH5α. The transcription initiation sites of both xenA and xenB were identified by primer extension analysis. BLAST analyses conducted with the P. putida xenA and the P. fluorescens xenB sequences demonstrated that these genes are similar to several other bacterial genes that encode broad-specificity flavoprotein reductases. The prokaryotic flavoprotein reductases described herein likely shared a common ancestor with old yellow enzyme of yeast, a broad-specificity enzyme which may serve a detoxification role in antioxidant defense systems. PMID:10515912

  3. The existence and significance of a mitochondrial nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Nohl, Hans; Staniek, Katrin; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2005-01-01

    The physiological functions of nitric oxide (NO) are well established. The finding that the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) is NO was totally unexpected. It was shown that NO is a reaction product of an enzymatically catalyzed, overall, 5-electron oxidation of guanidinium nitrogen from L-arginine followed by the release of the free radical species NO. NO is synthesized by a single protein complex supported by cofactors, coenzymes (such as tetrahydrobiopterin) and cytochrome P450. The latter can uncouple from substrate oxidation producing O2*- radicals. The research groups of Richter [Ghafourifar P, Richter C. Nitric oxide synthase activity in mitochondria. FEBS Lett 1997; 418: 291-296.] and Boveris [Giulivi C, Poderoso JJ, Boveris A. Production of nitric oxide by mitochondria. J Biol Chem 1998; 273: 11038-11043.] identified a mitochondrial NO synthase (NOS). There are, however, increasing reports demonstrating that mitochondrial NO is derived from cytosolic NOS belonging to the Ca2+-dependent enzymes. NO was thought to control cytochrome oxidase. This assumption is controversial due to the life-time of NO in biological systems (millisecond range). We found a nitrite reductase in mitochondria which is of major interest. Any increase of nitrite in the tissue which is the first oxidation product of NO, for instance following NO donors, will stimulate NO-recycling via mitochondrial nitrite reductase. In this paper, we describe the identity and the function of mitochondrial nitrite reductase and the consequences of NO-recycling in the metabolic compartment of mitochondria.

  4. Phosphoglycerate kinase acts in tumour angiogenesis as a disulphide reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Angelina J.; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Kisker, Oliver; Flynn, Evelyn; Underwood, Anne; Condron, Rosemary; Hogg, Philip J.

    2000-12-01

    Disulphide bonds in secreted proteins are considered to be inert because of the oxidizing nature of the extracellular milieu. An exception to this rule is a reductase secreted by tumour cells that reduces disulphide bonds in the serine proteinase plasmin. Reduction of plasmin initiates proteolytic cleavage in the kringle 5 domain and release of the tumour blood vessel inhibitor angiostatin. New blood vessel formation or angiogenesis is critical for tumour expansion and metastasis. Here we show that the plasmin reductase isolated from conditioned medium of fibrosarcoma cells is the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase. Recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase had the same specific activity as the fibrosarcoma-derived protein. Plasma of mice bearing fibrosarcoma tumours contained several-fold more phosphoglycerate kinase, as compared with mice without tumours. Administration of phosphoglycerate kinase to tumour-bearing mice caused an increase in plasma levels of angiostatin, and a decrease in tumour vascularity and rate of tumour growth. Our findings indicate that phosphoglycerate kinase not only functions in glycolysis but is secreted by tumour cells and participates in the angiogenic process as a disulphide reductase.

  5. The effect of quercetin and galangin on glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, Helena; Berczeliová, Elena

    2005-12-01

    Quercetin and galangin can change the activity of glutathione reductase. Quercetin (a catechol structure in the B-ring) and galangin (any hydroxyl group in the B-ring) have different biological activities but, both possess high antioxidant abilities. Quercetin during the antioxidative action, is converted into an oxidized products (o-semiquinone and o-quinone), and subsequently glutathionyl adducts may be formed or SH-enzyme can be inhibited. We have tried to see whether inhibition of glutathione reductase (GR) can be influenced by preincubation of enzyme with NADPH (a creation of reduced form of enzyme, GRH(2)) and whether diaphorase activity of the enzyme is decreased by these flavonoids. The results confirmed that quercetin inhibits GRH(2) and inhibition is reduced by addition of EDTA or N-acetylcysteine. Both of flavonoids have no effect on diaphorase activity of glutathione reductase and this enzyme could increase the production of free radicals by catalysis of reduction of o-quinone during action of quercetin in vivo.

  6. A novel role of the ferric reductase Cfl1 in cell wall integrity, mitochondrial function, and invasion to host cells in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Qian, Kefan; Chen, Yulu; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2014-11-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, causing both superficial mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic diseases. Iron acquisition is an important factor for pathogen-host interaction and also a significant element for the pathogenicity of this organism. Ferric reductases, which convert ferric iron into ferrous iron, are important components of the high-affinity iron uptake system. Sequence analyses have identified at least 17 putative ferric reductase genes in C. albicans genome. CFL1 was the first ferric reductase identified in C. albicans. However, little is known about its roles in C. albicans physiology and pathogenicity. In this study, we found that disruption of CFL1 led to hypersensitivity to chemical and physical cell wall stresses, activation of the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway, abnormal cell wall composition, and enhanced secretion, indicating a defect in CWI in this mutant. Moreover, this mutant showed abnormal mitochondrial activity and morphology, suggesting a link between ferric reductases and mitochondrial function. In addition, this mutant displayed decreased ability of adhesion to both the polystyrene microplates and buccal epithelial cells and invasion of host epithelial cells. These findings revealed a novel role of C. albicans Cfl1 in maintenance of CWI, mitochondrial function, and interaction between this pathogen and the host.

  7. Twitter use in physics conferences.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stephen

    An analysis of Twitter use in 116 conferences suggests that the service is used more extensively at PACS10 conferences (those devoted to the physics of elementary particles and fields) and PACS90 conferences (those devoted to geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics) than at conferences in other fields of physics. Furthermore, Twitter is used in a qualitatively different manner. A possible reason for these differences is discussed.

  8. Catalytic mechanism and substrate selectivity of aldo-keto reductases: insights from structure-function studies of Candida tenuis xylose reductase.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Regina; Wilson, David K; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2006-09-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) constitute a large protein superfamily of mainly NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductases involved in carbonyl metabolism. Catalysis is promoted by a conserved tetrad of active site residues (Tyr, Lys, Asp and His). Recent results of structure-function relationship studies for xylose reductase (AKR2B5) require an update of the proposed catalytic mechanism. Electrostatic stabilization by the epsilon-NH3+ group of Lys is a key source of catalytic power of xylose reductase. A molecular-level analysis of the substrate binding pocket of xylose reductase provides a case of how a very broadly specific AKR achieves the requisite selectivity for its physiological substrate and could serve as the basis for the design of novel reductases with improved specificities for biocatalytic applications.

  9. Conference on Navajo Orthography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohannessian, Sirarpi; And Others

    This report on the Conference on Navajo Orthography, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 2-3, 1969 constitutes a summary of the discussion and decisions of a meeting which was convened by the Center for Applied Linguistics under contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to agree on an orthography for the Navajo language. The immediate purpose…

  10. DEVELOP students attend conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Last month, Madeline Brozen and Jason Jones of the DEVELOP Program at John C. Stennis Space Center joined members from the program's national office at Langley Research Center to attend the Southern Growth Policies Board annual conference in Biloxi. Pictured are (l to r): Karen Allsbrook, Jonathan Gleason, Gov. Haley Barbour, Madeline Brozen, Lindsay Rogers and Tracey Silcox.

  11. Hydrogen Conference: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is currently a major chemical/fuel with long-term energy system benefits that may impact the industry's physical and economic well-being. EPRI's recent hydrogen conference concluded that to be competitive, the production cost must take into account environmental and end-use efficiency benefits.

  12. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  13. Conference summary - Personal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lub, J.

    2016-05-01

    This is a collection of remarks on the three and a half days of the RR Lyrae 2015 Conference, limited only by my own lack of attention and understanding. I end with some personal recollections on my complete failure, even though doing the necessary calculations, to spot the importance and the possible application of Fourier amplitudes and phases of the RR Lyrae light curves.

  14. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  15. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  16. Effective Parent Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Conferences with an upset parent, teacher, or student should be opportunities for schools to build relationships with the community and to foster a positive school culture. But in reality, they are often held because a problem has arisen and often end with stakeholders having a less-than-positive image of the school. Understanding the steps that…

  17. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The Association of Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference included 102 presentations. Abstracts of seven of these presentations are provided. Topic areas considered include LOGO, teaching probability through a computer game, writing effective computer assisted instructional materials, computer literacy, research on instructional…

  18. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  19. Microbicides 2006 conference

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Shattock, Robin; Delany, Sinead; McGowan, Ian; Morar, Neetha; Gottemoeller, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities. PMID:17038196

  20. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  1. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  2. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  3. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  4. Conference Rules, Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Linda K.

    2008-01-01

    Most academic conferences are preceded by some effort to make the sessions different from the usual format, but the usual format overwhelmingly prevails. That is: Each panel discussion runs no longer than two hours, during which two, three, or four specialists stand at a lectern and talk. Sometimes they will read a prepared paper; sometimes they…

  5. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  6. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  7. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  8. Summary: A Very Timely Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2012-04-01

    The conference poster includes a very apt phrase that describes a primary motivation for this conference: Time discovers truth. This aphorism, attributed to Seneca, was certainly affirmed by the many exciting talks and discussions at this conference, in both formal and informal settings.

  9. Making Connections: Attending Professional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherrstrom, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Attending a professional conference is an effective way to explore and advance knowledge, skills, and careers. For graduate students, attending a conference is an effective way to explore academic fields and new professions. However, attending a professional conference requires precious resources--time and money--so the decision to attend, or not,…

  10. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Are Essential for Virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Rouf, Syed Fazle; Kitowski, Vera; Böhm, Oliver M.; Rhen, Mikael; Jäger, Timo; Bange, Franz-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species represents a fundamental innate defense against microbes in a diversity of host organisms. Oxidative stress, amongst others, converts peptidyl and free methionine to a mixture of methionine-S- (Met-S-SO) and methionine-R-sulfoxides (Met-R-SO). To cope with such oxidative damage, methionine sulfoxide reductases MsrA and MsrB are known to reduce MetSOs, the former being specific for the S-form and the latter being specific for the R-form. However, at present the role of methionine sulfoxide reductases in the pathogenesis of intracellular bacterial pathogens has not been fully detailed. Here we show that deletion of msrA in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella (S.) enterica serovar Typhimurium increased susceptibility to exogenous H2O2, and reduced bacterial replication inside activated macrophages, and in mice. In contrast, a ΔmsrB mutant showed the wild type phenotype. Recombinant MsrA was active against free and peptidyl Met-S-SO, whereas recombinant MsrB was only weakly active and specific for peptidyl Met-R-SO. This raised the question of whether an additional Met-R-SO reductase could play a role in the oxidative stress response of S. Typhimurium. MsrC is a methionine sulfoxide reductase previously shown to be specific for free Met-R-SO in Escherichia (E.) coli. We tested a ΔmsrC single mutant and a ΔmsrBΔmsrC double mutant under various stress conditions, and found that MsrC is essential for survival of S. Typhimurium following exposure to H2O2, as well as for growth in macrophages, and in mice. Hence, this study demonstrates that all three methionine sulfoxide reductases, MsrA, MsrB and MsrC, facilitate growth of a canonical intracellular pathogen during infection. Interestingly MsrC is specific for the repair of free methionine sulfoxide, pointing to an important role of this pathway in the oxidative stress response of Salmonella Typhimurium. PMID:22073230

  11. Kinetic characteristics of ZENECA ZD5522, a potent inhibitor of human and bovine lens aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Cook, P N; Ward, W H; Petrash, J M; Mirrlees, D J; Sennitt, C M; Carey, F; Preston, J; Brittain, D R; Tuffin, D P; Howe, R

    1995-04-18

    Aldose reductase (aldehyde reductase 2) catalyses the conversion of glucose to sorbitol, and methylglyoxal to acetol. Treatment with aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) is a potential approach to decrease the development of diabetic complications. The sulphonylnitromethanes are a recently discovered class of aldose reductase inhibitors, first exemplified by ICI215918. We now describe enzyme kinetic characterization of a second sulphonylnitromethane, 3',5'-dimethyl-4'-nitromethylsulphonyl-2-(2-tolyl)acetanilide (ZD5522), which is at least 10-fold more potent against bovine lens aldose reductase in vitro and which also has a greater efficacy for reduction of rat nerve sorbitol levels in vivo (ED95 = 2.8 mg kg-1 for ZD5522 and 20 mg kg-1 for ICI 215918). ZD5522 follows pure noncompetitive kinetics against bovine lens aldose reductase when either glucose or methylglyoxal is varied (K(is) = K(ii) = 7.2 and 4.3 nM, respectively). This contrasts with ICI 215918 which is an uncompetitive inhibitor (K(ii) = 100 nM) of bovine lens aldose reductase when glucose is varied. Against human recombinant aldose reductase, ZD5522 displays mixed noncompetitive kinetics with respect to both substrates (K(is) = 41 nM, K(ii) = 8 nM with glucose and K(is) = 52 nM, K(ii) = 3.8 nM with methylglyoxal). This is the first report of the effects of a sulphonylnitromethane on either human aldose reductase or utilization of methylglyoxal. These results are discussed with reference to a Di Iso Ordered Bi Bi mechanism for aldose reductase, where the inhibitors compete with binding of both the aldehyde substrate and alcohol product. This model may explain why aldose reductase inhibitors follow noncompetitive or uncompetitive kinetics with respect to aldehyde substrates, and X-ray crystallography paradoxically locates an ARI within the substrate binding site. Aldehyde reductase (aldehyde reductase 1) is closely related to aldose reductase. Inhibition of bovine kidney aldehyde reductase by ZD5522

  12. Effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of losartan and its main metabolite EXP-3174 in rats: possible role of CYP3A4 and P-gp inhibition by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Hyung; Choi, Jun-Shik; Choi, Dong-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (atorvastatin, pravastatin, simvastatin) on the pharmacokinetics of losartan and its active metabolite EXP-3174 in rats. Pharmacokinetic parameters of losartan and EXP-3174 in rats were determined after oral and intravenous administration of losartan (9 mg/kg) without and with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (1 mg/kg). The effect of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on P-gp and cytochrome (CYP) 3A4 activity were also evaluated. Atorvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin inhibited CYP3A4 activities with IC₅₀ values of 48.0, 14.1 and 3.10 μmol/l, respectively. Simvastatin (1-10 μmol/l) enhanced the cellular uptake of rhodamine-123 in a concentration-dependent manner. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC₀₋∞) and the peak plasma concentration of losartan were significantly (p < 0.05) increased by 59.6 and 45.8%, respectively, by simvastatin compared to those of control. The total body clearance (CL/F) of losartan after oral administration with simvastatin was significantly decreased (by 34.8%) compared to that of controls. Consequently, the absolute bioavailability (F) of losartan after oral administration with simvastatin was significantly increased by 59.4% compared to that of control. The metabolite-parent AUC ratio was significantly decreased by 25.7%, suggesting that metabolism of losartan was inhibited by simvastatin. In conclusion, the enhanced bioavailability of losartan might be mainly due to inhibition of P-gp in the small intestine and CYP3A subfamily-mediated metabolism of losartan in the small intestine and/or liver and to reduction of the CL/F of losartan by simvastatin.

  13. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  14. Thioredoxin reductase 1 upregulates MCP-1 release in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen-Bo; Shen, Xun

    2009-09-04

    To know if thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) plays a role in antioxidant defense mechanisms against atherosclerosis, effect of TrxR1 on expression/release of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) was investigated in activated human endothelial-like EAhy926 cells. The MCP-1 release and expression, cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-{kappa}B subunit p65 were assayed in cells either overexpressing recombinant TrxR1 or having their endogenous TrxR1 knocked down. It was found that overexpression of TrxR1 enhanced, while knockdown of TrxR1 reduced MCP-1 release and expression. Upregulation of MCP-1 by TrxR1 was associated with increasing generation of intracellular ROS generation, enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-{kappa}B. Assay using NF-{kappa}B reporter revealed that TrxR1 upregulated transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B. This study suggests that TrxR1 enhances ROS generation, NF-{kappa}B activity and subsequent MCP-1 expression in endothelial cells, and may promote rather than prevent vascular endothelium from forming atherosclerotic plaque.

  15. A flavone from Manilkara indica as a specific inhibitor against aldose reductase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2003-09-01

    Isoaffinetin (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavone-6-C-glucoside) was isolated from Manilkara indica as a potent inhibitor of lens aldose reductase by bioassay-directed fractionation. This C-glucosyl flavone showed specific inhibition against aldose reductases (rat lens, porcine lens and recombinant human) with no inhibition against aldehyde reductase and NADH oxidase. Kinetic analysis showed that isoaffinetin exhibited uncompetitive inhibition against both dl-glyceraldehyde and NADPH. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the increasing number of hydroxy groups in the B-ring contributes to the increase in aldose reductase inhibition by C-glucosyl flavones.

  16. Ammonification in Bacillus subtilis Utilizing Dissimilatory Nitrite Reductase Is Dependent on resDE

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Tamara; Frankenberg, Nicole; Marino, Marco; Jahn, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    During anaerobic nitrate respiration Bacillus subtilis reduces nitrate via nitrite to ammonia. No denitrification products were observed. B. subtilis wild-type cells and a nitrate reductase mutant grew anaerobically with nitrite as an electron acceptor. Oxygen-sensitive dissimilatory nitrite reductase activity was demonstrated in cell extracts prepared from both strains with benzyl viologen as an electron donor and nitrite as an electron acceptor. The anaerobic expression of the discovered nitrite reductase activity was dependent on the regulatory system encoded by resDE. Mutation of the gene encoding the regulatory Fnr had no negative effect on dissimilatory nitrite reductase formation. PMID:9422613

  17. Structure of the Molybdenum Site of EEcherichia Coli Trimethylamine N-Oxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Nelson, K.Johnson; Rajagopalan, K.V.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-28

    We report a structural characterization of the molybdenum site of recombinant Escherichia coli trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) reductase using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The enzyme active site shows considerable similarity to that of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, in that, like DMSO reductase, the TMAO reductase active site can exist in multiple forms. Examination of the published crystal structure of TMAO oxidase from Shewanella massilia indicates that the postulated Mo coordination structure is chemically impossible. The presence of multiple active site structures provides a potential explanation for the anomalous features reported from the crystal structure.

  18. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibition Promotes Neurological Recovery, Peri-Lesional Tissue Remodeling, and Contralesional Pyramidal Tract Plasticity after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Ertugrul; Reitmeir, Raluca; Kilic, Ülkan; Caglayan, Ahmet Burak; Beker, Mustafa Caglar; Kelestemur, Taha; Ethemoglu, Muhsine Sinem; Ozturk, Gurkan; Hermann, Dirk M.

    2014-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors are widely used for secondary stroke prevention. Besides their lipid-lowering activity, pleiotropic effects on neuronal survival, angiogenesis, and neurogenesis have been described. In view of these observations, we were interested whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibition in the post-acute stroke phase promotes neurological recovery, peri-lesional, and contralesional neuronal plasticity. We examined effects of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin (0.2 or 2.0 mg/kg/day i.c.v.), administered starting 3 days after 30 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion for 30 days. Here, we show that rosuvastatin treatment significantly increased the grip strength and motor coordination of animals, promoted exploration behavior, and reduced anxiety. It was associated with structural remodeling of peri-lesional brain tissue, reflected by increased neuronal survival, enhanced capillary density, and reduced striatal and corpus callosum atrophy. Increased sprouting of contralesional pyramidal tract fibers crossing the midline in order to innervate the ipsilesional red nucleus was noticed in rosuvastatin compared with vehicle-treated mice, as shown by anterograde tract tracing experiments. Western blot analysis revealed that the abundance of HMG-CoA reductase was increased in the contralesional hemisphere at 14 and 28 days post-ischemia. Our data support the idea that HMG-CoA reductase inhibition promotes brain remodeling and plasticity far beyond the acute stroke phase, resulting in neurological recovery. PMID:25565957

  19. Components of glycine reductase from Eubacterium acidaminophilum. Cloning, sequencing and identification of the genes for thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin and selenoprotein PA.

    PubMed

    Lübbers, M; Andreesen, J R

    1993-10-15

    The genes encoding thioredoxin reductase (trxB), thioredoxin (trxA), protein PA of glycine reductase (grdA) and the first 23 amino acids of the large subunit of protein PC of glycine reductase (grdC) belonging to the reductive deamination systems present in Eubacterium acidaminophilum were cloned and sequenced. The proteins were products of closely linked genes with 314 codons (thioredoxin reductase), 110 codons (thioredoxin), and 158 codons (protein PA). The protein previously called 'atypically small lipoamide dehydrogenase' or 'electron transferring flavoprotein' could now conclusively be identified as a thioredoxin reductase (subunit mass of 34781 Da) by the alignment with the enzyme of Escherichia coli showing the same typical order of the corresponding domains. The thioredoxin (molecular mass of 11742 Da) deviated considerably from the known consensus sequence, even in the most strongly conserved redox-active segment WCGPC that was now GCVPC. The selenocysteine of protein PA (molecular mass of 16609 Da) was encoded by TGA. The protein was highly similar to those of Clostridium purinolyticum and Clostridium sticklandii involved in glycine reductase. Thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin of E. acidaminophilum could be successfully expressed in E. coli.

  20. Acetoacetyl Coenzyme A Reductase and Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in Rhizobium (Cicer) sp. Strain CC 1192

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Shahid N.; Copeland, Les

    1998-01-01

    Biochemical controls that regulate the biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) were investigated in Rhizobium (Cicer) sp. strain CC 1192. This species is of interest for studying PHB synthesis because the polymer accumulates to a large extent in free-living cells but not in bacteroids during nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants. Evidence is presented that indicates that CC 1192 cells retain the enzymic capacity to synthesize PHB when they differentiate from the free-living state to the bacteroid state. This evidence includes the incorporation by CC 1192 bacteroids of radiolabel from [14C]malate into 3-hydroxybutyrate which was derived by chemically degrading insoluble material from bacteroid pellets. Furthermore, the presence of an NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase, which was specific for R-(−)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA and NADP+ in the oxidative direction, was demonstrated in extracts from free-living and bacteroid cells of CC 1192. Activity of this enzyme in the reductive direction appeared to be regulated at the biochemical level mainly by the availability of substrates. The CC 1192 cells also contained an NADH-specific acetoacetyl-CoA reductase which oxidized S-(+)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. A membrane preparation from CC 1192 bacteroids readily oxidized NADH but not NADPH, which is suggested to be a major source of reductant for nitrogenase. Thus, a high ratio of NADPH to NADP+, which could enhance delivery of reductant to nitrogenase, could also favor the reduction of acetoacetyl-CoA for PHB synthesis. This would mean that fine controls that regulate the partitioning of acetyl-CoA between citrate synthase and 3-ketothiolase are important in determining whether PHB accumulates. PMID:9687441

  1. Catalysis of nitrosyl transfer reactions by a dissimilatory nitrite reductase (cytochrome c,d1).

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Hollocher, T C

    1984-02-25

    The dissimilatory nitrite reductase (cytochrome c,d1) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was observed at pH 7.5 to catalyze nitrosyl transfer (nitrosation) between [15N]nitrite and several N-nucleophiles or H2 18O, with rate enhancement of the order of 10(8) relative to analogous chemical reactions. The reducing system (ascorbate, N,N,N',N'-tetramethylphenylenediamine) could reduce nitrite (but not NO) enzymatically and had essentially no direct chemical reactivity toward nitrite or NO. The N-nitrosations showed saturation kinetics with respect to the nucleophile and, while exhibiting Vmax values which varied by about 40-fold, nevertheless showed little or no dependence of Vmax on nucleophile pKa. The N-nitrosations and NO-2/H2O-18O exchange required the reducing system, whereas NO/H2O-18O exchange was inhibited by the reducing system. NO was not detected to serve as a nitrosyl donor to N-nucleophiles. These and other kinetic observations suggest that the enzymatic nitrosyl donor is an enzyme-bound species derived from reduced enzyme and one molecule of nitrite, possibly a heme-nitrosyl compound (E-FeII X NO+) for which there is precedence. Nitrosyl transfer to N-nucleophiles may occur within a ternary complex of enzyme, nitrite, and nucleophile. Catalysis of nitrosyl transfer by nitrite reductase represents a new class of enzymatic reactions and may present another example of electrophilic catalysis by a metal center. The nitrosyl donor trapped by these reactions is believed to represent an intermediate in the reduction of nitrite by cytochrome c,d1.

  2. Structural alteration of cofactor specificity in Corynebacterium 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sanli, Gulsah; Banta, Scott; Anderson, Stephen; Blaber, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Corynebacterium 2,5-Diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase (2,5-DKGR) catalyzes the reduction of 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid (2,5-DKG) to 2-Keto-L-gulonic acid (2-KLG). 2-KLG is an immediate precursor to L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), and 2,5-DKGR is, therefore, an important enzyme in a novel industrial method for the production of vitamin C. 2,5-DKGR, as with most other members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, exhibits a preference for NADPH compared to NADH as a cofactor in the stereo-specific reduction of substrate. The application of 2,5-DKGR in the industrial production of vitamin C would be greatly enhanced if NADH could be efficiently utilized as a cofactor. A mutant form of 2,5-DKGR has previously been identified that exhibits two orders of magnitude higher activity with NADH in comparison to the wild-type enzyme, while retaining a high level of activity with NADPH. We report here an X-ray crystal structure of the holo form of this mutant in complex with NADH cofactor, as well as thermodynamic stability data. By comparing the results to our previously reported X-ray structure of the holo form of wild-type 2,5-DKGR in complex with NADPH, the structural basis of the differential NAD(P)H selectivity of wild-type and mutant 2,5-DKGR enzymes has been identified. PMID:14718658

  3. Iron-Sulfur Cluster Engineering Provides Insight into the Evolution of Substrate Specificity among Sulfonucleotide Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Hong, Jiyoung A.; Keller, Rebecca L.; Krebs, Carsten; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    Assimilatory sulfate reduction supplies prototrophic organisms with reduced sulfur that is required for the biosynthesis of all sulfur-containing metabolites, including cysteine and methionine. The reduction of sulfate requires its activation via an ATP-dependent activation to form adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (APS). Depending on the species, APS can be reduced directly to sulfite by APS reductase (APR) or undergo a second phosphorylation to yield 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS), the substrate for PAPS reductase (PAPR). These essential enzymes have no human homolog, rendering them attractive targets for the development of novel antibacterial drugs. APR and PAPR share sequence and structure homology as well as a common catalytic mechanism, but the enzymes are distinguished by two features, namely, the amino acid sequence of the phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) and an iron-sulfur cofactor in APRs. Based on the crystal structures of APR and PAPR, two P-loop residues are proposed to determine substrate specificity; however, this hypothesis has not been tested. In contrast to this prevailing view, we report here that the P-loop motif has a modest effect on substrate discrimination. Instead, by means of metalloprotein engineering, spectroscopic and kinetic analyses, we demonstrate that the iron-sulfur cluster cofactor enhances APS reduction by nearly 1000-fold, thereby playing a pivotal role in substrate specificity and catalysis. These findings offer new insights into the evolution of this enzyme family, and extend the known functions of protein-bound iron-sulfur clusters. PMID:22023093

  4. Structure-activity relationship for enantiomers of potent inhibitors of B. anthracis dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Christina R.; Wakeham, Nancy; Nammalwar, Baskar; Tseitin, Vladimir; Bourne, Philip C.; Barrow, Esther W.; Mylvaganam, Shankari; Ramnarayan, Kal; Bunce, Richard A.; Berlin, K. Darrell; Barrow, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance to antibiotic therapies is increasing and new treatment options are badly needed. There is an overlap between these resistant bacteria and organisms classified as likely bioterror weapons. For example, Bacillus anthracis is innately resistant to the anti-folate trimethoprim due to sequence changes found in the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme. Development of new inhibitors provides an opportunity to enhance the current arsenal of anti-folate antibiotics while also expanding the coverage of the anti-folate class. Methods We have characterized inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis dihydrofolate reductase by measuring the Ki and MIC values and calculating the energetics of binding. This series contains a core diaminopyrimidine ring, a central dimethoxybenzyl ring, and a dihydrophthalazine moiety. We have altered the chemical groups extended from a chiral center on the dihydropyridazine ring of the phthalazine moiety. The interactions for the most potent compounds were visualized by X-ray structure determination. Results We find that the potency of individual enantiomers is divergent with clear preference for the S-enantiomer, while maintaining a high conservation of contacts within the binding site. The preference for enantiomers seems to be predicated largely by differential interactions with protein residues Leu29, Gln30 and Arg53. Conclusions These studies have clarified the activity of modifications and of individual enantiomers, and highlighted the role of the less-active R-enantiomer in effectively diluting the more active S-enantiomer in racemic solutions. This directly contributes to the development of new antimicrobials, combating trimethoprim resistance, and treatment options for potential bioterrorism agents. PMID:22999981

  5. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  6. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  7. 2011 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2011-07-29

    Small particles have been at the heart of nanoscience since the birth of the field and now stand ready to make significant contributions to the big challenges of energy, health and sustainability. Atomic clusters show exquisite size-dependent electronic and magnetic properties and offer a new level of control in catalyses, sensors and biochips; functionalised nanocrystals offer remarkable optical properties and diverse applications in electronic devices, solar energy, and therapy. Both areas are complemented by a raft of recent advances in fabrication, characterization, and performance of a diversity of nanomaterials from the single atom level to nanowires, nanodevices, and biologically-inspired nanosystems. The goal of the 2011 Gordon Conference is thus to continue and enhance the interdisciplinary tradition of this series and discuss the most recent advances, fundamental scientific questions, and emerging applications of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. A single conference covering all aspects of nanoscience from fundamental issues to applications has the potential to create new ideas and stimulate cross fertilization. The meeting will therefore provide a balance among the three sub-components of the conference, true to its title, with a selection of new topics added to reflect rapid advances in the field. The open atmosphere of a Gordon conference, emphasizing the presentation of unpublished results and extensive discussions, is an ideal home for this rapidly developing field and will allow all participants to enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Historically, this Gordon conference has been oversubscribed, so we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral presentations. Given the important

  8. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    2015-06-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  9. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  10. CONFERENCE NOTE: Forthcoming Conference on Frequency Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-04-01

    The Third Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology will be held 5 7 October 1981 at the Centre Paul Langevin, Aussois, Savoie, France. This Conference will follow the lines of its predecessors at Forêt Montmorency, Quebec, Canada in September 1971 and at Copper Mountain, Colorado, USA in July 1976. It is intended to serve as a discussion forum on recent progress and ideas relating to precision frequency standards, the associated metrology and the specific fields of applications. A tentative list of the topics to be covered is the following: Progress in the field of atomic/molecular frequency standards throughout the electromagnetic spectrum Current trends and discussion of the precision capabilities of new techniques (Ramsey fringes in optics, cooling of atoms and ions . . . ) System application (VLBI, navigation . . .) and scientific applications (relativity, geodesy . . .) of atomic/molecular frequency standards and needs in these fields Modern distant time and frequency comparisons Progress in frequency synthesis of microwave to visible frequencies, etc. Most of the talks will be by invitation. Time will be provided for discussion, as well as for presentation of selected late ideas and results. Those interested in the Symposium should communicate with: Dr C Audoin, Laboratoire de l'Horloge Atomique, Bât. 221, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

  11. ADMET--Fifth Annual SMi Conference.

    PubMed

    Comer, John E

    2010-09-01

    SMi's fifth annual ADMET Conference, held in London, included topics covering new developments in the field of ADMET. This conference report highlights selected presentations on ADME optimization in drug discovery; targeting drugs to the brain; predicting bonds that might be attacked during metabolism; treating Caco-2 membranes with vinblastine to enhance P-glycoprotein interactions; predictive ADMET in hit-to-lead optimization; structure-based studies of ADMET targets; an accelerated process for integrated drug development; building hypotheses in lead selection and optimization; supersaturation effects; the prediction of drug-drug interactions; developing a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model; drug transporter assays in drug discovery; time-dependent inhibition screens in early drug discovery; the system-dependent inhibition of CYP enzymes; the integrating predictive toxicology framework OpenTox; high-content analysis for predictive cytotoxicity testing; and emerging in vitro toxicity assays.

  12. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T: Hypoplastic Left Heart and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Kimberly J; Olivero, Anthony D; Haw, Marcus P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of congenital heart defects is higher in infants with mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. The MTHFR C677T gene decreases the bioavailability of folate and increases plasma homocysteine, a risk factor for thrombosis. There have been no reported cases in the literature on the clinical implications of this procoagulable state in the setting of cyanotic heart disease, which itself has prothrombotic predisposition. Two patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome developed postoperative thrombotic complications, both were homozygous for MTHFR C677T. We present these cases and highlight the implications of MTHFR mutation in the management of complex congenital heart disease.

  13. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated.

  14. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-04-24

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  15. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  16. A Novel NADPH-dependent flavoprotein reductase from Bacillus megaterium acts as an efficient cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Milhim, Mohammed; Gerber, Adrian; Neunzig, Jens; Hannemann, Frank; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-08-10

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) require electron transfer partners to catalyze substrate conversions. With regard to biotechnological approaches, the elucidation of novel electron transfer proteins is of special interest, as they can influence the enzymatic activity and specificity of the P450s. In the current work we present the identification and characterization of a novel soluble NADPH-dependent diflavin reductase from Bacillus megaterium with activity towards a bacterial (CYP106A1) and a microsomal (CYP21A2) P450 and, therefore, we referred to it as B. megaterium cytochrome P450 reductase (BmCPR). Sequence analysis of the protein revealed besides the conserved FMN-, FAD- and NADPH-binding motifs, the presence of negatively charged cluster, which is thought to represent the interaction domain with P450s and/or cytochrome c. BmCPR was expressed and purified to homogeneity in Escherichia coli. The purified BmCPR exhibited a characteristic diflavin reductase spectrum, and showed a cytochrome c reducing activity. Furthermore, in an in vitro reconstituted system, the BmCPR was able to support the hydroxylation of testosterone and progesterone with CYP106A1 and CYP21A2, respectively. Moreover, in view of the biotechnological application, the BmCPR is very promising, as it could be successfully utilized to establish CYP106A1- and CYP21A2-based whole-cell biotransformation systems, which yielded 0.3g/L hydroxy-testosterone products within 8h and 0.16g/L 21-hydroxyprogesterone within 6h, respectively. In conclusion, the BmCPR reported herein owns a great potential for further applications and studies and should be taken into consideration for bacterial and/or microsomal CYP-dependent bioconversions.

  17. The Association of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes with the Risk of Childhood Leukemia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Ji, Hong-Xue; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Miao, Chia-En; Hsu, Yuan-Nian; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most prevalent type of pediatric cancer, the causes of which are likely to involve an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. To evaluate the effects of the genotypic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) on childhood ALL risk in Taiwan, two well-known polymorphic genotypes of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed to examine the extent of their associations with childhood ALL susceptibility and to discuss the MTHFR genotypic contribution to childhood ALL risk among different populations. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 266 patients with childhood ALL and an equal number of non-cancer controls recruited were genotyped utilizing PCR-RFLP methodology. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between childhood ALL and control groups. The CT and TT of MTHFR C677T genotypes were significantly more frequently found in controls than in childhood ALL patients (odds ratios=0.60 and 0.48, 95% confidence intervals=0.42–0.87 and 0.24–0.97, respectively). As for gender, the boys carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype conferred a lower odds ratio of 0.51 (95% confidence interval=0.32–0.81, P=0.0113) for childhood ALL. As for age, those equal to or greater than 3.5 years of age at onset of disease carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype were of lower risk (odds ratio= 0.43 and 95% confidence interval=0.26–0.71, P=0.0016). Conclusions Our results indicated that the MTHFR C677T T allele was a protective biomarker for childhood ALL in Taiwan, and the association was more significant in male patients and in patients 3.5 years of age or older at onset of disease. PMID:25793509

  18. Aldose Reductase-catalyzed Reduction of Aldehyde Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Spite, Matthew; Trent, John O.; West, Matthew B.; Ahmed, Yonis; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Oxidation of unsaturated phospholipids results in the generation of aldehyde side chains that remain esterified to the phospholipid backbone. Such “core” aldehydes elicit immune responses and promote inflammation. However, the biochemical mechanisms by which phospholipid aldehydes are metabolized or detoxified are not well understood. In the studies reported here, we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), which reduces hydrophobic aldehydes, metabolizes phospholipid aldehydes. Incubation with AR led to the reduction of 5-oxovaleroyl, 7-oxo-5-heptenoyl, 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-caproyl, and 5-hydroxy-8-oxo-6-octenoyl phospholipids generated upon oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC). The enzyme also catalyzed the reduction of phospholipid aldehydes generated from the oxidation of 1-alkyl, and 1-alkenyl analogs of PAPC, and 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid or phosphoglycerol. Aldose reductase catalyzed the reduction of chemically synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POVPC) with a Km of 10 μM. Addition of POVPC to the culture medium led to incorporation and reduction of the aldehyde in COS-7 and THP-1 cells. Reduction of POVPC in these cells was prevented by the AR inhibitors sorbinil and tolrestat and was increased in COS-7 cells overexpressing AR. Together, these observations suggest that AR may be a significant participant in the metabolism of several structurally diverse phospholipid aldehydes. This metabolism may be a critical regulator of the pro-inflammatory and immunogenic effects of oxidized phospholipids. PMID:15465833

  19. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  20. Human Neuroglobin Functions as a Redox-regulated Nitrite Reductase*

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Tejero, Jesús; Basu, Swati; Azarov, Ivan; Wang, Xunde; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Frizzell, Sheila; Jayaraman, Thottala; Geary, Lisa; Shapiro, Calli; Ho, Chien; Shiva, Sruti; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroglobin is a highly conserved hemoprotein of uncertain physiological function that evolved from a common ancestor to hemoglobin and myoglobin. It possesses a six-coordinate heme geometry with proximal and distal histidines directly bound to the heme iron, although coordination of the sixth ligand is reversible. We show that deoxygenated human neuroglobin reacts with nitrite to form nitric oxide (NO). This reaction is regulated by redox-sensitive surface thiols, cysteine 55 and 46, which regulate the fraction of the five-coordinated heme, nitrite binding, and NO formation. Replacement of the distal histidine by leucine or glutamine leads to a stable five-coordinated geometry; these neuroglobin mutants reduce nitrite to NO ∼2000 times faster than the wild type, whereas mutation of either Cys-55 or Cys-46 to alanine stabilizes the six-coordinate structure and slows the reaction. Using lentivirus expression systems, we show that the nitrite reductase activity of neuroglobin inhibits cellular respiration via NO binding to cytochrome c oxidase and confirm that the six-to-five-coordinate status of neuroglobin regulates intracellular hypoxic NO-signaling pathways. These studies suggest that neuroglobin may function as a physiological oxidative stress sensor and a post-translationally redox-regulated nitrite reductase that generates NO under six-to-five-coordinate heme pocket control. We hypothesize that the six-coordinate heme globin superfamily may subserve a function as primordial hypoxic and redox-regulated NO-signaling proteins. PMID:21296891

  1. ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanneau, Y.; Roby, C.; Meyer, C.M.; Vignais, P.M. )

    1989-07-25

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, nitrogenase is regulated by a reversible covalent modification of Fe protein or dinitrogenase reductase (Rc2). The linkage of the modifying group to inactive Rc2 was found to be sensitive to alkali and to neutral hydroxylamine. Complete release of the modifying group was achieved by incubation of inactive Rc2 in 0.4 or 1 M hydroxylamine. After hydroxylamine treatment of the Rc2 preparation, the modifying group could be isolated and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The modifying group comigrated with ADP-ribose on both ion-exchange HPLC and thin-layer chromatography. Analyses by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry provided further evidence that the modifying group was ADP-ribose. The NMR spectrum of inactive Rc2 exhibited signals characteristic of ADP-ribose; integration of these signals allowed calculation of a molar ration ADP-ribose/Rc2 of 0.63. A hexapeptide carrying the ADP-ribose moiety was purified from a subtilisin digest of inactive Rc2. The structure of this peptide, determined by amino acid analysis and sequencing, is Gly-Arg(ADP-ribose)-Gly-Val-Ile-Thr. This structure allows identification of the binding site for ADP-ribose as Arg 101 of the polypeptide chain of Rc2. It is concluded that nitrogenase activity in R. capsulatus is regulated by reversible ADP-ribosylation of a specific arginyl residue of dinitrogenase reductase.

  2. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants.

  3. Discovery of novel hepatoselective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors for treating hypercholesterolemia: a bench-to-bedside case study on tissue selective drug distribution.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Litchfield, John; Hutchings, Richard; Cheng, Xue-Min; Larsen, Scott D; Auerbach, Bruce; Bush, Mark R; Lee, Chitase; Erasga, Noe; Bowles, Daniel M; Boyles, David C; Lu, Gina; Sekerke, Catherine; Askew, Valerie; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Dillon, Lisa; Lin, Zhiwu; Robertson, Andrew; Olsen, Karl; Boustany, Carine; Atkinson, Karen; Goosen, Theunis C; Sahasrabudhe, Vaishali; Chupka, Jonathan; Duignan, David B; Feng, Bo; Scialis, Renato; Kimoto, Emi; Bi, Yi-An; Lai, Yurong; El-Kattan, Ayman; Bakker-Arkema, Rebecca; Barclay, Paul; Kindt, Erick; Le, Vu; Mandema, Jaap W; Milad, Mark; Tait, Bradley D; Kennedy, Robert; Trivedi, Bharat K; Kowala, Mark

    2011-05-01

    The design of drugs with selective tissue distribution can be an effective strategy for enhancing efficacy and safety, but understanding the translation of preclinical tissue distribution data to the clinic remains an important challenge. As part of a discovery program to identify next generation liver selective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors we report the identification of (3R,5R)-7-(4-((3-fluorobenzyl)carbamoyl)-5-cyclopropyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-3,5-dihydroxyheptanoic acid (26) as a candidate for treating hypercholesterlemia. Clinical evaluation of 26 (PF-03491165), as well as the previously reported 2 (PF-03052334), provided an opportunity for a case study comparison of the preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics as well as pharmacodynamics of tissue targeted HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

  4. Over-Expression of a Tobacco Nitrate Reductase Gene in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Increases Seed Protein Content and Weight without Augmenting Nitrogen Supplying

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Qiang; Nie, Xuan-Li; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Heavy nitrogen (N) application to gain higher yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) resulted in increased production cost and environment pollution. How to diminish the N supply without losing yield and/or quality remains a challenge. To meet the challenge, we integrated and expressed a tobacco nitrate reductase gene (NR) in transgenic wheat. The 35S-NR gene was transferred into two winter cultivars, “Nongda146” and “Jimai6358”, by Agrobacterium-mediation. Over-expression of the transgene remarkably enhanced T1 foliar NR activity and significantly augmented T2 seed protein content and 1000-grain weight in 63.8% and 68.1% of T1 offspring (total 67 individuals analyzed), respectively. Our results suggest that constitutive expression of foreign nitrate reductase gene(s) in wheat might improve nitrogen use efficiency and thus make it possible to increase seed protein content and weight without augmenting N supplying. PMID:24040315

  5. Expression of the yeast cpd1 gene in tobacco confers resistance to the fungal toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Panagiotis, Madesis; Kritonas, Kalantidis; Irini, Nianiou Obeidat; Kiriaki, Chatzidimitriou; Nicolaos, Panopoulos; Athanasios, Tsaftaris

    2007-06-01

    Many phytopathogenic species of the fungus Cercospora produce cercosporin, a photoactivated perylenequinone toxin that belongs to a family of photosensitizers, which absorb light energy and produce extremely cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species. The cpd1 (cercosporin photosensitizer detoxification) gene of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which encodes for a novel protein with significant similarity to the FAD-dependent pyridine nucleotide reductases, confers resistance to cercosporin when over-expressed in yeast. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential ability of cpd1 gene to confer resistance to cercosporin when expressed in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum). Transgenic tobacco plants were produced using Agrobacterium tumefaciens, with cpd1 integrated as the gene of interest. We report here that expression of cpd1 gene in tobacco can mediate resistance to cercosporin. The involvement of cpd1 gene in the detoxification of the cercosporin reinforces previous observations, which suggested that resistance to cercosporin is mediated by a mechanism involving toxin reduction.

  6. 76 FR 57746 - Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation... Systems and Processes for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA),...

  7. Sequence and properties of pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase from Enterobacter cloacae PB2.

    PubMed

    French, C E; Nicklin, S; Bruce, N C

    1996-11-01

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase, which reductively liberates nitrite from nitrate esters, is related to old yellow enzyme. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase follows a ping-pong mechanism with competitive substrate inhibition by NADPH, is strongly inhibited by steroids, and is capable of reducing the unsaturated bond of 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  8. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  9. QTL analysis of ferric reductase activity in the model legume lotus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological and molecular studies have demonstrated that iron accumulation from the soil into Strategy I plants can be limited by ferric reductase activity. An initial study of Lotus japonicus ecotypes Miyakojima MG-20 and Gifu B-129 identified significant leaf chlorosis and ferric reductase activ...

  10. Biliverdin Reductase Mediates Hypoxia-Induced EMT via PI3-Kinase and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rui; Yao, Ying; Han, Min; Zhao, Xiaoqin; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Wei, Juncheng; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding; Xu, Gang

    2008-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia in the renal parenchyma is thought to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), leading to fibrogenesis and ultimately end-stage renal failure. Biliverdin reductase, recently identified as a serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase that may activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, is upregulated in response to reactive oxygen species that may accompany hypoxia. We investigated this potential role of biliverdin reductase in hypoxia-induced renal tubular EMT. Expression of biliverdin reductase was upregulated in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK-2) cultured in hypoxic conditions (1% O2), and this was accompanied by reduced expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin. Inhibiting PI3K reversed these changes, consistent with EMT. In normoxic conditions, overexpression of biliverdin reductase promoted similar characteristics of EMT, which were also reversed by inhibiting PI3K. Furthermore, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knockdown biliverdin reductase, we demonstrated that the enzyme associates with phosphorylated Akt and mediates the hypoxia-induced EMT phenotype. In vivo, expression of biliverdin reductase increased in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and immunohistochemistry of serial sections demonstrated similar localization of phosphorylated Akt and biliverdin reductase. In conclusion, biliverdin reductase mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through a PI3K/Akt-dependent pathway. PMID:18184861

  11. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  12. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  13. SVC 2003 Technical Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-07-01

    The 46th Annual Technical Conference of the Society of Vacuum Coaters was held in San Francisco May 2-8. All the world events apparently did not affect the attendance or the spirit of the attendees. The Conference was a huge success and very well attended. Many feel that it was the best Techcon yet. This year's Conference really raised the bar for the 47th Annual Technical Conference in Dallas next year. Congratulations go out to the program committee, board of directors, education committee, scholarship committee and Management Plus for a job well done. Excellent accommodations were provided by the San Francisco Marriott.

  14. Rural Energy Conference Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Shannon Watson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska remains, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a place with many widely scattered, small, remote communities, well beyond the end of both the road system and the power grid. These communities have the highest energy costs of any place in the United States, despite the best efforts of the utilities that service them. This is due to the widespread dependence on diesel electric generators, which require small capital investments, but recent increases in crude oil prices have resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of power. In the enabling legislation for the Arctic Energy Office in 2001, specific inclusion was made for the study of ways of reducing the cost of electrical power in these remote communities. As part of this mandate, the University of Alaska has, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, the Denali Commission and the Alaska Energy Authority, organized a series of rural energy conferences, held approximately every 18 months. The goal of these meeting was to bring together rural utility operators, rural community leaders, government agency representatives, equipment suppliers, and researchers from universities and national laboratories to discuss the current state of the art in rural power generation, to discuss current projects, including successes as well as near successes. Many of the conference presenters were from industry and not accustomed to writing technical papers, so the typical method of organizing a conference by requesting abstracts and publishing proceedings was not considered viable. Instead, the organizing committee solicited presentations from appropriate individuals, and requested that (if they were comfortable with computers) prepare Power point presentations that were collected and posted on the web. This has become a repository of many presentations, and may be the best single source of information about current projects in the state of Alaska.

  15. S-nitrosoglutathione reductase affords protection against pathogens in Arabidopsis, both locally and systemically.

    PubMed

    Rustérucci, Christine; Espunya, M Carme; Díaz, Maykelis; Chabannes, Matthieu; Martínez, M Carmen

    2007-03-01

    Nitric oxide and S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are widespread signaling molecules that regulate immunity in animals and plants. Levels of SNOs in vivo are controlled by nitric oxide synthesis (which in plants is achieved by different routes) and by S-nitrosoglutathione turnover, which is mainly performed by the S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). GSNOR is encoded by a single-copy gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; Martínez et al., 1996; Sakamoto et al., 2002). We report here that transgenic plants with decreased amounts of GSNOR (using antisense strategy) show enhanced basal resistance against Peronospora parasitica Noco2 (oomycete), which correlates with higher levels of intracellular SNOs and constitutive activation of the pathogenesis-related gene, PR-1. Moreover, systemic acquired resistance is impaired in plants overexpressing GSNOR and enhanced in the antisense plants, and this correlates with changes in the SNO content both in local and systemic leaves. We also show that GSNOR is localized in the phloem and, thus, could regulate systemic acquired resistance signal transport through the vascular system. Our data corroborate the data from other authors that GSNOR controls SNO in vivo levels, and shows that SNO content positively influences plant basal resistance and resistance-gene-mediated resistance as well. These data highlight GSNOR as an important and widely utilized component of resistance protein signaling networks conserved in animals and plants.

  16. 5 CFR 185.120 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 185.120 Section... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.120 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences... conference at a reasonable time in advance of the hearing. (c) The ALJ may use prehearing conferences...

  17. 7 CFR 1753.10 - Preconstruction conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preconstruction conference. 1753.10 Section 1753.10... conference. The borrower shall conduct a conference, attended by the borrower, contractor, and resident... participant with a copy of the conference results. The GFR shall be invited to attend this conference....

  18. 10 CFR 820.22 - Informal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Informal conference. 820.22 Section 820.22 Energy... conference. The Director may convene an informal conference to discuss any situation that might be a... information. The Director may compel a person to attend the conference. This conference will not normally...

  19. 34 CFR 668.87 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prehearing conference. 668.87 Section 668.87 Education... Proceedings § 668.87 Prehearing conference. (a) A hearing official may convene a prehearing conference if he or she thinks that the conference would be useful, or if the conference is requested by— (1)...

  20. 29 CFR 2570.40 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conferences. 2570.40 Section 2570.40 Labor Regulations... Transaction Exemption Applications § 2570.40 Conferences. (a) Any conference between the Department and an... conference will be held at the applicant's request. (b) An applicant is entitled to only one conference...

  1. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  2. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  3. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  4. Networks Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasaki, Keiji K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The papers included in these proceedings represent the most interesting and current topics being pursued by personnel at GSFC's Networks Division and supporting contractors involved in Space, Ground, and Deep Space Network (DSN) technical work. Although 29 papers are represented in the proceedings, only 12 were presented at the conference because of space and time limitations. The proceedings are organized according to five principal technical areas of interest to the Networks Division: Project Management; Network Operations; Network Control, Scheduling, and Monitoring; Modeling and Simulation; and Telecommunications Engineering.

  5. Comparison of finasteride (Proscar), a 5 alpha reductase inhibitor, and various commercial plant extracts in in vitro and in vivo 5 alpha reductase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L; Primka, R L; Berman, C; Vergult, G; Gabriel, M; Pierre-Malice, M; Gibelin, B

    1993-01-01

    Human prostate was used as a source of 5 alpha reductase. Compounds were incubated with an enzyme preparation and [3H]testosterone. [3H]-dihydrotestosterone production was measured to calculate 5 alpha reductase activity. IC50 values (ng/ml) were finasteride = 1; Permixon = 5,600; Talso = 7,000; Strogen Forte = 31,000; Prostagutt = 40,000; and Tadenan = 63,000. Bazoton and Harzol had no activity at concentrations up to 500,000 ng/ml. In castrate rats stimulated with testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), finasteride, but not Permixon or Bazoton, inhibited T stimulated prostate growth, while none of the three compounds inhibited DHT stimulated growth. These results demonstrate that finasteride inhibits 5 alpha reductase, while Permixon and Bazoton have neither anti-androgen nor 5 alpha reductase inhibitory activity. In addition, in a 7 day human clinical trial, finasteride, but not Permixon or placebo, decreased serum DHT in men, further confirming the lack of 5 alpha reductase inhibition by Permixon. Finasteride and the plant extracts listed above do not inhibit the binding of DHT to the rat prostatic androgen receptor (concentrations to 100 micrograms/ml). Based on these results, it is unlikely that these plant extracts would shrink the prostate by inhibiting androgen action or 5 alpha reductase.

  6. Isolation of ascorbate free radical reductase from rabbit lens soluble fraction.

    PubMed

    Bando, Masayasu; Inoue, Takashi; Oka, Mikako; Nakamura, Kayako; Kawai, Kenji; Obazawa, Hajime; Kobayashi, Shizuko; Takehana, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase with diaphorase activity was isolated from the rabbit lens soluble fraction to characterise some molecular properties of the enzyme. The isolation was accomplished using gel filtration (Sephadex G-75 superfine or Sephacryl S-200 HR), affinity chromatography (Affi-Gel Blue), native isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A major soluble AFR reductase was found at an isoelectric point of 8.4 and a molecular weight of 31 kDa, and a few minor enzymes were also detected in the range of pI 7.0-8.6. An unknown N-terminal partial amino acid sequence was determined in one peptide fragment prepared from the major enzyme fraction. From the sequence analysis, it is discussed that the lens soluble AFR reductase may differ from NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase reported to be involved in the membrane-bound AFR reductase activity of mitochondria, microsomes and plasma membrane.

  7. Trypanothione Reductase: A Viable Chemotherapeutic Target for Antitrypanosomal and Antileishmanial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Omar F.

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are two debilitating disease groups caused by parasites of Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. and affecting millions of people worldwide. A brief outline of the potential targets for rational drug design against these diseases are presented, with an emphasis placed on the enzyme trypanothione reductase. Trypanothione reductase was identified as unique to parasites and proposed to be an effective target against trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The biochemical basis of selecting this enzyme as a target, with reference to the simile and contrast to human analogous enzyme glutathione reductase, and the structural aspects of its active site are presented. The process of designing selective inhibitors for the enzyme trypanothione reductase has been discussed. An overview of the different chemical classes of inhibitors of trypanothione reductase with their inhibitory activities against the parasites and their prospects as future chemotherapeutic agents are briefly revealed. PMID:21901070

  8. National Conference[s] on Career Education: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Joseph F.; And Others

    The report describes a series of conferences whose objective was to orient selected educational leaders to the implications of preparing educational personnel with a career education perspective. The first 32 pages of the report discuss project objectives and procedures, and detail participant profiles, pre- and post-conference career education…

  9. A clinically-identified emergent source of antibiotic resistance: the integron-associated DfrB4, a previously uncharacterized member of the trimethoprim-resistant dihydrofolate reductase B family.

    PubMed

    Toulouse, Jacynthe L; Edens, Thaddeus J; Alejaldre, Lorea; Manges, Amee R; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2017-02-27

    Whole genome sequencing of trimethoprim-resistant E. coli clinical isolates has identified a member of the trimethoprim-resistant type II dihydrofolate reductase gene family (dfrB). The dfrB4 gene was located within a class I integron flanked by multiple resistance genes. This arrangement was previously reported in a 130.6 kb multi-resistance plasmid. The DfrB4 protein conferred a > 2,000-fold increased trimethoprim resistance upon overexpression in E. coli Our results are consistent with dfrB4 contributing to clinical trimethoprim resistance.

  10. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate potently inhibits the in vitro activity of hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase[S

    PubMed Central

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Spina, Michele; Tran, Chi Nhan; Falconi, Maurizio; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is the rate-controlling enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, and owing to its biological and pharmacological relevance, researchers have investigated several compounds capable of modulating its activity with the hope of developing new hypocholesterolemic drugs. In particular, polyphenol-rich extracts were extensively tested for their cholesterol-lowering effect as alternatives, or adjuvants, to the conventional statin therapies, but a full understanding of the mechanism of their action has yet to be reached. Our work reports on a detailed kinetic and equilibrium study on the modulation of HMGR by the most-abundant catechin in green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Using a concerted approach involving spectrophotometric, optical biosensor, and chromatographic analyses, molecular docking, and site-directed mutagenesis on the cofactor site of HMGR, we have demonstrated that EGCG potently inhibits the in vitro activity of HMGR (Ki in the nanomolar range) by competitively binding to the cofactor site of the reductase. Finally, we evaluated the effect of combined EGCG-statin administration. PMID:21357570

  11. A new cotton SDR family gene encodes a polypeptide possessing aldehyde reductase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase activities.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Song, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Qin, Yong-Mei

    2010-03-01

    To understand regulatory mechanisms of cotton fiber development, microarray analysis has been performed for upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Based on this, a cDNA (GhKCR3) encoding a polypeptide belonging to short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase family was isolated and cloned. It contains an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding a polypeptide of 328 amino acid residues. Following its overexpression in bacterial cells, the purified recombinant protein specifically uses NADPH to reduce a variety of short-chain aldehydes. A fragment between Gly180 and Gly191 was found to be essential for its catalytic activity. Though the GhKCR3 gene shares low sequence similarities to the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YBR159w that encodes 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR) catalyzing the second step of fatty acid elongation, it was surprisingly able to complement the yeast ybr159wDelta mutant. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that very long-chain fatty acids, especially C26:0, were produced in the ybr159wDelta mutant cells expressing GhKCR3. Applying palmitoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA as substrates, GhKCR3 showed KCR activity in vitro. Quantitative real time-PCR analysis indicated GhKCR3 transcripts accumulated in rapidly elongating fibers, roots, and stems. Our results suggest that GhKCR3 is probably a novel KCR contributing to very long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in plants.

  12. Polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and thymidylate synthase (TYMS) in multiple myeloma risk.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carmen S P; Ortega, Manoela M; Ozelo, Margareth C; Araujo, Renato C; De Souza, Cármino A; Lorand-Metze, Irene; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce M; Costa, Fernando F

    2008-03-01

    We tested whether the polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene, MTHFR C677T and A1298C, the methionine synthase gene, MTR A2756G, the methionine synthase reductase gene, MTRR A66G, and the thymidylate synthase gene, TYMS 2R-->3R, involved in folate and methionine metabolism, altered the risk for multiple myeloma (MM). Genomic DNA from 123MM patients and 188 controls was analysed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion for the polymorphism analyses. The frequency of the MTR 2756 AG plus GG genotype was higher in patients than in controls (39.8% versus 23.4%, P=0.001). Individual carriers of the variant allele G had a 2.31 (95% CI: 1.38-3.87)-fold increased risk for MM compared with others. In contrast, similar frequencies of the MTHFR, the MTRR and the TYMS genotypes were seen in patients and controls. These results suggest, for the first time, a role for the MTR A2756G polymorphism in MM risk in our country, but should be confirmed by large-scale epidemiological studies with patients and controls age matched.

  13. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) gene polymorphisms and adult meningioma risk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Yan-Wen; Shi, Hua-Ping; Wang, Yan-Zhong; Li, Gui-Ling; Yu, Hai-Tao; Xie, Xin-You

    2013-11-01

    The causes of meningiomas are not well understood. Folate metabolism gene polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with various human cancers. It is still controversial and ambiguous between the functional polymorphisms of folate metabolism genes 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) and risk of adult meningioma. A population-based case–control study involving 600 meningioma patients (World Health Organization [WHO] Grade I, 391 cases; WHO Grade II, 167 cases; WHO Grade III, 42 cases) and 600 controls was done for the MTHFR C677T and A1298C, MTRR A66G, and MTR A2756G variants in Chinese Han population. The folate metabolism gene polymorphisms were determined by using a polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Meningioma cases had a significantly lower frequency of MTHFR 677 TT genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 0.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.33–0.74; P = 0.001] and T allele (OR = 0.80, 95 % CI 0.67–0.95; P = 0.01) than controls. A significant association between risk of meningioma and MTRR 66 GG (OR = 1.41, 95 % CI 1.02–1.96; P = 0.04) was also observed. When stratifying by the WHO grade of meningioma, no association was found. Our study suggested that MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G variants may affect the risk of adult meningioma in Chinese Han population.

  14. Curcumin is a tight-binding inhibitor of the most efficient human daunorubicin reductase--Carbonyl reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Hornung, Jan; Ebert, Bettina; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund

    2015-06-05

    Curcumin is a major component of the plant Curcuma longa L. It is traditionally used as a spice and coloring in foods and is an important ingredient in curry. Curcuminoids have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and gained increasing attention as potential neuroprotective and cancer preventive compounds. In the present study, we report that curcumin is a potent tight-binding inhibitor of human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1, Ki=223 nM). Curcumin acts as a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate 2,3-hexandione as revealed by plotting IC50-values against various substrate concentrations and most likely as a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH. Molecular modeling supports the finding that curcumin occupies the cofactor binding site of CBR1. Interestingly, CBR1 is one of the most effective human reductases in converting the anthracycline anti-tumor drug daunorubicin to daunorubicinol. The secondary alcohol metabolite daunorubicinol has significantly reduced anti-tumor activity and shows increased cardiotoxicity, thereby limiting the clinical use of daunorubicin. Thus, inhibition of CBR1 may increase the efficacy of daunorubicin in cancer tissue and simultaneously decrease its cardiotoxicity. Western-blots demonstrated basal expression of CBR1 in several cell lines. Significantly less daunorubicin reduction was detected after incubating A549 cell lysates with increasing concentrations of curcumin (up to 60% less with 50 μM curcumin), suggesting a beneficial effect in the co-treatment of anthracycline anti-tumor drugs together with curcumin.

  15. Naegleria fowleri: a free-living highly pathogenic amoeba contains trypanothione/trypanothione reductase and glutathione/glutathione reductase systems.

    PubMed

    Ondarza, Raúl N; Hurtado, Gerardo; Tamayo, Elsa; Iturbe, Angélica; Hernández, Eva

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents definitive data showing that the thiol-bimane compound isolated and purified by HPLC from Naegleria fowleri trophozoites unequivocally corresponds by matrix assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS, to the characteristic monoprotonated ion of trypanothione-(bimane)(2) [M(+)H(+)] of m/z 1104.57 and to the trypanothione-(bimane) of m/z 914.46. The trypanothione disulfide T(S)(2) was also found to have a molecular ion of m/z 723.37. Additionally HPLC demonstrated that thiol-bimane compounds corresponding to cysteine and glutathione were present in Naegleria. The ion patterns of the thiol-bimane compounds prepared from commercial trypanothione standard, Entamoeba histolytica and Crithidia luciliae are identical to the Naegleria thiol-bimane compound. Partially purified extracts from N. fowleri showed the coexistence of glutathione and trypanothione reductases activities. There is not doubt that the thiol compound trypanothione, which was previously thought to occur only in Kinetoplastida, is also present in the human pathogens E. histolytica and N. fowleri, as well as in the non-pathogenic euglenozoan E. gracilis. The presence of the trypanothione/trypanothione reductase system in N. fowleri creates the possibility of using this enzyme as a new "drug target" for rationally designed drugs to eliminate the parasite, without affecting the human host.

  16. Thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system of Streptomyces clavuligerus: sequences, expression, and organization of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Yanko, M; Mislovati, M; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Av-Gay, Y; Aharonowitz, Y

    1993-01-01

    The genes that encode thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase of Streptomyces clavuligerus were cloned, and their DNA sequences were determined. Previously, we showed that S. clavuligerus possesses a disulfide reductase with broad substrate specificity that biochemically resembles the thioredoxin oxidoreductase system and may play a role in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics. It consists consists of two components, a 70-kDa NADPH-dependent flavoprotein disulfide reductase with two identical subunits and a 12-kDa heat-stable protein general disulfide reductant. In this study, we found, by comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences, that the 35-kDa protein is in fact thioredoxin reductase; it shares 48.7% amino acid sequence identity with Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase, the 12-kDa protein is thioredoxin, and it shares 28 to 56% amino acid sequence identity with other thioredoxins. The streptomycete thioredoxin reductase has the identical cysteine redox-active region--Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys--and essentially the same flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADPH dinucleotide-binding sites as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and is partially able to accept E. coli thioredoxin as a substrate. The streptomycete thioredoxin has the same cysteine redox-active segment--Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys--that is present in virtually all eucaryotic and procaryotic thioredoxins. However, in vivo it is unable to donate electrons to E. coli methionine sulfoxide reductase and does not serve as a substrate in vitro for E. coli thioredoxin reductase. The S. clavuligerus thioredoxin (trxA) and thioredoxin reductase (trxB) genes are organized in a cluster. They are transcribed in the same direction and separated by 33 nucleotides. In contrast, the trxA and trxB genes of E. coli, the only other organism in which both genes have been characterized, are physically widely separated. Images PMID:8349555

  17. Flavin reductase: sequence of cDNA from bovine liver and tissue distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, K S; Hultquist, D E

    1994-01-01

    Flavin reductase catalyzes electron transfer from reduced pyridine nucleotides to methylene blue or riboflavin, and this catalysis is the basis of the therapeutic use of methylene blue or riboflavin in the treatment of methemoglobinemia. A cDNA for a mammalian flavin reductase has been isolated and sequenced. Degenerate oligonucleotides, with sequences based on amino acid sequences of peptides derived from bovine erythrocyte flavin reductase, were used as primers in PCR to selectively amplify a partial cDNA that encodes the bovine reductase. The template used in the PCR was first strand cDNA synthesized from bovine liver total RNA using oligo(dT) primers. A PCR product was used as a specific probe to screen a bovine liver cDNA library. The sequence determined from two overlapping clones contains an open reading frame of 621 nucleotides and encodes 206 amino acids. The amino acid sequence deduced from the bovine liver flavin reductase cDNA matches the amino acid sequences determined for erythrocyte reductase-derived peptides, and the predicted molecular mass of 22,001 Da for the liver reductase agrees well with the molecular mass of 21,994 Da determined for the erythrocyte reductase by electrospray mass spectrometry. The amino acid sequence at the N terminus of the reductase has homology to sequences of pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes, and the predicted secondary structure, beta alpha beta, resembles the common nucleotide-binding structural motif. RNA blot analysis indicates a single 1-kilobase reductase transcript in human heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, placenta, and skeletal muscle. Images PMID:7937764

  18. Policosanol safely down-regulates HMG-CoA reductase - potential as a component of the Esselstyn regimen.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2002-09-01

    Many of the wide-ranging health benefits conferred by statin therapy are mediated, not by reductions in LDL cholesterol, but rather by inhibition of isoprenylation reactions essential to the activation of Rho family GTPases; this may be the mechanism primarily responsible for the favorable impact of statins on risk for ischemic stroke, senile dementia, and fractures, as well as the anti-hypertensive and platelet-stabilizing actions of these drugs. Indeed, the extent of these benefits is such as to suggest that most adults would be wise to take statins; however, owing to the significant expense of statin therapy, as well as to the potential for dangerous side effects that mandates regular physician follow-up, this strategy appears impractical. However, policosanol, a mixture of long-chain aliphatic alcohols extractable from sugar cane wax, has shown cholesterol-lowering potency comparable to that of statins, and yet appears to be devoid of toxic risk. Recent evidence indicates that policosanol down-regulates cellular expression of HMG-CoA reductase, and thus has the potential to suppress isoprenylation reactions much like statins do. Consistent with this possibility, the results of certain clinical and animal studies demonstrate that policosanol has many effects analogous to those of statins that are not likely explained by reductions of LDL cholesterol. However, unlike statins, policosanol does not directly inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, and even in high concentrations it fails to down-regulate this enzyme by more than 50% - thus likely accounting for the safety of this nutraceutical. In light of the fact that policosanol is quite inexpensive and is becoming available as a non-prescription dietary supplement, it may represent a practical resource that could enable the general public to enjoy health benefits comparable to those conferred by statins. In a long-term clinical study enrolling patients with significant symptomatic coronary disease, Esselstyn has demonstrated

  19. 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Catalysis [Conference summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Soled, Stuart L.; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  20. History of NAMES Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    -Russian International Centre was demonstrated. By the high standards of the reports presented, as well as by its overall organization, the second Seminar met the standards of an international conference. Reviews of state-of-the-art developments in materials science were given by leading scientists from Moscow and from the Lorraine region. The three days of the seminar were structured into four main themes: Functional Materials Coatings, Films and Surface Engineering Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies The Environment and three Round Table discussions: Defining practical means of carrying out Franco-Russian collaborations in technology transfer and innovation Materials science ARCUS: Lorraine-Russian collaboration in materials science and the environment 32 oral and 25 poster presentations within four sections were given by a total of 110 participants. NAMES 2007, the 3rd Franco-Russian Seminar on New Achievements in Materials and Environmental Sciences, took place in Metz, France on 7-9 November 2007. The conference highlights fundamentals and development of the five main themes connected to the Lorraine-Russia ARCUS project with possible extension to other topics. The five main subjects included in the ARCUS project are: Bulk-surface-interface material sciences Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies Environment and natural resources Plasma physics—ITER project Vibrational dynamics The first, second and third NAMES conferences were financially supported by the following organizations: Ambassade de France à Moscou Communauté Urbaine du Grand Nancy Région Lorraine Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine Université de Metz Université Henry Poincaré CNRS ANVAR Federal Agency on Science and Innovations of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation Moscow Committee on Science and Technologies Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University) The 4th conference is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of

  1. Paired and interacting galaxies: Conference summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A.

    1990-01-01

    The author gives a summary of the conference proceedings. The conference began with the presentation of the basic data sets on pairs, groups, and interacting galaxies with the latter being further discussed with respect to both global properties and properties of the galactic nuclei. Then followed the theory, modelling and interpretation using analytic techniques, simulations and general modelling for spirals and ellipticals, starbursts and active galactic nuclei. Before the conference the author wrote down the three questions concerning pairs, groups and interacting galaxies that he hoped would be answered at the meeting: (1) How do they form, including the role of initial conditions, the importance of subclustering, the evolution of groups to compact groups, and the fate of compact groups; (2) How do they evolve, including issues such as relevant timescales, the role of halos and the problem of overmerging, the triggering and enhancement of star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei, and the relative importance of dwarf versus giant encounters; and (3) Are they important, including the frequency of pairs and interactions, whether merging and interactions are very important aspects of the life of a normal galaxy at formation, during its evolution, in forming bars, shells, rings, bulges, etc., and in the formation and evolution of active galaxies? Where possible he focuses on these three central issues in the summary.

  2. Calendar of Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas

  3. The Virtual Extension Annual Conference: Addressing Contemporary Professional Development Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Nancy K.; Brekke, Robin; Coates, Deb; Kress, Cathann; Hlas, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Extension systems are experimenting with new models for conducting professional development to enhance staff competence and other returns on professional development investments. The ISUEO virtual annual conference provides a successful flipped classroom model of asynchronous and synchronous learning events for conducting an Extension annual…

  4. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  5. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  6. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment,...

  7. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  8. Annual Quality Assurance Conference Presentations by Glynda Smith and Carrie Miller

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    25th Annual Quality Assurance Conference Presentation: Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts –Rules and Requirements and Presentation: Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2) Cryptosporidium Monitoring

  9. The Second National Conference Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chai, Carolyn

    In this summary of the 1978 National Conference on Asians in America and Asian Americans, conference proceedings, as well as papers and panel discussions, are briefly outlined. Workshops on foreign policy, immigration, Asian identity, education and employment, Indo-Chinese in the United States, teaching English to immigrants, racism and…

  10. Beating the Futures Conference Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, W. H. Clive

    1983-01-01

    Conference survival tips include: (1) noting the different kinds of speakers, their strengths and weaknesses; (2) discovering the reasons for often apparent cross-talk and misunderstanding; and (3) using the concept of futuring to gain ideas as to what can be done after the conference ends. (RM)

  11. SLA at 100: Conference Preview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstein, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    When School Library Association (SLA) convenes its annual conference in Washington, DC, June 14-17, 2009, the association will be celebrating its 100th birthday. This occasion allows for grand gestures--the SLA Salutes! Awards and Leadership Reception will be held in the Library of Congress's Great Hall. The conference also draws upon Washington…

  12. Vague Language in Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This study examined abstracts for a British Association for Applied Linguistics conference and a Sociolinguistics Symposium, to define the genre of conference abstracts in terms of vague language, specifically universal general nouns (e.g. people) and research general nouns (e.g. results), and to discover if the language used reflected the level…

  13. THE PREPLANNING TITLE VII CONFERENCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KIEFFER, ROBERT DE

    THIS REPORT IS A TRANSCRIPT OF PROCEEDINGS OF A PLANNING CONFERENCE HELD AT BOULDER, COLORADO IN SEPTEMBER 1958 FOR THE PURPOSE OF DESIGNING A LARGER CONFERENCE IN APRIL 1960. SPECIFICALLY THIS WOULD DEAL WITH MORE EFFECTIVE UTILIZATION OF TELEVISION, RADIO, MOTION PICTURES AND RELATED MEDIA FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES IN THE MOUNTAIN PLAINS STATES…

  14. Conference Connections: Rewiring the Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemens, George; Tittenberger, Peter; Anderson, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Increased openness, two-way dialogue, and blurred distinctions between experts and amateurs have combined with numerous technology tools for dialogue, personal expression, networking, and community formation to "remake" conferences, influencing not only how attendees participate in but also how organizers host conferences today. (Contains 31…

  15. Student-Led Portfolio Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, F. Leon; Paulson, Pearl R.

    In at least one Oregon school system, student-led conferences have begun to replace traditional report cards. When conferences are well done, parents believe they have learned more about their child's learning and progress than they would through a traditional report card. There is an important additional benefit in that students can rise to the…

  16. The combined nitrate reductase and nitrite-dependent route of NO synthesis in potato immunity to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Izbiańska, Karolina

    2016-11-01

    In contrast to the in-depth knowledge concerning nitric oxide (NO) function, our understanding of NO synthesis in plants is still very limited. In view of the above, this paper provides a step by step presentation of the reductive pathway for endogenous NO generation involving nitrate reductase (NR) activity and nitrite implication in potato defense to Phytophthora infestans. A biphasic character of NO emission, peaking mainly at 3 and then at 24 hpi, was detected during the hypersensitive response (HR). In avr P. infestans potato leaves enhanced NR gene and protein expression was tuned with the depletion of nitrate contents and the increase in nitrite supply at 3 hpi. In the same time period a temporary down-regulation of nitrite reductase (NiR) and activity was found. The study for the link between NO signaling and HR revealed an up-regulation of used markers of effective defense, i.e. Nonexpressor of PR genes (NPR1), thioredoxins (Thx) and PR1, at early time-points (1-3 hpi) upon inoculation. In contrast to the resistant response, in the susceptible one a late overexpression (24-48 hpi) of NPR1 and PR1 mRNA levels was observed. Presented data confirmed the importance of nitrite processed by NR in NO generation in inoculated potato leaves. However, based on the pharmacological approach the potential formation of NO from nitrite bypassing the NR activity during HR response to P. infestans has also been discussed.

  17. Nitrate reductase and nitrite as additional components of defense system in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) against Helicoverpa armigera herbivory.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rimaljeet; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Taggar, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Amylase inhibitors serve as attractive candidates of defense mechanisms against insect attack. Therefore, the impediment of Helicoverpa armigera digestion can be the effective way of controlling this pest population. Nitrite was found to be a potent mixed non-competitive competitive inhibitor of partially purified α-amylase of H. armigera gut. This observation impelled us to determine the response of nitrite and nitrate reductase (NR) towards H. armigera infestation in nine pigeonpea genotypes (four moderately resistant, three intermediate and two moderately susceptible). The significant upregulation of NR in moderately resistant genotypes after pod borer infestation suggested NR as one of the factors that determine their resistance status against insect attack. The pod borer attack caused greater reduction of nitrate and significant accumulation of nitrite in moderately resistant genotypes. The activity of nitrite reductase (NiR) was also enhanced more in moderately resistant genotypes than moderately susceptible genotypes on account of H. armigera herbivory. Expression of resistance to H. armigera was further revealed when significant negative association between NR, NiR, nitrite and percent pod damage was observed. This is the first report that suggests nitrite to be a potent inhibitor of H. armigera α-amylase and also the involvement of nitrite and NR in providing resistance against H. armigera herbivory.

  18. AhpC (alkyl hydroperoxide reductase) from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 protects Escherichia coli from multiple abiotic stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Yogesh; Chaurasia, Neha; Rai, Lal Chand

    2009-04-17

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) is known to detoxify peroxides and reactive sulfur species (RSS). However, the relationship between its expression and combating of abiotic stresses is still not clear. To investigate this relationship, the genes encoding the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (ahpC) from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 were introduced into E. coli using pGEX-5X-2 vector and their possible functions against heat, salt, carbofuron, cadmium, copper and UV-B were analyzed. The transformed E. coli cells registered significantly increase in growth than the control cells under temperature (47 {sup o}C), NaCl (6% w/v), carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), and UV-B (10 min) exposure. Enhanced expression of ahpC gene as measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR under aforementioned stresses at different time points demonstrated its role in offering tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses.

  19. Summary of 1990 Code Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Chan, Kwok-Chi D.

    1990-01-01

    The Conference on Codes and the Linear Accelerator Community was held in Los Alamos in January 1990, and had approximately 100 participants. This conference was the second in a series which has as its goal the exchange of information about codes and code practices among those writing and actually using these codes for the design and analysis of linear accelerators and their components. The first conference was held in San Diego in January 1988, and concentrated on beam dynamics codes and Maxwell solvers. This most recent conference concentrated on 3-D codes and techniques to handle the large amounts of data required for three-dimensional problems. In addition to descriptions of codes, their algorithms and implementations, there were a number of paper describing the use of many of the codes. Proceedings of both these conferences are available. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. PREFACE Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (CAMAN 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy

    2011-02-01

    This special issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials science and Engineering contains papers contributed to the Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (CAMAN 2009) held on 3-5 November 2009 in Putra World Trade Centre (PWTC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The objective of the congress is to provide a platform for professionals, academicians and researchers to exchange views, findings, ideas and experiences on advanced science and technology. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 50 papers were selected for publications in this issue. The policy of editing was the content of the material and its rapid dissemination was more important than its form. In 2009, the conference received close to 120 papers from leading researchers and participants from countries such as Iran, India, Switzerland, Myanmar, Nigeria, Canada, Yemen and Malaysia. We strongly hope the new ideas and results presented will stimulate and enhance the progress of research on the above conference theme. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this conference. They are also the ones who help make this conference possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We wish to thank all the authors who contributed papers to the conference and all reviewers for their efforts to review the papers as well as the sponsors. We would also like to thank the members of the CAMAN 2009 Organising Committee and the International Advisory Committee for their efforts in making the conference a success. Thank you very much indeed. Guest Editor Aidy Ali

  1. B-vitamins, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ward, Mary; Wilson, Carol P; Strain, J J; Horigan, Geraldine; Scott, John M; McNulty, Helene

    2011-07-01

    Hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke. A common polymorphism in the gene encoding the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), previously identified as the main genetic determinant of elevated homocysteine concentration and also recognized as a risk factor for CVD, appears to be independently associated with hypertension. The B-vitamin riboflavin is required as a cofactor by MTHFR and recent evidence suggests it may have a role in modulating blood pressure, specifically in those with the homozygous mutant MTHFR 677 TT genotype. If studies confirm that this genetic predisposition to hypertension is correctable by low-dose riboflavin, the findings could have important implications for the management of hypertension given that the frequency of this polymorphism ranges from 3 to 32 % worldwide.

  2. A ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor with deoxyribonucleoside-reversible cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Crona, Mikael; Codó, Paula; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Hofer, Anders; Fernandes, Aristi P; Tholander, Fredrik

    2016-11-01

    Ribonucleotide Reductase (RNR) is the sole enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides into deoxyribonucleotides. Even though RNR is a recognized target for antiproliferative molecules, and the main target of the approved drug hydroxyurea, few new leads targeted to this enzyme have been developed. We have evaluated a recently identified set of RNR inhibitors with respect to inhibition of the human enzyme and cellular toxicity. One compound, NSC73735, is particularly interesting; it is specific for leukemia cells and is the first identified compound that hinders oligomerization of the mammalian large RNR subunit. Similar to hydroxyurea, it caused a disruption of the cell cycle distribution of cultured HL-60 cells. In contrast to hydroxyurea, the disruption was reversible, indicating higher specificity. NSC73735 thus defines a potential lead candidate for RNR-targeted anticancer drugs, as well as a chemical probe with better selectivity for RNR inhibition than hydroxyurea.

  3. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  4. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  5. B-factor Analysis and Conformational Rearrangement of Aldose Reductase.

    PubMed

    Balendiran, Ganesaratnam K; Pandian, J Rajendran; Drake, Evin; Vinayak, Anubhav; Verma, Malkhey; Cascio, Duilio

    2014-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent reduction of glucose reaction that is catalyzed by Aldose Reductase (AR) follows a sequential ordered kinetic mechanism in which the co-factor NADPH binds to the enzyme prior to the aldehyde substrate. The kinetic/structural experiments have found a conformational change involving a hinge-like movement of a surface loop (residues 213-224) which is anticipated to take place upon the binding of the diphosphate moiety of NADPH. The reorientation of this loop, expected to permit the release of NADP(+), represents the rate-limiting step of the catalytic mechanism. This study reveals: 1) The Translation/Libration/Screw (TLS) analysis of absolute B-factors of apo AR crystal structures indicates that the 212-224 loop might move as a rigid group. 2) Residues that make the flexible loop slide in the AR binary and ternary complexes. 3) The normalized B-factors separate this segment into three different clusters with fewer residues.

  6. Purification and characterization of 5-ketofructose reductase from Erwinia citreus.

    PubMed Central

    Schrimsher, J L; Wingfield, P T; Bernard, A; Mattaliano, R; Payton, M A

    1988-01-01

    5-Ketofructose reductase [D(-)fructose:(NADP+) 5-oxidoreductase] was purified to homogeneity from Erwinia citreus and demonstrated to catalyse the reversible NADPH-dependent reduction of 5-ketofructose (D-threo-2,5-hexodiulose) to D-fructose. The enzyme appeared as a single species upon analyses by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing with an apparent relative molecular mass of 40,000 and an isoelectric point of 4.4. The amino acid composition of the enzyme and the N-terminal sequence of the first 39 residues are described. The steady-state kinetic mechanism was an ordered one with NADPH binding first to the enzyme and then to 5-ketofructose, and the order of product release was D-fructose followed by NADP+. The reversible nature of the reaction offers the possibility of using this enzyme for the determination of D-fructose. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3178725

  7. Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2010-03-19

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

  8. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx(5 )[ATS]x(4) Gx(4) [VIL]WNR[TS]x(2) [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x(3){K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes.

  9. Evidence for a Hexaheteromeric Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase in Moorella thermoacetica

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Johanna; Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Moorella thermoacetica can grow with H2 and CO2, forming acetic acid from 2 CO2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. All enzymes involved in this pathway have been characterized to date, except for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF). We report here that the M. thermoacetica gene that putatively encodes this enzyme, metF, is part of a transcription unit also containing the genes hdrCBA, mvhD, and metV. MetF copurified with the other five proteins encoded in the unit in a hexaheteromeric complex with an apparent molecular mass in the 320-kDa range. The 40-fold-enriched preparation contained per mg protein 3.1 nmol flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), 3.4 nmol flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and 110 nmol iron, almost as predicted from the primary structure of the six subunits. It catalyzed the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with reduced benzyl viologen but not with NAD(P)H in either the absence or presence of oxidized ferredoxin. It also catalyzed the reversible reduction of benzyl viologen with NADH (diaphorase activity). Heterologous expression of the metF gene in Escherichia coli revealed that the subunit MetF contains one FMN rather than FAD. MetF exhibited 70-fold-higher methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity with benzyl viologen when produced together with MetV, which in part shows sequence similarity to MetF. Heterologously produced HdrA contained 2 FADs and had NAD-specific diaphorase activity. Our results suggested that the physiological electron donor for methylenetetrahydrofolate reduction in M. thermoacetica is NADH and that the exergonic reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADH is coupled via flavin-based electron bifurcation with the endergonic reduction of an electron acceptor, whose identity remains unknown. PMID:25002540

  10. The modulation of carbonyl reductase 1 by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Boušová, Iva; Skálová, Lenka; Souček, Pavel; Matoušková, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), an enzyme belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, has been detected in all human tissues. CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of many xenobiotics, including important drugs (e.g. anthracyclines, nabumetone, bupropion, dolasetron) and harmful carbonyls and quinones. Moreover, it participates in the metabolism of a number of endogenous compounds and it may play a role in certain pathologies. Plant polyphenols are not only present in many human food sources, but are also a component of many popular dietary supplements and herbal medicines. Many studies reviewed herein have demonstrated the potency of certain flavonoids, stilbenes and curcuminoids in the inhibition of the activity of CBR1. Interactions of these polyphenols with transcriptional factors, which regulate CBR1 expression, have also been reported in several studies. As CBR1 plays an important role in drug metabolism as well as in the protection of the organism against potentially harmful carbonyls, the modulation of its expression/activity may have significant pharmacological and/or toxicological consequences. Some polyphenols (e.g. luteolin, apigenin and curcumin) have been shown to be very potent CBR1 inhibitors. The inhibition of CBR1 seems useful regarding the increased efficacy of anthracycline therapy, but it may cause the worse detoxification of reactive carbonyls. Nevertheless, all known information about the interactions of polyphenols with CBR1 have only been based on the results of in vitro studies. With respect to the high importance of CBR1 and the frequent consumption of polyphenols, in vivo studies would be very helpful for the evaluation of risks/benefits of polyphenol interactions with CBR1.

  11. d-Apiose Reductase from Aerobacter aerogenes1

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Donna L.; Kindel, Paul K.

    1970-01-01

    A strain of Aerobacter aerogenes PRL-R3 has been isolated which utilizes d-apiose as its sole source of carbon. A new enzyme, d-apiose reductase, was discovered in this strain. The enzyme was not present when the strain was grown on d-glucose. d-Apiose reductase catalyzes the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent interconversion of d-apiose and d-apiitol. The enzyme is specific for d-apiose and d-apiitol, with a few possible exceptions. The Km for d-apiose is 0.02 m. The Km for d-apiitol is 0.01 m. The enzyme is almost completely specific for the reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. When cell-free extracts were centrifuged at 100,000 × g for 1 hr, the enzyme remained in solution. Optimal activity for the reduction of d-apiose was obtained at pH 7.5 in glycylglycine buffer, whereas for the oxidation of d-apiitol it was obtained at pH 10.5 in glycine buffer. Enzymatic reduction of d-apiose was not appreciably affected by the presence of 0.02 m ethylenediaminetetraacetate. Paper chromatography and specific spray reagents were used to identify d-apiitol and d-apiose as the products of this reversible reaction. d-Apiose and d-apiitol did not serve as substrates for ribitol dehydrogenase and d-arabitol dehydrogenase from A. aerogenes PRL-R3. PMID:4314545

  12. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The promotion of interaction among investigators of all oceanographic disciplines studying the eastern Pacific Ocean was the goal of the 1990 Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference (EPOC), held October 17-19 on the snow-covered slopes of Mt. Hood, Oreg. Thirty oceanographers representing all disciplines attended.Dick Barber, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, N.C., chaired a session on the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, emphasizing issues related to biological activity. Steve Ramp of the Naval Postgraduate School in Montery, Calif., chaired a session on recent results from northern and central California experiments. On October 19, following an early morning earthquake, a business meeting and discussions regarding a collaboration in future experiments were held.

  13. Steroid 5β-Reductase from Leaves of Vitis vinifera: Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Mona; Munkert, Jennifer; Campa, Manuela; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan; Müller-Uri, Frieder

    2015-11-25

    A steroid 5β-reductase gene corresponding to the hypothetical protein LOC100247199 from leaves of Vitis vinifera (var. 'Chardonnay') was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed 5β-reductase activity when progesterone was used as a substrate. The reaction was stereoselective, producing only 5β-products such as 5β-pregnane-3,20-dione. Other small substrates (terpenoids and enones) were also accepted as substrates, indicating the highly promiscuous character of the enzyme class. Our results show that the steroid 5β-reductase gene, encoding an orthologous enzyme described as a key enzyme in cardenolide biosynthesis, is also expressed in leaves of the cardenolide-free plant V. vinifera. We emphasize the fact that, on some occasions, different reductases (e.g., progesterone 5β-reductase and monoterpenoid reductase) can also use molecules that are similar to the final products as a substrate. Therefore, in planta, the different reductases may contribute to the immense number of diverse small natural products finally leading to the flavor of wine.

  14. Purification, properties, and sequence of glycerol trinitrate reductase from Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed Central

    Snape, J R; Walkley, N A; Morby, A P; Nicklin, S; White, G F

    1997-01-01

    Glycerol trinitrate (GTN) reductase, which enables Agrobacterium radiobacter to utilize GTN and related explosives as sources of nitrogen for growth, was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme was a 39-kDa monomeric protein which catalyzed the NADH-dependent reductive scission of GTN (Km = 23 microM) to glycerol dinitrates (mainly the 1,3-isomer) with a pH optimum of 6.5, a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C, and no dependence on metal ions for activity. It was also active on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), on isosorbide dinitrate, and, very weakly, on ethyleneglycol dinitrate, but it was inactive on isopropyl nitrate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, ammonium ions, nitrate, or nitrite. The amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence was homologous (42 to 51% identity and 61 to 69% similarity) to those of PETN reductase from Enterobacter cloacae, N-ethylmaleimide reductase from Escherichia coli, morphinone reductase from Pseudomonas putida, and old yellow enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, placing the GTN reductase in the alpha/beta barrel flavoprotein group of proteins. GTN reductase and PETN reductase were very similar in many respects except in their distinct preferences for NADH and NADPH cofactors, respectively. PMID:9401040

  15. ISMB Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Teresa, Gaasterand; Martin, Vingron

    2011-07-01

    This special issue comprises the papers accepted for presentation at the 19th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, joint with the 10th European Conference on Computational Biology, an official conference of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB; http://www.iscb.org). ISMB/ECCB 2011 (http://www.iscb.org/ismb2011/) will take place in Vienna, Austria, from July 17 through July 19, 2011; preceded during July 14–16 by eight 1- or 2- day Special Interest Group (SIG) meetings, three satellite meetings and nine half-day tutorials; and followed by two additional satellite meetings. The 48 papers in this volume were selected from 258 submitted papers. Submitted papers were assigned to 13 areas. Area Chairs led each topic area by selecting their area's program committee and overseeing the reviewing process. Many Area Chairs were new compared to 2010, and two completely new areas were added in 2011, ‘Data Visualization’ and ‘Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics’. Six papers for which Area Chairs were in conflict were reviewed under a ‘Conflicts Management’ section headed by the Proceedings Chairs; one such paper was accepted in ‘Bioimaging’. Areas, co-chairs and acceptance information are listed in Table 1. Compared to prior years, five mature topic areas had steady submissions, ‘Evolution and Comparative Genomics’, ‘Gene Regulation and Transcriptomics’, ‘Protein Structure and Function’, ‘Sequence Analysis’, ‘Text Mining’. Two areas newer to ISMB were underrepresented this year, ‘Bioimaging’ and ‘Disease Models and Epidemiology’. One area doubled, ‘Applied Bioinformatics’, renamed from last year's ‘Other Bioinformatics Applications’; and one tripled, ‘Protein Interactions and Molecular Networks’. Across the areas, 326 members of the bioinformatics community provided reviews. Most papers received three reviews and several received four or more. There was

  16. Computational Biology Support: RECOMB Conference Series (Conference Support)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Waterman

    2006-06-15

    This funding was support for student and postdoctoral attendance at the Annual Recomb Conference from 2001 to 2005. The RECOMB Conference series was founded in 1997 to provide a scientific forum for theoretical advances in computational biology and their applications in molecular biology and medicine. The conference series aims at attracting research contributions in all areas of computational molecular biology. Typical, but not exclusive, the topics of interest are: Genomics, Molecular sequence analysis, Recognition of genes and regulatory elements, Molecular evolution, Protein structure, Structural genomics, Gene Expression, Gene Networks, Drug Design, Combinatorial libraries, Computational proteomics, and Structural and functional genomics. The origins of the conference came from the mathematical and computational side of the field, and there remains to be a certain focus on computational advances. However, the effective use of computational techniques to biological innovation is also an important aspect of the conference. The conference had a growing number of attendees, topping 300 in recent years and often exceeding 500. The conference program includes between 30 and 40 contributed papers, that are selected by a international program committee with around 30 experts during a rigorous review process rivaling the editorial procedure for top-rate scientific journals. In previous years papers selection has been made from up to 130--200 submissions from well over a dozen countries. 10-page extended abstracts of the contributed papers are collected in a volume published by ACM Press and Springer, and are available at the conference. Full versions of a selection of the papers are published annually in a special issue of the Journal of Computational Biology devoted to the RECOMB Conference. A further point in the program is a lively poster session. From 120-300 posters have been presented each year at RECOMB 2000. One of the highlights of each RECOMB conference is a

  17. Conference Report: Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorino, Naoto; Mori, Hiroyuki

    The 19th Power & Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 24-26, 2008 at Hiroshima University. The total number of technical papers was 415 and 53 sessions (52 oral sessions and 1 poster session) were organized. A panel discussion, a special lecture, technical exhibitions and technical tours were also organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 954 registrations. The conference has been successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. In this article, the outline of the conference is reported.

  18. Reduction of mitochondrial protein mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters by human glutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Aaron P.; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondrial outer membrane protein mitoNEET is a newly discovered target of type II diabetes drug pioglitazone. Structurally, mitoNEET is a homodimer with each monomer containing an N-terminal transmembrane alpha helix tethered to mitochondrial outer membrane and a C-terminal cytosolic domain hosting a redox active [2Fe-2S] cluster. Genetic studies have shown that mitoNEET has a central role in regulating energy metabolism in mitochondria. However, specific function of mitoNEET remains largely elusive. Here we find that the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters can be efficiently reduced by Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Purified human glutathione reductase has the same activity as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. However, rat thioredoxin reductase, a human thioredoxin reductase homolog that contains selenocysteine in the catalytic center, has very little or no activity to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. N-ethylmaleimide, a potent thiol modifier, completely inhibits human glutathione reductase to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters, indicating that the redox active disulfide in the catalytic center of human glutathione reductase may be directly involved in reducing the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. Additional studies reveal that the reduced mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters in mouse heart cell extracts can be reversibly oxidized by hydrogen peroxide without disruption of the clusters, suggesting that the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters may undergo redox transition to regulate energy metabolism in mitochondria in response to oxidative signals. PMID:25645953

  19. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Chlorella autotrophica and Chlorella saccharophila in Relation to Osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, G; Hellebust, J A

    1989-11-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the reduction of P5C to proline, was partially purified from two Chlorella species; Chlorella autotrophica, a euryhaline marine alga that responds to increases in salinity by accumulating proline and ions, and Chlorella saccharophila, which does not accumulate proline for osmoregulation. From the elution profile of this enzyme from an anion exchange column in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.6), containing sorbitol and glycine betaine, it was shown that P5C reductase from C. autotrophica was a neutral protein whereas the enzyme from C. saccharophila was negatively charged. The kinetic mechanisms of the reductase was characteristic of a ping-pong mechanism with double competitive substrate inhibition. Both enzymes showed high specificity for NADH as cofactor. The affinities of the reductases for their substrates did not change when the cells were grown at different salinities. In both algae, the apparent K(m) values of the reductase for P5C and NADH were 0.17 and 0.10 millimolar, respectively. A fourfold increase in maximal velocity of the reductase was observed when C. autotrophica was transferred from 50 to 150% artificial sea water. Even though the reductase was inhibited by NaCl, KCl, and proline, it still showed appreciable activity in the presence of these compounds at molar concentrations. A possible role for the regulation of proline synthesis at the step catalyzed by P5C reductase is discussed in relation to the specificity of P5C reductase for NADH and its responses to salt treatments.

  20. Expression of chlorite dismutase and chlorate reductase in the presence of oxygen and/or chlorate as the terminal electron acceptor in Ideonella dechloratans.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Miriam Hellberg; Johansson, Nicklas; Nilsson, Thomas; Rova, Maria

    2012-06-01

    The ability of microorganisms to perform dissimilatory (per)chlorate reduction is, for most species, known to be oxygen sensitive. Consequently, bioremediation processes for the removal of oxochlorates will be disturbed if oxygen is present. We measured the expression of chlorite dismutase and chlorate reductase in the presence of different terminal electron acceptors in the chlorate reducer Ideonella dechloratans. Enzyme activity assays and mRNA analyses by real-time quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR were performed on cell extracts from cells grown aerobically with and without chlorate and on cells grown anaerobically in the presence of chlorate. Our results showed that both chlorite dismutase and chlorate reductase are expressed during aerobic growth. However, transfer to anaerobic conditions with chlorate resulted in significantly enhanced enzyme activities and mRNA levels for both enzymes. Absence of oxygen was necessary for the induction to occur, since chlorate addition under aerobic conditions produced neither increased enzyme activities nor higher relative levels of mRNA. For chlorite dismutase, the observed increase in activity was on the same order of magnitude as the increase in the relative mRNA level, indicating gene regulation at the transcriptional level. However, chlorate reductase showed about 200 times higher enzyme activity in anaerobically induced cells, whereas the increase in mRNA was only about 10-fold, suggesting additional mechanisms influence the enzyme activity.