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  1. Potential use of aldose reductase inhibitors to prevent diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Zenon, G J; Abobo, C V; Carter, B L; Ball, D W

    1990-06-01

    Reviewed are (1) the biochemical basis and pathophysiology of diabetic complications and (2) the structure-activity relationships, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and adverse effects of aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs). ARIs are a new class of drugs potentially useful in preventing diabetic complications, the most widely studied of which have been cataracts and neuropathy. ARIs inhibit aldose reductase, the first, rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol metabolic pathway. In nonphysiological hyperglycemia the activity of hexokinase becomes saturated while that of aldose reductase is enhanced, resulting in intracellular accumulation of sorbitol. Because sorbitol does not readily penetrate the cell membrane it can persist within cells, which may lead to diabetic complications. ARIs are a class of structurally dissimilar compounds that include carboxylic acid derivatives, flavonoids, and spirohydantoins. The major pharmacologic action of an ARI involves competitive binding to aldose reductase and consequent blocking of sorbitol production. ARIs delay cataract formation in animals, but the role of aldose reductase in cataract formation in human diabetics has not been established. The adverse effects of ARIs include hypersensitivity reactions. Although the polyol pathway may not be solely responsible for diabetic complications, studies suggest that therapy with ARIs could be beneficial. Further research is needed to determine the long-term impact and adverse effects of ARIs in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  2. Androgen Regulation of 5α-Reductase Isoenzymes in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Prostate Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Ding, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhengxin; Lu, Jing-Fang; Maity, Sankar N.; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kim, Jeri

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme 5α-reductase, which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), performs key functions in the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway. The three isoenzymes of 5α-reductase identified to date are encoded by different genes: SRD5A1, SRD5A2, and SRD5A3. In this study, we investigated mechanisms underlying androgen regulation of 5α-reductase isoenzyme expression in human prostate cells. We found that androgen regulates the mRNA level of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in a cell type–specific manner, that such regulation occurs at the transcriptional level, and that AR is necessary for this regulation. In addition, our results suggest that AR is recruited to a negative androgen response element (nARE) on the promoter of SRD5A3 in vivo and directly binds to the nARE in vitro. The different expression levels of 5α-reductase isoenzymes may confer response or resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitors and thus may have importance in prostate cancer prevention. PMID:22194926

  3. Amelioration of Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis by Aldose Reductase Inhibition in Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh C. S.; Shoeb, Mohammad; Srivastava, Satish K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Recently, the authors showed that the inhibition of aldose reductase (AR) prevents bacterial endotoxin-induced uveitis in rats. They have now investigated the efficacy of AR inhibitors in the prevention of experimental autoimmune-induced uveitis (EAU) in rats. Methods. Lewis rats were immunized with bovine interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding peptide (IRBP) to develop EAU. Two or 8 days after immunization, the rats started receiving the AR inhibitor fidarestat (7 mg/kg/d; intraperitoneally). They were killed when the disease was at its peak; aqueous humor (AqH) was collected from one eye, and the other eye of each rat was used for histologic studies. The protein concentration and the levels of inflammatory markers were determined in AqH. Immunohistochemical analysis of eye sections was performed to determine the expression of inflammatory markers. The effect of AR inhibition on immune response was investigated in isolated T lymphocytes. Results. Immunization of rats by IRBP peptide resulted in a significant infiltration of leukocytes in the posterior and the anterior chambers of the eye. Further, EAU caused an increase in the concentration of proteins, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in AqH, and the expression of inflammatory markers such as inducible-nitric oxide synthase and cycloxygenase-2 in the rat eye ciliary bodies and retina. Treatment with fidarestat significantly prevented the EAU-induced ocular inflammatory changes. AR inhibition also prevented the proliferation of spleen-derived T cells isolated from EAU rats in response to the IRBP antigen. Conclusions. These results suggest that AR could be a novel mediator of bovine IRBP-induced uveitis in rats. PMID:21900376

  4. Prevention of hemodynamic and vascular albumin filtration changes in diabetic rats by aldose reductase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, R.G.; Chang, K.; Pugliese, G.; Eades, D.M.; Province, M.A.; Sherman, W.R.; Kilo, C.; Williamson, J.R. )

    1989-10-01

    This study investigated hemodynamic changes in diabetic rats and their relationship to changes in vascular albumin permeation and increased metabolism of glucose to sorbitol. The effects of 6 wk of streptozocin-induced diabetes and three structurally different inhibitors of aldose reductase were examined on (1) regional blood flow (assessed with 15-microns 85Sr-labeled microspheres) and vascular permeation by 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (2) glomerular filtration rate (assessed by plasma clearance of 57Co-labeled EDTA) and urinary albumin excretion (determined by radial immunodiffusion assay). In diabetic rats, blood flow was significantly increased in ocular tissues (anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, and optic nerve), sciatic nerve, kidney, new granulation tissue, cecum, and brain. 125I-BSA permeation was increased in all of these tissues except brain. Glomerular filtration rate and 24-h urinary albumin excretion were increased 2- and 29-fold, respectively, in diabetic rats. All three aldose reductase inhibitors completely prevented or markedly reduced these hemodynamic and vascular filtration changes and increases in tissue sorbitol levels in the anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, sciatic nerve, and granulation tissue. These observations indicate that early diabetes-induced hemodynamic changes and increased vascular albumin permeation and urinary albumin excretion are aldose reductase-linked phenomena. Discordant effects of aldose reductase inhibitors on blood flow and vascular albumin permeation in some tissues suggest that increased vascular albumin permeation is not entirely attributable to hemodynamic change.

  5. Prevention of hemodynamic and vascular albumin filtration changes in diabetic rats by aldose reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tilton, R G; Chang, K; Pugliese, G; Eades, D M; Province, M A; Sherman, W R; Kilo, C; Williamson, J R

    1989-10-01

    This study investigated hemodynamic changes in diabetic rats and their relationship to changes in vascular albumin permeation and increased metabolism of glucose to sorbitol. The effects of 6 wk of streptozocin-induced diabetes and three structurally different inhibitors of aldose reductase were examined on 1) regional blood flow (assessed with 15-microns 85Sr-labeled microspheres) and vascular permeation by 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 2) glomerular filtration rate (assessed by plasma clearance of 57Co-labeled EDTA) and urinary albumin excretion (determined by radial immunodiffusion assay). In diabetic rats, blood flow was significantly increased in ocular tissues (anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, and optic nerve), sciatic nerve, kidney, new granulation tissue, cecum, and brain. 125I-BSA permeation was increased in all of these tissues except brain. Glomerular filtration rate and 24-h urinary albumin excretion were increased 2- and 29-fold, respectively, in diabetic rats. All three aldose reductase inhibitors completely prevented or markedly reduced these hemodynamic and vascular filtration changes and increases in tissue sorbitol levels in the anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, sciatic nerve, and granulation tissue. These observations indicate that early diabetes-induced hemodynamic changes and increased vascular albumin permeation and urinary albumin excretion are aldose reductase-linked phenomena. Discordant effects of aldose reductase inhibitors on blood flow and vascular albumin permeation in some tissues suggest that increased vascular albumin permeation is not entirely attributable to hemodynamic changes. We hypothesize that 1) increases in blood flow may reflect impaired contractile function of smooth muscle cells in resistance arterioles and 2) increases in vascular 125I-BSA permeation and urinary albumin excretion reflect impaired vascular barrier functional integrity in addition to increased hydraulic conductance secondary to

  6. Monotherapy with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors and secondary prevention in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rackley, C E

    1996-09-01

    Although thrombolytic drugs, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and coronary artery bypass grafting have provided major advances in the treatment of coronary artery disease, the use of lipid-lowering drugs for secondary prevention has significantly reduced cardiovascular events in the population with coronary artery disease. Secondary prevention trials using HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors include the Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study (FATS), the Monitored Atherosclerosis Regression Study (MARS), the Canadian Coronary Atherosclerosis Intervention Trial (CCAIT), the Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Progression Study (ACAPS), the Multi Anti-Atheroma Study (MAAS), the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S), the Pravastatin Limitation of Atherosclerosis in Coronary Arteries (PLAC I), the Regression Growth Evaluation Statin Study (REGRESS), the Pravastatin Multinational Study, and the Pravastatin, Lipids, and Atherosclerosis in Carotids (PLAC II). Mean changes from baseline of lipid fractions in these trials included: total cholesterol 18 to 35% reduction; low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol 26 to 46% reduction; high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol 5 to 15% increase; and triglyceride 7 to 22% reduction. Angiographic regression or lack of progression was statistically demonstrated in the FATS, MARS, CCAIT, MAAS, PLAC I, and REGRESS trials. Cardiovascular events decreased 25 to 92% in all trials, and there was a significant reduction in both cardiovascular and total mortality in the 4S. The greater reduction in cardiovascular events than in anatomic changes suggests that the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors stabilized the surface of plaques. Monotherapy with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors provides the clinical opportunity to modify the natural history of coronary artery disease.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase inhibitors: phenothiazines and related compounds modify experimental Chagas' disease evolution.

    PubMed

    Rivarola, H W; Paglini-Oliva, P A

    2002-06-01

    Chagas' disease affects about 18 million people and 25% of the population of Latin America is at risk of acquiring Chagas' disease. The chemotherapy of Chagas' disease is still an open field and remains as an unsolved problem. Nifurtimox and benznidazole are currently used to treat this disease, however, both drugs have high toxicity and are mutagenic with the result that the patients frequently fail to follow treatment. T. cruzi enzimes such as trypanothione reductase, represent potential drug targets because they play an essential role in the life of this organism. This enzyme has been isolated, purified and studied by X ray crystallography. Phenothiazines and related compounds inhibit trypanothione reductase and a specially favoured fit is a phenothiazine with a 2- substitued with 2- chloro and 2- trifluoromethyl with a remote hydrophobic patch. The essential phenothiazine nucleus can adopt more than one inhibitory orientation in its binding site. Phenothiazines and related compounds are drugs used in psychiatric treatments. These anti-depressants inhibit trypanothione reductase through the peroxidase/ H2O2/ system, and also exert other trypanocidal effects upon epimastigotes and tripomastigotes forms: clomipramine through an anticalmodulin action; trifluopherazine and thioridazine induced disruption of mitochondria and prometazine provoked serious cell membrane disorganization. Clomipramine and thioridazine were also effective in treatment of mice with experimental Chagas' disease, significantly modifying the natural evolution of the infection; cardiac function and survival of infected and treated animals were not different from non infected animals. Phenothiazines and related compounds are promising trypanocidal agents for treatment of Chagas' disease. Other trypanocidal agents as nifurtimox, benznidazol,Allopurinol, cystein protease inhibitors and others, are also discussed.

  8. Selenium and the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase in the prevention, treatment and diagnostics of cancer.

    PubMed

    Selenius, Markus; Rundlöf, Anna-Klara; Olm, Eric; Fernandes, Aristi P; Björnstedt, Mikael

    2010-04-01

    Selenium is an essential element that is specifically incorporated as selenocystein into selenoproteins. It is a potent modulator of eukaryotic cell growth with strictly concentration-dependant effects. Lower concentrations are necessary for cell survival and growth, whereas higher concentrations inhibit growth and induce cell death. It is well established that selenium has cancer preventive effects, and several studies also have shown that it has strong anticancer effects with a selective cytotoxicity on malignant drug-resistant cells while only exerting marginal effects on normal and benign cells. This cancer-specific cytotoxicity is likely explained by high affinity selenium uptake dependent on proteins connected to multidrug resistance. One of the most studied selenoproteins in cancer is thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) that has important functions in neoplastic growth and is an important component of the resistant phenotype. Several reports have shown that TrxR is induced in tumor cells and pre-neoplastic cells, and several commonly used drugs interact with the protein. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of selenium as a potent preventive and tumor selective anticancer drug, and we also discuss the potential of using the expression and modulation of the selenoprotein TrxR in the diagnostics and treatment of cancer.

  9. Bioactive fraction of Saraca indica prevents diabetes induced cataractogenesis: An aldose reductase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Gauresh; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Saraca indica (SI) flowers extract and different bioactive fraction on in vitro aldose reductase (AR) inhibitory activity, high glucose-induced cataract in goat lens and in vivo streptozotocin (STZ; 45 mg/kg, i.p) induced cataract in rats. Methods: Extract of flowers of SI tested for inhibition against rat lens AR. Furthermore, bioactive fraction was investigated against high glucose-induced opacification of the lens in vitro lens culture and STZ induced diabetic cataract in rats. Identification of the bioactive component was attempted through high-performance thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica (EASI) produced maximum inhibition that may be due to high phenolic content. Goat lenses in media containing glucose developed a distinctly opaque ring in 72 h and treatment with EASI fraction lowered lens opacity in 72 h. Prolonged treatment with EASI to STZ-induced diabetic rats inhibited the AR activity and delayed cataract progression in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica fraction has potential to inhibit rat lens AR enzyme and prevent cataractogenesis not only in goat lens model (in vitro), but also in STZ induced diabetic rats (in vivo). This study is suggestive of the anticataract activity of EASI fraction that could be attributed to the phytoconstituents present in the same. PMID:25709218

  10. Thioredoxin and its reductase are present on synaptic vesicles, and their inhibition prevents the paralysis induced by botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pirazzini, Marco; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Zanetti, Giulia; Megighian, Aram; Scorzeto, Michele; Fillo, Silvia; Shone, Clifford C; Binz, Thomas; Rossetto, Ornella; Lista, Florigio; Montecucco, Cesare

    2014-09-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins consist of a metalloprotease linked via a conserved interchain disulfide bond to a heavy chain responsible for neurospecific binding and translocation of the enzymatic domain in the nerve terminal cytosol. The metalloprotease activity is enabled upon disulfide reduction and causes neuroparalysis by cleaving the SNARE proteins. Here, we show that the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin protein disulfide-reducing system is present on synaptic vesicles and that it is functional and responsible for the reduction of the interchain disulfide of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, C, and E. Specific inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase or thioredoxin prevent intoxication of cultured neurons in a dose-dependent manner and are also very effective inhibitors of the paralysis of the neuromuscular junction. We found that this group of inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxins is very effective in vivo. Most of them are nontoxic and are good candidates as preventive and therapeutic drugs for human botulism.

  11. The retinaldehyde reductase DHRS3 is essential for preventing the formation of excess retinoic acid during embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Sara E.; Pierzchalski, Keely; Butler Tjaden, Naomi E.; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Trainor, Paul A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Moise, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of retinol via retinaldehyde results in the formation of the essential morphogen all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). Previous studies have identified critical roles in the regulation of embryonic ATRA levels for retinol, retinaldehyde, and ATRA-oxidizing enzymes; however, the contribution of retinaldehyde reductases to ATRA metabolism is not completely understood. Herein, we investigate the role of the retinaldehyde reductase Dhrs3 in embryonic retinoid metabolism using a Dhrs3-deficient mouse. Lack of DHRS3 leads to a 40% increase in the levels of ATRA and a 60% and 55% decrease in the levels of retinol and retinyl esters, respectively, in Dhrs3−/− embryos compared to wild-type littermates. Furthermore, accumulation of excess ATRA is accompanied by a compensatory 30–50% reduction in the expression of ATRA synthetic genes and a 120% increase in the expression of the ATRA catabolic enzyme Cyp26a1 in Dhrs3−/− embryos vs. controls. Excess ATRA also leads to alterations (40–80%) in the expression of several developmentally important ATRA target genes. Consequently, Dhrs3−/− embryos die late in gestation and display defects in cardiac outflow tract formation, atrial and ventricular septation, skeletal development, and palatogenesis. These data demonstrate that the reduction of retinaldehyde by DHRS3 is critical for preventing formation of excess ATRA during embryonic development.—Billings, S. E., Pierzchalski, K., Butler Tjaden, N. E., Pang, X.-Y., Trainor, P. A., Kane, M. A., Moise, A. R. The retinaldehyde reductase DHRS3 is essential for preventing the formation of excess retinoic acid during embryonic development. PMID:24005908

  12. Aldose Reductase Inhibition Prevents Endotoxin-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Retinal Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kun-Che; Ponder, Jessica; LaBarbera, Daniel V.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal microglia become activated in diabetes and produce pro-inflammatory molecules associated with changes in retinal vasculature and increased apoptosis of retinal neurons and glial cells. We sought to determine if the action of aldose reductase (AR), an enzyme linked to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, contributes to activation of microglial cells. Methods. Involvement of AR in the activation process was studied using primary cultures of retinal microglia (RMG) isolated from wild-type and AR-null mice, or in mouse macrophage cultures treated with either AR inhibitors or small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed to AR. Inflammatory cytokines were measured by ELISA. Cell migration was measured using a transwell assay. Gelatin zymography was used to detect active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, while RMG-induced apoptosis of adult retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells was studied in a cell coculture system. Results. Aldose reductase inhibition or genetic deficiency substantially reduced lipopolysacharide (LPS)-induced cytokine secretion from macrophages and RMG. Aldose reductase inhibition or deficiency also reduced the activation of MMP-9 and attenuated LPS-induced cell migration. Additionally, blockade of AR by sorbinil or through genetic means caused a reduction in the ability of activated RMG to induce apoptosis of ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that the action of AR contributes to the activation of RMG. Inhibition of AR may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce inflammation associated with activation of RMG in disease. PMID:24677107

  13. Bovine and human alpha-crystallins as molecular chaperones: prevention of the inactivation of glutathione reductase by fructation.

    PubMed

    Blakytny, R; Harding, J J

    1997-06-01

    With no measurable protein synthesis occurring in the centre of the lens, structural proteins and enzymes there will need to be stable for many years, if not decades, in order to maintain lens integrity and function. Recent work has indicated that alpha-crystallin, which is sequentially related to heat shock proteins, has chaperone-like properties in that it is capable of preventing heat-induced aggregation of various proteins, including other crystallins. Thus this universal vertebrate lens protein may contribute to maintenance of lens integrity by protecting other lens proteins from non-enzymic insults or the consequences thereof. We previously showed that the enzyme glutathione reductase was inactivated in a time-dependent manner when incubated with various sugars, suggesting glycation was responsible for this effect. In this paper we confirmed that this was the case. Using this enzyme model system, the inclusion of either bovine or human alpha-crystallin protected against the inactivation of glutathione reductase by fructation. This action was specific, with control proteins displaying no such protection. Use of high performance liquid chromatography supported the fact that alpha-crystallin did not act simply by mopping up free sugar but rather maintained the activity of the modified enzyme. Dose-dependent experiments indicated that human alpha-crystallin was more effective than its bovine counterpart, which might be expected considering the much longer lifespan of humans. The stoichiometry of the protection by both alpha-crystallins indicated that alpha-crystallin with glutathione reductase was not acting like GroEL as a large complex with a hydrophobic pore, but rather that individual subunits may be capable of acting as chaperones.

  14. Prevention of VEGF-induced growth and tube formation in human retinal endothelial cell by aldose reductase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh CS; Srivastava, SK; Ramana, KV

    2012-01-01

    Objective Since diabetes-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is implicated in retinal angiogenesis, we aimed to examine the role of aldose reductase (AR) in VEGF–induced human retinal endothelial cell (HREC) growth and tube formation. Materials and Methods HREC were stimulated with VEGF and cell-growth was determined by MTT assay. AR inhibitor, fidarestat, to block the enzyme activity and AR siRNA to ablate AR gene expression in HREC were used to investigate the role of AR in neovascularization using cell-migration and tube formation assays. Various signaling intermediates and angiogenesis markers were assessed by Western blot analysis. Immuno-histochemical analysis of diabetic rat eyes was performed to examine VEGF expression in the retinal layer. Results Stimulation of primary HREC with VEGF caused increased cell growth and migration, and AR inhibition with fidarestat or ablation with siRNA significantly prevented it. VEGF-induced tube formation in HREC was also significantly prevented by fidarestat. Treatment of HREC with VEGF also increased the expression of VCAM, AR, and phosphorylation and activation of Akt and p38-MAP kinase, which were prevented by fidarestat. VEGF-induced expression of VEGFRII in HREC was also prevented by AR inhibition or ablation. Conclusions Our results indicate that inhibition of AR in HREC prevents tube formation by inhibiting the VEGF-induced activation of the Akt and p38-MAPK pathway and suggest a mediatory role of AR in ocular neovascularization generally implicated in retinopathy and AMD. PMID:22658411

  15. The retinaldehyde reductase DHRS3 is essential for preventing the formation of excess retinoic acid during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Billings, Sara E; Pierzchalski, Keely; Butler Tjaden, Naomi E; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Trainor, Paul A; Kane, Maureen A; Moise, Alexander R

    2013-12-01

    Oxidation of retinol via retinaldehyde results in the formation of the essential morphogen all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). Previous studies have identified critical roles in the regulation of embryonic ATRA levels for retinol, retinaldehyde, and ATRA-oxidizing enzymes; however, the contribution of retinaldehyde reductases to ATRA metabolism is not completely understood. Herein, we investigate the role of the retinaldehyde reductase Dhrs3 in embryonic retinoid metabolism using a Dhrs3-deficient mouse. Lack of DHRS3 leads to a 40% increase in the levels of ATRA and a 60% and 55% decrease in the levels of retinol and retinyl esters, respectively, in Dhrs3(-/-) embryos compared to wild-type littermates. Furthermore, accumulation of excess ATRA is accompanied by a compensatory 30-50% reduction in the expression of ATRA synthetic genes and a 120% increase in the expression of the ATRA catabolic enzyme Cyp26a1 in Dhrs3(-/-) embryos vs. controls. Excess ATRA also leads to alterations (40-80%) in the expression of several developmentally important ATRA target genes. Consequently, Dhrs3(-/-) embryos die late in gestation and display defects in cardiac outflow tract formation, atrial and ventricular septation, skeletal development, and palatogenesis. These data demonstrate that the reduction of retinaldehyde by DHRS3 is critical for preventing formation of excess ATRA during embryonic development.

  16. Effects of 15-month aldose reductase inhibition with fidarestat on the experimental diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, N; Mizuno, K; Makino, M; Suzuki, T; Yagihashi, S

    2000-10-01

    We examined the effects of long-term treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) fidarestat on functional, morphological and metabolic changes in the peripheral nerve of 15-month diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Slowed F-wave, motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities were corrected dose-dependently in fidarestat-treated diabetic rats. Morphometric analysis of myelinated fibers demonstrated that frequencies of abnormal fibers such as paranodal demyelination and axonal degeneration were reduced to the extent of normal levels by fidarestat-treatment. Axonal atrophy, distorted axon circularity and reduction of myelin sheath thickness were also inhibited. These effects were associated with normalization of increased levels of sorbitol and fructose and decreased level of myo-inositol in the peripheral nerve by fidarestat. Thus, the results demonstrated that long-term treatment with fidarestat substantially inhibited the functional and structural progression of diabetic neuropathy with inhibition of increased polyol pathway flux in diabetic rats.

  17. Biliverdin reductase A in the prevention of cellular senescence against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Young; Kang, Hyun Tae; Choi, Hae Ri; Park, Sang Chul

    2011-01-31

    Biliverdin reductase A (BLVRA), an enzyme that converts biliverdin to bilirubin, has recently emerged as a key regulator of the cellular redox cycle. However, the role of BLVRA in the aging process remains unclear. To study the role of BLVRA in the aging process, we compared the stress responses of young and senescent human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inducer, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). H2O2 markedly induced BLVRA activity in young HDFs, but not in senescent HDFs. Additionally, depletion of BLVRA reduced the H2O2-dependent induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in young HDFs, but not in senescent cells, suggesting an aging-dependent differential modulation of responses to oxidative stress. The role of BLVRA in the regulation of cellular senescence was confirmed when lentiviral RNAi- transfected stable primary HDFs with reduced BLVRA expression showed upregulation of the CDK inhibitor family members p16, p53, and p21, followed by cell cycle arrest in G0-G1 phase with high expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Taken together, these data support the notion that BLVRA contributes significantly to modulation of the aging process by adjusting the cellular oxidative status.

  18. Prevention of brain disease from severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kevin A; Morton, D Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G; Hendrickson, Christine; Robinson, Donna L; Wagner, Conrad; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Chwatko, Grazyna; Jakubowski, Hieronim; Niculescu, Mihai D; Mudd, S Harvey

    2007-06-01

    Over a four-year period, we collected clinical and biochemical data from five Amish children who were homozygous for missense mutations in 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR c.1129C>T). The four oldest patients had irreversible brain damage prior to diagnosis. The youngest child, diagnosed and started on betaine therapy as a newborn, is healthy at her present age of three years. We compared biochemical data among four groups: 16 control subjects, eight heterozygous parents, and five affected children (for the latter group, both before and during treatment with betaine anhydrous). Plasma amino acid concentrations were used to estimate changes in cerebral methionine uptake resulting from betaine therapy. In all affected children, treatment with betaine (534+/-222 mg/kg/day) increased plasma S-adenosylmethionine, improved markers of tissue methyltransferase activity, and resulted in a threefold increase of calculated brain methionine uptake. Betaine therapy did not normalize plasma total homocysteine, nor did it correct cerebral 5-methyltetrahydrofolate deficiency. We conclude that when the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate content of brain tissue is low, dietary betaine sufficient to increase brain methionine uptake may compensate for impaired cerebral methionine recycling. To effectively support the metabolic requirements of rapid brain growth, a large dose of betaine should be started early in life.

  19. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A and a dietary supplement S-methyl-L-cysteine prevent Parkinson's-like symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wassef, Ramez; Haenold, Ronny; Hansel, Alfred; Brot, Nathan; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2007-11-21

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disease, is caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Although the underlying cause of the neuronal loss is unknown, oxidative stress is thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of PD. The amino acid methionine is readily oxidized to methionine sulfoxide, and its reduction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes called methionine sulfoxide reductases (MSRs). The reversible oxidation-reduction cycle of methionine involving MSRs has been postulated to act as a catalytic antioxidant system protecting cells from oxidative damage. Here, we show that one member of the MSR family, MSRA, inhibits development of the locomotor and circadian rhythm defects caused by ectopic expression of human alpha-synuclein in the Drosophila nervous system. Furthermore, we demonstrate that one way to enhance the MSRA antioxidant system is dietary supplementation with S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMLC), found abundantly in garlic, cabbage, and turnips. SMLC, a substrate in the catalytic antioxidant system mediated by MSRA, prevents the alpha-synuclein-induced abnormalities. Therefore, interventions focusing on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized methionine catalyzed by MSRA represent a new prevention and therapeutic approach for PD and potentially for other neurodegenerative diseases involving oxidative stress.

  20. S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase Deficiency Confers Improved Survival and Neurological Outcome in Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Elphinstone, Robyn E; Besla, Rickvinder; Shikatani, Eric A; Lu, Ziyue; Hausladen, Alfred; Davies, Matthew; Robbins, Clinton S; Husain, Mansoor; Stamler, Jonathan S; Kain, Kevin C

    2017-09-01

    Artesunate remains the mainstay of treatment for cerebral malaria, but it is less effective in later stages of disease when the host inflammatory response and blood-brain barrier integrity dictate clinical outcomes. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of inflammation and microvascular integrity, and impaired NO bioactivity is associated with fatal outcomes in malaria. Endogenous NO bioactivity in mammals is largely mediated by S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). Based on these observations, we hypothesized that animals deficient in the SNO-metabolizing enzyme, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), which exhibit enhanced S-nitrosylation, would have improved outcomes in a preclinical model of cerebral malaria. GSNOR knockout (KO) mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA had significantly delayed mortality compared to WT animals (P < 0.0001), despite higher parasite burdens (P < 0.01), and displayed markedly enhanced survival versus the wild type (WT) when treated with the antimalarial drug artesunate (77% versus 38%; P < 0.001). Improved survival was associated with higher levels of protein-bound NO, decreased levels of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the brain, improved blood-brain barrier integrity, and improved coma scores, as well as higher levels of gamma interferon. GSNOR KO animals receiving WT bone marrow had significantly reduced survival following P. berghei ANKA infection compared to those receiving KO bone barrow (P < 0.001). Reciprocal transplants established that survival benefits of GSNOR deletion were attributable primarily to the T cell compartment. These data indicate a role for GSNOR in the host response to malaria infection and suggest that strategies to disrupt its activity will improve clinical outcomes by enhancing microvascular integrity and modulating T cell tissue tropism. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Finasteride, a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, potentiates antinociceptive effects of morphine, prevents the development of morphine tolerance and attenuates abstinence behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Verdi, Javad; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan

    2007-05-01

    It has been shown that morphine increases 5alpha-reductase enzyme activity in the rat central nervous system; however importance of this finding on morphine analgesia, tolerance and dependence has not been reported. In the present study, we investigated inhibition of 5alpha-reductase enzyme on morphine effects using finasteride. To determine whether the 5alpha-reductase enzyme interact with morphine analgesia, finasteride (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was administrated with morphine (5 and 7 mg/kg, i.p.). The tail-flick test was used to assess the nociceptive threshold, before and 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90 min after drug administration. In tolerance experiments, morphine 20 mg/kg was injected i.p., twice daily for 4 days. The development and expression of dependence were assessed in the naloxone precipitation test 5 days after the morphine (20-30 mg/kg, i.p.) administration. We found that finasteride could potentiate the antinociceptive effect of morphine. In addition, chronic finasteride administration effectively blocked development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. Following chronic morphine administration, single dose injection of finasteride failed to reverse tolerance but prevented naloxone precipitate withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, it was concluded that there is a functional relationship between 5alpha-reductase enzyme and morphine.

  2. Phenylcoumaran Benzylic Ether Reductase Prevents Accumulation of Compounds Formed under Oxidative Conditions in Poplar Xylem[W

    PubMed Central

    Niculaes, Claudiu; Morreel, Kris; Kim, Hoon; Lu, Fachuang; McKee, Lauren S.; Ivens, Bart; Haustraete, Jurgen; Vanholme, Bartel; Rycke, Riet De; Hertzberg, Magnus; Fromm, Jorg; Bulone, Vincent; Polle, Andrea; Ralph, John; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-01-01

    Phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER) is one of the most abundant proteins in poplar (Populus spp) xylem, but its biological role has remained obscure. In this work, metabolite profiling of transgenic poplar trees downregulated in PCBER revealed both the in vivo substrate and product of PCBER. Based on mass spectrometry and NMR data, the substrate was identified as a hexosylated 8–5-coupling product between sinapyl alcohol and guaiacylglycerol, and the product was identified as its benzyl-reduced form. This activity was confirmed in vitro using a purified recombinant PCBER expressed in Escherichia coli. Assays performed on 20 synthetic substrate analogs revealed the enzyme specificity. In addition, the xylem of PCBER-downregulated trees accumulated over 2000-fold higher levels of cysteine adducts of monolignol dimers. These compounds could be generated in vitro by simple oxidative coupling assays involving monolignols and cysteine. Altogether, our data suggest that the function of PCBER is to reduce phenylpropanoid dimers in planta to form antioxidants that protect the plant against oxidative damage. In addition to describing the catalytic activity of one of the most abundant enzymes in wood, we provide experimental evidence for the antioxidant role of a phenylpropanoid coupling product in planta. PMID:25238751

  3. Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page An Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 23, 2014 An experimental contact lens design releases a glaucoma medicine at a ...

  4. Syringic Acid Extracted from Herba dendrobii Prevents Diabetic Cataract Pathogenesis by Inhibiting Aldose Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dan; Yi, Yanchun; Qi, Hui; Gao, Xinxin; Fang, Hua; Gu, Qiong; Wang, Ling; Gu, Lianquan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Effects of Syringic acid (SA) extracted from dendrobii on diabetic cataract (DC) pathogenesis were explored. Methods. Both in vitro and in vivo DC lens models were established using D-gal, and proliferation of HLEC exposed to SA was determined by MMT assay. After 60-day treatment with SA, rat lens transparency was observed by anatomical microscopy using a slit lamp. SA protein targets were extracted and isolated using 2-DE and MALDI TOF/TOF. AR gene expression was investigated using qRT-PCR. Interaction sites and binding characteristics were determined by molecule-docking techniques and dynamic models. Results. Targeting AR, SA provided protection from D-gal-induced damage by consistently maintaining lens transparency and delaying lens turbidity development. Inhibition of AR gene expression by SA was confirmed by qRT-PCR. IC50 of SA for inhibition of AR activity was 213.17 μg/mL. AR-SA binding sites were Trp111, His110, Tyr48, Trp20, Trp79, Leu300, and Phe122. The main binding modes involved hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding. The stoichiometric ratio of non-covalent bonding between SA and AR was 1.0 to 13.3. Conclusion. SA acts to prevent DC in rat lenses by inhibiting AR activity and gene expression, which has potential to be developed into a novel drug for therapeutic management of DC. PMID:23365598

  5. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  6. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors prevent migration of human coronary smooth muscle cells through suppression of increase in oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Maeda, K; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2001-06-01

    In vitro and in vivo evidence of a decrease in vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration induced by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors has been reported. When added to SMC cultures for 6 hours, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors fluvastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin at 1 micromol/L resulted in a 48%, 50%, and 16% suppression, respectively, of human coronary SMC migration; these reductions mirrored the suppression in oxidative stress induced by 1 micromol/L lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC) of 50%, 53% and 19%, respectively. The hydroxylated metabolites of fluvastatin, M(2) and M(3), at 1 micromol/L also suppressed the enhancement of SMC migration by 58% and 45% and the increase in oxidative stress induced by lyso-PC of 58% and 49%, respectively. Lyso-PC activated phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC), and this activation was also suppressed by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. The inhibition of phospholipase D and PKC was reversed by 100 micromol/L mevalonate, its isoprenoid derivative, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol but not by 10 micromol/L squalene. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides at 5 micromol/L to PKC-alpha, but not those to the PKC-beta isoform, suppressed the lyso-PC-mediated increases in SMC migration and oxidative stress. These findings suggest that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors have direct antimigratory effects on the vascular wall beyond their effects on plasma lipids and that they might exert such antimigratory effects via suppression of the phospholipase D- and PKC (possibly PKC-alpha)-induced increase in oxidative stress, which might in turn prevent significant coronary artery disease.

  7. Sexual Violence Prevention through Bystander Education: An Experimental Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banyard, Victoria L.; Moynihan, Mary M.; Plante, Elizabethe G.

    2007-01-01

    The current study used an experimental design to evaluate a sexual violence prevention program based on a community of responsibility model that teaches women and men how to intervene safely and effectively in cases of sexual violence before, during, and after incidents with strangers, acquaintances, or friends. It approaches both women and men as…

  8. Sexual Violence Prevention through Bystander Education: An Experimental Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banyard, Victoria L.; Moynihan, Mary M.; Plante, Elizabethe G.

    2007-01-01

    The current study used an experimental design to evaluate a sexual violence prevention program based on a community of responsibility model that teaches women and men how to intervene safely and effectively in cases of sexual violence before, during, and after incidents with strangers, acquaintances, or friends. It approaches both women and men as…

  9. Aldose reductase inhibitor prevents hyperproliferation and hypertrophy of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells induced by high glucose.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Yoshikawa, J

    1995-12-01

    Vascular remodeling is a key process in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Recent evidence suggests that high glucose levels may function as a vascular smooth muscle growth and proliferation-promoting substance. To explore the role of the polyol pathway in this process, we examined the effect of an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI), epalrestat, on the growth characteristics of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Epalrestat (10 nmol/L, 1 mumol/L) significantly suppressed the high glucose-induced proliferative effect as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation by 67% and 82% in cell number, suggesting ARI as an antimitogenic factor. In VSMCs, epalrestat (10 nmol/L, 1 mumol/L) significantly suppressed the high glucose-induced incorporation of [3H]leucine by 45% and 58% with the concomitant reduction of the cell size estimated by flowcytometry. Epalrestat (1 mumol/L) also suppressed high glucose-induced intracellular NADH/NAD+ increase and membrane-bound protein kinase C activation. These results indicate that this ARI possesses an antiproliferative and antihypertrophic action on VSMCs induced by high glucose possibly through protein kinase C suppression.

  10. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-01-01

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  11. Experimental design-guided development of a stereospecific capillary electrophoresis assay for methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes using a diastereomeric pentapeptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingfu; Huo, Xingyu; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; El-Mergawy, Rabab; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2014-09-12

    A capillary electrophoresis method has been developed and validated to evaluate the stereospecific activity of recombinant human methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes employing the C-terminally dinitrophenyl-labeled N-acetylated pentapeptide ac-KIFM(O)K-Dnp as substrate (M(O)=methionine sulfoxide). The separation of the ac-KIFM(O)K-Dnp diastereomers and the reduced peptide ac-KIFMK-Dnp was optimized using experimental design with regard to the buffer pH, buffer concentration, sulfated β-cyclodextrin and 15-crown-5 concentration as well as capillary temperature and separation voltage. A fractional factorial response IV design was employed for the identification of the significant factors and a five-level circumscribed central composite design for the final method optimization. Resolution of the peptide diastereomers as well as analyte migration time served as responses in both designs. The resulting optimized conditions included 50mM Tris buffer, pH 7.85, containing 5mM 15-crown-5 and 14.3mg/mL sulfated β-cyclodextrin, at an applied voltage of 25kV and a capillary temperature of 21.5°C. The assay was subsequently applied to the determination of the stereospecificity of recombinant human methionine sulfoxide reductases A and B2. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic data were determined. The pentapeptide proved to be a good substrate for both enzymes. Furthermore, the first separation of methionine sulfoxide peptide diastereomers is reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) for preventing acute kidney injury after surgical procedures requiring cardiac bypass.

    PubMed

    Lewicki, Michelle; Ng, Irene; Schneider, Antoine G

    2015-03-11

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery among whom it is associated with poor outcomes, prolonged hospital stays and increased mortality. Statin drugs can produce more than one effect independent of their lipid lowering effect, and may improve kidney injury through inhibition of postoperative inflammatory responses. This review aimed to look at the evidence supporting the benefits of perioperative statins for AKI prevention in hospitalised adults after surgery who require cardiac bypass. The main objectives were to 1) determine whether use of statins was associated with preventing AKI development; 2) determine whether use of statins was associated with reductions in in-hospital mortality; 3) determine whether use of statins was associated with reduced need for RRT; and 4) determine any adverse effects associated with the use of statins. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register to 13 January 2015 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared administration of statin therapy with placebo or standard clinical care in adult patients undergoing surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass and reporting AKI, serum creatinine (SCr) or need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) as an outcome were eligible for inclusion. All forms and dosages of statins in conjunction with any duration of pre-operative therapy were considered for inclusion in this review. All authors extracted data independently and assessments were cross-checked by a second author. Likewise, assessment of study risk of bias was initially conducted by one author and then by a second author to ensure accuracy. Disagreements were arbitrated among authors until consensus was reached. Authors from two of the included studies provided additional data surrounding post-operative SCr as well as need for RRT. Meta-analyses were used to assess the outcomes of AKI, SCr

  13. Calcium Dobesilate Prevents Neurodegeneration and Vascular Leakage in Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Solà-Adell, Cristina; Bogdanov, Patricia; Hernández, Cristina; Sampedro, Joel; Valeri, Marta; Garcia-Ramirez, Marta; Pasquali, Christian; Simó, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms involved in the reported beneficial effects of Calcium dobesilate monohydrate (CaD) for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (DR) remain to be elucidated. The main aim of the present study is to examine whether CaD prevents early events in the pathogenesis of DR such as neurodegeneration and vascular leakage. In addition, putative mediators of both neurodegeneration (glutamate/GLAST, ET-1/ETB receptor) and early microvascular impairment (ET-1/ETA receptor, oxidative stress, VEGF, and the PKC-delta-p38 MAPK pathway) have been examined. Diabetic (db/db) mice were randomly assigned to daily oral treatment with CaD (200 mg/Kg/day) (n = 12) or vehicle (n = 12) for 14 days. In addition, 12 non-diabetic (db/+) mice matched by age were used as the control group. Functional abnormalities were assessed by electroretinography. Neurodegeneration and microvascular abnormalities were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Glutamate was determined by HPLC. CaD significantly decreased glial activation and apoptosis and produced a significant improvement in the electroretinogram parameters. Mechanistically, CaD prevented the diabetes-induced up-regulation of ET-1 and its cognate receptors (ETA-R and ETB-R), which are involved in microvascular impairment and neurodegeneration, respectively. In addition, treatment with CaD downregulated GLAST, the main glutamate transporter, and accordingly prevented the increase in glutamate. Finally, CaD prevented oxidative stress, and the upregulation of VEGF and PKC delta-p38 MAPK pathway induced by diabetes, thus resulting in a significant reduction in vascular leakage. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that CaD exerts neuroprotection in an experimental model of DR. In addition, we provide first evidence that CaD prevents the overexpression of ET-1 and its receptors in the diabetic retina. These beneficial effects on the neurovascular unit could pave the way for clinical trials addressed to confirm the

  14. [Preventive administration of new UDCA derivatives in experimental alcoholic steatohepatitis].

    PubMed

    Belonovskaia, E B; Naruta, E E; Lukivskaia, O Ia; Abakumov, V Z; Buko, V U

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the prophylactic effect of new derivatives of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), including UDCA-N-acetylcysteine, UDCA-L-acetylcysteine, and nor-UDCA (in doses equivalent to 40 mg/kg of UDCA) on the development of experimental alcoholic steatohepatitis induced by the Lieber-DeCarli liquid ethanol-containing diet. Results demonstrated that most of the investigated compounds produced a hepatoprotective effect, improving biochemical tests and liver morphology, as manifested by decreasing steatosis intensity, activity of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, triglyceride level in blood serum and liver, and TNF alpha content. However, nor-UDCA was most effective as compared to UDCA in preventing the accumulation of triglycerides in the liver.

  15. Diabetes-accelerated experimental osteoarthritis is prevented by autophagy activation.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M; López de Figueroa, P; Nogueira-Recalde, U; Centeno, A; Mendes, A F; Blanco, F J; Caramés, B

    2016-12-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). Autophagy, an essential homeostasis mechanism in articular cartilage, is defective in T2D and OA. However, how T2D may influence OA progression is still unknown. We aimed to determine how diabetes affects cartilage integrity and whether pharmacological activation of autophagy has efficacy in diabetic mice (db/db mice) with OA. Experimental OA was performed in the right knee of 9 weeks-old C57Bl/6J male mice (Lean group, N = 8) and of 9 weeks-old B6.BKS (D)-Leprdb male mice (db/db group, N = 16) by transection of medial meniscotibial and medial collateral ligaments. Left knee was employed as control knee. Rapamycin (2 mg/kg weight/day) or Vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) were administered intraperitoneally three times a week for 10 weeks. Histopathology of articular cartilage and synovium was evaluated by using semiquantitative scoring and synovitis grading systems, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was employed to evaluate the effect of diabetes and Rapamycin on cartilage integrity and OA biomarkers. Cartilage damage was increased in db/db mice compared to Lean mice after experimental OA, while no differences are observed in the control knee. Cartilage damage and synovium inflammation were reduced by Rapamycin treatment of OA-db/db mice. This protection was accompanied with a decrease in MMP-13 expression and decreased interleukin 12 (IL-12) levels. Furthermore, autophagy was increased and cartilage cellularity was maintained, suggesting that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) targeting prevents joint physical harm. Our findings indicate that diabetic mice exhibit increased joint damage after experimental OA, and that autophagy activation might be an effective therapy for diabetes-accelerated OA. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Priming with NO controls redox state and prevents cadmium-induced general up-regulation of methionine sulfoxide reductase gene family in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Andrea A E; Pena, Liliana B; Benavides, María P; Gallego, Susana M

    2016-12-01

    In the present study we evaluated the pre-treatment (priming) of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO-donor, as an interesting approach for improving plant tolerance to cadmium stress. We focused on the cell redox balance and on the methionine sulfoxide reductases (MSR) family as a key component of such response. MSR catalyse the reversible oxidation of MetSO residues back to Met. Five MSRA genes and nine MSRB genes have been identified in A. thaliana, coding for proteins with different subcellular locations. After treating 20 days-old A. thaliana (Col 0) plants with 100 μM CdCl2, increased protein carbonylation in leaf tissue, lower chlorophyll content and higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chloroplasts were detected, together with increased accumulation of all MSR transcripts evaluated. Further analysis showed reduction in guaiacol peroxidase activity (GPX) and increased catalase (CAT) activity, with no effect on ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Pre-exposition of plants to 100 μM SNP before cadmium treatment restored redox balance; this seems to be linked to a better performance of antioxidant defenses. Our results indicate that NO priming may be acting as a modulator of plant antioxidant system by interfering in oxidative responses and by preventing up-regulation of MSR genes caused by metal exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in the prevention of cerebrovascular attack in 1016 patients older than 75 years among 4014 type 2 diabetic individuals.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshio; Kubota, Kiyoshi; Kawashima, Seinosuke; Sone, Hirohito; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohrui, Takashi; Yokote, Koutaro; Takemoto, Minoru; Araki, Atsushi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Noto, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Ichiro; Yoshizumi, Masao; Ina, Koichiro; Nomura, Hideki

    2014-12-20

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce ischemic heart disease (IHD) in middle-aged diabetic individuals, and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) is a risk factor. However, their preventive effects on cerebrovascular attack (CVA) have not been identified in elderly, especially in elderly ≥ 75 years (late elderly), who account for approximately 30% of diabetic individuals in Japan. Randomized controlled studies of statins for late elderly are difficult to carry out, because many co-morbidities in elderly disrupt randomized controlled conditions. We performed a prospective cohort study (Japan Cholesterol and Diabetes Mellitus Study) with 5.5 years of follow-up since 2004. A total of 4014 type 2 diabetic patients without previous IHD or CVA (n=1936 women; age = 67.4 ± 9.5 years; ≥ 75 years: n = 1016) were enrolled, while 405 patients were registered as sub-cohort patients. We recorded detailed information on medications and laboratory data after every change in medication in patients of sub-cohort and suffered from IHD or CVA. We subdivided statin-users into prevalent, new and non-users. A total of 104 CVAs occurred during 5.5-years. Plasma HDL-C level was inversely correlated with CVA in patients ≥ 65 years. In case-control study, among patients who were not prescribed statins, CVA increased in age-dependent manner. CVA incidence was lower in prevalent and new statin-users than in non-users (hazard ratio [HR]:0.46, 0.523), especially in late elderly (HR: 0.51, 0.21). Statins reduced CVAs mainly due to a direct effect and partially due to the effects of HDL-C and glucose metabolism. No significant differences were observed between statins. Statins prevented CVA in middle-aged, elderly and late elderly diabetic patients via a direct effect. This study is the first to demonstrate the usefulness of observational studies for statistically analyzing agents' effects on late elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. HMG-COA reductase inhibitors: An opportunity for the improvement of imatinib safety. An experimental study in rat pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jasińska-Stroschein, Magdalena; Owczarek, Jacek; Surowiecka, Anna; Kącikowska, Joanna; Orszulak-Michalak, Daria

    2015-02-01

    Co-administration of statin with imatinib is thought to result in greater improvement in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) than imatinib treatment alone, and hence may allow greater effectiveness of imatinib therapy at lower doses. The effects of imanitib at dose of 20 and 50mg/kg bw given together with rosuvastatin or simvastatin were investigated with respect to right ventricle pressure (RVP), arterial blood pressure and right ventricle hypertrophy (RVH) in experimental monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension. Fourteen days after MCT injection, male rats were treated orally for another 14 days with imatinib, statin or a combination of the two. Concurrent administration of statin (lipophilic simvastatin, hydrophilic rosuvastatin) and higher dose imatinib reversed the MCT-induced increase in RVP more than each drug alone and decreased RV hypertrophy (RV/LV+S ratio), significantly. The increased RVP and RV hypertrophy was found to be reversed when a lower dose of imatinib was co-administered with rosuvastatin or simvastatin. Statins may intensify the beneficial effects of imatinib in PAH, which may be due to the additional influence of statin on the decrease of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced effects. These properties allow the dose of imatinib used in PAH treatment to be reduced and thereby might improve its safety profile. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. The mechanism for oxygen reduction in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) as obtained from a combination of theoretical and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Ädelroth, Pia

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial NO-reductases (NOR) belong to the heme-copper oxidase (HCuO) superfamily, in which most members are O2-reducing, proton-pumping enzymes. This study is one in a series aiming to elucidate the reaction mechanisms of the HCuOs, including the mechanisms for cellular energy conservation. One approach towards this goal is to compare the mechanisms for the different types of HCuOs, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and NOR, reducing the two substrates O2 and NO. Specifically in this study, we describe the mechanism for oxygen reduction in cytochrome c dependent NOR (cNOR). Hybrid density functional calculations were performed on large cluster models of the cNOR binuclear active site. Our results are used, together with published experimental information, to construct a free energy profile for the entire catalytic cycle. Although the overall reaction is quite exergonic, we show that during the reduction of molecular oxygen in cNOR, two of the reduction steps are endergonic with high barriers for proton uptake, which is in contrast to oxygen reduction in CcO, where all reduction steps are exergonic. This difference between the two enzymes is suggested to be important for their differing capabilities for energy conservation. An additional result from this study is that at least three of the four reduction steps are initiated by proton transfer to the active site, which is in contrast to CcO, where electrons always arrive before the protons to the active site. The roles of the non-heme metal ion and the redox-active tyrosine in the active site are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preventive and Therapeutic Euphol Treatment Attenuates Experimental Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Allisson F.; Marcon, Rodrigo; Schmidt, Éder C.; Bouzon, Zenilda L.; Pianowski, Luiz F.; Calixto, João B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The tetracyclic triterpene euphol is the main constituent found in the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli. This plant is widely known in Brazilian traditional medicine for its use in the treatment of several kinds of cancer, including leukaemia, prostate and breast cancers. Here, we investigated the effect of euphol on experimental models of colitis and the underlying mechanisms involved in its action. Methodology/Principal Findings Colitis was induced in mice either with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), and the effect of euphol (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg) on colonic injury was assessed. Pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by immunohistochemistry, enzyme-Linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA), real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Preventive and therapeutic oral administration of euphol attenuated both DSS- and TNBS-induced acute colitis as observed by a significant reduction of the disease activity index (DAI), histological/microscopic damage score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in colonic tissue. Likewise, euphol treatment also inhibited colon tissue levels and expression of IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, TNF-α and IL-6, while reducing NOS2, VEGF and Ki67 expression in colonic tissue. This action seems to be likely associated with inhibition of activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, euphol decreased LPS-induced MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ, but increased IL-10 secretion from bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. Of note, euphol, at the same schedule of treatment, markedly inhibited both selectin (P- and E-selectin) and integrin (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and LFA-1) expression in colonic tissue. Conclusions/Significance Together, these results clearly demonstrated that orally-administered euphol, both preventive or therapeutic treatment were effective in reducing the severity of colitis in two models of chemically-induced mouse colitis and suggest this plant

  1. Comparative activities of glutathione-S-transferase and dialdehyde reductase toward aflatoxin B1 in livers of experimental and farm animals.

    PubMed

    Tulayakul, P; Sakuda, S; Dong, K S; Kumagai, S

    2005-08-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the relative activities of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and aldehyde reductase toward aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in relation to the variation of species susceptibilities, we studied the in vitro cytosolic GST and reductase activities in liver tissues from male Fischer rats, ICR mice and golden hamsters, adult male rainbow trouts and female piglets. The GST activity was determined by incubating the liver cytosol with glutathione (GSH) and AFB1 in the presence of the hamster liver microsomes to metabolize AFB1 to AFB1-8, 9-epoxide. The reaction product, AFB1 and GSH conjugate (AFB1-GSH), was quantified with HPLC. The reductase activity was determined by incubating liver cytosol with AFB1-dialdehyde, followed by the quantification of the metabolic product, AFB1-dialcohol, with HPLC. All the animal species possessed the GST activities, and AFB1-GSH formed increasingly with the increase of the AFB1 concentration according to the model of first-order enzyme reaction kinetics. The V(max) and K(m) values of the GST activities in rodent species were higher and lower, respectively, than those in the trout and pig, being consistent with the relative susceptibilities to AFB1 of these animal species. However, no relationship was noted between the reductase activity and species susceptibility. Thus, the result of this study shows that GST toward AFB1, but not aldehyde reductase, is a determinant of the variation of species susceptibilities.

  2. Interleukin-10 prevents experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Rott, O; Fleischer, B; Cash, E

    1994-06-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease mediated by myelin protein-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes of the T(h)1-like phenotype. In rats, the disease is characterized by a monophasic clinical manifestation, followed by a subsequent spontaneous remission and the establishment of life-long resistance to reinduction of disease. Recent data indicate that intracerebral cytokine production, in particular synthesis of interleukin(IL)-10, is selectively up-regulated during the recovery phase of disease. This led us to assess the effects of IL-10 on different rat lymphoid cell functions in vitro and to consider the possibility of an IL-10-mediated treatment to prevent the induction of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disease in vivo. Human recombinant IL-10 suppressed interferon-gamma induced major histocompatibility complex class II up-regulation in rat peritoneal macrophages, exhibited pleiotropic effects on thymocytes and totally abrogated tumor necrosis factor production of encephalitogenic T lymphocytes in vitro, without simultaneously affecting proliferative responses of the cells. Upon systemic administration during the initiation phase of disease, IL-10 was effective in markedly suppressing the subsequent induction of EAE in Lewis rats. This suppression of clinical disease coincided with a significant and specific elevation of myelin basic protein-specific autoantibody production, a sustained T cell proliferative response to myelin basic protein and a diminution of CNS infiltrations and thymic involutions in diseased animals. These data implicate IL-10 as a possible candidate for treatment of T(h)1-mediated CNS (auto-) immune diseases.

  3. Melatonin prevents experimental preterm labor and increases offspring survival.

    PubMed

    Domínguez Rubio, Ana P; Sordelli, Micaela S; Salazar, Ana I; Aisemberg, Julieta; Bariani, María V; Cella, Maximiliano; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Franchi, Ana M

    2014-03-01

    Preterm delivery is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and contributes to delayed physical and cognitive development in children. At present, there is no efficient therapy to prevent preterm labor. A large body of evidence suggests that intra-amniotic infections may be a significant and potentially preventable cause of preterm birth. This work assessed the effect of melatonin in a murine model of inflammation-associated preterm delivery which mimics central features of preterm infection in humans. For this purpose, preterm labor was induced in BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injections of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 10.00 hr (10 μg LPS) and 13.00 hr (20 μg LPS) on day 15 of pregnancy. On day 14 of pregnancy, a pellet of melatonin (25 mg) had been subcutaneously implanted into a group of animals. In the absence of melatonin, a 100% incidence of preterm birth was observed in LPS-treated animals, and the fetuses showed widespread damage. By comparison, treatment with melatonin prevented preterm birth in 50% of the cases, and all pups from melatonin-treated females were born alive and their body weight did not differ from control animals. Melatonin significantly prevented the LPS-induced rises in uterine prostaglandin (PG) E2 , PGF2α, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein levels. In addition, melatonin prevented the LPS-induced increase in uterine nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible NO synthase protein, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels. Collectively, our results suggest that melatonin could be a new therapeutic tool to prevent preterm labor and to increase offspring survival. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Novel preharvest strategies involving the use of experimental chlorate preparations and nitro-based compounds to prevent colonization of food-producing animals by foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R C; Harvey, R B; Byrd, J A; Callaway, T R; Genovese, K J; Edrington, T S; Jung, Y S; McReynolds, J L; Nisbet, D J

    2005-04-01

    Foodborne diseases caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter species are of public health and economic significance. Shedding of these pathogens during production and slaughter are risks for contamination of products for human consumption. Consequently, strategies are sought to prevent or reduce the carriage of these pathogens in food animals before slaughter. Experimental products containing chlorate salts have been proven efficacious in reducing concentrations of E. coli and Salmonella Typhimurium in the gut of cattle, sheep, swine, and poultry when administered as feed or water additives. Mechanistically, chlorate selectively targets bacteria expressing respiratory nitrate reductase activity, such as most members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, as this enzyme catalyzes the reduction of chlorate to lethal chlorite. Most beneficial gut bacteria lack respiratory nitrate reductase activity, and thus the technology appears compatible with many bacteria exhibiting competitive exclusion capabilities. More recently, select nitrocompounds have been investigated as potential feed additives, and although these nitrocompounds significantly reduce pathogens on their own, evidence indicates that they may most effectively be used to complement the bactericidal activity of chlorate. A particularly attractive aspect of the nitrocompound technology is that, as potent inhibitors of ruminal methanogenesis, they may allow producers the opportunity to recoup costs associated with their use. At present, neither chlorate nor the nitrocompounds have been approved as feed additives by the US Food and Drug Administration, and consequently they are not yet available for commercial use.

  5. A Quasi-Experimental Analysis of Schoolwide Violence Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Tia Navelene; Leite, Walter; Smith, Stephen W.

    2017-01-01

    Violence prevention programs are commonplace in today's schools, though reviews of the literature reveal mixed empirical findings on their effectiveness. Often, these programs include a variety of components such as social skills training, student mentoring, and activities designed to build a sense of school community that have not been tested for…

  6. A Quasi-Experimental Analysis of Schoolwide Violence Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Tia Navelene; Leite, Walter; Smith, Stephen W.

    2017-01-01

    Violence prevention programs are commonplace in today's schools, though reviews of the literature reveal mixed empirical findings on their effectiveness. Often, these programs include a variety of components such as social skills training, student mentoring, and activities designed to build a sense of school community that have not been tested for…

  7. Turmeric extracts containing curcuminoids prevent experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Funk, Janet L; Oyarzo, Janice N; Frye, Jennifer B; Chen, Guanjie; Lantz, R Clark; Jolad, Shivanand D; Sólyom, Aniko M; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2006-03-01

    Turmeric has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for inflammatory disorders including arthritis. On the basis of this traditional usage, dietary supplements containing turmeric rhizome and turmeric extracts are also being used in the western world for arthritis treatment and prevention. However, to our knowledge, no data are available regarding antiarthritic efficacy of complex turmeric extracts similar in composition to those available for use as dietary supplements. Therefore, the studies described here were undertaken to determine the in vivo efficacy of well-characterized curcuminoid-containing turmeric extracts in the prevention or treatment of arthritis using streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis, a well-described animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Arthritic index, a clinical measure of joint swelling, was used as the primary endpoint for assessing the effect of extracts on joint inflammation. An essential oil-depleted turmeric fraction containing 41% of the three major curcuminoids was efficacious in preventing joint inflammation when treatment was started before, but not after, the onset of joint inflammation. A commercial sample containing 94% of the three major curcuminoids was more potent in preventing arthritis than the essential oil-depleted turmeric fraction when compared by total curcuminoid dose per body weight. In conclusion, these data (1) document the in vivo antiarthritic efficacy of an essential oil-depleted turmeric fraction and (2) suggest that the three major curcuminoids are responsible for this antiarthritic effect, while the remaining compounds in the crude turmeric extract may inhibit this protective effect.

  8. Topical Administration of Somatostatin Prevents Retinal Neurodegeneration in Experimental Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Cristina; García-Ramírez, Marta; Corraliza, Lidia; Fernández-Carneado, Jimena; Farrera-Sinfreu, Josep; Ponsati, Berta; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Valverde, Ángela M.; Simó, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Somatostatin (SST) is an endogenous neuroprotective peptide that is downregulated in the diabetic eye. The aim of the study was to test the usefulness of topical administration of SST in preventing retinal neurodegeneration. For this purpose, rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (STZ-DM) were treated with either SST eye drops or vehicle for 15 days. Nondiabetic rats treated with vehicle served as a control group. Functional abnormalities were assessed by electroretinography (ERG), and neurodegeneration was assessed by measuring glial activation and the apoptotic rate. In addition, proapoptotic (FasL, Bid, and activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3) and survival signaling pathways (BclxL) were examined. Intraretinal concentrations of glutamate and its main transporter glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) were also determined. Treatment with SST eye drops prevented ERG abnormalities, glial activation, apoptosis, and the misbalance between proapoptotic and survival signaling detected in STZ-DM rats. In addition, SST eye drops inhibited glutamate accumulation in the retina and GLAST downregulation induced by diabetes mellitus. We conclude that topical administration of SST has a potent effect in preventing retinal neurodegeneration induced by diabetes mellitus. In addition, our findings open up a new preventive pharmacological strategy targeted to early stages of DR. PMID:23474487

  9. [An experimental study on prevention of peridural adhesion after laminectomy].

    PubMed

    Pang, Zucai; Xu, Hanqun; Xie, Weijian

    2006-12-01

    To explore effective substances and methods for prevention of peridural adhesion. Laminectomy was performed on the 5th lumbar segment in 64 rabbits, which were equally divided into 4 groups. The dura mater (12 mm x 6 mm) was exposed. The exposed dura mater was left uncovered in Group A; the exposed dura mater was covered with sodium hyaluronate jel (high molecular weight, 1 ml) in Group B; the lamina repair was performed with the autologous spinous process in Group C; the lamina repair was performed with the sodium hyaluronate jel filling and the autologous spinous process in Group D. The specimens were observed grossly and histologically at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks postoperatively. The computed imaging analysis on the epidural adhesion was also performed at 6 weeks postoperatively. 1) The gross anatomical evaluation: Severe peridural adhesion was formed in Group A, less adhesion formed in Groups B and C, but no obvious adhesion formed in Group D. 2) The area percentage of the epidural scar: The area percentage of the epidural scar was 15.89%+/-1.88% and 13.94%+/-1.89% in Groups C and D respectively, which were significantly lower than those in Groups A and B (22.66%+/-2.89% and 20.70%+/-2.82%, P<0. 05). 3) The density of epidural scar: The density of the epidural scars were 42.03%+/-7.36% and 36. 50+/-9.08% in Groups B and D, which were significantly lower than those in Groups A and C (63.73%+/-6.06% and 52. 11%+/- 4.10%, P< 0.05). The high molecular weight sodium hyaluronate jel filling combined with the lamina repair using the autologous spinous process has the best preventive effect on the peridural adhesion after laminectomy.

  10. Atorvastatin prevents type 2 diabetes mellitus--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Madhu, Sri Venkata; Aslam, Mohammad; Galav, Vikas; Bhattacharya, Swapan Kumar; Jafri, Aiman Abbas

    2014-04-05

    Recent reports of increased diabetes risk have raised concerns regarding the use of statins. The present study was therefore planned to clarify whether atorvastatin can prevent diabetes development in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eight week old male Wistar rats were randomized into three groups (n = 12 each group). Group A was given standard chow diet, while group B and group C were offered high sucrose diet. In addition to high sucrose diet, group C was given atorvastatin (20mg/kg/day) from beginning of study till 26th week. After 26 weeks, a low dose of streptozotocin (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was given to all 3 groups and further followed for 4 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance tests were done at week 4, 26 and week 30. Development of impaired glucose tolerance at week 26 (16.66% vs 100%, P = <0.001) and diabetes at week 30 (16.66% vs 81.81%, P = 0.002) was significantly lower in rats pretreated with atorvastatin along with high sucrose diet viz group C compared to group B rats who received high sucrose diet only respectively. Also, metabolic indices like body weight, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose area under the curve (Gl-AUC) were significantly lower in group C compared to group B (P = <0.05) while insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was also lower in group C (P = 0.05). This study clearly demonstrates for the first time in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus that atorvastatin prevents development of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo effects of antibodies to immune response gene products: prevention of experimental allergic encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, L; Rosenbaum, J T; Sriram, S; McDevitt, H O

    1981-01-01

    Prevention of experimental allergic encephalitis in SJL/J [H-2s] mice was achieved with in vivo administration of antibody reactive with I-As gene products prior to immunization with spinal cord antigen. No protection was evident in animals that received antisera specific for I-Js gene products. Administration of antibody to I-As beginning 5 days after immunization with spinal cord antigen delayed, but did not prevent, the onset of experimental allergic encephalitis. PMID:6947275

  12. Prevention praised, cure preferred: results of between-subjects experimental studies comparing (monetary) appreciation for preventive and curative interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 'An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’ is a common saying, and indeed, most health economic studies conclude that people are more willing to pay for preventive measures than for treatment activities. This may be because most health economic studies ask respondents to compare preventive measures with treatment, and thus prompt respondents to consider other uses of resources. However, psychological theorizing suggests that, when methods do not challenge subjects to consider other uses of resources, curative treatment is favored over prevention. Could it be that while prevention is praised, cure is preferred? Methods In two experimental studies, we investigated, from a psychological perspective and using a between-subjects design, whether prevention or treatment is preferred and why. In both studies, participants first read a lung cancer prevention or treatment intervention scenario that varied on the prevention-treatment dimension, but that were the same on factors like 'costs per saved life’ and kind of disease. Then participants completed a survey measuring appreciation (general and monetary) as well as a number of potential mediating variables. Results Both studies clearly demonstrated that, when the design was between-subjects, participants had greater (general and monetary) appreciation for treatment interventions than for preventive interventions with perceived urgency of the intervention quite consistently mediating this effect. Differences in appreciation of treatment over preventive treatment were shown to be .59 (Study 1) and .45 (Study 2) on a 5-point scale. Furthermore, participants thought that health insurance should compensate more for the treatment than for preventive measures, differences of 16% (Study 1), and 22% (Study 2). When participants were asked to directly compare both interventions on the basis of a short description, they preferred the preventive intervention. Conclusion It appears that people claim to prefer

  13. Aldose reductase inhibitor improves insulin-mediated glucose uptake and prevents migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells induced by high glucose.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-05-01

    We examined involvement of the polyol pathway in high glucose-induced human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration using Boyden's chamber method. Chronic glucose treatment for 72 hours potentiated, in a concentration-dependent manner (5.6 to 22.2 mol/L), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) BB-mediated SMC migration. This potentiation was accompanied by an increase in PDGF BB binding, because of an increased number of PDGF-beta receptors, and this potentiation was blocked by the aldose reductase inhibitor epalrestat. Epalrestat at concentrations of 10 and 100 nmol/L inhibited high glucose-potentiated (22.2 mmol/L), PDGF BB-mediated migration. Epalrestat at 100 nmol/L inhibited a high glucose-induced increase in the reduced/oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ratio and membrane-bound protein kinase C (PKC) activity in SMCs. PKC inhibitors calphostin C (100 nmol/L) and chelerythrine (1 micromol/L) each inhibited high glucose-induced, PDGF BB-mediated SMC migration. High glucose-induced suppression of insulin-mediated [(3)H]-deoxyglucose uptake, which was blocked by both calphostin C (100 nmol/L) and chelerythrine (1 micromol/L), was decreased by epalrestat (100 nmol/L). Chronic high glucose treatment for 72 hours increased intracellular oxidative stress, which was directly measured by flow cytometry using carboxydichlorofluorescein diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester, and this increase was significantly suppressed by epalrestat (100 nmol/L). Antisense oligonucleotide to PKC-beta isoform inhibited high glucose-mediated changes in SMC migration, insulin-mediated [(3)H]-deoxyglucose uptake, and oxidative stress. These findings suggest that high glucose concentrations potentiate SMC migration in coronary artery and that the aldose reductase inhibitor epalrestat inhibits high glucose-potentiated, PDGF BB-induced SMC migration, possibly through suppression of PKC (PKC-beta), impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake, and oxidative stress.

  14. Prevention of cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid metabolic alterations in l-NAME hypertensive rats by sinapic acid--Role of HMG-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Raja, Boobalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-04-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of sinapic acid, a bioactive phenolic acid on high blood pressure associated cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid alterations in N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) induced hypertensive rats. Sinapic acid was administered to rats orally at a dosage of 40 mg/kg everyday for a period of 4 weeks. Sinapic acid treatment significantly decreased mean arterial pressure, left ventricular end diastolic pressure, organ weights (liver and kidney), lipid peroxidation products in tissues (liver and kidney), activities of hepatic marker enzymes and the levels of renal function markers in serum of l-NAME rats. Sinapic acid treatment also significantly increased the level of plasma nitric oxide metabolites, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in tissues of l-NAME rats. Tissue damage was assessed by histopathological examination. Alterations in plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, level of plasma lipoproteins and tissue lipids were corrected by sinapic acid treatment in l-NAME rats. Sinapic acid treatment significantly decreased the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in plasma and liver, whereas the activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase was significantly increased in the plasma of hypertensive rats. Docking result showed the interaction between sinapic acid and HMG-CoA reductase. Sinapic acid has shown best ligand binding energy of -5.5 kcal/M. Moreover, in chick embryo model, sinapic acid improved vessel density on chorioallantoic membrane. These results of the present study concludes that sinapic acid acts as a protective agent against hypertension associated cardiac dysfunction, kidney fibrosis and lipid alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 5α-Reductase Inhibition Prevents the Luteal Phase Increase in Plasma Allopregnanolone Levels and Mitigates Symptoms in Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pedro E; Rubinow, David R; Nieman, Lynnette K; Koziol, Deloris E; Morrow, A Leslie; Schiller, Crystal E; Cintron, Dahima; Thompson, Karla D; Khine, Khursheed K; Schmidt, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Changes in neurosteroid levels during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle may precipitate affective symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we stabilized neurosteroid levels by administering the 5α-reductase inhibitor dutasteride to block conversion of progesterone to its neurosteroid metabolite allopregnanolone in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and in asymptomatic control women. Sixteen women with prospectively confirmed PMDD and 16 control women participated in one of two separate randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trials, each lasting three menstrual cycles. After one menstrual cycle of single-blind placebo, participants were randomized to receive, for the next two menstrual cycles, either double-blind placebo or dutasteride (low-dose 0.5 mg/day in the first eight PMDD and eight control women or high-dose 2.5 mg/day in the second group of women). All women completed the daily rating form (DRF) and were evaluated in clinic during the follicular and luteal phases of each menstrual cycle. Main outcome measures were the DRF symptoms of irritability, sadness, and anxiety. Analyses were performed with SAS PROC MIXED. In the low-dose group, no significant effect of dutasteride on PMDD symptoms was observed compared with placebo (ie, symptom cyclicity maintained), and plasma allopregnanolone levels increased in women with PMDD from follicular to the luteal phases, suggesting the absence of effect of the low-dose dutasteride on 5α-reductase. In contrast, the high-dose group experienced a statistically significant reduction in several core PMDD symptoms (ie, irritability, sadness, anxiety, food cravings, and bloating) on dutasteride compared with placebo. Dutasteride had no effect on mood in controls. Stabilization of allopregnanolone levels from the follicular to the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle by blocking the conversion of progesterone to its 5α-reduced neurosteroid metabolite mitigates symptoms in PMDD. These data

  16. Metformin exhibits preventive and therapeutic efficacy against experimental cystic echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Julia A.; Dávila, Valeria A.; Rodrígues, Christian R.; Petrigh, Romina; Zoppi, Jorge A.; Crocenzi, Fernando A.; Cumino, Andrea C.

    2017-01-01

    Metformin (Met) is an anti-hyperglycemic and potential anti-cancer agent which may exert its anti-proliferative effects via the induction of energetic stress. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of Met against the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Metformin showed significant dose- and time-dependent killing effects on in vitro cultured protoscoleces and metacestodes. Notably, the combination of Met together with the minimum effective concentration of ABZSO had a synergistic effect after days 3 and 12 on metacestodes and protoscoleces, respectively. Oral administration of Met (50 mg/kg/day) in E. granulosus-infected mice was highly effective in reducing the weight and number of parasite cysts, yet its combination with the lowest recommended dose of ABZ (5 mg/kg/day) was even more effective. Coincidentally, intracystic Met accumulation was higher in animals treated with both drugs compared to those administered Met alone. Furthermore, the safe plant-derived drug Met exhibited remarkable chemopreventive properties against secondary hydatidosis in mice. In conclusion, based on our experimental data, Met emerges as a promising anti-echinococcal drug as it has proven to efficiently inhibit the development and growth of the E. granulosus larval stage and its combination with ABZ may improve the current anti-parasitic therapy. PMID:28182659

  17. Metformin exhibits preventive and therapeutic efficacy against experimental cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Loos, Julia A; Dávila, Valeria A; Rodrígues, Christian R; Petrigh, Romina; Zoppi, Jorge A; Crocenzi, Fernando A; Cumino, Andrea C

    2017-02-01

    Metformin (Met) is an anti-hyperglycemic and potential anti-cancer agent which may exert its anti-proliferative effects via the induction of energetic stress. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of Met against the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Metformin showed significant dose- and time-dependent killing effects on in vitro cultured protoscoleces and metacestodes. Notably, the combination of Met together with the minimum effective concentration of ABZSO had a synergistic effect after days 3 and 12 on metacestodes and protoscoleces, respectively. Oral administration of Met (50 mg/kg/day) in E. granulosus-infected mice was highly effective in reducing the weight and number of parasite cysts, yet its combination with the lowest recommended dose of ABZ (5 mg/kg/day) was even more effective. Coincidentally, intracystic Met accumulation was higher in animals treated with both drugs compared to those administered Met alone. Furthermore, the safe plant-derived drug Met exhibited remarkable chemopreventive properties against secondary hydatidosis in mice. In conclusion, based on our experimental data, Met emerges as a promising anti-echinococcal drug as it has proven to efficiently inhibit the development and growth of the E. granulosus larval stage and its combination with ABZ may improve the current anti-parasitic therapy.

  18. Preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on cardiac hypertrophy and alterations in electrocardiogram, lipids, and lipoproteins in experimentally induced myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhro Jyoti; Stanely Mainzen Prince, P

    2013-10-01

    The present study evaluated the preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on cardiac hypertrophy and alterations in electrocardiogram, lipids, and lipoproteins in experimentally induced myocardial infarcted rats. Rats were pretreated with p-coumaric acid (8 mg/kg body weight) daily for a period of 7 days and then injected with isoproterenol (100mg/kg body weight) on 8th and 9th day to induce myocardial infarction. Myocardial infarction induced by isoproterenol was indicated by increased level of cardiac sensitive marker and elevated ST-segments in the electrocardiogram. Also, the levels/concentrations of serum and heart cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids were increased in myocardial infarcted rats. Isoproterenol also increased the levels of serum low density and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol and decreased the levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. It also enhanced the activity of liver 3-hydroxy-3 methyl glutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. p-Coumaric acid pretreatment revealed preventive effects on all the biochemical parameters and electrocardiogram studied in myocardial infarcted rats. The in vitro study confirmed the free radical scavenging property of p-coumaric acid. Thus, p-coumaric acid prevented cardiac hypertrophy and alterations in lipids, lipoproteins, and electrocardiogram, by virtue of its antihypertrophic, antilipidemic, and free radical scavenging effects in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

  19. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  20. Structural Elucidation of Chalcone Reductase and Implications for Deoxychalcone Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bomati, Erin K.; Austin, Michael B.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    4,2′,4′,6′-tetrahydroxychalcone (chalcone) and 4,2′,4′-trihydroxychalcone (deoxychalcone) serve as precursors of ecologically important flavonoids and isoflavonoids. Deoxychalcone formation depends on chalcone synthase and chalcone reductase; however, the identity of the chalcone reductase substrate out of the possible substrates formed during the multistep reaction catalyzed by chalcone synthase remains experimentally elusive. We report here the three-dimensional structure of alfalfa chalcone reductase bound to the NADP+ cofactor and propose the identity and binding mode of its substrate, namely the non-aromatized coumaryl-trione intermediate of the chalcone synthase-catalyzed cyclization of the fully extended coumaryl-tetraketide thioester intermediate. In the absence of a ternary complex, the quality of the refined NADP+-bound chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for computer-assisted docking to evaluate the likelihood of possible substrates. Interestingly, chalcone reductase adopts the three-dimensional structure of the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. The aldo/keto reductase fold is structurally distinct from all known ketoreductases of fatty acid biosynthesis, which instead belong to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. The results presented here provide structural support for convergent functional evolution of these two ketoreductases that share similar roles in the biosynthesis of fatty acids/polyketides. In addition, the chalcone reductase structure represents the first protein structure of a member of the aldo/ketoreductase 4 family. Therefore, the chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for the homology modeling of other aldo/ketoreductase 4 family members, including the reductase involved in morphine biosynthesis, namely codeinone reductase. PMID:15970585

  1. The role of experimental research in the study of the prevention of malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Shabad, L. M.

    1962-01-01

    The author discusses the role of experimental oncological research in the prevention of malignant neoplasms, with special reference to the conclusions drawn from such research in the USSR. He points out that experimental research can contribute to cancer prevention in two ways: (a) by supplying information on the occurrence of carcinogenic substances in the human environment—in the atmosphere, in industry and in foodstuffs—and thus providing a rational basis for the introduction of measures to prevent cancer from arising; and (b) by throwing light on the series of tissue changes that may precede the development of the malignant tumour and hence making it possible, through the timely treatment and cure of known precancerous conditions, to prevent cancer from developing. PMID:13911073

  2. Prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma: potential targets, experimental models, and clinical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hoshida, Yujin; Fuchs, Bryan C.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic fibrotic liver diseases such as viral hepatitis eventually develop liver cirrhosis, which causes occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Given the limited therapeutic efficacy in advanced HCC, prevention of HCC development could be an effective strategy for improving patient prognosis. However, there is still no established therapy to meet the goal. Studies have elucidated a wide variety of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in HCC development. Genetically-engineered or chemically-treated experimental models of cirrhosis and HCC have been developed and shown their potential value in investigating molecular therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers for HCC prevention. In this review, we overview potential targets of prevention and currently available experimental models, and discuss strategies to translate the findings into clinical practice. PMID:22873223

  3. Tomato Lycopene and Lung Cancer Prevention: From Experimental to Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Palozza, Paola; Simone, Rossella E.; Catalano, Assunta; Mele, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that tomato lycopene may be preventive against the formation and the development of lung cancer. Experimental studies demonstrated that lycopene may inhibit the growth of several cultured lung cancer cells and prevent lung tumorigenesis in animal models through various mechanisms, including a modulation of redox status, cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis induction, a regulation of growth factor signaling, changes in cell growth-related enzymes, an enhancement of gap junction communication and a prevention of smoke-induced inflammation. In addition, lycopene also inhibited cell invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Several lycopene metabolites have been identified, raising the question as to whether the preventive effects of lycopene on cancer risk is, at least in part, due to its metabolites. Despite these promising reports, it is difficult at the moment to directly relate available experimental data to human pathophysiology. More well controlled clinical intervention trials are needed to further clarify the exact role of lycopene in the prevention of lung cancer cell growth. Such studies should take into consideration subject selection, specific markers of analysis, the levels of carotenoids being tested, metabolism and isomerization of lycopene, interaction with other bioactive food components. This article reviews data on the cancer preventive activities of lycopene, possible mechanisms involved, and the relationship between lycopene consumption and human cancer risk. PMID:24212813

  4. Nicotinic acid prevents experimental liver fibrosis by attenuating the prooxidant process.

    PubMed

    Arauz, Jonathan; Rivera-Espinoza, Yadira; Shibayama, Mineko; Favari, Liliana; Flores-Beltrán, Rosa Elena; Muriel, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins that occurs in most chronic liver diseases. Nicotinamide treatment has been shown to prevent collagen accumulation and fibrogenesis in a bleomycin model of lung fibrosis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of nicotinic acid (NA) on experimental liver fibrosis and investigated its underlying mechanism. Fibrosis was induced by chronic TAA administration and the effects of co-administration with NA for 8 weeks were evaluated, including control groups. TAA administration induced liver fibrosis, which was prevented by nicotinic acid. NA prevented the elevation of liver enzymes and prevented hepatic glycogen depletion. Liver histopathology and hydroxyproline levels were significantly lower in the rats treated with TAA plus NA compared with TAA only. NA demonstrated antioxidant properties by restoring the redox equilibrium (lipid peroxidation and GPx levels). Western blot assays showed decreased expression levels of TGF-β and its downstream inductor CTGF. Additionally, NA prevented hepatic stellate cell activation due by blocking the expression of α-SMA. Zymography assays showed that NA decreased the activity of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. NA prevents experimental fibrosis; the mechanisms of action are associated with its antioxidant properties and the reduction in TGF-β expression. The decrease in TGF-β levels may be associated with the attenuation of the oxidative processes, thus resulting in a reduction in HSC activation and ECM deposition. The findings suggest a possible role for NA as an antifibrotic agent for liver injury. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Prevention of LDL-suppression of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity by progesterone (PG): evidence for cytochrome P-450 involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, R.C.; Gupta, A.; Panini, S.R.; Rudney, H.

    1987-05-01

    Incubation of rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) with PG has been reported by us to prevent the suppression of HMGR activity by LDL. In the present study, addition of LDL and PG to IEC-6 cells resulted in a 2 fold increase in cellular free cholesterol (CH) in 24 h, while HMGR activity remained elevated. PG did not affect the internalization and degradation of (/sup 125/I) LDL nor the accumulation of free (/sup 3/H) CH in cells incubated with (/sup 3/H-cholesteryl linoleate)-LDL. Also, PG did not affect the intracellular transport of LDL-derived (/sup 3/H) CH to the plasma membrane nor the efflux of the (/sup 3/H) CH into medium containing human high density lipoprotein. Addition of LDL to cells, in which the cellular CH was radiolabeled from (/sup 3/H) acetate, resulted in an increased formation of radiolabeled oxysterols, detected by HPLC, and a corresponding decrease in HMGR activity. PG attenuated both the LDL-induced formation of oxysterols and suppression of HMGR activity. PG inhibited cytochrome P-450 dependent oxidation of benzphetamine, aminopyrine and aniline by liver microsomes from phenobarbitol treated rats. These results suggest PG may prevent LDL suppression of HMGR activity in IEC-6 cells by inhibiting cytochrome P-450 dependent formation of regulatory oxysterols.

  6. Preventive effect of some substances on experimental oxalic calculogenesis in the frog.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, F; Fella, A; Pota, A

    1981-01-01

    Rana esculenta tadpoles that are fed spinach develop an oxalic calculogenesis. The addition of cholestyramine, orthophosphate, citrate, allopurinol and tungstate to the tank water prevented calculi formation while succinimide, magnesium oxide, hydrochlorothiazide and tetracycline were ineffective. Methylene blue proved lethal to tadpoles, and its anti-lithogenic activity could not be assessed. These findings, except for the non-effectiveness of magnesium oxide, are in agreement with both the theoretical expectations and the results obtained in other experimental models. Experimental frog calculogenesis seems to be a simple and valid method for evaluating anti-lithogenic activity.

  7. Probenecid Application Prevents Clinical Symptoms and Inflammation in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Hainz, Nadine; Wolf, Sandra; Tschernig, Thomas; Meier, Carola

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Neurological impairments are caused by axonal damage due to demyelination and neuroinflammation within the central nervous system. T cells mediate the neuroinflammation. The activation of T cells is induced by the release of adenosine triphosphate and involves purinergic receptors as well as pannexin (Panx) proteins. As Panx1 is expressed on T cells, we here propose that application of probenecid, a known Panx inhibitor, will prevent the onset of clinical symptoms in a mouse model of MS, the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. EAE-induced mice received daily injections of probenecid. Disease scores, T cell numbers, and microglia activation were compared between experimental groups. Probenecid treatment resulted in lower disease scores as compared to EAE animals. Probenecid-treated animals also displayed fewer inflammatory lesions. Microglia activation was not altered by treatment. In conclusion, probenecid prevented the onset of EAE.

  8. Immunological approach to the regulation of nitrate reductase in Monoraphidium braunii.

    PubMed

    Díez, J; López-Ruiz, A

    1989-02-01

    The effects of different culture conditions on nitrate reductase activity and nitrate reductase protein from Monoraphidium braunii have been studied, using two different immunological techniques, rocket immunoelectrophoresis and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, to determine nitrate reductase protein. The nitrogen sources ammonium and glutamine repressed nitrate reductase synthesis, while nitrite, alanine, and glutamate acted as derepressors. There was a four- to eightfold increase of nitrate reductase activity and a twofold increase of nitrate reductase protein under conditions of nitrogen starvation versus growth on nitrate. Nitrate reductase synthesis was repressed in darkness. However, when Monoraphidium was grown under heterotrophic conditions with glucose as the carbon and energy source, the synthesis of nitrate reductase was maintained. With ammonium or darkness, changes in nitrate reductase activity correlated fairly well with changes in nitrate reductase protein, indicating that in both cases loss of activity was due to repression and not to inactivation of the enzyme. Experiments using methionine sulfoximine, to inhibit ammonium assimilation, showed that ammonium per se and not a product of its metabolism was the corepressor of the enzyme. The appearance of nitrate reductase activity after transferring the cells to induction media was prevented by cycloheximide and by 6-methylpurine, although in this latter case the effect was observed only in cells preincubated with the inhibitor for 1 h before the induction period.

  9. An Introduction to Sensitivity Analysis for Unobserved Confounding in Non-Experimental Prevention Research

    PubMed Central

    Kuramoto, S. Janet; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite that randomization is the gold standard for estimating causal relationships, many questions in prevention science are left to be answered through non-experimental studies often because randomization is either infeasible or unethical. While methods such as propensity score matching can adjust for observed confounding, unobserved confounding is the Achilles heel of most non-experimental studies. This paper describes and illustrates seven sensitivity analysis techniques that assess the sensitivity of study results to an unobserved confounder. These methods were categorized into two groups to reflect differences in their conceptualization of sensitivity analysis, as well as their targets of interest. As a motivating example we examine the sensitivity of the association between maternal suicide and offspring’s risk for suicide attempt hospitalization. While inferences differed slightly depending on the type of sensitivity analysis conducted, overall the association between maternal suicide and offspring’s hospitalization for suicide attempt was found to be relatively robust to an unobserved confounder. The ease of implementation and the insight these analyses provide underscores sensitivity analysis techniques as an important tool for non-experimental studies. The implementation of sensitivity analysis can help increase confidence in results from non-experimental studies and better inform prevention researchers and policymakers regarding potential intervention targets. PMID:23408282

  10. Psychoeducation in the prevention of eating disorders: An experimental approach in adolescent schoolgirls.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Pier Luigi; Ciano, Rossana P.; Balestrieri, Matteo

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this report is to analyse the impact of a psychoeducational preventive programme on the eating habits of a sample of adolescent schoolgirls. Of the 112 schoolgirls attending five classes, about 86% agreed to participate in the program. Of these, 63 participants belonged to the experimental group and 33 agreed to the control group. The psychoeducational sessions were performed once a month for each of three experimental classes. The programme involved discussions on the nature of eating disorders, on epidemiological aspects and on the importance of early detection of risk factors. The tests used to evaluate the sample were the EDI-2 and the PF-16. The results showed a significant improvement in bulimic attitudes, asceticism, feelings of ineffectiveness, and maturity fears. Anxiety traits were also better managed in the experimental group. Our conclusions suggest that correct information about eating disorders can ameliorate unhealthy attitudes towards eating behaviour.

  11. Psychoeducation in the prevention of eating disorders: an experimental approach in adolescent schoolgirls.

    PubMed

    Rocco, P L; Ciano, R P; Balestrieri, M

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this report is to analyse the impact of a psychoeducational preventive programme on the eating habits of a sample of adolescent schoolgirls. Of the 112 schoolgirls attending five classes, about 86% agreed to participate in the program. Of these, 63 participants belonged to the experimental group and 33 agreed to the control group. The psychoeducational sessions were performed once a month for each of three experimental classes. The programme involved discussions on the nature of eating disorders, on epidemiological aspects and on the importance of early detection of risk factors. The tests used to evaluate the sample were the EDI-2 and the PF-16. The results showed a significant improvement in bulimic attitudes, asceticism, feelings of ineffectiveness, and maturity fears. Anxiety traits were also better managed in the experimental group. Our conclusions suggest that correct information about eating disorders can ameliorate unhealthy attitudes towards eating behaviour.

  12. The contribution of parent-child interactions to smoking experimentation in adolescence: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    White, James

    2012-02-01

    Because few prospective studies have examined the independent influence of mothers and fathers on smoking experimentation, we tested the association between a set of parent-specific, familial and peer interactions with smoking experimentation in early adolescence. Data come from two cohorts in the British Youth Panel Survey (N = 1736; mean age at baseline, 11.26; SD = 0.65), a study of children resident with members of the British Household Panel Survey. Baseline data showed 8.2% of participants had smoked which increased to 40.3% after a 3-year follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression models showed risk factors for the onset of experimentation included frequent time spent with peers (P < 0.001), maternal smoking (P = 0.001), female gender and older participant age (P < 0.001). Parent-child quarrels, mother-child conversations, family meal frequency and household income were not significantly associated with experimentation. Frequent father-child conversations, about things which mattered to children, were the only type of parent-child contact associated with a reduced risk of experimentation (P < 0.001), and a significant interaction suggested that maternal smoking increased the likelihood of girls but not boys experimentation (P = 0.01). This study suggests that familial risk and protective factors operate independently and that more attention should be paid to the role of fathers in smoking prevention.

  13. Role of experimental and epidemiological evidence of carcinogenicity in the primary prevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    Experimental chemical carcinogenesis, which included long-term tests in experimental animals,had a dominating role in cancer research between the 1920s and the late 1960s. Two events marked a certain decline of confidence in the ability of experimental results to predict human risks: the incapacity of developing methods to identify agents acting on the different steps of the carcinogenesis process, and the incapacity to reproduce experimentally the strong evidence of carcinogenicity of tobacco smoke provided by epidemiological studies. It was at that time that epidemiologists and biostatisticians developed criteria for assessing the causation of chronic-degenerative diseases relying primarily on epidemiological evidence. In 1969 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) did initiate a programme for identifying the cause of cancer with the aim of promoting the primary prevention of cancer. The programme is focused on the evaluation of the carcinogenicity of environmental agents on the basis of both the experimental and epidemiological evidence and, since the 1990s, a balanced use of the new tools provided by advances in toxicology, molecular biology and genetics. A strong point of the IARC programme is that in the absence of adequate human data it is reasonable and prudent to regard agents for which there is sufficient experimental evidence of carcinogenicity as if they were carcinogenic to humans.

  14. Preventive and curative effect of Pistacia lentiscus oil in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Naouar, Mustafa S; Mekki, Lilia Zouiten; Charfi, Lamia; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2016-10-01

    to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of the Pistacia lentiscus oil in experimental colitis model. Colitis was induced in male rats by instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) in all groups. The experimental groups consisted of: 5 rats received Lentisc oil 2months before colitis induction (preventive group), 5 rats received the oil on the day of colitis induction (curative group) and 5 control rats. Lentisc oil was extracted from the ripe fruit of the plant by the cold press method and was analyzed by spectro-chromatography. Lentisc oil has been inserted with a standard diet at the dose of 30mg oil/100g of food/rat. The lentisc oil sample is composed mainly by Oleic acid (47.96%), Palmitic acid (27.94%) and Linoleic acid (20.22%).There was a significant difference between control rats and treated rats with lentisc oil concerned body mass (p=0.009), bleeding index (p=0.005 and p=0.018) and diarrhea (p=0.012). Histological examination revealed a clear difference between the control and preventive groups with disappearance of erosion, decreased of cryptitis, irregular crypts and crypt loss in the preventive group. Curative group showed a significant decrease of ulceration, hyperplasia, cryptitis, irregular crypts and crypt loss compared to the control group. There was an attenuation of inflammation in the preventive group compared to the curative group without statistically significant. Lentisc oil administration could provide a protective effect on intestinal inflammation in colitis rats induced by TNBS mainly when it is administered at a young age in preventive mode. This beneficial effect would involve a modification of arachidonic acid metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Preventative and Therapeutic Probiotic Use in Allergic Skin Conditions: Experimental and Clinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Öner; Göksu Erol, Azize Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are ingested live microbes that can modify intestinal microbial populations in a way that benefits the host. The interest in probiotic preventative/therapeutic potential in allergic diseases stemmed from the fact that probiotics have been shown to improve intestinal dysbiosis and permeability and to reduce inflammatory cytokines in human and murine experimental models. Enhanced presence of probiotic bacteria in the intestinal microbiota is found to correlate with protection against allergy. Therefore, many studies have been recently designed to examine the efficacy of probiotics, but the literature on the allergic skin disorders is still very scarce. Here, our objective is to summarize and evaluate the available knowledge from randomized or nonrandomized controlled trials of probiotic use in allergic skin conditions. Clinical improvement especially in IgE-sensitized eczema and experimental models such as atopic dermatitis-like lesions (trinitrochlorobenzene and picryl chloride sensitizations) and allergic contact dermatitis (dinitrofluorobenzene sensitization) has been reported. Although there is a very promising evidence to recommend the addition of probiotics into foods, probiotics do not have a proven role in the prevention or the therapy of allergic skin disorders. Thus, being aware of possible measures, such as probiotics use, to prevent/heal atopic diseases is essential for the practicing allergy specialist. PMID:24078929

  16. Preventative and therapeutic probiotic use in allergic skin conditions: experimental and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Öner; Erol, Azize Yasemin Göksu

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are ingested live microbes that can modify intestinal microbial populations in a way that benefits the host. The interest in probiotic preventative/therapeutic potential in allergic diseases stemmed from the fact that probiotics have been shown to improve intestinal dysbiosis and permeability and to reduce inflammatory cytokines in human and murine experimental models. Enhanced presence of probiotic bacteria in the intestinal microbiota is found to correlate with protection against allergy. Therefore, many studies have been recently designed to examine the efficacy of probiotics, but the literature on the allergic skin disorders is still very scarce. Here, our objective is to summarize and evaluate the available knowledge from randomized or nonrandomized controlled trials of probiotic use in allergic skin conditions. Clinical improvement especially in IgE-sensitized eczema and experimental models such as atopic dermatitis-like lesions (trinitrochlorobenzene and picryl chloride sensitizations) and allergic contact dermatitis (dinitrofluorobenzene sensitization) has been reported. Although there is a very promising evidence to recommend the addition of probiotics into foods, probiotics do not have a proven role in the prevention or the therapy of allergic skin disorders. Thus, being aware of possible measures, such as probiotics use, to prevent/heal atopic diseases is essential for the practicing allergy specialist.

  17. Microbial Epitopes Act as Altered Peptide Ligands to Prevent Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Pedro J.; Garren, Hideki; Hirschberg, David L.; Langer-Gould, Annette M.; Levite, Mia; Karpuj, Marcela V.; Southwood, Scott; Sette, Alessandro; Conlon, Paul; Steinman, Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    Molecular mimicry refers to structural homologies between a self-protein and a microbial protein. A major epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP), p87–99 (VHFFKNIVTPRTP), induces experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). VHFFK contains the major residues for binding of this self-molecule to T cell receptor (TCR) and to the major histocompatibility complex. Peptides from papilloma virus strains containing the motif VHFFK induce EAE. A peptide from human papilloma virus type 40 (HPV 40) containing VHFFR, and one from HPV 32 containing VHFFH, prevented EAE. A sequence from Bacillus subtilis (RKVVTDFFKNIPQRI) also prevented EAE. T cell lines, producing IL-4 and specific for these microbial peptides, suppressed EAE. Thus, microbial peptides, differing from the core motif of the self-antigen, MBPp87–99, function as altered peptide ligands, and behave as TCR antagonists, in the modulation of autoimmune disease. PMID:10209044

  18. Nanofiber nets in prevention of cicatrization in spinal procedures. Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Andrychowski, Jarosław; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Sulejczak, Dorota; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Czernicki, Zbigniew; Kowalewski, Tomasz Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    Excessive cicatrisation or epidural fibrosis in the operative field is an inappropriate event occasionally occurring after neurosurgical procedures (i.e., spine procedures and craniotomies). This excessive process may disturb the postoperative course and render reoperations more difficult and risky. The literature describes this phenomenon as accompanying up to 20% of neurosurgical procedures. The scar tissue that forms postoperatively adheres to the dura mater, penetrates into the spinal canal and can cause narrowing symptoms, neurological deficits and pain. The incidence and spread of this excessive scar or epidural fibrosis can be prevented through the modification of the surgical technique by incorporating endoscopic or microscopic access to minimize the operative field and the use of isolating substances (autogenous or heterogeneous) administered intraoperatively. The aim of this experimental study was to morphologically assess the cicatrization process, adhesion and to prevent excessive scar formation with the local use of membranes manufactured by an electrospinning process (nanotechnology). We also investigated whether the biodegradable nanofibrous net triggers or modifies the immunological response or the local inflammatory process. Micro-nanofibrous membranes were produced by the electrospinning process. A biodegradable, medically certified copolymer poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) was used as the electrospun material. An experimental rat model was used in this study. Experimental and control groups were formed with specified follow-up times of 4, 14 and 30 days. During the operation, a two-level laminectomy in the thoracic segment was performed. The operative field was divided into two regions. Isolating material was used on the dura mater and surface of the spinal cord in the area where the laminectomy was performed. The material was analysed with the use of light and electron microscopy. Local cicatrisation can be modified using nanomaterials

  19. Ameliorative potential of omega 3 fatty acids and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on experimentally-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kabel, Ahmed M; Abd Elmaaboud, Maaly A; Albarraq, Ahmed A

    2015-05-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has a relation to obesity. It may lead to hepatocellular carcinoma. To date, the therapeutic options are limited due to complex pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the effect of atorvastatin and omega 3 fatty acids on experimentally-induced NASH. Sixty male albino rats were divided into 6 equal groups; control group, high fat emulsion/sucrose (HFE/S) diet, HFE/S+carboxymethyl cellulose, HFE/S +Atorvastatin, HFE/S+Fish oil and HFE/S+Atorvastatin+Fish oil. Serum alanine aminotransferase, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high density lipoproteins, insulin, glucose, C-reactive protein and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index were measured. Also, hepatic TC, TG, malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) were determined. Liver sections were examined histopathologically. Atorvastatin improved lipid profile, inflammation and oxidative stress but did not improve insulin resistance, hepatic TGF-β1 or body weight while fish oil improved lipid profile, decreased inflammation and oxidative stress, improved insulin resistance, hepatic TGF-β1 and body weight compared to HFE/S group. Atorvastatin/fish oil combination produced significant improvement in the lipid profile, inflammation, oxidative stress, insulin resistance, hepatic TGF-β1 and body weight compared to the use of each of these drugs alone. This might be attributed to the effect of fish oil on the lipid profile, inflammatory cytokines, insulin resistance and TGF-β1 which potentiates the effect of atorvastatin on NASH.

  20. Prophylactic herbal therapy prevents experimental ascending urinary tract infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yan-Qing; Sun, Min; Chi, Ying

    2016-10-01

    To study the preventive effect of herbal formulation on experimental murine urinary tract infection (UTI) induced by Dr Escherichia coli 11128. E. coli 11128 carrying Dr fimbriae was isolated from patients with chronic pyelonephritis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of herbal solution for E. coli 11128 was determined for further studies. Forty C3H/HeJ mice were divided into the herb-treated group (n=20, given Chinese herbs by gavage at an average dose of 20 g/kg body weight daily 3 days before inoculation), and control group (n=20, given the same amount of distilled water by gavage). Three and 6 days after infection, bacteria were counted in the urine and the kidneys of the mice. Kidney histopathologic changes were evaluated. Neutrophils infiltration and accumulation were detected. The MIC value of herbal solution was 0.1 g/mL for the E. coli 11128. In herb-treated mice, there was a significant reduction in bacterial counts in urine and colonization densities of kidneys. Microscopic studies revealed signs of inflammation in kidneys. In herb-treated mice, herbal administration resulted in significantly reduced neutrophilic infiltrates (P<0.05). The semi-quantitative scores for renal lesions were significantly lower (P<0.05). Prophylactic administration of herbal formulation potentiated the effect in partially preventing experimental murine ascending UTI.

  1. Experimental study on asphaltene adsorption onto formation rock: An approach to asphaltene formation damage prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, G.; Barberis Canonica, L.; Galbariggi, G.; Bertero, L.; Carniani, C.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, through a comparative study on Static vs Dynamic adsorption of asphaltene onto formation rock, it is reported how, for the particular asphaltene/formation rock system here considered, the Dynamic asphaltene adsorption onto formation rock is a continuous phenomenon by which the quantity of adsorbed asphaltene increases continuously. In the authors` opinion this rather remarkable adsorption behavior may contribute to asphaltene formation damage. In the hypothesis that prevention may represent a more economical approach than removal, in this work is also reported a possible prevention approach based on formation rock treatment by means of specific chemicals more apt than asphaltenes to be adsorbed onto rock. As preliminary demonstration, with the aim at assessing qualitatively the potential of their approach, the authors have pre-treated the rock by means of commercially available asphaltene dispersant and flocculation inhibitors. Albeit the chosen additives are not commercialized on the base of their specific adsorption feature, a prevention effect has been effectively found. Experimental set ups and procedures used as a base for a test able to rank chemicals with respect to their asphaltene adsorption inhibitive effects are also reported.

  2. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  3. Treatment with N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline prevents experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Pablo; Liu, Yunhe; Liao, Tang-Dong; Chen, Xiaojuan; González, Germán E.; Bobbitt, Kevin R.; Smolarek, Derek; Peterson, Ed L.; Kedl, Ross; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine

    2012-01-01

    Myocarditis is commonly associated with cardiotropic infections and has been linked to development of autoimmunity. N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) is a naturally occurring tetrapeptide that prevents inflammation and fibrosis in hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases; however, its effect on autoimmune-mediated cardiac diseases remains unknown. We studied the effects of Ac-SDKP in experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM), a model of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that Ac-SDKP prevents autoimmune myocardial injury by modulating the immune responses. Lewis rats were immunized with porcine cardiac myosin and treated with Ac-SDKP or vehicle. In EAM, Ac-SDKP prevented both systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, remodeling as shown by hypertrophy and fibrosis, and cell-mediated immune responses without affecting myosin-specific autoantibodies or antigen-specific T cell responses. In addition, Ac-SDKP reduced cardiac infiltration by macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cells, pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-2, IL-17] and chemokines (cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, interferon-γ-induced protein 10), cell adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, L-selectin), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Ac-SDKP prevents autoimmune cardiac dysfunction and remodeling without reducing the production of autoantibodies or T cell responses to cardiac myosin. The protective effects of Ac-SDKP in autoimmune myocardial injury are most likely mediated by inhibition of 1) innate and adaptive immune cell infiltration and 2) expression of proinflammatory mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and MMPs. PMID:22923621

  4. Combined MMF and insulin therapy prevents renal injury in experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Zha, Dongqing; Xiang, Guangsheng; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Jia, Ruhan

    2006-12-01

    Conventional therapies for diabetic mellitus are not effective in preventing the progression from early diabetic nephropathy (DN) to end-stage renal disease. The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of DN has been implicated both clinically and experimentally, which provides an alternative therapeutic target for DN. Anti-inflammatory impact of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) alone and in combination with insulin had been observed in a rat model of experimental DN. In this study, the diabetic rats were subjected to different treatments. Compared to control, the expression levels of CD68, NGF, and NF-kappaB p65, as determined immunohistochemically, were elevated in diabetic rats. Treatment with combined MMF/insulin is associated with a significant reduction in renal tissue of NGF and NF-kappaB p65 expression, macrophage infiltration. It also partially improved the renal function and attenuated renal hypertrophy at early stage of DN. CD68 was found to positively correlate with urinary albumin excretion and NGF. The combined use of MMF/insulin seemed to offer more protections in rats with experimental diabetic renal injury, and the protective effects of MMF might be due to its anti-inflammatory actions through inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and reduction of T cells and macrophage infiltration and/or other kidney chemokine productions.

  5. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  6. Tramadol-induced hyperalgesia and its prevention by ketamine in rats: A randomised experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana; Aguado, Delia; Benito, Javier; García-Fernández, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2015-10-01

    Opioid analgesia not only reduces inhalational anaesthetic requirements but may also induce delayed hyperalgesia, with potential effects on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anaesthetics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the development of tramadol-induced hyperalgesia and the associated changes in MAC, and whether ketamine prevents both processes. A randomised, experimental study. Experimental Surgery Unit, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Thirty-nine adult male Wistar rats. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNT) were determined up to 21 days after the intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of tramadol (50 mg kg) with or without ketamine (10 mg kg), or 0.9% saline. The MNT and the MAC of sevoflurane were also assessed in a second experiment before, early (30 min) and 7 days after drug administration with the same treatments. The MAC and MNT were evaluated. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was employed to determine differences between treatments and times on MAC and MNT. Tramadol, alone or combined with ketamine, produced an early increase in MNT. However, tramadol given alone decreased MNT from day 1 up to 3 weeks, which was associated with an increase in the MAC of sevoflurane (P < 0.05; day 7). Ketamine administration prevented both the reduction in MNT and the increase in MAC (P > 0.05). Tramadol-induced hyperalgesia in the rat lasted for several weeks and was associated with an increase in the MAC of sevoflurane. Prior administration of ketamine blocked both phenomena.

  7. Experimental concepts for toxicity prevention and tissue restoration after central nervous system irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Nieder, Carsten; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Astner, Sabrina T

    2007-01-01

    Several experimental strategies of radiation-induced central nervous system toxicity prevention have recently resulted in encouraging data. The present review summarizes the background for this research and the treatment results. It extends to the perspectives of tissue regeneration strategies, based for example on stem and progenitor cells. Preliminary data suggest a scenario with individually tailored strategies where patients with certain types of comorbidity, resulting in impaired regeneration reserve capacity, might be considered for toxicity prevention, while others might be "salvaged" by delayed interventions that circumvent the problem of normal tissue specificity. Given the complexity of radiation-induced changes, single target interventions might not suffice. Future interventions might vary with patient age, elapsed time from radiotherapy and toxicity type. Potential components include several drugs that interact with neurodegeneration, cell transplantation (into the CNS itself, the blood stream, or both) and creation of reparative signals and a permissive microenvironment, e.g., for cell homing. Without manipulation of the stem cell niche either by cell transfection or addition of appropriate chemokines and growth factors and by providing normal perfusion of the affected region, durable success of such cell-based approaches is hard to imagine. PMID:17603905

  8. Prevention of chemically induced diabetes mellitus in experimental animals by virgin argan oil.

    PubMed

    Bellahcen, Said; Mekhfi, Hassane; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Hakkou, Abdelkader; Aziz, Mohammed; Bnouham, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    The argan tree plays an important socioeconomic and ecologic role in South Morocco. Moreover, there is much evidence for the beneficial effects of virgin argan oil (VAO) on human health. Thus, this study investigated whether administering VAO to rats can prevent the development of diabetes. VAO extracted by a traditional method from the almonds of Argania spinosa (2 mL/kg) was administered orally (for 7 consecutive days) to rats before and during intraperitoneal alloxan administration (75 mg/kg for 5 consecutive days). An alloxan diabetic-induced untreated group and treated by table oil were used as control groups. Body mass, blood glucose and hepatic glycogen were evaluated. In the present study, subchronic treatment with VAO at a dose of 2 mL/kg, before the experimental induction of diabetes, prevented the body mass loss, induced a significant reduction of blood glucose and a significant increase of hepatic glycogen level (p < 0.001) compared with the untreated diabetic group. In conclusion, the present study shows that argan oil should be further investigated in a human study to clarify its possible role in reducing weight loss in diabetics, and even in inhibiting the development or progression of diabetes. This antidiabetic effect could be due to the richness of VAO in tocopherols, phenolic compounds and unsaturated fatty acids. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Vinegar Treatment Prevents the Development of Murine Experimental Colitis via Inhibition of Inflammation and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fengge; Feng, Jiaxuan; Wang, Xinhui; Qi, Zhimin; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-02-10

    This study investigated the preventive effects of vinegar and acetic acid (the active component of vinegar) on ulcerative colitis (UC) in mice. Vinegar (5% v/v) or acetic acid (0.3% w/v) treatment significantly reduced the disease activity index and histopathological scores, attenuated body weight loss, and shortened the colon length in a murine experimental colitis model induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Further mechanistic analysis showed that vinegar inhibited inflammation through suppressing Th1 and Th17 responses, the NLRP3 inflammasome, and MAPK signaling activation. Vinegar also inhibited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis in the colitis mouse model. Surprisingly, pretreatment with vinegar for 28 days before DSS induction increased levels of the commensal lactic acid-producing or acetic acid-producing bacteria, including Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria, and Enterococcus faecalis, whereas decreased Escherichia coli levels were found in the feces of mice. These results suggest that vinegar supplementation might provide a new dietary strategy for the prevention of UC.

  10. Antiinflammatory Effect of Phytosterols in Experimental Murine Colitis Model: Prevention, Induction, Remission Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldini, Rita; Micucci, Matteo; Cevenini, Monica; Fato, Romana; Bergamini, Christian; Nanni, Cristina; Cont, Massimiliano; Camborata, Cecilia; Spinozzi, Silvia; Montagnani, Marco; Roda, Giulia; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Rosini, Francesca; Roda, Aldo; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Phytosterols, besides hypocholesterolemic effect, present anti-inflammatory properties. Little information is available about their efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of a mixture of phytosterols on prevention/induction/remission in a murine experimental model of colitis. Phytosterols were administered x os before, during and after colitis induction with Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) in mice. Disease Activity Index (DAI), colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress in the intestinal tissue (ileum and colon) and gallbladder ileum and colon spontaneous and carbachol (CCh) induced motility, plasma lipids and plasma, liver and biliary bile acids (BA) were evaluated. A similar longitudinal study was performed in a DSS colitis control group. Mice treated with DSS developed severe colitis as shown by DAI, colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress. Both spontaneous and induced ileal and colonic motility were severely disturbed. The same was observed with gallbladder. DSS colitis resulted in an increase in plasma cholesterol, and a modification of the BA pattern. Phytosterols feeding did not prevent colitis onset but significantly reduced the severity of the disease and improved clinical and histological remission. It had strong antioxidant effects, almost restored colon, ileal and gallbladder motility. Plasmatic levels of cholesterol were also reduced. DSS induced a modification in the BA pattern consistent with an increase in the intestinal BA deconjugating bacteria, prevented by phytosterols. Phytosterols seem a potential nutraceutical tool for gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases, combining metabolic systematic and local anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:25268769

  11. Caffeine prevents experimental liver fibrosis by blocking the expression of TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Arauz, Jonathan; Zarco, Natanael; Segovia, José; Shibayama, Mineko; Tsutsumi, Victor; Muriel, Pablo

    2014-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that caffeine exerts beneficial effects on the liver; however, the molecular mechanisms by which caffeine exerts beneficial effects on the liver are poorly defined. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of caffeine in preventing thioacetamide (TAA)-induced cirrhosis in rats. Cirrhosis was induced by chronic TAA administration and the effects of coadministration of caffeine for 8 weeks were evaluated, including control groups. The administration of TAA induced liver cirrhosis, which was inhibited by caffeine. Caffeine prevents elevation of liver enzymes. Liver histopathology and hydroxyproline levels were significantly lower in the rats treated with TAA plus caffeine compared with TAA only. Caffeine shows antioxidant properties by restoring the redox equilibrium [lipid peroxidation and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels]. Western blot assays showed blockade of the expression of transforming growth factor-β and its downstream inductor connective tissue growth factor. Similarly, caffeine decreases messenger RNA levels of these profibrogenic proteins. In addition, caffeine inhibits hepatic stellate cells because of blockade of the expression of α-smooth muscle actin; in the western blot assay, we also found low levels of mRNA of collagen α1. Zymography assays showed that caffeine had an effect on the activity of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, but no effect on the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, using RT-PCR. Our results show that caffeine prevents experimental cirrhosis; the mechanisms of action are associated with its antioxidant properties and mainly by its ability to block the elevation of the profibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor-β, which may be associated with attenuation of the inflammatory and fibrotic processes.

  12. Antiinflammatory effect of phytosterols in experimental murine colitis model: prevention, induction, remission study.

    PubMed

    Aldini, Rita; Micucci, Matteo; Cevenini, Monica; Fato, Romana; Bergamini, Christian; Nanni, Cristina; Cont, Massimiliano; Camborata, Cecilia; Spinozzi, Silvia; Montagnani, Marco; Roda, Giulia; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Rosini, Francesca; Roda, Aldo; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Phytosterols, besides hypocholesterolemic effect, present anti-inflammatory properties. Little information is available about their efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of a mixture of phytosterols on prevention/induction/remission in a murine experimental model of colitis. Phytosterols were administered x os before, during and after colitis induction with Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) in mice. Disease Activity Index (DAI), colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress in the intestinal tissue (ileum and colon) and gallbladder ileum and colon spontaneous and carbachol (CCh) induced motility, plasma lipids and plasma, liver and biliary bile acids (BA) were evaluated. A similar longitudinal study was performed in a DSS colitis control group. Mice treated with DSS developed severe colitis as shown by DAI, colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress. Both spontaneous and induced ileal and colonic motility were severely disturbed. The same was observed with gallbladder. DSS colitis resulted in an increase in plasma cholesterol, and a modification of the BA pattern. Phytosterols feeding did not prevent colitis onset but significantly reduced the severity of the disease and improved clinical and histological remission. It had strong antioxidant effects, almost restored colon, ileal and gallbladder motility. Plasmatic levels of cholesterol were also reduced. DSS induced a modification in the BA pattern consistent with an increase in the intestinal BA deconjugating bacteria, prevented by phytosterols. Phytosterols seem a potential nutraceutical tool for gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases, combining metabolic systematic and local anti-inflammatory effects.

  13. Go!: results from a quasi-experimental obesity prevention trial with hospital employees.

    PubMed

    LaCaille, Lara J; Schultz, Jennifer Feenstra; Goei, Ryan; LaCaille, Rick A; Dauner, Kim Nichols; de Souza, Rebecca; Nowak, Amy Versnik; Regal, Ronald

    2016-02-19

    Worksite obesity prevention interventions using an ecological approach may hold promise for reducing typical weight gain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Go!, an innovative 12-month multi-component worksite obesity prevention intervention. A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design was utilized; 407 eligible hospital employees (intervention arm) and 93 eligible clinic employees (comparison arm) participated. The intervention involved pedometer distribution, labeling of all foods in the worksite cafeteria and vending machines (with calories, step equivalent, and a traffic light based on energy density signaling recommended portion), persuasive messaging throughout the hospital, and the integration of influential employees to reinforce healthy social norms. Changes in weight, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, and dietary behavior after 6 months and 1 year were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included knowledge, perceptions of employer commitment to employee health, availability of information about diet, exercise, and weight loss, perceptions of coworker support and frequency of health discussions with coworkers. A process evaluation was conducted as part of the study. Repeated measures ANCOVA indicated that neither group showed significant increases in weight, BMI, or waist circumference over 12 months. The intervention group showed a modest increase in physical activity in the form of walking, but decreases in fruit and vegetable servings and fiber intake. They also reported significant increases in knowledge, information, perceptions of employer commitment, and health discussions with peers. Employees expressed positive attitudes towards all components of the Go! This low-intensity intervention was well-received by employees but had little effect on their weight over the course of 12 months. Such results are consistent with other worksite obesity prevention studies using ecological approaches

  14. An experimental evaluation of the All Stars prevention curriculum in a community after school setting.

    PubMed

    Gottfredson, Denise C; Cross, Amanda; Wilson, Denise; Rorie, Melissa; Connell, Nadine

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the effectiveness of a prevention curriculum, All Stars, as implemented in a year-long school-based after school program and provides an independent replication of the effects of All Stars on targeted mediators and problem behaviors using an experimental methodology. Middle school students (N = 447) who registered for the after school program were randomly assigned to the experimental or control condition. The sample included approximately equal proportions of males and females, was 70% African American, and 59% of the students received subsidized meals at school. All Stars was delivered with reasonable integrity to the program design, although with lower quality than reported in earlier efficacy trials. However, actual student exposure to the program was lower than expected due to low levels of attendance in the after school program. Students who ever attended received an average of 16 h of All Stars instruction. Results showed no differences between the treatment and control students at post-test on any of the outcomes or mediators. Further, no positive effects were found for youths receiving higher dosage, higher quality program delivery, or both. Insufficient time to achieve high quality implementation in the after school context and potential deviancy training are suggested as reasons for the failure to replicate positive program effects.

  15. Effects of magnesium salts in preventing experimental oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Yamaguchi, K; Morozumi, M

    1990-08-01

    Magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium sulfate, magnesium trisilicate, and magnesium citrate were added to a calcium-oxalate lithogenic diet in order to determine their effects in preventing lithogenesis. Male Wistar-strain rats which had been fed the glycolic-acid diet developed marked urinary calculi within four weeks. Rats in the magnesium-hydroxide, magnesium-citrate, and magnesium-trisilicate groups, however, had almost no stones in the urinary system. Rats in the magnesium-oxide and magnesium-sulfate groups showed significantly less effect than those in the former three groups. During the experimental period, the 24-hour urinary oxalate excretion and concentration were higher in the glycolic-acid group than in the other groups. The urinary citrate excretion and concentration were the highest in the magnesium-hydroxide and magnesium-citrate groups and higher in the magnesium-trisilicate and magnesium-oxide groups than in the magnesium-sulfate and glycolic-acid groups. Similar trends were observed in the urinary magnesium excretion and in its concentration. The urinary calcium excretion and concentration were higher in the experimental groups than in the glycolic-acid group. The urinary calcium/magnesium ratio remained mostly unchanged. Therefore, it can be concluded that alkaline magnesium salts increase the urinary calcium and magnesium concentrations, without changing the calcium/magnesium ratio, and inhibit urinary calculi formation, most likely by increasing the urinary citrate concentration.

  16. Interleukin 10 gene transfer prevents experimental colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, G; Xing, Z; Hogaboam, C; Gauldie, J; Collins, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The development of colitis in interleukin 10 (IL-10) deficient mice, together with the known anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of this cytokine have prompted consideration of IL-10 as a treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, studies using hrIL-10 in IBD models have yielded inconsistent results.
AIMS—To examine the therapeutic potential of overexpressing the IL-10 gene before and after the induction of experimental colitis in rats.
METHODS—Gene transfer was achieved by intraperitoneal injection of non-replicating human type 5 adenovirus bearing the IL-10 gene, either 24 hours before or one hour after intrarectal administration of dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in rats. Colonic damage and inflammation was assessed macroscopically and by measuring myeloperoxidase activity and leukotriene B4 concentrations.
RESULTS—Gene transfer increased IL-10 protein in serum for up to six days. IL-10 gene transfer prior to colitis improved colitis macroscopically and histologically, and significantly reduced colonic myeloperoxidase activity and leukotriene B4 concentrations. In contrast, IL-10 gene transfer after the onset of colitis had no beneficial effect.
CONCLUSIONS—Gene therapy using an adenovirus-IL-10 construct was successful in preventing but not in reversing experimental colitis in the rat.


Keywords: gene therapy; colitis; interleukin 10; adenovirus vector; leukotrienes; inflammatory bowel disease; maintenance therapy PMID:10673295

  17. Effect of anterior chamber air bubble on prevention of experimental Staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Morteza; Rahat, Feisal; Khalili, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadi, Farzin

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is a serious complication of penetrating ocular trauma and cataract surgery. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability of an anterior chamber air bubble to prevent experimental Staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis. The anterior chamber was opened with a clear corneal incision to drain the aqueous humor in one eye of 24 rabbits. S. epidermidis was injected into the anterior chamber. The infected rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. Animals in group 1 (n = 12) received an air bubble to reconstruct the anterior chamber, and animals in Group 2 (n = 12) received Balanced Salt Solution (BSS) for reconstruction. Clinical examination in each group was performed 2, 3 and 7 days after inoculation of the bacteria. Clinical examination scores were recorded. All eyes were enucleated for histophatological examination. Clinical endophthalmitis was seen in 7/12 (58.3%) in group 2, but in only 1/12 (8.3%) in group 1 (p = 0.027). Mean clinical scores of groups 1and 2 on the 3rd day were 2.6 +/- 1.4 and 7.2 +/- 1.7 respectively. (p < 0.001). The mean clinical scores of groups 1and 2 on the 7th day were 2.3 +/- 1.2 and 6.8 +/- 1.5 respectively (p < 0.001). Histopathological examination confirmed clinical findings. An air bubble in the anterior chamber may have protective effects against the development of experimental S. epidermidis endophthalmitis.

  18. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  19. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer prevention by dietary phytochemicals: From experimental models to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Maru, Girish B; Hudlikar, Rasika R; Kumar, Gaurav; Gandhi, Khushboo; Mahimkar, Manoj B

    2016-01-01

    Chemoprevention is one of the cancer prevention approaches wherein natural/synthetic agent(s) are prescribed with the aim to delay or disrupt multiple pathways and processes involved at multiple steps, i.e., initiation, promotion, and progression of cancer. Amongst environmental chemopreventive compounds, diet/beverage-derived components are under evaluation, because of their long history of exposure to humans, high tolerability, low toxicity, and reported biological activities. This compilation briefly covers and compares the available evidence on chemopreventive efficacy and probable mechanism of chemoprevention by selected dietary phytochemicals (capsaicin, curcumin, diallyl sulphide, genistein, green/black tea polyphenols, indoles, lycopene, phenethyl isocyanate, resveratrol, retinoids and tocopherols) in experimental systems and clinical trials. All the dietary phytochemicals covered in this review have demonstrated chemopreventive efficacy against spontaneous or carcinogen-induced experimental tumors and/or associated biomarkers and processes in rodents at several organ sites. The observed anti-initiating, anti-promoting and anti-progression activity of dietary phytochemicals in carcinogen-induced experimental models involve phytochemical-mediated redox changes, modulation of enzymes and signaling kinases resulting to effects on multiple genes and cell signaling pathways. Results from clinical trials using these compounds have not shown them to be chemopreventive. This may be due to our: (1) inability to reproduce the exposure conditions, i.e., levels, complexity, other host and lifestyle factors; and (2) lack of understanding about the mechanisms of action and agent-mediated toxicity in several organs and physiological processes in the host. Current research efforts in addressing the issues of exposure conditions, bioavailability, toxicity and the mode of action of dietary phytochemicals may help address the reason for observed mismatch that may ultimately

  20. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  1. [Inhibition of aldose reductase by Chinese herbal medicine].

    PubMed

    Mao, X M; Zhang, J Q

    1993-10-01

    Seven Chinese herbal drugs were screened for experimental inhibition of lens aldose reductase activity, among which quercetin exhibited potent enzyme-inhibitory activities in vitro. Its IC50 value was 3.44 x 10(-7) mol/L. It may be helpful in the prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic complications.

  2. Effectiveness of Hyalobarrier and Seprafilm to prevent polypropylene mesh shrinkage: a macroscopic and histological experimental study.

    PubMed

    Nohuz, Erdogan; Alaboud, Maher; Darcha, Claude; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Aublet-Cuvelier, Bruno; Jacquetin, Bernard

    2014-08-01

    Polypropylene (PP) mesh shrinkage represents a serious complication, as a significant cause of pain and recurrence of pelvic organ prolapse or ventral hernias, frequently requiring several surgical interventions. The retraction seems to be caused by the host, in response to the implantation, through the occurrence of periprosthetic adhesions and fibrosis. We hypothesized that avoiding the postoperative adhesions can prevent PP mesh shrinkage. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to three groups. A standardized hernia defect was induced on the abdominal wall, which was repaired using an extraperitoneal PP mesh alone (group 1), with application of a hyaluronate carboxymethylcellulose-based bioresorbable membrane (Seprafilm, group 2), or an auto-cross-linked polysaccharide hyaluronan-based solution (Hyalobarrier gel, group 3). Eight weeks after the procedure, a repeat laparotomy was performed. After scoring the adhesion and measuring the mesh surface, a microscopic study of the prosthesis-host tissue interfaces was performed. Group 1 displayed a median shrinkage of 29% of the mesh. The Seprafilm group (p = 0.0238) and Hyalobarrier gel group (p = 0.0072) displayed a significantly smaller reduction of 19.12 and 17 %, respectively. Control group 1 displayed a significantly greater adhesion score (30.40) than the Seprafilm (11.67, p = 0.0028) and Hyalobarrier gel groups (11.19, p = 0.0013). The fibrosis was reduced in the Hyalobarrier gel group only. This experimental study revealed that Hyalobarrier gel and Seprafilm can prevent PP mesh shrinkage and postoperative adhesions. They might be integrated in a mesh size-saving strategy, which should preserve the quality and durability of the surgical repair and limit the postoperative pain.

  3. Nrf2 and Snail-1 in the prevention of experimental liver fibrosis by caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo-Bastidas, Daniela; Oceguera-Contreras, Edén; Salazar-Montes, Adriana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Hernández-Ortega, Luis Daniel; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the molecular mechanisms involved in experimental hepatic fibrosis prevention by caffeine (CFA). METHODS: Liver fibrosis was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal thioacetamide or bile duct ligation and they were concomitantly treated with CFA (15 mg/kg per day). Fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltrate were evaluated and classified by Knodell index. Inflammatory infiltrate was quantified by immunohistochemistry (anti-CD11b). Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for collagen I (Col-1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). Activation of Nrf2 and Snail-1 was analyzed by Western-blot. TNF-α expression was proved by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, CAT activity was performed by zymography. RESULTS: CFA treatment diminished fibrosis index in treated animals. The Knodell index showed both lower fibrosis and necroinflammation. Expression of profibrogenic genes CTGF, Col-1 and TGF-β1 and proinflammatory genes TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1 was substantially diminished with CFA treatment with less CD11b positive areas. Significantly lower values of transcriptional factor Snail-1 were detected in CFA treated rats compared with cirrhotic rats without treatment; in contrast Nrf2 was increased in the presence of CFA. Expression of SOD and CAT was greater in animals treated with CFA showing a strong correlation between mRNA expression and enzyme activity. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that CFA inhibits the transcriptional factor Snail-1, down-regulating profibrogenic genes, and activates Nrf2 inducing antioxidant enzymes system, preventing inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:24379627

  4. Prevention or Modification of Epileptogenesis after Brain Insults: Experimental Approaches and Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Diverse brain insults, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, infections, tumors, neurodegenerative diseases, and prolonged acute symptomatic seizures, such as complex febrile seizures or status epilepticus (SE), can induce “epileptogenesis,” a process by which normal brain tissue is transformed into tissue capable of generating spontaneous recurrent seizures. Furthermore, epileptogenesis operates in cryptogenic causes of epilepsy. In view of the accumulating information about cellular and molecular mechanisms of epileptogenesis, it should be possible to intervene in this process before the onset of seizures and thereby either prevent the development of epilepsy in patients at risk or increase the potential for better long-term outcome, which constitutes a major clinical need. For identifying pharmacological interventions that prevent, interrupt or reverse the epileptogenic process in people at risk, two groups of animal models, kindling and SE-induced recurrent seizures, have been recommended as potentially useful tools. Furthermore, genetic rodent models of epileptogenesis are increasingly used in assessing antiepileptogenic treatments. Two approaches have been used in these different model categories: screening of clinically established antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for antiepileptogenic or disease-modifying potential, and targeting the key causal mechanisms that underlie epileptogenesis. The first approach indicated that among various AEDs, topiramate, levetiracetam, carisbamate, and valproate may be the most promising. On the basis of these experimental findings, two ongoing clinical trials will address the antiepileptogenic potential of topiramate and levetiracetam in patients with traumatic brain injury, hopefully translating laboratory discoveries into successful therapies. The second approach has highlighted neurodegeneration, inflammation and up-regulation of immune responses, and neuronal hyperexcitability as potential targets for antiepileptogenesis

  5. Prevention of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by a phage library-derived cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Natarajan; Im, Sin-Heyog; Balass, Moshe; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2000-01-01

    Many pathogenic antibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG), are directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). These antibodies are highly conformation dependent; hence, linear peptides derived from native receptor sequences are poor candidates for their immunoneutralization. We employed a phage-epitope library to identify peptide-mimotopes capable of preventing the pathogenicity of the anti-MIR mAb 198. We identified a 15-mer peptide (PMTLPENYFSERPYH) that binds specifically to mAb 198 and inhibits its binding to AcChoR. A 10-fold increase in the affinity of this peptide was achieved by incorporating flanking amino acid residues from the coat protein as present in the original phage library. This extended peptide (AEPMTLPENYFSERPYHPPPP) was constrained by the addition of cysteine residues on both ends of the peptide, thus generating a cyclic peptide that inhibited the binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR with a potency that is three orders of magnitude higher when compared with the parent library peptide. This cyclic peptide inhibited the in vitro binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR and prevented the antigenic modulation of AcChoR caused by mAb 198 in human muscle cell cultures. The cyclic peptide also reacted with several other anti-MIR mAbs and the sera of EAMG rats. In addition, this peptide blocked the ability of mAb 198 to passively transfer EAMG in rats. Further derivatization of the cyclic peptide may aid in the design of suitable synthetic mimotopes for modulation of MG. PMID:10639153

  6. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Flores, Alyssa M; Casey, Scott D; Felix, Christian M; Phuan, Puay W; Verkman, A S; Levin, Marc H

    2016-05-01

    Dry eye disorders, including Sjögren's syndrome, constitute a common problem in the aging population, with limited effective therapeutic options available. The cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a major prosecretory channel at the ocular surface. We investigated whether compounds that target CFTR can correct the abnormal tear film in dry eye. Small-molecule activators of human wild-type CFTR identified by high-throughput screening were evaluated in cell culture and in vivo assays, to select compounds that stimulate Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion across the ocular surface in mice. An aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine, CFTRact-K089, fully activated CFTR in cell cultures with EC50 ∼250 nM and produced an ∼8.5 mV hyperpolarization in ocular surface potential difference. When delivered topically, CFTRact-K089 doubled basal tear volume for 4 h and had no effect in CF mice. CFTRact-K089 showed sustained tear film bioavailability without detectable systemic absorption. In a mouse model of aqueous-deficient dry eye produced by lacrimal ablation, topical administration of 0.1 nmol CFTRact-K089 3 times daily restored tear volume to basal levels, preventing corneal epithelial disruption when initiated at the time of surgery and reversing it when started after development of dry eye. Our results support the potential utility of CFTR-targeted activators as a novel prosecretory treatment for dry eye.-Flores, A. M., Casey, S. D., Felix, C. M., Phuan, P. W., Verkman, A. S., Levin, M. H. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease. © FASEB.

  7. Alcohol prevention at sporting events: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    PubMed

    Durbeej, Natalie; Elgán, Tobias H; Jalling, Camilla; Gripenberg, Johanna

    2016-06-06

    Alcohol intoxication and overserving of alcohol at sporting events are of great concern, given the relationships between alcohol consumption, public disturbances, and violence. During recent years this matter has been on the agenda for Swedish policymakers, authorities and key stakeholders, with demands that actions be taken. There is promising potential for utilizing an environmental approach to alcohol prevention as a strategy to reduce the level of alcohol intoxication among spectators at sporting events. Examples of prevention strategies may be community mobilization, Responsible Beverage Service training, policy work, and improved controls and sanctions. This paper describes the design of a quasi-experimental control group study to examine the effects of a multi-component community-based alcohol intervention at matches in the Swedish Premier Football League. A baseline assessment was conducted during 2015 and at least two follow-up assessments will be conducted in 2016 and 2017. The two largest cities in Sweden are included in the study, with Stockholm as the intervention area and Gothenburg as the control area. The setting is Licensed Premises (LP) inside and outside Swedish football arenas, in addition to arena entrances. Spectators are randomly selected and invited to participate in the study by providing a breath alcohol sample as a proxy for Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC). Actors are hired and trained by an expert panel to act out a standardized scene of severe pseudo-intoxication. Four types of cross-sectional data are generated: (i) BAC levels among ≥ 4 200 spectators, frequency of alcohol service to pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to purchase alcohol at LP (ii) outside the arenas (≥200 attempts) and (iii) inside the arenas (≥ 200 attempts), and (iv) frequency of security staff interventions towards pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to enter the arenas (≥ 200 attempts). There is an urgent need nationally and internationally to

  8. Endovascular Coil Embolization of Segmental Arteries Prevents Paraplegia After Subsequent TAAA Repair – An Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Geisbüsch, S; Stefanovic, A; Koruth, JS; Lin, HM; Morgello, S; Weisz, DJ; Griepp, RB; Di Luozzo, G

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test a strategy for minimizing ischemic spinal cord injury (SCI) following extensive thoracoabdominal aneurysm (TAAA) repair, we occluded a small number of segmental arteries (SAs) endovascularly one week before simulated aneurysm repair in an experimental model. Methods 30 juvenile Yorkshire pigs (25.2±1.7kg) were randomized into three groups. All SAs—intercostal and lumbar—were sacrificed by a combination of surgical ligation of the lumbar SAs and occlusion of intercostal SAs with thoracic endovascular stent grafting (TEVAR). 7–10 days before this simulated TAAA replacement, SAs in the lower thoracic/upper lumbar region were occluded using embolization coils: 1.5±0.5 SAs in Group 1 (T13/L1), and 4.5±0.5 in Group 2 (T11-L3). No SAs were coiled in the controls. Hind limb function was evaluated blindly from daily videotapes using a modified Tarlov score: 0=paraplegia; 9=full recovery. After sacrifice, each segment of spinal cord was graded histologically using the 9-point Kleinman score: 0=normal, 8=complete necrosis. Results Hind limb function remained normal after coil embolization. After simulated TAAA repair, paraplegia occurred in 6/10 control pigs, but only 2/10 pigs in Group 1: no pigs in Group 2 had SCI. Tarlov scores were significantly better in Group 2 (Control vs 1 p=0.06; Control vs 2 p= 0.0002; 1 vs 2 p=0.05). A dramatic reduction in histologic damage—most prominently in the coiled region—was seen when SAs were embolized before simulated TAAA repair. Conclusions Endovascular coiling of 2–4 SAs prevents paraplegia in an experimental model of extensive hybrid TAAA repair, and helps protect the spinal cord from ischemic histopathological injury. A clinical trial in a selected patient population at high risk for postoperative SCI may be appropriate. PMID:24220154

  9. Eszopiclone Prevents Excitotoxicity and Neurodegeneration in the Hippocampus Induced by Experimental Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon J.; Xi, Ming-Chu; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Yamuy, Jack; Sampogna, Sharon; Tsai, Kevin L.; Lim, Vincent; Morales, Francisco R.; Chase, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: This study was designed to determine the effects of eszopiclone on apnea-induced excitotoxic synaptic processes and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Design: Recurrent periods of apnea, which consisted of a sequence of apnea (75% SpO2), followed by ventilation with recovery to normoxia (> 95% SpO2), were induced for a period of three hours in anesthetized guinea pigs. The CA3 Schaffer collateral pathway in the hippocampus was stimulated and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) response was recorded in CA1. Animals in the experimental group received an intravenous injection of eszopiclone (3 mg/kg) 10 min prior to the initiation of the periods of recurrent apnea, and once every 60 min thereafter; control animals received comparable injections of vehicle. At the end of the 3-h period of recurrent apnea, the animals were perfused, and hippocampal sections were immunostained in order to determine the presence of apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Analyses and Results: Apnea resulted in a persistent increase in synaptic responsiveness of CA1 neurons as determined by analyses of the fEPSP. Eszopiclone antagonized the apnea-induced increase in the fEPSP. Morphological analyses revealed significant apoptosis of CA1 neurons in control animals; however, there was no significant apoptosis in eszopiclone-treated animals. Conclusions: Eszopiclone was determined to suppress the apnea-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons, thereby reducing/eliminating neurotoxicity. These data lend credence to our hypothesis that eszopiclone, exclusive of its hypnotic actions, has the capacity to function as a potent neuroprotective agent. Citation: Fung SJ; Xi MC; Zhang JH; Yamuy J; Sampogna S; Tsai KL; Lim V; Morales FR; Chase MH. Eszopiclone prevents excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus induced by experimental apnea. SLEEP 2009;32(12):1593-1601. PMID:20041595

  10. Prevention of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by antibodies against α4βl integrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yednock, Ted A.; Cannon, Catherine; Fritz, Lawrence C.; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Steinman, Lawrence; Karin, Nathan

    1992-03-01

    EXPERIMENTAL autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory condition of the central nervous system with similarities to multiple sclerosis1,2. In both diseases, circulating leukocytes penetrate the blood-brain barrier and damage myelin, resulting in impaired nerve conduction and paralysis3-5. We sought to identify the adhesion receptors that mediate the attachment of circulating leukocytes to inflamed brain endothelium in EAE, because this interaction is the first step in leukocyte entry into the central nervous system. Using an in vitro adhesion assay on tissue sections, we found that lymphocytes and monocytes bound selectively to inflamed EAE brain vessels. Binding was inhibited by antibodies against the integrin molecule α4βl, but not by antibodies against numerous other adhesion receptors. When tested in vivo, anti-α4 integrin effectively prevented the accumulation of leukocytes in the central nervous system and the development of EAE. Thus, therapies designed to interfere with α4βl integrin may be useful in treating inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.

  11. Anti-IL-17A autovaccination prevents clinical and histological manifestations of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Uyttenhove, Catherine; Sommereyns, Caroline; Théate, Ivan; Michiels, Thomas; Van Snick, Jacques

    2007-09-01

    Excessive or inappropriate production of IL-17A has been reported in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and multiple sclerosis. The potential clinical relevance of these correlations was suggested by the protective effects of anti-IL-17A monoclonal antibodies in various mouse disease models. However, the chronic nature of the corresponding human afflictions raises great challenges for Ab-based therapies. An alternative to passive Ab therapy is autovaccination. Covalent association of self-cytokines with foreign proteins has been reported to induce the production of antibodies capable of neutralizing the biological activity of the target cytokine. We recently reported that cross-linking of IL-17A to ovalbumin produced highly immunogenic complexes that induced long-lasting IL-17A-neutralizing antibodies. Vaccinated SJL mice were completely protected against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by proteolipid protein peptide (PLP 139-151), and a monoclonal anti-IL-17A Ab (MM17F3), derived from C57Bl/6 mice vaccinated against IL-17A-OVA, also prevented disease development. Here we report that this Ab also protects C57Bl/6 mice from myelin oligdendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE. Histological analysis of brain sections of C57Bl/6 mice treated with MM17F3 showed a complete absence of inflammatory infiltrates and evidence for a marked inhibition of chemokine and cytokine messages in the spinal cord. These results further extend the analytical and therapeutic potential of the autovaccine procedure.

  12. Prevention of Intraabdominal Adhesions: An Experimental Study Using Mitomycin-C and 4% Icodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Urkan, Murat; Özerhan, İsmail Hakkı; Ünlü, Aytekin; Can, Mehmet Fatih; Öztürk, Erkan; Günal, Armağan; Yağcı, Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intraabdominal adhesions remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, intraabdominal adhesions can develop in more than 50% of abdominal operations. Aims: We compared the anti-adhesive effects of two different agents on postoperative adhesion formation in a cecal abrasion model. Study Design: Experimental animal study. Methods: Forty Wistar albino type female rats were anesthetized and underwent laparotomy. Study groups comprised Sham, Control, Mitomycin-C, 4% Icodextrin, and Mitomycin-C +4% Icodextrin groups. Macroscopic and histopathological evaluations of adhesions were performed. Results: The frequencies of moderate and severe adhesions were significantly higher in the control group than the other groups. The mitomycin-C and Mitomycin-C +4% Icodextrin groups were associated with significantly lower adhesion scores compared to the control group and 4% Icodextrin group scores (p=0.002 and p=0.008, respectively). The adhesion scores of the Mitomycin-C group were also significantly lower than those of the 4% Icodextrin group (p=0.008). Conclusion: Despite its potential for bone marrow toxicity, Mitomycin-C seems to effectively prevent adhesions. Further studies that prove an acceptable safety profile relating to this promising anti-adhesive agent are required before moving into clinical trials. PMID:28251021

  13. Preventing Pregnancy in High School Students: Observations From a 3-Year Longitudinal, Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Dierschke, Nicole; Lowe, Diana; Plastino, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess whether a sexual health education intervention reduces pregnancy rates in high school students. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a 3-year quasi-experimental study performed in South Texas from 2011 to 2015 in which 1437 students without a history of pregnancy at baseline were surveyed each fall and spring. Potentially confounding risk factors considered included sexual behaviors, intentions, and demographics. The outcome measure was self-reported pregnancy status for male and female students. We performed analyses for male and female students using separate discrete time-to-event models. Results. We found no difference in pregnancy rates between intervention and comparison students within the first 3 years of high school. Female and male students in the intervention groups had pregnancy hazard ratios of, respectively, 1.62 (95% CI = 0.9, 2.61; P = .1) and 0.78 (95% CI = 0.44, 1.48; P = .4) relative to the comparison groups. Conclusions. The educational intervention had no impact on the pregnancy rate. Social media tools in pregnancy prevention programs should be adaptive to new technologies and rapidly changing adolescent preferences for these services. PMID:27689503

  14. Small Heat Shock Protein αA-Crystallin Prevents Photoreceptor Degeneration in Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Narsing A.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Pararajasegaram, Geeta; Bhat, Suraj P.

    2012-01-01

    The small heat shock protein, αA-crystallin null (αA−/−) mice are known to be more prone to retinal degeneration than the wild type mice in Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis (EAU). In this report we demonstrate that intravenous administration of αA preserves retinal architecture and prevents photoreceptor damage in EAU. Interestingly, only αA and not αB-crystallin (αB), a closely related small heat shock protein works, pointing to molecular specificity in the observed retinal protection. The possible involvement of αA in retinal protection through immune modulation is corroborated by adaptive transfer experiments, (employing αA−/− and wild type mice with EAU as donors and Rag2−/− as the recipient mice), which indicate that αA protects against the autoimmune challenge by modulating the systemic B and T cell immunity. We show that αA administration causes marked reduction in Th1 cytokines (TNF-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ), both in the retina and in the spleen; notably, IL-17 was only reduced in the retina suggesting local intervention. Importantly, expression of Toll-like receptors and their associated adaptors is also inhibited suggesting that αA protection, against photoreceptor loss in EAU, is associated with systemic suppression of both the adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:22479415

  15. Pretreatment with Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent the experimental mucositis in Swiss mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The antimetabolite chemotherapy 5-Fluorouracil is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical cancer treatment. Although this drug is not specific for cancer cells and also acts on healthy cells, it can cause mucositis, a common collateral effect. Dysbiosis has also been described in 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis and is likely to contribute to the overall development of mucositis. In light of this theory, the use of probiotics could be a helpful strategy to alleviate mucositis. So the aim of this study was evaluate the impact of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii in a model of mucositis. Results After induced of mucositis, mice from the Mucositis groups showed a decrease in food consumption (p < 0.05) and therefore had a greater weight loss (p < 0.05). The treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii did not reverse this effect (p > 0.05). Mucositis induced an increase in intestinal permeability and intestinal inflammation (p < 0.05). There were no differences in mucosal lesions, intestinal permeability and sIgA secretion (p > 0.05) in mice pretreated with S. boulardii. Conclusions S. boulardii was not able to prevent the effects of experimental mucositis induced by 5- Fluorouracil. PMID:24721659

  16. Pretreatment with Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent the experimental mucositis in Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Tatiani Uceli; de Melo Silva, Brenda; Dias, Michelle Nobre; Paiva, Nivea Carolina; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Fernandes, Simone Odilia; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Dos Santos Martins, Flaviano; de Vasconcelos Generoso, Simone

    2014-04-11

    The antimetabolite chemotherapy 5-Fluorouracil is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical cancer treatment. Although this drug is not specific for cancer cells and also acts on healthy cells, it can cause mucositis, a common collateral effect. Dysbiosis has also been described in 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis and is likely to contribute to the overall development of mucositis. In light of this theory, the use of probiotics could be a helpful strategy to alleviate mucositis. So the aim of this study was evaluate the impact of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii in a model of mucositis. After induced of mucositis, mice from the Mucositis groups showed a decrease in food consumption (p < 0.05) and therefore had a greater weight loss (p < 0.05). The treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii did not reverse this effect (p > 0.05). Mucositis induced an increase in intestinal permeability and intestinal inflammation (p < 0.05). There were no differences in mucosal lesions, intestinal permeability and sIgA secretion (p > 0.05) in mice pretreated with S. boulardii. S. boulardii was not able to prevent the effects of experimental mucositis induced by 5- Fluorouracil.

  17. Effects of pyruvate salts, pyruvic acid, and bicarbonate salts in preventing experimental oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Yamaguchi, K; Tanaka, T; Morozumi, M

    1986-05-01

    Sodium pyruvate, potassium pyruvate, pyruvic acid, sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate were added to a calcium-oxalate lithogenic diet (a glycolic-acid diet) in order to determine their effects in preventing lithogenicity. Male Wistar-strain rats who had been fed the glycolic-acid diet developed marked urinary calculi within four weeks. Rats in the sodium and potassium pyruvate groups had, however, almost no stones in the urinary system. Rats in the bicarbonate and pyruvic-acid groups showed slightly less effect than those in the pyruvate groups. Urinary oxalate excretion was high in all the groups during the experiment. The urinary oxalate concentration was relatively higher in the sodium-pyruvate group, and significantly higher in the potassium-pyruvate group, than in the glycolic-acid group. Urinary citrate excretion was high both in the pyruvate and bicarbonate groups; the urinary citrate concentration was, however, significantly higher in the pyruvate groups than in the bicarbonate groups at the fourth experimental week. The urinary calcium and magnesium concentrations were irrelevant to the diets administered. Therefore, it can be concluded that pyruvate salts inhibit urinary calculi formation, not by decreasing oxalate synthesis, but by increasing the urinary citrate concentration; bicarbonate salts work in the same manner, but a little less effectively.

  18. Preventive Effect of Zea mays L. (Purple Waxy Corn) on Experimental Diabetic Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Thiraphatthanavong, Paphaphat; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-mee, Wipawee; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Tong-un, Terdthai; Suriharn, Bhalang; Lertrat, Kamol

    2014-01-01

    Recently, substances possessing antioxidant can prevent cataractogenesis of diabetic cataract. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the anticataract effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn), a flavonoids rich plant, in experimental diabetic cataract. Enucleated rat lenses were incubated in artificial aqueous humor containing 55 mM glucose with various concentrations of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) ranging between 2, 10, and 50 mg/mL at room temperature for 72 h. At the end of the incubation period, the evaluation of lens opacification, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and AR in lens were performed. The results showed that both medium and high doses of extract decreased lens opacity together with the decreased MDA level. In addition, medium dose of extract increased GPx activity while the high dose decreased AR activity. No other significant changes were observed. The purple waxy corn seeds extract is the potential candidate to protect against diabetic cataract. The mechanism of action may occur via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AR. However, further research in vivo is still essential. PMID:24527449

  19. Preventive effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) on experimental diabetic cataract.

    PubMed

    Thiraphatthanavong, Paphaphat; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Wipawee, Thukham-mee; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Terdthai, Tong-un; Suriharn, Bhalang; Lertrat, Kamol

    2014-01-01

    Recently, substances possessing antioxidant can prevent cataractogenesis of diabetic cataract. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the anticataract effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn), a flavonoids rich plant, in experimental diabetic cataract. Enucleated rat lenses were incubated in artificial aqueous humor containing 55 mM glucose with various concentrations of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) ranging between 2, 10, and 50 mg/mL at room temperature for 72 h. At the end of the incubation period, the evaluation of lens opacification, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and AR in lens were performed. The results showed that both medium and high doses of extract decreased lens opacity together with the decreased MDA level. In addition, medium dose of extract increased GPx activity while the high dose decreased AR activity. No other significant changes were observed. The purple waxy corn seeds extract is the potential candidate to protect against diabetic cataract. The mechanism of action may occur via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AR. However, further research in vivo is still essential.

  20. Prevention of Intraabdominal Adhesions: An Experimental Study Using Mitomycin-C and 4% Icodextrin.

    PubMed

    Urkan, Murat; Özerhan, İsmail Hakkı; Ünlü, Aytekin; Can, Mehmet Fatih; Öztürk, Erkan; Günal, Armağan; Yağcı, Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    Intraabdominal adhesions remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, intraabdominal adhesions can develop in more than 50% of abdominal operations. We compared the anti-adhesive effects of two different agents on postoperative adhesion formation in a cecal abrasion model. Experimental animal study. Forty Wistar albino type female rats were anesthetized and underwent laparotomy. Study groups comprised Sham, Control, Mitomycin-C, 4% Icodextrin, and Mitomycin-C +4% Icodextrin groups. Macroscopic and histopathological evaluations of adhesions were performed. The frequencies of moderate and severe adhesions were significantly higher in the control group than the other groups. The mitomycin-C and Mitomycin-C +4% Icodextrin groups were associated with significantly lower adhesion scores compared to the control group and 4% Icodextrin group scores (p=0.002 and p=0.008, respectively). The adhesion scores of the Mitomycin-C group were also significantly lower than those of the 4% Icodextrin group (p=0.008). Despite its potential for bone marrow toxicity, Mitomycin-C seems to effectively prevent adhesions. Further studies that prove an acceptable safety profile relating to this promising anti-adhesive agent are required before moving into clinical trials.

  1. Nonmyeloablative conditioning generates autoantigen-encoding bone marrow that prevents and cures an experimental autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Z; Chung, J-Y; Chan, J; Toh, B-H; Alderuccio, F

    2012-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases result from chronic targeted immune responses that lead to tissue pathology and disease. The potential of autologous hematopoietic stem cells transplantation as a treatment for autoimmunity is currently being trialled but disease relapse is an issue. We have previously shown in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) that the transplantation of bone marrow (BM) transduced to encode the autoantigen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) can prevent disease induction. However these studies were performed using lethal irradiation to generate BM chimeras and a critical factor for translation to humans would be the ability to utilize low toxic preconditioning regimes. In this study, treosulfan was used as a nonmyeloablative agent to generate BM chimeras encoding MOG and assessed in models of EAE induction and reversal. We find that treosulfan conditioning can promote a low degree of chimerism that is sufficient to promote antigen specific tolerance and protect mice from EAE. When incorporated into a curative protocol for treating mice with established EAE, nonmyeloablative conditioning and low chimerism was equally efficient in maintaining disease resistance. These studies further underpin the potential and feasibility of utilizing a gene therapy approach to treat autoimmune disease. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii Upregulates Interleukin-12 To Prevent Plasmodium berghei-Induced Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Settles, Erik W.; Moser, Lindsey A.; Harris, Tajie H.

    2014-01-01

    A chronic infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii has previously been shown to protect mice against subsequent viral, bacterial, or protozoal infections. Here we have shown that a chronic T. gondii infection can prevent Plasmodium berghei ANKA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with soluble T. gondii antigens (STAg) reduced parasite sequestration and T cell infiltration in the brains of P. berghei-infected mice. Administration of STAg also preserved blood-brain barrier function, reduced ECM symptoms, and significantly decreased mortality. STAg treatment 24 h post-P. berghei infection led to a rapid increase in serum levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). By 5 days after P. berghei infection, STAg-treated mice had reduced IFN-γ levels compared to those of mock-treated mice, suggesting that reductions in IFN-γ at the time of ECM onset protected against lethality. Using IL-10- and IL-12βR-deficient mice, we found that STAg-induced protection from ECM is IL-10 independent but IL-12 dependent. Treatment of P. berghei-infected mice with recombinant IL-12 significantly decreased parasitemia and mortality. These data suggest that IL-12, either induced by STAg or injected as a recombinant protein, mediates protection from ECM-associated pathology potentially through early induction of IFN-γ and reduction in parasitemia. These results highlight the importance of early IL-12 induction in protection against ECM. PMID:24396042

  3. The role of friends' disruptive behavior in the development of children's tobacco experimentation: results from a preventive intervention study.

    PubMed

    van Lier, Pol A C; Huizink, Anja; Vuijk, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Having friends who engage in disruptive behavior in childhood may be a risk factor for childhood tobacco experimentation. This study tested the role of friends' disruptive behavior as a mediator of the effects of a classroom based intervention on children's tobacco experimentation. 433 Children (52% males) were randomly assigned to the Good Behavior Game (GBG) intervention, a universal preventive intervention targeting disruptive behavior, and facilitating positive prosocial peer interactions. Friends' disruptive behavior was assessed from age 7-10 years. Participants' experimentation with tobacco was assessed annually from age 10-13. Reduced rates in tobacco experimentation and friends' disruptive behavior were found among GBG children, as compared to controls. Support for friends' disruptive behavior as a mediator in the link between intervention status and tobacco experimentation was found. These results remained after controlling for friends' and parental smoking status, and child ADHD symptoms. The results support the role of friends' disruptive behavior in preadolescents' tobacco experimentation.

  4. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  5. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  6. Prevention

    Treesearch

    Kerry Britton; Barbara Illman; Gary Man

    2010-01-01

    Prevention is considered the most cost-effective element of the Forest Service Invasive Species Strategy (USDA Forest Service 2004). What makes prevention difficult is the desire to maximize free trade and the resulting benefits to society while, at the same time, protecting natural resources. The role of science is to first identify which commodities pose an...

  7. Histochemical localization of nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, K C; Duke, S O

    1981-01-01

    NADH-dependent nitrate reductase (E.C. 1.6.6.1) was ultrastructurally localized in norflurazon-treated and control soybean cotyledons [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] by a method based upon the increase in osmiophilia due to the formation of an azo dye. The reaction product was observed in small vesicles throughout the cytoplasm. An apparent transport of nitrite to the plastid, the site of nitrite reduction, may occur through fusion of the nitrite-containing vesicles with the chloroplast envelope. Plants grown in tungstate lacked nitrate reductase activity as measured by standard assay procedures, and showed no increase in osmiophilia, suggesting a degree of specificity of this cytochemical procedure.

  8. Endovascular coil embolization of segmental arteries prevents paraplegia after subsequent thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair: an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Geisbüsch, Sarah; Stefanovic, Angelina; Koruth, Jacob S; Lin, Hung-Mo; Morgello, Susan; Weisz, Donald J; Griepp, Randall B; Di Luozzo, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    To test a strategy for minimizing ischemic spinal cord injury after extensive thoracoabdominal aneurysm (TAAA) repair, we occluded a small number of segmental arteries (SAs) endovascularly 1 week before simulated aneurysm repair in an experimental model. Thirty juvenile Yorkshire pigs (25.2 ± 1.7 kg) were randomized into 3 groups. All SAs, both intercostal and lumbar, were killed by a combination of surgical ligation of the lumbar SAs and occlusion of intercostal SAs with thoracic endovascular stent grafting. Seven to 10 days before this simulated TAAA replacement, SAs in the lower thoracic/upper lumbar region were occluded using embolization coils: 1.5 ± 0.5 SAs in group 1 (T13/L1), and 4.5 ± 0.5 SAs in group 2 (T11-L3). No SAs were coiled in the controls. Hind limb function was evaluated blindly from daily videotapes using a modified Tarlov score (0 = paraplegia, 9 = full recovery). After death, each segment of spinal cord was graded histologically using the 9-point Kleinman score (0 = normal, 8 = complete necrosis). Hind limb function remained normal after coil embolization. After simulated TAAA repair, paraplegia occurred in 6 of 10 control pigs, but in only 2 of 10 pigs in group 1; no pigs in group 2 had a spinal cord injury. Tarlov scores were significantly better in group 2 (control vs group 1, P = .06; control vs group 2, P = .0002; group 1 vs group 2, P = .05). A dramatic reduction in histologic damage, most prominently in the coiled region, was seen when SAs were embolized before simulated TAAA repair. Endovascular coiling of 2 to 4 SAs prevented paraplegia in an experimental model of extensive hybrid TAAA repair, and helped protect the spinal cord from ischemic histopathologic injury. A clinical trial in a selected patient population at high risk for postoperative spinal cord injury may be appropriate. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Naturalistic Experimental Designs as Tools for Understanding the Role of Genes and the Environment in Prevention Research.

    PubMed

    Leve, Leslie D; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Harold, Gordon T; Natsuaki, Misaki N; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Cresko, William A

    2017-01-16

    Before genetic approaches were applied in experimental studies with human populations, they were used by animal and plant breeders to observe, and experimentally manipulate, the role of genes and environment on specific phenotypic or behavioral outcomes. For obvious ethical reasons, the same level of experimental control is not possible in human populations. Nonetheless, there are natural experimental designs in human populations that can serve as logical extensions of the rigorous quantitative genetic experimental designs used by animal and plant researchers. Applying concepts such as cross-fostering and common garden rearing approaches from the life science discipline, we describe human designs that can serve as naturalistic proxies for the controlled quantitative genetic experiments facilitated in life sciences research. We present the prevention relevance of three such human designs: (1) children adopted at birth by parents to whom they are not genetically related (common garden approach); (2) sibling designs where one sibling is reared from birth with unrelated adoptive parents and the other sibling is reared from birth by the biological mother of the sibling pair (cross-fostering approach); and (3) in vitro fertilization designs, including egg donation, sperm donation, embryo donation, and surrogacy (prenatal cross-fostering approach). Each of these designs allows for differentiation of the effects of the prenatal and/or postnatal rearing environment from effects of genes shared between parent and child in naturalistic ways that can inform prevention efforts. Example findings from each design type are provided and conclusions drawn about the relevance of naturalistic genetic designs to prevention science.

  10. Resveratrol protects from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in the uterus and prevents experimental preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Bariani, María Victoria; Correa, Fernando; Leishman, Emma; Domínguez Rubio, Ana Paula; Arias, Andreína; Stern, Aníbal; Bradshaw, Heather B; Franchi, Ana María

    2017-08-01

    pregnant BALB/c mice with resveratrol prevented the LPS-induced preterm birth in 64% of the cases, whereas only 15% of mice with LPS alone escaped preterm birth. Treatment with resveratrol resulted in a reduced NOS activity (P < 0.05) in the uterus of LPS-treated mice. Similarly, resveratrol reduced the expression of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory agents such as iNOS (P < 0.05), COX-2 (P < 0.05), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) (P < 0.05) and anandamide (AEA) (P < 0.05). Moreover, resveratrol administration resulted in changes in the uterine endocannabinoid profiling altered by LPS. N/A. Since our experimental design involves the use of mice, the extrapolation of the results presented here to humans is limited. Our findings provide evidence for the tocolytic effects of resveratrol. Dr Ana María Franchi was funded by Agencia Nacional para la Promoción Científica y Tecnológica (PICT 2013/0097) and by Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (PIP 2012/0061). Dr Heather B. Bradshaw was funded by NIH (DA006668). The authors have no competing interests.

  11. [Experimental study prevention of reperfusion injury of skeletal muscle by local hypothermia and its clinical application].

    PubMed

    An, H; Jiang, D; Ni, W

    1997-01-01

    Local hypothermia as a preventive method to reperfusion injury of skeletal muscles was studied. Sixteen Japanese rabbits were divided into four groups at random. Before the tourniquet was inflated, a cold gel pack was applied to the right hind leg of each rabbit for 15 minutes to produce local hypothermic condition, without application of tourniquet the left hind limb was under local hypothermic condition as a control. The duration of tourniquet ischemia was 4 hours, and then reperfusion for one and two hours in the A and B groups respectively; in the C and D groups the duration of ischemia was 5 hours, and reperfusion for one and two hours, respectively. The muscle temperature averaged 16.6 degrees C with a needle thermocouple in the hind limb under local hypothermia. The serum K+, LA, SOD, LPO were determined from bilateral femoral veins, and electron and light microscopic studies of sural muscles were done in the post-reperfusion period. It was found that the K+, LA, LPO were lower than that of the control groups (P < 0.01), but SOD was higher than that of the control group (P < 0.01). Electron and light microscopic studies showed sight but reversible damage of muscular structure with the possibility of in the hypothermic groups cell regeneration. Basing on this experimental results, this method was applied in 45 cases reparative and reconstructive surgery of limbs. The duration of application of tourniquet averaged 2 hours and 57 minutes, the longest being 4 hours and 31 minutes, when the muscle temperature had reduced to 22.4 degrees C. There were no postoperative complications associated with this technique. Local hypothermia appeared to be a safe and effective method of decreasing the reperfusion damage after ischemia.

  12. Helping rural women in Pakistan to prevent postpartum hemorrhage: a quasi experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mir, Ali Mohammad; Wajid, Abdul; Gull, Sadaf

    2012-10-30

    According to the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey from 2006-2007, the maternal mortality ratio in rural areas is 319 per 100,000 live births. Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal deaths in Pakistan. The objectives of the study were to document the feasibility of distribution of misoprostol tablets by community-based providers mainly traditional birth attendants and acceptability and use of misoprostol by women who gave birth at home. A quasi-experimental design, comprising intervention and comparison areas, was used to document the acceptability of providing misoprostol tablets to pregnant women to prevent postpartum hemorrhage in the rural community setting in Pakistan. Data were collected using structured questionnaires administered to women before and after delivery at home and their birth attendants. Out of 770 women who delivered at home, 678 (88%) ingested misoprostol tablets and 647 (84%) ingested the tablets after the birth of the neonate but prior to the delivery of the placenta. The remaining women took misoprostol tablets after delivery of the placenta. Side effects were experienced by 40% of women and were transitory in nature. Among women who delivered at home, 80% said that they would use misoprostol tablets in the future and 74% were willing to purchase them in the future. Self-administration of misoprostol in the home setting is feasible. Community-based providers, such as traditional birth attendants and community midwives with proper training and counseling, play an important role in reducing postpartum hemorrhage. Proper counseling and information exchange are helpful for introducing new practices in resource-constrained rural communities. Until such a time that skilled birth attendance is made more universally available in the rural setting, alternative strategies, such as training and using the services of traditional birth attendants to provide safe pregnancy care, must be considered.

  13. Framing and personalizing informed consent to prevent negative expectations: An experimental pilot study.

    PubMed

    Heisig, Sarah R; Shedden-Mora, Meike C; Hidalgo, Pablo; Nestoriuc, Yvonne

    2015-10-01

    Informing patients about medical treatments and their possible side effects is ethically and legally obligatory but may trigger negative expectations and nocebo-related side effects. This pilot study aims to investigate the effect of different informed consent procedures on treatment expectations for adjuvant breast cancer treatments (Study 1: endocrine therapy; Study 2: chemotherapy). Using an experimental 2-factorial design, healthy women were informed about endocrine therapy (n = 60) or chemotherapy (n = 64) within a hypothetical scenario. Information was framed with or without treatment benefit information and delivered in a personalized or standardized interaction. Primary outcomes were necessity-concern beliefs about the treatment and side-effect expectations, secondary outcomes were decisional conflicts. In Study 1, side-effect expectations (η²p= .08) and decisional conflicts (η²p = .07) were lower when framed treatment information was given. Providing personalized information resulted in more functional necessity-concern beliefs (η²p = .06) and lower decisional conflicts (η²p = .07). Personalizing and framing of information resulted in more functional necessity-concern beliefs (η²p = .10) and lower decisional conflicts. In Study 2, necessity-concern beliefs were more functional with framing (η²p = .06). Participants in the personalized groups reported lower decisional conflicts (η²p = .06). No differences in side-effect expectations were revealed. This is the first study to provide evidence for optimized treatment expectations through altered informed consent strategies. The results emphasize that framing and personalizing informed consent can positively influence treatment expectations and reduce decisional conflicts. However, generalizations are impaired by the study's pilot character. The potential to prevent nocebo responses in clinical practice should be analyzed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Microbial products (biosurfactant and extracellular chromate reductase) of marine microorganism are the potential agents reduce the oxidative stress induced by toxic heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Gnanamani, A; Kavitha, V; Radhakrishnan, N; Suseela Rajakumar, G; Sekaran, G; Mandal, A B

    2010-09-01

    The present study demonstrates hexavalent chromium reduction and trivalent chromium tolerance behavior of marine Bacillus sp., MTCC 5514 through its extracellular enzyme reductase and biosurfactants production. The isolate reduces 10-2000 mg/L of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium with in 24-96 h respectively and the release of extracellular chromium reductase, found responsible for the reduction. Upon reduction, the concentration of trivalent chromium in the medium found comparatively less. Experimental results reveal, biosurfactants activity found responsible for the less concentration of Cr(III). Hypothetically, trivalent chromium upon formation get entrapped in the micelle of biosurfactants, prevents microbial cells from exposure towards trivalent chromium. Thus, the chosen isolate exhibit tolerance and growth with the increasing concentration of chromium.

  15. Enzyme toolbox: novel enantiocomplementary imine reductases.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Philipp N; Fademrecht, Silvia; Hofelzer, Sebastian; Pleiss, Jürgen; Leipold, Friedemann; Turner, Nicholas J; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-10-13

    Reducing reactions are among the most useful transformations for the generation of chiral compounds in the fine-chemical industry. Because of their exquisite selectivities, enzymatic approaches have emerged as the method of choice for the reduction of C=O and activated C=C bonds. However, stereoselective enzymatic reduction of C=N bonds is still in its infancy-it was only recently described after the discovery of enzymes capable of imine reduction. In our work, we increased the spectrum of imine-reducing enzymes by database analysis. By combining the currently available knowledge about the function of imine reductases with the experimentally uncharacterized diversity stored in protein sequence databases, three novel imine reductases with complementary enantiopreference were identified along with amino acids important for catalysis. Furthermore, their reducing capability was demonstrated by the reduction of the pharmaceutically relevant prochiral imine 2-methylpyrroline. These novel enzymes exhibited comparable to higher catalytic efficiencies than previously described enzymes, and their biosynthetic potential is highlighted by the full conversion of 2-methylpyrroline in whole cells with excellent selectivities.

  16. Steroidal pyrazolines evaluated as aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Mohamed M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Bhat, Mashooq A; Amr, Abdel-Galil E; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M

    2012-05-01

    The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibition of synthesized heterocyclic pyrazole derivatives fused with steroidal structure for chemoprevention of cancer is reported herein. All compounds were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Cyproterone(®)). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds were much more potent than the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC(50) of 80 μM. In addition, all the compounds displayed potent quinone reductase-2 inhibition. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors resulting from this study have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  17. Transcutaneous immunization as preventative and therapeutic regimens to protect against experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, L A; Clements, J D; Bakaletz, L O

    2011-01-01

    We have developed three nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) adhesin-derived immunogens that are significantly efficacious against experimental otitis media (OM) due to NTHI when delivered parenterally. We now expanded our preventative immunization strategies to include transcutaneous immunization (TCI) as a less invasive, but potentially equally efficacious, regimen to prevent OM due to NTHI. Additionally, we examined the potential of TCI as a therapeutic immunization regimen to resolve ongoing experimental OM. Preventative immunization with NTHI outer membrane protein (OMP) P5- and type IV pilus-targeted immunogens, delivered with the adjuvant LT(R192G-L211A), induced significantly earlier clearance of NTHI from the nasopharynges and middle ears of challenged chinchillas compared with receipt of immunogen or adjuvant alone. Moreover, therapeutic immunization resulted in significant resolution of established NTHI biofilms from the middle ear space of animals compared with controls. These data advocate TCI with the adhesin-directed immunogens as an efficacious regimen for prevention and resolution of experimental NTHI-induced OM. PMID:21326197

  18. Selenium prevents cognitive decline and oxidative damage in rat model of streptozotocin-induced experimental dementia of Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Ishrat, Tauheed; Parveen, Kehkashan; Khan, Mohd Moshahid; Khuwaja, Gulrana; Khan, M Badruzzaman; Yousuf, Seema; Ahmad, Ajmal; Shrivastav, Pallavi; Islam, Fakhrul

    2009-07-24

    Selenium (Se), a nutritionally essential trace element with known antioxidant potential, protects the brain from oxidative damage in various models of neurodegeneration. Intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) in rats causes impairment of brain glucose and energy metabolism along with oxidative damage and cholinergic dysfunction, and provides a relevant model for sporadic dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT). The present study demonstrates the therapeutic efficacy of Se on cognitive deficits and oxidative damage in ICV-STZ in rats. Male Wistar rats were pre-treated with sodium selenite, a salt of Se (0.1 mg/kg; body weight) for 7 days and then were injected bilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg), while sham rats received the same volume of vehicle. After two ICV-STZ infusions, rats were tested for memory deficits in passive avoidance and Morris water maze (MWM) tests and then were sacrificed for biochemical and histopathological assays. ICV-STZ-infused rats showed significant loss in learning and memory ability, which were significantly improved by Se supplementation. A significant increase in thio-barbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), protein carbonyl (PC) and a significant decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH), antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase [GPx] and glutathione reductase [GR]) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in hippocampus were observed in ICV-STZ rats. Se supplementation significantly ameliorated all alterations induced by ICV-STZ in rats. Our study reveals that Se, as a powerful antioxidant, prevents cognitive deficits, oxidative damage and morphological changes in the ICV-STZ rats. Thus, it may have a therapeutic value for the treatment of SDAT.

  19. Profound prevention of experimental brain metastases of breast cancer by temozolomide in an MGMT-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Duchnowska, Renata; Woditschka, Stephan; Hua, Emily; Qian, Yongzhen; Biernat, Wojciech; Sosińska-Mielcarek, Katarzyna; Gril, Brunilde; Stark, Andreas M; Hewitt, Stephen M; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Jassem, Jacek; Steeg, Patricia S

    2014-05-15

    Brain metastases of breast cancer cause neurocognitive damage and are incurable. We evaluated a role for temozolomide in the prevention of brain metastases of breast cancer in experimental brain metastasis models. Temozolomide was administered in mice following earlier injection of brain-tropic HER2-positive JIMT-1-BR3 and triple-negative 231-BR-EGFP sublines, the latter with and without expression of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). In addition, the percentage of MGMT-positive tumor cells in 62 patient-matched sets of breast cancer primary tumors and resected brain metastases was determined immunohistochemically. Temozolomide, when dosed at 50, 25, 10, or 5 mg/kg, 5 days per week, beginning 3 days after inoculation, completely prevented the formation of experimental brain metastases from MGMT-negative 231-BR-EGFP cells. At a 1 mg/kg dose, temozolomide prevented 68% of large brain metastases, and was ineffective at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg. When the 50 mg/kg dose was administered beginning on days 18 or 24, temozolomide efficacy was reduced or absent. Temozolomide was ineffective at preventing brain metastases in MGMT-transduced 231-BR-EGFP and MGMT-expressing JIMT-1-BR3 sublines. In 62 patient-matched sets of primary breast tumors and resected brain metastases, 43.5% of the specimens had concordant low MGMT expression, whereas in another 14.5% of sets high MGMT staining in the primary tumor corresponded with low staining in the brain metastasis. Temozolomide profoundly prevented the outgrowth of experimental brain metastases of breast cancer in an MGMT-dependent manner. These data provide compelling rationale for investigating the preventive efficacy of temozolomide in a clinical setting. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. The double task of preventing malnutrition and overweight: a quasi-experimental community-based trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Maternal-Child Pastoral is a volunteer-based community organization of the Dominican Republic that works with families to improve child survival and development. A program that promotes key practices of maternal and child care through meetings with pregnant women and home visits to promote child growth and development was designed and implemented. This study aims to evaluate the impact of the program on nutritional status indicators of children in the first two years of age. Methods A quasi-experimental design was used, with groups paired according to a socioeconomic index, comparing eight geographical areas of intervention with eight control areas. The intervention was carried out by lay health volunteers. Mothers in the intervention areas received home visits each month and participated in a group activity held biweekly during pregnancy and monthly after birth. The primary outcomes were length and body mass index for age. Statistical analyses were based on linear and logistic regression models. Results 196 children in the intervention group and 263 in the control group were evaluated. The intervention did not show statistically significant effects on length, but point estimates found were in the desired direction: mean difference 0.21 (95%CI −0.02; 0.44) for length-for-age Z-score and OR 0.50 (95%CI 0.22; 1.10) for stunting. Significant reductions of BMI-for-age Z-score (−0.31, 95%CI −0.49; -0.12) and of BMI-for-age > 85th percentile (0.43, 95%CI 0.23; 0.77) were observed. The intervention showed positive effects in some indicators of intermediary factors such as growth monitoring, health promotion activities, micronutrient supplementation, exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding. Conclusions Despite finding effect measures pointing to effects in the desired direction related to malnutrition, we could only detect a reduction in the risk of overweight attributable to the intervention. The findings related to obesity prevention may be

  1. Antibiotic embedded absorbable prosthesis for prevention of surgical mesh infection: experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Grau, J M; Morales-Conde, S; González Galán, V; Martín Cartes, J A; Docobo Durantez, F; Padillo Ruiz, F J

    2015-04-01

    Ventral hernias are a common problem in a general surgery and hernioplasty is an integral part of a general surgeon's practice. The use of prosthetic material has drastically reduced the risk of recurrence, but has introduced additional potential complications such as surgical wound infections, adhesion formation, graft rejection, etc. The development of a wound infection in a hernia that is repaired with a prosthetic material is a grave complication, often requiring removal of the prosthesis. This experimental study examined efficacy of completely absorbable, hydrophilic, PGA-TMC (polyglycolic acid-trimethylene carbonate) prosthesis impregnated with antibiotic for reduction of infectious complications. Antibiotic-impregnated PGA-TMC prostheses were placed intraperitoneally in 90 Wistar white rats that were randomized and distributed into four groups. Group 0 (23 rats): there were placed PGA-TMC prosthesis without antibiotic impregnation (control group). Group 1 (25 rats): meshes were placed and infected later with 1 × 10(8) UFC of S. aureus/1 ml/2 cm(2) (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD). Group 2 (21 rats): cefazolin-impregnated prostheses were placed (1 g × 100 ml, at the rate of 1 ml/cm(2) of prosthesis) and were subsequently infected with the same bacterial inoculate. Group 3 (21 rats): cefazolin-impregnated prostheses with double quantity of cefazolin and infected. A week later these animals were killed and specimens were extracted for bacterial quantification and histological studies. Evident decrease of bacterial colonization was observed in series 2 and 3 [the ones impregnated with cefazolin, in comparison with the group 1 (infected without previous antibiotic impregnation)] with statistically significant results (p < 0.00). Results were really positive when the antibiotic solution had been applied to the mesh. There have been formed adherences to the prosthesis when placing it in contact with

  2. Multilevel analysis quantifies variation in the experimental effect while optimizing power and preventing false positives.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Emmeke; Dolan, Conor V; Verhage, Matthijs; van der Sluis, Sophie

    2015-12-19

    In neuroscience, experimental designs in which multiple measurements are collected in the same research object or treatment facility are common. Such designs result in clustered or nested data. When clusters include measurements from different experimental conditions, both the mean of the dependent variable and the effect of the experimental manipulation may vary over clusters. In practice, this type of cluster-related variation is often overlooked. Not accommodating cluster-related variation can result in inferential errors concerning the overall experimental effect. The exact effect of ignoring the clustered nature of the data depends on the effect of clustering. Using simulation studies we show that cluster-related variation in the experimental effect, if ignored, results in a false positive rate (i.e., Type I error rate) that is appreciably higher (up to ~20-~50 %) than the chosen [Formula: see text]-level (e.g., [Formula: see text] = 0.05). If the effect of clustering is limited to the intercept, the failure to accommodate clustering can result in a loss of statistical power to detect the overall experimental effect. This effect is most pronounced when both the magnitude of the experimental effect and the sample size are small (e.g., ~25 % less power given an experimental effect with effect size d of 0.20, and a sample size of 10 clusters and 5 observations per experimental condition per cluster). When data is collected from a research design in which observations from the same cluster are obtained in different experimental conditions, multilevel analysis should be used to analyze the data. The use of multilevel analysis not only ensures correct statistical interpretation of the overall experimental effect, but also provides a valuable test of the generalizability of the experimental effect over (intrinsically) varying settings, and a means to reveal the cause of cluster-related variation in experimental effect.

  3. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; hide

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  4. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  5. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  6. Molybdenum effector of fumarate reductase repression and nitrate reductase induction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, S; Lin, E C

    1987-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the presence of nitrate prevents the utilization of fumarate as an anaerobic electron acceptor. The induction of the narC operon encoding the nitrate reductase is coupled to the repression of the frd operon encoding the fumarate reductase. This coupling is mediated by nitrate as an effector and the narL product as the regulatory protein (S. Iuchi and E. C. C. Lin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:3901-3905, 1987). The protein-ligand complex appears to control narC positively but frd negatively. In the present study we found that a molybdenum coeffector acted synergistically with nitrate in the regulation of frd and narC. In chlD mutants believed to be impaired in molybdate transport (or processing), full repression of phi(frd-lac) and full induction of phi(narC-lac) by nitrate did not occur unless the growth medium was directly supplemented with molybdate (1 microM). This requirement was not clearly manifested in wild-type cells, apparently because it was met by the trace quantities of molybdate present as a contaminant in the mineral medium. In chlB mutants, which are known to accumulate the Mo cofactor because of its failure to be inserted as a prosthetic group into proteins such as nitrate reductase, nitrate repression of frd and induction of narC were also intensified by molybdate supplementation. In this case a deficiency of the molybdenum coeffector might have resulted from enhanced feedback inhibition of molybdate transport (or processing) by the elevated level of the unutilized Mo cofactor. In addition, mutations in chlE, which are known to block the synthesis of the organic moiety of the Mo cofactor, lowered the threshold concentration of nitrate (< 1 micromole) necessary for frd repression and narC induction. These changes could be explained simply by the higher intracellular nitrate attainable in cells lacking the ability to destroy the effector. PMID:3301812

  7. Effects of heparin fractions on the prevention of skin necrosis resulting from adriamycin extravasation: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Askar, Ibrahim; Erbas, M Kemal; Gurlek, Ali

    2002-09-01

    Extravasation of a chemotherapeutic agent is one of the most frequent complications in cancer patients. Full-thickness skin necrosis often occurs after extravasation. Alternative approaches to treatment are local wound care, elevation, and hypothermia. It was shown that heparin prevents skin necrosis. In this experimental study, the effects of heparin fractions on the prevention of skin necrosis were compared by applying an extravasation model of Adriamycin in rats. Forty Sprague-Dawley male rats weighing 250 to 300 g were used. A total of 0.3 ml doxorubicin hydrochloride was administered subcutaneously to all rats. Ten minutes later, in the control group (group I), 1 ml normal saline was administered subcutaneously. In the first experimental group (group II), 100 U per day heparin sodium was administered in a volume of 1 ml subcutaneously. In the second experimental group (group III), nadroparin calcium (5 anti-Xa U per kilogram per day) was administered. In the third and last experimental group (group IV), dalteparin sodium (5 anti-Xa U per kilogram per day) was administered. All drugs were administered for 2 weeks. Necrotic areas were measured 4 weeks later. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance and the Mann-Whitney test. Heparin fractions caused a decreased ulcer rate and size than controls ( < 0.05). There was no superiority among heparin fractions. The authors think that low-molecular weight heparins are preferred, considering the higher risk of bleeding with unfractionated heparin.

  8. Fire prevention in Butte County, California ... evaluation of an experimental program

    Treesearch

    William S. Folkman

    1973-01-01

    An initial survey in 1964 measured the existing levels of knowledge and attitudes concerning use and abuse of fire in wildland areas among residents of Butte County, California. During the next 6 years, the California Division of Forestry carried out an intensive fire prevention program. A resurvey was conducted in 1970 to find out if any changes in levels of knowledge...

  9. Comparison of montelukast and cabergoline for prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: in an experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Akman, Levent; Sahin, Gulnaz; Erbas, Oytun; Aktug, Huseyin; Akdogan, Aysin; Goker, Ege Nazan Tavmergen; Taskiran, Dilek; Tavmergen, Erol

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is a serious iatrogenic complication that can occur during assisted reproductive techniques. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of the leukotriene receptor antagonist (montelukast) treatment in prevention of OHSS and compare to cabergoline treatment. Twenty-four immature female Wistar rats were assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group. In the remaining three groups, OHSS was induced through ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins. No treatment was given to Group 2. Group 3 was administered a low-dose 100 mg/kg cabergoline treatment and Group 4 was received 20 mg/kg montelukast. Body weight, ovarian weight, vasculary permability (VP), peritoneal fluid vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) values and VEGF immune-expression were compared between the groups. Both cabergoline and montelukast prevented progression of OHSS compared to the OHSS group. Body weight, ovarian weight, VP, peritoneal fluid VEGF values and VEGF expression were significantly lower in both cabergoline- and montelukast-treated rats than in those not treated OHSS group. In conclusion, montelukast is an effective option for prevention of OHSS, as well as cabergoline. Montelukast may be a new treatment option to prevent and control the OHSS.

  10. Characterization of anaerobic sulfite reduction by Salmonella typhimurium and purification of the anaerobically induced sulfite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hallenbeck, P.C. ); Clark, M.A.; Barrett, E.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium that lack the biosynthetic sulfite reductase (cysI and cysJ mutants) retain the ability to reduce sulfite for growth under anaerobic conditions. Here we report studies of sulfite reduction by a cysI mutant of S. typhimurium and purification of the associated anaerobic sulfite reductase. Sulfite reduction for anaerobic growth did not require a reducing atmosphere but was prevented by an argon atmosphere contaminated with air (<0.33%). It was also prevented by the presence of 0.1 mM nitrate. Anaerobic growth in liquid minimal medium, but not on agar, was found to require additions of trace amounts (10{sup {minus}7} M) of cysteine. Spontaneous mutants that grew under the argon contaminated with air also lost the requirement for 10{sup {minus}7}M cysteine for anaerobic growth in liquid. A role for sulfite reduction in anaerobic energy generation was contraindicated by the findings that sulfite reduction did not improve cell yields, and anaerobic sulfite reductase activity was greatest during the stationary phase of growth. Sulfite reductase was purified from the cytoplasmic fraction of the anaerobically grown cysI mutant and was purified 190-fold. The most effective donor in crude extracts was NADH. NADHP and methyl viologen were, respectively, 40 and 30% as effective as NADH. Oxygen reversibly inhibited the enzyme. The anaerobic sulfite reductase showed some resemblance to the biosynthetic sulfite reductase, but apparently it has a unique, as yet unidentified function.

  11. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  12. Preventive effect of Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1324 on Group B Streptococcus vaginal colonization in an experimental mouse model.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, P R; Juárez Tomás, M S; Leccese Terraf, M C; Nader-Macías, M E F

    2015-04-01

    To assess the preventive effect of different intravaginal (i.va.) doses of Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1324 against vaginal colonization by Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in a murine experimental model. The major virulence factors of four vaginal GBS clinical isolates were determined to select the most virulent strain and set up a murine model of streptococcal vaginal colonization. Later, the effect of four and seven doses of 10(8) viable cells of Lact. reuteri CRL1324 i.va. administered, prior to the GBS challenge was studied. Seven doses of lactobacilli were able to significantly reduce the number of viable GBS cells, while four doses showed no preventive effect. Both doses reduced the leucocyte influx induced by GBS. Seven doses caused a slight increase in the Lact. reuteri CRL1324 vaginal colonization compared with four doses and reduced murine vaginal pH compared to control mice. Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1324 evidenced a preventive effect on GBS vaginal colonization in an experimental mouse model. Maternal GBS colonization is one of the most important risk factors for developing disease in newborns. Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1324 could be considered as a new biological agent to reduce infections caused by this micro-organism. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  14. Experimental urethane anaesthesia prevents digoxin intoxication: electrocardiographic and histological study in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Princi, T; Delbello, G; Grill, V

    2000-10-01

    An electrocardiographic and histological study was performed in rabbit to detect the effects of urethane (ethyl carbamate) intraperitoneal (i.p.) anaesthesia in digoxin intoxication, since it has been previously shown that this anaesthetic and digitalis glycosides exert specific peripheral effects on the cardiovascular system involving central structures of the autonomic nervous system. We observed that i.p. urethane anaesthesia prevented the onset of the electrocardiographic signs of digitalis intoxication, as well as inhibiting the appearance of histological myocardial alterations after treatment with toxic digoxin doses. On the other hand, lethal arrhythmias and severe myocardial damage were observed in animals that had not undergone preliminary urethane anaesthesia. These results indicate that the effect exerted by urethane in preventing the toxic action of digoxin is probably due to a decrease of sympathetic activity in anaesthetized animals by centrally mediated sympathetic inhibition. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. Dietary Agents and Phytochemicals in the Prevention and Treatment of Experimental Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Arpit; Kaur, Kamaljeet; Hegde, Shweta; Kalekhan, Faizan M; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Fayad, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), consisting mainly of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), are important immune-mediated diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. The etiology of the disease includes environmental and genetic factors. Its management presents a constant challenge for gastroenterologists and conventional surgeon. 5-Amninosalicylates, antibiotics, steroids, and immune modulators have been used to reduce the symptoms and for maintenance of remission. Unfortunately, long-term usage of these agents has been found to lead to severe toxicities, which are deterrent to the users. Pre-clinical studies carried out in the recent past have shown that certain dietary agents, spices, oils, and dietary phytochemicals that are consumed regularly possess beneficial effects in preventing/ameliorating UC. For the first time, this review addresses the use of these dietary agents and spices in the treatment and prevention of IBD and also emphasizes on the mechanisms responsible for their effects. PMID:25379461

  16. Gene therapy based in antimicrobial peptides and proinflammatory cytokine prevents reactivation of experimental latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Espinosa, Octavio; Hernández-Bazán, Sujhey; Francisco-Cruz, Alejandro; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; López-Casillas, Fernando; Carretero, Marta; Del Río, Marcela; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) latent infection can lead to reactivation. The design of new strategies to prevent it is an important subject. B6D2F1 mice were infected intratracheally with a low dose of Mtb H37Rv to induce chronic infection. After 7 months, mice were treated with one dose of recombinant adenoviruses encoding TNFα, β defensin-3 and LL37. Immunosupression was induced 1 month later with corticosterone. In comparison with the control group, mice treated with adenoviruses showed significantly less bacterial load and pneumonia, the adenoviruses encoding TNFα and LL37 being the most efficient. Gene therapy based in a proinflammatory cytokine or antimicrobial peptides is a potentially useful system to prevent reactivation of latent tuberculosis.

  17. Prevention of leakage by sealing colon anastomosis: experimental study in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Slieker, Juliette C; Vakalopoulos, Konstantinos A; Komen, Niels A; Jeekel, Johannes; Lange, Johan F

    2013-10-01

    In colorectal surgery, anastomotic leakage (AL) is the most significant complication. Sealants applied around the colon anastomosis may help prevent AL by giving the anastomosis time to heal by mechanically supporting the anastomosis and preventing bacteria leaking into the peritoneal cavity. The aim of this study is to compare commercially available sealants on their efficacy of preventing leakage in a validated mouse model for AL. Six sealants (Evicel, Omnex, VascuSeal, PleuraSeal, BioGlue, and Colle Chirurgicale Cardial) were applied around an anastomosis constructed with five interrupted sutures in mice, and compared with a control group without sealant. Outcome measures were AL, anastomotic bursting pressure, and death. In the control group there was a 40% death rate with a 50% rate of AL. None of the sealants were able to diminish the rate of AL. Furthermore, use of the majority of sealants resulted in failure to thrive, increased rates of ileus, and higher mortality rates. If sealing of a colorectal anastomosis could achieve a reduction of incidence of clinical AL, this would be a promising tool for prevention of leakage in colorectal surgery. In this study, we found no evidence that sealants reduce leakage rates in a mouse model for AL. However, the negative results of this study make us emphasize the need of systemic research, investigating histologic tissue reaction of the bowel to different sealants, the capacity of sealants to form a watertight barrier, their time of degradation, and finally their results in large animal models for AL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention Methods of Natural Convection in Inclined Pipes - An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebach, Robin; Haberstroh, Christoph

    It is widely known in cryogenics that interconnecting pipework between warm and cold temperature level contribute to the heat intake of a cryogenic storage tank, especially under critical inclination. With the help of a recently published correlation the additional heat intake by possibly upcoming convection can be estimated. However, for practical application the knowledge of additional heat leaks is only one thing that matters. Rather interesting are methods for an effective prevention of natural convection even under critical inclinations. Within this paper we discuss several approaches which presumably have potential to reduce convective heat transfer. With the help of theoretical analysis and experiments in our test cryostat we evaluated the impact of all approaches with remarkable results. Further, a comparison was carried out with literature hints for the prevention of natural convection in pipes. As the main result of our study we could clearly distinguish the most effective prevention methods and even more interesting is the almost useless ones which have been anticipated as effective in literature.

  19. Preventing Depression in Later Life: Translation From Concept to Experimental Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Sriwattanakomen, Roy; Ford, Angela F.; Thomas, Stephen B.; Miller, Mark D.; Stack, Jacqueline A.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Kasckow, John; Brown, Charlotte; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The authors detail the public health need for depression prevention research and the decisions made in designing an experiment testing problem solving therapy as “indicated” preventive intervention for high-risk older adults with subsyndromal depression. Special attention is given to the recruitment of African Americans because of well-documented inequalities in mental health services and depression treatment outcomes between races. Methods A total of 306 subjects (half white, half African American) with scores of 16 or higher on the Center for Epidemiological Studies of Depression Scale, but with no history of major depressive disorder in the past 12 months, are being recruited and randomly assigned to either problem solving therapy-primary care or to a dietary education control condition. Time to, and rate of, incident episodes of major depressive disorder are to be modeled using survival analysis. Level of depressive symptoms will be analyzed via a mixed models approach. Results Twenty-two subjects have been recruited into the study, and to date eight have completed the randomly assigned intervention and postintervention assessment. Four of 22 have exited after developing major depressive episodes. None have complained about study procedures or demands. Implementation in a variety of community settings is going well. Conclusion The data collected to date support the feasibility of translating from epidemiology to RCT design and implementation of empirical depression prevention research in later life. PMID:18515690

  20. Role of Nd:YAG laser for prevention of neuroma formation: an in vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Elwakil, Tarek F; Elkharbotly, Ahmad

    2008-04-01

    Nerve transection is commonly followed by the development of neuroma at the proximal stump. It can be very painful especially at exposed sites. It may arise spontaneously or after mechanical irritation. Neuroma and its high recurrence rate might be resisting problems to treat. Various treatment modalities for neuroma and its recurrence have been proposed, but none has provided satisfactory results. The present study was conducted to evaluate the neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1,064 nm) nerve transection technique for prevention of neuroma formation. There were 48 facial nerves out of 24 Rex rabbits divided into two equal groups. The 24 left-sided facial nerves at group A were subjected to Nd:YAG laser for nerve transection, while the 24 right-sided facial nerves at group B were subjected to scalpel nerve transection. The results were grossly and histopathologically evaluated. Grossly, laser-transected nerves showed an infrequent incidence of neuroma formation. Histopathologically, laser-transected nerves showed photothermal degenerative changes of the axons and myelin sheaths with intact perineurium and endoneurium. No Schwann cell hyperactivity could also be elicited among laser-transected nerves. Nd:YAG laser was found to be an effective tool that could be applied, whenever it is possible, for division of major nerves to prevent the formation of the subsequent stump neuroma. Moreover, this technique should be considered during treatment of well-established neuroma to prevent the challenging reported high incidence of recurrence.

  1. Honey prevents oral mocositis in children undergoing chemotherapy: A quasi-experimental study with a control group.

    PubMed

    Kobya Bulut, Hacer; Güdücü Tüfekci, Fatma

    2016-12-01

    There are numerous pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options available in the treatment of oral mucositis. However, in spite of so many methods and products, medical professionals have not come to a consensus as to which of these offer the best results. This study was conducted to assess the effect of oral care with honey on children undergoing chemotherapy for the prevention and healing of oral mucositis. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on children undergoing chemotherapy. The study group consisted of 83 children who attended clinics and polyclinics for chemotherapy. All the children were included in the study period. The study was completed with a total of 76 children except for seven patients who were excluded from the study. The data were collected using a form and the World Health Organization Mucositis Assessment Index. The data were analyzed using percentage distributions, means, a chi-square test, a t-test, a variance analysis, and a Friedman test. Ethics approval of the study was obtained from the Institution Ethics Committee. It was found that the severity of oral mucositis in the children in the experimental group was significantly less than the control group. The mucositis recovery period in the experimental group was significantly shorter than the control group. Regular oral care with honey for children undergoing chemotherapy for hematological cancers prevents mucositis and also accelerates recovery of it when started after mucositis onset. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Superiority of preventive antibiotic treatment compared with standard treatment of poststroke pneumonia in experimental stroke: a bed to bench approach

    PubMed Central

    Hetze, Susann; Engel, Odilo; Römer, Christine; Mueller, Susanne; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Stroke patients are prone to life-threatening bacterial pneumonia. Previous experimental stroke studies have demonstrated that preventive antibiotic treatment (PAT) improves outcome compared with placebo treatment, which however does not model the clinical setting properly. Here we investigate whether PAT is superior to the current clinical ‘gold standard' for treating poststroke infections. Therefore, we modeled stroke care according to the current stroke guidelines recommending early antibiotic treatment after diagnosing infections. To reliably diagnose pneumonia in living mice, we established a general health score and a magnetic resonance imaging protocol for radiologic confirmation. Compared with standard treatment after diagnosis by these methods, PAT not only abolished pneumonia successfully but also improved general medical outcome. Both, preventive and standard antibiotic treatment using enrofloxacin improved survival in a similar way compared with placebo treatment. However, in contrast to standard treatment, only PAT improved functional outcome assessed by gait analysis. In conclusion, standard and preventive treatment approach reduced poststroke mortality, however at the cost of a worse neurologic outcome compared with preventive approach. These data support the concept of PAT for treating patients at risk for poststroke infections and warrant phase III trials to prove this concept in clinical setting. PMID:23361393

  3. Topical administration of DPP-IV inhibitors prevents retinal neurodegeneration in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Cristina; Bogdanov, Patricia; Solà-Adell, Cristina; Sampedro, Joel; Valeri, Marta; Genís, Xavier; Simó-Servat, Olga; García-Ramírez, Marta; Simó, Rafael

    2017-08-04

    The main aims of the present study were: (1) to assess the expression and content of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) in human and db/db mouse retinas, and in human vitreous fluid; and (2) to determine whether the topical administration of the DPP-IV inhibitors (DPP-IVi) would prevent retinal neurodegeneration and vascular leakage in db/db mice by reducing endogenous glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) degradation. To assess the expression and content of DPP-IV, human samples of vitreous fluid and retinas were obtained from participants with type 2 diabetes (n = 8) and age-matched non-diabetic individuals (n = 8), as well as from db/db (n = 72) and db/+ (n = 28) mice. The interventional study, which included 72 db/db mice, consisted of the topical administration (eye drops) of saxagliptin, sitagliptin or vehicle for 14 days. DPP-IV mRNA levels were assessed by RT-PCR, and protein content was measured by ELISA or western blotting. GLP-1 was assessed by immunofluorescence, and its downstream effector exchange protein activated by cAMP-1 (EPAC-1) was used as a measure of GLP-1 receptor activation. Retinal analyses were performed in vivo by electroretinography and ex vivo by RT-PCR (Epac-1, Iba-1 [also known as Aif1]), western blotting (EPAC-1, glial fibrillar acidic protein [GFAP], glutamate-aspartate transporter [GLAST]) and immunofluorescence measurements (GLP-1, GFAP, ionised calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 [IBA-1], TUNEL, GLAST, albumin and collagen IV). Glutamate was quantified by HPLC. In addition, vascular leakage was examined by the Evans Blue method. DPP-IV was present in human vitreous fluid but in a range 100-fold less than in plasma. Both mRNA levels and protein content were much lower in the retina than in the liver or bowel, but were significantly higher in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from diabetic donors in comparison to non-diabetic donors (p < 0.05). Topical treatment with DPP-IVi prevented glial activation, apoptosis and vascular

  4. Preventive effects of lignan extract from flax hulls on experimentally induced benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Simons, Rudy; Verbruggen, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Consumption of diet rich in lignans may decrease the risk of some chronic hormonal conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study investigated whether a lignan-rich extract from flaxseed hulls, LinumLife EXTRA (LLE), could prevent BPH using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Male Wistar-Unilever rats were randomly divided into four groups of 12 rats each: a negative control group fed with control diet and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of corn oil without TP, and three groups fed with control diet (positive control), diet containing 0.5% LLE (LLE 0.5) or 1.0% LLE (LLE 1.0) and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of TP in corn oil. Treatments with diets started 2 weeks before the induction of BPH and were carried out for 5 consecutive weeks. The influence of TP and LLE on body weight (BW), food and water consumptions, and enterolactone (ENL) levels in serum and urine of rats was examined at the end of the 5-week treatment period. TP significantly diminished the mean body weight gain (MBWG) of positive control rats and their food and water consumptions while LLE reduced significantly this MBWG reduction in a dose-dependent manner. The lignan-rich extract significantly inhibited TP-induced prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat BW) increase in comparison with positive controls (P<.001). This effect was dose dependent. Higher serum and urine levels of ENL correlated well with the dose of extract provided to rats. It was concluded that the lignan-rich flaxseed hull extract prevented the TP-induced BPH indicating it might be beneficial in the prevention of BPH.

  5. [Experimental research on the prevention of rabbit postoperative abdominal cavity adhesion with PLGA membrane].

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiubing; Pan, Yongming; Hua, Fei; Sun, Chaoying; Chen, Liang; Chen, Fangming; Zhu, Keyan; Xu, Jianqin; Chen, Minli

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the prevention of rabbit postoperative abdominal cavity adhesion with poly (lactic-co-glycotic acid) (PLGA) membrane and the mechanism of this prevention function. Sixty-six Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into normal control group, model control group and PLGA membrane group. The rabbits were treated with multifactor methods to establish the postoperative abdominal cavity adhesion models except for those in the normal control group. PLGA membrane was used to cover the wounds of rabbits in the PLGA membrane group and nothing covered the wounds of rabbits in the model control group. The hematologic parameters, liver and kidney functions and fibrinogen contents were detected at different time. The rabbit were sacrificed 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 weeks after the operations, respectively. The adhesions were graded blindly, and Masson staining and immunohistochemistry methods were used to observe the proliferation of collagen fiber and the expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) on the cecal tissues, respectively. The grade of abdominal cavity adhesion showed that the PLGA membrane-treated group was significant lower than that in the model control group, and it has no influence on liver and kidney function and hematologic parameters. But the fibrinogen content and the number of white blood cell in the PLGA membrane group were significant lower than those of model control group 1 week and 2 weeks after operation, respectively. The density of collagen fiber and optical density of TGF-β1 in the PLGA membrane group were significant lower than those of model control group. The results demonstrated that PLGA membrane could be effective in preventing the abdominal adhesions in rabbits, and it was mostly involved in the reducing of fibrinogen exudation, and inhibited the proliferation of collagen fiber and over-expression of TGF-β1.

  6. Prevention of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis by recombinant human interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ablake, Maila; Macrì, Battesimo; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2002-02-01

    We studied the effect of exogenously administered recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/Hej mice. IL-6 significantly reduced histological signs of EAO and appearance of delayed type hypersensitivity against the immunizing testicular germinal cells. The effect was seen even though the cytokine was administered for only 6 consecutive days and 2 weeks after immunization.

  7. Prevention of Histological Changes after Colonic Diversion in Rats: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    M, Pathak; M, Srinivas; A, Shariff

    2017-01-01

    AIM : To determine the beneficial effects of Glutamine, Psyllium, Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA), and Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK), in preventing the histological changes after diversion colostomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS : After ethical clearance, male wistar rats (n=40) underwent diversion colostomy. Rats were divided into five groups of 8 rats each. Each group was given, after diversion colostomy, per rectally, one of the five agents being tested as an enema (3 ml/kg/day). Group I: Normal saline. Group II: Glutamine Group III: Psyllium, Group IV: MAK. Group V: Short chain fatty acid. The rats were euthanised 45 days after performing diversion colostomy. Morphometrical analysis of defunctionalised colon was done. Statistical analysis was done using SSPS statistical analysis software. RESULTS : On comparison with Group I epithelial cell height and mucosal thickness was significantly higher in Group II. Muscularis externae thickness was significantly higher in Group III on comparison with Group I. Group V had least inflammatory changes. CONCLUSIONS : Atrophic and inflammatory changes in the diverted colon can be prevented by per rectal administration of Glutamine, Psyllium and Short chain fatty acids. PMID:28770123

  8. Cytoprotective drugs in the prevention of ethanol-induced experimental gastric mucosal damage: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, E; Carpino, F; Petrozza, V; Bianchi, G; Alberico, P; Melis, M; Carlei, F; Lygidakis, N J

    1993-04-01

    Various so-called "cytoprotective" agents (sucralfate, carbenoxolone, 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2, sulglycotide and Maalox TC) have been tested on rats, with the aim of quantifying their capability to prevent ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Rats fasted for 48 hours received 1 ml of 80% ethanol by oral gavage, after prior oral treatment with placebo or one of the above-mentioned drugs u.i.d. for 5 consecutive days. Six hours after ethanol administration, the animals were sacrificed and the stomach was removed and processed for computerized macroscopic assessment of the damaged surface and for structural (light microscopy) and ultrastructural (scanning and transmission electron microscopy) studies. The results obtained demonstrate that ethanol injury caused extensive mucosal necrosis of the glandular region of the stomach, an event that was effectively reduced in rats treated with 16,16-dm-PGE2, carbenoxolone or sulglycotide. These drugs appeared to preserve the mucosa, with morphology comparable to that of normal noninjured rats - in contrast to the other drugs investigated. These data confirm the cytoprotective properties of sulglycotide in particular, which was the most potent agent for preventing the development of ethanol-induced acute lesions of the gastric mucosa.

  9. A comparison between effects of pyruvate and herb medicines in preventing experimental oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Morozumi, M; Tanaka, T; Yamaguchi, K

    1986-08-01

    Sodium pyruvate, choreito (a herbal preparation), and urajirogashi (a herb) were added to a calcium-oxalate lithogenic diet (a glycolic-acid diet) to determine their effects in preventing lithogenicity. Male Wistar-strain rats which had been fed the glycolic-acid diet developed marked urinary calculi within 4 weeks. Rats in the groups fed a pyruvate diet had, however, almost no stones in the urinary system. The choreito and urajirogashi were slightly less effective than the pyruvate. Urinary oxalate excretion was high in all the groups during the experiment, especially in the pyruvate and the glycolic-acid groups, but, it was relatively lowered in the herb groups, especially towards the end of the experiment (p less than 0.05). Urinary citrate excretion was high in the pyruvate group, but it was significantly low in the other groups. In the choreito group, remarkable increases in urinary volume and magnesium excretion were observed; however, they were statistically non-significant and urinary calcium excretion was higher than in the glycolic-acid group during the experiment. Therefore, it can be concluded that choreito and urajirogashi may have some beneficial effect though any such effect is inferior to that of pyruvate, in preventing calculi formation, partly by decreasing the urinary oxalate excretion; increased urine volume and magnesium excretion may also have some other, additional effects in the choreito group.

  10. Adhesion-preventing properties of 4% icodextrin and canola oil: a comparative experimental study.

    PubMed

    Yigitler, Cengizhan; Karakas, Dursun Ozgur; Kucukodaci, Zafer; Cosar, Alpaslan; Gülec, Bülent; Akin, Mehmet Levhi

    2012-11-01

    Postsurgical abdominal adhesions are common, serious postoperative complications. The present study compared the usefulness of 4% icodextrin and canola oil in preventing postoperative peritoneal adhesions. Twenty-four Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. Following a laparotomy, a serosal abrasion was made by brushing the cecum, and 3 mL of 0.9% NaCl, 4% icodextrin, or 3 mL of canola oil were intraperitoneally administered for the control, icodextrin, and canola oil groups, respectively. The abdomen was then closed. All of the rats were sacrificed at day 10. Macroscopic, histopathological, and biochemical evaluations were performed. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and ANOVA tests. Macroscopic analyses revealed that both canola oil and 4% icodextrin reduced adhesion formation, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.17). The histopathological examinations revealed no significant differences in terms of giant cell, lymphocyte/plasmocyte, neutrophil, ICAM1, or PECAM1 scores. However, both canola oil and 4% icodextrin significantly reduced fibrosis (p = 0.025). In the canola oil group, the histiocytic reactions were significantly increased (p = 0.001), and the hydroxyproline levels were significantly lower than those in the other groups (p = 0.034). In the present study, canola oil was determined to be superior to 4% icodextrin in lowering hydroxyproline levels and increasing histiocytic reactions. Considering these results, we believe that canola oil is a promising agent for preventing adhesion formation.

  11. Prevention of Histological Changes after Colonic Diversion in Rats: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    M, Pathak; M, Srinivas; A, Shariff

    2017-01-01

    To determine the beneficial effects of Glutamine, Psyllium, Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA), and Maharishi Amrit Kalash (MAK), in preventing the histological changes after diversion colostomy. After ethical clearance, male wistar rats (n=40) underwent diversion colostomy. Rats were divided into five groups of 8 rats each. Each group was given, after diversion colostomy, per rectally, one of the five agents being tested as an enema (3 ml/kg/day). Group I: Normal saline. Group II: Glutamine Group III: Psyllium, Group IV: MAK. Group V: Short chain fatty acid. The rats were euthanised 45 days after performing diversion colostomy. Morphometrical analysis of defunctionalised colon was done. Statistical analysis was done using SSPS statistical analysis software. On comparison with Group I epithelial cell height and mucosal thickness was significantly higher in Group II. Muscularis externae thickness was significantly higher in Group III on comparison with Group I. Group V had least inflammatory changes. Atrophic and inflammatory changes in the diverted colon can be prevented by per rectal administration of Glutamine, Psyllium and Short chain fatty acids.

  12. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  13. Cysteine-286 as the site of acylation of the Lux-specific fatty acyl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Meighen, E A

    1997-04-04

    The channelling of fatty acids into the fatty aldehyde substrate for the bacterial bioluminescence reaction is catalyzed by a fatty acid reductase multienzyme complex, which channels fatty acids through the thioesterase (LuxD), synthetase (LuxE) and reductase (LuxC) components. Although all three components can be readily acylated in extracts of different luminescent bacteria, this complex has been successfully purified only from Photobacterium phosphoreum and the sites of acylation identified on LuxD and LuxE. To identify the acylation site on LuxC, the nucleotide sequence of P. phosphoreum luxC has been determined and the gene expressed in a mutant Escherichia coli strain. Even in crude extracts, the acylated reductase intermediate as well as acyl-CoA reductase activity could be readily detected, providing the basis for analysis of mutant reductases. Comparison of the amino-acid sequences of LuxC from P. phosphoreum, P. leiognathi and other luminescent bacteria, showed that only three cysteine residues (C171, C279, and C286) were conserved. As a cysteine residue on LuxC has been implicated in fatty acyl transfer, each of the conserved cysteine residues of the P. phosphoreum and P. leiognathi reductases was converted to a serine residue, and the properties of the mutant proteins examined. Only mutation of C286-blocked reductase activity and prevented formation of the acylated reductase intermediate, showing that C286 is the site of acylation on LuxC.

  14. Aqueous garlic extracts prevent oxidative stress and vascular remodeling in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Prieto, Marcela Alejandra; González, Roxana Elizabeth; Renna, Nicolás Federico; Galmarini, Claudio Rómulo; Miatello, Roberto Miguel

    2010-06-09

    The organosulfur profile and the effect on oxidative stress and vascular remodeling in fructose-fed rats (FFR) were evaluated in Fuego INTA and Morado INTA garlic cultivars. Wistar rats were fed either normal rat chow (control) or the same diet plus 10% fructose in drinking water. During the last 6 weeks of a 12 week period of the corresponding diet, a subgroup of control and FFR received an aqueous extract of Fuego INTA and Morado INTA. Fuego INTA showed higher levels of total thiosulfinates, allicin, and pungency than Morado INTA. FFR showed an increase of systolic blood pressure, aortic NAD(P)H oxidase activity, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and vascular remodeling that was significantly reduced after both garlic administrations. The beneficial effect was slightly higher when Fuego INTA was administered. Both aqueous garlic extracts prevent oxidative stress and vascular remodeling in rats with metabolic syndrome, suggesting the existence of slight differences among cultivars.

  15. Chinese Herbal Compounds for the Prevention and Treatment of Atherosclerosis: Experimental Evidence and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianping; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Wang, Jing; Li, Jiqiang; Janicki, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. Research into the disease has led to many compelling hypotheses regarding the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic lesion formation and the resulting complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Herbal medicine has been widely used in China as well as other Asian countries for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases for hundreds of years; however, the mechanisms of action of Chinese herbal medicine in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis have not been well studied. In this review, we briefly describe the mechanisms of atherogenesis and then summarize the research that has been performed in recent years regarding the effectiveness and mechanisms of antiatherogenic Chinese herbal compounds in an attempt to build a bridge between traditional Chinese medicine and cellular and molecular cardiovascular medicine. PMID:26089946

  16. High density lipoproteins and prevention of experimental atherosclerosis with special reference to tree shrews.

    PubMed

    She, M P; Xia, R Y; Ran, B F; Wong, Z L

    1990-01-01

    According to data obtained from epidemiological and experimental survey, serum HDL level is known to be correlated conversely with the incidence of atherosclerosis. Experimental data collected in this article explained part of its mechanism, which is described in four parts as follows: 1. The result of 3 successive experiments on experimental atherosclerosis in tree shrews (total of 96 animals available including 40 as the controls) showed that the serum HDL level had been kept persistantly to 69-88% of the total serum lipoproteins even after a high cholesterol intake for 32 weeks. The incidence of atheromatous lesions developed was only 0-9%, but the incidence of gall stone was very high, 48-84% by gross examination by the end of these experiments. 2. HDL are also capable of (1) promotion of monocyte migration activity; (2) enhancement of cholesterol clearance rate of aortic smooth muscle cells originally isolated from either rabbits or tree shrews; (3) inhibition of 20% of LDL degradation but with no inhibitory effect obtained on Ac-LDL degradation in the endothelial cells; (4) presence of specific binding sites for apo E free HDL on the surface of aortic smooth muscle cells from either rabbits or tree shrews which recognizes apo A1 as a ligand. 3. Data from 2 successive experiments in rabbits showed that HDL lipoproteins (mainly apo A1) possess an inhibitory effect on the development of atheromatous plaques, but not a very strong one. 4. The colesterol clearance effect of smooth muscle cells was markedly enhanced by apo A1/phospholipid liposomes (the apo A1 used was isolated from either rabbit's or tree shrew's serum) in vitro.

  17. Adhesion-preventing properties of 4% icodextrin and canola oil: a comparative experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Yigitler, Cengizhan; Karakas, Dursun Ozgur; Kucukodacı, Zafer; Cosar, Alpaslan; Gülec, Bülent; Akin, Mehmet Levhi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Postsurgical abdominal adhesions are common, serious postoperative complications. The present study compared the usefulness of 4% icodextrin and canola oil in preventing postoperative peritoneal adhesions. METHODS: Twenty-four Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. Following a laparotomy, a serosal abrasion was made by brushing the cecum, and 3 mL of 0.9% NaCl, 4% icodextrin, or 3 mL of canola oil were intraperitoneally administered for the control, icodextrin, and canola oil groups, respectively. The abdomen was then closed. All of the rats were sacrificed at day 10. Macroscopic, histopathological, and biochemical evaluations were performed. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and ANOVA tests. RESULTS: Macroscopic analyses revealed that both canola oil and 4% icodextrin reduced adhesion formation, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.17). The histopathological examinations revealed no significant differences in terms of giant cell, lymphocyte/plasmocyte, neutrophil, ICAM1, or PECAM1 scores. However, both canola oil and 4% icodextrin significantly reduced fibrosis (p = 0.025). In the canola oil group, the histiocytic reactions were significantly increased (p = 0.001), and the hydroxyproline levels were significantly lower than those in the other groups (p = 0.034). CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, canola oil was determined to be superior to 4% icodextrin in lowering hydroxyproline levels and increasing histiocytic reactions. Considering these results, we believe that canola oil is a promising agent for preventing adhesion formation. PMID:23184208

  18. Methylene blue prevents retinal damage in an experimental model of ischemic proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Rey-Funes, Manuel; Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Fernández, Juan C; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Inserra, Pablo I F; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; López-Costa, Juan J; Dorfman, Verónica B; Martínez, Alfredo; Loidl, César F

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia induces retinal lesions, generating ischemic proliferative retinopathy, which may result in blindness. Previously, we showed that the nitrergic system was involved in the physiopathology of perinatal asphyxia. Here we analyze the application of methylene blue, a well-known soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, as a therapeutic strategy to prevent retinopathy. Male rats (n = 28 per group) were treated in different ways: 1) control group comprised born-to-term animals; 2) methylene blue group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery; 3) perinatal asphyxia (PA) group comprised rats exposed to perinatal asphyxia (20 min at 37°C); and 4) methylene blue-PA group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery, and then the pups were subjected to PA as above. For molecular studies, mRNA was obtained at different times after asphyxia, and tissue was collected at 30 days for morphological and biochemical analysis. Perinatal asphyxia produced significant gliosis, angiogenesis, and thickening of the inner retina. Methylene blue treatment reduced these parameters. Perinatal asphyxia resulted in a significant elevation of the nitrergic system as shown by NO synthase (NOS) activity assays, Western blotting, and (immuno)histochemistry for the neuronal isoform of NOS and NADPH-diaphorase activity. All these parameters were also normalized by the treatment. In addition, methylene blue induced the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic peptide, pigment epithelium-derived factor. Application of methylene blue reduced morphological and biochemical parameters of retinopathy. This finding suggests the use of methylene blue as a new treatment to prevent or decrease retinal damage in the context of ischemic proliferative retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Preventive activity of banana peel polyphenols on CCl4-induced experimental hepatic injury in Kunming mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, RUI; FENG, XIA; ZHU, KAI; ZHAO, XIN; SUO, HUAYI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the preventive effects of banana peel polyphenols (BPPs) against hepatic injury. Mice were divide into normal, control, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg banana peel polyphenol and silymarin groups. All the mice except normal mice were induced with hepatic damage using CCl4. The serum and tissue levels of mice were determined by a kit and the tissues were further examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. BPPs reduced the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase in a CCl4-induced mouse model of hepatic injury. Furthermore, BPPs reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and triglyceride, while increasing glutathione levels in the serum and liver tissues of mice. In addition, the effects of 200 mg/kg treatment were more evident, and these effects were comparable to those of the drug silymarin. Serum levels of the cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon-γ, were reduced in the mice treated with BPPs compared with injury control group mice, and these levels were comparable to those of the normal and silymarin-treated groups. Histopathological examination indicated that BPPs were able to reduce the extent of CCl4-induced liver tissue injury and protect the liver cells. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of the inflammation-associated factors cyclooxygenase-2, nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α and IL-1β were reduced in mice treated with BPPs compared with the control group mice. Mice that received 200 mg/kg BPP exhibited reduced expression levels of these factors compared with mice that received 100 mg/kg BPP. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that BPPs exert a good preventive effect against hepatic injury. PMID:27168833

  20. Total glucosides of paeony prevents juxta-articular bone loss in experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) is a biologically active compound extracted from Paeony root. TGP has been used in rheumatoid arthritis therapy for many years. However, the mechanism by which TGP prevents bone loss has been less explored. Methods TGP was orally administered for 3 months to New Zealand rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Digital x-ray knee images and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the subchondral knee bone were performed before sacrifice. Chondrocytes were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histological analysis and mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were evaluated in joint tissues. Results The BMD value in TGP rabbits was significantly higher compared with that seen in the AIA model rabbits. In addition, the subchondral bone plate was almost completely preserved by TGP treatment, while there was a decrease in bone plate integrity in AIA rabbits. There was less damage to the chondrocytes of the TGP treated group. Immunohistochemical examination of the TGP group showed that a higher percentage of TGP treated chondrocytes expressed OPG as compared to the chondrocytes isolated from AIA treated animals. In contrast, RANKL expression was significantly decreased in the TGP treated group compared to the AIA group. In support of the immunohistochemistry data, the expression of RANKL mRNA was decreased and OPG mRNA expression was enhanced in the TGP group when compared to that of the AIA model group. Conclusion These results reveal that TGP suppresses juxta-articular osteoporosis and prevents subchondral bone loss. The decreased RANKL and increased OPG expression seen in TGP treated animals could explain how administration of TGP maintains higher BMD. PMID:23870279

  1. Preventive activity of banana peel polyphenols on CCl4-induced experimental hepatic injury in Kunming mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Feng, Xia; Zhu, Kai; Zhao, Xin; Suo, Huayi

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the preventive effects of banana peel polyphenols (BPPs) against hepatic injury. Mice were divide into normal, control, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg banana peel polyphenol and silymarin groups. All the mice except normal mice were induced with hepatic damage using CCl4. The serum and tissue levels of mice were determined by a kit and the tissues were further examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. BPPs reduced the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase in a CCl4-induced mouse model of hepatic injury. Furthermore, BPPs reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and triglyceride, while increasing glutathione levels in the serum and liver tissues of mice. In addition, the effects of 200 mg/kg treatment were more evident, and these effects were comparable to those of the drug silymarin. Serum levels of the cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon-γ, were reduced in the mice treated with BPPs compared with injury control group mice, and these levels were comparable to those of the normal and silymarin-treated groups. Histopathological examination indicated that BPPs were able to reduce the extent of CCl4-induced liver tissue injury and protect the liver cells. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of the inflammation-associated factors cyclooxygenase-2, nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α and IL-1β were reduced in mice treated with BPPs compared with the control group mice. Mice that received 200 mg/kg BPP exhibited reduced expression levels of these factors compared with mice that received 100 mg/kg BPP. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that BPPs exert a good preventive effect against hepatic injury.

  2. Topical Administration of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Prevents Retinal Neurodegeneration in Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Cristina; Bogdanov, Patricia; Corraliza, Lidia; García-Ramírez, Marta; Solà-Adell, Cristina; Arranz, José A; Arroba, Ana I; Valverde, Angela M; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system and the retina is ontogenically a brain-derived tissue, the aims of the current study were as follows: 1) to examine the expression and content of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in human and db/db mice retinas; 2) to determine the retinal neuroprotective effects of systemic and topical administration (eye drops) of GLP-1R agonists in db/db mice; and 3) to examine the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. We have found abundant expression of GLP-1R in the human retina and retinas from db/db mice. Moreover, we have demonstrated that systemic administration of a GLP-1R agonist (liraglutide) prevents retinal neurodegeneration (glial activation, neural apoptosis, and electroretinographical abnormalities). This effect can be attributed to a significant reduction of extracellular glutamate and an increase of prosurvival signaling pathways. We have found a similar neuroprotective effect using topical administration of native GLP-1 and several GLP-1R agonists (liraglutide, lixisenatide, and exenatide). Notably, this neuroprotective action was observed without any reduction in blood glucose levels. These results suggest that GLP-1R activation itself prevents retinal neurodegeneration. Our results should open up a new approach in the treatment of the early stages of DR. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Experimental investigation of contamination prevention techniques to cryogenic surfaces on board orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hetrick, M. A.; Rantanen, R. O.; Ress, E. B.; Froechtenigt, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Within the simulation limitations of on-orbit conditions, it was demonstrated that a helium purge system could be an effective method for reducing the incoming flux of contaminant species. Although a generalized purge system was employed in conjunction with basic telescope components, the simulation provided data that could be used for further modeling and design of a specific helium injection system. Experimental telescope pressures required for 90% attenuation appeared to be slightly higher (factor of 2 to 5). Cooling the helium purge gas and telescope components from 300 to 140 K had no measurable effect on stopping efficiency of a given mass flow of helium from the diffuse injector.

  4. Oral administration of an immunodominant T-cell epitope downregulates Th1/Th2 cytokines and prevents experimental myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Baggi, Fulvio; Andreetta, Francesca; Caspani, Elisabetta; Milani, Monica; Longhi, Renato; Mantegazza, Renato; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Antozzi, Carlo

    1999-01-01

    The mucosal administration of the native antigen or peptide fragments corresponding to immunodominant regions is effective in preventing or treating several T cell–dependent models of autoimmune disease. No data are yet available on oral tolerance with immunodominant T-cell peptides in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), an animal model of B cell–dependent disease. We report that oral administration of the T-cell epitope α146-162 of the Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (TAChR) α-subunit suppressed T-cell responses to AChR and ameliorated the disease in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. Protection from EAMG was associated with reduced serum Ab’s to mouse AChR and reduced AChR loss in muscle. The effect of Tα146-162 feeding was specific; treatment with a control peptide did not affect EAMG manifestations. The protective effect induced by peptide Tα146-162 was mediated by reduced production of IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-10 by TAChR-reactive cells, suggesting T-cell anergy. TGF-β–secreting Th3 cells did not seem to be involved in tolerance induction. We therefore demonstrate that feeding a single immunodominant epitope can prevent an Ab-mediated experimental model of autoimmune disease. PMID:10545527

  5. Subcutaneous injection of normal saline prevents cutaneous complications of ethanol sclerotherapy for superficial vascular lesions: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Aki; Kurita, Masakazu; Ozaki, Mine; Fujiki, Masahide; Kaji, Nobuyuki; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2011-08-01

    Percutaneous sclerotherapy is an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of venous malformations. Absolute ethanol is used as a sclerotic agent because of its effectiveness but is often avoided for treatment of superficial lesions because of the possible risk of cutaneous necrosis. A preclinical experimental study was performed to validate whether the cytotoxic effects of ethanol on surrounding healthy tissues could be diminished with prophylactic subcutaneous injection of normal saline above the vascular lesion immediately after intraluminal injection of ethanol by dilution. The effect of normal saline dilution on cytotoxicity of ethanol to the main cells of the skin (fibroblasts and keratinocytes) were assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Effects of subcutaneous injection of normal saline immediately after intraluminal ethanol injection were assessed in a newly developed animal experimental model using the rabbit auricular vein. Cytotoxic effects of ethanol were decreased by saline dilution in vitro. Subcutaneous injection of normal saline after intraluminal injection of ethanol prevented the cutaneous ulceration observed in all cases without subcutaneous injection of normal saline in our animal model. Subcutaneous injection of normal saline appears effective for preventing cutaneous complications after ethanol sclerotherapy for superficial vascular lesions. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  6. [Inhibition of pancreatic stellate cell activation by lisinopril for prevention fibrogenesis in experimental chronic alcoholic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Nichitaĭlo, M E; Kravchenko, D A; Medvetskiĭ, E B; Shpon'ka, I S; Savitskaia, I M

    2012-07-01

    Lisinopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor) attenuates fibrotic changes in pancreas after distal pancreatectomy in rats with experimental alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis. Lisinopril was administered after distal pancreatectomy in rats with experimental alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis. The animals were treated with lisinopril at the dose of 10 mg/kg body weight per day for 21 days after operation. To estimate the efficacy of the treatment on activity and number of pancreatic stellate cells the immunohistochemical investigation was made with alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), desmin, vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) using. The treatment of rats after operation with lisinopril inhibite activity of pancreatic stellate cells and characterized by significant decrease of the alpha-SMA, desmin, GFAP, vimentin and TIMP-2 expression. The ratio of MMP-1/TIMP-2 was greater in the group with treatment then in the control group. This therapy had a trend to alleviate the fibrotic changes in pancreas.

  7. The preventive effect of Bacillus subtilus strain DB9011 against experimental infection with enterotoxcemic Escherichia coli in weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Hikita, Chie; Mochizuki, Masami; Nakayama, Keizo

    2013-04-01

    Porcine edema disease (ED) is caused by Shiga toxin 2e-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Post-weaned piglets often suffer from ED as a result of intestinal infection with STEC, which causes impaired growth performance and high mortality. Antimicrobial therapy is a curative treatment for piglets infected with STEC, but the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant STEC has become a serious problem for Japanese pig farmers. Therefore, an alternative strategy other than antimicrobial therapy is needed for the prevention or treatment of ED. In this study, we evaluated the effect of oral administration of Bacillus subtilis DB9011 (DB9011) to prevent the experimental infection of STEC in weaning piglets. Eight 21-day-old piglets were divided into two groups: STEC challenge with the basal diet, and STEC challenge with DB9011 supplemented diet. The challenge was carried out when the animals were 25, 26 and 27 days old using STEC contained in capsules resistant against gastric digestion. All pigs were euthanized at 36 days of age. DB9011 improved the symptoms of ED and decreased the number of STEC in the ileal digesta and feces. Accordingly, oral administration of DB9011 in weaned piglets prevents ED through the suppression of the growth of STEC in the ileum.

  8. Human aldose reductase and human small intestine aldose reductase are efficient retinal reductases: consequences for retinoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Crosas, Bernat; Hyndman, David J; Gallego, Oriol; Martras, Sílvia; Parés, Xavier; Flynn, T Geoffrey; Farrés, Jaume

    2003-08-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyse the reduction of a variety of carbonyl compounds, such as carbohydrates, aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and steroids. We have studied the retinal reductase activity of human aldose reductase (AR), human small-intestine (HSI) AR and pig aldehyde reductase. Human AR and HSI AR were very efficient in the reduction of all- trans -, 9- cis - and 13- cis -retinal ( k (cat)/ K (m)=1100-10300 mM(-1).min(-1)), constituting the first cytosolic NADP(H)-dependent retinal reductases described in humans. Aldehyde reductase showed no activity with these retinal isomers. Glucose was a poor inhibitor ( K (i)=80 mM) of retinal reductase activity of human AR, whereas tolrestat, a classical AKR inhibitor used pharmacologically to treat diabetes, inhibited retinal reduction by human AR and HSI AR. All- trans -retinoic acid failed to inhibit both enzymes. In this paper we present the AKRs as an emergent superfamily of retinal-active enzymes, putatively involved in the regulation of retinoid biological activity through the assimilation of retinoids from beta-carotene and the control of retinal bioavailability.

  9. Diets containing inulin but not lupins help to prevent swine dysentery in experimentally challenged pigs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, C F; Phillips, N D; La, T; Hernandez, A; Mansfield, J; Kim, J C; Mullan, B P; Hampson, D J; Pluske, J R

    2010-10-01

    Swine dysentery is a contagious mucohemorrhagic diarrheal disease caused by the intestinal spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae that colonizes and induces inflammation of the cecum and colon. It has been reported that a diet containing chicory root and sweet lupin can prevent swine dysentery. This experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that inulin in the chicory root rather than galactans in lupins was responsible for protective effects. An experiment with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was undertaken using pigs fed barley- and triticale-based diets, with the main effects being protein source [185 g/kg of canola meal (decreased galactans) or 220 g/kg of lupins (greater galactans)] and inulin supplementation (0 or 80 g/kg). Forty Large White × Landrace pigs weighing 21 ± 3 kg, with 10 pigs per diet, were allowed to adapt to the diets for 2 wk, and then each pig was challenged orally 4 times with a broth culture containing B. hyodysenteriae on consecutive days. Pigs were killed when they showed clinical signs of dysentery or 6 wk postchallenge. Pigs fed diets without inulin had 8.3 times greater risk (P = 0.017) of developing swine dysentery and were 16 times more likely (P = 0.004) to have colon contents that were culture-positive for B. hyodysenteriae, compared with the pigs fed a diet with 80 g/kg of inulin. Diets containing lupins did not prevent pigs from developing clinical swine dysentery; however, inclusion of lupins or inulin or both in the diets delayed the onset of disease compared with the diet based mainly on canola meal (P < 0.05). Diet did not influence the total concentration of organic acids in the ileum, cecum, or upper and lower colon; however, the molar proportions of the organic acids were influenced (P < 0.05). Consequently the pH values in the cecum, and upper and lower colon were not influenced (P > 0.05) by diet. However the pH values of the ileal digesta were decreased in pigs fed the diet with both lupins and

  10. Iron prevents the development of experimental cerebral malaria by attenuating CXCR3-mediated T cell chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Van Den Ham, Kristin M; Shio, Marina Tiemi; Rainone, Anthony; Fournier, Sylvie; Krawczyk, Connie M; Olivier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a severe neurological complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Previous studies have suggested that iron overload can suppress the generation of a cytotoxic immune response; however, the effect of iron on experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is yet unknown. Here we determined that the incidence of ECM was markedly reduced in mice treated with iron dextran. Protection was concomitant with a significant decrease in the sequestration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells within the brain. CD4+ T cells demonstrated markedly decreased CXCR3 expression and had reduced IFNγ-responsiveness, as indicated by mitigated expression of IFNγR2 and T-bet. Additional analysis of the splenic cell populations indicated that parenteral iron supplementation was also associated with a decrease in NK cells and increase in regulatory T cells. Altogether, these results suggest that iron is able to inhibit ECM pathology by attenuating the capacity of T cells to migrate to the brain.

  11. Lactobacillus casei prevents the upregulation of ICAM-1 expression and leukocyte recruitment in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Sandra; Llopis, Marta; Antolín, María; Gironella, Meritxell; Sans, Miquel; Malagelada, Juan Ramon; Piqué, Josep Maria; Guarner, Francisco; Panés, Julián

    2006-12-01

    Lactobacillus casei has been shown to attenuate the severity of experimental colitis. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the effects of L. casei on colitis are related to modulation of leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed intestine. Rats with a colonic segment excluded from fecal transit were surgically prepared. The segment was decontaminated with antibiotics and recolonized with normal flora isolated from the inflamed rat colon, associated or not to L. casei. Control and colitic [2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced] animals were studied. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were characterized in the colonic microcirculation by intravital microscopy, and ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression was measured by the radiolabeled antibody technique. Compared with the noninflamed colonic segment, induction of colitis by TNBS provoked a marked increase in the number of leukocytes firmly adherent to the venular wall (0.5 +/- 0.1 vs. 2.1 +/- 0.6 leukocytes/100 mum, P < 0.01). Colonization with L. casei significantly reduced the number of adherent leukocytes (1.3 +/- 0.4 leukocytes/100 mum; P < 0.05) but did not affect the increased rolling interactions associated with the induction of colitis. Compared with the noncolitic group, induction of colitis was associated with a marked increase in ICAM-1 expression (117 +/- 4 vs. 180 +/- 3 ng antibody/g tissue) that was abrogated when the colitic segment was colonized by L. casei (117 +/- 3 ng antibody/g tissue, P < 0.05). However, L. casei administration did not modify VCAM-1 upregulation in colitic animals. L. casei attenuates leukocyte recruitment observed in experimental colitis induced by TNBS. This effect is possibly related to abrogation of ICAM-1 upregulation.

  12. Clofibric and ethacrynic acids prevent experimental pyelonephritis by Escherichia coli in mice.

    PubMed

    Balagué, Claudia E; de Ruiz, Clara Silva; Rey, Rosario; de Duffard, Ana María Evangelista; Nader-Macías, María Elena

    2004-11-01

    Interfering Escherichia coli attachment to the urinary tract, using P-fimbriation inhibitors, can prevent pyelonephritis. Clofibric and ethacrynic acids are organic compounds structurally related, but with different pharmacological uses. These agents are potentially active in the urinary tract due to its elimination in an unaltered form by the renal route. This study described a pyelonephritogenic E. coli strain, grown in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of clofibric or ethacrynic acids (0.1 and 1 mM, respectively), which exhibits inhibition of P1 erythrocytes agglutination and a drastic decrease in fimbriation, using electron microscopy and quantitative analyses of superficial proteins (decrease to a 17-25% in comparison with the control). In vivo assays were performed using ascending urinary tract infection in mice. The treatment with therapeutic doses of the drugs, administered 2 days before the bacterial challenge and daily until the end of the experiment (22 days), abolished renal infection after 7-10 days of drug exposure. Within this period clofibric acid did not produce adverse effects on the renal parenchyma. However, ethacrynic acid caused pyelitis and tubular cellular desquamation. These results suggested that clofibric acid might be useful in the short-term prophylaxis of urinary tract infection.

  13. Nudging to prevent the purchase of incompatible digital products online: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gabriele; Hernández, Penélope; van Bavel, René; Vila, José

    2017-01-01

    Ensuring safe and satisfactory online shopping activity, especially among vulnerable consumers such as elderly and less educated citizens, is part of a larger set of consumer policy objectives seeking to strengthen trust in the electronic marketplace. This article contributes to that goal by testing the effectiveness of nudges intended to prevent the purchase of 'incompatible' digital products (i.e., those which cannot be used with the devices owned by consumers or the systems they operate). We ran a computerised lab experiment (n = 626) examining three types of nudges, the effects of age and education, and interaction effects between these variables and the nudges. Results show that emotive warning messages and placing incompatibility information at the checkout page rather than earlier in the purchasing process were effective in reducing the purchase of incompatible goods. Age was also a relevant factor: older participants were more likely to purchase incompatible goods. In addition, there was an interaction effect between all nudges and age: two nudges exacerbated the effect of age, while another mitigated it. These results suggest nudges can be an effective policy tool, confirm a generational gap in online behaviour, and highlight how nudges can moderate the effect of socio-demographic variables.

  14. Heating stents with radio frequency energy to prevent tumor ingrowth: modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Lawes, Kate; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    1998-04-01

    Stents are often inserted into internal orifices to treat blockage due to tumor ingrowth. Stents are favored due to their minimally invasive nature, possible avoidance of a surgical procedure, and their ability to palliate surgically non-resectable disease. Because of rapid tumor growth however, a treatment means to prevent overgrowth through the stent and resultant blockage is required. To further this goal, experiments were performed in which a stent was placed in tissue and heated with radiofrequency (RF) energy to coagulate a cylinder of tissue, thereby eradicating viable tissue in the proximity of the stent. Temperatures were measured at the central stent surface and edges over time during a 5 - 10 minute heating in phantom and in fresh tissue. In addition, a finite element model was used to simulate the electric field and temperature distribution. Blood flow was also introduced in the model by evaluating RF application to stents to determine effectiveness of the energy applications. Changing perfusion and tissue electrical conductivity as a function of temperature was applied as the tissue was heated to 100 degree(s)C. Results from the electric field model will be shown as well as the thermal distribution over time from the simulations. Lastly, results from the damage integral will be discussed.

  15. Nudging to prevent the purchase of incompatible digital products online: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Gabriele; Hernández, Penélope; van Bavel, René; Vila, José

    2017-01-01

    Ensuring safe and satisfactory online shopping activity, especially among vulnerable consumers such as elderly and less educated citizens, is part of a larger set of consumer policy objectives seeking to strengthen trust in the electronic marketplace. This article contributes to that goal by testing the effectiveness of nudges intended to prevent the purchase of 'incompatible' digital products (i.e., those which cannot be used with the devices owned by consumers or the systems they operate). We ran a computerised lab experiment (n = 626) examining three types of nudges, the effects of age and education, and interaction effects between these variables and the nudges. Results show that emotive warning messages and placing incompatibility information at the checkout page rather than earlier in the purchasing process were effective in reducing the purchase of incompatible goods. Age was also a relevant factor: older participants were more likely to purchase incompatible goods. In addition, there was an interaction effect between all nudges and age: two nudges exacerbated the effect of age, while another mitigated it. These results suggest nudges can be an effective policy tool, confirm a generational gap in online behaviour, and highlight how nudges can moderate the effect of socio-demographic variables. PMID:28282401

  16. Spirulina maxima prevents fatty liver formation in CD-1 male and female mice with experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Blé-Castillo, J L; Juárez-Oropeza, M A; Díaz-Zagoya, J C

    2001-07-20

    The dietary administration of 5% Spirulina maxima (SM) during four weeks to diabetic mice, starting one week after a single dose of alloxan, 250 mg/Kg body weight, prevented fatty liver production in male and female animals. The main action of SM was on triacylglycerol levels in serum and liver. There was also a moderate hypoglycemia in male mice. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances also decreased in serum and liver after SM administration. There was also a decrease in the percentage of HDL in diabetic mice that was reverted by the SM administration. The sum of LDL + VLDL percentages was also partially normalized in diabetic animals by the SM administration. An additional observation was the lower incidence of adherences between the liver and the intestine loops in the diabetic mice treated with SM compared with diabetic mice without SM. Male and female mice showed differences to diabetes susceptibility and response to SM, the female being more resistant to diabetes induction by alloxan and more responsive to the beneficial effects of SM. It is worth future work of SM on humans looking for better quality of life and longer survival of diabetic patients.

  17. Alpha-lipoic acid prevents mitochondrial damage and neurotoxicity in experimental chemotherapy neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Melli, Giorgia; Taiana, Michela; Camozzi, Francesca; Triolo, Daniela; Podini, Paola; Quattrini, Angelo; Taroni, Franco; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    The study investigates if alpha-lipoic acid is neuroprotective against chemotherapy induced neurotoxicity, if mitochondrial damage plays a critical role in toxic neurodegenerative cascade, and if neuroprotective effects of alpha-lipoic acid depend on mitochondria protection. We used an in vitro model of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy that closely mimic the in vivo condition by exposing primary cultures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons to paclitaxel and cisplatin, two widely used and highly effective chemotherapeutic drugs. This approach allowed investigating the efficacy of alpha-lipoic acid in preventing axonal damage and apoptosis and the function and ultrastructural morphology of mitochondria after exposure to toxic agents and alpha-lipoic acid. Our results demonstrate that both cisplatin and paclitaxel cause early mitochondrial impairment with loss of membrane potential and induction of autophagic vacuoles in neurons. Alpha-lipoic acid exerts neuroprotective effects against chemotherapy induced neurotoxicity in sensory neurons: it rescues the mitochondrial toxicity and induces the expression of frataxin, an essential mitochondrial protein with anti-oxidant and chaperone properties. In conclusion mitochondrial toxicity is an early common event both in paclitaxel and cisplatin induced neurotoxicity. Alpha-lipoic acid protects sensory neurons through its anti-oxidant and mitochondrial regulatory functions, possibly inducing the expression of frataxin. These findings suggest that alpha-lipoic acid might reduce the risk of developing peripheral nerve toxicity in patients undergoing chemotherapy and encourage further confirmatory clinical trials.

  18. Neuroprotective role for carbonyl reductase?

    PubMed

    Maser, Edmund

    2006-02-24

    Oxidative stress is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and Creutzfeld-Jakob diseases or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Reactive oxygen species seem to play a significant role in neuronal cell death in that they generate reactive aldehydes from membrane lipid peroxidation. Several neuronal diseases are associated with increased accumulation of abnormal protein adducts of reactive aldehydes, which mediate oxidative stress-linked pathological events, including cellular growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. Combining findings on neurodegeneration and oxidative stress in Drosophila with studies on the metabolic characteristics of the human enzyme carbonyl reductase (CR), it is clear now that CR has a potential physiological role for neuroprotection in humans. Several lines of evidence suggest that CR represents a significant pathway for the detoxification of reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and that CR in humans is essential for neuronal cell survival and to confer protection against oxidative stress-induced brain degeneration.

  19. Confounding by indication in non-experimental evaluation of vaccine effectiveness: the example of prevention of influenza complications

    PubMed Central

    Hak, E; Verheij, T.; Grobbee, D; Nichol, K; Hoes, A

    2002-01-01

    Randomised allocation of vaccine or placebo is the preferred method to assess the effects of the vaccine on clinical outcomes relevant to the individual patient. In the absence of phase 3 trials using clinical end points, notably post-influenza complications, alternative non-experimental designs to evaluate vaccine effects or safety are often used. The application of these designs may, however, lead to invalid estimates of vaccine effectiveness or safety. As patients with poor prognosis are more likely to be immunised, selection for vaccination is confounded by patient factors that are also related to clinical end points. This paper describes several design and analytical methods aimed at limiting or preventing this confounding by indication in non-experimental studies. In short, comparison of study groups with similar prognosis, restriction of the study population, and statistical adjustment for dissimilarities in prognosis are important tools and should be considered. Only if the investigator is able to show that confounding by indication is sufficiently controlled for, results of a non-experimental study may be of use to direct an evidence based vaccine policy. PMID:12461118

  20. [Pharmaco and diet based prostate cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Eisinger, François; Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Rossi, Dominique; Cussenot, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    In 2010, in France, 8,790 men died from prostate cancer despite a low and decreasing mortality rate. The individual risk/benefit ratio of prostate cancer screening is the focus of controversy and currently not in favor of a systematic screening program. Therefore, only prevention could reduce incidence, side effects of treatment and related mortality. Interestingly, prostate cancer prevention is also a field of controversy mainly about 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors. However, it could be expected that pharmaco- or diet-based prevention will be a huge tool for cancer control, even more for prostate cancer burden. This review comprehensively analyses which molecules or compounds could be used in preventive trials. With regard to pharmaco-prevention, three different kinds of drugs could be identified. First drugs, which aim at mainly or even solely reduce prostate cancer risk such as 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators. Drugs, which aim at wider preventive impact such as: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or difluoromethylornithine. Lastly, drugs for which reducing prostate cancer incidence is merely a side effect such as statins, metformin or histones desacetylase inhibitors. With regard to diet-based prevention, two main approaches could be identified: aliments and nutriments, on one hand, and vitamin and minerals, on the other. Interestingly if compounds reach experimental plausibility, natural foods or even global diet seem to have a higher impact. Lastly, besides assessment of efficacy, effectiveness required the critical step of compliance, which might actually be the weakest link of the prevention chain.

  1. A new material to prevent urethral damage after implantation of artificial devices: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Salvador Vilar Correia; Machado, Marcilio Romero; Pinto, Flávia Cristina Morone; Lira, Mariana Montenegro de Melo; de Albuquerque, Amanda Vasconcelos; Lustosa, Eugênio Soares; da Silva, Jaiurte Gomes Martins; Campos, Olávio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To validate the application of the bacterial cellulose (BC) membrane as a protecting barrier to the urethra. Materials and Methods Forty female Wistar rats (four groups of 10): Group 1 (sham), the urethra was dissected as in previous groups and nothing applied around; Group 2, received a 0.7cm strip of the BC applied around the urethra just below the bladder neck; Group 3, received a silicon strip with the same dimensions as in group 2; Group 4, had a combination of 2 and 3 groups being the silicon strip applied over the cellulosic material. Half of the animals in each group were killed at 4 and 8 months. Bladder and urethra were fixed in formalin for histological analysis. Results Inflammatory infiltrates were more intense at 4 months at lymphonodes (80% Grade 2), statistically different in the group 2 compared with groups 1 (p=0.0044) and 3 (p=0.0154). At 8 months, all samples were classified as grade 1 indicating a less intense inflammatory reaction in all groups. In group 2, at 8 months, there was a reduction in epithelial thickness (30±1μm) when com-pared to groups 1 (p=0.0001) and 3 (p<0.0001). Angiogenesis was present in groups 2 and 4 and absent in group 3. In BC implant, at 4 and 8 months, it was significant when comparing groups 4 with 1 (p=0.0159). Conclusion BC membrane was well integrated to the urethral wall promoting tissue remodeling and strengthening based on morphometric and histological results and may be a future option to prevent urethral damage. PMID:27819753

  2. A new material to prevent urethral damage after implantation of artificial devices: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lima, Salvador Vilar Correia; Machado, Marcilio Romero; Pinto, Flávia Cristina Morone; Lira, Mariana Montenegro de Melo; Albuquerque, Amanda Vasconcelos de; Lustosa, Eugênio Soares; Silva, Jaiurte Gomes Martins da; Campos, Olávio

    2017-01-01

    To validate the application of the bacterial cellulose (BC) membrane as a protecting bar-rier to the urethra. Forty female Wistar rats (four groups of 10): Group 1 (sham), the urethra was dissected as in previous groups and nothing applied around; Group 2, received a 0.7cm strip of the BC applied around the urethra just below the bladder neck; Group 3, received a silicon strip with the same dimensions as in group 2; Group 4, had a combination of 2 and 3 groups being the silicon strip applied over the cellulosic material. Half of the animals in each group were killed at 4 and 8 months. Bladder and urethra were fixed in formalin for histological analysis. Inflammatory infiltrates were more intense at 4 months at lymphonodes (80% Grade 2), statistically different in the group 2 compared with groups 1 (p=0.0044) and 3 (p=0.0154). At 8 months, all samples were classified as grade 1 indicating a less intense inflammatory reaction in all groups. In group 2, at 8 months, there was a reduction in epithelial thickness (30±1μm) when com-pared to groups 1 (p=0.0001) and 3 (p<0.0001). Angiogenesis was present in groups 2 and 4 and absent in group 3. In BC implant, at 4 and 8 months, it was significant when comparing groups 4 with 1 (p=0.0159). BC membrane was well integrated to the urethral wall promoting tissue remodeling and strengthening based on morphometric and histological results and may be a future option to prevent urethral damage. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  3. Human parathyroid hormone 1-34 prevents bone loss in experimental biliary cirrhosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Dresner-Pollak, Rivka; Gabet, Yankel; Steimatzky, Arza; Hamdani, Gilad; Bab, Itai; Ackerman, Zvi; Weinreb, Miron

    2008-01-01

    Reduced bone mass and increased fracture rate are complications of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). The effect of intermittent administration of human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) 1-34 on bone mass and architecture in bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats was studied. Six-month-old male rats were subjected to BDL or sham operation (SO) and were treated from the second postoperative week intermittently with either hPTH 1-34 40 microg/kg per day, 80 microg/kg per day, or a vehicle for 4 weeks. Femoral and tibial bones were evaluated ex vivo by dual x-ray absorptiometry, microcomputed tomography, and histomorphometry. Serum osteocalcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline cross-links (DPD) were determined. BDL rats had decreased bone mass compared with SO rats as indicated by a 6% decrease in femoral and tibial bone mineral density (BMD), 18% reduction in femoral trabecular bone volume (bone volume/total volume [BV/TV]), 17% decrease in trabecular thickness, and 10% decrease in tibial cortical thickness. The administration of hPTH 1-34 at 40 microg/kg per day increased femoral and tibial BMD (9% and 9%), femoral trabecular BV/TV (50%), trabecular thickness (50%), tibial cortical thickness (17%), and serum osteocalcin (82%). On the other hand, hPTH 1-34 80 microg/kg per day had no effect on BMD and tibial cortical thickness, was associated with a smaller increase in trabecular BV/TV (24%), and had a higher osteoclast number and DPD compared with untreated BDL rats and the lower hPTH 1-34 dose treatment group. BDL rats exhibit loss of bone mass and structure, which can be prevented by the intermittent administration of hPTH 1-34, a potential therapy for osteoporosis in PBC.

  4. Effectiveness of citronella preparations in preventing mosquito bites: systematic review of controlled laboratory experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Kongkaew, C; Sakunrag, I; Chaiyakunapruk, N; Tawatsin, A

    2011-07-01

    This review aims to examine the effectiveness of citronella preparation used as a mosquito repellent. Multiple computerized databases such as MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, and AMED, were searched for controlled laboratory experiments that compared the effectiveness of citronella products to control in repelling Aedes, Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes using the cage or room methods. Outcomes measures were protection time and percentage repellency. The weighted mean difference and 95% confidence interval were calculated comparing the outcomes in the citronella and control groups. Meta-analysis was performed using the DerSimonian and Laird method under a random-effects model. Eleven studies met inclusion criteria. Based on a meta-analysis of studies using the cage method, protection time of the citronella oil for preventing Aedes mosquitoes was less than that in the DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) group, with a difference in protection time of 253 min (95% confidence interval: 169-336). The combination of citronella oil and vanillin is likely to have a longer protection time compared with citronella oil alone. In studies using the room method, citronella oil and/or the combination of citronella oil and vanillin provided complete repellency at least 3 h. In Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes, a combination of citronella oil and vanillin product demonstrated a comparable protection time against DEET; however, it remained inconclusive due to a limited number of studies. Citronella products are less effective than DEET products in terms of duration of protection. Adding vanillin to citronella oil products could prolong the protection time. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Limitations in Bonding to Dentin and Experimental Strategies to Prevent Bond Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Tjäderhane, L.; Breschi, L.; Mazzoni, A.; Li, N.; Mao, J.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    The limited durability of resin-dentin bonds severely compromises the lifetime of tooth-colored restorations. Bond degradation occurs via hydrolysis of suboptimally polymerized hydrophilic resin components and degradation of water-rich, resin-sparse collagen matrices by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins. This review examined data generated over the past three years on five experimental strategies developed by different research groups for extending the longevity of resin-dentin bonds. They include: (1) increasing the degree of conversion and esterase resistance of hydrophilic adhesives; (2) the use of broad-spectrum inhibitors of collagenolytic enzymes, including novel inhibitor functional groups grafted to methacrylate resins monomers to produce anti-MMP adhesives; (3) the use of cross-linking agents for silencing the activities of MMP and cathepsins that irreversibly alter the 3-D structures of their catalytic/allosteric domains; (4) ethanol wet-bonding with hydrophobic resins to completely replace water from the extrafibrillar and intrafibrillar collagen compartments and immobilize the collagenolytic enzymes; and (5) biomimetic remineralization of the water-filled collagen matrix using analogs of matrix proteins to progressively replace water with intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar apatites to exclude exogenous collagenolytic enzymes and fossilize endogenous collagenolytic enzymes. A combination of several of these strategies should result in overcoming the critical barriers to progress currently encountered in dentin bonding. PMID:21220360

  6. A successful experimental model for intimal hyperplasia prevention using a resveratrol-delivering balloon.

    PubMed

    Tolva, Valerio; Mazzola, Silvia; Zerbi, Pietro; Casana, Renato; Albertini, Mariangela; Calvillo, Laura; Selmin, Francesca; Cilurzo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Restenosis due to intimal hyperplasia is a major clinical problem that compromises the success of angioplasty and endovascular surgery. Resveratrol (RSV) has demonstrated a beneficial effect on restenosis from angioplasty. Unfortunately, the physicochemical characteristics of RSV reduce the practicality of its immediate clinical application. This work proposes an experimental model aiming to setup an intravessel, elutable, RSV-containing compound. A 140 μg/mL RSV sterile injectable solution with a suitable viscosity for intravascular administration by drug-delivery catheter (RSV-c) was prepared. This solution was locally administered in the common iliac artery of adult male New Zealand White rabbits using a dedicated device (Genie; Acrostak, Geneva, Switzerland) after the induction of intimal hyperplasia by traumatic angioplasty. The RSV concentrations in the wall artery were determined, and the thickness of the harvested iliac arteries was measured over a 1-month period. The Genie catheter was applied in rabbit vessels, and the local delivery resulted in an effective reduction in restenosis after plain angioplasty. Notably, RSV-c forced into the artery wall by balloon expansion might accumulate in the interstitial areas or within cells, avoiding the washout of solutions. Magnification micrographs showed intimal proliferation was significantly inhibited when RSV-c was applied. Moreover, no adverse events were documented in in vitro or in vivo studies. RSV can be advantageously administered in the arterial walls by a drug-delivery catheter to reduce the risk of restenosis. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Clinical and experimental study on Ligusticum wallichii mixture in preventing and treating bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Shao, C R; Chen, F M; Tang, Y X

    1994-08-01

    To investigate the significance of Ligusticum wallichii Mixture (LWM) and its possible therapeutical mechanism in bronchial asthma, clinical and experimental studies were carried out. LWM inhibited bronchospasm induced by histamine and acetylcholine in guinea pigs; the plasma level of TXB2 was decreased remarkably and the incubation period from antigen inhalation to asthma attack could be delayed by LWM; the incidence of asthma and its mortality were reduced in guinea pigs, compared with control, P < 0.01. In addition, the prolonged period of induced asthma attack was negatively correlated to the plasma level of TXB2 in guinea pigs (P < 0.01). It was observed that the plasma level of TXB2 was decreased, the forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1%) was elevated significantly in asthmatic patients after they were treated by LWM. Moreover, the total effective rate was significantly better than that in the control (92% : 62%). It indicated that: (1) The effects of airway allergic inflammation (AAI) might be the important pathological basis for the bronchial asthma, (2) TXA2 might be an important inflammatory mediator in asthma which could be taken as an useful biochemical parameter for evaluating clinical effects, (3) LWM could relax tracheal smooth muscle, improve pulmonary function, inhibit the synthesis and release of TXA2 with no side effects.

  8. Limitations in bonding to dentin and experimental strategies to prevent bond degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Tjäderhane, L; Breschi, L; Mazzoni, A; Li, N; Mao, J; Pashley, D H; Tay, F R

    2011-08-01

    The limited durability of resin-dentin bonds severely compromises the lifetime of tooth-colored restorations. Bond degradation occurs via hydrolysis of suboptimally polymerized hydrophilic resin components and degradation of water-rich, resin-sparse collagen matrices by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins. This review examined data generated over the past three years on five experimental strategies developed by different research groups for extending the longevity of resin-dentin bonds. They include: (1) increasing the degree of conversion and esterase resistance of hydrophilic adhesives; (2) the use of broad-spectrum inhibitors of collagenolytic enzymes, including novel inhibitor functional groups grafted to methacrylate resins monomers to produce anti-MMP adhesives; (3) the use of cross-linking agents for silencing the activities of MMP and cathepsins that irreversibly alter the 3-D structures of their catalytic/allosteric domains; (4) ethanol wet-bonding with hydrophobic resins to completely replace water from the extrafibrillar and intrafibrillar collagen compartments and immobilize the collagenolytic enzymes; and (5) biomimetic remineralization of the water-filled collagen matrix using analogs of matrix proteins to progressively replace water with intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar apatites to exclude exogenous collagenolytic enzymes and fossilize endogenous collagenolytic enzymes. A combination of several of these strategies should result in overcoming the critical barriers to progress currently encountered in dentin bonding.

  9. Piezosurgery prevents brain tissue damage: an experimental study on a new rat model.

    PubMed

    Pavlíková, G; Foltán, R; Burian, M; Horká, E; Adámek, S; Hejčl, A; Hanzelka, T; Sedý, J

    2011-08-01

    Piezosurgery is a promising meticulous system for bone cutting, based on ultrasound microvibrations. It is thought that the impact of piezosurgery on the integrity of soft tissue is generally low, but it has not been examined critically. The authors undertook an experimental study to evaluate the brain tissue response to skull bone removal using piezosurgery compared with a conventional drilling method. In Wistar male rats, a circular bone window was drilled to the parietal bone using piezosurgery on one side and a conventional bone drill on the other side. The behavioural performance of animals was evaluated using the motor BBB test and sensory plantar test. The brains of animals were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. The results of MRI showed significantly increased depth and width of the brain lesion in the region of conventional drilling compared with the region where piezosurgery was used. Cresylviolet and NF 160 staining confirmed these findings. There was no significant difference in any of the behavioural tests between the two groups. In conclusion, piezosurgery is a safe method for the performance of osteotomy in close relation to soft tissue, including an extremely injury-sensitive tissue such as brain. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Curcumin prevents the development of dextran sulfate Sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Yasuyuki; Andoh, Akira; Inatomi, Osamu; Yagi, Yuhki; Bamba, Shigeki; Araki, Yoshio; Hata, Kazunori; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2007-11-01

    Curcumin is a phenolic natural product isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa (turmeric). We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the development of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis. BALB/c mice were fed a chow containing either 3.5% (wt/wt) DSS or 3.5% DSS + 2.0% (wt/wt) curcumin. The body weight loss was more apparent in DSS-treated mice than in DSS + curcumin-treated mice. The disease activity index, histological colitis score, and MPO activity were all significantly higher in DSS-treated mice than in DSS plus curcumin-treated mice. Microscopically, mucosal edema, cellular infiltration, and epithelial disruption were much more severe in DSS-treated mice than in DSS + curcumin-treated mice. In DSS + curcumin-treated mice, NF-kappaB activation was blocked in the mucosa. In conclusion, the development of DSS-induced colitis was significantly attenuated by curcumin. Being a nontoxic natural dietary product, curcumin could be useful in treatment of IBD patients.

  11. Erythropoietin administration partially prevents adipose tissue loss in experimental cancer cachexia models

    PubMed Central

    Penna, Fabio; Busquets, Silvia; Toledo, Miriam; Pin, Fabrizio; Massa, David; López-Soriano, Francisco J.; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated cachexia is characterized, among other symptoms, by a dramatic loss of both muscle and fat. In addition, the cachectic syndrome is often associated with anemia. The object of the present investigation was to assess the effects of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment on experimental cancer cachexia models. The results clearly show that, in addition to the improvement of the hematocrit, EPO treatment promoted a partial preservation of adipose tissue while exerting negligible effects on muscle loss. Administration of EPO to tumor-bearing animals resulted in a significant increase of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in adipose tissue, suggesting that the treatment favored triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in the adipose tissue. In vitro experiments using both adipose tissue slices and 3T3-L1 adipocytes suggests that EPO is able to increase the lipogenic rate through the activation of its specific receptor (EPOR). This metabolic pathway, in addition to TAG uptake by LPL, may contribute to the beneficial effects of EPO on fat preservation in cancer cachexia. PMID:23966665

  12. Endoscopic shielding technique with a newly developed hydrogel to prevent thermal injury in two experimental models.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Boix, Jaume; Moreno de Vega, Vicente; Bon, Ignacio; Marín, Ingrid; Bartolí, Ramón

    2017-09-01

    A newly developed hydrogel, applied through the endoscope as an endoscopic shielding technique (EndoSTech), is aimed to prevent deep thermal injury and to accelerate the healing process of colonic induced ulcers after therapeutic endoscopy. Lesions were performed in rats (n = 24) and pigs (n = 8). Rats were randomized to receive EndoSTech (eight rats each) with: saline (control), hyaluronic acid and product. In pigs, three ulcer sites were produced in each pig: endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR)-ulcer with prior saline injection (A; EMR-saline), EMR-saline plus EndoSTech with product (B; EMR-saline-P), and EMR with prior injection of product plus EndoSTech-P (C; EMR-P-P). At the end of the 14-day study, the same lesions were performed again in healthy mucosa to assess acute injury. Animals were sacrificed after 7 (rats) and 14 (pigs) days. Ulcers were macroscopically and histopathologically evaluated. Thermal injury (necrosis) was assessed with a 1-4 scale. In rats, treatment with product improved mucosal healing comparing with saline and hyaluronic acid (70% vs 30.3% and 47.2%; P = 0.003), avoiding mortality (0% vs 50% and 25%; P = 0.038), and perforation (0% vs 100% and 33.3%; P = 0.02); respectively. In pigs, submucosal injection of product induced a marked trend towards a less deep thermal injury (C = 2.25-0.46 vs A and B = 2.75-0.46; P = 0.127). Mucosal healing rate was higher with product (B = 90.2-3.9%, C = 91.3-5.5% vs A = 73.1-12.6%; P = 0.002). This new hydrogel demonstrates strong healing properties in preclinical models. In addition, submucosal injection of this product is able to avoid high thermal load of the gastrointestinal wall. © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  13. Resveratrol prevents alveolar bone loss in an experimental rat model of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Govinda; Poudel, Sher Bahadur; Kook, Sung-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory polyphenol. Periodontitis is induced by oral pathogens, where a systemic inflammatory response accompanied by oxidative stress is the major event initiating disease. We investigated how resveratrol modulates cellular responses and the mechanisms related to this modulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs). We also explored whether resveratrol protects rats against alveolar bone loss in an experimental periodontitis model. Periodontitis was induced around the first upper molar of the rats by applying ligature infused with LPS. Stimulating hGFs with 5μg/ml LPS augmented the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and Toll-like receptor-4. LPS treatment also stimulated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation of several protein kinases in the cells. However, the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) was inhibited by the addition of LPS. Resveratrol treatment almost completely inhibited all of these changes in LPS-stimulated cells. Specifically, resveratrol alone augmented HO-1 induction via Nrf2-mediated signaling. Histological and micro-CT analyses revealed that administration of resveratrol (5mg/kg body weight) improved ligature/LPS-mediated alveolar bone loss in rats. Resveratrol also attenuated the production of inflammation-related proteins, the formation of osteoclasts, and the production of circulating ROS in periodontitis rats. Furthermore, resveratrol suppressed LPS-mediated decreases in HO-1 and Nrf2 levels in the inflamed periodontal tissues. Collectively, our findings suggest that resveratrol protects rats from periodontitic tissue damage by inhibiting inflammatory responses and by stimulating antioxidant defense systems. The aims of this study were to investigate how resveratrol modulates cellular responses and the mechanisms related to this modulation in

  14. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiying; Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Iron accumulation was involved in the acute phase following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could attenuate cellular iron accumulation following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could decrease ROS generation and improve cell energy supply following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could alleviate apoptosis and brain injury following SAH. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH + RR, and SAH + Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron–sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  15. Dietary medium-chain triglycerides prevent chemically induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Ishii, Kenichi; Hosomura, Naohiro; Ogiku, Masahito

    2010-03-01

    The effects of dietary medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) on experimental colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) were investigated in rats. Male Wistar rats were given an intracolonic injection of TNBS and were then fed liquid diets containing MCTs or corn oil (AIN93) as controls. Serum and tissue samples were collected 1 week after TNBS enema. The severity of colitis was evaluated pathologically, and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured. Furthermore, messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels for inflammatory cytokines and a chemokine were assessed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. In another set of experiments, the protein expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 in the colon was measured 1 week after feeding of liquid diets. To investigate the effects of MCTs on macrophages, RAW246.7 macrophages were incubated with media containing albumin conjugated with MCT or linoleic acid, which is the major component of corn oil. Then, the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was measured. Dietary MCTs blunted significantly the protein levels of TLR-4 in the colon. Furthermore, the expression of TLR-4 was significantly blunted in RAW264.7 cells incubated with MCTs compared with cells incubated with linoleic acid. Induction of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), TNF-alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in the colon was attenuated by dietary MCT. Furthermore, MPO activities in the colonic tissue were significantly blunted in animals fed the MCT diets compared with those fed the control diets. As a result, dietary MCTs improved chemically induced colitis significantly. MCTs most likely are useful for the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease as an anti-inflammatory immunomodulating nutrient.

  16. Depletion of C6 prevents development of proteinuria in experimental membranous nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, P. J.; Ochi, R. F.; Schulze, M.; Johnson, R. J.; Campbell, C.; Couser, W. G.

    1989-01-01

    To study the possible role of the complement membrane attack complex, C5b-9, in an experimental rat model that is morphologically indistinguishable from membranous nephropathy in man (passive Heymann nephritis [PHN]), an antibody to rat C6 was used to deplete C6 levels to less than 5% of pretreatment values (C6D) during disease development. C3, C7, C8, and C9 levels were not different in C6D and control rats. After injection of nephritogenic quantities of 125I-anti-Fx1A antibody, the kinetics of disappearance of labeled IgG from the blood were identical in the complement deficient and sufficient groups, and glomerular deposition of 125I-antibody was the same in both groups at 5 days. Glomerular deposits of sheep IgG and C3 were also similar in C6D and controls, but glomerular deposits of C6 and C5b-9 neoantigens were markedly reduced or absent in C6 depleted rats. However, despite equivalent antibody deposits, proteinuria was abolished in C6D rats compared with normocomplementemic controls. Similar results were obtained when F(ab')2 anti-rat C6 IgG was used to deplete C6 during development of PHN. These results demonstrate that C6 is required for the development of the increased glomerular permeability that occurs in PHN, presumably because C6 is required for formation of C5b-9. We conclude that glomerular injury in the PHN model of membranous nephropathy in the rat is mediated by C5b-9. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2672823

  17. Preventive Therapy of Experimental Colitis with Selected iron Chelators and Anti-oxidants

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mostaghel, Elahe; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Iron chelators, such as maltol and kojic acid, have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. They may have beneficial effects on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) because iron can develop and aggravate inflammation in IBD. In the present study, the effect of selected iron chelators and anti-oxidants were evaluated on a model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Methods: Colitis was induced with instillation of 75 mg/kg TNBS in 0.25 ml ethanol 50% via the anus in fasted male Wistar rats. The animals were assigned randomly to 12 groups (n = 6) and treated once daily, started 2 hours before colitis induction, with normal saline (5 ml/kg), maltol (70, 140, 280 mg/kg), kojic acid (75, 150, 300 mg/kg), vitamin E (400 mg/kg), deferiprone (L1) (150 mg/kg) and prednisolone (4 mg/kg) orally and deferoxamine (50 mg/kg) intraperitoneally for 5 days. In the sixth day, rats were scarified and colon tissues were assessed macroscopically and pathologically. Results: Maltol (280 mg/kg) was able to reduce colon weight / length ratio, ulcer index and total colitis index similar to prednisolone, deferoxamine and deferiprone as positive controls. However, kojic acid and vitamin E could not significantly alleviate macroscopic and/or pathologic features of inflammation in comparison to normal saline. Conclusions: Maltol with the highest test dose was capable to protect against experimentally induced colitis. Kojic acid and vitamin E were not effective in this animal model of colon inflammation. More detailed studies are warranted to explore the mechanisms involved in anti-colitic property of maltol and to explain ineffectiveness of kojic acid and vitamin E. PMID:22826760

  18. Phosphate Control and 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol Administration in Preventing Experimental Renal Osteodystrophy in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, W. E.; Bordier, P.; Marie, P.; Hruska, K.; Harter, H.; Greenwalt, A.; Blondin, J.; Haddad, J.; Bricker, N.; Slatopolsky, E.

    1977-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrated that secondary hyperparathyroidism in dogs with chronic renal disease may occur, at least in part, as a consequence of the need for progressive adaptation in renal phosphorus (P) excretion that occurs as glomerular filtration rate falls. However, the studies were of relatively short duration. Moreover, no information emerged regarding a potential role of calcium malabsorption in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The short duration of the protocol did not lend itself to the study of the effect of P control or the administration of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy. In the present studies, 14 dogs with experimental chronic renal disease were studied serially for a period of 2 yr. Each animal was studied first with two normal kidneys on an intake of P of 1,200 mg/day. Then, renal insufficiency was produced by 5/6 nephrectomy. The dogs then were divided into three groups. In group I, 1,200 mg/day P intake was administered for the full 2 yr. In group II, P intake was reduced from the initial 1,200 mg/day, in proportion to the measured fall in glomerular filtration rate, in an effort to obviate the renal adaptation in P excretion. In group III, “proportional reduction” of P intake also was employed; but in addition, 20 μg of 25(OH)D3 were administered orally three times a week. In group I, parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels rose throughout the 2-yr period reaching a final concentration of 557±70 U (normal 10-60). In group II, values for PTH remained normal throughout the 1st yr, increased modestly between the 12th and the 18th mo, but then did not rise after the 18th mo. In group III, no elevation of PTH levels was observed at any time; however, these animals were hypercalcemic. Histomorphologic analyses of the ribs of these dogs were performed serially throughout the 2-yr period. A linear relationship was obtained between the osteoclastic resorption surface and the concentration

  19. Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT) as a preventive method for space motion sickness: Background and experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Finding an effective treatment for the motion sickness-like symptoms that occur in space has become a high priority for NASA. The background research is reviewed and the experimental design of a formal life sciences shuttle flight experiment designed to prevent space motion sickness in shuttle crew members is presented. This experiment utilizes a behavioral medicine approach to solving this problem. This method, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), involves training subjects to voluntarily control several of their own physiological responses to environmental stressors. AFT has been used reliably to increase tolerance to motion sickness during ground-based tests in over 200 men and women under a variety of conditions that induce motion sickness, and preliminary evidence from space suggests that AFT may be an effective treatment for space motion sickness as well. Proposed changes to this experiment for future manifests are included.

  20. Effectiveness of a sports-based HIV prevention intervention in the Dominican Republic: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Z A; Welsch, R L; Erickson, J D; Craig, S; Adams, L V; Ross, D A

    2012-01-01

    Previous observational and quasi-experimental studies in sub-Saharan Africa have suggested the effectiveness of youth-targeted HIV prevention interventions using sport as an educational tool. No studies have yet assessed the effect of similar programs in the Caribbean. A quasi-experimental trial was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a sports-based intervention in six migrant settlements in the Puerto Plata Province of the Dominican Republic. A total of 397 structured interviews were conducted with 140 adolescents prior to, immediately following, and four months following 10-hour interventions using the Grassroot Soccer curriculum. Interview responses were coded, aggregated into composite scores, and analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for baseline differences as well as age, sex, community, and descent. At post-intervention, significant differences were observed between groups in HIV-related knowledge (adjOR = 13.02, 95% CI = 8.26, 20.52), reported attitudes (adjOR = 12.01, 95% CI = 7.61, 18.94), and reported communication (adjOR = 3.13, 95% CI = 1.91, 5.12). These differences remained significant at four-month follow-up, though declines in post-intervention knowledge were observed in the Intervention group while gains in knowledge and reported attitudes were observed in the Control group. Results suggest that this sports-based intervention could play a valuable role in HIV prevention efforts in the Caribbean, particularly those targeting early adolescents. Further evaluation of sports-based interventions should include indicators assessing behavioral and biological outcomes, longer-term follow-up, a larger sample, randomization of study participants, and strenuous efforts to minimize loss-to-follow-up.

  1. Effects of chronic normobaric hypoxic and hypercapnic exposure in rats: Prevention of experimental chronic mountain sickness by hypercapnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, B.; Bonkovsky, H. L.; Ou, Lo-Chang

    1987-09-01

    A syndrome of experimental chronic mountain sickness can be produced in the Hilltop strain of Sprague-Dawley rats by chronic hypobaric hypoxic exposure. This syndrome is characterized by polycythemia, plasma hemoglobinemia, pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy with eventual failure and death. It has generally been assumed that these changes are caused by chronic hypoxemia, not by hypobaric exposure per se. We have now confirmed this directly by showing that chronic normobaric hypoxic exposure (10.5% O2) produces similar hematologic and hemodynamic changes. Further, the addition of hypercapnic exposure to the hypoxic exposure blunted or prevented the effects of the hypoxic exposure probably by stimulating respiration, thus increasing the rate of oxygen delivery to the cells. Changes in the rate-controlling enzymes of hepatic heme metabolism, 5-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase, and in cytochrome(s) P-450, the major hepatic hemoprotein(s), were also measured in hypoxic and hypercapnic rats. Hypoxia decreased 5-aminolevulinate synthase and increased cytochrome(s) P-450, probably by increasing the size of a “regulatory” heme pool within hepatocytes. These changes were also prevented by the addition of hypercapnic to hypoxic exposure.

  2. Medicine Sellers for Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections: Effect of a Quasi-Experimental Training Intervention in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Alam, Nazmul; Alam, Anadil; Fournier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This study used a quasi-experimental pre-post design to test whether short training can improve medicine sellers' (MSs) practices and skills for prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Bangladesh. The training included lectures, printed materials, and identification of referral sites. Difference-in-differences estimation was used to determine the effects of intervention on key primary and secondary outcomes. Advice given by the MSs in intervention group for partner treatment and condoms use increased significantly by 11% and 9%, respectively, after adjusting for baseline differences in education, religion, age, duration of training, and study site. Referral of clients to qualified service providers increased by 5% in the intervention group compared to the comparison group, but this change was not found to be statistically significant. Significantly higher proportion of MSs in the intervention group recognized the recommended medications as per the national syndromic management guidelines in Bangladesh for treatment of urethral discharge and genital ulcer symptoms. Short training intervention was found to be effective in improving MSs' practice of promoting condom use and partner treatment to the clients. We anticipate the need for broad based training programs of MSs to improve their skills for the prevention and control of STI/HIV in Bangladesh.

  3. Medicine Sellers for Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections: Effect of a Quasi-Experimental Training Intervention in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nazmul; Alam, Anadil; Fournier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This study used a quasi-experimental pre-post design to test whether short training can improve medicine sellers' (MSs) practices and skills for prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Bangladesh. The training included lectures, printed materials, and identification of referral sites. Difference-in-differences estimation was used to determine the effects of intervention on key primary and secondary outcomes. Advice given by the MSs in intervention group for partner treatment and condoms use increased significantly by 11% and 9%, respectively, after adjusting for baseline differences in education, religion, age, duration of training, and study site. Referral of clients to qualified service providers increased by 5% in the intervention group compared to the comparison group, but this change was not found to be statistically significant. Significantly higher proportion of MSs in the intervention group recognized the recommended medications as per the national syndromic management guidelines in Bangladesh for treatment of urethral discharge and genital ulcer symptoms. Short training intervention was found to be effective in improving MSs' practice of promoting condom use and partner treatment to the clients. We anticipate the need for broad based training programs of MSs to improve their skills for the prevention and control of STI/HIV in Bangladesh. PMID:26491678

  4. Hsp65-producing Lactococcus lactis prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice by inducing CD4+LAP+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Rafael M; Oliveira, Rafael P; Medeiros, Samara R; Gomes-Santos, Ana C; Alves, Andrea C; Loli, Flávia G; Guimarães, Mauro A F; Amaral, Sylvia S; da Cunha, André P; Weiner, Howard L; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Faria, Ana M C

    2013-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) participate in the cellular response to stress and they are hiperexpressed in inflammatory conditions. They are also known to play a major role in immune modulation, controlling, for instance, autoimmune responses. In this study, we showed that oral administration of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain that produces and releases LPS-free Hsp65 prevented the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. This was confirmed by the reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate and absence of injury signs in the spinal cord. The effect was associated with reduced IL-17 and increased IL-10 production in mesenteric lymph node and spleen cell cultures. Hsp65-producing-L. lactis-fed mice had a remarkable increase in the number of natural and inducible CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+LAP+ (Latency-associated peptide) Tregs - which express the membrane-bound TGF-β - in spleen, inguinal and mesenteric lymph nodes as well as in spinal cord. Moreover, many Tregs co-expressed Foxp3 and LAP. In vivo depletion of LAP+ cells abrogated the effect of Hsp65-producing L. lactis in EAE prevention and worsened disease in medium-fed mice. Thus, Hsp65-L.lactis seems to boost this critical regulatory circuit involved in controlling EAE development in mice.

  5. Hsp65-producing Lactococcus lactis prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice by inducing CD4+LAP+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Rafael M.; Oliveira, Rafael P.; Medeiros, Samara R.; Gomes-Santos, Ana C.; Alves, Andrea C.; Loli, Flávia G.; Guimarães, Mauro A.F.; Amaral, Sylvia S.; da Cunha, André P.; Weiner, Howard L.; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Faria, Ana M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) participate in the cellular response to stress and they are hiperexpressed in inflammatory conditions. They are also known to play a major role in immune modulation, controlling, for instance, autoimmune responses. In this study, we showed that oral administration of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain that produces and releases LPS-free Hsp65 prevented the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. This was confirmed by the reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate and absence of injury signs in the spinal cord. The effect was associated with reduced IL-17 and increased IL-10 production in mesenteric lymph node and spleen cell cultures. Hsp65-producing-L. lactis-fed mice had a remarkable increase in the number of natural and inducible CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+LAP+ (Latency-associated peptide) Tregs - which express the membrane-bound TGF-β - in spleen, inguinal and mesenteric lymph nodes as well as in spinal cord. Moreover, many Tregs co-expressed Foxp3 and LAP. In vivo depletion of LAP+ cells abrogated the effect of Hsp65-producing L. lactis in EAE prevention and worsened disease in medium-fed mice. Thus, Hsp65-L.lactis seems to boost this critical regulatory circuit involved in controlling EAE development in mice. PMID:22939403

  6. Adhesion prevention in ventral hernia repair: an experimental study comparing three lightweight porous meshes recommended for intraperitoneal use.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, L; Ceci, F; Mattia, S; Fabbi, M; Negro, P; Gossetti, F

    2017-02-01

    In ventral hernia repair, when prosthetic material is placed intraperitoneally, it may lead to an inflammatory reaction resulting in adhesions between the mesh and abdominal viscera. Several meshes have been developed to minimize this process. In this experimental study, the ability of different combined meshes to attenuate the adhesion formation was examined. Three commercially available lightweight porous combined meshes were placed intraperitoneally to repair an abdominal wall defect in rats: DynaMesh-IPOM (PVDF + PP), TiMesh (titanium-coated filament PP) and C-QUR/FX (omega-3 fatty acid-coated filament PP). The DynaMesh-CICAT (PVDF) was implanted in the control group. Adhesion formation was macroscopically evaluated and scored after 7 and 21 days. All animals except two presented intra-abdominal adhesions. None of the meshes examined in the study demonstrated to prevent adhesions. C-QUR/FX reduced adhesion formation at 7 days' follow-up compared with all other meshes but by 21 days this effect was diminished. Between 7 and 21 days adhesion extension significantly decreased for TiMesh. TAS did not show significant modifications between 7 and 21 days' follow-up for each mesh. The combined porous meshes tested in the present study demonstrated to reduce but not to prevent the adhesion formation, even if with some differences. Combined porous meshes could be chosen instead of simple meshes for retro-rectus preperitoneal prosthetic ventral hernia repair.

  7. Effect of daily administration of pyrantel tartrate in preventing infection in horses experimentally challenged with Sarcocystis neurona.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Mary G; Schott, Harold C; Kaneene, John B; Murphy, Alice J; Kruttlin, Elizabeth A; Hines, Melissa T; Sellon, Debra C; Patterson, Jon S; Elsheikha, Hany M; Dubey, J P; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-05-01

    To determine whether daily administration of pyrantel tartrate can prevent infection in horses experimentally challenged with Sarcocystis neurona. 24 mixed-breed specific-pathogen-free weanling horses, 10 adult horses, 1 opossum, and 6 mice. Sarcocystis neurona-naïve weanling horses were randomly allocated to 2 groups. Group A received pyrantel tartrate at the labeled dose, and group B received a nonmedicated pellet. Both groups were orally inoculated with 100 sporocysts/d for 28 days, 500 sporocysts/d for 28 days, and 1000 sporocysts/d for 56 days. Blood samples were collected weekly, and CSF was collected monthly. Ten seronegative adult horses were monitored as untreated, uninfected control animals. All serum and CSF samples were tested by use of western blot tests to detect antibodies against S. neurona. At the end of the study, the number of seropositive and CSF-positive horses in groups A and B were compared by use of the Fisher exact test. Time to seroconversion on the basis of treatment groups and sex of horses was compared in 2 univariable Cox proportional hazards models. After 134 days of sporocyst inoculation, no significant differences were found between groups A and B for results of western blot tests of serum or CSF There were no significant differences in number of days to seroconversion on the basis of treatment groups or sex of horses. The control horses remained seronegative. Daily administration of pyrantel tartrate at the current labeled dose does not prevent S. neurona infection in horses.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... About half of these individuals adopt a male gender role in adolescence or early adulthood. Related Information ... 1730-5. Citation on PubMed Cohen-Kettenis PT. Gender change in 46,XY persons with 5alpha-reductase- ...

  9. Effect of a fall prevention program on balance maintenance using a quasi-experimental design in real-world settings.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Yvonne; Fournier, Michel; Laforest, Sophie; Gauvin, Lise; Filiatrault, Johanne; Corriveau, Hélène

    2012-08-01

    To examine the effect of a fall prevention program offered under real-world conditions on balance maintenance several months after the program. To explore the program's impact on falls. A quasi-experimental study was conducted among community-dwelling seniors, with pre- and postintervention measures of balance performance and self-reported falls. Ten community-based organizations offered the intervention (98 participants) and 7 recruited participants to the study's control arm (102 participants). An earlier study examined balance immediately after the 12-week program. The present study focuses on the 12-month effect. Linear regression (balance) and negative binomial regression (falls) procedures were performed.falls. During the 12-month study period, experimental participants improved and maintained their balance as reflected by their scores on three performance tests. There was no evidence of an effect on falls.falls. Structured group exercise programs offered in community-based settings can maintain selected components of balance for several months after the program's end.

  10. Evaluation of metaphylactic RNA interference to prevent equine herpesvirus type 1 infection in experimental herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy in horses.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Gillian A; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Pusterla, Nicola; Erb, Hollis N; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate metaphylactic RNA interference to prevent equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection in experimental herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy in horses and to determine whether horses infected with a neuropathogenic strain of the virus that develop equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) have differences in viremia. 13 seronegative horses. EHV-1 strain Ab4 was administered intranasally on day 0, and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs [EHV-1 specific siRNAs {n = 7} or an irrelevant siRNA {6}]) were administered intranasally 24 hours before and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after infection. Physical and neurologic examinations, nasal swab specimens, and blood samples were collected for virus isolation and quantitative PCR assay. Data from the study were combined with data from a previous study of 14 horses. No significant difference was detected in clinical variables, viremia, or detection of EHV-1 in nasal swab specimens of horses treated with the EHV-1 targeted siRNAs (sigB3-siOri2) versus controls. No significant differences in viremia were detected between horses that developed EHM and those that did not. Administration of siRNAs targeted against EHV-1 around the time of EHV-1 infection was not protective with this experimental design. Horses infected with the neuropathogenic EHV-1 strain Ab4 that developed EHM did not have a more pronounced viremia.

  11. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  12. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  13. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  14. [Progress in research of aldose reductase inhibitors in traditional medicinal herbs].

    PubMed

    Feng, Chang-Gen; Zhang, Lin-Xia; Liu, Xia

    2005-10-01

    The traditional medicinal herbs are natural product, and have no obviously toxic action and side effect, and their resources are extensive. The adverse effects produced by aldose reductase inhibitors in traditional medicinal herbs are less than those from chemical synthesis and micro-organism, they can effectively prevent and delay diabetic complication, such as diabetic nephropathy, vasculopathy, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and so on. They will have a wonderful respect. Flavonoid compounds and their derivates from traditional medicinal herbs are active inhibitors to aldose reductase, such as quercetin, silymarin, puerarin, baicalim, berberine and so on. In addition, some compound preparations show more strongly activity in inhibiting aldose reductase and degrading sorbitol contents, such as Shendan in traditional medicinal herbs being active inhibitors and Jianyi capsule, Jinmaitong composita, Liuwei Di-huang pill, et al. The progresses definite functions of treating diabetes complications have been reviewed.

  15. The role of ketotifen in the prevention of testicular damage in rats with experimental unilateral undescended testes

    PubMed Central

    Acikgoz, Abdullah; Asci, Ramazan; Aydin, Oguz; Çavuş, Hikmet; Donmez, Gamze; Buyukalpelli, Recep

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study conducted on rats were to determine mast cell (MC) proliferation on undescended testes (UDTs); whether there is a correlation between MC proliferation and testicular damage; and whether testicular damage can be prevented with administration of an MC blocker. Sixty-five newborn male rats were divided into three groups. During the neonatal period, unilateral UDTs were experimentally induced in Group 2 and Group 3. The rats in Group 3 were given 1 mg/kg/day ketotifen orally until the end of the study. Groups 2 (n=30) and 3 (n=15) were divided into groups of ten and five rats, respectively, each of which underwent bilateral orchiectomy in either the prepubertal, pubertal, or adult period. Group 1 (n=15) underwent a sham operation followed by bilateral orchiectomy, with five rats in each of the prepubertal, pubertal, and adult periods. Testicular MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas, biopsy scores, interstitial connective tissue, seminiferous tubule (ST) diameters, and the basement membrane thickness of STs were evaluated. In Group 2 the ST diameters in the UDTs decreased, the number of MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas increased, ST basement membranes thickened, and spermatogenesis decreased. The number of MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas of the descended testes increased and spermatogenesis decreased. In Group 3, the number of MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas decreased. In unilateral UDTs, the number of MCs in the interstitial and subtubular areas increased in both testes. Fibrosis developed in the ST basement membranes and interstitial areas, and spermatogenesis deteriorated. Testicular fibrosis may be prevented with administration of an MC blocker. PMID:25364234

  16. Nitrotyrosylation of Ca2+ channels prevents c-Src kinase regulation of colonic smooth muscle contractility in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Gracious R; Kang, Minho; Shirwany, Najeeb; Malykhina, Anna P; Drozd, Mary; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2007-09-01

    Basal levels of c-Src kinase are known to regulate smooth muscle Ca(2+) channels. Colonic inflammation results in attenuated Ca(2+) currents and muscle contraction. Here, we examined the regulation of calcium influx-dependent contractility by c-Src kinase in experimental colitis. Ca(2+)-influx induced contractions were measured by isometric tension recordings of mouse colonic longitudinal muscle strips depolarized by high K(+). The E(max) to CaCl(2) was significantly less in inflamed tissues (38.4 +/- 7.6%) than controls, indicative of reduced Ca(2+) influx. PP2 [4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine], a selective Src kinase inhibitor, significantly reduced the contractile amplitude and shifted the pD(2) from 3.88 to 2.44 in controls, whereas it was ineffective in inflamed tissues (3.66 versus 3.43). After pretreatment with a SIN-1 (3-morpholinosydnonimine)/peroxynitrite combination, the maximal contraction to CaCl(2) was reduced by 46 +/- 7% in controls but unaffected in inflamed tissues (13 +/- 11%). Peroxynitrite also prevented the inhibitory effect of PP2 in control tissues. In colonic single smooth muscle cells, PP2 inhibited Ca(2+) currents by 84.1 +/- 3.9% in normal but only 36.2 +/- 13% in inflamed tissues. Neither the Ca(2+) channel Ca(v)1.2b, gene expression, nor the c-Src kinase activity was altered by inflammation. Western blot analysis showed no change in the Ca(2+) channel protein expression but increased nitrotyrosylated-Ca(2+) channel proteins during inflammation. These data suggest that post-translational modification of Ca(2+) channels during inflammation, possibly nitrotyrosylation, prevents c-Src kinase regulation resulting in decreased Ca(2+) influx.

  17. Polylactic acid nanosheets in prevention of postoperative intestinal adhesion and their effects on bacterial propagation in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Hinoki, A; Saito, A; Kinoshita, M; Yamamoto, J; Saitoh, D; Takeoka, S

    2016-05-01

    Ultrathin films (nanosheets) adhere tightly to organ surfaces but prevent adhesion to other organs. The antiadhesive effect of nanosheets and their effect on bacterial propagation were investigated in a murine intestinal adhesion model. Polylactic acid nanosheets (approximately 80 nm thick) were produced. Serosal defects were created by peeling off the intestinal serosa; these were left open or covered with nanosheets or Seprafilm® and the formation of intestinal adhesions was analysed. To examine bacterial propagation, a nanosheet or Seprafilm® was placed on intact murine jejunum followed by Escherichia coli inoculation at the site. Treatment both with nanosheets and with Seprafilm® reduced postoperative intestinal adhesion (mean adhesion score 0·67 for nanosheets, 0·43 for Seprafilm® and 2·87 for no antiadhesive treatment; P < 0·001 for nanosheets or Seprafilm® versus no adhesive treatment). Nanosheet treatment did not affect bacterial propagation in the peritoneal cavity, whereas Seprafilm®-treated mice showed bacterial propagation, leading to increased mortality. Nanosheets may be effective novel antiadhesive agents even in the presence of bacterial contamination. Surgical relevance Intra-abdominal adhesions following surgical contamination can trigger postoperative complications and lead to deterioration in long-term quality of life. However, currently there are no effective antiadhesion materials to prevent the formation of adhesions. Treatment with ultrathin nanosheets effectively reduced postoperative intestinal adhesion in an experimental mouse model, and did not affect bacterial propagation in the peritoneal cavity. These nanosheets are potent novel antiadhesive materials that potentially can be applied even in contaminated conditions. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  19. Efficacy of different nitric oxide-based strategies in preventing experimental cerebral malaria by Plasmodium berghei ANKA.

    PubMed

    Martins, Yuri C; Zanini, Graziela M; Frangos, John A; Carvalho, Leonardo J M

    2012-01-01

    Low nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a role in the pathogenesis of human as well as of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) caused by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA). ECM is partially prevented by administration of the NO-donor dipropylenetriamine NONOate (DPTA-NO) at high concentration (1 mg/mouse), which also induces major side effects such as a sharp drop in blood pressure. We asked whether alternative strategies to improve NO bioavailability with minor side effects would also be effective in preventing ECM. Mice were infected with PbA and prophylactically treated twice a day with bolus injections of L-arginine, Nω-hydroxy-nor-Arginine (nor-NOHA), tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), separately or combined, sodium nitrite, sildenafil or sildenafil plus DPTA-NO starting on day 0 of infection. L-arginine and BH4 supplementation, with or without arginase inhibition by nor-NOHA, increased plasma nitrite levels but failed to protect against ECM development. Accordingly, prophylactic treatment with continuous delivery of L-arginine using osmotic pumps also did not improve survival. Similar outcomes were observed with sodium nitrite sildenafil (aimed at inhibiting phosphodiesterase-5) or with DPTA-NO. However, sildenafil (0.1 mg/mouse) in combination with a lower dose (0.1 mg/mouse) of DPTA-NO decreased ECM incidence (82 ± 7.4% mortality in the saline group and 38 ± 10.6% in the treated group; p<0.05). The combined prophylactic therapy did not aggravate anemia, had delayed effects in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and induced lower effects in pulse pressure when compared to DPTA-NO 1 mg/mouse. These data show that sildenafil lowers the amount of NO-donor needed to prevent ECM, resulting also in lesser side effects. Prophylactic L-arginine when given in bolus or continuous delivery and bolus BH4 supplementation, with or without arginase inhibition, were able to increase NO bioavailability in PbA-infected mice but failed to decrease ECM incidence in

  20. Modulating hemoglobin nitrite reductase activity through allostery: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Alayash, Abdu I; Wilson, Michael T; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-11-30

    The production of nitric oxide by hemoglobin (Hb) has been proposed to play a major role in the control of blood flow. Because of the allosteric nature of hemoglobin, the nitrite reductase activity is a complex function of oxygen partial pressure PO2. We have previous developed a model to obtain the micro rate constants for nitrite reduction by R state (kR) and T state (kT) hemoglobin in terms of the experimental maximal macro rate constant kNmax and the corresponding oxygen concentration PO2max. However, because of the intrinsic difficulty in obtaining accurate macro rate constant kN, from available experiments, we have developed an alternative method to determine the micro reaction rate constants (kR and kT) by fitting the simulated macro reaction rate curve (kN versus PO2) to the experimental data. We then use our model to analyze the effect of pH (Bohr Effect) and blood ageing on the nitrite reductase activity, showing that the fall of bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) during red cell storage leads to increase NO production. Our model can have useful predictive and explanatory power. For example, the previously described enhanced nitrite reductase activity of ovine fetal Hb, in comparison to the adult protein, may be understood in terms of a weaker interaction with BPG and an increase in the value of kT from 0.0087M(-1)s(-1) to 0.083M(-1)s(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Induction of aldose reductase and sorbitol in renal inner medullary cells by elevated extracellular NaCl.

    PubMed Central

    Bagnasco, S M; Uchida, S; Balaban, R S; Kador, P F; Burg, M B

    1987-01-01

    Aldose reductase [aldehyde reductase 2; alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21] catalyzes conversion of glucose to sorbitol. Although its activity is implicated in the progression of ocular and neurological complications of diabetes, the normal function of the enzyme in most cells is unknown. Both aldose reductase activity and substantial levels of sorbitol were previously reported in renal inner medullary cells. In this tissue, the extracellular NaCl concentration normally is high and varies considerably depending on the urine concentration. We report here on a line of renal medullary cells in which medium that is high in NaCl greatly increases both aldose reductase activity and intracellular sorbitol. In these tissue culture cells (and presumably also in the renal inner medulla), the intracellular sorbitol helps balance the osmotic pressure of elevated extracellular NaCl and thus prevents cellular dehydration. PMID:3104902

  2. Chicken muscle aldose reductase: purification, properties and relationship to other chicken aldo/keto reductases.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D G; Davidson, W S

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme that catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of a wide range of aromatic and hydroxy-aliphatic aldehydes was purified from chicken breast muscle. This enzyme shares many properties with mammalian aldose reductases including molecular weight, relative substrate specificity, Michaelis constants, an inhibitor specificity. Therefore, it seems appropriate to call this enzyme an aldose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21). Chicken muscle aldose reductase appears to be kinetically identical to an aldose reductase that has been purified from chicken kidney (Hara et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 133, 207-214) and to hen muscle L-glycol dehydrogenase (Bernado et al., Biochim. biophys. Acta 659, 189-198). The association of this aldose reductase with muscular dystrophy in the chick is discussed.

  3. KIDNEY STONE INCIDENCE AND METABOLIC URINARY CHANGES AFTER MODERN BARIATRIC SURGERY: REVIEW OF CLINICAL STUDIES, EXPERIMENTAL MODELS, AND PREVENTION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Benjamin K.; Hatch, Marguerite

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has been associated with increased metabolic kidney stone risk and post-operative stone formation. A MEDLINE search, performed for articles published between January 2005 and November 2013, identified 24 pertinent studies containing 683 bariatric patients with 24-hour urine profiles, 6,777 bariatric patients with kidney stone incidence, and 7,089 non-stone forming controls. Of all procedures reviewed, only Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) was linked to post-operative kidney stone development, increasing stone incidence two-fold in non-stone formers (8.5%) and four-fold in patients with previous stone history (16.7%). High quality evidence from 7 studies (n=277 patients) before and after RYGB identified the following post-RYGB urinary lithogenic risk factors: 30% reduction in urine volume (the main driver of urinary crystal saturation), 40% reduction in urinary citrate (a potent stone inhibitor), and 50% increase in urinary oxalate (a stone promotor). Based on this, a summary of strategies to reduce calcium oxalate stone risk following RYGB is provided. Furthermore, recent experimental RYGB studies are assessed for insights into the pathophysiology of oxalate handling, and the literature in gut anion (oxalate) transport is reviewed. Finally, as a potential probiotic therapy for hyperoxaluria, primary data from our laboratory is presented, demonstrating a 70% reduction in urinary oxalate levels in four experimental RYGB animals after colonization with Oxalobacter formigines, a non-pathogenic gut commensal that uses oxalate as an energy source. Overall, urine profiles and kidney stone risk following bariatric surgery appear modifiable by dietary adjustments, appropriate supplementation, and lifestyle changes. For hyperoxaluria resistant to dietary oxalate restriction and calcium binding, well-designed human investigations are needed to identify additional means of lowering urinary oxalate, such as Oxalobacter colonization or empiric pyridoxine therapy

  4. rgpA DNA vaccine induces antibody response and prevents alveolar bone loss in experimental peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin; Wang, Zhifeng; Ji, Ping; Bian, Yuanyuan; Lan, Jing

    2013-06-01

    Peri-implantitis is one of many reasons for dental implant failure. This study is designed to prevent experimental peri-implantitis by arginine-specific gingipain A (rgpA) DNA vaccine. The bilateral mandibular second and third premolars from 15 male beagle dogs were extracted, and 60 implants were immediately implanted. Three months after implantation, the animals were randomly divided into groups A, B, and C and immunized with plasmid vector-rgpA, heat-killed Porphyromonas gingivalis, and plasmid vector, respectively. Cotton ligatures infiltrated with P. gingivalis were placed in the submarginal position around the neck of the implants to induce peri-implantitis. Clinical measurements, including probing depth (PD) and bleeding on probing, were recorded every 2 weeks postoperatively, and P. gingivalis-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum and secretory IgA (sIgA) in saliva were quantitatively analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the same time. Animals were sacrificed after 6 weeks, 50-μm undecalcified histologic sections were prepared using methylene blue dye, and bone loss around implants was measured. Higher levels of IgG in serum and sIgA in saliva could be measured in groups A and B but not in group C after immunization. There were statistical differences (P <0.05) between, before, and after immunization, but no difference was found between groups A and B (P >0.05). Both peri-implant PD and bone loss in group A were significantly less than in groups B and C. IgG and sIgA could be generated by immunization with rgpA DNA vaccine, which could significantly slow down bone loss in the experimental peri-implantitis canine model.

  5. Alcohol-free red wine prevents arterial thrombosis in dietary-induced hypercholesterolemic rats: experimental support for the 'French paradox'.

    PubMed

    De Curtis, A; Murzilli, S; Di Castelnuovo, A; Rotilio, D; Donati, M B; De Gaetano, G; Iacoviello, L

    2005-02-01

    The concept of the 'French paradox' has been recently challenged. As it is difficult in a short period to produce direct clinical evidence of the protective effect of red wine on thrombosis, we evaluated such a possibility in an experimental model mimicking the conditions of the 'French paradox'. Normolipidemic rats (FNL) were fed a standard diet or a 2% cholesterol-rich-diet (Ch-rich-diet) for 5 months: the latter was given either alone (FNL + D) or in combination with 'alcohol-free' red wine (FNL + D + 5 W). Arterial thrombosis was measured as the occlusion time (OT) of an artificial prosthesis inserted into the abdominal aorta. Lipid levels, platelet adhesion to fibrillar collagen, factor VII (FVII) clotting activity and fibrinogen levels were also measured. Compared to animals fed a standard diet, Ch-rich diet induced in FNL rats a several-fold increase in lipids and FVII levels with a concomitant significant increase in both thrombotic tendency (shortening of the OT) and platelet adhesion. 'Alcohol-free' red wine supplementation almost completely reverted the prothrombotic effect of the Ch-rich-diet. Indeed, the OT was prolonged from 78 +/- 3 to 122 +/- 10 h (P < 0.01), while platelet adhesion to fibrillar collagen was reduced from 49 +/- 3.5% to 30 +/- 2.8%. Neither the increase in lipid levels induced by Ch-rich diet nor FVII or fibrinogen levels were modified by wine supplementation. In conclusion, in experimental animals, this study supports the concept of the 'French paradox' that regular consumption of wine (rather than alcohol) was able to prevent arterial thrombosis associated with dietary-induced hypercholesterolemia, an effect mediated by downregulation of platelet function.

  6. Fundamental experimentation and theoretical modeling for prevention of molten aluminum-water steam explosions in casting pits

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Nelson, L.S.

    1997-02-01

    Explosive interactions between molten aluminum and water are being studied with a focus on fundamentals to determine what causes robust-enough triggers for explosion onset, to determine the extent of protection provided from various coatings and to develop a novel methodology for prevention. The workscope includes experimentation and mathematical modeling of the interactions between molten metals and water at various different coated and uncoated surfaces. Phenomenological issues related to surface wettability, gas generation from coatings, charring of coatings, inertial constraint, melt temperature, water temperature, external shocks are being investigated systematically to gage their relative impact on triggerability of surface-assisted steam explosion. The steam explosion triggering studies (SETS) facility was designed and constructed as a rapid-turnaround, cost-effective, and safe means to address these phenomenological issues and to derive quantitative, practically-fundamental data for situations covering melt masses relocating over submerged surfaces ranging from a few grams to {approximately} 1,000 kg. Initial testing has provided insightful results which are very consistent with empirical field observations taken over the past 40 years. This paper provides the scientific basis of the technical approach for design and operation of the SETS facility, along with key results and insights from tests conducted so far.

  7. Effect of an herbal mouth rinse in preventing periodontal inflammation in an experimental gingivitis model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Noah; Grbic, John T; Saffer, Aron J; Wexler, Isaiah D; Williams, Ray C

    2012-03-01

    Gingivitis is a chronic inflammatory condition, resulting from gingival bacteria and bacterial byproducts. Antiplaque oral rinses reduce inflammation by removing or inhibiting plaque formation. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of HM-302, a mouth rinse based on natural products, on gingival inflammation. A prospective, double-blinded, randomized parallel-group controlled trial involving 62 patients was conducted to assess efficacy and safety. During a 2-week period with no dental hygiene, subjects were randomized to receive either the study rinse (HM-302); a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) rinse; an essential oils (EO) rinse; or a water-only preparation. The gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), and number of bleeding sites were measured at baseline and at the end of the study period. Progression of gingival inflammation resulting from lack of dental hygiene was lowest in patients treated with the HM-302 rinse, and was significantly less marked than in patients treated with the water-only preparation. When compared to the CPC and EO treatments, HM-302 was the only mouth rinse that was significantlybetter than the control, with respect to both the change in absolute GI scores (p = .006) and to the percent increase in GI scores (p = .012). No serious adverse effects were noted in any of the study groups. HM-302 is a safe and effective treatment for preventing the development of gingival inflammation in an experimental gingivitis model. Further research is needed to evaluate its long-term effects.

  8. Can empirical hypertonic saline or sodium bicarbonate treatment prevent the development of cardiotoxicity during serious amitriptyline poisoning? Experimental research.

    PubMed

    Paksu, Muhammet Sukru; Zengin, Halit; Ilkaya, Fatih; Paksu, Sule; Guzel, Hasan; Ucar, Durmus; Uzun, Adem; Alacam, Hasan; Duran, Latif; Murat, Naci; Guzel, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate whether hypertonic saline or sodium bicarbonate administration prevented the development of cardiotoxicity in rats that received toxic doses of amitriptyline. Thirty-six Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The animals were divided into six groups. Group 1 received toxic doses of i.p. amitriptyline. Groups 2 and 3 toxic doses of i.p. amitriptyline, plus i.v. sodium bicarbonate and i.v. hypertonic saline, respectively. Group 4 received only i.v. sodium bicarbonate, group 5 received only i.v. hypertonic saline, and group 6 was the control. Electrocardiography was recorded in all rats for a maximum of 60 minutes. Blood samples were obtained to measure the serum levels of sodium and ionised calcium. The survival time was shorter in group 1. In this group, the animals' heart rates also decreased over time, and their QRS and QTc intervals were significantly prolonged. Groups 2 and 3 showed less severe changes in their ECGs and the rats survived for a longer period. The effects of sodium bicarbonate or hypertonic saline treatments on reducing the development of cardiotoxicity were similar. The serum sodium levels decreased in all the amitriptyline-applied groups. Reduction of serum sodium level was most pronounced in group 1. Empirical treatment with sodium bicarbonate or hypertonic saline can reduce the development of cardiotoxicity during amitriptyline intoxication. As hypertonic saline has no adverse effects on drug elimination, it should be considered as an alternative to sodium bicarbonate therapy.

  9. Preventing thermal runaway propagation in lithium ion battery packs using a phase change composite material: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Stephen; Schweitzer, Ben; Khateeb, Siddique; Al-Hallaj, Said

    2017-02-01

    The safety issues of lithium ion batteries pose ongoing challenges as the market for Li-ion technology continues to grow in personal electronics, electric mobility, and stationary energy storage. The severe risks posed by battery thermal runaway necessitate safeguards at every design level - from materials, to cell construction, to module and pack assembly. One promising approach to pack thermal management is the use of phase change composite materials (PCC™), which offer passive protection at low weight and cost while minimizing system complexity. We present experimental nail penetration studies on a Li-ion pack for small electric vehicles, designed with and without PCC, to investigate the effectiveness of PCC thermal management for preventing propagation when a single cell enters thermal runaway. The results show that when parallel cells short-circuit through the penetrated cell, the packs without PCC propagate fully while those equipped with PCC show no propagation. In cases where no external short circuits occur, packs without PCC sometimes propagate, but not consistently. In all test conditions, the use of PCC lowers the maximum temperature experienced by neighboring cells by 60 °C or more. We also elucidate the propagation sequence and aspects of pack failure based on cell temperature, voltage, and post-mortem data.

  10. The Role of Friends’ Disruptive Behavior in the Development of Children’s Tobacco Experimentation: Results from a Preventive Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Huizink, Anja; Vuijk, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Having friends who engage in disruptive behavior in childhood may be a risk factor for childhood tobacco experimentation. This study tested the role of friends’ disruptive behavior as a mediator of the effects of a classroom based intervention on children’s tobacco experimentation. 433 Children (52% males) were randomly assigned to the Good Behavior Game (GBG) intervention, a universal preventive intervention targeting disruptive behavior, and facilitating positive prosocial peer interactions. Friends’ disruptive behavior was assessed from age 7–10 years. Participants’ experimentation with tobacco was assessed annually from age 10–13. Reduced rates in tobacco experimentation and friends’ disruptive behavior were found among GBG children, as compared to controls. Support for friends’ disruptive behavior as a mediator in the link between intervention status and tobacco experimentation was found. These results remained after controlling for friends’ and parental smoking status, and child ADHD symptoms. The results support the role of friends’ disruptive behavior in preadolescents’ tobacco experimentation. PMID:20694577

  11. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  12. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  13. A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a Community-Based HIV Prevention Intervention for Mexican American Female Adolescents: The SHERO's Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Gary W.; Bangi, Audrey K.; Sanchez, Bernadette; Doll, Mimi; Pedraza, Ana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a quasi-experimental evaluation of a community-based, culturally and ecologically tailored HIV prevention intervention for Mexican American female adolescents grounded in the AIDS risk reduction model. A total of 378 Mexican American female adolescents (mean age = 15.2) participated in either the nine-session SHERO's (a…

  14. High- and Low-Level Dissonance-Based Eating Disorder Prevention Programs with Young Women with Body Image Concerns: An Experimental Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Whitney; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As cognitive dissonance is theorized to contribute to the effects of dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs, we evaluated a high-dissonance version of this program against a low-dissonance version and a wait-list control condition to provide an experimental test of the mechanism of intervention effects. Method: Female…

  15. High- and Low-Level Dissonance-Based Eating Disorder Prevention Programs with Young Women with Body Image Concerns: An Experimental Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Whitney; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As cognitive dissonance is theorized to contribute to the effects of dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs, we evaluated a high-dissonance version of this program against a low-dissonance version and a wait-list control condition to provide an experimental test of the mechanism of intervention effects. Method: Female…

  16. The tyrosyl free radical in ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Gräslund, A; Sahlin, M; Sjöberg, B M

    1985-01-01

    The enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase, catalyses the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, a reaction essential for DNA synthesis in all living cells. The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase, which is the prototype of all known eukaryotic and virus-coded enzymes, consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins B1 and B2. The B2 subunit contains an antiferromagnetically coupled pair of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of an electron, has its unpaired spin density delocalized in the aromatic ring of tyrosine. Effects of iron-radical interaction indicate a relatively close proximity between the iron center and the radical. The EPR signal of the radical can be studied directly in frozen packed cells of E. coli or mammalian origin, if the cells are made to overproduce ribonucleotide reductase. The hypothetic role of the tyrosyl free radical in the enzymatic reaction is not yet elucidated, except in the reaction with the inhibiting substrate analogue 2'-azido-CDP. In this case, the normal tyrosyl radical is destroyed with concomitant appearance of a 2'-azido-CDP-localized radical intermediate. Attempts at spin trapping of radical reaction intermediates have turned out negative. In E. coli the activity of ribonucleotide reductase may be regulated by enzymatic activities that interconvert a nonradical containing form and the fully active protein B2. In synchronized mammalian cells, however, the cell cycle variation of ribonucleotide reductase, studied by EPR, was shown to be due to de novo protein synthesis. Inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase are of medical interest because of their ability to control DNA synthesis. One example is hydroxyurea, used in cancer therapy, which selectively destroys the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:3007085

  17. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin - A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-02-15

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC50- and Ki-values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects.

  18. Aldose Reductase-catalyzed Reduction of Aldehyde Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Spite, Matthew; Trent, John O.; West, Matthew B.; Ahmed, Yonis; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Oxidation of unsaturated phospholipids results in the generation of aldehyde side chains that remain esterified to the phospholipid backbone. Such “core” aldehydes elicit immune responses and promote inflammation. However, the biochemical mechanisms by which phospholipid aldehydes are metabolized or detoxified are not well understood. In the studies reported here, we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), which reduces hydrophobic aldehydes, metabolizes phospholipid aldehydes. Incubation with AR led to the reduction of 5-oxovaleroyl, 7-oxo-5-heptenoyl, 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-caproyl, and 5-hydroxy-8-oxo-6-octenoyl phospholipids generated upon oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC). The enzyme also catalyzed the reduction of phospholipid aldehydes generated from the oxidation of 1-alkyl, and 1-alkenyl analogs of PAPC, and 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid or phosphoglycerol. Aldose reductase catalyzed the reduction of chemically synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POVPC) with a Km of 10 μM. Addition of POVPC to the culture medium led to incorporation and reduction of the aldehyde in COS-7 and THP-1 cells. Reduction of POVPC in these cells was prevented by the AR inhibitors sorbinil and tolrestat and was increased in COS-7 cells overexpressing AR. Together, these observations suggest that AR may be a significant participant in the metabolism of several structurally diverse phospholipid aldehydes. This metabolism may be a critical regulator of the pro-inflammatory and immunogenic effects of oxidized phospholipids. PMID:15465833

  19. Prevention of unfavourable effects of cigarette smoke on flap viability using botulinum toxin in random pattern flaps: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Karayel, Hikmet; Kaya, Burak; Caydere, Muzaffer; Terzioğlu, Ahmet; Aslan, Gürcan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are numerous clinical and experimental studies reporting unfavourable effects of cigarette smoke on skin flaps. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether unfavourable effects of cigarette smoke on flap survival could be reduced by botulinum toxin type A. METHODS: Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats (15 months of age, mean weight 210 g [range 180 g to 230 g]) were included. They were divided into four groups of seven animals each. The control group underwent the surgical procedure alone. Surgical procedure was performed after administration of botulinum toxin type A in the botulinum toxin (BTX) group, after exposure to cigarette smoke in the cigarette smoke (CS) group, and after BTX type A administration and exposure to CS in the CS+BTX (CS+BTX) group. Random pattern cutaneous flaps (3 cm × 9 cm) were elevated from the dorsum of all rats. Necrosis area was calculated in percentages (%) using Image J computer software. Tissue samples were examined histopathologically. RESULTS: The mean necrotic area in the control group (26%) and in the BTX group (21%) were similar (P=0.497), whereas administration of BTX type A significantly decreased flap necrosis area in the rats exposed to CS (the mean necrosis areas were 41.5% in the CS group, and 26% in the CS+BTX group; P<0.001). Histopathological examination findings corroborated the unfavourable effects of CS and preventive effects of BTX type A. CONCLUSION: Preoperative administration of BTX significantly enhanced flap viability in the rats exposed to CS. Further human studies are warranted to verify whether BTX type A could be used as an agent to reduce the risk of flap necrosis in patients who smoke. PMID:26361625

  20. Antibodies Targeting Hsa and PadA Prevent Platelet Aggregation and Protect Rats against Experimental Endocarditis Induced by Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Stefano; Menzi, Carmen; Oechslin, Frank; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José Manuel

    2016-12-01

    Streptococcus gordonii and related species of oral viridans group streptococci (VGS) are common etiological agents of infective endocarditis (IE). We explored vaccination as a strategy to prevent VGS-IE, using a novel antigen-presenting system based on non-genetically modified Lactococcus lactis displaying vaccinogens on its surface. Hsa and PadA are surface-located S. gordonii proteins implicated in platelet adhesion and aggregation, which are key steps in the pathogenesis of IE. This function makes them ideal targets for vaccination against VGS-IE. In the present study, we report the use of nonliving L. lactis displaying at its surface the N-terminal region of Hsa or PadA by means of the cell wall binding domain of Lactobacillus casei A2 phage lysine LysA2 (Hsa-LysA2 and PadA-LysA2, respectively) and investigation of their ability to elicit antibodies in rats and to protect them from S. gordonii experimental IE. Immunized and control animals with catheter-induced sterile aortic valve vegetations were inoculated with 10(6) CFU of S. gordonii The presence of IE was evaluated 24 h later. Immunization of rats with L. lactis Hsa-LysA2, L. lactis PadA-LysA2, or both protected 6/11 (55%), 6/11 (55%), and 11/12 (91%) animals, respectively, from S. gordonii IE (P < 0.05 versus controls). Protection correlated with the induction of high levels of functional antibodies against both Hsa and PadA that delayed or totally inhibited platelet aggregation by S. gordonii These results support the value of L. lactis as a system for antigen delivery and of Hsa and PadA as promising candidates for a vaccine against VGS-IE. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Antibodies Targeting Hsa and PadA Prevent Platelet Aggregation and Protect Rats against Experimental Endocarditis Induced by Streptococcus gordonii

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Stefano; Menzi, Carmen; Oechslin, Frank; Moreillon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii and related species of oral viridans group streptococci (VGS) are common etiological agents of infective endocarditis (IE). We explored vaccination as a strategy to prevent VGS-IE, using a novel antigen-presenting system based on non-genetically modified Lactococcus lactis displaying vaccinogens on its surface. Hsa and PadA are surface-located S. gordonii proteins implicated in platelet adhesion and aggregation, which are key steps in the pathogenesis of IE. This function makes them ideal targets for vaccination against VGS-IE. In the present study, we report the use of nonliving L. lactis displaying at its surface the N-terminal region of Hsa or PadA by means of the cell wall binding domain of Lactobacillus casei A2 phage lysine LysA2 (Hsa-LysA2 and PadA-LysA2, respectively) and investigation of their ability to elicit antibodies in rats and to protect them from S. gordonii experimental IE. Immunized and control animals with catheter-induced sterile aortic valve vegetations were inoculated with 106 CFU of S. gordonii. The presence of IE was evaluated 24 h later. Immunization of rats with L. lactis Hsa-LysA2, L. lactis PadA-LysA2, or both protected 6/11 (55%), 6/11 (55%), and 11/12 (91%) animals, respectively, from S. gordonii IE (P < 0.05 versus controls). Protection correlated with the induction of high levels of functional antibodies against both Hsa and PadA that delayed or totally inhibited platelet aggregation by S. gordonii. These results support the value of L. lactis as a system for antigen delivery and of Hsa and PadA as promising candidates for a vaccine against VGS-IE. PMID:27736784

  2. Preventive effect of chrysin on experimental autoimmune uveitis triggered by injection of human IRBP peptide 1-20 in mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangda; Fang, Sijie; Zhang, Zhuhong; Wang, Yang; You, Caiyun; Zhang, Jingkai; Yan, Hua

    2016-03-21

    Uveitis is a common cause of blindness worldwide. Experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) is an animal model of noninfectious uveitis. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a member of the flavonoid family and has anti-inflammatory effects. We immunized C57BL/6J mice with human interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein peptide 1-20 to induce EAU. Chrysin was administered intragastrically at 25 mg/kg daily to the chrysin-treated mice from 3 days before immunization to 21 days after immunization. Vehicle was administered to the mice in the control group according to the same protocol. Lower clinical and histopathological scores, increased integrity of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and higher expression of tight junction proteins were observed in the chrysin-treated mice. Chrysin significantly decreased the proportions of Th1, Th17 and CD4(+)CD3(+)CD62L(+) Th0 cells, and increased the proportion of Treg cells. Both macrophage infiltration and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the retina were efficiently inhibited by chrysin treatment. In chrysin-treated mice, the expression of interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α was reduced in the retina, whereas higher levels of transforming growth factor-β were detected. Furthermore, NF-κBp65 was downregulated after chrysin treatment. In conclusion, as an anti-inflammatory molecule, chrysin exerts a preventive effect on EAU by modulating the balance among helper T-cell subsets and suppressing ocular inflammation, thereby maintaining the integrity of the BRB.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 21 March 2016; doi:10.1038/cmi.2015.107.

  3. 17β-estradiol prevents experimentally-induced oxidative damage to membrane lipids and nuclear DNA in porcine ovary.

    PubMed

    Stepniak, Jan; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens, with their principle representative 17β-estradiol, contribute to the redox state of cells showing both pro- and antioxidative properties. In the ovary, being the main source of estrogens, maintaining balance between the production and detoxification of ROS is crucial. Whereas ovary estrogen concentration is difficult to estimate, its circulating concentration in women may reach the nanomolar level. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of 17β-estradiol on oxidative damage to membrane lipids (lipid peroxidation, LPO) and to nuclear DNA in the porcine ovary under basal conditions and in the presence of Fenton reaction (Fe(2+)+H2O2→Fe(3+)+(•)OH + OH(-)) substrates. Ovary homogenates and DNA were incubated in the presence of 17β-estradiol (1 mM-1 pM), without/with FeSO4 (30 μM) + H2O2 (0.5 mM). Malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals (MDA + 4-HDA) concentration (LPO index) was measured spectrophotometrically. The concentration of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) (DNA damage index) was measured by HPLC. We observed that 17β-estradiol did not alter the basal level of oxidative damage, but reduced Fe(2+)+H2O2-induced oxidative damage to membrane lipids when ≥10 nM and to DNA at concentrations ≥1 nM. In the ovary at near physiological concentration, 17β-estradiol prevents experimentally induced oxidative damage. This suggests that under physiological conditions this hormone may contribute to protecting the ovary against oxidative damage.

  4. Effect of Human Amniotic Membrane on Prevention of Colorectal Anastomosis Leakage in Cases with Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy: An Experimental Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Sam; Joraghi, Sajjad Ahmadi; Roshanravan, Reza; Ghahramani, Leila; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Hosseinzadeh, Masood; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Hussein, Ahmed Mohammed Ali; Najibpour, Neda; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy is one of the most important factors which results in negative effects on wound healing and increases anastomosis leakage. Diverting loop ileostomy has been usually performed after colorectal anastomosis in cases of colorectal cancer with a history of neoadjuvant radiotherapy to decrease the chance of leakage. Considering the side effects of diverting loop ileostomy, the objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of human amniotic membrane (HAM) on colorectal anastomosis leakage after neo-adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: In this experimental animal study, 20 crossbreed rabbits were randomly divided into two groups (case group: 13 rabbits, control group: 7 rabbits) after receiving an equal dose of external beam radiation. Four weeks after irradiation, resection of 4 cm of colorectal segment and end-to-end single layer anastomosis were conducted. In the case group, a 2×2 cm wrap of HAM applied around the site of anastomosis. Eight weeks later, all the survived rabbits were sacrificed. A segment of anastomotic sites was resected in all expired and survived rabbits and sent for pathological evaluation. Mann-Whitney U Test (SPSS for Windows, Ver. 16, Chicago, IL) was applied to analyze healing scores between the two groups. Results: Due to anastomosis dehiscence, 5 rabbits expired in the control group, but all the 13 rabbits (case group) survived after 8 weeks and showed no leakage. In addition, pathological evaluation revealed significant epithelialization and neovascularization in the case group. Statistically, healing score was higher in the case group rather than the control group (P<0.001). Conclusion: To prevent post irradiation colorectal anastomosis leakage, the use of HAM might play a significant role and a feasible technical approach. PMID:27853330

  5. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  6. Isolation, sequence identification and tissue expression profile of two novel soybean (glycine max) genes-vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, G Y

    2009-09-01

    The complete mRNA sequences of two soybean (glycine max) genes-vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase, were amplified using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. The sequence analysis of these two genes revealed that soybean vestitone reductase gene encodes a protein of 327 amino acids which has high homology with the vestitone reductase of Medicago sativa (77%). The soybean chalcone reductase gene encodes a protein of 314 amino acids that has high homology with the chalcone reductase of kudzu vine (88%) and medicago sativa (83%). The expression profiles of the soybean vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase genes were studied and the results indicated that these two soybean genes were differentially expressed in detected soybean tissues including leaves, stems, roots, inflorescences, embryos and endosperm. Our experiment established the foundation for further research on these two soybean genes.

  7. Epalrestat: an aldose reductase inhibitor for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Mary Ann; Borja, Nancy L

    2008-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common long-term complications in patients with diabetes mellitus, with a prevalence of 60-70% in the United States. Treatment options include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, tramadol, and capsaicin. These agents are modestly effective for symptomatic relief, but they do not affect the underlying pathology nor do they slow progression of the disease. Epalrestat is an aldose reductase inhibitor that is approved in Japan for the improvement of subjective neuropathy symptoms, abnormality of vibration sense, and abnormal changes in heart beat associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Unlike the current treatment options for diabetic neuropathy, epalrestat may affect or delay progression of the underlying disease process. Data from experimental studies indicate that epalrestat reduces sorbitol accumulation in the sciatic nerve, erythrocytes, and ocular tissues in animals, and in erythrocytes in humans. Data from six clinical trials were evaluated, and it was determined that epalrestat 50 mg 3 times/day may improve motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and subjective neuropathy symptoms as compared with baseline and placebo. Epalrestat is well tolerated, and the most frequently reported adverse effects include elevations in liver enzyme levels and gastrointestinal-related events such as nausea and vomiting. Epalrestat may serve as a new therapeutic option to prevent or slow the progression of diabetic neuropathy. Long-term, comparative studies in diverse patient populations are needed for clinical application.

  8. The 15kDa selenoprotein and thioredoxin reductase 1 promote colon cancer by different pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Yoo, Min-Hyuk; Naranjo-Suarez, Salvador; Xu, Xue-Ming; He, Yiwen; Asaki, Esther; Seifried, Harold E; Reinhold, William C; Davis, Cindy D; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2015-01-01

    Selenoproteins mediate much of the cancer-preventive properties of the essential nutrient selenium, but some of these proteins have been shown to also have cancer-promoting effects. We examined the contributions of the 15kDa selenoprotein (Sep15) and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1) to cancer development. Targeted down-regulation of either gene inhibited anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth and formation of experimental metastases of mouse colon carcinoma CT26 cells. Surprisingly, combined deficiency of Sep15 and TR1 reversed the anti-cancer effects observed with down-regulation of each single gene. We found that inflammation-related genes regulated by Stat-1, especially interferon-γ-regulated guanylate-binding proteins, were highly elevated in Sep15-deficient, but not in TR1-deficient cells. Interestingly, components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were up-regulated in cells lacking both TR1 and Sep15. These results suggest that Sep15 and TR1 participate in interfering regulatory pathways in colon cancer cells. Considering the variable expression levels of Sep15 and TR1 found within the human population, our results provide insights into new roles of selenoproteins in cancer.

  9. Rac1-mediated effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Adam, Oliver; Laufs, Ulrich

    2014-03-10

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) lower serum cholesterol concentrations and are beneficial in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. The positive clinical effects have only partially been reproduced with other lipid-lowering interventions suggesting potential statin effects in addition to cholesterol lowering. In experimental models, direct beneficial cardiovascular effects that are mediated by the inhibition of isoprenoids have been documented, which serve as lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules such as small Rho guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins, whose membrane localization and function are dependent on isoprenylation. Rac1 GTPase is an established master regulator of cell motility through the cortical actin reorganization and of reactive oxygen species generation through the regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity. Observations in cells, animals, and humans have implicated the activation of Rac1 GTPase as a key component of cardiovascular pathologies, including the endothelial dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, atrial fibrillation, stroke, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, the underlying signal transduction remains incompletely understood. Based on the recent advance made in Rac1 research in the cardiovascular system by using mouse models with transgenic overexpression of activated Rac1 or conditional knockout, as well as Rac1-specific small molecule inhibitor NSC 23766, the improved understanding of the Rac1-mediated effects statins may help to identify novel therapeutic targets and strategies.

  10. The prenyltransferase UBIAD1 is the target of geranylgeraniol in degradation of HMG CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Marc M; Elsabrouty, Rania; Seemann, Joachim; Jo, Youngah; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder in humans characterized by abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in the cornea. SCD-associated mutations have been identified in the gene encoding UBIAD1, a prenyltransferase that synthesizes vitamin K2. Here, we show that sterols stimulate binding of UBIAD1 to the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMG CoA reductase, which is subject to sterol-accelerated, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation augmented by the nonsterol isoprenoid geranylgeraniol through an unknown mechanism. Geranylgeraniol inhibits binding of UBIAD1 to reductase, allowing its degradation and promoting transport of UBIAD1 from the ER to the Golgi. CRISPR-CAS9-mediated knockout of UBIAD1 relieves the geranylgeraniol requirement for reductase degradation. SCD-associated mutations in UBIAD1 block its displacement from reductase in the presence of geranylgeraniol, thereby preventing degradation of reductase. The current results identify UBIAD1 as the elusive target of geranylgeraniol in reductase degradation, the inhibition of which may contribute to accumulation of cholesterol in SCD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05560.001 PMID:25742604

  11. Curcumin is a tight-binding inhibitor of the most efficient human daunorubicin reductase--Carbonyl reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Hornung, Jan; Ebert, Bettina; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund

    2015-06-05

    Curcumin is a major component of the plant Curcuma longa L. It is traditionally used as a spice and coloring in foods and is an important ingredient in curry. Curcuminoids have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and gained increasing attention as potential neuroprotective and cancer preventive compounds. In the present study, we report that curcumin is a potent tight-binding inhibitor of human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1, Ki=223 nM). Curcumin acts as a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate 2,3-hexandione as revealed by plotting IC50-values against various substrate concentrations and most likely as a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH. Molecular modeling supports the finding that curcumin occupies the cofactor binding site of CBR1. Interestingly, CBR1 is one of the most effective human reductases in converting the anthracycline anti-tumor drug daunorubicin to daunorubicinol. The secondary alcohol metabolite daunorubicinol has significantly reduced anti-tumor activity and shows increased cardiotoxicity, thereby limiting the clinical use of daunorubicin. Thus, inhibition of CBR1 may increase the efficacy of daunorubicin in cancer tissue and simultaneously decrease its cardiotoxicity. Western-blots demonstrated basal expression of CBR1 in several cell lines. Significantly less daunorubicin reduction was detected after incubating A549 cell lysates with increasing concentrations of curcumin (up to 60% less with 50 μM curcumin), suggesting a beneficial effect in the co-treatment of anthracycline anti-tumor drugs together with curcumin.

  12. Crystal Structure of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae 3'-Phosphoadenosine-5'-Phosphosulfate Reductase Complexed With Adenosine 3',5'-Bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Lemongello, D.; Segel, I.H.; Fisher, A.J.

    2009-05-28

    Most assimilatory bacteria, fungi, and plants species reduce sulfate (in the activated form of APS or PAPS) to produce reduced sulfur. In yeast, PAPS reductase reduces PAPS to sulfite and PAP. Despite the difference in substrate specificity and catalytic cofactor, PAPS reductase is homologous to APS reductase in both sequence and structure, and they are suggested to share the same catalytic mechanism. Metazoans do not possess the sulfate reduction pathway, which makes APS/PAPS reductases potential drug targets for human pathogens. Here, we present the 2.05 A resolution crystal structure of the yeast PAPS reductase binary complex with product PAP bound. The N-terminal region mediates dimeric interactions resulting in a unique homodimer assembly not seen in previous APS/PAPS reductase structures. The 'pyrophosphate-binding' sequence (47)TTAFGLTG(54) defines the substrate 3'-phosphate binding pocket. In yeast, Gly54 replaces a conserved aspartate found in APS reductases vacating space and charge to accommodate the 3'-phosphate of PAPS, thus regulating substrate specificity. Also, for the first time, the complete C-terminal catalytic motif (244)ECGIH(248) is revealed in the active site. The catalytic residue Cys245 is ideally positioned for an in-line attack on the beta-sulfate of PAPS. In addition, the side chain of His248 is only 4.2 A from the Sgamma of Cys245 and may serve as a catalytic base to deprotonate the active site cysteine. A hydrophobic sequence (252)RFAQFL(257) at the end of the C-terminus may provide anchoring interactions preventing the tail from swinging away from the active site as seen in other APS/PAPS reductases.

  13. Fumarate Reductase Activity of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Aue, B. J.; Diebel, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Some characteristics of a fumarate reductase from Streptococcus faecalis are described. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.4; optimal activity was observed when the ionic strength of the phosphate buffer was adjusted to 0.088. The Km value of the enzyme for reduced flavin mononucleotide was 2 × 10−4 m as determined with a 26-fold preparation. In addition to fumarate, the enzyme reduced maleate and mesaconate. No succinate dehydrogenase activity was detected, but succinate did act as an inhibitor of the fumarate reductase activity. Other inhibitors were malonate, citraconate, and trans-, trans-muconate. Metal-chelating agents did not inhibit the enzyme. A limited inhibition by sulfhydryl-binding agents was observed, and the preparations were sensitive to air oxidation and storage. Glycine, alanine, histidine, and possibly lysine stimulated fumarate reductase activity in the cell-free extracts. However, growth in media supplemented with glycine did not enhance fumarate reductase activity. The enzymatic activity appears to be constitutive. PMID:4960892

  14. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  15. Synthesis of symmetric disulfides as potential alternative substrates for trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Jaouhari, R; Besheya, T; McKie, J H; Douglas, K T

    1995-12-01

    The synthesis of a series of symmetrical disulfides as potential substrates of trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase was described. The key intermediate in the synthetic approach was the choice of S-(t)butylmercapto-L-cysteine (1). The spermidine ring in the native substrate, trypanothione disulfide (TSST), was replaced with 3-dimethyl-aminopropylamine (DMAPA), while theγ-Glu moiety was replaced by phenylalanyl or tryptophanyl residues. The same modifications in theγ-Glu moiety of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) were applied.

  16. Identification of structural domains within the large subunit of herpes simplex virus ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Conner, J; Cross, A; Murray, J; Marsden, H

    1994-12-01

    The large subunit (R1) of herpes simplex virus (HSV) ribonucleotide reductase is a bifunctional protein consisting of a unique N-terminal protein kinase domain and a ribonucleotide reductase domain. Previous studies showed that the two functional domains are linked by a protease sensitive site. Here we provide evidence for two subdomains, of 30K and 53K, within the reductase domain. The two fragments, which were produced by limited proteolysis and were resistant to further degradation, remained tightly associated in a complex containing two molecules of each. They were capable of binding the R2 subunit of HSV ribonucleotide reductase with approximately the same affinity as the intact protein but the complex did not complement the small subunit (R2) to give an active enzyme. At low concentrations (0.4 micrograms/ml) of trypsin or V8 protease, cleavage between the subdomains was prevented by the presence of the N-terminal protein kinase domain. At higher protease concentrations (1 micrograms/ml) the N-terminal domain is extensively proteolysed and the 30K and 53K domains were generated. Identical results were obtained using purified R1 isolated from infected cell extracts or following expression in Escherichia coli. The origin of the two domains was investigated by N-terminal sequencing of the 53K fragment and by examining their reactivity with a panel of R1-specific monoclonal antibodies which we isolated and epitope mapped for that purpose. The trypsin cleavage site was found to lie between arginine 575 and asparagine 576, and proteolysis in this region was not prevented by the presence of R2 or the nonapeptide YAGAVVNDL. We propose that the ribonucleotide reductase region of HSV R1 exists in a two domain structure, and that the interdomain linking region is protected by the unique N terminus.

  17. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  18. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  19. Control of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Leys, E.J.; Kellems, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The authors used methotrexate-resistant mouse cells in which dihydrofolate reductase levels are approximately 500 times normal to study the effect of growth stimulation on dihydrofolate reductase gene expression. As a result of growth stimulation, the relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase protein synthesis increased threefold, reaching a maximum between 25 and 30 h after stimulation. The relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production (i.e., the appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm) increased threefold after growth stimulation and was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the relative steady-state level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid in the nucleus. However, the increase in the nuclear level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid was not accompanied by a significant increase in the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes. These data indicated that the relative rate of appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm depends on the relative stability of the dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid sequences in the nucleus and is not dependent on the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes.

  20. Augmentation of CFTR maturation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sawczak, Victoria; Zaidi, Atiya; Butler, Maya; Bennett, Deric; Getsy, Paulina; Zeinomar, Maryam; Greenberg, Zivi; Forbes, Michael; Rehman, Shagufta; Jyothikumar, Vinod; DeRonde, Kim; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Straub, Adam; Sun, Fei; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi; Randell, Scott; Kelley, Thomas J.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase regulates novel endogenous S-nitrosothiol signaling pathways, and mice deficient in GSNO reductase are protected from airways hyperreactivity. S-nitrosothiols are present in the airway, and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) tend to have low S-nitrosothiol levels that may be attributed to upregulation of GSNO reductase activity. The present study demonstrates that 1) GSNO reductase activity is increased in the cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o−) cells expressing mutant F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) compared with the wild-type CFBE41o− cells, 2) GSNO reductase expression level is increased in the primary human bronchial epithelial cells expressing mutant F508del-CFTR compared with the wild-type cells, 3) GSNO reductase colocalizes with cochaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop; Stip1) in human airway epithelial cells, 4) GSNO reductase knockdown with siRNA increases the expression and maturation of CFTR and decreases Stip1 expression in human airway epithelial cells, 5) increased levels of GSNO reductase cause a decrease in maturation of CFTR, and 6) a GSNO reductase inhibitor effectively reverses the effects of GSNO reductase on CFTR maturation. These studies provide a novel approach to define the subcellular location of the interactions between Stip1 and GSNO reductase and the role of S-nitrosothiols in these interactions. PMID:26637637

  1. A defect in sodium-dependent amino acid uptake in diabetic rabbit peripheral nerve. Correction by an aldose reductase inhibitor or myo-inositol administration.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, D A; Lattimer, S A; Carroll, P B; Fernstrom, J D; Finegold, D N

    1990-01-01

    A myo-inositol-related defect in nerve sodium-potassium ATPase activity in experimental diabetes has been suggested as a possible pathogenetic factor in diabetic neuropathy. Because the sodium-potassium ATPase is essential for other sodium-cotransport systems, and because myo-inositol-derived phosphoinositide metabolites regulate multiple membrane transport processes, sodium gradient-dependent amino acid uptake was examined in vitro in endoneurial preparations derived from nondiabetic and 14-d alloxan diabetic rabbits. Untreated alloxan diabetes reduced endoneurial sodium-gradient dependent uptake of the nonmetabolized amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid by greater than 50%. Administration of an aldose reductase inhibitor prevented reductions in both nerve myo-inositol content and endoneurial sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. Myo-inositol supplementation that produced a transient pharmacological elevation in plasma myo-inositol concentration, but did not raise nerve myo-inositol content, reproduced the effect of the aldose reductase inhibitor on endoneurial sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. Phorbol myristate acetate, which acutely normalizes sodium-potassium ATPase activity in diabetic nerve, did not acutely correct 2-aminoisobutyric uptake when added in vitro. These data suggest that depletion of a small myo-inositol pool may be implicated in the pathogenesis of defects in amino acid uptake in diabetic nerve and that rapid correction of sodium-potassium ATPase activity with protein kinase C agonists in vitro does not acutely normalize sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. PMID:2185278

  2. Inhibition of pea ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase by Zn-ferrocyanide.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Daniela L Catalano; Rial, Daniela V; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A

    2004-11-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) represent a prototype of enzymes involved in numerous metabolic pathways. We found that pea FNR ferricyanide diaphorase activity was inhibited by Zn2+ (Ki 1.57 microM). Dichlorophenolindophenol diaphorase activity was also inhibited by Zn2+ (Ki 1.80 microM), but the addition of ferrocyanide was required, indicating that the inhibitor is an arrangement of both ions. Escherichia coli FNR was also inhibited by Zn-ferrocyanide, suggesting that inhibition is a consequence of common structural features of these flavoenzymes. The inhibitor behaves in a noncompetitive manner for NADPH and for artificial electron acceptors. Analysis of the oxidation state of the flavin during catalysis in the presence of the inhibitor suggests that the electron-transfer process between NADPH and the flavin is not significantly altered, and that the transfer between the flavin and the second substrate is mainly affected. Zn-ferrocyanide interacts with the reductase, probably increasing the accessibility of the prosthetic group to the solvent. Ferredoxin reduction was also inhibited by Zn-ferrocyanide in a noncompetitive manner, but the observed Ki was about nine times higher than those for the diaphorase reactions. The electron transfer to Anabaena flavodoxin was not affected by Zn-ferrocyanide. Binding of the apoflavodoxin to the reductase was sufficient to overcome the inhibition by Zn-ferrocyanide, suggesting that the interaction of FNRs with their proteinaceous electron partners may induce a conformational change in the reductase that alters or completely prevents the inhibitory effect.

  3. Copper-dependent inhibition and oxidative inactivation with affinity cleavage of yeast glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Tsubouchi, Ryoko; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshino, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    Effects of copper on the activity and oxidative inactivation of yeast glutathione reductase were analyzed. Glutathione reductase from yeast was inhibited by cupric ion and more potently by cuprous ion. Copper ion inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively with respect to the substrate GSSG and NADPH. The Ki values of the enzyme for Cu(2+) and Cu(+) ion were determined to be 1 and 0.35 μM, respectively. Copper-dependent inactivation of glutathione reductase was also analyzed. Hydrogen peroxide and copper/ascorbate also caused an inactivation with the cleavage of peptide bond of the enzyme. The inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme was prevented by addition of catalase, suggesting that hydroxyl radical produced through the cuprous ion-dependent reduction of oxygen is responsible for the inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme. SDS-PAGE and TOF-MS analysis confirmed eight fragments, which were further determined to result from the cleavage of the Met17-Ser18, Asn20-Thr21, Glu251-Gly252, Ser420-Pro421, Pro421-Thr422 bonds of the enzyme by amino-terminal sequencing analysis. Based on the kinetic analysis and no protective effect of the substrates, GSSG and NADPH on the copper-mediated inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme, copper binds to the sites apart from the substrate-sites, causing the peptide cleavage by hydroxyl radical. Copper-dependent oxidative inactivation/fragmentation of glutathione reductase can explain the prooxidant properties of copper under the in vivo conditions.

  4. Is there an optimal pacing site to prevent atrial fibrillation?: an experimental study in the chronically instrumented goat.

    PubMed

    Duytschaever, Mattias; Danse, Peter; Eysbouts, Sabine; Allessie, Maurits

    2002-12-01

    Atrial pacing can reduce the number of recurrences of atrial fibrillation (AF). It is unclear the extent to which this effect is determined by the site(s) of pacing. In six electrically remodeled goats (24-hour AF), the window of inducibility of AF was determined by applying premature stimuli (S1-S2) at the right (RA) or left (LA) atrium (baseline values). Determination of the window of inducibility of AF at RA and LA was repeated during preventive pacing at four sites: RA, LA, Bachmann's bundle (BB), and RA+LA (biatrial). Mapping was used to elucidate the mechanisms of prevention of AF. At baseline, the window of inducibility of AF was 49 +/- 9 msec at RA and 45 +/- 17 msec at LA. Initiation of AF was associated with conduction block of the premature beat at BB. Preventive pacing at BB markedly shortened the window of inducibility of AF at RA (25 +/- 11 msec) and LA (17 +/- 8 msec, P < 0.01). Pacing at RA only shortened the window of inducibility of AF at LA (23 +/- 9 msec, P < 0.01), whereas pacing at LA only shortened the window of inducibility of AF at RA (23 +/- 11 msec, P < 0.01). Biatrial pacing failed to shorten the window of inducibility of AF both at RA and LA. Prevention of AF by pacing was due to prolongation of the premature interval at BB. In the caprine model of AF, BB is a critical area of conduction of premature beats and initiation of AF. Pacing at BB can prevent but not completely abolish the initiation of AF by single premature beats (shortening of the window of inducibility). Prevention of AF by pacing is based on prolongation of the premature interval at BB, thus preventing conduction block and reentry. In general, the optimal site for preventive pacing is close to the area of block and remote from the origin of premature beats.

  5. An Evaluation of a Teat Dip with Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonic Acid in Preventing Bovine Mammary Gland Infection from Experimental Exposure to Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, D. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Brooks, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teat dip with dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (1.94%) for the prevention of intramammary infections was determined in cows experimentally challenged with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus. The infection rates with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus were 62.5% and 75% in undipped quarters, 12.5% and 21.5% in dipped quarters with a reduction rate of 80% and 71% respectively. The significance of some findings in relation to mastitis control are discussed. PMID:17422110

  6. Evaluation of Biodegradable Cefazolin Sodium Microspheres for the Prevention of Infection in Rabbits with Experimental Open Tibial Fractures Stabilized with Internal Fixation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    therapy with biodegradable polv-(IDL,- lactide - co-glycolide) cefazolin-loaded microspheres for the prevention of infection in experimental open...risk of infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of local antibiotic therapy with biodegradable poly-(DL- lactide -co-glycolide...antibiotic Bacterial Inoculum was microencapsulated in a copolymer of poly-(DL- lactide -co-glycolide) that gradually biodegrades to Staphylococcus aureus

  7. Real-Time Smart Grids Control for Preventing Cascading Failures and Blackout using Neural Networks: Experimental Approach for N-1-1 Contingency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrabian, Sina; Belkacemi, Rabie; Babalola, Adeniyi A.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel intelligent control is proposed based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to mitigate cascading failure (CF) and prevent blackout in smart grid systems after N-1-1 contingency condition in real-time. The fundamental contribution of this research is to deploy the machine learning concept for preventing blackout at early stages of its occurrence and to make smart grids more resilient, reliable, and robust. The proposed method provides the best action selection strategy for adaptive adjustment of generators' output power through frequency control. This method is able to relieve congestion of transmission lines and prevent consecutive transmission line outage after N-1-1 contingency condition. The proposed ANN-based control approach is tested on an experimental 100 kW test system developed by the authors to test intelligent systems. Additionally, the proposed approach is validated on the large-scale IEEE 118-bus power system by simulation studies. Experimental results show that the ANN approach is very promising and provides accurate and robust control by preventing blackout. The technique is compared to a heuristic multi-agent system (MAS) approach based on communication interchanges. The ANN approach showed more accurate and robust response than the MAS algorithm.

  8. Material and Social Incentives to Participation in Behavioral Interventions: A Meta-Analysis of Gender Disparities in Enrollment and Retention in Experimental Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Durantini, Marta R.; Albarracín, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Objective A meta-analysis was conducted to test theoretical hypotheses about the predictors of enrollment and completion of condom-use-promotion interventions among men and women. Design A meta-analysis summarized research reports of the efficacy of experimental interventions on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. Main Outcome Measures The outcome measure consisted of (a) a measure of participation, obtained by subtracting the actual number of participants from the number of the invited people, and (b) a measure of retention was obtained by subtracting the number of participants who completed the intervention from the number of commencers. Results Experimental interventions providing instrumental and financial resources (e.g., payments) increased initiation and retention more among predominantly male samples, whereas experimental interventions using group formats increased initiation and retention more among predominantly female samples. These patterns remained while controlling for past condom use, other HIV-risk behaviors, and demographics associated with gender composition. Conclusion People seek out HIV-prevention interventions to fulfill gender-specific needs, and these differences must be taken into account in the design of HIV-prevention interventions. PMID:19751090

  9. The Role of Friends' Disruptive Behavior in the Development of Children's Tobacco Experimentation: Results from a Preventive Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol A. C.; Huizink, Anja; Vuijk, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Having friends who engage in disruptive behavior in childhood may be a risk factor for childhood tobacco experimentation. This study tested the role of friends' disruptive behavior as a mediator of the effects of a classroom based intervention on children's tobacco experimentation. 433 Children (52% males) were randomly assigned to the Good…

  10. The Role of Friends' Disruptive Behavior in the Development of Children's Tobacco Experimentation: Results from a Preventive Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol A. C.; Huizink, Anja; Vuijk, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Having friends who engage in disruptive behavior in childhood may be a risk factor for childhood tobacco experimentation. This study tested the role of friends' disruptive behavior as a mediator of the effects of a classroom based intervention on children's tobacco experimentation. 433 Children (52% males) were randomly assigned to the Good…

  11. Mechanism of inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with motexafin gadolinium (MGd)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahedi Avval, Farnaz; Berndt, Carsten; Pramanik, Aladdin; Holmgren, Arne

    2009-02-13

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is an expanded porphyrin anticancer agent which selectively targets tumor cells and works as a radiation enhancer, with promising results in clinical trials. Its mechanism of action is oxidation of intracellular reducing molecules and acting as a direct inhibitor of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). This paper focuses on the mechanism of inhibition of RNR by MGd. Our experimental data present at least two pathways for inhibition of RNR; one precluding subunits oligomerization and the other direct inhibition of the large catalytic subunit of the enzyme. Co-localization of MGd and RNR in the cytoplasm particularly in the S-phase may account for its inhibitory properties. These data can elucidate an important effect of MGd on the cancer cells with overproduction of RNR and its efficacy as an anticancer agent and not only as a general radiosensitizer.

  12. FRUCTOSE-6-PHOSPHATE REDUCTASE FROM SALMONELLA GALLINARUM

    PubMed Central

    Zancan, Glaci T.; Bacila, Metry

    1964-01-01

    Zancan, Glaci T. (Universidade do Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil), and Metry Bacila. Fructose-6-phosphate reductase from Salmonella gallinarum. J. Bacteriol. 87:614–618. 1964.—A fructose-6-phosphate reductase present in cell-free extracts of Salmonella gallinarum was purified approximately 42 times. The optimal pH for this enzyme is 8.0. The enzyme is specific for fructose-6-phosphate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The dissociation constants are 1.78 × 10−4m for fructose-6-phosphate and 8.3 × 10−5m for NADH. The Q10, reaction order, and equilibrium constant were determined. The enzyme is sensitive to p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, but not to o-iodosobenzoic acid nor to N-ethylmaleimide. PMID:14127579

  13. Characterization of human platelet glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Moroff, G; Kosow, D P

    1978-12-08

    Glutathione reductase (NAD(P)h:oxidized glutathione oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 1000-fold from the cytoplasmic fraction of human platelets. Salts, including the heretofore unreported effect of sodium citrate, activate the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione. Sodium citrate and monovalent salt activation appears to involve multiple sites having different binding affinities. At sub-saturating sodium phosphate, non-linear double reciprocal plots indicative of substrate activation by oxidized glutathione were observed. Initial velocity double reciprocal plots at sub-saturating and saturating concentrations of phosphate generate a family of converging lines. NADP+ is a partial inhibitor, indicating that the reduction of oxidized glutathione can proceed by more than one pathway. FMN, FAD, and riboflavin inhibit platelet glutathione reductase by influencing only the V while nitrofurantoin inhibition is associated with an increase Koxidized glutathione and a decreased V.

  14. [Prevention of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides for high power microwave radiation induced testicular injury in rats: an experimental research].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Wei; Zhong, Xiu-Hong; Sun, Yan-Mei; Yang, Shu-Yan; Shen, Nan; Zhang, Yi-Zhong; Yang, Ning-Jiang; Ren, Kuang; Lu, Shi-Jie

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effect of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides on testicular injury induced by exposure to high power microwave (HPM) in rats. A total of 30 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, i.e., the normal control group, the microwave radiation model group, the treatment group, the new microwave radiation model group, and the prevention group, 6 in each group. All rats, except those in the normal control group, were exposed to microwave at an average power density of 200 mW/cm2 for 6 min. Rats in the control group and the model group were administered with normal saline by gastrogavage, once a day. Rats in the treatment group and the prevention group were given with Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides by gastrogavage, 2 mL each time (400 mg/kg body weight), once a day. All rats were sacrificed on the 11th day.The sperm density and the rate of sperm deformity were determined. Pathological changes of testis were observed by light microscope and transmission electron microscope. Short-term HPM irradiation could significantly reduce the sperm density and increase the sperm deformity rate (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, obvious pathological changes of testes occurred. Compared with the two model groups, the sperm density increased and the sperm deformity rate decreased in the treatment group and the prevention group (P < 0.05). Under the light microscope, injuries of spermatogenic cells and stromal cells, as well as vascular dilatation and congestion were obviously alleviated in the treatment group and the prevention group. Mitochondrial swelling and endoplasmic reticulum expansion shown by ultrastructural observation were also significantly alleviated. Of them, injuries of spermatogenic cells and inflammation response were milder in the treatment group than in the prevention group. Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides had significant protective effect on microwave radiation induced testicular injury. Better effect was obtained by therapeutic medication than

  15. Characterization of erythrose reductases from filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with putative erythrose reductase activity have been identified in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium graminearum by in silico analysis. The proteins found in T. reesei and A. niger had earlier been characterized as glycerol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase, respectively. Corresponding genes from all three fungi were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Subsequently, they were used to establish optimal enzyme assay conditions. All three enzymes strictly require NADPH as cofactor, whereas with NADH no activity could be observed. The enzymatic characterization of the three enzymes using ten substrates revealed high substrate specificity and activity with D-erythrose and D-threose. The enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger herein showed comparable activities, whereas the one from F. graminearum reached only about a tenth of it for all tested substrates. In order to proof in vivo the proposed enzyme function, we overexpressed the erythrose reductase-encoding gene in T. reesei. An increased production of erythritol by the recombinant strain compared to the parental strain could be detected. PMID:23924507

  16. One statin, two statins, three statins, more: similarities and differences of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2011-01-01

    Statin drugs (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are one of the most widely prescribed drugs today. They are considered first-line therapy to lower blood serum cholesterol levels in conjunction with therapeutic lifestyle changes for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. In the following discussion, a brief explanation of the background of statins will explain why they are deemed so important today. The similarities and differences between the different statins will be addressed, including a look at dosage, side effects, and cautions for the seven 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors currently available.

  17. Effect of Tinospora cordifolia on experimental diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nadig, Pratibha D.; Revankar, Roshni R.; Dethe, Shankar M.; Narayanswamy, Sriniwas B.; Aliyar, Meharban A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of stem of Tinospora cordifolia (TC) on hyperalgesia in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and in- vitro aldose reductase inhibition. Materials and Methods: Wistar albino rats, rendered diabetic with streptozotocin, were divided into 5 groups, namely the diabetic control treated with vehicle (DC), standard control which received glibenclamide+metformin (SC), test groups treated with 100, 200and 400 mg/kg b.w. of Tinospora cordifolia (TC1, TC2 and TC3 respectively). A group of five normal animals served as normal control (NC). Fasting blood glucose, body weight and reaction time to tail flick were measured one week after induction of diabetes. The animals were then treated orally for two weeks after which the same parameters were repeated. In-vitro aldose reductase inhibition assay was carried out at concentrations of 5, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mcg/ml of Tinospora cordifolia using rat lens from normal rats. The in-vivo results were analysed with Mann Whitney test. Results: The DC group demonstrated a decrease in the reaction time (hyperalgesia) compared to NC while a significant increase in the reaction time was observed with SC, TC2 and TC3 groups (p<0.05) as compared to the DC group. TC1 and TC2 showed a significant reduction in body weight compared to their baseline values (p<0.05). There was no significant change in the fasting blood glucose (FBS) in any of the groups. In-vitro aldose reductase inhibition was observed with TC with an IC50 of 103 mcg/ml. Conclusions: Tinospora cordifolia prevents the hyperalgesia in experimental diabetic neuropathy. It has an aldose reductase inhibitory activity in-vitro which may contribute to the beneficial effects. PMID:23112417

  18. Prevention of postoperative adhesions by a novel honeycomb-patterned poly(lactide) film in a rat experimental model.

    PubMed

    Fukuhira, Yukako; Ito, Masaya; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Sumi, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masaru; Yamamoto, Sadaaki; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2008-08-01

    Intraperitoneal adhesion is a serious problem concerning abdominal surgery. This study evaluated the performance of a honeycomb-patterned poly(lactide) (HCPLA) film as a physical barrier for preventing postoperative adhesion. HCPLA films were prepared using dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) or a copolymer of dodecylacrylamide and omega-carboxyhexylacrylamide (CAP) as a surfactant (HCPLA-DOPE and HCPLA-CAP, respectively). In an in vivo adhesion prevention experiment, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent standard cecum abrasion before midline laparotomy. We placed 2 cm x 2 cm HCPLA and flat films on the gliding interfaces; untreated rats formed the control group. After 1 week, adhesion was scored from 0 to 4. No significant difference was observed in the scores among groups, but macroscopic differences in adhesion prevention were observed. The adhesive strength of HCPLA-DOPE (18.1 +/- 1.2 g) to skinless chicken breast was significantly higher than that of the flat film (15.2 +/- 0.8 g, p < 0.05). Further, the adhesion score after 1 week for the HCPLA-DOPE group (1.6 +/- 0.2) was significantly lower than that for the control group (3.0 +/- 0.3, p < 0.05) but comparable to that for the Seprafilm group (1.4 +/- 0.3). These results demonstrated the potential of HCPLA-DOPE as a physical barrier for preventing postoperative adhesion.

  19. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26536144

  20. Molecular modeling toward selective inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase from the biological warfare agent Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Juliana O S; Mancini, Daiana T; Guimarães, Ana P; Gonçalves, Arlan S; da Cunha, Elaine F F; França, Tanos C C; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2015-02-16

    In the present work, we applied docking and molecular dynamics techniques to study 11 compounds inside the enzymes dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from the biological warfare agent Bacillus anthracis (BaDHFR) and Homo sapiens sapiens (HssDHFR). Six of these compounds were selected for a study with the mutant BaF96IDHFR. Our results corroborated with experimental data and allowed the proposition of a new molecule with potential activity and better selectivity for BaDHFR.

  1. How native-state topology affects the folding of dihydrofolate reductase and interleukin-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Cecilia; Jennings, Patricia A.; Onuchic, José N.

    2000-05-01

    The overall structure of the transition-state and intermediate ensembles observed experimentally for dihydrofolate reductase and interleukin-1 can be obtained by using simplified models that have almost no energetic frustration. The predictive power of these models suggests that, even for these very large proteins with completely different folding mechanisms and functions, real protein sequences are sufficiently well designed, and much of the structural heterogeneity observed in the intermediates and the transition-state ensembles is determined by topological effects.

  2. Effect of Lomodex-MgSO(4) in the prevention of reperfusion injury following unilateral testicular torsion: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Adivarekar, Prashant K; Bhagwat, Sarita S; Raghavan, Vijaya; Bandivdekar, A H

    2005-03-01

    Fertility in patients treated for unilateral testicular torsion has been shown to be significantly reduced in all the reported series to date, implying that the present-day treatment requires further refinement in the form of adjunct pharmacotherapeutic intervention (Lomodex and MgSO(4)) in addition to scrotal exploration. Prepubertal Holtzman strain rats (35 days old) were used for our study. Two sets were formed with six groups of rats in each set. Rats were treated as follows: group 1, sham-operated group; group 2, torsion (4 h); group 3, torsion + detorsion (1 h); group 4, torsion + ATP-MgCl(2) + detorsion; group 5, torsion + Lomodex-MgSO(4) + detorsion; group 6, torsion + normal saline + detorsion. Whereas the first set of animals was sacrificed immediately at the end of experiment, animals in set 2 were sacrificed 8 weeks after the end of the experiment to look for the development of antisperm antibodies. Parameters studied were thiobarbituric acid reductase (TBAR) assay, histology of testicular tissue, and sperm agglutination test. Student's t-test was used for significance. With detorsion (149.95+/-30.68) there was a significant rise in the TBAR values (P<0.05) compared with torsion (57.39+/-14.47). Treatment with both Lomodex-MgSO(4) (40.74+/-6.39) and ATP-MgCl(2) (48.30+/-18.35) yielded TBAR levels comparable to those in the sham group (31.35+/-11.96). Similar injury was also seen on the contralateral testis, with detorsion (114.28+/-10.68) much more detrimental than torsion (40.59+/-15.02) and rescue seen following treatment with Lomodex-MgSO(4) (27.55+/-8.64) as well as ATP-MgCl(2) (38.61+/-12.23). Regarding th histology, with detorsion there was evidence of severe distortion of tubules, with almost all the tubules showing maturation arrest and a few tubules completely devoid of any germinal cells. Treatment with Lomodex-MgSO(4) as well as ATP-MgCl(2) showed preservation of tubular morphology. Our study failed to document the presence of agglutinating

  3. Methionine sulfoxide reductase contributes to meeting dietary methionine requirements

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Kim, Geumsoo; Levine, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases are present in all aerobic organisms. They contribute to antioxidant defenses by reducing methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. However, the actual in vivo roles of these reductases are not well defined. Since methionine is an essential amino acid in mammals, we hypothesized that methionine sulfoxide reductases may provide a portion of the dietary methionine requirement by recycling methionine sulfoxide. We used a classical bioassay, the growth of weanling mice fed diets varying in methionine, and applied it to mice genetically engineered to alter the levels of methionine sulfoxide reductase A or B1. Mice of all genotypes were growth retarded when raised on chow containing 0.10% methionine instead of the standard 0.45% methionine. Retardation was significantly greater in knockout mice lacking both reductases. We conclude that the methionine sulfoxide reductases can provide methionine for growth in mice with limited intake of methionine, such as may occur in the wild. PMID:22521563

  4. Methylseleninate is a substrate rather than an inhibitor of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. Implications for the antitumor effects of selenium.

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Gross, Jurgen H

    2002-03-22

    Biochemical and clinical evidence indicates that monomethylated selenium compounds are crucial for the tumor preventive effects of the trace element selenium and that methylselenol (CH(3)SeH) is a key metabolite. As suggested by Ganther (Ganther, H. E. (1999) Carcinogenesis 20, 1657-1666), methylselenol and its precursor methylseleninate might exert their effects by inhibition of the selenoenzyme thioredoxin reductase via the irreversible formation of a diselenide bridge. Here we report that methylseleninate does not act as an inhibitor of mammalian thioredoxin reductase but is in fact an excellent substrate (K(m) of 18 microm, k(cat) of 23 s(-1)), which is reduced by the enzyme according to the equation 2 NADPH + 2 H(+) + CH(3)SeO(2)H --> 2 NADP(+) + 2 H(2)O + CH(3)SeH. The selenium-containing product of this reaction was identified by mass spectrometry. Nascent methylselenol was found to efficiently reduce both H(2)O(2) and glutathione disulfide. The implications of these findings for the antitumor activity of selenium are discussed. Methylseleninate was a poor substrate not only for human glutathione reductase but also for the non-selenium thioredoxin reductases enzymes from Drosophila melanogaster and Plasmodium falciparum. This suggests that the catalytic selenocysteine residue of mammalian thioredoxin reductase is essential for methylseleninate reduction.

  5. A comparison of the preventive effects of lanthanides and fluoride on human experimental root surface carious-like lesions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Jin, H; Liu, A

    1999-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of lanthanides prevention of human root surface carious-like lesions and to compare the effectiveness of lanthanum (La) with that of cerium (Ce) and fluoride (F). Various treatment procedures were also compared. Acetic buffers containing lanthanum, cerium, and fluoride (500 ppm) were used individually or in combination to treat 48 cementum-dentin samples. The acid-resistant capacity of various treatment procedures was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, and polarizing light microscope analyses. The acid-resistant effects of lanthanide element were comparable to those of fluoride, and their acid-resistant effects were even stronger when combined with fluoride and cerium. These effects are likely due to the formation of La(Ce)HAP, FLa(Ce)HAP, and lanthanum/cerium phosphate compounds. Combined F/La(Ce) was more effective in the prevention of root surface caries than were lanthanides alone.

  6. Expression, and Molecular and Enzymatic Characterization of Cu-Containing Nitrite Reductase from a Marine Ammonia-Oxidizing Gammaproteobacterium, Nitrosococcus oceani

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Keitaro; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) remove intracellular nitrite to prevent its toxicity by a nitrifier denitrification pathway involving two denitrifying enzymes, nitrite reductase and nitric oxide reductase. Here, a Cu-containing nitrite reductase from Nitrosococcus oceani strain NS58, a gammaproteobacterial marine AOB, was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Sequence homology analysis indicated that the nitrite reductase from N. oceani was phylogenetically closer to its counterparts from denitrifying bacteria than that of the betaproteobacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. The recombinant enzyme was a homotrimer of a 32 kDa subunit molecule. The enzyme was green in the oxidized state with absorption peaks at 455 nm and 575 nm. EPR spectroscopy indicated the presence of type 2 Cu. Molecular activities and the affinity constant for the nitrite were determined to be 1.6×103 s−1 and 52 μM, respectively. PMID:22641151

  7. Effect of Light on Chemical Modification of Chloroplast Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Nestor; Lucero, Héctor A.; Vallejos, Rubén H.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical modification of spinach chloroplasts by phenylglyoxal and dansyl chloride resulted in inhibition of NADP photoreduction. The rate of inactivation was higher with both reagents when modification was carried out in the light with methylviologen or phenazine methosulfate present. Uncouplers prevent the effect of light. Electron transport from water to methylviologen was not affected by the modifiers. The presence of 10 millimolar NADP completely protected the membrane-bound reductase against inactivation by phenylglyoxal. With lower concentrations, protection was higher in the light than in the dark. The apparent dissociation constants of the enzyme-substrate complex for NADP were 0.9 and 0.1 millimolar for the dark and light inactivation, respectively. Inactivation of NADP photoreduction by dansyl chloride was completely prevented by ferredoxin, but only partially by nucleotides. The diaphorase activity was inhibited in chloroplasts modified by phenylglyoxal, but not when modified by dansyl chloride. The results suggest that energizing thylakoid membranes by light induces a conformational change in membrane-bound ferredoxin-NADP reductase, and that the reductase is an allotopic enzyme. PMID:16661221

  8. An Experimental Study to Determine the Role of Inferior Vena Cava Filter in Preventing Bone Cement Implantation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wangang; Zheng, Qiangsun; Li, Bingling; Shi, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Dingcheng; Wang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inferior vena cava filters (IVCF) are frequently used for preventing pulmonary embolism (PE) following deep venous thromboembolism. Objectives: The present study was designed to investigate whether IVCF could prevent or impede the occurrence of bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS), since PE is considered as the central mechanism of BCIS. Materials and Methods: Fifteen sheep were divided into three groups: bone cement free (BCF) group, cement implantation (CI) group and IVCF group. In all the groups, an osteotomy proximal to the greater trochanter of left femur was carried out. In BCF group, the femoral canal was not reamed out or packed with any bone cement. In CI and IVCF groups, the left femoral canals were packed with bone cement, to simulate the cementing procedures carried out in hip replacement. An OptEase® filter was placed and released in inferior vena cava, prior to packing cement in the femoral canal in IVCF group, while the IVCF was not released in the CI group. The BCF group was considered as control. Results: Systolic blood pressure (SBP), saturation of oxygen (SaO2) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) declined significantly 10 min after the bone cement packing, in CI group, compared to those in BCF group. This was accompanied by a rise in the arterial pH. However, IVCF prevented those changes in the CI group. On ultrasonography, there were dotted echoes in right atrium in the CI group, after bone cement packing, while such echoes were hardly seen in the IVCF group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that IVCF could prevent BCIS effectively, and, as a corollary, suggests that PE represents the leading cause of the constellation of BCIS symptoms. PMID:26557267

  9. Application of a silver coating on plastic biliary stents to prevent biofilm formation: an experimental study using electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Wada, Ikuo; Shibukawa, Goro; Fujisawa, Mariko; Sato, Ai; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Hoshi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Biliary stent dysfunction is mainly caused by biliary sludge that forms as a result of bacterial adherence and subsequent biofilm formation on the inner surface of the stent. Silver ions arewell known to have excellent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms. In this study, we designed and constructed silver-coated plastic stent (PS) and investigated whether the silver coating prevented bacterial adherence and biofilm formation through the use of electron microscopy. Material and methods: The polyurethane PS with/without silver coating were prepared in 6-inch segments. The silver-based antimicrobial agents were electrostatically applied onto the stent surface. The stents were then immersed for 5 weeks in infected human bile juice obtained from a patient with cholangitis, and electron microscopy was used to investigate the ability of the modified PS to prevent bacterial adherence and biofilm formation. Results: The bacterial flora did not change before and after immersion of stents in both the group with and without silver coating. Electron microscopic observation revealed meshwork-like structures around the bacteria, characteristic of biofilm-forming bacteria, in all stents from the control group (6/6, 100 %). On the other hand, a limited number of bacteria were observed in all stents in the silver-coated group, and no apparent biofilm formation was observed (0/6, 0 %). Conclusions: The significance of the findings from our study is the ability of silver-coated PS to prevent biofilm formation on the stent surface, which results in the prevention of stent occlusion. PMID:27747284

  10. Experimental lung injury promotes alterations in energy metabolism and respiratory mechanics in the lungs of rats: prevention by exercise.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Maira J; da Cunha, Aline A; Scherer, Emilene B S; Machado, Fernanda Rossato; Loureiro, Samanta O; Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Guma, Fátima; Lago, Pedro Dal; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of lung injury on energy metabolism (succinate dehydrogenase, complex II, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP levels), respiratory mechanics (dynamic and static compliance, elastance and respiratory system resistance) in the lungs of rats, as well as on phospholipids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The protective effect of physical exercise on the alterations caused by lung injury, including lung edema was also evaluated. Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise. After this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide. Adult Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise and after this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide in dose 100 μg/100 g body weight. The sham group received isotonic saline instillation. Twelve hours after the injury was performed the respiratory mechanical and after the rats were decapitated and samples were collected. The rats subjected to lung injury presented a decrease in activities of the enzymes of the electron transport chain and ATP levels in lung, as well as the formation of pulmonary edema. A decreased lung dynamic and static compliance, as well as an increase in respiratory system resistance, and a decrease in phospholipids content were observed. Physical exercise was able to totally prevent the decrease in succinate dehydrogenase and complex II activities and the formation of pulmonary edema. It also partially prevented the increase in respiratory system resistance, but did not prevent the decrease in dynamic and static compliance, as well as in phospholipids content. These findings suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction may be one of the important contributors to lung damage and that physical exercise may be beneficial in this pathology, although it did not prevent all changes present in lung injury.

  11. Limited proteolysis of the nitrate reductase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Y; Ogura, N; Nakagawa, H

    1988-12-25

    The functional structure of assimilatory NADH-nitrate reductase from spinach leaves was studied by limited proteolysis experiments. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with trypsin, two stable products of 59 and 45 kDa were observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The fragment of 45 kDa was purified by Blue Sepharose chromatography. NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were associated with this 45-kDa fragment which contains FAD, heme, and NADH binding fragment. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, two major peaks were observed by high performance liquid chromatography size exclusion gel filtration. FMNH2-nitrate reductase and reduced methyl viologen-nitrate reductase activities were associated with the first peak of 170 kDa which consists of two noncovalently associated (75-90-kDa) fragments. NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity, however, was associated with the second peak which consisted of FAD and NADH binding sites. Incubation of the 45-kDa fragment with S. aureus V8 protease produced two major fragments of 28 and 14 kDa which contained FAD and heme, respectively. These results indicate that the molybdenum, heme, and FAD components of spinach nitrate reductase are contained in distinct domains which are covalently linked by exposed hinge regions. The molybdenum domain appears to be important in the maintenance of subunit interactions in the enzyme complex.

  12. Alendronate Can Improve Bone Alterations in Experimental Diabetes by Preventing Antiosteogenic, Antichondrogenic, and Proadipocytic Effects of AGEs on Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates such as alendronate are antiosteoporotic drugs that inhibit the activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and secondarily promote osteoblastic function. Diabetes increases bone-matrix-associated advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that impair bone marrow progenitor cell (BMPC) osteogenic potential and decrease bone quality. Here we investigated the in vitro effect of alendronate and/or AGEs on the osteoblastogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic potential of BMPC isolated from nondiabetic untreated rats. We also evaluated the in vivo effect of alendronate (administered orally to rats with insulin-deficient Diabetes) on long-bone microarchitecture and BMPC multilineage potential. In vitro, the osteogenesis (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, type 1 collagen, and mineralization) and chondrogenesis (glycosaminoglycan production) of BMPC were both decreased by AGEs, while coincubation with alendronate prevented these effects. The adipogenesis of BMPC (PPARγ, intracellular triglycerides, and lipase) was increased by AGEs, and this was prevented by coincubation with alendronate. In vivo, experimental Diabetes (a) decreased femoral trabecular bone area, osteocyte density, and osteoclastic TRAP activity; (b) increased bone marrow adiposity; and (c) deregulated BMPC phenotypic potential (increasing adipogenesis and decreasing osteogenesis and chondrogenesis). Orally administered alendronate prevented all these Diabetes-induced effects on bone. Thus, alendronate could improve bone alterations in diabetic rats by preventing the antiosteogenic, antichondrogenic, and proadipocytic effects of AGEs on BMPC. PMID:27840829

  13. A Technology-Mediated Behavioral Weight Gain Prevention Intervention for College Students: Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Sundstrom, Beth; Larsen, Chelsea; Magradey, Karen; Wilcox, Sara; Brandt, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Background Both men and women are vulnerable to weight gain during the college years, and this phenomenon is linked to an increased risk of several chronic diseases and mortality. Technology represents an attractive medium for the delivery of weight control interventions focused on college students, given its reach and appeal among this population. However, few technology-mediated weight gain prevention interventions have been evaluated for college students. Objective This study examined a new technology-based, social media-facilitated weight gain prevention intervention for college students. Methods Undergraduates (n =58) in two sections of a public university course were allocated to either a behavioral weight gain prevention intervention (Healthy Weight, HW; N=29) or a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination awareness intervention (control; N=29). All students were enrolled, regardless of initial body weight or expressed interest in weight management. The interventions delivered 8 lessons via electronic newsletters and Facebook postings over 9 weeks, which were designed to foster social support and introduce relevant educational content. The HW intervention targeted behavioral strategies to prevent weight gain and provided participants with a Wi-Fi-enabled scale and an electronic physical activity tracker to facilitate weight regulation. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine within- and between-group differences in measures of self-reported weight control practices and objectively measured weight. Use of each intervention medium and device was objectively tracked, and intervention satisfaction measures were obtained. Results Students remained weight stable (HW: −0.48+1.9 kg; control: −0.45+1.4 kg), with no significant difference between groups over 9 weeks (P =.94). However, HW students reported a significantly greater increase in the number of appropriate weight control strategies than did controls (2.1+4.5 vs −1

  14. A Technology-Mediated Behavioral Weight Gain Prevention Intervention for College Students: Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    West, Delia Smith; Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Sundstrom, Beth; Larsen, Chelsea; Magradey, Karen; Wilcox, Sara; Brandt, Heather M

    2016-06-13

    Both men and women are vulnerable to weight gain during the college years, and this phenomenon is linked to an increased risk of several chronic diseases and mortality. Technology represents an attractive medium for the delivery of weight control interventions focused on college students, given its reach and appeal among this population. However, few technology-mediated weight gain prevention interventions have been evaluated for college students. This study examined a new technology-based, social media-facilitated weight gain prevention intervention for college students. Undergraduates (n =58) in two sections of a public university course were allocated to either a behavioral weight gain prevention intervention (Healthy Weight, HW; N=29) or a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination awareness intervention (control; N=29). All students were enrolled, regardless of initial body weight or expressed interest in weight management. The interventions delivered 8 lessons via electronic newsletters and Facebook postings over 9 weeks, which were designed to foster social support and introduce relevant educational content. The HW intervention targeted behavioral strategies to prevent weight gain and provided participants with a Wi-Fi-enabled scale and an electronic physical activity tracker to facilitate weight regulation. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine within- and between-group differences in measures of self-reported weight control practices and objectively measured weight. Use of each intervention medium and device was objectively tracked, and intervention satisfaction measures were obtained. Students remained weight stable (HW: -0.48+1.9 kg; control: -0.45+1.4 kg), with no significant difference between groups over 9 weeks (P =.94). However, HW students reported a significantly greater increase in the number of appropriate weight control strategies than did controls (2.1+4.5 vs -1.1+3.4, respectively; P =.003) and there was no increase in

  15. Prevention of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and experimental autoimmune pinealitis in (Lewis x Brown-Norway) F1 rats by HgCl2 injections.

    PubMed Central

    Saoudi, A; Bellon, B; de Kozak, Y; Kuhn, J; Vial, M C; Thillaye, B; Druet, P

    1991-01-01

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) induces in Brown-Norway (BN) and (Lewis x Brown-Norway) F1 hybrid rats a transient autoimmune disease characterized by the production of various antibodies to self and non-self antigens and by a dramatic increase of serum IgE. Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) can be induced in Lewis (LEW) and (LEW x BN) F1 hybrid rats by a single immunization with retinal S-antigen (S-Ag). Besides uveoretinitis, animals immunized with S-Ag develop an autoimmune pinealitis (EAP). We demonstrate in this study that (LEW x BN) F1 hybrid rats, injected with HgCl2 7 days before S-Ag immunization, are quite efficiently protected against EAU and EAP. We also show that HgCl2-induced protection is neither due to a cytotoxic effect of HgCl2 nor to CD8+ T-cell dependent mechanisms nor to the HgCl2-induced increase of serum IgE concentration. The role of other hypothetical mechanisms, such as anti-S-Ag anti-idiotypic antibodies and/or HgCl2-induced unbalance between T-helper cell subsets, is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1748484

  16. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx(5 )[ATS]x(4) Gx(4) [VIL]WNR[TS]x(2) [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x(3){K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes.

  17. A chlorhexidine-releasing epoxy-based coating on titanium implants prevents Staphylococcus aureus experimental biomaterial-associated infection.

    PubMed

    Riool, M; Dirks, A J; Jaspers, V; de Boer, L; Loontjens, T J; van der Loos, C M; Florquin, S; Apachitei, I; Rijk, L N; Keul, H A; Zaat, S A

    2017-02-14

    Prevention of biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) remains a challenging problem, in particular due to the increased risk of resistance development with the current antibiotic-based strategies. Metallic orthopaedic devices, such as non-cemented implants, are often inserted under high mechanical stress. These non-cemented implants cannot be protected by e.g. antibioticreleasing bone cement or other antimicrobial approaches, such as the use of bioactive glass. Therefore, in order to avoid abrasion during implantation procedures, we developed an antimicrobial coating with great mechanical stability for orthopaedic implants, to prevent Staphylococcus aureus BAI. We incorporated 5 and 10 wt % chlorhexidine in a novel mechanically stable epoxy-based coating, designated CHX5 and CHX10, respectively. The coatings displayed potent bactericidal activity in vitro against S. aureus, with over 80 % of the release (19 µg/cm2 for CHX5 and 41 µg/cm2 for CHX10) occurring within the first 24 h. In mice, the CHX10 coating significantly reduced the number of CFU (colony forming units), both on the implants and in the peri-implant tissues, 1 d after S. aureus challenge. The CHX10-coated implants were well-tolerated by the animals, with no signs of toxicity observed by histological analysis. Moreover, the coating significantly reduced the frequency of culture-positive tissues 1 d, and of culture-positive implants 1 and 4 d after challenge. In summary, the chlorhexidine-releasing mechanically stable epoxy-based CHX10 coating prevented implant colonisation and S. aureus BAI in mice and has good prospects for clinical development.

  18. Preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on lysosomal dysfunction and myocardial infarct size in experimentally induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jyoti Roy, Abhro; Stanely Mainzen Prince, P

    2013-01-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on lysosomal dysfunction and myocardial infarct size in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with p-coumaric acid (8 mg/kg body weight) daily for a period of 7 days after which isoproterenol (100mg/kg body weight) was injected subcutaneously into rats twice at an interval of 24h (8th and 9th day).The activity/levels of serum cardiac diagnostic markers, heart lysosomal lipid peroxidation products and the activities of lysosomal enzymes (β-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, cathepsin-B and cathepsin-D) were significantly (P<0.05) increased in the serum and heart of isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Isoproterenol also lowered the activities of β-glucuronidase and cathepsin-D in the lysosomal fraction. The pretreatment with p-coumaric acid significantly (P<0.05) prevented the changes in the levels of lysosomal lipid peroxidation products and the activities of lysosomal enzymes. In addition, p-coumaric acid greatly reduced myocardial infarct size. p-Coumaric acid pretreatment (8 mg/kg body weight) to normal rats did not show any significant effect. Thus, this study showed that p-coumaric acid prevents lysosomal dysfunction against cardiac damage induced by isoproterenol and brings back the levels of lipid peroxidation products and activities of lysosomal enzymes to near normal levels. The in vitro study also revealed the free radical scavenging activity of p-coumaric acid. Thus, the observed effects are due to p-coumaric acid's free radical scavenging and membrane stabilizing properties.

  19. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  20. The orphan protein bis-γ-glutamylcystine reductase joins the pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductase family

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juhan; Copley, Shelley D.

    2014-01-01

    Facile DNA sequencing became possible decades after many enzymes had been purified and characterized. Consequently, there are still “orphan” enyzmes whose activity is known but the genes that encode them have not been identified. Identification of the genes encoding orphan enzymes is important because it allows correct annotation of genes of unknown function or with mis-assigned function. Bis-γ-glutamylcystine reductase (GCR) is an orphan protein that was purified in 1988. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of bis-γ-glutamylcystine. γ-Glutamylcysteine (γ-Glu-Cys) is the major low molecular weight thiol in halobacteria. We purified GCR from Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and identified the sequence of 23 tryptic peptides by NanoLC electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. These peptides cover 62% of the protein predicted to be encoded by a gene in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 that is annotated as mercuric reductase. GCR and mercuric reductase activities were assayed using enzyme that was expressed in E. coli and re-folded from inclusion bodies. The enzyme had robust GCR activity, but no mercuric reductase activity. The genomes of most, but not all, halobacteria for which whole genome sequences are available have close homologs of GCR, suggesting that there is more to be learned about the low molecular weight thiols used in halobacteria. PMID:23560638

  1. Effectiveness of a Multimodal Community Intervention Program to Prevent Suicide and Suicide Attempts: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yutaka; Sakai, Akio; Otsuka, Kotaro; Uda, Hidenori; Oyama, Hirofumi; Ishizuka, Naoki; Awata, Shuichi; Ishida, Yasushi; Iwasa, Hiroto; Kamei, Yuichi; Motohashi, Yutaka; Nakamura, Jun; Nishi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoki; Yotsumoto, Toshihiko; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Suzuki, Yuriko; Tajima, Miyuki; Tanaka, Eriko; Sakai, Hironori; Yonemoto, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Multilevel and multimodal interventions have been suggested for suicide prevention. However, few studies have reported the outcomes of such interventions for suicidal behaviours. Methods We examined the effectiveness of a community-based multimodal intervention for suicide prevention in rural areas with high suicide rates, compared with a parallel prevention-as-usual control group, covering a total of 631,133 persons. The effectiveness was also examined in highly populated areas near metropolitan cities (1,319,972 persons). The intervention started in July 2006, and continued for 3.5 years. The primary outcome was the incidence of composite outcome, consisting of completed suicides and suicide attempts requiring admission to an emergency ward for critical care. We compared the rate ratios (RRs) of the outcomes adjusted by sex, age group, region, period and interaction terms. Analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis and stratified by sex and age groups. Findings In the rural areas, the overall median adherence of the intervention was significantly higher. The RR of the composite outcome in the intervention group decreased 7% compared with that of the control group. Subgroup analyses demonstrated heterogeneous effects among subpopulations: the RR of the composite outcome in the intervention group was significantly lower in males (RR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.59–0.998, p = 0.0485) and the RR of suicide attempts was significantly lower in males (RR = 0.39, 95% CI 0.22–0.68, p = 0.001) and the elderly (RR = 0.35, 95% CI 0.17–0.71, p = 0.004). The intervention had no effect on the RR of the composite outcome in the highly populated areas. Interpretation Our findings suggest that this community-based multimodal intervention for suicide prevention could be implemented in rural areas, but not in highly populated areas. The effectiveness of the intervention was shown for males and for the elderly in rural areas. Trial

  2. [Tissue culture inactivated vaccine for the prevention of Japanese encephalitis: experimental and laboratory process and control layout].

    PubMed

    Loginova, I V; Deriabin, P G; Tikhomirov, E E; Karpova, E F

    2007-01-01

    A process flow diagram was elaborated for production and control of tissue culture inactivated vaccine (TCIV) against Japanese encephalitis (JE). The vaccine was prepared on the basis of the earlier patented JE virus strain (K3). Experimental laboratory JE TCIV series were obtained; their safety and high immunogenicity were tested on animals. Regulations (an instruction) for preparing and controlling JE TCIV have been worked out, which have been approved by the Academic Council of the D. I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology.

  3. Preventive effects of ACTICOA powder, a cocoa polyphenolic extract, on experimentally induced prostate hyperplasia in Wistar-Unilever rats.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Rozan, Pascale; Messaoudi, Michaël

    2007-12-01

    Plant extracts are useful in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study investigates whether ACTICOA (Barry Callebaut France, Louviers, France) powder (AP), a cocoa polyphenolic extract, could prevent prostate hyperplasia induced by testosterone propionate (TP) in rats. Male Wistar-Unilever rats were randomly divided in four groups of 12 rats: one negative control group receiving subcutaneous injections of corn oil and treated with vehicle and three groups injected subcutaneously with TP and treated with the vehicle (positive control) or AP at 24 (AP24) and 48 (AP48) mg/kg/day. Treatments were given orally and started 2 weeks before the induction of prostate hyperplasia. The influence of TP and AP on body weights and food and water consumption of rats was examined. On day 36, rats were sacrificed, and the prostates were removed, cleaned, and weighed. The prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat body weight) was then calculated. TP significantly influenced the body weight gain of the rats and their food and water consumption, while AP at both doses tested reduced significantly these differences. TP significantly increased prostate size ratio (P < .001), and this induced increase was significantly inhibited in AP-treated rats in comparison with positive controls (P < .001) in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that AP can prevent TP-induced prostate hyperplasia and therefore may be beneficial in the management of BPH.

  4. Aldose Reductase Deficiency Protects from Autoimmune- and Endotoxin-Induced Uveitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh C. S.; Shoeb, Mohammed; Srivastava, Satish K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effect of aldose reductase (AR) deficiency in protecting the chronic experimental autoimmune (EAU) and acute endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in c57BL/6 mice. Methods. The WT and AR-null (ARKO) mice were immunized with human interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding peptide (hIRPB-1–20), to induce EAU, or were injected subcutaneously with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg) to induce EIU. The mice were killed on day 21 for EAU and at 24 hours for EIU, when the disease was at its peak, and the eyes were immediately enucleated for histologic and biochemical studies. Spleen-derived T-lymphocytes were used to study the antigen-specific immune response in vitro and in vivo. Results. In WT-EAU mice, severe damage to the retinal wall, especially to the photoreceptor layer was observed, corresponding to a pathologic score of ∼2, which was significantly prevented in the ARKO or AR inhibitor–treated mice. The levels of cytokines and chemokines increased markedly in the whole-eye homogenates of WT-EAU mice, but not in ARKO-EAU mice. Further, expression of inflammatory marker proteins such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 was increased in the WT-EIU mouse eyes but not in the ARKO-EIU eyes. The T cells proliferated vigorously when exposed to the hIRPB antigen in vitro and secreted various cytokines and chemokines, which were significantly inhibited in the T cells isolated from the ARKO mice. Conclusions. These findings suggest that AR-deficiency/inhibition protects against acute as well as chronic forms of ocular inflammatory complications such as uveitis. PMID:21911582

  5. Functional significance of evolving protein sequence in dihydrofolate reductase from bacteria to humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, C Tony; Hanoian, Philip; French, Jarrod B; Pringle, Thomas H; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2013-06-18

    With the rapidly growing wealth of genomic data, experimental inquiries on the functional significance of important divergence sites in protein evolution are becoming more accessible. Here we trace the evolution of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and identify multiple key divergence sites among 233 species between humans and bacteria. We connect these sites, experimentally and computationally, to changes in the enzyme's binding properties and catalytic efficiency. One of the identified evolutionarily important sites is the N23PP modification (∼mid-Devonian, 415-385 Mya), which alters the conformational states of the active site loop in Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase and negatively impacts catalysis. This enzyme activity was restored with the inclusion of an evolutionarily significant lid domain (G51PEKN in E. coli enzyme; ∼2.4 Gya). Guided by this evolutionary genomic analysis, we generated a human-like E. coli dihydrofolate reductase variant through three simple mutations despite only 26% sequence identity between native human and E. coli DHFRs. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the overall conformational motions of the protein within a common scaffold are retained throughout evolution, although subtle changes to the equilibrium conformational sampling altered the free energy barrier of the enzymatic reaction in some cases. The data presented here provide a glimpse into the evolutionary trajectory of functional DHFR through its protein sequence space that lead to the diverged binding and catalytic properties of the E. coli and human enzymes.

  6. Exercise training prevents increased intraocular pressure and sympathetic vascular modulation in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castro, E F S; Mostarda, C T; Rodrigues, B; Moraes-Silva, I C; Feriani, D J; De Angelis, K; Irigoyen, M C

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to study the effects of exercise training (ET) performed by rats on a 10-week high-fructose diet on metabolic, hemodynamic, and autonomic changes, as well as intraocular pressure (IOP). Male Wistar rats receiving fructose overload in drinking water (100 g/L) were concomitantly trained on a treadmill for 10 weeks (FT group) or kept sedentary (F group), and a control group (C) was kept in normal laboratory conditions. The metabolic evaluation comprised the Lee index, glycemia, and insulin tolerance test (KITT). Arterial pressure (AP) was measured directly, and systolic AP variability was performed to determine peripheral autonomic modulation. ET attenuated impaired metabolic parameters, AP, IOP, and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) induced by fructose overload (FT vs F). The increase in peripheral sympathetic modulation in F rats, demonstrated by systolic AP variance and low frequency (LF) band (F: 37±2, 6.6±0.3 vs C: 26±3, 3.6±0.5 mmHg2), was prevented by ET (FT: 29±3, 3.4±0.7 mmHg2). Positive correlations were found between the LF band and right IOP (r=0.57, P=0.01) and left IOP (r=0.64, P=0.003). Negative correlations were noted between KITT values and right IOP (r=-0.55, P=0.01) and left IOP (r=-0.62, P=0.005). ET in rats effectively prevented metabolic abnormalities and AP and IOP increases promoted by a high-fructose diet. In addition, ocular benefits triggered by exercise training were associated with peripheral autonomic improvement.

  7. Dose dependent effect of resveratrol in preventing cisplatin-induced ovarian damage in rats: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Atli, Mine; Engin-Ustun, Yaprak; Tokmak, Aytekin; Caydere, Muzaffer; Hucumenoglu, Sema; Topcuoglu, Canan

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of resveratrol in preventing cisplatin (CP) induced ovarian damage in rats. Twenty-eight female Wistar albino rats were separated into four groups. No medication was given to group 1. Over the 21-day study period, low-dose resveratrol was given to group 2, high-dose resveratrol was given to group 3, and saline was administered to group 4. On the 15th day of medication, all groups except for group 1 were treated with a single dose of CP. Serum levels of anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) were tested at baseline and on the 15th and 21st days. All rats underwent oophorectomy one week after CP application. Primordial, primary, secondary, and tertiary follicles were counted microscopically. No significant difference was observed among the groups in mean AMH levels according to follow-up time. The numbers of primary and primordial follicles were statistically significantly higher in group 2 than in group 4 (p<0.05). The number of tertiary follicles was statistically significantly higher in group 1 than in groups 3 and 4 (p<0.05), but it was not statistically significantly different than in group 2. Resveratrol, particularly at low-doses, can prevent CP induced ovarian damage by maintaining the numbers of primordial and primary follicles. Further studies are needed to study the effect of resveratrol on human ovaries. Copyright © 2017 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the preventative effects exerted by Lactobacillus fermentum in an experimental model of septic shock induced in mice.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Belén; Rodríguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Comalada, Mònica; Bailón, Elvira; Camuesco, Desireé; Olivares, Mónica; Xaus, Jordi; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Gálvez, Julio

    2009-01-01

    The preventative effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 were evaluated in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model of septic shock in mice. The probiotic was administered suspended in drinking water at the final concentration of 108 colony-forming units/ml for 2 weeks before the induction of an endotoxic shock by an intraperitoneal injection of LPS (400 microg/200 microl per mouse). Blood and different organs were collected after 24 h to evaluate the severity of the endotoxic shock and the preventative effects of the probiotic. L. fermentum reduced TNF-alpha levels in blood, which promotes the major alterations observed during septic shock, as well as the infiltration of activated neutrophils into the lungs. Furthermore, free radical overproduction and oxidative stress were associated with a significant decrease in hepatic glutathione levels in septic mice, and with an excessive NO production attributed to the induction of the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS). In fact, hepatic glutathione levels were significantly increased in the group of mice receiving the probiotic, and the increased iNOS expression both in the colon and lungs was down-regulated in those mice treated with L. fermentum. Finally, pre-treatment with L. fermentum may also exert its protective action modulating the expression of different cytokines in splenocyte-derived T cells such us IL-2, IL-5, IL-6 or IL-10. In conclusion, pre-treatment with L. fermentum may exert its protective action against LPS-induced organ damage in mice by a combination of several actions including its antioxidant properties and by reduction of the synthesis of the pro-inflammatory TNF-alpha and IL-6.

  9. Succinobucol, a Non-Statin Hypocholesterolemic Drug, Prevents Premotor Symptoms and Nigrostriatal Neurodegeneration in an Experimental Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Colle, Dirleise; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hort, Mariana Appel; Godoi, Marcelo; Le Douaron, Gael; Braga, Antonio Luiz; Assreuy, Jamil; Michel, Patrick Pierre; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Farina, Marcelo

    2017-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by non-motor and motor disabilities. This study investigated whether succinobucol (SUC) could mitigate nigrostriatal injury caused by intranasal 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) administration in mice. Moreover, the effects of SUC against MPTP-induced behavioral impairments and neurochemical changes were also evaluated. The quantification of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH(+)) cells was also performed in primary mesencephalic cultures to evaluate the effects of SUC against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) toxicity in vitro. C57BL/6 mice were treated with SUC (10 mg/kg/day, intragastric (i.g.)) for 30 days, and thereafter, animals received MPTP infusion (1 mg/nostril) and SUC treatment continued for additional 15 days. MPTP-infused animals displayed significant non-motor symptoms including olfactory and short-term memory deficits evaluated in the olfactory discrimination, social recognition, and water maze tasks. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by inhibition of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase activity (complex I), as well as significant decrease of TH and dopamine transporter (DAT) immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum. Although SUC treatment did not rescue NADH dehydrogenase activity inhibition, it was able to blunt MPTP-induced behavioral impairments and prevented the decrease in TH and DAT immunoreactivities in substantia nigra (SN) and striatum. SUC also suppressed striatal astroglial activation and increased interleukin-6 levels in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Furthermore, SUC significantly prevented the loss of TH(+) neurons induced by MPP(+) in primary mesencephalic cultures. These results provide new evidence that SUC treatment counteracts early non-motor symptoms and neurodegeneration/neuroinflammation in the nigrostriatal pathway induced by intranasal MPTP administration in mice by modulating events downstream to the

  10. Prostaglandin E1 maintains structural integrity of intestinal mucosa and prevents bacterial translocation during experimental obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Gurleyik, Emin; Coskun, Ozgur; Ustundag, Nil; Ozturk, Elif

    2006-01-01

    The absence of bile in the gut lumen induces mucosal injury and promotes bacterial translocation (BT). Prostaglandin E (PGE) has a protective effect on the mucosal layer of the alimentary tract. We hypothesize that PGE1 may prevent BT by its beneficial action on the mucosa of the small bowel. Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided equally into 3 groups; Group 1 (control) underwent sham laparotomy, group 2 obstructive jaundice (OJ) and group 3 (OJ + PGE1) underwent common bile duct (CBD) ligation and transection. Groups 1 and 2 received; 1 mL normal saline and group 3 received 40 mg of the PGE1 analogue misoprostol dissolved in 1 mL normal saline administered by orogastric tube once daily. After 7 days, laparotomy and collection of samples for laboratory analyses were performed, including bacteriological analysis of intestine, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), and blood, and histopathologic examination of intestinal mucosa to determine mucosal thickness and structural damage. Serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels confirmed OJ in all animals with CBD transection. The mucosal damage score was significantly reduced in jaundiced animals receiving PGE1 compared to jaundiced controls (2.15 +/- 0.74 vs 5.3 +/- 0.59; p < .00001) and mucosal thickness was greater (607 +/- 59.1 microm vs. 393 +/- 40.3 microm; p < .00001). The incidence of BT to MLNs decreased from 90% to 30% (p < .02) when jaundiced rats received PGE1. PGE1 treatment reduced the detection rate of viable enteric bacteria in the blood from 60% to 10% (p < .057). We conclude that administration of PGE1 provides protection against OJ-induced atrophy and damage of intestinal mucosa, and thereby prevents translocation of enteric bacteria to underlying tissues.

  11. Polymethoxy flavonoids, nobiletin and tangeretin, prevent lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory bone loss in an experimental model for periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Tominari, Tsukasa; Hirata, Michiko; Matsumoto, Chiho; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2012-01-01

    Nobiletin, a polymethoxy flavonoid (PMF), inhibits systemic bone resorption and maintains bone mass in estrogen-deficient ovariectomized mice. This study examined the anti-inflammatory effects of PMFs, nobiletin, and tangeretin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone resorption. Nobiletin and tangeretin suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption and suppressed the receptor activator of NFκB ligand-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 macrophages. Nobiletin clearly restored the alveolar bone mass in a mouse experimental model for periodontitis by inhibiting LPS-induced bone resorption. PMFs may therefore provide a new therapeutic approach for periodontal bone loss.

  12. 3-Methyleneoxindole Reductase of Peas 1

    PubMed Central

    Moyed, H. S.; Williamson, Valerie

    1967-01-01

    A 100-fold purification of a reduced triphosphopyridine nucleotide/3-methyleneoxindole reductase of peas has been achieved using conventional protein fractionation procedures. Reduced diphosphopyridine nucleotide is 25-fold less effective than reduced triphosphopyridine nucleotide as the reductant. The preparation is free of other reductase activities including those linking the oxidation of reduced pyridine nucleotide coenzymes to the reduction of cytochrome c; vitamins K1, K2, and K3; O2; nitrate; oxidized glutathione; and thiazolyl blue tetrazolium. The affinity of the enzyme for 3-methyleneoxindole (Ks = 0.5 mm 3-methyleneoxindole) is relatively high. It is, therefore, reasonable to assume that 3-methyleneoxindole is the normal substrate. The enzyme is inhibited by indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-aldehyde, and by l-naph-thaleneacetic acid. While these are not especially powerful inhibitors (K1 = 1.9-4.0 mm) the competitive relationship with 3-methyleneoxindole indicates that significant inhibition might occur at low intracellular concentrations of the substrate. PMID:6042360

  13. Soluble ascorbate free radical reductase in the human lens.

    PubMed

    Bando, M; Obazawa, H

    1994-01-01

    A major and a minor ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase were separated from the soluble fraction in the human lens cortex by DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange column chromatography. These AFR reductases also exhibited diaphorase activity using dichlorophenolindophenol and ferricyanide as electron acceptors. The major AFR reductase was partially purified by 5'AMP-Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography. This partially purified AFR reductase showed a single band of diaphorase activity in native polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. This activity band corresponded to the major protein observed in protein staining by Coomassie Brilliant Blue. However, the protein staining by Coomassie Brilliant Blue showed this activity band surrounded by diffused staining. Molecular weight of the partially purified AFR reductase was determined to be 32 kDa by gel filtration, and the apparent Km value for AFR was about 15 microM. This major lens AFR reductase could be distinguished from soluble Neurospora, Euglena and cucumber AFR reductases, and from two ubiquitous enzymes with reduction activity of AFR and/or foreign compounds, ie, NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and DT-diaphorase, by their molecular weights, Km values and/or ion-exchange chromatographic behaviors.

  14. Functional and Phylogenetic Divergence of Fungal Adenylate-Forming Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Daniel; Lackner, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    A key step in fungal l-lysine biosynthesis is catalyzed by adenylate-forming l-α-aminoadipic acid reductases, organized in domains for adenylation, thiolation, and the reduction step. However, the genomes of numerous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes contain an unexpectedly large number of additional genes encoding similar but functionally distinct enzymes. Here, we describe the functional in vitro characterization of four reductases which were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. The Ceriporiopsis subvermispora serine reductase Nps1 features a terminal ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) domain and thus belongs to a hitherto undescribed class of fungal multidomain enzymes. The second major class is characterized by the canonical terminal short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain and represented by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora Nps3 as the first biochemically characterized l-α-aminoadipic acid reductase of basidiomycete origin. Aspergillus flavus l-tyrosine reductases LnaA and LnbA are members of a distinct phylogenetic clade. Phylogenetic analysis supports the view that fungal adenylate-forming reductases are more diverse than previously recognized and belong to four distinct classes. PMID:25085485

  15. Structure of an integral membrane sterol reductase from Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Roberti, Rita; Blobel, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Sterols are essential biological molecules in the majority of life forms. Sterol reductases1 including Delta-14 sterol reductase (C14SR), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7) and 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) reduce specific carbon-carbon double bonds of the sterol moiety using a reducing cofactor during sterol biosynthesis. Lamin B Receptor2 (LBR), an integral inner nuclear membrane protein, also contains a functional C14SR domain. Here we report the crystal structure of a Delta-14 sterol reductase (maSR1) from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a homolog of human C14SR, LBR, and DHCR7, with the cofactor NADPH. The enzyme contains 10 transmembrane segments (TM). Its catalytic domain comprises the C-terminal half (containing TM6-10) and envelops two interconnected pockets, one of which faces the cytoplasm and houses NADPH, while the other one is accessible from the lipid bilayer. Comparison with a soluble steroid 5β-reductase structure3 suggests that the reducing end of NADPH meets the sterol substrate at the juncture of the two pockets. A sterol reductase activity assay proves maSR1 can reduce the double bond of a cholesterol biosynthetic intermediate demonstrating functional conservation to human C14SR. Therefore, our structure as a prototype of integral membrane sterol reductases provides molecular insight into mutations in DHCR7 and LBR for inborn human diseases. PMID:25307054

  16. Structural and biochemical characterization of cinnamoyl-coa reductases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cinnamoyl-coenzyme A reductase (CCR) catalyzes the reduction of hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters using NADPH to produce hydroxycinnamyl aldehyde precursors in lignin synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity of cinnamoyl-CoA reductases from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a str...

  17. Anti-inflammatory effect of antidiabetic thiazolidinediones prevents bone resorption rather than cartilage changes in experimental polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Koufany, Meriem; Moulin, David; Bianchi, Arnaud; Muresan, Mikhaela; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Netter, Patrick; Weryha, Georges; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma agonists with potent anti-diabetic properties and potential anti-inflammatory effects. We compared the ability of a range of oral doses of these thiazolidinediones, including those sufficient to restore insulin sensitization, to inhibit the pathogenesis of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). AIA was induced in Lewis rats by a subcutaneous injection of 1 mg of complete Freund's adjuvant. Rats were treated orally for 21 days with pioglitazone 3, 10 or 30 mg/kg/day, rosiglitazone 3 or 10 mg/kg/day, or with vehicle only. The time course of AIA was evaluated by biotelemetry to monitor body temperature and locomotor activity, by clinical score and plethysmographic measurement of hindpaw oedema. At necropsy, RT-PCR analysis was performed on synovium, liver and subcutaneous fat. Changes in cartilage were evaluated by histological examination of ankle joints, radiolabelled sulphate incorporation (proteoglycan synthesis), glycosaminoglycan content (proteoglycan turnover) and aggrecan expression in patellar cartilage. Whole-body bone mineral content was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The highest doses of rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg/day) or pioglitazone (30 mg/kg/day) were required to reduce fever peaks associated with acute or chronic inflammation, respectively, and to decrease arthritis severity. At these doses, thiazolidinediones reduced synovitis and synovial expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and basic fibroblast growth factor without affecting neovascularization or the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Thiazolidinediones failed to prevent cartilage lesions and arthritis-induced inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis, aggrecan mRNA level or glycosaminoglycan content in patellar cartilage, but reduced bone erosions and inflammatory bone loss. A trend towards lower urinary levels of deoxipyridinolin was also noted in arthritic rats treated with

  18. Anti-inflammatory effect of antidiabetic thiazolidinediones prevents bone resorption rather than cartilage changes in experimental polyarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Koufany, Meriem; Moulin, David; Bianchi, Arnaud; Muresan, Mikhaela; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Netter, Patrick; Weryha, Georges; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Background Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonists with potent anti-diabetic properties and potential anti-inflammatory effects. We compared the ability of a range of oral doses of these thiazolidinediones, including those sufficient to restore insulin sensitization, to inhibit the pathogenesis of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Methods AIA was induced in Lewis rats by a subcutaneous injection of 1 mg of complete Freund's adjuvant. Rats were treated orally for 21 days with pioglitazone 3, 10 or 30 mg/kg/day, rosiglitazone 3 or 10 mg/kg/day, or with vehicle only. The time course of AIA was evaluated by biotelemetry to monitor body temperature and locomotor activity, by clinical score and plethysmographic measurement of hindpaw oedema. At necropsy, RT-PCR analysis was performed on synovium, liver and subcutaneous fat. Changes in cartilage were evaluated by histological examination of ankle joints, radiolabelled sulphate incorporation (proteoglycan synthesis), glycosaminoglycan content (proteoglycan turnover) and aggrecan expression in patellar cartilage. Whole-body bone mineral content was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results The highest doses of rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg/day) or pioglitazone (30 mg/kg/day) were required to reduce fever peaks associated with acute or chronic inflammation, respectively, and to decrease arthritis severity. At these doses, thiazolidinediones reduced synovitis and synovial expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and basic fibroblast growth factor without affecting neovascularization or the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Thiazolidinediones failed to prevent cartilage lesions and arthritis-induced inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis, aggrecan mRNA level or glycosaminoglycan content in patellar cartilage, but reduced bone erosions and inflammatory bone loss. A trend towards lower urinary levels of deoxipyridinolin was also noted in arthritic

  19. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis by oxylanosterols.

    PubMed

    Panini, S R; Sexton, R C; Gupta, A K; Parish, E J; Chitrakorn, S; Rudney, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of rat intestinal epithelial cell cultures with the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor, 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)-ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), resulted in an accumulation of squalene 2,3:22,23-dioxide (SDO). When U18666A was withdrawn and the cells were treated with the sterol 14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor, ketoconazole, SDO was metabolized to a product identified as 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol. To test the biological effects and cellular metabolism of this compound, we prepared 24(RS),25-epoxylanosterol by chemical synthesis. The epimeric mixture of 24,25-epoxylanosterols could be resolved by high performance liquid chromatography on a wide-pore, non-endcapped, reverse phase column. Both epimers were effective suppressors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity of IEC-6 cells. The suppressive action of the natural epimer, 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol, but not that of 24(R),25-epoxylanosterol could be completely prevented by ketoconazole. IEC-6 cells could efficiently metabolize biosynthetic 24(S),25-epoxy[3H]anosterol mainly to the known reductase-suppressor 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol. This metabolism was substantially reduced by ketoconazole. These data support the conclusion that 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol per se is not a suppressor of HMG-CoA reductase activity but is a precursor to a regulatory oxysterol(s). It has recently been reported that 25-hydroxycholesterol can occur naturally in cultured cells in amounts sufficient to effect regulation of HMG-CoA reductase (Saucier et al. 1985. J. Biol. Chem. 260: 14571-14579). In order to investigate the biological effects of possible precursors of 25-hydroxycholesterol, we chemically synthesized 25-hydroxylanosterol and 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one. Both oxylanosterol derivatives suppressed cellular sterol synthesis at the level of HMG-CoA reductase. U18666A had the unusual effect of potentiating the inhibitory effect of 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one but did not influence the effect of

  20. [Prevention of osteoporosis by foods and dietary supplements. Milk basic protein (MBP) induces alveolar bone formation in rat experimental periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Seto, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Toshihiko

    2006-10-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by infection of periodontopathic bacteriae, which induced alveolar bone resorpotion. Milk basic protein (MBP) has been reported to be useful as a supplement because of increasing bone formation in animal and human studies. We examined the effect of MBP for alveolar bone formation in rat experimental periodontitis. After alveolar bone resorption was induced by ligature technique, the diets containing low and high dose of MBP were given to rats for 90 days. Micro-focus computed tomography and histological observation revealed a recovery of alveolar bone in high-dose MBP group compared to the control group. Osteoid thickness of alveolar bone crest significantly increased in low and high-dose MBP groups. These findings indicate that MBP may be effective for the recovery of alveolar bone resorption in periodontitis.

  1. Experimental glomerulonephritis is attenuated by CD8+ T cell chimerism and prevented by Mls-1-incompatible thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Sutmuller, M; Baelde, H J; Tysma, O M; de Heer, E; Bruijn, J A

    1998-07-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in mice is a model resembling glomerulonephritis in human systemic lupus erythematosus. In the present study congenic mouse strains were used to investigate the pathogenetic role of (1) donor T cell subset chimerism and (2) donor thymocytes in this model. In GvHD employing minor lymphocyte-stimulating-1 (Mls-1)-compatible donors and recipients, full-blown immune complex glomerulonephritis was associated with a low-donor CD8(+) T cell chimerism. Injection of lymphocytes from Mls-1-negative donors (Mls-1(b)) into Mls-1-positive recipients (Mls-1(a)) induces a type of GvHD characterized by rapid self-limitation accompanied by the immediate inhibition of donor T cell chimerism and the absence of glomerulonephritis. However, omission of thymocytes from the donor inoculate does result in glomerular depositions containing immunoglobulins. These results suggest that donor CD8(+) T cell chimerism is associated with attenuation of immune complex glomerulonephritis, whereas Mls-1-incompatible donor T cell precursors prevent the disease. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. Intranasal brain delivery of cationic nanoemulsion-encapsulated TNFα siRNA in prevention of experimental neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunita; Gandham, Srujan K; Panicucci, Riccardo; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2016-05-01

    Neuroinflammation is a hallmark of acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of intranasal cationic nanoemulsion encapsulating an anti-TNFα siRNA, for potential anti-inflammatory therapy. TNFα siRNA nanoemulsions were prepared and characterized for particle size, surface charge, morphology, and stability and encapsulation efficiency. Qualitative and quantitative intracellular uptake studies by confocal imaging and flow cytometry, respectively, showed higher uptake compared to Lipofectamine® transfected siRNA. Nanoemulsion significantly lowered TNFα levels in LPS-stimulated cells. Upon intranasal delivery of cationic nanoemulsions almost 5 fold higher uptake was observed in the rat brain compared to non-encapsulated siRNA. More importantly, intranasal delivery of TNFα siRNA nanoemulsions in vivo markedly reduced the unregulated levels of TNFα in an LPS-induced model of neuroinflammation. These results indicate that intranasal delivery of cationic nanoemulsions encapsulating TNFα siRNA offered an efficient means of gene knockdown and this approach has significant potential in prevention of neuroinflammation. Neuroinflammation is often seen in patients with neurodegenerative disorders and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) plays a significant role in contributing to neuronal dysfunction. As a result, inhibition of TNFα may alleviate disease severity. In this article, the authors investigated using a cationic nanoemulsion system carrying TNFα siRNA intra-nasally to protect against neuroinflammation. This new method may provide a future approach in this clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intranasal Brain Delivery of Cationic Nanoemulsion-Encapsulated TNFα siRNA in Prevention of Experimental Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sunita; Gandham, Srujan K.; Panicucci, Riccardo; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a hallmark of acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Activated microglia and secreted factors such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) are key mediators of neuroinflammation and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of intranasal cationic nanoemulsions encapsulating an anti-TNFα siRNA, for potential anti-inflammatory therapy, tested in an LPS induced model of neuroinflammation. The strategy of developing a cationic nanoemulsion system for silencing the TNFα gene was to efficiently provide neuroprotection against inflammation. TNFα siRNA nanoemulsions were prepared and characterized for particle size, surface charge, morphology, and stability and encapsulation efficiency. Qualitative and quantitative intracellular uptake studies by confocal imaging and flow cytometry, respectively, showed higher uptake compared to Lipofectamine® transfected siRNA. Nanoemulsions showed significantly lower (p<0.01) levels of TNFα in LPS-stimulated cells. Upon intranasal delivery of cationic nanoemulsions almost 5 fold higher uptake was observed in the rat brain compared to non-encapsulated siRNA. More importantly, intranasal delivery of TNFα siRNA nanoemulsions in vivo markedly reduced the unregulated levels of TNFα in an LPS-induced model of neuroinflammation where TNFα functions as a signaling molecule, which aggravates inflammation. These results indicate that intranasal delivery of cationic nanoemulsions encapsulating TNFα siRNA offered an efficient means of gene knockdown and this approach has significant potential in prevention of neuroinflammation. PMID:26767514

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON EFFECTS OF CATHODIC PROTECTION TO PREVENT MACRO-CELL CORROSION OF STEEL IN CONCRETE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Ueno, Moe; Ishii, Kouji; Seki, Hiroshi

    Reinforcing bars embedded in concrete tend to corrode due to salt attack under marine environments. Corrosion of bars might be often caused with phenomenon of macro-cell. Cathodic protection has been, so far, applied to control the corrosion of reinforcing bars in RC members. In order to make clear the mechanisms of macro-cell corr osion and the effect of cathodic protecti on, laboratory tests were carried out. Testing concrete specimens contained two reinforcing bars which were buried at upper area of specimens and at lower area of ones, respectively. Lower zone of the concrete specimens were immersed in water. Testing results indicated as follows: (1) reinforci ng bars under wetting condition were anode and reinforcing bars under drying one cathode, (2) current density of macro-cell between two bars increased according as the potential difference increased and electric resistance of the concrete between two bars decreased, and (3) cathodic protection was effective to prevented macro-cell corrosion of reinforcing bars in concrete. Furthermore, it was presumed that corroded iron might be reduced to metal iron due to the protection current.

  5. One compound of saponins from Disocorea zingiberensis protected against experimental acute pancreatitis by preventing mitochondria-mediated necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Wen, Li; Shen, Yan; Shi, Na; Xing, Zhihua; Xia, Qing; Niu, Hai; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a painful inflammatory disorder of the exocrine pancreas, ranking as the most common gastrointestinal reasons for hospitalization with no specific therapy currently. Diosgenyl saponins extracted from natural products and diosgenin or its derivatives have been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in various diseases. However, the therapeutic effects of diosgenyl saponins from Dioscorea zingiberensis C. H. Wright in AP have not yet been determined. Five compounds were extracted and screened for taurocholate-induced necrosis in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Particularly, 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-3β, 22α, 26-trihydroxy-25(R)-furosta-5-en-3-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (compound 1) exhibited the best protective effects with no toxicity observed. Next, we showed compound 1 concentration-dependently inhibited necrotic cell death pathway activation and 2.5 mM compound 1 also prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, adenosine triphosphate production, and reactive oxygen species generation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Finally, we showed compound 1 protected against three clinically representative murine models of AP and significantly improved pancreatitis-associated acute lung injury. These data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that one compound of diosgenyl saponins can be potential treatment for AP. This study suggests natural saponins may serve as fruitful sources for exploring/identifying potential therapies for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27779235

  6. Glutathione reductase gsr-1 is an essential gene required for Caenorhabditis elegans early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Mora-Lorca, José Antonio; Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gaffney, Christopher J; Naranjo-Galindo, Francisco José; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Guerrero-Gómez, David; Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Cabello, Juan; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant thiol in the vast majority of organisms and is maintained in its reduced form by the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase. In this work, we describe the genetic and functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans gsr-1 gene that encodes the only glutathione reductase protein in this model organism. By using green fluorescent protein reporters we demonstrate that gsr-1 produces two GSR-1 isoforms, one located in the cytoplasm and one in the mitochondria. gsr-1 loss of function mutants display a fully penetrant embryonic lethal phenotype characterized by a progressive and robust cell division delay accompanied by an aberrant distribution of interphasic chromatin in the periphery of the cell nucleus. Maternally expressed GSR-1 is sufficient to support embryonic development but these animals are short-lived, sensitized to chemical stress, have increased mitochondrial fragmentation and lower mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, the embryonic lethality of gsr-1 worms is prevented by restoring GSR-1 activity in the cytoplasm but not in mitochondria. Given the fact that the thioredoxin redox systems are dispensable in C. elegans, our data support a prominent role of the glutathione reductase/glutathione pathway in maintaining redox homeostasis in the nematode.

  7. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  8. Inhibitory effects of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott constituents on aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Mei; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Beom Goo; Hong, Jae Seung; Lim, Soon Sung

    2014-08-27

    The goal of this study was to determine the rat lens aldose reductase-inhibitory effects of 95% ethanol extracts from the leaves of C. esculenta and, its organic solvent soluble fractions, including the dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (BuOH) and water (H2O) layers, using dl-glyceraldehyde as a substrate. Ten compounds, namely tryptophan (1), orientin (2), isoorientin (3), vitexin (4), isovitexin (5), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (6), luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (7), rosmarinic acid (8), 1-O-feruloyl-d-glucoside (9) and 1-O-caffeoyl-d-glucoside (10) were isolated from the EtOAc and BuOH fractions of C. esculenta. The structures of compounds 1-10 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and comparison with previous reports. All the isolates were subjected to an in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity against rat lens aldose reductase. Among tested compounds, compounds 2 and 3 significantly inhibited rat lens aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 1.65 and 1.92 μM, respectively. Notably, the inhibitory activity of orientin was 3.9 times greater than that of the positive control, quercetin (4.12 μM). However, the isolated compounds showed only moderate ABTS+ [2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] activity. These results suggest that flavonoid derivatives from Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott represent potential compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic complications.

  9. Comparative experimental investigation on the efficacy of mono- and multiprobiotic strains in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Kobyliak, Nazarii; Falalyeyeva, Tetyana; Virchenko, Oleksandr; Mykhalchyshyn, Galyna; Bodnar, Petro; Spivak, Mykola; Yankovsky, Dmytro; Beregova, Tetyana; Ostapchenko, Lyudmyla

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the efficacy of different probiotic strains, their combinations and forms (alive or lyophilized) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) prevention. In this study, 70 rats have been used divided into 7 groups of 10 animals in each: I - intact rats, II-VII - rats with monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced NAFLD. Rats with NAFLD were untreated (group II, MSG-obesity group) and treated with probiotics (groups III-VII). In order to develop NAFLD, newborn rats of groups II-VII were injected with a solution of monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g) subcutaneously (s.c.) at 2nd,4th, 6th, 8th,10th postnatal day. The groups III-V received lyophilized monoprobiotics B. animalis VKL, B. animalis VKB, L.casei IMVB-7280, respectively. The group VI received 2.5 ml/kg of an aqueous solution of a mixture of the three probiotic strains (2:1:1 Lactobacillus casei IMVB-7280, Bifidobacterium animalis VKL, Bifidobacterium animalis VKB) at a dose of 50 mg/kg (5 × 10(9) CFU/kg) (g) (intragastrically). The group VII was treated with multiprobiotic "Symbiter" containing biomass of 14 alive probiotic strains (Lactobacillus + Lactococcus (6 × 10(10) CFU/g), Bifidobacterium (1 × 10(10)/g), Propionibacterium (3 × 10(10)/g), Acetobacter (1 × 10(6)/g)) at a dose of 140 mg/kg (1.4 × 10(10) CFU/kg). The treatment with probiotics was started at the age of 1 month. There were 3 courses of treatment, each included 2-week administration and 2-week break. All parameters were measured in 4-month aged rats. Introduction of MSG during the neonatal period leads to the NAFLD development in the 4-months old rats. For steatosis degree there was no significant difference between MSG-obesity group and lyophilized monocomponent probiotics groups (III-V). The highest manifestation of steatosis was observed for B. animalis VKL group (2.0 ± 0.25) as compared to B. animalis VKB (1.70 ± 0.21) and L. casei IMVB-7280 (1.80 ± 0.20). The steatosis score changes between all monoprobiotics groups (III

  10. The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs): Overview.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2015-06-05

    The aldo-keto reductase (AKR) protein superfamily contains >190 members that fall into 16 families and are found in all phyla. These enzymes reduce carbonyl substrates such as: sugar aldehydes; keto-steroids, keto-prostaglandins, retinals, quinones, and lipid peroxidation by-products. Exceptions include the reduction of steroid double bonds catalyzed by AKR1D enzymes (5β-reductases); and the oxidation of proximate carcinogen trans-dihydrodiol polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; while the β-subunits of potassium gated ion channels (AKR6 family) control Kv channel opening. AKRs are usually 37kDa monomers, have an (α/β)8-barrel motif, display large loops at the back of the barrel which govern substrate specificity, and have a conserved cofactor binding domain. AKRs catalyze an ordered bi bi kinetic mechanism in which NAD(P)H cofactor binds first and leaves last. In enzymes that favor NADPH, the rate of release of NADP(+) is governed by a slow isomerization step which places an upper limit on kcat. AKRs retain a conserved catalytic tetrad consisting of Tyr55, Asp50, Lys84, and His117 (AKR1C9 numbering). There is conservation of the catalytic mechanism with short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) even though they show different protein folds. There are 15 human AKRs of these AKR1B1, AKR1C1-1C3, AKR1D1, and AKR1B10 have been implicated in diabetic complications, steroid hormone dependent malignancies, bile acid deficiency and defects in retinoic acid signaling, respectively. Inhibitor programs exist world-wide to target each of these enzymes to treat the aforementioned disorders. Inherited mutations in AKR1C and AKR1D1 enzymes are implicated in defects in the development of male genitalia and bile acid deficiency, respectively, and occur in evolutionarily conserved amino acids. The human AKRs have a large number of nsSNPs and splice variants, but in many instances functional genomics is lacking. AKRs and their variants are now poised to be interrogated using

  11. Preventive effects of bortezomib on denervation-induced atrophy of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles: an experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sei, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Aki; Nishida, Naoya; Hato, Naohito; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2015-07-01

    Bortezomib was effective in attenuating atrophy of the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, but not the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. This was probably due to differences in the fiber composition of the two muscles. The PCA muscle is composed of a combination of fast- and slow-twitch fibers, and therefore is more resistant to atrophy than the TA muscle, which is composed solely of fast-twitch fibers. To investigate the preventive effects of bortezomib on denervation-induced atrophy of the TA and PCA muscles in the rat. Following transection of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve, bortezomib (100 μg/kg) was administered subcutaneously on post-denervation days 1 and 4, followed by a 10-day rest period every 14 days; each 2-week period constituted a single treatment cycle. In controls, saline was administered instead. Animals were killed for histological examination at 4 (n = 6), 8 (n = 7), and 12 (n = 7) weeks post-denervation. Muscle atrophy was assessed using three indices: wet muscle weight, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, and the number of muscle fibers/mm(2). The effects of bortezomib were evaluated by comparing the left (L) and right (R) muscles, with sequential changes in the L/R ratio assessed. In saline-administered animals, atrophy of the left-sided TA and PCA muscles progressed rapidly during the first 4 weeks post-denervation, following which progression slowed. Atrophy was greater in the TA compared with the PCA muscle, although this difference was not statistically significant. In bortezomib-administered animals, atrophy of the PCA muscle was attenuated significantly at post-denervation weeks 8 and 12; no such reduction in atrophy was observed for the TA muscle.

  12. Prevention of experimental diabetes by Uncaria tomentosa extract: Th2 polarization, regulatory T cell preservation or both?

    PubMed

    Domingues, Alexandre; Sartori, Alexandrina; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Valente, Ligia Maria Marino; da Rosa, Larissa Camargo; Ishikawa, Larissa Lumi Watanabe; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Viero, Rosa Marlene

    2011-09-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC (Rubiaceae) is a species native to the Amazon rainforest and surrounding tropical areas that is endowed with immunomodulatory properties and widely used around the world. In this study we investigated the immunomodulatory potential of Uncaria tomentosa (UT) aqueous-ethanol extract on the progression of immune-mediated diabetes. C57BL/6 male mice were injected with MLDS (40 mg/kg) and orally treated with UT at 10-400mg/kg during 21 days. Control groups received MLDS alone or the respective dilution vehicle. Pancreatic mononuclear infiltrate and β-cell insulin content were analyzed by HE and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, and measured by digital morphometry. Lymphocyte immunophenotyping and cytokine production were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Treating the animals with 50-400mg/kg of UT caused a significant reduction in the glycemic levels, as well as in the incidence of diabetes. The morphometric analysis of insulitis revealed a clear protective effect. Animals treated with UT at 400mg/kg presented a higher number of intact islets and a significant inhibition of destructive insulitis. Furthermore, a significant protection against the loss of insulin-secreting presented β-cells was achieved, as observed by a careful immunohistochemical evaluation. The phenotypic analysis indicated that the groups treated with higher doses (100-400mg/kg) presented CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell values similar to those observed in healthy animals. These same higher doses also increased the number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells. Moreover, the extract modulated the production of Th1 and Th2, with increased levels of IL-4 and IL-5. The extract was effective to prevent the progression of immune-mediated diabetes by distinct pathways. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The preventive role of thoracic duct ligation on cerebral fat embolism in lung injury: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Eroglu, Atilla; Gundogdu, Cemal; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Altas, Sare; Aydin, Nazan

    2008-11-01

    Cerebral fat embolism constitutes a major problem in intensive care units and treatment methods are highly controversial. Cerebral fat embolism has been thought to result from the migration of bone marrow fragments to the brain. However, the present authors observed that cerebral fat embolism is not possible unless the bone marrow particles cause alveolar wall destruction due to pulmonary artery occlusion. Thoracic duct ligation is essential for improved patient survival under such conditions. The aim was to investigate whether thoracic duct ligation plays a preventive role in cerebral fat embolism in lung injury. Pulmonary contusion was established with chest wall trauma in 20 male hybrid rabbits (n=20), with thoracic duct ligation being administered to half (n=10). Ten days after the procedure, all the rabbits were sacrificed. Brain specimens were taken using the frozen-section method, stained with Sudan Black, and examined microscopically. In the frozen brain sections the number of branches occluded by fat particles in both the central cerebral arteries was 15.5+/-3.02 in eight animals of the non-ligated group (GI) compared with 4.7+/-2.45 in two animals of the ligated group (GII). The number of occluded branches of the middle cerebral arteries was significantly higher in GI than in GII (p<0.001). The number of branches of both central cerebral arteries occluded by lipid particles was greater in the non-ligated than in the ligated animals. It is believed that thoracic duct ligation provides significant protection against fat embolism in cases of thoracic trauma.

  14. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  15. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  16. A high-throughput assay format for determination of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, N.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Choudary, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a microplate-based high-throughput procedure for rapid assay of the enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, using extremely small volumes of reagents. The new procedure offers the advantages of rapidity, small sample size-nanoliter volumes, low cost, and a dramatic increase in the throughput sample number that can be analyzed simultaneously. Additional advantages can be accessed by using microplate reader application software packages that permit assigning a group type to the wells, recording of the data on exportable data files and exercising the option of using the kinetic or endpoint reading modes. The assay can also be used independently for detecting nitrite residues/contamination in environmental/food samples. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Wnt7a Inhibits IL-1β Induced Catabolic Gene Expression and Prevents Articular Cartilage Damage in Experimental Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Averi L.; Hui Mingalone, Carrie K.; Foote, Andrea T.; Uchimura, Tomoya; Zhang, Ming; Zeng, Li

    2017-01-01

    Wnt7a is a protein that plays a critical role in skeletal development. However, its effect on cartilage homeostasis under pathological conditions is not known. In this study, we found a unique inverse correlation between Wnt7a gene expression and that of MMP and IL-1β in individual human OA cartilage specimens. Upon ectopic expression in primary human articular chondrocytes, Wnt7a inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP and iNOS gene expression. Western blot analysis indicated that Wnt7a induced both canonical Wnt signaling and NFAT and Akt non-canonical signaling. Interestingly, inhibiting the canonical and Akt pathway did not affect Wnt7a activity. However, inhibiting the NFAT pathway impaired Wnt7a’s ability to inhibit MMP expression, suggesting that Wnt7a requires NFAT signaling to exert this function. In vivo, intraarticular injection of lentiviral Wnt7a strongly attenuated articular cartilage damage induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) OA-inducing surgery in mice. Consistently, Wnt7a also inhibited the progressive increase of joint MMP activity in DMM animals. These results indicate that Wnt7a signaling inhibits inflammatory stimuli-induced catabolic gene expression in human articular chondrocytes and is sufficient to attenuate MMP activities and promote joint cartilage integrity in mouse experimental OA, demonstrating a novel effect of Wnt7a on regulating OA pathogenesis. PMID:28165497

  18. BJ-3105, a 6-Alkoxypyridin-3-ol Analog, Impairs T Cell Differentiation and Prevents Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Timilshina, Maheshwor; Kang, Youra; Dahal, Ishmit; You, Zhiwei; Nam, Tae-gyu; Kim, Keuk-Jun

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are essential in inflammation and autoimmune diseases. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secreting T helper (Th1) and IL-17 secreting T helper (Th17) cells are critical for several autoimmune diseases. To assess the inhibitory effect of a given compound on autoimmune disease, we screened many compounds with an in vitro Th differentiation assay. BJ-3105, a 6-alkoxypyridin-3-ol analog, inhibited IFN-γ and IL-17 production from polyclonal CD4+ T cells and ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD4+ T cells which were activated by T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. BJ-3105 ameliorated the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model by reducing Th1 and Th17 generation. Notably, Th cell differentiation was significantly suppressed by BJ-3105 treatment without inhibiting in vitro proliferation of T cells or inducing programmed cell death. Mechanistically, BJ-3105 inhibited the phosphorylation of JAK and its downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) that is critical for Th differentiation. These results demonstrated that BJ-3105 inhibits the phosphorylation of STAT in response to cytokine signals and subsequently suppressed the differentiation of Th cell responses. PMID:28095433

  19. [The experimental study on biodegradable gel membrane applied to prevention of postoperative adhesion of abdominal cavity surgery].

    PubMed

    Song, Ju-kun; Bao, Chong-yun; Yuan, Ming-long; Ding, Yun-ping; Zhou, Jing-lin; Xue, Jing; Jiang, Hua-zhou; Liao, Yun-mao; Li, Wei

    2007-07-01

    To develop a new type of anti-adhesion gel membrane and explore its applying technique. 24 adult New Zealand white rabbits were used for the experiment research project, the animals were divided into two groups: the experiment group (18 adult New Zealand white rabbits) and the control group (6 adult New Zealand white rabbits). The animal models were established via the abdominal cavity. The biodegradable gel membrane was covered to the surface of the operating region in experimental animal group, while the 0.9% NaCL was directly rinsing the operating region in the controlled group. The specimens were collected at postoperatively week 2, 4 or 8 respectively. The samples were evaluated by global and histological observation. In the experiment group, a few adhed zones were observed in 2 and 4 weeks after operation, but in 8 weeks after operation, the adhesion zone was disappeared. In the control group, a few adheol zones were founded in 2 weeks after operation. In 4 weeks after operation, the adhed zone become conspicuously emerged. In 8 weeks after operation, the cicatri band was occurred. The biodegradable gel membrane usd into the postoperative abdominal cavity is effective and easy to manipulate, and it could be used as a high-effect, cheap drug of anti-adhesion in operation for surgeons.

  20. Enteral diets enriched with medium-chain triglycerides and N-3 fatty acids prevent chemically induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Ogiku, Masahito; Tsuchiya, Masato; Ishii, Kenichi; Hara, Michio

    2010-11-01

    The specific purpose of this study was to evaluate the significant effects of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) and N-3 fatty acids on chemically induced experimental colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed liquid diets enriched with N-6 fatty acid (control diets), N-3 fatty acid (MCT- diets), and N-3 fatty acid and MCT (MCT+ diets) for 2 weeks and then were given an intracolonic injection of TNBS. Serum and tissue samples were collected 5 days after ethanol or TNBS enema. The severity of colitis was evaluated pathologically, and tissue myeloperoxidase activity was measured in colonic tissues. Furthermore, protein levels for inflammatory cytokines and a chemokine were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in colonic tissues. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in the colon by TNBS enema was markedly attenuated by the MCT+ diet among the 3 diets studied. Furthermore, the induction of chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 also was blunted significantly in animals fed the MCT+ diets. As a result, MPO activities in the colonic tissue also were blunted significantly in animals fed the MCT+ diets compared with those fed the control diets or the MCT- diets. Furthermore, the MCT+ diet improved chemically induced colitis significantly among the 3 diets studied. Diets enriched with both MCTs and N-3 fatty acids may be effective for the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease as antiinflammatory immunomodulating nutrients.

  1. [The correction of the status of the pulmonary surfactant system as a method for preventing experimental pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Korzh, E V; Faĭnerman, V B

    1997-01-01

    Using a model of experimental pneumoconiosis in albino rats, induced by breathing in a rock dust, we attempted correction of the pulmonary surfactant system, for which purpose we tried choline chloride as a drug preparation. The action of the above drug was found out to be depended upon the moment of its administration and time during which it is being administered, and is that of influence on both the concentration and mechanism of absorbtion of surface-active fractions of the surfactant in the liquid-gas interface. Early administration of choline chloride (during the dust factor exposure) increases concentration of those surfactants notable for their surface-active properties being maintained, and improves the processes of diffusion of surface-active substances, which observation is accompanied by decrease in intensity of the processes of fibroformation in the lung tissue. Choline chlorid employed on the discontinuation of the dust exposure has adverse effects leading to changes in the lipid composition, impairing the surface-active properties and processes of diffusion of the pulmonary surfactant, which fact may contribute to aggravation of fibrosis in the lungs.

  2. Expression in Escherichia coli of Cytochrome c Reductase Activity from a Maize NADH:Nitrate Reductase Complementary DNA 1

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Wilbur H.

    1992-01-01

    A cDNA clone was isolated from a maize (Zea mays L. cv W64A×W183E) scutellum λgt11 library using maize leaf NADH:nitrate reductase Zmnr1 cDNA clone as a hybridization probe; it was designated Zmnr1S. Zmnr1S was shown to be an NADH:nitrate reductase clone by nucleotide sequencing and comparison of its deduced amino acid sequence to Zmnr1. Zmnr1S, which is 1.8 kilobases in length and contains the code for both the cytochrome b and flavin adenine dinucleotide domains of nitrate reductase, was cloned into the EcoRI site of the Escherichia coli expression vector pET5b and expressed. The cell lysate contained NADH:cytochrome c reductase activity, which is a characteristic partial activity of NADH:nitrate reductase dependent on the cytochrome b and flavin adenine dinucleotide domains. Recombinant cytochrome c reductase was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on monoclonal antibody Zm2(69) Sepharose. The purified cytochrome c reductase, which had a major size of 43 kilodaltons, was inhibited by polyclonal antibodies for maize leaf NADH:nitrate reductase and bound these antibodies when blotted to nitrocellulose. Ultraviolet and visible spectra of oxidized and NADH-reduced recombinant cytochrome c reductase were nearly identical with those of maize leaf NADH:nitrate reductase. These two enzyme forms also had very similar kinetic properties with respect to NADH-dependent cytochrome c and ferricyanide reduction. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668941

  3. Analyses of glutathione reductase hypomorphic mice indicate a genetic knockout.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Lynette K; Tamura, Toshiya; Rogers, Bryan J; Welty, Stephen E; Hansen, Thomas N; Smith, Charles V

    2004-12-01

    A strain of mice (Gr1a1Neu) that exhibited tissue glutathione reductase (GR) activities that were substantially lower (less than 10% in liver) than the corresponding activities in control mice has been reported. The present report describes characterization of the mutation(s) in the GR gene of these mice. RT-PCR of mRNA from the Neu mice indicated a substantial deletion in the normal GR coding sequence. Southern blots revealed that the deletion involved a region spanning from intron 1 through intron 5. The exact breakpoints of the deletion were characterized by PCR and sequencing through the region encompassing the deletion. The deletion involves nucleotides 10840 through 23627 of the genomic GR gene and functionally deletes exons 2 through 5. In addition, the deletion produces a frame shift in exon 6 and introduces a stop codon in exon 7 that would prevent translation of the remainder of the protein. Consequently, the Neu mice are incapable of producing a functional GR protein and appear to be genetic knockouts for GR. The Neu mice offer live animal models with which to test hypotheses regarding oxidant mechanisms of tissue injury in vivo.

  4. Crateva adansonii DC, an African ethnomedicinal plant, exerts cytotoxicity in vitro and prevents experimental mammary tumorigenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zingue, Stéphane; Cisilotto, Julia; Tueche, Alain Brice; Bishayee, Anupam; Mefegue, Francine Azegha; Sandjo, Louis Pergaud; Magne Nde, Chantal Beatrice; Winter, Evelyn; Michel, Thomas; Ndinteh, Derek Tantoh; Awounfack, Charline Florence; Silihe, Kevine Kamga; Melachio Tanekou, Tito Tresor; Creczynski-Pasa, Tânia Beatriz; Njamen, Dieudonné

    2016-08-22

    estimated to be greater than 5000mg/kg. These aforementioned results suggest that the C. adansonii extract may possess antitumor constituents, which could combat breast cancer and prevent chemically-induced breast cancer in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Finding the keys to successful adult-targeted advertisements on obesity prevention: an experimental audience testing study.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Helen; Scully, Maree; Durkin, Sarah; Brennan, Emily; Cotter, Trish; Maloney, Sarah; O'Hara, Blythe J; Wakefield, Melanie

    2015-08-20

    Mass media communications are an important component of comprehensive interventions to address population levels of overweight and obesity, yet we have little understanding of the effective characteristics of specific advertisements (ads) on this topic. This study aimed to quantitatively test audience reactions to existing adult-focused public health television ads addressing overweight and obesity to determine which ads have the highest levels of message acceptance, argument strength, personalised perceived effectiveness and negative emotional impact. 1116 Australian adults aged 21-55 years recruited from a national online panel participated in this web-based study. Quotas were applied to achieve even numbers of males and females, those aged 21-29 years and 30-55 years, and those with a healthy weight (BMI = 18.5-24.9) and overweight/obesity (BMI = 25+). Participants were randomly assigned to view and rate four of eight ads that varied in terms of message content (health consequences, supportive/encouraging or social norms/acceptability) and execution style (graphic, simulation/animation, positive or negative testimonial, or depicted scene). Toxic fat (a graphic, health consequences ad) was the top performing ad on all four outcome measures and was significantly more likely than the other ads tested to promote strong responses in terms of message acceptance, argument strength and negative emotional impact. Measure up (a negative testimonial, health consequences ad) performed comparably on personalised perceived effectiveness. Most ads produced stronger perceptions of personalised perceived effectiveness among participants with overweight/obesity compared to participants with healthy weight. Some ads were more likely to promote strong negative emotions among participants with overweight/obesity. Findings provide preliminary evidence of the most promising content and executional styles of ads that could be pursued as part of obesity prevention campaigns. Ads

  6. Kinetic mechanism of pulmonary carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, K; Nakayama, T; Nakagawa, M; Hara, A; Sawada, H

    1988-05-15

    The kinetic mechanism of guinea-pig lung carbonyl reductase was studied at pH 7 in the forward reaction with five carbonyl substrates and NAD(P)H and in the reverse reaction with propan-2-ol and NAD(P)+. In each case the enzyme mechanism was sequential, and product-inhibition studies were consistent with a di-iso ordered bi bi mechanism, in which NAD(P)H binds to the enzyme first and NAD(P)+ leaves last and the binding of cofactor induces isomerization. The kinetic and binding studies of the cofactors and several inhibitors such as pyrazole, benzoic acid, Cibacron Blue and benzamide indicate that the cofactor and Cibacron Blue bind to the free enzyme whereas the other inhibitors bind to the binary and/or ternary complexes.

  7. Kinetic mechanism of pulmonary carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, K; Nakayama, T; Nakagawa, M; Hara, A; Sawada, H

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of guinea-pig lung carbonyl reductase was studied at pH 7 in the forward reaction with five carbonyl substrates and NAD(P)H and in the reverse reaction with propan-2-ol and NAD(P)+. In each case the enzyme mechanism was sequential, and product-inhibition studies were consistent with a di-iso ordered bi bi mechanism, in which NAD(P)H binds to the enzyme first and NAD(P)+ leaves last and the binding of cofactor induces isomerization. The kinetic and binding studies of the cofactors and several inhibitors such as pyrazole, benzoic acid, Cibacron Blue and benzamide indicate that the cofactor and Cibacron Blue bind to the free enzyme whereas the other inhibitors bind to the binary and/or ternary complexes. PMID:3048244

  8. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: biochemical characterization and medical significance.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Elizabeth E

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylenetetrahydofolate (CH2-H4folate) to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (CH3-H4folate). The enzyme employs a noncovalently-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which accepts reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H and transfers them to CH2-H4folate. The reaction provides the sole source of CH3-H4folate, which is utilized by methionine synthase in the synthesis of methionine from homocysteine. MTHFR plays a key role in folate metabolism and in the homeostasis of homocysteine; mutations in the enzyme lead to hyperhomocyst(e)inemia. A common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and depression in adults, and of neural tube defects in the fetus. The mutation also confers protection for certain types of cancers. This review presents the current knowledge of the enzyme, its biochemical characterization, and medical significance.

  9. The Effectiveness of Crataegus orientalis M Bieber. (Hawthorn) Extract Administration in Preventing Alveolar Bone Loss in Rats with Experimental Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Mükerrem; Sağlam, Mehmet; Köseoğlu, Serhat; Köksal, Ekrem; Keleş, Ali; Esen, Hacı Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this animal study was to evaluate the effects of hawthorn (Crataeus orientalis M Bieber.) extract on serum oxidative status and alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. Twenty-seven Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following groups: non- ligated+placebo (saline) (NL, n = 9), ligature only+placebo (saline) (LO, n = 9), and ligature and treated with hawthorn extract in saline (H, n = 9) (100 mg/kg orogastrically, once a day for 11 days). Periodontitis was induced by submerging a 4/0 silk ligature in the sulcus of the mandibular right first molars of rats, and the animals were sacrificed after 11 days. Micro-CT examinations were performed for linear and volumetric parameter assessment of alveolar bone. Periodontal tissues were histopathologically examined to assess the differences among the study groups. Levels of serum total antioxidant status (TAS)/total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also analyzed. Alveolar bone loss was significantly reduced by hawthorn administration compared to LO group (p<0.05). The number of inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in the LO group was significantly higher than that of the NL and H groups (p< 0.05). The number of osteoblasts in the LO and H groups was significantly higher than that of the NL group (p<0.05). TOS and OSI levels were significantly reduced in H group compared to LO group (P <0.05) and TAS levels were similar in H and NL group (p< 0.05). Hawthorn extract showed inhibitory effect on periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss by regulating TAS, TOS and OSI levels in periodontal disease in rats when administered systemically.

  10. Experimental total wrapping of breast implants with acellular dermal matrix: a preventive tool against capsular contracture in breast surgery?

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Marweh; Bertram, Martin; Kneser, Ulrich; Keller, Andrea K; Horch, Raymund E

    2013-10-01

    Capsular contracture remains a hitherto unsolved complication after implantation of silicone gel-filled breast prostheses. Based on clinical and experimental data, the use of an acellular dermal matrix as a sheath around implants may lead to lesser capsular contracture acting as a proposed biological environment mimicking wound bed tissue. The aim of our study was to analyse the tissue reaction after implantation of silicone prosthesis with and without an envelope of acellular dermal matrix. Implantation of 60 silicone prostheses in the back of Lewis rats were carried out, randomly paired taking one rat from group A and one from group B. Group A included implants completely enveloped with xenogenic acellular dermis and group B undraped silicone implants. At 3, 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively, the samples were explanted and subjected to histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. A new myofibroblast tissue layer was identified in proximity to the implant in both groups. The thickness of the layer in group A was continuously thinner than in group B regarding the different explantation time points. Implants completely wrapped with acellular dermal matrix showed significantly lesser inflammatory signs at 3 and 12 weeks after implantation compared to controls. Cell proliferation after 12 weeks was significantly decreased in group A. The slight myofibroblast layer and reduced rate of inflammation and proliferation in the treatment group show a positive effect of total acellular dermal matrix envelope and hypothesise the decrease of capsular contracture in long-term periods. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Gennis, Robert B; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2011-11-01

    Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol: O₂ oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O₂ and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O₂-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O₂, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  13. Enhanced silver nanoparticle synthesis by optimization of nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Gopalram, Shubaash; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Deepak, Venkataraman; Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructure materials are attracting a great deal of attention because of their potential for achieving specific processes and selectivity, especially in biological and pharmaceutical applications. The generation of silver nanoparticles using optimized nitrate reductase for the reduction of Ag(+) with the retention of enzymatic activity in the complex is being reported. This report involves the optimization of enzyme activity to bring about enhanced nanoparticle synthesis. Response surface methodology and central composite rotary design (CCRD) were employed to optimize a fermentation medium for the production of nitrate reductase by Bacillus licheniformis at pH 8. The four variables involved in the study of nitrate reductase were Glucose, Peptone, Yeast extract and KNO(3). Glucose had a significant effect on nitrate reductase production. The optimized medium containing (%) Glucose: 1.5, Peptone: 1, Yeast extract: 0.35 and KNO(3): 0.35 resulted in a nitrate reductase activity of 452.206 U/ml which is same as that of the central level. The medium A (showing least nitrate reductase activity) and the medium B (showing maximum nitrate reductase activity) were compared for the synthesis. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the particles exhibited a peak at 431 nm and the A(431) for the medium B was 2-fold greater than that of the medium A. The particles were also characterized using TEM. The particles synthesized using the optimized enzyme activity ranged from 10 to 80 nm and therefore can be extended to various medicinal applications.

  14. Effectiveness of anonymised information sharing and use in health service, police, and local government partnership for preventing violence related injury: experimental study and time series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Florence, Curtis; Brennan, Iain; Simon, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of anonymised information sharing to prevent injury related to violence. Design Experimental study and time series analysis of a prototype community partnership between the health service, police, and local government partners designed to prevent violence. Setting Cardiff, Wales, and 14 comparison cities designated “most similar” by the Home Office in England and Wales. Intervention After a 33 month development period, anonymised data relevant to violence prevention (precise violence location, time, days, and weapons) from patients attending emergency departments in Cardiff and reporting injury from violence were shared over 51 months with police and local authority partners and used to target resources for violence prevention. Main outcome measures Health service records of hospital admissions related to violence and police records of woundings and less serious assaults in Cardiff and other cities after adjustment for potential confounders. Results Information sharing and use were associated with a substantial and significant reduction in hospital admissions related to violence. In the intervention city (Cardiff) rates fell from seven to five a month per 100 000 population compared with an increase from five to eight in comparison cities (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 0.69). Average rate of woundings recorded by the police changed from 54 to 82 a month per 100 000 population in Cardiff compared with an increase from 54 to 114 in comparison cities (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.68, 0.61 to 0.75). There was a significant increase in less serious assaults recorded by the police, from 15 to 20 a month per 100 000 population in Cardiff compared with a decrease from 42 to 33 in comparison cities (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.38, 1.13 to 1.70). Conclusion An information sharing partnership between health services, police, and local government in Cardiff, Wales, altered policing

  15. Preventing the BDNF and NGF loss involved in the effects of cornel iridoid glycoside on attenuation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhao; Zheng, Na; Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Li; Liu, Jianghong; Wang, Qi; Yin, Linlin

    2016-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the beneficial effects of cornel iridoid glycoside (CIG), a main component extract from Cornus officinalis, on neurotrophin expression in mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a classical model of multiple sclerosis (MS). After EAE initiation, CIG was intragastrically administered daily for 32 days and reduced disease severity. Histopathological staining and western blotting both showed that CIG could prevent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) loss in the spinal cord of EAE mice. In conclusion, our findings indicated that CIG treatment suppressed disease severity of EAE partially through blocking downregulation of neurotrophic factor expression such as BDNF and NGF, suggesting that CIG may have beneficial effects for the treatment of demyelinating diseases such as MS.

  16. Modulation of haemostatic function and prevention of experimental thrombosis by red wine in rats: a role for increased nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Wollny, Tomasz; Aiello, Luca; Di Tommaso, Donata; Bellavia, Vincenzo; Rotilio, Domenico; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ethyl alcohol and wine (red and white) on haemostatic parameters and experimental thrombosis were studied in rats; NO was evaluated as a possible mediator of these effects. We found that red wine (12% alcohol) supplementation (8.4±0.4 ml d−1 in drinking water, for 10 days) induced a marked prolongation of ‘template' bleeding time (BT) (258±13 vs 132±13 s in controls; P<0.001), a decrease in platelet adhesion to fibrillar collagen (11.6±1.0 vs 32.2±1.3%; P<0.01) and a reduction in thrombus weight (1.45±0.33 vs 3.27±0.39 mg; P<0.01). Alcohol-free red wine showed an effect similar to red wine. In contrast, neither ethyl alcohol (12%) nor white wine (12% alcohol) affected these systems. All these effects were also observed after red wine i.v. injection (1 ml kg−1 of 1 : 4 dilution) 15 min before the experiments. The effects of red wine were prevented by the NO inhibitor, Nωnitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME). L-arginine, not D-arginine, reversed the effect of L-NAME on red wine infusion. Red wine injection induced a 3 fold increase in total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter values of rat plasma with respect to controls, while white wine and alcohol did not show any effect. Our study provides evidence that red wine modulates primary haemostasis and prevents experimental thrombosis in rats, independently of its alcohol content, by a NO-mediated mechanism. PMID:10401566

  17. Berberine inhibits androgen synthesis by interaction with aldo-keto reductase 1C3 in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuantong; Zhao, Lijing; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Haitao; Xu, Duo; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yi; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 has recently been regarded as a potential therapeutic target in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Herein, we investigated whether berberine delayed the progression of castrate-resistant prostate cancer by reducing androgen synthesis through the inhibition of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. Cell viability and cellular testosterone content were measured in prostate cancer cells. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 mRNA and protein level were detected by RT-PCR and Western bolt analyses, respectively. Computer analysis with AutoDock Tools explored the molecular interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. We found that berberine inhibited 22Rv1 cells proliferation and decreased cellular testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibited Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity, rather than influenced mRNA and protein expressions. Molecular docking study demonstrated that berberine could enter the active center of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 and form p-p interaction with the amino-acid residue Phe306 and Phe311. In conclusion, the structural interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 is attributed to the suppression of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity and the inhibition of 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell growth by decreasing the intracellular androgen synthesis. Our result provides the experimental basis for the design, research, and development of AKR1C3 inhibitors using berberine as the lead compound.

  18. Infusion of Sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate-Conjugated MOG35-55-Coupled Spleen Cells Effectively Prevents and Reverses Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanfang; Guo, Yixian; Xia, Chang-Qing

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have evaluated our recently developed method for antigen-cell coupling using sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) heterobifunctional crosslinker in prevention and reversal of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We demonstrate that infusion of MOG35-55-coupled spleen cells (MOG-SP) significantly prevents and reverses EAE. Further studies show that the protected animals exhibit significantly delayed EAE upon EAE reinduction. Moreover, adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells from the protected mice to naïve syngeneic mice renders the recipient mice resistant to EAE induction. Unexpectedly, CD4+ T cell proliferation is similar upon ex vivo stimulation by MOG35-55 amongst all groups. However, further analysis of those proliferating CD4+ T cells shows remarkable differences in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (70% in MOG-SP groups versus 10-25% in control groups) and in IL-17+ cells (2-3% in MOG-SP groups versus 6-9% in control groups). In addition, we discover that MOG-SP treatment also significantly attenuates MOG35-55-responding IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. These findings suggest that MOG-SP treatment induces EAE protective MOG35-55-specific regulatory T cells and suppresses EAE pathogenic Th17 and Th1 cells. Our study provides a novel approach for antigen-based EAE immunotherapy, which can potentially be translated into clinical application for immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis.

  19. Infusion of Sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate-Conjugated MOG35–55-Coupled Spleen Cells Effectively Prevents and Reverses Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lanfang; Guo, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have evaluated our recently developed method for antigen-cell coupling using sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) heterobifunctional crosslinker in prevention and reversal of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We demonstrate that infusion of MOG35–55-coupled spleen cells (MOG-SP) significantly prevents and reverses EAE. Further studies show that the protected animals exhibit significantly delayed EAE upon EAE reinduction. Moreover, adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells from the protected mice to naïve syngeneic mice renders the recipient mice resistant to EAE induction. Unexpectedly, CD4+ T cell proliferation is similar upon ex vivo stimulation by MOG35–55 amongst all groups. However, further analysis of those proliferating CD4+ T cells shows remarkable differences in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (70% in MOG-SP groups versus 10–25% in control groups) and in IL-17+ cells (2-3% in MOG-SP groups versus 6–9% in control groups). In addition, we discover that MOG-SP treatment also significantly attenuates MOG35–55-responding IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. These findings suggest that MOG-SP treatment induces EAE protective MOG35–55-specific regulatory T cells and suppresses EAE pathogenic Th17 and Th1 cells. Our study provides a novel approach for antigen-based EAE immunotherapy, which can potentially be translated into clinical application for immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26258148

  20. Novel role of red wine-derived polyphenols in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease dementia and brain pathology: experimental approaches and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that by the middle of this century, as many as 14 million Americans will have Alzheimer's disease, creating an enormous strain on families, the health care system and the federal budget. There are still widespread misconceptions about issues related to the prevention and/or treatment of disease pathogenesis, leaving us unprepared to deal with the disease. To address these challenges, several therapeutic approaches are currently under investigation, mainly in an attempt to delay disease onset and eventually slow down its progression. Recent epidemiological evidence has implicated the protective role of dietary polyphenols from grape products against Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that certain bioactive grape-derived polyphenols may protect against Alzheimer's disease-type cognitive deterioration, in part by interfering with the generation and assembly of β-amyloid peptides into neurotoxic oligomeric aggregated species. Brain-targeting polyphenols have been shown to significantly reduce the generation of β-amyloid peptides in primary cortico-hippocampal neuron cultures, and preliminary results indicate that they may influence neuronal synaptic plasticity. Recent evidence has also implicated the role of certain grape-derived preparations in beneficially modulating tau neuropathology, including reducing tau aggregation. Studies suggest that dietary polyphenolics may benefit Alzheimer's disease by modulating multiple disease-modifying modalities, both β-amyloid-dependent and independent mechanisms, and provide impetus for the development of polyphenolic compounds for Alzheimer's disease prevention and/or therapy.

  1. Carboxylation mechanism and stereochemistry of crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, a carboxylating enoyl-thioester reductase

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Brecht, Volker; Fuchs, Georg; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemo- and stereoselective reductions are important reactions in chemistry and biology, and reductases from biological sources are increasingly applied in organic synthesis. In contrast, carboxylases are used only sporadically. We recently described crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA but also the reductive carboxylation of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to ethylmalonyl-CoA. In this study, the complete stereochemical course of both reactions was investigated in detail. The pro-(4R) hydrogen of NADPH is transferred in both reactions to the re face of the C3 position of crotonyl-CoA. In the course of the carboxylation reaction, carbon dioxide is incorporated in anti fashion at the C2 atom of crotonyl-CoA. For the reduction reaction that yields butyryl-CoA, a solvent proton is added in anti fashion instead of the CO2. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase is a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and shares the same phylogenetic origin. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from NAD(P)H within this superfamily is highly conserved, although the substrates and reduction reactions catalyzed by its individual representatives differ quite considerably. Our findings led to a reassessment of the stereospecificity of enoyl(-thioester) reductases and related enzymes with respect to their amino acid sequence, revealing a general pattern of stereospecificity that allows the prediction of the stereochemistry of the hydride transfer for enoyl reductases of unknown specificity. Further considerations on the reaction mechanism indicated that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase may have evolved from enoyl-CoA reductases. This may be useful for protein engineering of enoyl reductases and their application in biocatalysis. PMID:19458256

  2. The structure of apo and holo forms of xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase from Candida tenuis.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2002-07-16

    Xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase dependent on NADPH or NADH and belongs to the largely monomeric aldo-keto reductase superfamily of proteins. It catalyzes the first step in the assimilation of xylose, an aldose found to be a major constituent monosaccharide of renewable plant hemicellulosic material, into yeast metabolic pathways. It does this by reducing open chain xylose to xylitol, which is reoxidized to xylulose by xylitol dehydrogenase and metabolically integrated via the pentose phosphate pathway. No structure has yet been determined for a xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase or a family 2 aldo-keto reductase. The structures of the Candida tenuis xylose reductase apo- and holoenzyme, which crystallize in spacegroup C2 with different unit cells, have been determined to 2.2 A resolution and an R-factor of 17.9 and 20.8%, respectively. Residues responsible for mediating the novel dimeric interface include Asp-178, Arg-181, Lys-202, Phe-206, Trp-313, and Pro-319. Alignments with other superfamily members indicate that these interactions are conserved in other dimeric xylose reductases but not throughout the remainder of the oligomeric aldo-keto reductases, predicting alternate modes of oligomerization for other families. An arrangement of side chains in a catalytic triad shows that Tyr-52 has a conserved function as a general acid. The loop that folds over the NAD(P)H cosubstrate is disordered in the apo form but becomes ordered upon cosubstrate binding. A slow conformational isomerization of this loop probably accounts for the observed rate-limiting step involving release of cosubstrate. Xylose binding (K(m) = 87 mM) is mediated by interactions with a binding pocket that is more polar than a typical aldo-keto reductase. Modeling of xylose into the active site of the holoenzyme using ordered waters as a guide for sugar hydroxyls suggests a convincing mode of substrate binding.

  3. H-tunneling in the multiple H-transfers of the catalytic cycle of morphinone reductase and in the reductive half-reaction of the homologous pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Basran, Jaswir; Harris, Richard J; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2003-11-07

    The mechanism of flavin reduction in morphinone reductase (MR) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) reductase, and flavin oxidation in MR, has been studied by stopped-flow and steady-state kinetic methods. The temperature dependence of the primary kinetic isotope effect for flavin reduction in MR and PETN reductase by nicotinamide coenzyme indicates that quantum mechanical tunneling plays a major role in hydride transfer. In PETN reductase, the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is essentially independent of temperature in the experimentally accessible range, contrasting with strongly temperature-dependent reaction rates, consistent with a tunneling mechanism from the vibrational ground state of the reactive C-H/D bond. In MR, both the reaction rates and the KIE are dependent on temperature, and analysis using the Eyring equation suggests that hydride transfer has a major tunneling component, which, unlike PETN reductase, is gated by thermally induced vibrations in the protein. The oxidative half-reaction of MR is fully rate-limiting in steady-state turnover with the substrate 2-cyclohexenone and NADH at saturating concentrations. The KIE for hydride transfer from reduced flavin to the alpha/beta unsaturated bond of 2-cyclohexenone is independent of temperature, contrasting with strongly temperature-dependent reaction rates, again consistent with ground-state tunneling. A large solvent isotope effect (SIE) accompanies the oxidative half-reaction, which is also independent of temperature in the experimentally accessible range. Double isotope effects indicate that hydride transfer from the flavin N5 atom to 2-cyclohexenone, and the protonation of 2-cyclohexenone, are concerted and both the temperature-independent KIE and SIE suggest that this reaction also proceeds by ground-state quantum tunneling. Our results demonstrate the importance of quantum tunneling in the reduction of flavins by nicotinamide coenzymes. This is the first observation of (i) three H-nuclei in an

  4. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  5. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  6. The 5α-reductase inhibitor Dutasteride but not Finasteride protects dopamine neurons in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Litim, Nadhir; Bourque, Mélanie; Al Sweidi, Sara; Morissette, Marc; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2015-10-01

    Finasteride and Dutasteride are 5α-reductase inhibitors used in the clinic to treat endocrine conditions and were recently found to modulate brain dopamine (DA) neurotransmission and motor behavior. We investigated if Finasteride and Dutasteride have a neuroprotective effect in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) male mice as a model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Experimental groups included saline treated controls and mice treated with saline, Finasteride (5 and 12.5 mg/kg) or Dutasteride (5 and 12.5 mg/kg) for 5 days before and 5 days after MPTP administration (4 MPTP injections, 6.5 mg/kg on day 5 inducing a moderate DA depletion) and then they were euthanized. MPTP administration decreased striatal DA contents measured by HPLC while serotonin contents remained unchanged. MPTP mice treated with Dutasteride 5 and 12.5 mg/kg had higher striatal DA and metabolites (DOPAC and HVA) contents with a decrease of metabolites/DA ratios compared to saline-treated MPTP mice. Finasteride had no protective effect on striatal DA contents. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels measured by in situ hybridization in the substantia nigra pars compacta were unchanged. Dutasteride at 12.5 mg/kg reduced the effect of MPTP on specific binding to striatal DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) measured by autoradiography. MPTP reduced compared to controls plasma testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentrations measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; Dutasteride and Finasteride increased plasma T levels while DHT levels remained low. In summary, our results showed that a 5α-reductase inhibitor, Dutasteride has neuroprotective activity preventing in male mice the MPTP-induced loss of several dopaminergic markers.

  7. A quasi-experimental study to mobilize rural low-income communities to assess and improve the ecological environment to prevent childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Paula; Gold, Abby; Abbott, Angela; Contreras, Dawn; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2016-05-04

    The Ecological Model of Childhood Overweight focuses on characteristics that could affect a child's weight status in relation to the multiple environments surrounding that child. A community coaching approach allows community groups to identify their own strengths, priorities and identity. Little to no research currently exists related to community-based efforts inclusive of community coaching in creating environmental change to prevent childhood obesity particularly in rural communities. A quasi-experimental study will be conducted with low-income, rural communities (n = 14) in the North Central region of the United States to mobilize capacity in communities to create and sustain an environment of healthy eating and physical activity to prevent childhood obesity. Two rural communities within seven Midwestern states (IN, KS, MI, OH, ND, SD, WI) will be randomly assigned to serve as an intervention or comparison community. Coalitions will complete assessments of their communities, choose from evidence-based approaches, and implement nutrition and physical activity interventions each year to prevent childhood obesity with emphasis on policy, system or environmental changes over four years. Only intervention coalitions will receive community coaching from a trained coach. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, annually and project end using previously validated instruments and include coalition self-assessments, parental perceptions regarding the built environment, community, neighborhood, and early childhood environments, self-reflections from coaches and project staff, ripple effect mapping with coalitions and, final interviews of key stakeholders and coaches. A mixed-methods analysis approach will be used to evaluate if Community Coaching enhances community capacity to create and sustain an environment to support healthy eating and physical activity for young children. ANOVA or corresponding non-parametric tests will be used to analyze quantitative data

  8. Exploration of Nitrate Reductase Metabolic Pathway in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Vinícius; Diniz, Carlos; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Barh, Debmalya

    2017-01-01

    Based on the ability of nitrate reductase synthesis, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is classified into two biovars: Ovis and Equi. Due to the presence of nitrate reductase, the Equi biovar can survive in absence of oxygen. On the other hand, Ovis biovar that does not have nitrate reductase is able to adapt to various ecological niches and can grow on certain carbon sources. Apart from these two biovars, some other strains are also able to carry out the reduction of nitrate. The enzymes that are involved in electron transport chain are also identified by in silico methods. Findings about pathogen metabolism can contribute to the identification of relationship between nitrate reductase and the C. pseudotuberculosis pathogenicity, virulence factors, and discovery of drug targets. PMID:28316974

  9. Exploration of Nitrate Reductase Metabolic Pathway in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sintia; Sousa, Cassiana; Abreu, Vinícius; Diniz, Carlos; Dorneles, Elaine M S; Lage, Andrey P; Barh, Debmalya; Azevedo, Vasco

    2017-01-01

    Based on the ability of nitrate reductase synthesis, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is classified into two biovars: Ovis and Equi. Due to the presence of nitrate reductase, the Equi biovar can survive in absence of oxygen. On the other hand, Ovis biovar that does not have nitrate reductase is able to adapt to various ecological niches and can grow on certain carbon sources. Apart from these two biovars, some other strains are also able to carry out the reduction of nitrate. The enzymes that are involved in electron transport chain are also identified by in silico methods. Findings about pathogen metabolism can contribute to the identification of relationship between nitrate reductase and the C. pseudotuberculosis pathogenicity, virulence factors, and discovery of drug targets.

  10. Enantioselective imine reduction catalyzed by imine reductases and artificial metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Gamenara, Daniela; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2014-05-21

    Adding value to organic synthesis. Novel imine reductases enable the enantioselective reduction of imines to afford optically active amines. Likewise, novel bioinspired artificial metalloenzymes can perform the same reaction as well. Emerging proof-of-concepts are herein discussed.

  11. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems.

  12. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  13. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-09-15

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  14. Comparison of autogenous cartilage, acellular dermis, and solvent-dehydrated pericardium for the prevention and correction of dorsal nasal irregularities: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Çöloğlu, Harun; Uysal, Afşin; Tiftikçioğlu, Yiğit Özer; Oruç, Melike; Koçer, Uğur; Coşkun, Erhan; Ramadan, Selma Uysal; Astarcı, Müzeyyen Hesna

    2012-06-01

    Numerous materials have been used for the correction and prevention of dorsal nasal irregularities. Experimental and clinical studies have been useful but have provided insufficient results for several reasons, including the impossibility of obtaining pathologic specimens from aesthetic patients and imprecise experimental models. In this study, an experimental model for rhinoplasty is used for the comparative evaluation of solvent-dehydrated pericardium, acellular dermal matrix, and autogenous ear cartilage as onlay grafts for the prevention and correction of nasal dorsal irregularities. We used an experimental rabbit rhinoplasty model that has a human nose-like osteocartilaginous junction. Thus, our goal is to get a more realistic idea about the features of these three materials. Thirty New Zealand rabbits weighing 2,100-2,550 g were used. The noses of the rabbits were evaluated with computerized tomographic measurements, "pinch" tests were performed for skin properties, and all were photographed before the surgical procedures. They were divided into three groups: Autogenous cartilage grafts were applied after the rhinoplasty operation in group 1, acellular dermal matrixes were used after the rhinoplasty in group 2, and pericardium allografts were used after the rhinoplasty in group 3. The rabbits were followed up for 4 months before they were evaluated by photography, computerized tomography, and "pinch" tests for the skin properties of the nose. Then they were killed for histopathologic evaluation. Adhesion and resorption rates of the onlay grafts were observed and subdermal thickness measurements were made to determine the fate of the grafts as well as their effects on the overlying skin. The major advantages of the allografts used in groups 2 and 3 are the ease of obtaining them without any donor site morbidity, shorter operative procedures, and lower distortion rates due to lack of cartilage memory. The results of this study conform to those of previous

  15. Carbon-carbon double-bond reductases in nature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minmin; Hu, Haihong; Ma, Li; Zhou, Quan; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2014-08-01

    Reduction of C = C bonds by reductases, found in a variety of microorganisms (e.g. yeasts, bacteria, and lower fungi), animals, and plants has applications in the production of metabolites that include pharmacologically active drugs and other chemicals. Therefore, the reductase enzymes that mediate this transformation have become important therapeutic targets and biotechnological tools. These reductases are broad-spectrum, in that, they can act on isolation/conjugation C = C-bond compounds, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives, and nitro compounds. In addition, several mutations in the reductase gene have been identified, some associated with diseases. Several of these reductases have been cloned and/or purified, and studies to further characterize them and determine their structure in order to identify potential industrial biocatalysts are still in progress. In this study, crucial reductases for bioreduction of C = C bonds have been reviewed with emphasis on their principal substrates and effective inhibitors, their distribution, genetic polymorphisms, and implications in human disease and treatment.

  16. Distribution of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activity among microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouji; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Yoda, Koji; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nimura-Matsune, Kaori; Mura, Kiyoshi; Tokue, Chiyoko; Katoh, Tetzuya; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2004-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) constitutes a large family of enzymes found in microorganisms, animals, and plants, but the detection of the activities of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductases (peroxiredoxin reductases) in cell extracts, and the purification based on peroxide reductase activity, have only been done in bacteria and Trypanosomatidae. A peroxiredoxin reductase (NADH oxidase) from a bacterium, Amphibacillus, displayed only poor activities in the presence of purified Prx from Saccharomyces or Synechocystis, while it is highly active in the presence of bacterial Prx. These results suggested that an enzyme system different from that in bacteria might exist for the reduction of Prx in yeast and cyanobacteria. Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activities were detected in cell extracts of Saccharomyces, Synechocystis, and Chlorella, and the enzyme activities of Saccharomyces and Chlorella were induced under vigorously aerated culture conditions and intensive light exposure conditions, respectively. Partial purification of Prx-linked peroxidase from the induced yeast cells indicated that the Prx-linked peroxidase system consists of two protein components, namely, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. This finding is consistent with the previous report on its purification based on its protein protection activity against oxidation [Chae et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 27670-27678 (1994)]. In this study we have confirmed that Prx-linked peroxidase activity are widely distributed, not only in bacteria species and Trypanosomatidae, but also in yeast and photosynthetic microorganisms, and showed reconstitution of the activity from partially purified interspecies components.

  17. Engineering Styrene Monooxygenase for Biocatalysis: Reductase-Epoxidase Fusion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Heine, Thomas; Tucker, Kathryn; Okonkwo, Nonye; Assefa, Berhanegebriel; Conrad, Catleen; Scholtissek, Anika; Schlömann, Michael; Gassner, George; Tischler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The enantioselective epoxidation of styrene and related compounds by two-component styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) has targeted these enzymes for development as biocatalysts. In the present work, we prepare genetically engineered fusion proteins that join the C-terminus of the epoxidase (StyA) to the N-terminus of the reductase (StyB) through a linker peptide and demonstrate their utility as biocatalysts in the synthesis of Tyrain purple and other indigoid dyes. A single-vector expression system offers a simplified platform for transformation and expansion of the catalytic function of styrene monooxygenases, and the resulting fusion proteins are self-regulated and couple efficiently NADH oxidation to styrene epoxidation. We find that the reductase domain proceeds through a sequential ternary-complex mechanism at low FAD concentration and a double-displacement mechanism at higher concentrations of FAD. Single-turnover studies indicate an observed rate constant for FAD-to-FAD hydride transfer of ~8 s(-1). This step is rate limiting in the styrene epoxidation reaction and helps to ensure that flavin reduction and styrene epoxidation reactions proceed without wasteful side reactions. Comparison of the reductase activity of the fusion proteins with the naturally occurring reductase, SMOB, and N-terminally histidine-tagged reductase, NSMOB, suggests that the observed changes in catalytic mechanism are due in part to an increase in flavin-binding affinity associated with the N-terminal extension of the reductase.

  18. Microsecond subdomain folding in dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Iwakura, Masahiro; Matthews, C Robert; Bilsel, Osman

    2011-07-08

    The characterization of microsecond dynamics in the folding of multisubdomain proteins has been a major challenge in understanding their often complex folding mechanisms. Using a continuous-flow mixing device coupled with fluorescence lifetime detection, we report the microsecond folding dynamics of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a two-subdomain α/β/α sandwich protein known to begin folding in this time range. The global dimensions of early intermediates were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer, and the dynamic properties of the local Trp environments were monitored by fluorescence lifetime detection. We found that substantial collapse occurs in both the locally connected adenosine binding subdomain and the discontinuous loop subdomain within 35 μs of initiation of folding from the urea unfolded state. During the fastest observable ∼550 μs phase, the discontinuous loop subdomain further contracts, concomitant with the burial of Trp residue(s), as both subdomains achieve a similar degree of compactness. Taken together with previous studies in the millisecond time range, a hierarchical assembly of DHFR--in which each subdomain independently folds, subsequently docks, and then anneals into the native conformation after an initial heterogeneous global collapse--emerges. The progressive acquisition of structure, beginning with a continuously connected subdomain and spreading to distal regions, shows that chain entropy is a significant organizing principle in the folding of multisubdomain proteins and single-domain proteins. Subdomain folding also provides a rationale for the complex kinetics often observed.

  19. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  20. The Effectiveness and Sustainability of a Universal School-Based Programme for Preventing Depression in Chinese Adolescents: A Follow-Up Study Using Quasi-Experimental Design

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Eliza S. Y.; Kwok, Chi-Leung; Wong, Paul W. C.; Fu, King-Wa; Law, Yik-Wa; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background A pilot study about the effectiveness of a universal school-based programme, “The Little Prince is Depressed”, for preventing depression in Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong was conducted and reported previously. This study used a larger sample to examine the effectiveness and sustainability of the programme. Methods This study used quasi-experimental design. Twelve schools enrolled in “The Little Prince is Depressed” programme either as an intervention or a control condition. The intervention schools carried out the 12-session programme in two phases: the professional-led first phase and the teacher-led second phase. All participants were required to complete a questionnaire at three time points measuring their (1) depressive, anxiety, and stress levels; (2) knowledge of mental health; (3) attitudes towards mental illness; (4) perceived social support; and (5) help-seeking behaviours. Results A total of 3,391 students participated in the study. The level of depressive symptoms did not reduce significantly at post-intervention; however, a delayed effect was observed at follow-up assessment for the participants of the teacher-led group in reducing anxiety and stress levels. Also, the knowledge of mental health and attitudes towards mental illness of the intervention-group participants significantly improved at post-test, and the outcomes were maintained at 4 to 5 months after the intervention in both the professional-led and the teacher-led conditions (p<.05). A preference among schoolchildren for whom to seek help from was identified. Conclusions The universal depression prevention programme was effective in enhancing knowledge of mental health and promoting a more positive attitude towards mental illness among adolescents in Hong Kong. In particular, the teacher-led group showed better outcomes than the professional-led group in reducing students’ anxiety and stress at follow-up period. The programme can achieve sustainability in schools if

  1. The Effectiveness and Sustainability of a Universal School-Based Programme for Preventing Depression in Chinese Adolescents: A Follow-Up Study Using Quasi-Experimental Design.

    PubMed

    Lai, Eliza S Y; Kwok, Chi-Leung; Wong, Paul W C; Fu, King-Wa; Law, Yik-Wa; Yip, Paul S F

    2016-01-01

    A pilot study about the effectiveness of a universal school-based programme, "The Little Prince is Depressed", for preventing depression in Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong was conducted and reported previously. This study used a larger sample to examine the effectiveness and sustainability of the programme. This study used quasi-experimental design. Twelve schools enrolled in "The Little Prince is Depressed" programme either as an intervention or a control condition. The intervention schools carried out the 12-session programme in two phases: the professional-led first phase and the teacher-led second phase. All participants were required to complete a questionnaire at three time points measuring their (1) depressive, anxiety, and stress levels; (2) knowledge of mental health; (3) attitudes towards mental illness; (4) perceived social support; and (5) help-seeking behaviours. A total of 3,391 students participated in the study. The level of depressive symptoms did not reduce significantly at post-intervention; however, a delayed effect was observed at follow-up assessment for the participants of the teacher-led group in reducing anxiety and stress levels. Also, the knowledge of mental health and attitudes towards mental illness of the intervention-group participants significantly improved at post-test, and the outcomes were maintained at 4 to 5 months after the intervention in both the professional-led and the teacher-led conditions (p<.05). A preference among schoolchildren for whom to seek help from was identified. The universal depression prevention programme was effective in enhancing knowledge of mental health and promoting a more positive attitude towards mental illness among adolescents in Hong Kong. In particular, the teacher-led group showed better outcomes than the professional-led group in reducing students' anxiety and stress at follow-up period. The programme can achieve sustainability in schools if teachers are provided with adequate support.

  2. Possibilities for preventive treatment in rheumatoid arthritis? Lessons from experimental animal models of arthritis: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, J S; Schoones, J W; Huizinga, T W; Toes, R E; van der Helm-van Mil, A H

    2017-02-01

    Current research in rheumatoid arthritis focuses on preclinical disease phases as it is hypothesised that early preclinical treatment might prevent progression to full-blown disease. Since performance of studies in prearthritis phases in humans is challenging, animal models offer an opportunity to evaluate preventive treatments. We performed a systematic literature review and summarised treatment effects during different stages of arthritis development in animal models. Eight medical literature databases were systematically searched. Studies were selected if they reported effects of synthetic or biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in animal models of arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis and adjuvant-induced arthritis) on arthritis severity, as measured with arthritis severity scores, paw swelling or paw volume. Quality was assessed using an 11-item checklist. Study characteristics were extracted and effect sizes obtained in high-quality studies were summarised in meta-analyses. Studies were categorised into three groups: prophylactic (prior to generation of autoantibody response), prearthritis (after induction of autoantibody response) and therapeutic intervention (after arthritis development). Out of 1415 screened articles, 22 studies (including n=712 animals) were eligible of good quality and included in meta-analyses. Prophylactic (16 experiments, n=312 animals) and prearthritis treatment (9 experiments, n=156 animals) both were associated with a reduction of arthritis severity (p<0.001 and p=0.005, respectively). Stratified analyses for different antirheumatic drugs initiated in the prearthritis phase suggested higher efficacy of methotrexate than of anti-tumour necrosis factor. Data of experimental studies in animal models of arthritis suggest that prophylactic and prearthritis treatment strategies are effective and hint at differences in efficacy between antirheumatic drugs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  3. Synthesis of organic nitrates of luteolin as a novel class of potent aldose reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qin; Cheng, Ning; Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Peng, Sheng-Ming; Zou, Xiao-Qing

    2013-07-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the design of drugs that prevent and treat diabetic complications. Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) have received significant attentions as potent therapeutic drugs. Based on combination principles, three series of luteolin derivatives were synthesised and evaluated for their AR inhibitory activity and nitric oxide (NO)-releasing capacity in vitro. Eighteen compounds were found to be potent ARIs with IC50 values ranging from (0.099±0.008) μM to (2.833±0.102) μM. O(7)-Nitrooxyethyl-O(3'),O(4')-ethylidene luteolin (La1) showed the most potent AR inhibitory activity [IC50=(0.099±0.008) μM]. All organic nitrate derivatives released low concentrations of NO in the presence of l-cysteine. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that introduction of an NO donor, protection of the catechol structure, and the ether chain of a 2-carbon spacer as a coupling chain on the luteolin scaffold all help increase the AR inhibitory activity of the resulting compound. This class of NO-donor luteolin derivatives as efficient ARIs offer a new concept for the development and design of new drug for preventive and therapeutic drugs for diabetic complications.

  4. Education Against Tobacco (EAT): a quasi-experimental prospective evaluation of a multinational medical-student-delivered smoking prevention programme for secondary schools in Germany.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Titus J; Stamm-Balderjahn, Sabine; Seeger, Werner; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

    2015-09-18

    To evaluate the multinational medical-student-delivered tobacco prevention programme for secondary schools for its effectiveness to reduce the smoking prevalence among adolescents aged 11-15 years in Germany at half year follow-up. We used a prospective quasi-experimental study design with measurements at baseline (t1) and 6 months postintervention (t2) to investigate an intervention in 8 German secondary schools. The participants were split into intervention and control classes in the same schools and grades. A total of 1474 eligible participants of both genders at the age of 11-15 years were involved within the survey for baseline assessment of which 1200 completed the questionnaire at 6-month follow-up (=longitudinal sample). The schools participated voluntarily. The inclusion criteria were age (10-15 years), grade (6-8) and school type (regular secondary schools). Two 60 min school-based modules delivered by medical students. The primary end point was the difference from t1 to t2 of the smoking prevalence in the control group versus the difference from t1 to t2 in the intervention group (difference of differences approach). The percentage of former smokers and new smokers in the two groups were studied as secondary outcome measures. In the control group, the percentage of students who claimed to be smokers doubled from 4.2% (t1) to 8.1% (t2), whereas it remained almost the same in the intervention group (7.1% (t1) to 7.4% (t2); p=0.01). The likelihood of quitting smoking was almost six times higher in the intervention group (total of 67 smokers at t1; 27 (4.6%) and 7 (1.1%) in the control group; OR 5.63; 95% CI 2.01 to 15.79; p<0.01). However, no primary preventive effect was found. We report a significant secondary preventive (smoking cessation) effect at 6-month follow-up. Long-term evaluation is planned. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. A randomized controlled experimental study of the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma and hyaluronic acid for the prevention of adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Cetinkaya, Nilufer; Bas, Sevda; Korkmaz, Elmas; Ozgu, Emre; Terzioglu, Gokay Serdar; Buyukkagnici, Umran; Akbay, Serap; Caydere, Muzaffer; Gungor, Tayfun

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been known to possess an efficacy in tissue regeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PRP on post-operative adhesion formation in an experimental rat study. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control, hyaluronic acid, and PRP treatment groups and operated on for uterine horn adhesion modeling. Blood was collected to produce a PRP with platelet counts of 688 × 10(3)/μL, and 1 ml of either hyaluronic acid gel or PRP was administered over the standard lesions, while the control group received no medication. The evaluation of post-operative adhesions was done on the 30th post-operative day. The location, extent, type, and tenacity of adhesions as well as total adhesion scores, tissue inflammation, fibrosis and transforming growth factor-1beta (TGF-1β) expressions were evaluated. The total adhesion score was significantly lower in the PRP group (3.2 ± 1.5) compared with the hyaluronic acid (5.0 ± 1.3) and control (8.1 ± 1.7) groups. The extent of the adhesions was significantly lower in the PRP group. There was no significant difference in the type and tenacity of adhesions between the hyaluronic acid and the PRP group. The level of inflammation was significantly higher in the control group than the others, while there was no difference between the PRP and hyaluronic acid groups. TGF-1β expression was significantly lesser in the PRP group than the control and hyaluronic acid groups. PRP is more effective than hyaluronic acid treatment in preventing post-operative adhesion formation in an experimental rat uterine horn adhesion model.

  6. Magnesium taurate prevents cataractogenesis via restoration of lenticular oxidative damage and ATPase function in cadmium chloride-induced hypertensive experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2016-12-01

    Previously we found that hypertension potentiates the risk the cataractogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of magnesium taurate (MgT) on hypertension and associated lenticular damages against cadmium chloride (CdCl2)-induced hypertensive animals. Male Sprague-Dawley albino rats (150-180g) were assigned to five experimental groups (n=6). Among the five groups, normal group received 0.3% carboxymethyl cellulose (10ml/kg/day, p.o.). Hypertension control group received CdCl2 (0.5mg/kg/day, i.p.). Tests and standard groups received MgT (3 and 6mg/kg/day, p.o.) and amlodipine (3mg/kg/day, p.o.) concurrently with CdCl2 respectively, for six consecutive weeks. Blood pressure, heart rate, and eyes were examined biweekly, and pathophysiological parameters in serum and eye lenses were evaluated after six weeks of the experimental protocol. The chronic administration of MgT concurrently with CdCl2 significantly restored the blood pressure, serum and lens antioxidants (CAT, SOD, GPx, and GSH), MDA level, and ions (Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)). Additionally, MgT treatment led to significant increase in the lens proteins (total and soluble), Ca(2+) ATPase, and Na(+)K(+) ATPase activity as compared to hypertension control group. Ophthalmoscope observations indicated that MgT treatments delayed the progression of cataract against the hypertensive state. The study shows that MgT prevents the progression of cataractogenesis via restoration of blood pressure, lenticular oxidative damages, and lens ATPase functions in the hypertensive state. The results suggest that MgT supplement may play a beneficial role to manage hypertension and associated cataractogenesis.

  7. Glucose and blood pressure lowering effects of Pycnogenol® are inefficient to prevent prolongation of QT interval in experimental diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jankyova, Stanislava; Kmecova, Jana; Cernecka, Hana; Mesarosova, Lucia; Musil, Peter; Brnoliakova, Zuzana; Kyselovic, Jan; Babal, Pavel; Klimas, Jan

    2012-08-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy shows ECG alterations related to cardiac repolarization and manifested by increased duration of QT interval. Although the mechanism is unknown, it is widely believed that the reduction of hyperglycaemia might prevent such alterations. To test this hypothesis, we used the standardized extract of French pine bark - Pycnogenol(®) (PYC) with hypoglycaemic and antioxidant properties in 8-9 week old rats with experimentally (streptozotocin) induced diabetes mellitus (DM). PYC was administered orally for 6 weeks in three different doses (10, 20, and 50 mg/kg b.w., resp.). Experimental DM was manifested by hyperglycaemia (four to six-fold increase in plasma glucose concentration; p<0.05) and significantly increased mean arterial blood pressure (by 19%; p<0.05) measured using catheterization of carotid artery in vivo. Both abnormalities were dose-dependently reduced by PYC. In addition, diabetic cardiomyopathy was associated with a significant increase in left ventricular weight to body weight ratio (by 21%; p<0.05) and a significant decrease of the width of cardiomyocytes (by 23%; p<0.05) indicating cardiac edema on the one side, and hypotrophy of cardiomyocytes on the other. Both of these changes were not affected by PYC. Consequently to metabolic and hemodynamic alterations, significant prolongation of QT interval (by 20%; p<0.05) was present in diabetic rats, however, PYC failed to correct it. Conclusively, PYC fails to correct QT prolongation in spite of dose-dependent reduction of glycaemia and high blood pressure in streptozotocin-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  8. High- and low-level dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs with young women with body image concerns: an experimental trial.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Whitney; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2011-02-01

    As cognitive dissonance is theorized to contribute to the effects of dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs, we evaluated a high-dissonance version of this program against a low-dissonance version and a wait-list control condition to provide an experimental test of the mechanism of intervention effects. Female college students (N = 124, mean age = 20.9 years, SD = 3.9) with body image concerns were randomized to the 3 conditions. The high-dissonance program was designed to maximize dissonance induction, and the low-dissonance program was designed to minimize it; the substantive content of the 2 programs was matched. Relative to controls, those in the high-dissonance condition showed significantly greater reductions in thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dieting, and eating disorder symptoms by posttest, and those in the low-dissonance condition showed significantly greater reductions in the first 3 outcomes by posttest, with most of these effects persisting to 3-month follow-up. High-dissonance participants showed significantly greater reductions in eating disorder symptoms than low-dissonance participants did by posttest, but this effect was nonsignificant by 3-month follow-up. Results suggest that dissonance induction contributes to intervention effects but imply that the intervention content, nonspecific factors, and demand characteristics play a much more potent role in producing effects.

  9. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study: An experimental medicine platform for evaluating new drugs for relapse prevention in addiction. Part A: Study description.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Louise M; Flechais, Remy S A; Murphy, Anna; Reed, Laurence J; Abbott, Sanja; Boyapati, Venkataramana; Elliott, Rebecca; Erritzoe, David; Ersche, Karen D; Faluyi, Yetunde; Faravelli, Luca; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Kalk, Nicola J; Kuchibatla, Shankar S; McGonigle, John; Metastasio, Antonio; Mick, Inge; Nestor, Liam; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Smith, Dana G; Suckling, John; Tait, Roger; Taylor, Eleanor M; Waldman, Adam D; Robbins, Trevor W; Deakin, J F William; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2015-09-01

    Drug and alcohol dependence are global problems with substantial societal costs. There are few treatments for relapse prevention and therefore a pressing need for further study of brain mechanisms underpinning relapse circuitry. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study is an experimental medicine approach to this problem: using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques and selective pharmacological tools, it aims to explore the neuropharmacology of putative relapse pathways in cocaine, alcohol, opiate dependent, and healthy individuals to inform future drug development. Addiction studies typically involve small samples because of recruitment difficulties and attrition. We established the platform in three centres to assess the feasibility of a multisite approach to address these issues. Pharmacological modulation of reward, impulsivity and emotional reactivity were investigated in a monetary incentive delay task, an inhibitory control task, and an evocative images task, using selective antagonists for µ-opioid, dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) and neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors (naltrexone, GSK598809, vofopitant/aprepitant), in a placebo-controlled, randomised, crossover design. In two years, 609 scans were performed, with 155 individuals scanned at baseline. Attrition was low and the majority of individuals were sufficiently motivated to complete all five sessions (n=87). We describe herein the study design, main aims, recruitment numbers, sample characteristics, and explain the test hypotheses and anticipated study outputs.

  10. The schistosome glutathione S-transferase P28GST, a unique helminth protein, prevents intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis through a Th2-type response with mucosal eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Driss, V; El Nady, M; Delbeke, M; Rousseaux, C; Dubuquoy, C; Sarazin, A; Gatault, S; Dendooven, A; Riveau, G; Colombel, J F; Desreumaux, P; Dubuquoy, L; Capron, M

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal helminth parasites are potent inducers of T helper type 2 (Th2) response and have a regulatory role, notably on intestinal inflammation. As infection with schistosomes is unlikely to provide a reliable treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, we have investigated the beneficial effect of a schistosome enzymatic protein, the 28-kDa glutathione S-transferase (P28GST), on the modulation of disease activity and immune responses in experimental colitis. Our results showed that immunization with recombinant P28GST is at least as efficient as established schistosome infection to reduce colitis lesions and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering underlying mechanisms, the decrease of inflammatory parameters was associated with the polarization of the immune system toward a Th2 profile, with local and systemic increases of interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-5. Dense eosinophil infiltration was observed in the colons of P28GST-immunized rats and mice. Depletion of eosinophils by treatment with an anti-Siglec-F monoclonal antibody and use of IL-5-deficient mice led to the loss of therapeutic effect, suggesting the crucial role for eosinophils in colitis prevention by P28GST. These findings reveal that immunization with P28GST, a unique recombinant schistosome enzyme, ameliorates intestinal inflammation through eosinophil-dependent modulation of harmful type 1 responses, representing a new immuno-regulatory strategy against inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26174763

  11. The schistosome glutathione S-transferase P28GST, a unique helminth protein, prevents intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis through a Th2-type response with mucosal eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Driss, V; El Nady, M; Delbeke, M; Rousseaux, C; Dubuquoy, C; Sarazin, A; Gatault, S; Dendooven, A; Riveau, G; Colombel, J F; Desreumaux, P; Dubuquoy, L; Capron, M

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal helminth parasites are potent inducers of T helper type 2 (Th2) response and have a regulatory role, notably on intestinal inflammation. As infection with schistosomes is unlikely to provide a reliable treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, we have investigated the beneficial effect of a schistosome enzymatic protein, the 28-kDa glutathione S-transferase (P28GST), on the modulation of disease activity and immune responses in experimental colitis. Our results showed that immunization with recombinant P28GST is at least as efficient as established schistosome infection to reduce colitis lesions and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering underlying mechanisms, the decrease of inflammatory parameters was associated with the polarization of the immune system toward a Th2 profile, with local and systemic increases of interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-5. Dense eosinophil infiltration was observed in the colons of P28GST-immunized rats and mice. Depletion of eosinophils by treatment with an anti-Siglec-F monoclonal antibody and use of IL-5-deficient mice led to the loss of therapeutic effect, suggesting the crucial role for eosinophils in colitis prevention by P28GST. These findings reveal that immunization with P28GST, a unique recombinant schistosome enzyme, ameliorates intestinal inflammation through eosinophil-dependent modulation of harmful type 1 responses, representing a new immuno-regulatory strategy against inflammatory bowel diseases.

  12. Prevention of antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia by vitamin D: a data mining prediction followed by experimental exploration of the molecular mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Takuya; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of hyperglycaemia, thus limiting their clinical use. This study focused on finding the molecular mechanism underlying antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia. First, we searched for drug combinations in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database wherein a coexisting drug reduced the hyperglycaemia risk of atypical antipsychotics, and found that a combination with vitamin D analogues significantly decreased the occurrence of quetiapine–induced adverse events relating diabetes mellitus in FAERS. Experimental validation using mice revealed that quetiapine acutely caused insulin resistance, which was mitigated by dietary supplementation with cholecalciferol. Further database analysis of the relevant signalling pathway and gene expression predicted quetiapine-induced downregulation of Pik3r1, a critical gene acting downstream of insulin receptor. Focusing on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling pathway, we found that the reduced expression of Pik3r1 mRNA was reversed by cholecalciferol supplementation in skeletal muscle, and that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into C2C12 myotube was inhibited in the presence of quetiapine, which was reversed by concomitant calcitriol in a PI3K-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that vitamin D coadministration prevents antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance by upregulation of PI3K function. PMID:27199286

  13. Sulfite reductase protects plants against sulfite toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Rheinlands Ruhm') and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation.

  14. Purification and properties of proline reductase from Clostridium sticklandii.

    PubMed

    Seto, B; Stadtman, T C

    1976-04-25

    Proline reductase of Clostridium sticklandii is a membrane-bound protein and is released by treatment with detergents. The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity and is estimated by gel filtration and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation to have a molecular weight of 298,000 to 327,000. A minimum molecular weight of 30,000 to 31,000 was calculated on the basis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and amino acid composition. Amino acid analysis showed a preponderance of acidic amino acids. No tryptophan was detected in the protein either spectrophotometrically or by amino acid analysis. A total of 20 sulfhydryl groups measured by titration of the reduced protein with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) is in agreement with 20 cystic acid residues determined in hydrolysates of performic acid-oxidized protein. No molybdenum, iron, or selenium was found in the pure protein. Although NADH is the physiological electron donor for the proline reductase complex, the purified 300,000 molecular weight reductase component is inactive in the presence of NADH in vitro. Dithiothreitol, in contrast, can serve as electron donor both for unpurified (putative proline reductase complex) and purified proline reductase in vitro.

  15. Uterine glutathione reductase activity: modulation by estrogens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, M; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Pedrón, N N; Hicks, J J

    1999-10-29

    The aim of this study was to determine whether glutathione reductase activity in uterine tissue is regulated by sex hormones. In spayed rats uterine glutathione reductase was significantly increased by exogenous estrogen (P< 0.01), progesterone (P< 0.01) or estrogen plus progesterone (P<0.01). When enzyme activity is expressed per mg protein, daily administration of estrogen or progesterone induces a progressive increase of this enzyme between 24 to 48 h or 24 to 72 h of treatment, respectively. Whereas the combination of both steroids causes an earlier and higher increase in glutathione reductase activity at 24 h of treatment. Estradiol singly or in combination with progesterone induced the highest protein concentration in the uterus. Whereas uterine DNA concentration is only significantly affected by estradiol. Our results suggest that uterine glutathione reductase is regulated by estradiol and progesterone and may be involved in maintaining levels of reduced glutathione in the uterus. This compound may be required for control of the redox state of thiol groups and in detoxification reactions involving H2O2 and electrophylic substances. The antioxidant action of estrogens is partially due to the stimulation of glutathione reductase.

  16. Bacterial morphinone reductase is related to Old Yellow Enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    French, C E; Bruce, N C

    1995-01-01

    Morphinone reductase, produced by Pseudomonas putida M10, catalyses the NADH-dependent saturation of the carbon-carbon double bond of morphinone and codeinone, and is believed to be involved in the metabolism of morphine and codeine. The structural gene encoding morphinone reductase, designated morB, was cloned from Ps. putida M10 genomic DNA by the use of degenerate oligonucleotide probes based on elements of the amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme. Sequence analysis and structural characteristics indicated that morphinone reductase is related to the flavoprotein alpha/beta-barrel oxidoreductases, and is particularly similar to Old Yellow Enzyme of Saccharomyces spp. and the related oestrogen-binding protein of Candida albicans. Expressed sequence tags from several plant species show high homology to these enzymes, suggesting the presence of a family of enzymes conserved in plants and fungi. Although related bacterial proteins are known, morphinone reductase appears to be more similar to the eukaryotic proteins. Morphinone reductase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and has potential applications for the industrial preparation of semisynthetic opiates. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:8554504

  17. HMG-CoA reductase guides migrating primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, M; Broihier, H T; Moore, L A; Lehmann, R

    1998-12-03

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is best known for catalysing a rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis, but it also participates in the production of a wide variety of other compounds. Some clinical benefits attributed to inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase are now thought to be independent of any serum cholesterol-lowering effect. Here we describe a new cholesterol-independent role for HMG-CoA reductase, in regulating a developmental process: primordial germ cell migration. We show that in Drosophila this enzyme is highly expressed in the somatic gonad and that it is necessary for primordial germ cells to migrate to this tissue. Misexpression of HMG-CoA reductase is sufficient to attract primordial germ cells to tissues other than the gonadal mesoderm. We conclude that the regulated expression of HMG-CoA reductase has a critical developmental function in providing spatial information to guide migrating primordial germ cells.

  18. Dynamic Control of Electron Transfers in Diflavin Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Aigrain, Louise; Fatemi, Fataneh; Frances, Oriane; Lescop, Ewen; Truan, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Diflavin reductases are essential proteins capable of splitting the two-electron flux from reduced pyridine nucleotides to a variety of one electron acceptors. The primary sequence of diflavin reductases shows a conserved domain organization harboring two catalytic domains bound to the FAD and FMN flavins sandwiched by one or several non-catalytic domains. The catalytic domains are analogous to existing globular proteins: the FMN domain is analogous to flavodoxins while the FAD domain resembles ferredoxin reductases. The first structural determination of one member of the diflavin reductases family raised some questions about the architecture of the enzyme during catalysis: both FMN and FAD were in perfect position for interflavin transfers but the steric hindrance of the FAD domain rapidly prompted more complex hypotheses on the possible mechanisms for the electron transfer from FMN to external acceptors. Hypotheses of domain reorganization during catalysis in the context of the different members of this family were given by many groups during the past twenty years. This review will address the recent advances in various structural approaches that have highlighted specific dynamic features of diflavin reductases. PMID:23203109

  19. [Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and methionine synthase reductase gene polymorphisms in ethnic Han women from Linyi].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-li; Lu, Yan-qiang; Li, Hua-feng; Rui, Xin-yi; Zhang, Li-jun; Wu, Chuan-ye; Fang, Ai-min; Wang, Gui-xi

    2012-12-01

    To explore the distribution of genetic polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C/T, 1298A/C and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) 66A/G among ethnic Han females from Linyi, and to correlate it with serum level of homocysteine (Hcy). A cross-sectional study was carried out. Oral epithelial cell samples were collected from 825 subjects. MTHFR and MTRR gene polymorphisms were determined with a Taqman-Minor Groove Binder (MGB) method. Distribution of gene polymorphisms was analyzed and compared with others regions of China including Weifang, Zhengzhou, Deyang and Hainan. A biochemical assay was also carried out to determine the total Hcy in plasma of 281 subjects. The reductase activity of MTHFR was classified into decreased and stable groups according to genetic polymorphism of MTHFR. Correlation between MTHFR groups and total Hcy level were also explored. (1) The frequencies of MTHFR677CC, CT and TT genotypes of the selected subjects were 16.7%, 48.3% and 35.0%, respectively. The frequencies of MTHFR 1298AA, AC and CC genotypes were 76.0%, 21.6% and 2.4%, respectively. And those of MTRR 66AA, AG and GG genotypes were 54.7%, 39.4% and 5.9%, respectively. For the selected subjects, their frequency of MTHFR 677TT genotype was higher than that of Deyang and Hainan (P< 0.01), whilst the frequency of MTHFR 1298CC genotype was lower than that of Deyang and Hainan (P < 0.01), and the frequency of MTRR 66 GG genotype was lower than that of Hainan (P< 0.01). (2) The Hcy level for those with decreased MTHFR activity was significantly higher than those with stable MTHFR activity (P< 0.05). MTHFR gene 677C/T, 1298A/C and MTRR 66A/G polymorphisms in ethnic Han women from Linyi have differed significantly from other regions of China. Decreased MTHFR activity caused by genetic polymorphisms is a risk factor for raised Hcy level.

  20. Degradation of HMG-CoA reductase-induced membranes in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Elevated levels of certain membrane proteins, including the sterol biosynthetic enzyme HMG-CoA reductase, induce proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum. When the amounts of these proteins return to basal levels, the proliferated membranes are degraded, but the molecular details of this degradation remain unknown. We have examined the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase-induced membranes in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this yeast, increased levels of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMG-CoA reductase isozyme encoded by HMG1 induced several types of membranes, including karmellae, which formed a cap of stacked membranes that partially surrounded the nucleus. When expression of HMG1 was repressed, the karmellae detached from the nucleus and formed concentric, multilayered membrane whorls that were then degraded. During the degradation process, CDCFDA-stained compartments distinct from preexisting vacuoles formed within the interior of the whorls. In addition to these compartments, particles that contained neutral lipids also formed within the whorl. As the thickness of the whorl decreased, the lipid particle became larger. When degradation was complete, only the lipid particle remained. Cycloheximide treatment did not prevent the formation of whorls. Thus, new protein synthesis was not needed for the initial stages of karmellae degradation. On the contrary, cycloheximide promoted the detachment of karmellae to form whorls, suggesting that a short lived protein may be involved in maintaining karmellae integrity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that karmellae membranes differentiated into self-degradative organelles. This process may be a common pathway by which ER membranes are turned over in cells. PMID:7559789

  1. A recombinant thioredoxin-glutathione reductase from Fasciola hepatica induces a protective response in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, Gabriela; Silveira, Fernando; Martín-Alonso, José M; Salinas, Gustavo; Carmona, Carlos; Parra, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Antioxidant systems are fundamental components of host-parasite interactions, and often play a key role in parasite survival. Here, we report the cloning, heterologous expression, and characterization of a thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) from Fasciola hepatica. The deduced polypeptide sequence of the cloned open reading frame (ORF) confirmed the experimental N-terminus previously determined for a native F. hepatica TGR showing thioredoxin reductase (TR) activity. The sequence revealed the presence of a fusion between a glutaredoxin (Grx) and a TR domain, similar to that previously reported in Schistosoma mansoni and Echinococcus granulosus. The F. hepatica TGR sequence included an additional redox active center (ACUG; U being selenocysteine) located at the C-terminus. The addition of a recombinant selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element in the Escherichia coli expression vector, or the substitution of the native selenocysteine by a cysteine, indicated the relevance of this unusual amino acid residue for the activity of F. hepatica TGR. Rabbit vaccination with recombinant F. hepatica TGR reduced the worm burden by 96.7% following experimental infection, further supporting the relevance of TGR as a promising target for anti Fasciola treatments.

  2. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:27051453

  3. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase.

  4. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. Results To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Conclusion Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo. PMID:24308601

  5. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Shi, Zi; Maximova, Siela; Payne, Mark J; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-05

    The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo.

  6. Selenium in thioredoxin reductase: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Brian M; Eckenroth, Brian E; Flemer, Stevenson; Hondal, Robert J

    2008-12-02

    Most high M(r) thioredoxin reductases (TRs) have the unusual feature of utilizing a vicinal disulfide bond (Cys(1)-Cys(2)) which forms an eight-membered ring during the catalytic cycle. Many eukaryotic TRs have replaced the Cys(2) position of the dyad with the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). Here we demonstrate that Cys- and Sec-containing TRs are distinguished by the importance each class of enzymes places on the eight-membered ring structure in the catalytic cycle. This hypothesis was explored by studying the truncated enzyme missing the C-terminal ring structure in conjunction with oxidized peptide substrates to investigate the reduction and opening of this dyad. The peptide substrates were identical in sequence to the missing part of the enzyme, containing either a disulfide or selenylsulfide linkage, but were differentiated by the presence (cyclic) and absence (acyclic) of the ring structure. The ratio of these turnover rates informs that the ring is only of modest importance for the truncated mouse mitochondrial Sec-TR (ring/no ring = 32), while the ring structure is highly important for the truncated Cys-TRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans (ring/no ring > 1000). All three enzymes exhibit a similar dependence upon leaving group pK(a) as shown by the use of the acyclic peptides as substrates. These two factors can be reconciled for Cys-TRs if the ring functions to simultaneously allow for attack by a nearby thiolate while correctly positioning the leaving group sulfur atom to accept a proton from the enzymic general acid. For Sec-TRs the ring is unimportant because the lower pK(a) of the selenol relative to a thiol obviates its need to be protonated upon S-Se bond scission and permits physical separation of the selenol and the general acid. Further study of the biochemical properties of the truncated Cys and Sec TR enzymes demonstrates that the chemical advantage conferred on the eukaryotic enzyme by a selenol is the ability to

  7. Oroxyloside prevents dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in mice by inhibiting NF-κB pathway through PPARγ activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Sun, Yang; Zhao, Yue; Ding, Youxiang; Zhang, Xiaobo; Kong, Lingyi; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Zhao, Li

    2016-04-15

    Oroxyloside, as a metabolite of oroxylin A, may harbor various beneficial bioactivities which have rarely been reported in the previous studies. Here we established the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis and evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of oroxyloside in vivo. As a result, oroxyloside attenuated DSS-induced body weight loss, colon length shortening and colonic pathological damage. Furthermore, oroxyloside inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activities as well. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum and colon was also significantly reduced by oroxyloside. We unraveled the underlying mechanisms that oroxyloside inhibited NF-κB pathway by activating Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) to attenuate DSS-induced colitis. Moreover, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanisms of oroxyloside in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM). Oroxyloside decreased several LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in RAW264.7 and BMDM. We also found that oroxyloside inhibited LPS-induced activation of NF-κB signaling pathway via activating PPARγ in RAW 264.7 and BMDM. Docking study showed that oroxyloside could bind with PPARγ. GW9662, the inhibitor of PPARγ, and PPARγ siRNA transfection blocked the effect of oroxyloside on PPARγ activation. Our study suggested that oroxyloside prevented DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting NF-κB pathway through PPARγ activation. Therefore, oroxyloside may be a promising and effective agent for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  8. The effectiveness of a rotavirus vaccine in preventing hospitalizations and deaths presumably due to acute infectious diarrhea in Brazilian children: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Teles, Estêvão; Moscovici, Leonardo; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Alves, Domingos; Laprega, Milton Roberto; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the main etiologic agent of acute infectious diarrhea in children worldwide. Considering that a rotavirus vaccine (G1P8, strain RIX4414) was added to the Brazilian vaccination schedule in 2006, we aimed to study its effectiveness and safety regarding intestinal intussusception. A quasi-experimental trial was performed in which the primary outcome was the number of hospitalizations that were presumably due to acute infectious diarrhea per 100,000 children at risk (0-4 years old). The secondary outcomes included mortality due to acute infectious diarrhea and the intestinal intussusception rates in children in the same age range. We analyzed three scenarios: Health Division XIII of the State of São Paulo (DRS XIII) from 2002 to 2008, the State of São Paulo, and Brazil from 2002 to 2012. The averages of the hospitalization rates for 100,000 children in the pre- and post-vaccination periods were 1,413 and 959, respectively, for DRS XIII (RR=0.67), 312 and 249, respectively, for the State of São Paulo (RR=0.79), and 718 and 576, respectively, for Brazil (RR=0.8). The mortality rate per 100,000 children in the pre- and post-vaccination periods was 2.0 and 1.3, respectively, for DRS XIII (RR=0.66), 5.5 and 2.5, respectively, for the State of São Paulo (RR=0.47), and 15.0 and 8.0, respectively, for Brazil (RR=0.53). The average annual rates of intussusception for 100,000 children in DRS XIII were 28.0 and 22.0 (RR=0.77) in the pre- and post-vaccination periods, respectively. A monovalent rotavirus vaccine was demonstrated to be effective in preventing the hospitalizations and deaths of children that were presumably due to acute infectious diarrhea, without increasing the risk of intestinal intussusception.

  9. Prevention and diminished expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by low dose naltrexone (LDN) or opioid growth factor (OGF) for an extended period: Therapeutic implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Kristen A; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-03-24

    Endogenous opioids inhibit the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with 30days of treatment. This study examined the long term effects of the opioid growth factor (OGF, [Met(5)]-enkephalin) and a low dose of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (LDN) on expression of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE. C57BL/6 mice began receiving daily injections of 10mg/kg OGF (MOG+OGF), 0.1mg/kg naltrexone (MOG+LDN), or saline (MOG+Vehicle) at the time of EAE induction and continuing for 60days. In contrast to 100% of the MOG+Vehicle group with behavioral symptoms of EAE, 63% and 68% of the MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN mice expressed disease. Both severity and disease indices of EAE in OGF- and LDN-treated mice were notably decreased from MOG+Vehicle cohorts. By day 60, 6- and 3-fold more animals in the MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN groups, respectively, had a remission compared to MOG+Vehicle mice. Neuropathological studies revealed i) astrocyte activation and neuronal damage as early as day 10 (prior to behavioral symptoms) in all MOG-injected groups, ii) a significant reduction of activated astrocytes in MOG+OGF and MOG+LDN groups compared to MOG+Vehicle mice at day 30, and iii) no demyelination on day 60 in mice treated with OGF or LDN and not displaying disease symptoms. These results indicate that treatment with OGF or LDN had no deleterious long-term repercussions and did not exacerbate EAE, but i) halted progression of disease, ii) reversed neurological deficits, and iii) prevented the onset of neurological dysfunction across a considerable span of time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Quasi-Experimental Study Analyzing the Effectiveness of Portable High-Efficiency Particulate Absorption Filters in Preventing Infections in Hematology Patients during Construction

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Mehmet; Yılmaz, Gülden; Coşkun, Belgin; Topçuoğlu, Pervin; Öztürk, Bengi; Gündüz, Mehmet; Atilla, Erden; Arslan, Önder; Özcan, Muhit; Demirer, Taner; İlhan, Osman; Konuk, Nahide; Balık, İsmail; Gürman, Günhan; Akan, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The increased risk of infection for patients caused by construction and renovation near hematology inpatient clinics is a major concern. The use of high-efficiency particulate absorption (HEPA) filters can reduce the risk of infection. However, there is no standard protocol indicating the use of HEPA filters for patients with hematological malignancies, except for those who have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This quasi-experimental study was designed to measure the efficacy of HEPA filters in preventing infections during construction. Materials and Methods: Portable HEPA filters were placed in the rooms of patients undergoing treatment for hematological malignancies because of large-scale construction taking place near the hematology clinic. The rates of infection during the 6 months before and after the installation of the portable HEPA filters were compared. A total of 413 patients were treated during this 1-year period. Results: There were no significant differences in the antifungal prophylaxis and treatment regimens between the groups. The rates of infections, clinically documented infections, and invasive fungal infections decreased in all of the patients following the installation of the HEPA filters. When analyzed separately, the rates of invasive fungal infections were similar before and after the installation of HEPA filters in patients who had no neutropenia or long neutropenia duration. HEPA filters were significantly protective against infection when installed in the rooms of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, patients who were undergoing consolidation treatment, and patients who were neutropenic for 1-14 days. Conclusion: Despite the advent of construction and the summer season, during which environmental Aspergillus contamination is more prevalent, no patient or patient subgroup experienced an increase in fungal infections following the installation of HEPA filters. The protective effect of HEPA

  11. Do cytochromes function as oxygen sensors in the regulation of nitrate reductase biosynthesis?

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, C H; Bishop, C W

    1977-01-01

    The observation that oxygen represses nitrate reductase biosynthesis in a hemA mutant grown aerobically with or without delta-aminolevulinic acid indicates that cytochromes are not responsible for nitrate reductase repression in aerobically grown cells. PMID:326768

  12. Studies on the regulation of assimilatory nitrate reductase in Ankistrodesmus braunii.

    PubMed

    Diez, J; Chaparro, A; Vega, J M; Relimpio, A

    1977-01-01

    In the green alga Ankistrodesmus braunii, all the activities associated with the nitrate reductase complex (i.e., NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase, NAD(P)H-cytochrome c reductase and FMNH2-or MVH-nitrate reductase) are nutritionally repressed by ammonia or methylamine. Besides, ammonia or methylamine promote in vivo the reversible inactivation of nitrate reductase, but not of NAD(P)H-cytochrome c reductase. Subsequent removal of the inactivating agent from the medium causes reactivation of the inactive enzyme. Menadione has a striking stimulation on the in vivo reactivation of the inactive enzyme. The nitrate reductase activities, but not the diaphorase activity, can be inactivated in vitro by preincubating a partially purified enzyme preparation with NADH or NADPH. ADP, in the presence of Mg(2+), presents a cooperative effect with NADH in the in vitro inactivation of nitrate reductase. This effect appears to be maximum at a concentration of ADP equimolecular with that of NADH.

  13. Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei trypanothione reductase: comparative molecular field analysis modeling and structural basis for selective inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-10-01

    Sleeping sickness is a major cause of death in Africa. Since no secure treatment is available, the development of novel therapeutic agents is urgent. In this context, the enzyme trypanothione reductase (TR) is a prominent molecular target that has been investigated in drug design for sleeping sickness. In this study, comparative molecular field analysis models were generated for a series of Trypanosoma brucei TR inhibitors. Statistically significant results were obtained and the models were applied to predict the activity of external test sets, with good correlation between predicted and experimental results. We have also investigated the structural requirements for the selective inhibition of the parasite's enzyme over the human glutathione reductase. The quantitative structure-activity relationship models provided valuable information regarding the essential molecular requirements for the inhibitory activity upon the target protein, providing important insights into the design of more potent and selective TR inhibitors.

  14. Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract.

    PubMed

    Snow, Anson; Shieh, Biehuoy; Chang, Kun-Che; Pal, Arttatrana; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; Ruzycki, Philip; Palla, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G Bhanuprakesh; Petrash, J Mark

    2015-06-05

    Aldose reductase (AR) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic eye diseases, including cataract and retinopathy. However, not all diabetics develop ocular complications. Paradoxically, some diabetics with poor metabolic control appear to be protected against retinopathy, while others with a history of excellent metabolic control develop severe complications. These observations indicate that one or more risk factors may influence the likelihood that an individual with diabetes will develop cataracts and/or retinopathy. We hypothesize that an elevated level of AR gene expression could confer higher risk for development of diabetic eye disease. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the onset and severity of diabetes-induced cataract in transgenic mice, designated AR-TG, that were either heterozygous or homozygous for the human AR (AKR1B1) transgene construct. AR-TG mice homozygous for the transgene demonstrated a conditional cataract phenotype, whereby they developed lens vacuoles and cataract-associated structural changes only after induction of experimental diabetes; no such changes were observed in AR-TG heterozygotes or nontransgenic mice with or without experimental diabetes induction. We observed that nondiabetic AR-TG mice did not show lens structural changes even though they had lenticular sorbitol levels almost as high as the diabetic AR-TG lenses that showed early signs of cataract. Over-expression of AR led to increases in the ratio of activated to total levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK1/2), which are known to be involved in cell growth and apoptosis, respectively. After diabetes induction, AR-TG but not WT controls had decreased levels of phosphorylated as well as total ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. These results indicate that high AR expression in the context of hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency may constitute a risk factor that could predispose the

  15. Biomarkers of Adverse Response to Mercury: Histopathology versus Thioredoxin Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Vasco; Ramos, Paula; Canário, João; Lu, Jun; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to mercury is normally assessed by measuring its accumulation in hair, blood or urine. Currently, the biomarkers of effect that have been proposed for mercurials, such as coproporphyrines or oxidative stress markers, are not sensitive enough and lack specificity. Selenium and selenoproteins are important targets for mercury and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in particular was shown to be very sensitive to mercury compounds both in vitro and in vivo. In this study we looked into the relation between the inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity and histopathological changes caused by exposure to mercurials. Juvenile zeabra-seabreams were exposed to Hg2+ or MeHg for 28 days and histopathological changes were analyzed in the liver and kidney as well as TrxR activity. Both mercurials caused histopathological changes in liver and kidney, albeit Hg2+ caused more extensive and severe lesions. Likewise, both mercurials decreased TrxR activity, being Hg2+ a stronger inhibitor. Co-exposure to Hg2+ and Se fully prevented TrxR inhibition in the liver and reduced the severity of lesions in the organ. These results show that upon exposure to mercurials, histopathological alterations correlate with the level of TrxR activity and point to the potential use of this enzyme as a biomarker of mercury toxicity. PMID:22888199

  16. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism: epidemiology, metabolism and the associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Liew, Siaw-Cheok; Gupta, Esha Das

    2015-01-01

    The Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism is associated with various diseases (vascular, cancers, neurology, diabetes, psoriasis, etc) with the epidemiology of the polymorphism of the C677T that varies dependent on the geography and ethnicity. The 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) locus is mapped on chromosome 1 at the end of the short arm (1p36.6). This enzyme is important for the folate metabolism which is an integral process for cell metabolism in the DNA, RNA and protein methylation. The mutation of the MTHFR gene which causes the C677T polymorphism is located at exon 4 which results in the conversion of valine to alanine at codon 222, a common polymorphism that reduces the activity of this enzyme. The homozygous mutated subjects have higher homocysteine levels while the heterozygous mutated subjects have mildly raised homocysteine levels compared with the normal, non-mutated controls. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an emerging risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases and with the increasing significance of this polymorphism in view of the morbidity and mortality impact on the patients, further prevention strategies and nutritional recommendations with the supplementation of vitamin B12 and folic acid which reduces plasma homocysteine level would be necessary as part of future health education. This literature review therefore focuses on the recent evidence-based reports on the associations of the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and the various diseases globally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence by cerulenin: In vivo evidence for covalent modification of the reductase enzyme involved in aldehyde synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M. ); Meighen, E.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence is very sensitive to cerulenin, a fungal antibiotic which is known to inhibit fatty acid synthesis. When Vibrio harveyi cells pretreated with cerulenin were incubated with ({sup 3}H)myristic acid in vivo, acylation of the 57-kilodalton reductase subunit of the luminescence-specific fatty acid reductase complex was specifically inhibited. Light emission of wild-type V. harveyi was 20-fold less sensitive to cerulenin at low concentrations (10{mu}g/ml) than that of the dark mutant strain M17, which requires exogenous myristic acid for luminescence because of a defective transferase subunit. The sensitivity of myristic acid-stimulated luminescence in the mutant strain M17 exceeded that of phospholipid synthesis from ({sup 14}C)acetate, whereas uptake and incorporation of exogenous ({sup 14}C)myristic acid into phospholipids was increased by cerulenin. The reductase subunit could be labeled by incubating M17 cells with ({sup 3}H)tetrahydrocerulenin; this labeling was prevented by preincubation with either unlabeled cerulenin or myristic acid. Labeling of the reductase subunit with ({sup 3}H)tetrahydrocerulenin was also noted in an aldehyde-stimulated mutant (A16) but not in wild-type cells or in another aldehyde-stimulated mutant (M42) in which ({sup 3}H)myristoyl turnover at the reductase subunit was found to be defective. These results indicate that (i) cerulenin specifically and covalently inhibits the reductase component of aldehyde synthesis, (ii) this enzyme is partially protected from cerulenin inhibition in the wild-type strain in vivo, and (iii) two dark mutants which exhibit similar luminescence phenotypes (mutants A16 and M42) are blocked at different stages of fatty acid reduction.

  18. Dihydrofolate Reductase Activity in Strains of Streptococcus faecium var. durans Resistant to Methasquin and Amethopterin1

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Jeanne I.; Hutchison, Dorris J.

    1972-01-01

    Resistance to the antifolates methasquin and amethopterin has been studied in new strains of Streptococcus faecium var. durans. Two methasquin-resistant strains (SF/MQ, SF/MQT) and an amethopterin-resistant strain (SF/AM) were selected independently from the wild-type S. faecium var. durans (SF/O). SF/MQT is a thymine auxotroph. Total dihydrofolate reductase activity was elevated in each of the resistant strains. The greatest increase (36-fold) was observed in extracts of SF/AM. The methasquin-resistant strains, SF/MQ and SF/MQT, had 29-fold and 8-fold, respectively, more dihydrofolate reductase activity than the parental strain. Total dihydrofolate reductase activity of SF/O was separable by gel filtration into two components: a folate reductase (11%) and a specific dihydrofolate reductase (89%). Folate reductase activity was associated with 88% of the total dihydrofolate reductase activity of SF/MQT, with specific dihydrofolate reductase activity accounting for the remaining 12%. In SF/MQ and SF/AM, folate reductase activity was associated with 97% of the total dihydrofolate reductase activity. Studies of the inhibition by methasquin and amethopterin of partially purified folate reductase and specific dihydrofolate reductase of the mutant strains suggested that resistance was not accompanied by changes in the affinities of these enzymes for either antifolate. PMID:4401600

  19. DFT Calculations for Intermediate and Active States of the Diiron Center with Tryptophan or Tyrosine Radical in Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wen-Ge; Noodleman, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Class Ia ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) subunit R2 contains a diiron active site. In this paper, active site models for the intermediate X-Trp48+· and X-Tyr122·, the active Fe(III)Fe(III)-Tyr122·, and the met Fe(III)Fe(III) states of E. coli R2 are studied, using broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) incorporated with the conductor like screening (COSMO) solvation model. Different structural isomers and different protonation states have been explored. Calculated geometric, energetic, Mössbauer, hyperfine, and redox properties are compared with available experimental data. Feasible detailed structures of these intermediate and active states are proposed. Asp84 and Trp48 are most likely the main contributing residues to the result that the transient Fe(IV)Fe(IV) state is not observed in wild-type class Ia E. coli R2. Asp84 is proposed to serve as a proton transfer conduit between the diiron cluster and Tyr122 in both the tyrosine radical activation pathway and in the first steps of the catalytic proton coupled electron transfer pathway. Proton coupled and simple redox potential calculations show that the kinetic control of proton transfer to Tyr122· plays a critical role in preventing reduction from the active Fe(III)Fe(III)-Tyr122· state to the met state, which is potentially the reason that the Tyr122· in the active state can be stable over very long period. PMID:21322584

  20. Expression of nitrite and nitric oxide reductases in free-living and plant-associated Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Hun; Shapleigh, James P

    2005-08-01

    A number of the bacteria that form associations with plants are denitrifiers. To learn more about how the association with plants affects expression of denitrification genes, the regulation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductases was investigated in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Analysis of free-living cells revealed that expression of the genes encoding nitrite and nitric oxide reductases, nirK and nor, respectively, requires low-oxygen conditions, nitric oxide, and the transcriptional regulator NnrR. Expression of nor was monitored in plant-associated bacteria using nor-gfp fusion expression. In root association experiments, only a small percentage of the attached cells were fluorescent, even when they were incubated under a nitrogen atmosphere. Inactivation of nirK had no significant effect on the ability of A. tumefaciens to bind to plant roots regardless of the oxygen tension, but it did decrease the occurrence of root-associated fluorescent cells. When wild-type cells containing the gfp fusion were infiltrated into leaves, most cells eventually became fluorescent. The same result was obtained when a nirK mutant was used, suggesting that nitric oxide activated nor expression in the endophytic bacteria. Addition of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor to block nitric oxide generation by the plant prevented gfp expression in infiltrated nitrite reductase mutants, demonstrating that plant-derived nitric oxide can activate nor expression in infiltrated cells.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Thioredoxin Reductase Is Essential for Thiol Redox Homeostasis but Plays a Minor Role in Antioxidant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kan; O'Brien, Kathryn M.; Trujillo, Carolina; Wang, Ruojun; Wallach, Joshua B.; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) must cope with exogenous oxidative stress imposed by the host. Unlike other antioxidant enzymes, Mtb’s thioredoxin reductase TrxB2 has been predicted to be essential not only to fight host defenses but also for in vitro growth. However, the specific physiological role of TrxB2 and its importance for Mtb pathogenesis remain undefined. Here we show that genetic inactivation of thioredoxin reductase perturbed several growth-essential processes, including sulfur and DNA metabolism and rapidly killed and lysed Mtb. Death was due to cidal thiol-specific oxidizing stress and prevented by a disulfide reductant. In contrast, thioredoxin reductase deficiency did not significantly increase susceptibility to oxidative and nitrosative stress. In vivo targeting TrxB2 eradicated Mtb during both acute and chronic phases of mouse infection. Deliberately leaky knockdown mutants identified the specificity of TrxB2 inhibitors and showed that partial inactivation of TrxB2 increased Mtb’s susceptibility to rifampicin. These studies reveal TrxB2 as essential thiol-reducing enzyme in Mtb in vitro and during infection, establish the value of targeting TrxB2, and provide tools to accelerate the development of TrxB2 inhibitors. PMID:27249779

  2. Identification of the missing trans-acting enoyl reductase required for phthiocerol dimycocerosate and phenolglycolipid biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Siméone, Roxane; Constant, Patricia; Guilhot, Christophe; Daffé, Mamadou; Chalut, Christian

    2007-07-01

    Phthiocerol dimycocerosates (DIM) and phenolglycolipids (PGL) are functionally important surface-exposed lipids of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Their biosynthesis involves the products of several genes clustered in a 70-kb region of the M. tuberculosis chromosome. Among these products is PpsD, one of the modular type I polyketide synthases responsible for the synthesis of the lipid core common to DIM and PGL. Bioinformatic analyses have suggested that this protein lacks a functional enoyl reductase activity domain required for the synthesis of these lipids. We have identified a gene, Rv2953, that putatively encodes an enoyl reductase. Mutation in Rv2953 prevents conventional DIM formation and leads to the accumulation of a novel DIM-like product. This product is unsaturated between C-4 and C-5 of phthiocerol. Consistently, complementation of the mutant with a functional pks15/1 gene from Mycobacterium bovis BCG resulted in the accumulation of an unsaturated PGL-like substance. When an intact Rv2953 gene was reintroduced into the mutant strain, the phenotype reverted to the wild type. These findings indicate that Rv2953 encodes a trans-acting enoyl reductase that acts with PpsD in phthiocerol and phenolphthiocerol biosynthesis.

  3. The role of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase in plumbagin-induced, reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geun Hye; Ryu, Jung Min; Jeon, Yu Jin; Choi, Joonhyeok; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, You-Mie; Lee, Sangkyu; Bae, Jong-Sup; Jung, Jong-Wha; Chang, Woochul; Kim, Lark Kyun; Jee, Jun-Goo; Lee, Min Young

    2015-10-15

    Plumbagin is a secondary metabolite that was first identified in the Plumbago genus of plants. It is a naphthoquinone compound with anti-atherosclerosis, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, contraceptive, cardiotonic, immunosuppressive, and neuroprotective activities. However, the mechanisms of plumbagin's activities are largely unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of plumbagin on HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells as well as LLC lung cancer cells, SiHa cervical carcinoma cells. Plumbagin significantly decreased HepG2 cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with plumbagin significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3/7 activity. Using the similarity ensemble approach (SEA)-a state-of-the-art cheminformatic technique-we identified two previously unknown cellular targets of plumbagin: thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione reductase (GR). This was then confirmed using protein- and cell-based assays. We found that plumbagin was directly reduced by TrxR, and that this reduction was inhibited by the TrxR inhibitor, sodium aurothiomalate (ATM). Plumbagin also decreased the activity of GR. Plumbagin, and the GR inhibitor sodium arsenite all increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and this increase was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) in HepG2 cells. Plumbagin increased TrxR-1 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression and pretreatment with NAC significantly attenuated the plumbagin-induced increase of TrxR-1 and HO-1 expression in HepG2 cells, LLC cells and SiHa cells. Pretreatment with NAC significantly prevented the plumbagin-induced decrease in cell viability in these cell types. In conclusion, plumbagin exerted its anticancer effect by directly interacting with TrxR and GR, and thus increasing intracellular ROS levels.

  4. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...