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Sample records for reduction processes influencing

  1. Influence of physical and chemical aquifer heterogeneity on nitrate reduction processes by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbacher, T.; Jang, E.; He, W.; Savoy, H.; Schueth, C.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reduction reactions, as one of the most important redox reactions in a subsurface system, are strongly influenced by various heterogeneity factors which influence transport of chemical species and spatial distribution of redox substances and consequently have an effect on overall nitrate reduction capacity. In this presented work, the influence of two heterogeneity factors, spatially heterogeneity of hydrological parameters versus spatial heterogeneity of geochemical reactive substances distribution, are discussed with a focus on nitrate transport and redox transformation processes. For this purpose, a coupling interface OGS#IPhreeqc is employed. This code combines Finite-Element groundwater flow and multi-species transport code of OpenGeoSys (OGS) with the IPhreeqc module of open source geochemical solver PHREEQC. The resulting coupled model is applied for simulation of nitrate reduction processes with a series of hypothetical aquifer systems, built using exponentially-correlated log-normal distributed hydraulic conductivity and reactive substances. The spatially heterogeneous aquifer system is realized by a RandomFields package using a statistical program R. Results show that the heterogeneous hydraulics conductivity field has larger impact on nitrate reduction capacity than heterogeneous reactive substances distribution. Moreover, nitrate reduction capacity can be increased by enhanced mixing in heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field however its overall reduction capacity has gradually decreased as a degree of heterogeneity has increased since accessibility of the chemical species by the reactive substances may be limited. These results support that appropriate characterization of the variance of hydraulic conductivity within the aquifer is important to predict contaminant fate and transport and quantify the impact of uncertainty on numerical groundwater simulation.

  2. Sulfur Isotopes as Indicators of Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Processes Influencing Field Scale Uranium Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, J. L.; Conrad, M. E.; Williams, K. H.; N'guessan, L.; Long, P. E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    An in-situ acetate amendment at a DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site near Rifle, CO demonstrated successful reduction of aqueous U(VI), to less soluble U(IV) through stimulated microbial activity. U(VI) reduction rates were highest during iron reduction and decreased with the onset of sulfate reduction. However, sustained U(IV) attenuation was observed following subsequent termination of the acetate amendment. These findings illustrate the importance of the transition between iron and sulfate reducing conditions in stimulating bioreduction of uranium. The sulfur isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide were measured through this transition in order to explore the utility of these data in tracking the extent of microbial sulfate reduction and to assess the stability of sulfide precipitates. Samples for isotopic analyses and aqueous measurements of sulfate, ferrous iron, U(VI) and acetate were collected in one background well and three monitoring wells down-gradient of the acetate injection. Results show an increase of up to 7‰ in the δ34S of sulfate at the onset of sulfate reduction, followed by a return to background δ34S values of -8‰ following cessation of the acetate amendment. The δ34S values of sulfide increased from roughly -20‰ at the onset of sulfate reduction to a maximum of -0.8‰ during peak sulfate removal, followed by a gradual return to values of roughly -28‰ upon cessation of the acetate amendment. These data present a unique perspective on the processes governing the bioreduction experiment in that the sulfate isotopes are a function of both transport and mixing processes, whereas the sulfide isotopes represent biogenic sulfide that is rapidly removed from the aqueous phase. Thus a comparable enrichment in sulfate isotopic data noted in the closest and furthest wells from the injection gallery suggest bioreduction in both of these locations, while a larger increase in sulfide isotopic values in the closest well

  3. Directional Processing and Noise Reduction in Hearing Aids: Individual and Situational Influences on Preferred Setting.

    PubMed

    Neher, Tobias; Wagener, Kirsten C; Fischer, Rosa-Linde

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of individual differences in hearing aid (HA) outcome is a prerequisite for more personalized HA fittings. Currently, knowledge of how different user factors relate to response to directional processing (DIR) and noise reduction (NR) is sparse. To extend a recent study linking preference for DIR and NR to pure-tone average hearing thresholds (PTA) and cognitive factors by investigating if (1) equivalent links exist for different types of DIR and NR, (2) self-reported noise sensitivity and personality can account for additional variability in preferred DIR and NR settings, and (3) spatial target speech configuration interacts with individual DIR preference. Using a correlational study design, overall preference for different combinations of DIR and NR programmed into a commercial HA was assessed in a complex speech-in-noise situation and related to PTA, cognitive function, and different personality traits. Sixty experienced HA users aged 60-82 yr with controlled variation in PTA and working memory capacity took part in this study. All of them had participated in the earlier study, as part of which they were tested on a measure of "executive control" tapping into cognitive functions such as working memory, mental flexibility, and selective attention. Six HA settings based on unilateral (within-device) or bilateral (across-device) DIR combined with inactive, moderate, or strong single-microphone NR were programmed into a pair of behind-the-ear HAs together with individually prescribed amplification. Overall preference was assessed using a free-field simulation of a busy cafeteria situation with either a single frontal talker or two talkers at ±30° azimuth as the target speech. In addition, two questionnaires targeting noise sensitivity and the "Big Five" personality traits were administered. Data were analyzed using multiple regression analyses and repeated-measures analyses of variance with a focus on potential interactions between the HA

  4. Sulfur isotopes as indicators of amended bacterial sulfate reduction processes influencing field scale uranium bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Druhan, Jennifer L; Conrad, Mark E; Williams, Kenneth H; N'Guessan, Lucie; Long, Philip E; Hubbard, Susan S

    2008-11-01

    Aqueous uranium (U(VI)) concentrations in a contaminated aquifer in Rifle Colorado have been successfully lowered through electron donor amended bioreduction. Samples collected during the acetate amendment experiment were analyzed for aqueous concentrations of Fe(ll), sulfate, sulfide, acetate, U(VI), and delta(34)S of sulfate and sulfide to explore the utility of sulfur isotopes as indicators of in situ acetate amended sulfate and uranium bioreduction processes. Enrichment of up to 7% per hundred in delta(34)S of sulfate in down-gradient monitoring wells indicates a transition to elevated bacterial sulfate reduction. A depletion in Fe(II), sulfate, and sulfide concentrations atthe height of sulfate reduction, along with an increase in the delta(34)S of sulfide to levels approaching the delta(34)S values of sulfate, indicates sulfate limited conditions concurrent with a rebound in U(VI) concentrations. Upon cessation of acetate amendment, sulfate and sulfide concentrations increased, while delta(34)S values of sulfide returned to less than -20% per hundred and sulfate delta(34)S decreased to near-background values, indicating lower levels of sulfate reduction accompanied by a corresponding drop in U(VI). Results indicate a transition between electron donor and sulfate-limited conditions at the height of sulfate reduction and suggest stability of biogenic FeS precipitates following the end of acetate amendment.

  5. Sulfur Isotopes as Indicators of Amended Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Processes Influencing Field Scale Uranium Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Druhan, Jennifer L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2008-11-01

    Aqueous uranium (U(VI)) concentrations in a contaminated aquifer in Rifle Colorado have been successfully lowered through electron donor amended bioreduction. Samples collected during the acetate amendment experiment were analyzed for aqueous concentrations of Fe(II), sulfate, sulfide, acetate, U(VI), and δ34S of sulfate and sulfide to explore the utility of sulfur isotopes as indicators of in situ acetate amended sulfate and uranium bioreduction processes. Enrichment of up to 7‰ in δ34S of sulfate in down-gradient monitoring wells indicates a transition to elevated bacterial sulfate reduction. A depletion in Fe(II), sulfate, and sulfide concentrations at the height of sulfate reduction, along with an increase in the δ34S of sulfide to levels approaching the d34S values of sulfate, indicates sulfate limited conditions concurrent with a rebound in U(VI) concentrations. Upon cessation of acetate amendment, sulfate and sulfide concentrations increased, while δ34S values of sulfide returned to less than -20‰ and sulfate δ34S decreased to near-background values, indicating lower levels of sulfate reduction accompanied by a corresponding drop in U(VI). Results indicate a transition between electron donor and sulfate-limited conditions at the height of sulfate reduction and suggest stability of biogenic FeS precipitates following the end of acetate amendment.

  6. Influence of dihydroxybenzenes on paracetamol and ciprofloxacin degradation and iron(III) reduction in Fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Costa E Silva, Beatriz; de Lima Perini, João Angelo; Nogueira, Raquel F Pupo

    2017-03-01

    The degradation of paracetamol (PCT) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) was compared in relation to the generation of dihydroxylated products, Fe(III) reduction and reaction rate in the presence of dihydroxybenzene (DHB) compounds, or under irradiation with free iron (Fe(3+)) or citrate complex (Fecit) in Fenton or photo-Fenton process. The formation of hydroquinone (HQ) was observed only during PCT degradation in the dark, which increased drastically the rate of PCT degradation, since HQ formed was able to reduce Fe(3+) and contributed to PCT degradation efficiency. When HQ was initially added, PCT and CIP degradation rate in the dark was much higher in comparison to the absence of HQ, due to the higher and faster formation of Fe(2+) at the beginning of reaction. In the absence of HQ, no CIP degradation was observed; however, when HQ was added after 30 min, the degradation rate increased drastically. Ten PCT hydroxylated intermediates were identified in the absence of HQ, which could contribute for Fe(III) reduction and consequently to the degradation in a similar way as HQ. During CIP degradation, only one product of hydroxyl radical attack on benzene ring and substitution of the fluorine atom was identified when HQ was added to the reaction medium.

  7. Influence of punch face angle and reduction on flow mode in backward and combined radial backward extrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jeong-hoon; Hwang, Beong Bok; Lee, Ho Yong

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis on the flow mode which determines lubrication limit such as stiction onto or sliding over punch face. The main goal of this study is to examine the influence of geometrical parameters such as punch face angle, reduction in area, and the gap height in radial direction in backward and combined radial-backward extrusion process on the flow mode and surface stresses such as sliding velocity, sliding distance and surface expansion. Annealed steel 17Cr3 was selected as a model material, a rigid-plastic material, for simulation, which was conducted using a commercially available FEA tool, Deform 2-D, programmed in a rigid plasticity theory. Change of flow mode during deformation was also investigated to find under which conditions of process parameter adopted the flow mode changes from stiction to transition or transition to sliding. In this paper, sliding velocities were quantitatively analyzed to determine the flow mode.

  8. Influence of electrochemical reduction and oxidation processes on the decolourisation and degradation of C.I. Reactive Orange 4 solutions.

    PubMed

    del Río, A I; Molina, J; Bonastre, J; Cases, F

    2009-06-01

    The electrochemical treatment of wastewaters from textile industry is a promising treatment technique for substances which are resistant to biodegradation. This paper presents the results of the electrochemical decolourisation and degradation of C.I. Reactive Orange 4 synthetic solutions (commercially known as Procion Orange MX2R). Electrolyses were carried out under galvanostatic conditions in a divided or undivided electrolytic cell. Therefore, oxidation, reduction or oxido-reduction experiences were tested. Ti/SnO(2)-Sb-Pt and stainless steel electrodes were used as anode and cathode, respectively. Degradation of the dye was followed by TOC, total nitrogen, COD and BOD(5) analyses. TOC removal after an oxidation process was higher than after oxido-reduction while COD removal after this last process was about 90%. Besides, the biodegradability of final samples after oxido-reduction process was studied and an improvement was observed. UV-Visible spectra revealed the presence of aromatic structures in solution when an electro-reduction was carried out while oxido-reduction process degraded both azo group and aromatic structures. HPLC analyses indicated the presence of a main intermediate after the reduction process with a chemical structure closely similar to 2-amine-1, 5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid. The lowest decolourisation rate corresponded to electrochemical oxidation. In these experiences a higher number of intermediates were generated as HPLC analysis demonstrated. The decolourisation process for the three electrochemical processes studied presented a pseudo-first order kinetics.

  9. Influence of Ca amount on the synthesis of Nd2Fe14B particles in reduction-diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Qiang; Kim, Dongsoo; Choi, Chuljin

    2014-04-01

    Nd2Fe14B alloy particles with high coercivity of more than 10 kOe were successfully synthesized by adjusting the amount of Calcium (Ca) in reduction-diffusion (R-D) process. Calcium oxide (CaO) and unreacted Ca remained after R-D process in particles prepared by heat treatment in Hydrogen (H2) atmosphere at previous step. In the ratio of 0.4 of Ca to powders (Ca/powders, wt%), residual Ca was not detected from X-ray diffraction pattern. On the other hand, Ca appeared above the ratio of 1.0 and below the ratio of 0.2, amount of Ca was not enough to reduce Nd oxide. Moreover, excess Ca affected magnetic property of final products obtained after washing, because residual Ca gave rise to evolution of H2 gas during disintegration with water and it led to the formation of Nd2Fe14BHx (x=1-5). Finally, Nd2Fe14B magnetic particles were synthesized after washing in de-ionized water with a mean size of 2 μm and their maximum energy product showed 15.5 MGOe.

  10. Influence of electron donors and copper concentration on geochemical and mineralogical processes under conditions of biological sulphate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Sulphidogenous microorganism communities were isolated from soil polluted by crude oil. The study was focused on determining the influence of 1) copper (II) concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and 2) the applied electron donor on the course and evolution of mineral-forming processes under conditions favouring growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The influence of copper concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and the type of mineral phases formed was determined during experiments in which copper (II) chloride at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 g/L was added to SRB cultures. The experiments were performed in two variants: with ethanol (4 g/L) or lactate (4 g/L) as the sole carbon source. In order to determine the taxonomic composition of the selected microorganism communities, the 16S rRNA method was used. Results of this analysis confirmed the presence of Desulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium, Desulfotalea, Thermotoga, Solibacter, Gramella, Anaeromyxobacter and Myxococcus sp. in the stationary cultures. The post-culture sediments contained covelline (CuS) and digenite (Cu9S5 ). Based on the results, it can be stated that the type of carbon source applied during incubation plays a crucial role in determining the mineral composition of the post-culture sediments. Thus, regardless of the amount of copper ion introduced to a culture with lactate as the sole carbon source, no copper sulphide was observed in the post-culture sediments. Cultures with ethanol as the sole carbon source, on the other hand, yielded covelline or digenite in all post-culture sediments.

  11. Numerical Study about the Influence of Wall Angle about Main Strains, Thickness Reduction and Forces on Single Point Incremental Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksik, Valentin

    2016-12-01

    The current paper aims to study, using numerical simulation, the influence of the wall angle on the single point incremental forming process. For the analysis there has been used the LS-Dyna software and three explicit dynamic analyses were run for three parts with wall angles of 450, 550 and 650. The factors taken into account are the main strains, the thickness reduction and the forces on three directions. The material data introduced into the simulation were determined based on an uniaxial traction test on an Instron 5587 testing machine and the Aramis system was used as optical extensometer.

  12. Dimensional Reduction and Hadronic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Signer, Adrian; Stoeckinger, Dominik

    2008-11-23

    We consider the application of regularization by dimensional reduction to NLO corrections of hadronic processes. The general collinear singularity structure is discussed, the origin of the regularization-scheme dependence is identified and transition rules to other regularization schemes are derived.

  13. The influence of oxidation reduction potential and water treatment processes on quartz lamp sleeve fouling in ultraviolet disinfection reactors.

    PubMed

    Wait, Isaac W; Johnston, Cliff T; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2007-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection systems are incorporated into drinking water production facilities because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial capabilities, and the minimal disinfection by-product formation that generally accompanies their use. Selection of an optimal location for a UV system within a drinking water treatment facility depends on many factors; a potentially important consideration is the effect of system location on operation and maintenance issues, including the potential for fouling of quartz surfaces. To examine the effect of system location on fouling, experiments were conducted at a groundwater treatment facility, wherein aeration, chlorination, and sand filtration were applied sequentially for treatment. In this facility, access to the water stream was available prior to and following each of the treatment steps. Therefore, it was possible to examine the effects of each of these unit operations on fouling dynamics within a UV system. Results indicated zero-order formation kinetics for the fouling reactions at all locations. Increases in oxidation reduction potential, caused by water treatment steps such as aeration and chlorination, increased the rate of sleeve fouling and the rate of irradiance loss within the reactor. Analysis of metals in the sleeve foulant showed that calcium and iron predominate, and relative comparisons of foulant composition to water chemistry highlighted a high affinity for incorporation into the foulant matrix for both iron and manganese, particularly after oxidizing treatment steps. Fouling behavior was observed to be in qualitative agreement with representations of the degree of saturation, relative to the metal:ligand combinations that are believed to comprise a large fraction of the foulants that accumulate on the surfaces of quartz jackets in UV systems used to treat water.

  14. Influence of relative rolling reduction and thickness layers bimetallic plate at the non-uniformity of the strain after rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydz, D.; Stradomski, G.; Dyja, H.

    2017-02-01

    In the article were made numerical and laboratory tests of two-layers rolling process sheet composed of Al99,8 + M1E. Laboratory tests made with use of 150 mm diameter working rolls mill. To the modeling of the bimetallic plate rolling were taken the FEM Forge 2D software based on the theory of plasticity and MathCad program (in which to the rolling process modeling were used the mathematical model developed in the work [5] based on the theory of viscoelasticity). The aim of study was to determine the influence of layer thickness HT0/HM0 and relative deformation ε on the uneven distribution of steel sheet deformation after rolling process. Calculations based on the theory of viscoelasticity allowed additionally take into account the impact of the delayed effects of the variation of viscoelastic deformation of layers of the bimetallic plate rolling process.

  15. Resist process optimization for further defect reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Iseki, Tomohiro; Marumoto, Hiroshi; Takayanagi, Koji; Yoshida, Yuichi; Uemura, Ryouichi; Yoshihara, Kosuke

    2012-03-01

    Defect reduction has become one of the most important technical challenges in device mass-production. Knowing that resist processing on a clean track strongly impacts defect formation in many cases, we have been trying to improve the track process to enhance customer yield. For example, residual type defect and pattern collapse are strongly related to process parameters in developer, and we have reported new develop and rinse methods in the previous papers. Also, we have reported the optimization method of filtration condition to reduce bridge type defects, which are mainly caused by foreign substances such as gels in resist. Even though we have contributed resist caused defect reduction in past studies, defect reduction requirements continue to be very important. In this paper, we will introduce further process improvements in terms of resist defect reduction, including the latest experimental data.

  16. Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Senkov, Oleg N.

    2000-01-01

    The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

  17. The Peer Influence Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinan, Maureen T.

    1981-01-01

    Outlining a conceptual scheme specifying how peer influences mediate the effects of organizational characteristics of schools on student outcomes, with social psychological theories of interpersonal attraction and influence as the basis for the outline, is the aim of this paper. Selection of peers and influence of peers is outlined. (CE)

  18. Forging process design for risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yongning

    In this dissertation, forging process design has been investigated with the primary concern on risk reduction. Different forged components have been studied, especially those ones that could cause catastrophic loss if failure occurs. As an effective modeling methodology, finite element analysis is applied extensively in this work. Three examples, titanium compressor disk, superalloy turbine disk, and titanium hip prosthesis, have been discussed to demonstrate this approach. Discrete defects such as hard alpha anomalies are known to cause disastrous failure if they are present in those stress critical components. In this research, hard-alpha inclusion movement during forging of titanium compressor disk is studied by finite element analysis. By combining the results from Finite Element Method (FEM), regression modeling and Monte Carlo simulation, it is shown that changing the forging path is able to mitigate the failure risk of the components during the service. The second example goes with a turbine disk made of superalloy IN 718. The effect of forging on microstructure is the main consideration in this study. Microstructure defines the as-forged disk properties. Considering specific forging conditions, preform has its own effect on the microstructure. Through a sensitivity study it is found that forging temperature and speed have significant influence on the microstructure. In order to choose the processing parameters to optimize the microstructure, the dependence of microstructure on die speed and temperature is thoroughly studied using design of numerical experiments. For various desired goals, optimal solutions are determined. The narrow processing window of titanium alloy makes the isothermal forging a preferred way to produce forged parts without forging defects. However, the cost of isothermal forging (dies at the same temperature as the workpiece) limits its wide application. In this research, it has been demonstrated that with proper process design, the die

  19. Carbon dioxide reduction by the Bosch process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, M. P.; Reid, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Prototype units for carrying out the reduction of carbon dioxide to elementary carbon have been built and operated successfully. In some cases, however, startup difficulties have been reported. Moreover, the recycle reactor product has been reported to contain only small amounts of water and undesirably high yields of methane. This paper presents the results of the first phase of an experimental study that was carried out to define the mechanisms occurring in the reduction process. Conclusions are drawn and possible modifications to the present recycle process are suggested.

  20. Carbon dioxide reduction by the Bosch process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, M. P.; Reid, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Prototype units for carrying out the reduction of carbon dioxide to elementary carbon have been built and operated successfully. In some cases, however, startup difficulties have been reported. Moreover, the recycle reactor product has been reported to contain only small amounts of water and undesirably high yields of methane. This paper presents the results of the first phase of an experimental study that was carried out to define the mechanisms occurring in the reduction process. Conclusions are drawn and possible modifications to the present recycle process are suggested.

  1. Toxicity reduction of photo processing wastewaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.

    1992-01-01

    The photo processing industry can be characterized by treatment processes and subsequent silver recovery. The effluents generated all contain various amounts of silver. The objectives of this study were to determine toxicity of photo processing effluents and to explore their toxicity mitigation. Six samples, from small shops to a major photo processing center, were studied. Two samples (I and VI) were found to be extremely toxic, causing 100 and 99% inhibition of duckweed frond reproduction, respectively, and were used for subsequent toxicity reduction experiments. Lime and sodium sulfide were effective for the toxicity reduction of Sample VI; both reduced its toxicity to negligible. Sample I was far more toxic and was first diluted to 2.2% and then treated with 0.5 g lime/100 mL, reducing toxicity from 100% to 12% inhibition.

  2. Process simulation of aluminum reduction cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tabsh, I.; Dupuis, M.; Gomes, A.

    1996-10-01

    A program was developed to model the dynamic behavior of an aluminum reduction cell. The program simulates the physical process by solving the heat and mass balance equations that characterize the behavior of eleven chemical species in the system. It also models operational events (such as metal tapping, anode change, etc.) and the process control logic including various alumina feeding policies and anode effect quenching. The program is a PC based Windows{reg_sign} application that takes full advantage of the Windows user interface. This paper describes the implementation of the process model and the control logic. Various results using the simulation are compared to measured data.

  3. Processing Cost Reduction Program Freeze Dried Foods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    tenderness of cooked freeze dried meat is significantly affected by the cooking method (Driver & Venkata Raman. 1977) The six meal varieties...Menu B Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Ration Pack Savoury Steak Fingers Menu C Each of the six meals has a taste panel rating of at least 6 for...Processing costs are inversely proportional to the dry solids throughput rate. The largest cost reduction of 38% was achieved for Savoury Steak

  4. Cataclasis and processes of particle size reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, Tom G.

    1991-05-01

    The particle size distribution (P.S.D.) of fragmented geological materials is affected by the fragmentation process, initial size distribution, number of fracturing events, energy input, strain, and confining pressure. A summary of literature shows that the fractal dimension ( D) of the P.S.D. is increased by the number of fracturing events, energy input, strain, and confining pressure. Cenozoic cataclasis of granite, granodiorites, gneisses and arkose seen in cores from the Cajon Pass drillhole, southern California, produced P.S.D.s with values of D that varied from 1.88 to 3.08. Each rock type has a characteristic and more limited range of D. Areas of dilatant texture and mode I fracture-fillings have low average values (2.32 and 2.37) compared to an average value of 2.67 in shear fracture-fillings D has a good inverse correlation with average particle size. Data from fault rocks in the San Gabriel fault zone, southern California ( Anderson et al., 1983) have been reanalyzed to show that values of D are higher (2.10 5.52) and average particle size is lower than the Cajon Pass samples, but the ranges of values overlap, and the inverse correlation between D and average particle size is extended. Microstructural observations combined with these results suggest that three processes contributed to particle size reduction during cataclasis. The first process of feldspar alteration, which leads to low values of D, has not been previously recognized. The second process is probably constrained comminution ( Sammis et al., 1987), since the average D in shear fracture-fillings is close to the value of 2.58 predicted by this theory. A further stage of particle size reduction is demonstrated by an increase of D with cataclasis. This third process is selective fracture of larger particles, which may also operate during localization and the cataclastic flow-to-faulting transition as observed in experiments. A transition from constrained comminution to selective fracture of

  5. Process for energy reduction with flash fusing

    SciTech Connect

    Berkes, J.S.

    1987-10-06

    This patent describes a process for affecting a reduction in the energy needed for accomplishing the flash fusing of a developed image which comprises (1) providing a toner composition with resin particles, pigment articles, and wax. The wax possesses a lower melting temperature than the resin particles and is selected from the group consisting of polyethylene and polypropylene with a molecular weight of less than about 6,000; (2) introducing the aforementioned toner composition into a xerographic imaging apparatus having incorporated therein a flash fusing device; (3) generating an electrostatic latent image in the imaging apparatus, and subsequently developing this image with the toner composition; (4) transferring the image to a supporting substrate; and (5) permanently attaching the image to the substrate with energy emitted from a flash fusing device, and wherein there is formed between the supporting substrate and the toner composition during fusing a wax layer.

  6. Influence of the hot-fill water-spray-cooling process after continuous pasteurization on the number of decimal reductions and on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris CRA 7152 growth in orange juice stored at 35 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Ana Cláudia N F; Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Pacheco-Sanchez, Cristiana P; Massaguer, Pilar R

    2010-02-28

    In this study, the influence of the hot-fill water-spray-cooling process after continuous pasteurization on the number of decimal reductions (gamma) and growth parameters (lag time; lambda, ratio N(f)/N(o); kappa, maximum growth rate; mu) of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris CRA 7152 in orange juice stored at 35 degrees C were investigated. Two different inoculum levels of A. acidoterrestris CRA 7152 (10(2) and 10(3) spores/mL) in orange juice (11(0)Brix, pH 3.7) and a Microthermics UHT-HTST pilot plant were used to simulate industrial conditions. Results have shown that regardless of the inoculum level (10(2) or 10(3) spores/mL), the pasteurization processes were unable to cause even 1 gamma. Predictive modeling using the Baranyi model showed that only kappa and time to reach 10(4)spores/mL (t10(4) - time to juice spoilage) were affected by the spore inoculum used (p<0.05). It has been concluded that A. acidoterrestris was able to survive the hot-fill process and to grow and spoil orange juice in 5-6 days when the final storage temperature was 35 degrees C. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Advanced Reduction Processes: A New Class of Treatment Processes

    PubMed Central

    Vellanki, Bhanu Prakash; Batchelor, Bill; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new class of treatment processes called advanced reduction processes (ARPs) is proposed. ARPs combine activation methods and reducing agents to form highly reactive reducing radicals that degrade oxidized contaminants. Batch screening experiments were conducted to identify effective ARPs by applying several combinations of activation methods (ultraviolet light, ultrasound, electron beam, and microwaves) and reducing agents (dithionite, sulfite, ferrous iron, and sulfide) to degradation of four target contaminants (perchlorate, nitrate, perfluorooctanoic acid, and 2,4 dichlorophenol) at three pH-levels (2.4, 7.0, and 11.2). These experiments identified the combination of sulfite activated by ultraviolet light produced by a low-pressure mercury vapor lamp (UV-L) as an effective ARP. More detailed kinetic experiments were conducted with nitrate and perchlorate as target compounds, and nitrate was found to degrade more rapidly than perchlorate. Effectiveness of the UV-L/sulfite treatment process improved with increasing pH for both perchlorate and nitrate. We present the theory behind ARPs, identify potential ARPs, demonstrate their effectiveness against a wide range of contaminants, and provide basic experimental evidence in support of the fundamental hypothesis for ARP, namely, that activation methods can be applied to reductants to form reducing radicals that degrade oxidized contaminants. This article provides an introduction to ARPs along with sufficient data to identify potentially effective ARPs and the target compounds these ARPs will be most effective in destroying. Further research will provide a detailed analysis of degradation kinetics and the mechanisms of contaminant destruction in an ARP. PMID:23840160

  8. Defective Reduction in Frozen Pie Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooted, Oranuch; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat

    2017-06-01

    The frozen pie production has a lot of defects resulting in high production cost. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) technique has been applied to improve the frozen pie process. Pareto chart is also used to determine the major defects of frozen pie. There are 3 main processes that cause the defects which are the 1st freezing to glazing process, the forming process, and the folding process. The Risk Priority Number (RPN) obtained from FMEA is analyzed to reduce the defects. If RPN of each cause exceeds 45, the process will be considered to be improved and selected for the corrective and preventive actions. The results showed that RPN values decreased after the correction. Therefore, the implementation of FMEA technique can help to improve the performance of frozen pie process and reduce the defects approximately 51.9%.

  9. Application of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gourishankar, K. V.

    1998-11-11

    Metallothermic reductions have been extensively studied in the field of extractive metallurgy. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we have developed a molten-salt based reduction process using lithium. This process was originally developed to reduce actinide oxides present in spent nuclear fuel. Preliminary thermodynamic considerations indicate that this process has the potential to be adapted for the extraction of other metals. The reduction is carried out at 650 C in a molten-salt (LiCl) medium. Lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), produced during the reduction of the actinide oxides, dissolves in the molten salt. At the end of the reduction step, the lithium is regenerated from the salt by an electrowinning process. The lithium and the salt from the electrowinning are then reused for reduction of the next batch of oxide fuel. The process cycle has been successfully demonstrated on an engineering scale in a specially designed pyroprocessing facility. This paper discusses the applicability of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes with specific reference to our process. Results are presented from our work on actinide oxides to highlight the role of lithium and its effect on process variables in these molten-salt based reduction processes.

  10. Reductions in Aprotic Media II. Influence of Catalytic Hydrogen Reduction on the Course of Hydrocarbon Reduction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    28-30). If indeed napthalene is substituted for diphenylanthracene, the high frequency MSRS spectrum shows a single peak at 437.0 nm, precisely at...electrode is electrolyzed for several minutes at hydrogen evolution ptentials in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions, the 612.5 nm transient appears as in...may be of consequence in practical applications, such as its influence on undesirable side reactions in lithium/ sulfur dioxide cells. Work is continuing

  11. Influence of model reduction on uncertainty of flood inundation predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, R. J.; Kiczko, A.; Osuch, M.

    2012-04-01

    Derivation of flood risk maps requires an estimation of the maximum inundation extent for a flood with an assumed probability of exceedence, e.g. a 100 or 500 year flood. The results of numerical simulations of flood wave propagation are used to overcome the lack of relevant observations. In practice, deterministic 1-D models are used for flow routing, giving a simplified image of a flood wave propagation process. The solution of a 1-D model depends on the simplifications to the model structure, the initial and boundary conditions and the estimates of model parameters which are usually identified using the inverse problem based on the available noisy observations. Therefore, there is a large uncertainty involved in the derivation of flood risk maps. In this study we examine the influence of model structure simplifications on estimates of flood extent for the urban river reach. As the study area we chose the Warsaw reach of the River Vistula, where nine bridges and several dikes are located. The aim of the study is to examine the influence of water structures on the derived model roughness parameters, with all the bridges and dikes taken into account, with a reduced number and without any water infrastructure. The results indicate that roughness parameter values of a 1-D HEC-RAS model can be adjusted for the reduction in model structure. However, the price we pay is the model robustness. Apart from a relatively simple question regarding reducing model structure, we also try to answer more fundamental questions regarding the relative importance of input, model structure simplification, parametric and rating curve uncertainty to the uncertainty of flood extent estimates. We apply pseudo-Bayesian methods of uncertainty estimation and Global Sensitivity Analysis as the main methodological tools. The results indicate that the uncertainties have a substantial influence on flood risk assessment. In the paper we present a simplified methodology allowing the influence of

  12. Coal fueled ported kiln direct reduction process in Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Rierson, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    Allis Mineral Systems (AMS), formerly the minerals processing group at Allis-Chalmers Corporation, developed a ported kiln process in the 1960`s specifically for the direct reduction of iron ore. The process is called ACCAR. This ported kiln technology has more recently been coupled with AMS` GRATE-KILN System for iron oxide pelletizing into the GRATE-CAR Process, for minerals reduction. The GRATE-CAR Process can handle a fine grained ore concentrate through the steps of agglomeration, induration and reduction in a single production line.

  13. Defective Reduction in Automotive Headlining Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittichai, Saranya; Chutima, Parames

    2016-05-01

    In an automobile parts manufacturing company, currently the headlining process has a lot of wastes resulting in a high cost of quality per year. In this paper, the Six Sigma method is used to reduce the defects in the headlining process. Cause-and-effect matrix and failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) were adopted to screen the factors that affect the quality of headlining. The 2k-1 fractional factorials design was also use to determine the potential preliminary root causes. The full factorial experiments was conducted to identify appropriate settings of the significant factors. The result showed that the process can reduce the defects of headlining from 12.21% to 6.95%

  14. Wet trimming process for critical dimension reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam X.; Smith, Brian A.; Qin, Anwei

    2008-03-01

    Plasma trimming is a method widely used to achieve small feature sizes beyond the capability of photolithography. Plasma processes reduce the dimensions of photoresist, anti-reflective coating, hardmask, or device substrate patterns with varying degrees of anisotropy. The vertical trim rate is higher than or equal to the lateral trim rate. As a result, much of the line-edge roughness from the resist pattern remains. High aspect-ratio resist patterns are subject to necking and collapse during this process. However, by using a developer-soluble hardmask in place of traditional anti-reflective layers, it is possible to achieve controllable, anisotropic trim rates, as well as reduced roughness. Moreover, the process benefits from a very thin resist, or imaging layer, instead of relying on a thicker mask with a high aspect-ratio. The hardmask is patterned during a standard resist develop step, and the resist may be stripped prior to substrate etching due to the high etch resistance of the hardmask. Many other advantages have been discovered from this wet trimming process, including high resolution, extended depth of focus, controllable trim rate, and lower cost than traditional methods.

  15. AMPERE Science Data Reduction and Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Dyrud, L.; Anderson, B.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) uses the constellation of Iridium Communications satellites in 780-km-altitude, circular, near-polar orbits to monitor the electro-dynamic coupling of the ionosphere to the surrounding space environment in real time. The constellation consists of 66 satellites plus on-orbit spares, and each satellite carries a magnetometer for attitude determination. The magnetometer data are continuously sent from Iridium Satellite Network Operations Center to the AMPERE Science Data Center, where they are processed to extract the magnetic perturbation signatures associated with the Birkeland currents. This is accomplished by first merging real-time telemetry packets from each satellite into time-ordered sets of records, formatting and compiling a database. Subsequent processing automatically evaluates baselines, inter-calibrates magnetic field data between satellites, and quantifies the magnetic field residuals with the goal to reduce errors to the 30-nT digitization resolution of the magnetometers. The magnetic field residuals are then used to rank the quality of the data from the individual satellites and weight the data in subsequent science processing. Because magnetic fields generated by the Birkeland currents represent typically less than one percent of the total magnetic field, numerous challenges must be overcome to derive reliable magnetic perturbation signals. For example, corrections to the IGRF magnetic field model must be applied and adverse effects due to missing data must be mitigated. In the final processing step the Birkeland currents are derived by applying Ampere's law to the spherical harmonic fit of the perturbation data. We present the processing methodology, discuss the sensitivity of the Birkeland currents on the accuracy of the derived magnetic perturbations, and show a preliminary analysis of the 3-5 August 2010 geomagnetic storm.

  16. Influence of Milling Process on Efavirenz Solubility.

    PubMed

    Zaini, Erizal; Wahyu, Deni; Octavia, Maria Dona; Fitriani, Lili

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the milling process on the solubility of efavirenz. Milling process was done using Nanomilling for 30, 60, and 180 min. Intact and milled efavirenz were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectroscopy infrared (IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and solubility test. The X-ray diffractogram showed a decline on peak intensity of milled efavirenz compared to intact efavirenz. The SEM graph depicted the change from crystalline to amorphous habit after milling process. The IR spectrum showed there was no difference between intact and milled efavirenz. Thermal analysis which performed by DSC showed a reduction on endothermic peak after milling process which related to decreasing of crystallinity. Solubility test of intact and milled efavirenz was conducted in distilled water free CO2 with 0.25% sodium lauryl sulfate media and measured using high-performance liquid chromatography method with acetonitrile: distilled water (80:20) as mobile phases. The solubility was significantly increased (P < 0.05) after milling processes, which the intact efavirenz was 27.12 ± 2.05, while the milled efavirenz for 30, 60, and 180 min were 75.53 ± 1.59, 82.34 ± 1.23, and 104.75 ± 0.96 μg/mL, respectively. Based on the results, the solubility of efavirenz improved after milling process.

  17. Factors influencing reductions in smoking among Australian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dessaix, Anita; Maag, Audrey; McKenzie, Jeanie; Currow, David C

    2016-01-28

    A continued increase in the proportion of adolescents who never smoke, as well as an understanding of factors that influence reductions in smoking among this susceptible population, is crucial. The World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provides an appropriate structure to briefly examine Australian and New South Wales policies and programs that are influencing reductions in smoking among adolescents in Australia. This paper provides an overview of price and recent tax measures to reduce the demand for tobacco, the evolution of smoke-free environment policies, changes to tobacco labelling and packaging, public education campaigns, and restrictions to curb tobacco advertising. It also discusses supplyreduction measures that limit adolescents' access to tobacco products. Consideration is given to emerging priorities to achieve continued declines in smoking by Australian adolescents.

  18. Hybrid process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sprague, B.N.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes a process for reducing the nitrogen oxide concentration in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing into the effluent a first treatment agent comprising a nitrogenous composition selected from the group consisting of urea, ammonia, hexamethylenetetramine, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, NH{sub 4}-lignosulfonate, fur-furylamine, tetrahydrofurylamine, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, biuret, 1.1{prime}-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, calcium cyanamide, and mixtures thereof under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides concentration and ensure the presence of ammonia in the effluent; introducing into the effluent a second treatment agent comprising an oxygenated hydrocarbon at an effluent temperature of about 500{degrees} F. to about 1600{degrees} F. under conditions effective to oxidize nitric oxide in the effluent to nitrogen dioxide and ensure the presence of ammonia at a weight ratio of ammonia to nitrogen dioxide of about 1:5 to about 5:1; and contacting the effluent with an aqueous scrubbing solution having a pH of 12 or lower under conditions effective to cause nitrogen dioxide to be absorbed therein.

  19. Influence of magnetite stoichiometry on U(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Gorski, Christopher A; Boyanov, Maxim I; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Kemner, Kenneth M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-01-17

    Hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) can be reduced enzymatically by various microbes and abiotically by Fe(2+)-bearing minerals, including magnetite, of interest because of its formation from Fe(3+) (oxy)hydroxides via dissimilatory iron reduction. Magnetite is also a corrosion product of iron metal in suboxic and anoxic conditions and is likely to form during corrosion of steel waste containers holding uranium-containing spent nuclear fuel. Previous work indicated discrepancies in the extent of U(VI) reduction by magnetite. Here, we demonstrate that the stoichiometry (the bulk Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratio, x) of magnetite can, in part, explain the observed discrepancies. In our studies, magnetite stoichiometry significantly influenced the extent of U(VI) reduction by magnetite. Stoichiometric and partially oxidized magnetites with x ≥ 0.38 reduced U(VI) to U(IV) in UO(2) (uraninite) nanoparticles, whereas with more oxidized magnetites (x < 0.38) and maghemite (x = 0), sorbed U(VI) was the dominant phase observed. Furthermore, as with our chemically synthesized magnetites (x ≥ 0.38), nanoparticulate UO(2) was formed from reduction of U(VI) in a heat-killed suspension of biogenic magnetite (x = 0.43). X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy results indicate that reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is coupled to oxidation of Fe(2+) in magnetite. The addition of aqueous Fe(2+) to suspensions of oxidized magnetite resulted in reduction of U(VI) to UO(2), consistent with our previous finding that Fe(2+) taken up from solution increased the magnetite stoichiometry. Our results suggest that magnetite stoichiometry and the ability of aqueous Fe(2+) to recharge magnetite are important factors in reduction of U(VI) in the subsurface.

  20. Molecular Modeling of Environmentally Important Processes: Reduction Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne; Bumpus, John A.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Cramer, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing use of computational quantum chemistry in the modeling of environmentally important processes is described. The employment of computational quantum mechanics for the prediction of oxidation-reduction potential for solutes in an aqueous medium is discussed.

  1. Evaluation of process for sludge particle size reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Precechtel, D.R.; Packer, M.J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-18

    This document evaluates the available technology for K Basin sludge particle size. The results can be used to demonstrate the sensitivity or lack thereof, of K Basin sludge to available reduction processes and TWRS proposed particle acceptance criteria.

  2. Molecular Modeling of Environmentally Important Processes: Reduction Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne; Bumpus, John A.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Cramer, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing use of computational quantum chemistry in the modeling of environmentally important processes is described. The employment of computational quantum mechanics for the prediction of oxidation-reduction potential for solutes in an aqueous medium is discussed.

  3. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Jr., Fred J.

    1985-01-01

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  4. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, F.J. Jr.

    1983-06-16

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  5. Earthing the Human Body Influences Physiologic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sokal, Karol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study was designed to answer the question: Does the contact of the human organism with the Earth via a copper conductor affect physiologic processes? Subjects and experiments Five (5) experiments are presented: experiment 1—effect of earthing on calcium–phosphate homeostasis and serum concentrations of iron (N = 84 participants); experiment 2—effect of earthing on serum concentrations of electrolytes (N = 28); experiment 3—effect of earthing on thyroid function (N = 12); experiment 4—effect of earthing on glucose concentration (N = 12); experiment 5—effect of earthing on immune response to vaccine (N = 32). Subjects were divided into two groups. One (1) group of people was earthed, while the second group remained without contact with the Earth. Blood and urine samples were examined. Results Earthing of an electrically insulated human organism during night rest causes lowering of serum concentrations of iron, ionized calcium, inorganic phosphorus, and reduction of renal excretion of calcium and phosphorus. Earthing during night rest decreases free tri-iodothyronine and increases free thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone. The continuous earthing of the human body decreases blood glucose in patients with diabetes. Earthing decreases sodium, potassium, magnesium, iron, total protein, and albumin concentrations while the levels of transferrin, ferritin, and globulins α1, α2, β, and γ increase. These results are statistically significant. Conclusions Earthing the human body influences human physiologic processes. This influence is observed during night relaxation and during physical activity. Effect of the earthing on calcium–phosphate homeostasis is the opposite of that which occurs in states of weightlessness. It also increases the activity of catabolic processes. It may be the primary factor regulating endocrine and nervous systems. PMID:21469913

  6. Earthing the human body influences physiologic processes.

    PubMed

    Sokal, Karol; Sokal, Pawel

    2011-04-01

    This study was designed to answer the question: Does the contact of the human organism with the Earth via a copper conductor affect physiologic processes? Subjects and experiments: Five (5) experiments are presented: experiment 1-effect of earthing on calcium-phosphate homeostasis and serum concentrations of iron (N = 84 participants); experiment 2-effect of earthing on serum concentrations of electrolytes (N = 28); experiment 3-effect of earthing on thyroid function (N = 12); experiment 4-effect of earthing on glucose concentration (N = 12); experiment 5-effect of earthing on immune response to vaccine (N = 32). Subjects were divided into two groups. One (1) group of people was earthed, while the second group remained without contact with the Earth. Blood and urine samples were examined. Earthing of an electrically insulated human organism during night rest causes lowering of serum concentrations of iron, ionized calcium, inorganic phosphorus, and reduction of renal excretion of calcium and phosphorus. Earthing during night rest decreases free tri-iodothyronine and increases free thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone. The continuous earthing of the human body decreases blood glucose in patients with diabetes. Earthing decreases sodium, potassium, magnesium, iron, total protein, and albumin concentrations while the levels of transferrin, ferritin, and globulins α1, α2, β, and γ increase. These results are statistically significant. Earthing the human body influences human physiologic processes. This influence is observed during night relaxation and during physical activity. Effect of the earthing on calcium-phosphate homeostasis is the opposite of that which occurs in states of weightlessness. It also increases the activity of catabolic processes. It may be the primary factor regulating endocrine and nervous systems.

  7. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    PubMed

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  8. Adapting an HIV Risk Reduction Curriculum: Processes and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa K; Wickliffe, Joi; Humiston, Sharon G; Dowd, M Denise; Kelly, Patricia; DeLurgio, Stephen; Goggin, Kathy

    2017-05-01

    Becoming a Responsible Teen (BART) is a community-based, HIV risk reduction curriculum shown to increase safer sex behaviors among African American adolescents. However, BART does not address common barriers to sexual health care access, which may limit program efficacy. We used a community-engaged adaptation process to maximize program relevance and health outcomes by incorporating a broad ecological perspective. Adolescent and staff advisory boards at a community-based organization recommended modifications (e.g., delete references to Kwanzaa, update language, localize incentives) and supported inclusion of critical on-site health services, such as sexually transmitted infection testing and condom provision. We conducted a trial of adapted BART (one session/week for 8 weeks) with 36 adolescents at two community organizations (mean age = 15.5 years, 52% female; 61% reported previous sexual intercourse). Most received on-site sexually transmitted infection testing (61%) and condoms (70%). Adolescents demonstrated significant improvements in self-efficacy for safer sexual practices (p < .02), AIDS risk knowledge (p < .001), condom knowledge (p < .001), and condom attitudes (p < .04). Adolescents and staff were satisfied with the revised curriculum and found on-site services acceptable. Based on improvements in constructs influencing behavior and the successful delivery of services essential for optimal health, future studies to assess efficacy and sustainability of the adapted curriculum appear warranted.

  9. Computer program developed for flowsheet calculations and process data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfredson, P. G.; Anastasia, L. J.; Knudsen, I. E.; Koppel, L. B.; Vogel, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Computer program PACER-65, is used for flowsheet calculations and easily adapted to process data reduction. Each unit, vessel, meter, and processing operation in the overall flowsheet is represented by a separate subroutine, which the program calls in the order required to complete an overall flowsheet calculation.

  10. SELECTION AND PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE REDUCTANTS FOR SRAT PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.; Pickenheim, B.; Peeler, D.

    2009-06-30

    Defense Waste Processing Facility - Engineering (DWPF-E) has requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform scoping evaluations of alternative flowsheets with the primary focus on alternatives to formic acid during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The reductants shown below were selected for testing during the evaluation of alternative reductants for Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing. The reductants fall into two general categories: reducing acids and non-acidic reducing agents. Reducing acids were selected as direct replacements for formic acid to reduce mercury in the SRAT, to acidify the sludge, and to balance the melter REDuction/OXidation potential (REDOX). Non-acidic reductants were selected as melter reductants and would not be able to reduce mercury in the SRAT. Sugar was not tested during this scoping evaluation as previous work has already been conducted on the use of sugar with DWPF feeds. Based on the testing performed, the only viable short-term path to mitigating hydrogen generation in the CPC is replacement of formic acid with a mixture of glycolic and formic acids. An experiment using glycolic acid blended with formic on an 80:20 molar basis was able to reduce mercury, while also targeting a predicted REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) of 0.2 expressed as Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe. Based on this result, SRNL recommends performing a complete CPC demonstration of the glycolic/formic acid flowsheet followed by a design basis development and documentation. Of the options tested recently and in the past, nitric/glycolic/formic blended acids has the potential for near term implementation in the existing CPC equipment providing rapid throughput improvement. Use of a non-acidic reductant is recommended only if the processing constraints to remove mercury and acidify the sludge acidification are eliminated. The non-acidic reductants (e.g. sugar) will not reduce mercury during CPC processing and sludge acidification would

  11. Dietary sodium reduction in New Zealand: influence of the Tick label.

    PubMed

    Ning, Sherry X; Mainvil, Louise A; Thomson, Rachel K; McLean, Rachel M

    2017-01-01

    The Tick programme of the National Heart Foundation (NHF) is the longest standing voluntary front of pack signpost nutrition logo in New Zealand. It provides a platform for collaboration with the food industry to encourage development of healthier products. This study evaluated the impact of the Tick programme on sodium in processed food. Fifty-two Tick programme products from food categories known to contribute substantially to sodium intake were identified. Sales volumes (kg) from January 2011 to December 2013 were multiplied by changes in sodium content over that time, producing an estimate of programme impact. Five semi-structured interviews with industry representatives were conducted, to look at other influences for sodium reduction, and themes identified through methods of thematic analysis. Over the period, the Tick programme influenced food companies to remove approximately 16 tonnes of salt through the reformulation and formulation of 52 Tick-approved breakfast cereals, edible oil spreads, cooking sauces and processed poultry products. Other factors influencing sodium reduction reported by company representatives included increased consumer and industry interest in healthier product nutrition profiles and other sodium reduction programmes targeting reformulation/formulation. The Tick remains a credible and well-recognized brand and may provide a competitive edge for participating food manufacturers in the current market. The Tick programme is effective in influencing industry to reduce sodium in processed foods in New Zealand. The combined impact of the Tick and other NHF programmes has the potential to reduce population sodium intake and improve health outcomes.

  12. Industrial processes influenced by gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1988-01-01

    In considering new directions for low gravity research with particular regard to broadening the number and types of industrial involvements, it is noted that transport phenomena play a vital role in diverse processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and biotech industries. Relatively little attention has been given to the role of gravity in such processes. Accordingly, numerous industrial processes and phenomena are identified which involve gravity and/or surface tension forces. Phase separations and mixing are examples that will be significantly different in low gravity conditions. A basis is presented for expanding the scope of the low gravity research program and the potential benefits of such research is indicated.

  13. Sludge reduction and performance analysis of a modified sludge reduction process.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Qiao, Weimin; Xing, Can; Wang, Yingjun; Wang, Chunying; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yiru; Wang, Luochun

    2014-01-01

    A modified sludge process reduction activated sludge (SPRAS) technology was developed by inserting a sludge process reduction (SPR) module, composed of an aeration tank and a settler, before the activated sludge system was proposed in this study. Compared with the anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic (AAO) process, the SPRAS resulted in a remarkable decrease in sludge production by 76.6%; sludge decay owing to lengthy solids retention time (about 121.5 d) could be the major cause. During the 217-day operation, the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) (from 54 to -198 mV) and pH (from 7.8 to 5.0) at the bottom of the SPR settler gradually decreased, and low ORP and pH were in favor of sludge reduction in the SPRAS system. The insertion of the SPR module improved the removal efficiencies of suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand and ammonium nitrogen, and total nitrogen concentration in the effluent was reduced from 23.89 ± 4.82 to 14.16 ± 3.98 mg/L by 50% influent bypassing the SPR module. These results indicated that the SPRAS process could produce much less excess sludge and guarantee better effluent quality than the AAO process.

  14. Silica behavior in the alumina carbothermic reduction-chlorination process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fulong; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Haibin; Yu, Qingchun; Xu, Baoqiang; Dai, Yongnian

    2011-08-01

    The behavior of silica was investigated experimentally in an alumina carbothermic reduction process and chlorination process in vacuum. The results showed that, first, SiC was produced by SiO2 and C, and then Al4SiC4 was produced by Al4C3, Al4O4C, C, and SiC during the alumina carbothermic reduction process at about 1,763 K. C, Al3C4 and Al4O4C decreased and Al4SiC4 increased as content of SiO2 increased. The following chlorination process was blocked, and the recovery rate of aluminum decreased quickly compared with that without silica. It was inferred that silica might be unfavorable for aluminum extracted from alumina by carbothermic reductionchlorination process in vacuum at about 1763 K.

  15. Power, Influence Tactics, and Influence Processes in Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boughton, Marla

    2011-01-01

    Current studies of power, influence tactics, and influence processes in virtual teams assume that these constructs operate in a similar manner as they do in the face-to-face (FtF) environment. However, the virtual context differs from the FtF environment on a variety of dimensions, such as the availability of status cues. The differences between…

  16. Power, Influence Tactics, and Influence Processes in Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boughton, Marla

    2011-01-01

    Current studies of power, influence tactics, and influence processes in virtual teams assume that these constructs operate in a similar manner as they do in the face-to-face (FtF) environment. However, the virtual context differs from the FtF environment on a variety of dimensions, such as the availability of status cues. The differences between…

  17. Tannins Influence Soil Chemical Processes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tannins, plant secondary compounds, can affect soil and water quality by interacting with inorganic and organic compounds. However, the fate of tannins and their effect on soil metal cycling dynamics and soil chemical processes is poorly understood. We examined the effects of commercial available ...

  18. Serpentinization processes: Influence of silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Sun, W.; Ding, X.; Song, M.; Zhan, W.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinization systems are highly enriched in molecular hydrogen (H2) and hydrocarbons (e.g. methane, ethane and propane). The production of hydrocarbons results from reactions between H2 and oxidized carbon (carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide), which possibly contribute to climate changes during early history of the Earth. However, the influence of silica on the production of H2 and hydrocarbons was poorly constrained. We performed experiments at 311-500 °C and 3.0 kbar using mechanical mixtures of silica and olivine in ratios ranging from 0 to 40%. Molecular hydrogen (H2), methane, ethane and propane were formed, which were analyzed by gas chromatography. It was found that silica largely decreased H2 production. Without any silica, olivine serpentinization produced 94.5 mmol/kg H2 after 20 days of reaction time. By contrast, with the presence of 20% silica, H2 concentrations decreased largely, 8.5 mmol/kg. However, the influence of silica on the production of hydrocarbons is negligible. Moreover, with the addition of 20%-40% silica, the major hydrous minerals are talc, which was quantified according to an established standard curve calibrated by infrared spectroscopy analyses. It shows that silica greatly enhances olivine hydration, especially at 500 °C. Without any addition of silica, reaction extents were <5% at 17 days during olivine serpentinization at 500 °C and 3.0 kbar. By contrast, with the presence of 50% silica, olivine was completely transformed to talc within 9 days. This study indicates that silica impedes the oxidation of ferrous iron into ferric iron, and that rates of olivine hydration in natural geological settings are much faster with silica supply.

  19. Possibility of Alternaria toxins reduction by extrusion processing of whole wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Janić Hajnal, Elizabet; Čolović, Radmilo; Pezo, Lato; Orčić, Dejan; Vukmirović, Đuro; Mastilović, Jasna

    2016-12-15

    This study represents the first report about possibility of reduction of Alternaria toxins in wheat using the extrusion process. Effects of extrusion processing parameters - moisture content (w=16, 20, 24g/100g), feeding rate (q=15, 20, 25kg/h), and screw speed (v=300, 390, 480rpm), on reduction rate of tenuazonic acid (TeA), alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), in whole wheat flour were investigated. Temperature ranged between 111.1 and 160.8°C, while the absolute pressure was from 0.17 to 0.23MPa. The simultaneous influence of w and v was the most important for TeA reduction (p<0.05), while v and q were the most influential for AOH reduction (p<0.01). Level of AME reduction was mostly influenced by w and v (p<0.10). Optimal parameters for reduction of all three Alternaria toxins were as follows: w=24g/100g, q=25kg/h, v=390rpm, with a reduction of 65.6% for TeA, 87.9% for AOH and 94.5% for AME.

  20. sIPV process development for costs reduction.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2015-08-20

    Polio is expected to be eradicated within only a few years from now. Upon polio eradication, the use of oral polio vaccines, which can cause circulating and virulent vaccine derived polio viruses, will be stopped. From this moment onwards, inactivated polio vaccines (IPV) will be used for worldwide vaccination against polio. An increased demand for IPV is thus anticipated. As a result, process development studies regarding the IPV production process, developed in the 1960s, have intensified. Studies on yield optimization aiming at costs reduction as well as the use of alternative polio viruses, which are more biosafe for manufacturing, are actual. Here our strategy to setup a new IPV production process using attenuated Sabin polio virus strains is presented. Moreover, aspects on reduction of the costs of goods and the impact of process optimization on sIPV costs are reviewed.

  1. Quantitative prediction of reduction in large pipe setting round process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Zhan, Peipei; Ma, Rui; Zhai, Ruixue

    2013-07-01

    The control manner during the process to ensure the quality of pipe products mainly relies on the operator's experience, so it is very necessary to study the setting round process and obtain its spring-back law. The setting round process is shaping an oval section pipe into circular section, so it is difficult to provide a quantificational analysis for its spring-back process because of the curvature inequality of pipe section neutral layer. However, the spring-back law of the circle-oval process can be easily predicted. The experimental method is firstly used to establish the equivalent effect between the setting round process and the circle-oval process. The setting round process can be converted into the circle-oval process. There are two difficulties in the theoretical analysis for the circle-oval process: elastic-plastic bending problem of curved beam; statically indeterminate problem. A quantitative analytic method for the circle-oval process is presented on the basis of combination of the spring-back law of plane curved beam with the element dividing idea in finite element method. The ovality after unloading versus the relative reduction is plotted with analytical and experimental results respectively, which shows a fair agreement. Finally, the method of quantitative prediction of reduction for large pipe setting round is given based on the equivalent effect and the analytical results. Five pipes, which are needed to be set round, are used to carry out experiment so as to verify this method. The results of verification experiment indicates that, in the experimental range, the residual ovality are all under 0.35% after the once only setting round with the theoretical prediction reductions. It is much less than the 1% requirement of pipe standard. Applying the established theoretical analysis is able to correct the pipe ovality with sufficient accuracy, which provides theoretical direction to plant use.

  2. Influence of mixed reductants on the growth rate of WF 6-based W-CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongste, J. F.; Oosterlaken, T. G. M.; Leusink, G. J.; van der Jeugd, C. A.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Radelaar, S.

    1995-10-01

    The influence of adding dichlorosilane (SiH 2Cl 2) or germane (GeH 4) to the SiH 4-based reduction reaction of tungsten-hexafluoride (WF 6) has been investigated in order to enhance the properties of the silane W-CVD process: e.g. selectivity and step-coverage. It is shown that the kinetics of the silane-dichlorosilane process can be characterised by a surface reaction limitation, thus improving the control of the process. For the mixed SiH 4GeH 4 reduction reaction of WF 6 it is shown that the GeH 4 process dominates the reaction kinetics. Also addition of SiH 2Cl 2 to the GeH 4-based reduction of WF 6 has been examined. It is found that in this case the formation of W is only slightly influenced. The reaction kinetics are similar to that of the unmodified deposition process.

  3. Pilot scale treatment of chromite ore processing residue using sodium sulfide in single reduction and coupled reduction/stabilization processes.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Antonio; Ramírez, Martha; Hernández, Sergio; Schmidt, Winfried; Revah, Sergio

    2012-03-15

    Single Cr(VI) reduction and coupled reduction/stabilization (R/S) processes were evaluated at pilot scale to determine their effectiveness to treat chromite ore processing residue (COPR). Sodium sulfide was used as the reducing agent and cement, gypsum and lime were tested as the stabilizing agents. The pilot experiments were performed in a helical ribbon blender mixer with batches of 250 kg of COPR and mixing time up to 30 min. Na2S/Cr(VI) mass ratios of 4.6, 5.7 and 6.8 were evaluated in the single reduction process to treat COPR with Cr(VI) concentration of ≈4.2 g/kg. The R/S process was tested with a Na2S/Cr(VI) mass ratio of 5.7 and including stabilizing agents not exceeding 5% (w/w(COPR)), to treat COPR with a Cr(VI) content of ≈5.1g/kg. The single reduction process with a ratio of 6.8, reached Cr(VI) reduction efficiencies up to 97.6% in the first days, however these values decreased to around 93% after 380 days of storage. At this point the total Cr level was around 12.5 mg/L. Cr(VI) removal efficiencies exceeding 96.5% were reached and maintained during 380 days when the coupled R/S process was evaluated. Total Cr levels lower than 5 mg/l were attained at the initials days in all R/S batch tested, however after 380 days, concentrations below the regulatory limit were only found with gypsum (2%) as single agent and with a blend of cement (4%) and lime (1%). These results indicated that the coupled R/S process is an excellent alternative to stabilize COPR. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrologic processes influencing meadow ecosystems [chapter 4

    Treesearch

    Mark L. Lord; David G. Jewett; Jerry R. Miller; Dru Germanoski; Jeanne C. Chambers

    2011-01-01

    The hydrologic regime exerts primary control on riparian meadow complexes and is strongly influenced by past and present geomorphic processes; biotic processes; and, in some cases, anthropogenic activities. Thus, it is essential to understand not only the hydrologic processes that operate within meadow complexes but also the interactions of meadow hydrology with other...

  5. Influence of Calcium on Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase Uranium (VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming

    2007-06-27

    The effect of calcium on microbial reduction of a solid phase U(VI), sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH ∙1.5H2O), was evaluated in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 7 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased both the rate and extent of Na-boltwoodite dissolution by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) is a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. The overall rates of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) can be described by the coupled rates of dissolution and microbial reduction that were both influenced by calcium. The results demonstrated that dissolved U(VI) concentration during microbial reduction was a complex function of solid phase U(VI) dissolution kinetics, aqueous U(VI) speciation, and microbial activity.

  6. Investigation of reduction process and related impurities in ezetimibe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dengfeng; Su, Jiangtao

    2015-03-25

    During the synthesis of ezetimibe bulk drug, research for the impurities which especially come from the last two steps of synthetic route is of great significance for the quality by design (QbD) concept. The design spaces of last two steps of reduction reaction were established. The critical parameters were discussed under the QbD concept, which have noticeable impact on the impurity profile such as the new process related impurities mentioned in this paper. Three novel reduction process related impurities were prepared by designed synthetic route and co-injected with ezetimibe sample for identification. These novel process related impurities were also detected in different laboratory batches of ezetimibe bulk drug and characterized using MS, (1)H, (13)C, 2D NMR and IR techniques. The synthesis, isolation, identification, structural elucidation and formation of impurities were also discussed in detail.

  7. Potential effect of salt reduction in processed foods on health.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Marieke A H; Hoogenveen, Rudolf T; Hoekstra, Jeljer; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; van Raaij, Joop M A

    2014-03-01

    Excessive salt intake has been associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Reducing salt intake is considered an important public health strategy in the Netherlands. The objective was to evaluate the health benefits of salt-reduction strategies related to processed foods for the Dutch population. Three salt-reduction scenarios were developed: 1) substitution of high-salt foods with low-salt foods, 2) a reduction in the sodium content of processed foods, and 3) adherence to the recommended maximum salt intake of 6 g/d. Health outcomes were obtained in 2 steps: after salt intake was modeled into blood pressure levels, the Chronic Disease Model was used to translate modeled blood pressures into incidences of cardiovascular diseases, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), and life expectancies. Health outcomes of the scenarios were compared with health outcomes obtained with current salt intake. In total, 4.8% of acute myocardial infarction cases, 1.7% of congestive heart failure cases, and 5.8% of stroke cases might be prevented if salt intake meets the recommended maximum intake. The burden of disease might be reduced by 56,400 DALYs, and life expectancy might increase by 0.15 y for a 40-y-old individual. Substitution of foods with comparable low-salt alternatives would lead to slightly higher salt intake reductions and thus to more health gain. The estimates for sodium reduction in processed foods would be slightly lower. Substantial health benefits might be achieved when added salt is removed from processed foods and when consumers choose more low-salt food alternatives.

  8. Recovery of Work-Related Stress: Complaint Reduction and Work-Resumption are Relatively Independent Processes.

    PubMed

    de Vente, Wieke; Kamphuis, Jan Henk; Blonk, Roland W B; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2015-09-01

    The process of recovery from work-related stress, consisting of complaint reduction and work-resumption, is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate predictors of complaint reduction and work-resumption, as well as testing complaint reduction as a mediator in the association between predictors and work-resumption. Seventy-one patients on sickness-leave because of work-related stress complaints were followed over a period of 13 months. Predictors comprised personal (demographics, coping, cognitions), work-related (job-characteristics, social support), and illness-related (complaint duration, absence duration) variables. Dependent variables were distress complaints, burnout complaints, and work-resumption. Complaints reduced considerably over time to borderline clinical levels and work-resumption increased to 68% at 13 months. Predictors of stronger reduction of distress complaints were male gender, less working hours, less decision authority, more co-worker support, and shorter absence duration. Predictors of stronger reduction of burnout complaints were male gender, lower age, high education, less avoidant coping, less decision authority, more job security, and more co-worker support. Predictors of work-resumption were lower age and stronger reduction of burnout complaints. No indication for a mediating role of burnout complaints between the predictor age and work-resumption was found. Complaint reduction and work-resumption are relatively independent processes. Symptom reduction is influenced by individual and work-related characteristics, which holds promise for a multidisciplinary treatment approach for work-related stress.

  9. Regularized Embedded Multiple Kernel Dimensionality Reduction for Mine Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Traditional multiple kernel dimensionality reduction models are generally based on graph embedding and manifold assumption. But such assumption might be invalid for some high-dimensional or sparse data due to the curse of dimensionality, which has a negative influence on the performance of multiple kernel learning. In addition, some models might be ill-posed if the rank of matrices in their objective functions was not high enough. To address these issues, we extend the traditional graph embedding framework and propose a novel regularized embedded multiple kernel dimensionality reduction method. Different from the conventional convex relaxation technique, the proposed algorithm directly takes advantage of a binary search and an alternative optimization scheme to obtain optimal solutions efficiently. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for supervised, unsupervised, and semisupervised scenarios. PMID:27247562

  10. Regularized Embedded Multiple Kernel Dimensionality Reduction for Mine Signal Processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Traditional multiple kernel dimensionality reduction models are generally based on graph embedding and manifold assumption. But such assumption might be invalid for some high-dimensional or sparse data due to the curse of dimensionality, which has a negative influence on the performance of multiple kernel learning. In addition, some models might be ill-posed if the rank of matrices in their objective functions was not high enough. To address these issues, we extend the traditional graph embedding framework and propose a novel regularized embedded multiple kernel dimensionality reduction method. Different from the conventional convex relaxation technique, the proposed algorithm directly takes advantage of a binary search and an alternative optimization scheme to obtain optimal solutions efficiently. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for supervised, unsupervised, and semisupervised scenarios.

  11. Influence of nitrogen doping on oxygen reduction electrocatalysis at carbon nanofiber electrodes.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Stephen; Stevenson, Keith J

    2005-03-17

    Nondoped and nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon nanofiber (CNF) electrodes were prepared via a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using precursors consisting of ferrocene and either xylene or pyridine to control the nitrogen content. Structural and compositional differences between the nondoped and N-doped varieties were assessed using TEM, BET, Raman, TGA, and XPS. Electrochemical methods were used to study the influence of nitrogen doping on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The N-doped CNF electrodes demonstrate significant catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction in aqueous KNO(3) solutions at neutral to basic pH. Electrochemical data are presented which indicate that the ORR proceeds by the peroxide pathway via two successive two-electron reductions. However, for N-doped CNF electrodes, the reduction process can be treated as a catalytic regenerative process where the intermediate hydroperoxide (HO(2)(-)) is chemically decomposed to regenerate oxygen, 2HO(2)(-) <==> O(2) + 2OH(-). The proposed electrocatalysis mechanisms for ORR at both nondoped and N-doped varieties are supported by electrochemical simulations and by measured difference in hydroperoxide decomposition rate constants. Remarkably, approximately 100 fold enhancement for hydroperoxide decomposition is observed for N-doped CNFs, with rates comparable to the best known peroxide decomposition catalysts. Collectively the data indicate that exposed edge plane defects and nitrogen doping are important factors for influencing adsorption of reactive intermediates (i.e., superoxide, hydroperoxide) and for enhancing electrocatalysis for the ORR at nanostructured carbon electrodes.

  12. Defect reduction methodologies for damascene interconnect process development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumanich, Andrew; Cai, Man-Ping

    1999-08-01

    A critical aspect of interconnect process development is identifying and eliminating yield impacting defects. A methodology is described which has been implemented at Applied Materials to utilize wafer metrology tools to drive process development for advanced interconnect fabrication. The methodology is based on a patterned wafer inspection tool, the WF736Duo, combined with a high throughput defect- review SEM with automatic defect classification, the SEMVision. This combination is tools facilitates defect sourcing and elimination. The requirements for defect reduction are increased since defects can result from both the levels and the interaction between levels. A full-flow Cu damascene interconnect process is examined from oxide deposition to final electrical test to establish inspection strategies for defect reduction. The inspection points for optimal defect reduction are identified based on e-test determination of yield limiting defects. The WF736 was utilized to capture a wide range of defects at the various processing steps. The progression of the defects is tracked to the final e-test point. This tracking both establishes the key defect types and facilitates defect sourcing. Further, the unique ability of the WF736 to segregate defects during the inspection with no loss in throughput, along with the SEMVision ADC analysis, allowed for faster defect sourcing.

  13. The Influence of Articular Cartilage Thickness Reduction on Meniscus Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Witkowski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the biomechanical interaction between meniscus and cartilage in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Methods The finite element method was used to simulate knee joint contact mechanics. Three knee models were created on the basis of knee geometry from the Open Knee project. We reduced the thickness of medial cartilages in the intact knee model by approximately 50% to obtain a medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) model. Two variants of medial knee OA model with congruent and incongruent contact surfaces were analysed to investigate the influence of congruency. A nonlinear static analysis for one compressive load case was performed. The focus of the study was the influence of cartilage degeneration on meniscal extrusion and the values of the contact forces and contact areas. Results In the model with incongruent contact surfaces, we observed maximal compressive stress on the tibial plateau. In this model, the value of medial meniscus external shift was 95.3% greater, while the contact area between the tibial cartilage and medial meniscus was 50% lower than in the congruent contact surfaces model. After the non-uniform reduction of cartilage thickness, the medial meniscus carried only 48.4% of load in the medial compartment in comparison to 71.2% in the healthy knee model. Conclusions We have shown that the change in articular cartilage geometry may significantly reduce the role of meniscus in load transmission and the contact area between the meniscus and cartilage. Additionally, medial knee OA may increase the risk of meniscal extrusion in the medial compartment of the knee joint. PMID:27936066

  14. Phase Evolution During the Carbothermic Reduction Process of Ilmenite Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2014-09-01

    The phase evolution during the carbothermic reduction process of Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate was investigated under argon atmosphere. The Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate briquette with graphite powder was reduced at 1473 K, 1573 K, 1673 K, and 1773 K (1200 °C, 1300 °C, 1400 °C, and 1500 °C) respectively, with the molar ratios of C to FeTiO3 being 4:1 and 5:1. The phase transformation of the briquette reduced at different temperatures was investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. During the carbothermic reduction process from 1473 K to 1773 K (1200 °C to 1500 °C), it was found that main phases were Fe, Ti3O5, Ti2O3, and TiC x O y . The lowest temperature for the generation of TiC x O y was 1573 K (1300 °C) for both kinds of briquettes with different C contents. The rate controlling step for the carbothermic reduction above 1573 K (1300 °C) obeyed the diffusion model. The reduction degree of the ilmenite was increased by increasing the temperature. With the increase of reaction temperature and reaction time, TiC x O y phase would be reduced to TiC phase.

  15. Phase Evolution During the Carbothermic Reduction Process of Ilmenite Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2015-02-01

    The phase evolution during the carbothermic reduction process of Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate was investigated under argon atmosphere. The Panzhihua ilmenite concentrate briquette with graphite powder was reduced at 1473 K, 1573 K, 1673 K, and 1773 K (1200 °C, 1300 °C, 1400 °C, and 1500 °C) respectively, with the molar ratios of C to FeTiO3 being 4:1 and 5:1. The phase transformation of the briquette reduced at different temperatures was investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. During the carbothermic reduction process from 1473 K to 1773 K (1200 °C to 1500 °C), it was found that main phases were Fe, Ti3O5, Ti2O3, and TiC x O y . The lowest temperature for the generation of TiC x O y was 1573 K (1300 °C) for both kinds of briquettes with different C contents. The rate controlling step for the carbothermic reduction above 1573 K (1300 °C) obeyed the diffusion model. The reduction degree of the ilmenite was increased by increasing the temperature. With the increase of reaction temperature and reaction time, TiC x O y phase would be reduced to TiC phase.

  16. A dynamic proof of mercury elimination from solution through a combined sorption-reduction process.

    PubMed

    Carro, Leticia; Anagnostopoulos, Vasilis; Lodeiro, Pablo; Barriada, José L; Herrero, Roberto; Sastre de Vicente, Manuel E

    2010-12-01

    Physico-chemical factors affecting mercury elimination from solution using fern as sorbent have been analysed. It was demonstrated that interaction of mercury with this biomass follows two processes, adsorption by the functional groups in the biopolymers of the cell wall and reduction by easily oxidized compounds of the biomass. Batch experiments have been done to analyse the effect of pH, ionic strength of the media or competition with other metals. Ionic strength did not show a significant influence in the process, but mercury speciation with the formation of negatively charge complexes represented an important drawback in metal elimination. Continuous flow conditions were also analysed since many industrial applications will require them. These studies allowed distinguishing the two processes: mercury sorption was observed but also reduction of this metal occurs. Reduction to mercury (I) and metallic mercury has been confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis of the column filling after the continuous flow experiments.

  17. Treatment of oxide spent fuel using the lithium reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, E.J.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.

    1996-05-01

    The wide variety in the composition of DOE spent nuclear fuel complicates its long-term disposition because of the potential requirement to individually qualify each type of fuel for repository disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed the electrometallurgical treatment technique to convert all of these spent fuel types into a single set of disposal forms, simplifying the qualification process. While metallic fuels can be directly processed using the electrometallurgical treatment technique, oxide fuels must first be reduced to the metallic form. The lithium reduction process accomplishes this pretreatment. In the lithium process the oxide components of the fuel are reduced using lithium at 650 C in the presence of molten LiCl, yielding the corresponding metals and Li{sub 2}O. The reduced metal components are then separated from the LiCl salt phase and become the feed material for electrometallurgical treatment. A demonstration test of the lithium reduction process was successfully conducted using a 10-kg batch of simulated oxide spent fuel and engineering-scale equipment specifically constructed for that purpose. This paper describes the lithium process, the equipment used in the demonstration test, and the results of the demonstration test.

  18. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.; Sprague, B.N.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of the concentration of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. The process comprises introducing a treatment agent which comprises a composition selected from the group consisting of NH/sub 4/-lignosulfonate, calcium lignosulfonate, 2-furoic acid, 1,3 dioxolane, tetrahydrofuran, furfurylamine, furfurylalcohol, gluconic acid, citric acid, n-butyl acetate, 1,3 butylene glycol, methylal, tetrahydrofuryl alcohol, furan, fish oil, coumalic acid, furfuryl acetate, tetrahydrofuran 2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid, tetrahydrofurylamine, furylacrylic acid, tetrahydropyran, 2,5-furandimethanol, mannitol, hexamethylenediamine, barbituric acid, acetic anhydride, oxalic acid, mucic acid and d-galactose.

  19. Watershed scale influence of pesticide reduction practices on pesticides and fishes within channelized agricultural headwater streams

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Implementation of pesticide reduction practices to reduce pesticide usage within agricultural watersheds has the potential to reduce pesticide concentrations within agricultural streams. The watershed scale influence of pesticide reduction practices on pesticides and the biota within agricultural he...

  20. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Alexandre F.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  1. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes

    PubMed Central

    Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Reinitz, John

    2015-01-01

    Here we characterize the low noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: there exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction. PMID:25768447

  2. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexandre F; Hornos, José Eduardo M; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  3. [Electrochemical reduction characteristics of nitro-benzene compounds at the copper electrode and the influence of pH on reduction].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-ying; Fan, Jin-hong; Gao, Ting-yao

    2005-03-01

    The electrochemical reduction characteristics of nitro-benzene compounds were investigated using cyclic voltammetry technique. The reductive reactivity of the nitro-benzene compounds at the copper electrode was evaluated, the reduction mechanisms of the nitrobenzene compounds at the copper electrode and the influences of pH on them were also discussed in this paper. The experimental results show that nitro-benzene compounds is capable of reducing directly at the copper electrode, and the reduction peaks were at - 0.58V and - 1.32V or so (vs. SCE). Both acidity and basicity favor reduction of nitro-group at the copper electrode: the elimination reaction is easy to occur in the alkaline medium with the formation of nitroso-group; in the acid medium the probability of the reaction between the obtained electrons nitro group and hydrogen ions raises, which causes magnification of the current through the solution; in addition, the growth of hydrogen atoms in number favors the occurring of the addition and substitution reactions at the electrode. pH strongly influenced the electrochemical reduction characteristics of the nitrobenzene compounds at the copper electrode, and it mainly depends on the properties of the substituents on the benzene ring, their configurations and numbers, and their location versus nitro group on the benzene ring. The results provide a theoretical and experimental basis for investigating the reduction mechanisms by the catalyzed iron inner electrolysis process.

  4. The Influence of Emotions on Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, Lars-Olof; Sjoberg, Lennart

    1978-01-01

    This report on the influence of emotional factors on cognitive processes and their importance to the design of man-machine systems intended to function under conditions of threat reviews the literature on stress and human performance, coping strategies, emotion theory, and individual differences in response to stress. A framework for relating…

  5. The relative importance of microbial nitrate reduction processes in an agriculturally-impacted estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Francis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Human activities are increasing reactive nitrogen levels worldwide. Reactive nitrogen exists largely as nitrate and may be ecologically harmful to nutrient-limited systems. Nitrate loadings to the environment may be transformed by the microbial nitrate reduction processes of denitrification (converting nitrate to dinitrogen gas), or of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) (allowing reactive nitrogen to persist). The predominant nitrate reduction pathway largely determines the nitrogen removal capacity of the estuary. Therefore, identifying the relative importance of denitrification and DNRA in a given system provides insight into how much nitrate is transformed to dinitrogen and ammonium. Estuary sediments often have high nitrate reduction rates, but the environmental factors that determine which process prevails are underexplored. Nitrate availability and salinity are thought to influence which nitrate reduction process predominates. Elkhorn Slough is a small California estuary that experiences a range of nitrate concentrations (0 to over 2,000 μM) and salinities (0 to 33.5) depending on the agricultural runoff introduced through the Old Salinas River and the tidal influence. This study investigates how the fluctuating nutrient and salinity conditions found over the diel cycle at the interface of the Old Salinas River and Elkhorn Slough influences the nitrogen transformation rates observed. Benthic denitrification and DNRA are evaluated using whole sediment core incubations amended with an overlying 15NO3- labeled pool. Rates of denitrification and DNRA in the sediment are calculated using the isotope pairing technique. The results of this research will help elucidate the relative importance of dissimilatory nitrate removal pathways in an agriculturally-impacted estuary and ultimately reveal whether anthropogenic nitrate inputs are preserved or removed from the system.

  6. Influence of Dynamical Conditions on the Reduction of UVI at the Magnetite-Solution Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Boily, Jean F.; Buck, Edgar C.; Skomurski, Frances N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Bargar, John R.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2010-01-14

    The heterogeneous reduction of UVI to UIV by ferrous iron is a potentially key process influencing the fate and transport of U in the environment. The reactivity of both sorbed and structural FeII has been studied for numerous substrates, including magnetite. The results from UVI-magnetite experiments have been variable, ranging from no reduction to clear evidence for the formation of UIV. In this contribution, we used XAS and high resolution (+cryogenic) XPS to study the interaction of UVI with nano-particulate magnetite. The results indicated that UVI was partially reduced to UV with no evidence of UIV. However, thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed-valence U phases with average oxidation states below (V) should have been stable, indicating that the system was not in redox equilibrium. A reaction pathway that involves incorporation of U and stabilization of UV and UVI in secondary phases is invoked to explain the observations.

  7. The influence of Kinesiology Taping on the reduction of lymphoedema among women after mastectomy - preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pop, Teresa Bronisława; Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Tymczak, Monika; Hałas, Ireneusz; Banaś, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Kinesiology Taping is a method that assists healing processes and improves the physical efficiency. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of Kinesiology Taping on the lymphoedema reduction among women after mastectomy. The subject of the research included 44 women underwent single mastectomy along with the removal of lymph nodes. The examination was carried out from the 4(th) of January to the 4(th) of February, 2013. The traditional taping method was implemented among 22 women, whereas the own taping method was used among the other 22 women. The therapy took 21 days, during which the tapes were applied three times every 7 days. The measurements were made before every application and at the end of the therapy. In the study, a questionnaire was used and it included questions concerning basic demographic, epidemiological data as well as the evaluation of the therapy effectiveness. The linear measurements of the upper limbs, the measurements of the range of joints' motion in the upper limb were taken as well as grip strength was made. The reduction of the volume of lymphoedema of 55% was reported in the study group, whereas the oedema reduced by 27% in the clinical control one. In the reduction of lymphoedema, the greater effectiveness of the own taping method in comparison to the traditional one was reported. Kinesiology Taping exerted an influence on the improvement of the upper limb's joints movability and the grip strength.

  8. Influence of calorie reduction on DNA repair capacity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Gebhard, Daniel; Bergemann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restrictive feeding prolongs the lifespan of a variety of model organisms like rodents and invertebrates. It has been shown that caloric restriction reduces age-related as well as overall-mortality, reduces oxidative stress and influences DNA repair ability positively. There are numerous studies underlining this, but fewer studies involving humans exist. To contribute to a better understanding of the correlation of calorie reduction and DNA repair in humans, we adapted the host cell reactivation assay to an application with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, we used this reliable and reproducible assay to research the influence of a special kind of calorie reduction, namely F. X. Mayr therapy, on DNA repair capacity. We found a positive effect in all persons with low pre-existing DNA repair capacity. In individuals with normal pre-existing DNA repair capacity, no effect on DNA repair capacity was detectable. Decline of DNA repair, accumulation of oxidative DNA damages, mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere shortening as well as caloric intake are widely thought to contribute to aging. With regard to that, our results can be considered as a strong indication that calorie reduction may support DNA repair processes and thus contribute to a healthier aging.

  9. The Reduction of Lunar Regolith by Carbothermal Processing Using Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Hegde, U.; Gokoglu, S.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of lunar regolith for the production of oxygen is a key component of the In-Situ Resource Utilization plans Currently being developed by NASA. In the carbothermal process, a portion of the surface of the regolith in a container is heated by exposure to a heat source so that a small zone of molten regolith is established. A continuous flow of methane is maintained over the molten regolith zone. In this paper, we discuss the development of a chemical conversion model of the carbothermal process to predict the rate of production of carbon monoxide. Our model is based on a mechanism where methane pyrolyzes when it comes in contact with the surface of the hot molten regolith to form solid carbon and hydrogen gas. Carbon is deposited on the surface of the melt, and hydrogen is released into the gas stream above the melt surface. We assume that the deposited carbon mixes in the molten regolith and reacts with metal oxides in a reduction reaction by which gaseous carbon monoxide is liberated. Carbon monoxide bubbles through the melt and is released into the gas stream. It is further processed downstream to ultimately produce oxygen.

  10. The Reduction of Lunar Regolith by Carbothermal Processing Using Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Hegde, U.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of lunar regolith for the production of oxygen is a key component of the In-Situ Resource Utilization plans currently being developed by NASA. In the carbothermal process, a portion of the surface of the regolith in a container is heated by exposure to a heat source so that a small zone of molten regolith is established. A continuous flow of methane is maintained over the molten regolith zone. In this paper, we discuss the development of a chemical conversion model of the carbothermal process to predict the rate of production of carbon monoxide. Our model is based on a mechanism where methane pyrolyzes when it comes in contact with the surface of the hot molten regolith to form solid carbon and hydrogen gas. Carbon is deposited on the surface of the melt, and hydrogen is released into the gas stream above the melt surface. We assume that the deposited carbon mixes in the molten regolith and reacts with metal oxides in a reduction reaction by which gaseous carbon monoxide is liberated. Carbon monoxide bubbles through the melt and is released into the gas stream. It is further processed downstream to ultimately produce oxygen.

  11. Virus Reduction during Advanced Bardenpho and Conventional Wastewater Treatment Processes.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Bradley W; Kitajima, Masaaki; Campillo, Maria E; Gerba, Charles P; Pepper, Ian L

    2016-09-06

    The present study investigated wastewater treatment for the removal of 11 different virus types (pepper mild mottle virus; Aichi virus; genogroup I, II, and IV noroviruses; enterovirus; sapovirus; group-A rotavirus; adenovirus; and JC and BK polyomaviruses) by two wastewater treatment facilities utilizing advanced Bardenpho technology and compared the results with conventional treatment processes. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing full-scale treatment processes that all received sewage influent from the same region. The incidence of viruses in wastewater was assessed with respect to absolute abundance, occurrence, and reduction in monthly samples collected throughout a 12 month period in southern Arizona. Samples were concentrated via an electronegative filter method and quantified using TaqMan-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results suggest that Plant D, utilizing an advanced Bardenpho process as secondary treatment, effectively reduced pathogenic viruses better than facilities using conventional processes. However, the absence of cell-culture assays did not allow an accurate assessment of infective viruses. On the basis of these data, the Aichi virus is suggested as a conservative viral marker for adequate wastewater treatment, as it most often showed the best correlation coefficients to viral pathogens, was always detected at higher concentrations, and may overestimate the potential virus risk.

  12. Evaluating simultaneous chromate and nitrate reduction during microbial denitrification processes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Chen, Xueming; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification and heterotrophic denitrification have been demonstrated to be promising technological processes for simultaneous removal of nitrate NO3(-) and chromate (Cr (VI)), two common contaminants in surface and ground waters. In this work, a mathematical model was developed to describe and evaluate the microbial and substrate interactions among sulfur oxidizing denitrifying organism, methanol-based heterotrophic denitrifiers and chromate reducing bacteria in the biofilm systems for simultaneous nitrate and chromate removal. The concomitant multiple chromate reduction pathways by these microbes were taken into account in this model. The validity of the model was tested using experimental data from three independent biofilm reactors under autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. The model sufficiently described the nitrate, chromate, methanol, and sulfate dynamics under varying conditions. The modeling results demonstrated the coexistence of sulfur-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria and heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria in the biofilm under mixotrophic conditions, with chromate reducing bacteria being outcompeted. The sulfur-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria substantially contributed to both nitrate and chromate reductions although heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria dominated in the biofilm. The mixotrophic denitrification could improve the tolerance of autotrophic denitrifying bacteria to Cr (VI) toxicity. Furthermore, HRT would play an important role in affecting the microbial distribution and system performance, with HRT of higher than 0.15 day being critical for a high level removal of nitrate and chromate (over 90%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of collisional dephasing processes on superfluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Jeffery J.; Malcuit, Michelle S.; Raymer, Michael G.; Boyd, Robert W.; Drummond, Peter D.

    1989-11-01

    We present a quantum-mechanical treatment of the influence of collisional dephasing processes on the statistical properties of superfluorescence (SF). The theory, which treats nonlinear propagation effects as well as quantum noise, shows how the nature of the cooperative emission process changes from that of SF to that of amplified spontaneous emission as the collisional dephasing rate is varied. The predictions of how the SF delay time varies with the collisional dephasing rate are in good agreement with the results of a recent experiment [M. S. Malcuit, J. J. Maki, D. J. Simkin, and R. W. Boyd, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1189 (1987)].

  14. Reductive stripping process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Fred J.; Crouse, David J.

    1984-01-01

    A reductive stripping flow sheet for recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is described. Uranium is stripped from a uranium-loaded organic phase by a redox reaction converting the uranyl to uranous ion. The uranous ion is reoxidized to the uranyl oxidation state to form an aqueous feed solution highly concentrated in uranium. Processing of this feed through a second solvent extraction cycle requires far less stripping reagent as compared to a flow sheet which does not include the reductive stripping reaction.

  15. Multistep processing and stress reduction in CVD diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijhawan, Sumit

    A serious impediment in the utility of diamond films is the large internal stresses that develop during growth. These stresses generally have thermal and growth components. The thermal component is determined by the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of film and substrate while the growth component may arise from several possible mechanisms during CVD growth. These growth stresses tend to be particularly large in diamond. The objective of this work is to understand and reduce the growth stresses in diamond films by tailoring the CVD process. Continuous, polycrystalline diamond films were deposited on Si by microwave plasma-assisted CVD. Very high internal stresses (>2 GPA) consisting of growth and thermal components were observed. The growth component is tensile and increases with growth time. We were able to reduce the evolution of growth stresses considerably by multistep processing of our films. An intermediate annealing step was included between successive growth periods. It is important to note that the annealing step must be conducted at key points during the growth process in order to effectively reduce stress. Maximum reduction in stress is achieved only if the sample is annealed when the diamond grains are partially coalesced (after 2--3 hours of growth). Annealing of continuous films does not produce a significant reduction in stress. The origin of growth stress in our films is attributed to non-equilibrated initial atomic positions during impingement and the successive relaxations to minimize interfacial energies. The film quality was monitored using Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Based on our experimental results and analyses, it is hypothesized that rearrangements of strained boundary structures during the anneal can lower the interfacial energy change during subsequent growth and produce less stress. Multistep processing was also used to enhance diamond nucleation on Ni. An annealing pretreatment step, that consists of saturating

  16. Influence of degassing on hot-melt extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saad M; Morott, Joseph T; Alshetaili, Abdullah S; Tiwari, Roshan V; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Repka, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of degassing on an extrusion process, with respect to extrudate quality and drug release properties. Processed formulations were extruded with and without a degassing vent port at various locations along the barrel. All the experiments were performed under constant processing temperature, feeding rate, and screw speed. During the extrusion process, torque and pressure were monitored and recorded. The degassing process was beneficial when used over a conveying section after a mixing section. This is attributed to the large surface area available on the conveying elements, which minimizes the internal volume of the processed material, thereby facilitating the escape of entrapped gases. Degassing enhanced the homogeneity, physical appearance, and drug release properties of all the formulations. Furthermore, the degassing process also enhanced the cross-sectional uniformity of the extruded material, which is beneficial for visual monitoring during processing. Degassing considerably reduced the post-extrusion moisture content of Formula D3, which contains the highly hygroscopic polymer Kollidon® 17 PF, suggesting that the greatest influence of this process is on hygroscopic materials. The reduction in post-extrusion moisture content resulting from the inclusion of a degassing vent port, reduced fluctuations in the values of in-line monitoring parameters such as pressure and torque. Employing a degassing unit during hot-melt extrusion processing could help increase process efficacy and product quality.

  17. Key factors influencing rates of heterotrophic sulfate reduction in hydrothermal massive sulfide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K. L.; Rogers, D.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Despite sulfate reduction's ubiquity in marine systems, relatively little is known about how environmental or ecological factors influence rates of sulfate reduction. While numerous studies have considered how sulfate reduction and methanogenesis compete for reductants in natural and human-made systems, less is known about how temperature or metabolite concentration, such as sulfate and sulfide concentrations, affects rates of sulfate reduction. Here we use a factorial experimental design to evaluate the effects of key variables on sulfate reduction kinetics in sulfide deposits recovered from hydrothermal vents in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca ridge. Microbial sulfate reduction rates were measured by 35-S tracer techniques over a range of environmentally relevant chemical conditions (pH, H2S, SO42-, and organic carbon concentrations) and temperatures (4, 50 and 90°C). Maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C, and sulfate reduction rates had significant positive correlations with increasing sulfide, pH and sulfate. However, sulfate reduction rates did not correlate to exogenous dissolved organic carbon, implicating exogenous hydrogen or endogenous organic matter as the reductant (or even sulfur disproportionation). This research presents an opportunity to better understand the key variables that influence the rates of microbial sulfate reduction in hydrothermal environments and provides a framework for modeling sulfate reduction in mid-ocean ridge systems.

  18. Cystic gene dosage influences kidney lesions after nephron reduction.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, Stéphanie; Viau, Amandine; Burtin, Martine; El-Karoui, Khalil; Cnops, Yvette; Terryn, Sara; Debaix, Huguette; Bérissi, Sophie; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Devuyst, Olivier; Terzi, Fabiola

    2015-01-01

    Cystic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive development of multiple fluid-filled cysts. Cysts can be acquired, or they may appear during development or in postnatal life due to specific gene defects and lead to renal failure. The most frequent form of this disease is the inherited polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Experimental models of PKD showed that an increase of cellular proliferation and apoptosis as well as defects in apico-basal and planar cell polarity or cilia play a critical role in cyst development. However, little is known about the mechanisms and the mediators involved in acquired cystic kidney diseases (ACKD). In this study, we used the nephron reduction as a model to study the mechanisms underlying cyst development in ACKD. We found that tubular dilations after nephron reduction recapitulated most of the morphological features of ACKD. The development of tubular dilations was associated with a dramatic increase of cell proliferation. In contrast, the apico-basal polarity and cilia did not seem to be affected. Interestingly, polycystin 1 and fibrocystin were markedly increased and polycystin 2 was decreased in cells lining the dilated tubules, whereas the expression of several other cystic genes did not change. More importantly, Pkd1 haploinsufficiency accelerated the development of tubular dilations after nephron reduction, a phenotype that was associated to a further increase of cell proliferation. These data were relevant to humans ACKD, as cystic genes expression and the rate of cell proliferation were also increased. In conclusion, our study suggests that the nephron reduction can be considered a suitable model to study ACKD and that dosage of genes involved in PKD is also important in ACKD.

  19. Lead removal and toxicity reduction from industrial wastewater through biological sulfate reduction process.

    PubMed

    Teekayuttasakul, Paphungkorn; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2008-10-01

    The practicability of lead removal from sulfate-rich wastewater through biological sulfate reduction process with hydrogen as electron donor was investigated. Sulfide, which was converted from sulfate by a sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in a gas-lift reactor, was used to remove lead as lead sulfide precipitate. Furthermore, the toxicity of wastewater in terms of whole effluent toxicity (WET) before and after treatment was analyzed by using Microtox analyzer. The experiment was divided into three stages as follows: Stage I, startup and operation of sulfidogenic process fed with synthetic wastewater in a gas-lift reactor; Stage II, operation of sulfidogenic process fed with real wastewater in the same reactor and analysis of toxicity; and Stage III, separation of lead from wastewater. In stage I, the volumetric sulfate-sulfur loading rate was gradually increased from 1.0 g/L.d until no improvement of sulfide-sulfur production efficiency was evident at 2.58 g/L.d and maximum sulfide-sulfur concentration was set to 340 mg/L. In stage II, the results showed that the laboratory scale reactor could treat a real wastewater without inhibition or any remarkable problem. The produced sulfide-sulfur, 200 mg/L, was a little less in comparison with that of the previous stage. It could be due to the higher concentration of total dissolved solid (TDS). However, the sulfate concentration was still reduced by approximately 30%. The WET test by Microtox showed that toxicity was reduced more than 13 times. In stage III, the effluent from the reactor containing sulfide-sulfur of about 200 mg/L and lead-containing solution of 20 mg/L were fed with sulfide to lead ratio 3 moles: 1 mole into the precipitation chamber in which the optimum pH for lead sulfide precipitation of 8.0 was maintained. It was found that lead removal of 99% was attained.

  20. Identifying the influential aquifer heterogeneity factor on nitrate reduction processes by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, E.; He, W.; Savoy, H.; Dietrich, P.; Kolditz, O.; Rubin, Y.; Schüth, C.; Kalbacher, T.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate reduction reactions in groundwater systems are strongly influenced by various aquifer heterogeneity factors that affect the transport of chemical species, spatial distribution of redox reactive substances and, as a result, the overall nitrate reduction efficiency. In this study, we investigated the influence of physical and chemical aquifer heterogeneity, with a focus on nitrate transport and redox transformation processes. A numerical modeling study for simulating coupled hydrological-geochemical aquifer heterogeneity was conducted in order to improve our understanding of the influence of the aquifer heterogeneity on the nitrate reduction reactions and to identify the most influential aquifer heterogeneity factors throughout the simulation. Results show that the most influential aquifer heterogeneity factors could change over time. With abundant presence of electron donors in the high permeable zones (initial stage), physical aquifer heterogeneity significantly influences the nitrate reduction since it enables the preferential transport of nitrate to these zones and enhances mixing of reactive partners. Chemical aquifer heterogeneity plays a comparatively minor role. Increasing the spatial variability of the hydraulic conductivity also increases the nitrate removal efficiency of the system. However, ignoring chemical aquifer heterogeneity can lead to an underestimation of nitrate removals in long-term behavior. With the increase of the spatial variability of the electron donor, i.e. chemical heterogeneity, the number of the "hot spots" i.e. zones with comparably higher reactivity, should also increase. Hence, nitrate removal efficiencies will also be spatially variable but overall removal efficiency will be sustained if longer time scales are considered and nitrate fronts reach these high reactivity zones.

  1. Impacts of natural organic matter on perchlorate removal by an advanced reduction process.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuhang; Batchelor, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate can be destroyed by Advanced Reduction Processes (ARPs) that combine chemical reductants (e.g., sulfite) with activating methods (e.g., UV light) in order to produce highly reactive reducing free radicals that are capable of rapid and effective perchlorate reduction. However, natural organic matter (NOM) exists widely in the environment and has the potential to influence perchlorate reduction by ARPs that use UV light as the activating method. Batch experiments were conducted to obtain data on the impacts of NOM and wavelength of light on destruction of perchlorate by the ARPs that use sulfite activated by UV light produced by low-pressure mercury lamps (UV-L) or by KrCl excimer lamps (UV-KrCl). The results indicate that NOM strongly inhibits perchlorate removal by both ARP, because it competes with sulfite for UV light. Even though the absorbance of sulfite is much higher at 222 nm than that at 254 nm, the results indicate that a smaller amount of perchlorate was removed with the UV-KrCl lamp (222 nm) than with the UV-L lamp (254 nm). The results of this study will help to develop the proper way to apply the ARPs as practical water treatment processes.

  2. Modeling Air Pollution in Beijing: Emission Reduction vs. Meteorological Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risse, Eicke-Alexander; Hao, Nan; Trautmann, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    This case study uses the Chemical Transport Model WRF-Chem to simulate and measure the efficiency of temporal large-scale emission reductions under different meteorological conditions. The Nov. 2014 Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit provides a unique opportunity for this study due to the extraordinarily good and well-measured air quality which is believed to be induced by intense emission- reduction measures by the Chinese government. Four cases are simulated to inter-compare between favorable und unfavorablemeteorological conditions (in terms of air quality) as well as reduced and non-reduced emissions. Key variables of the simulation results are evaluated against AERONET measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and air-quality measurements by the Chinese Ministry of Environment (CME). The inter-comparison is then performed on time- and volume-averaged total concentrations of the key variables Nitrogenous Oxide (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10).The simulation settings and some important facts about the model are shown in table 1.

  3. Influence of model order reduction methods on dynamical-optical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Störkle, Johannes; Eberhard, Peter

    2017-04-01

    In this work, the influence of model order reduction (MOR) methods on optical aberrations is analyzed within a dynamical-optical simulation of a high precision optomechanical system. Therefore, an integrated modeling process and new methods have to be introduced for the computation and investigation of the overall dynamical-optical behavior. For instance, this optical system can be a telescope optic or a lithographic objective. In order to derive a simplified mechanical model for transient time simulations with low computational cost, the method of elastic multibody systems in combination with MOR methods can be used. For this, software tools and interfaces are defined and created. Furthermore, mechanical and optical simulation models are derived and implemented. With these, on the one hand, the mechanical sensitivity can be investigated for arbitrary external excitations and on the other hand, the related optical behavior can be predicted. In order to clarify these methods, academic examples are chosen and the influences of the MOR methods and simulation strategies are analyzed. Finally, the systems are investigated with respect to the mechanical-optical frequency responses, and in conclusion, some recommendations for the application of reduction methods are given.

  4. [Influence of light wavelength and intensity on the reduction of divalent mercury in aquatic system].

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Jia; Zhong, Zi-Xuan; Sun, Rong-Guo; Yang, Kun; Wang, Ding-Yong

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the photo-reduction of HgCI2, under various light wavelengths and intensities. The whole process was tracked by changing Hg0 concentrations in argon and Hg0 flux was calculated for qualitative and quantitative analysis; the rate order was determined by both differential and integral methods. The principal results indicated: Higher mercury emission flux was observed under shorter light wavelength and stronger intensity, which shows the important role of photoenergy in the reaction. The degree of mercury reduction was determined by radiation wavelength and intensity, and it was also influenced by solution volume and the flow rate of carrier gas. Under different light conditions, Hg0 concentrations in argon all increased at the beginning and decreased after a specific time period, since the main reactions in rising period were the photo-reduction of Hg2+ and the emission of Hg0 while the reaction in decreasing period was the emission of Hg0 only. The rate order under visible light was the first order while it was the second order under UVA and UVB, which attributes to the fact that coordination complex has certain light absorption band, which is related with the available light wavelength provided by experimental lamps.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Reduction Post-Processing Sub-System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Greenwood, Zachary; Barton, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) facilitates the recovery of oxygen from metabolic CO2. The CRA utilizes the Sabatier process to produce water with methane as a byproduct. The methane is currently vented overboard as a waste product. Because the CRA relies on hydrogen for oxygen recovery, the loss of methane ultimately results in a loss of oxygen. For missions beyond low earth orbit, it will prove essential to maximize oxygen recovery. For this purpose, NASA is exploring an integrated post-processor system to recover hydrogen from CRA methane. The post-processor, called a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) partially pyrolyzes methane to recover hydrogen with acetylene as a byproduct. In-flight operation of post-processor will require a Methane Purification Assembly (MePA) and an Acetylene Separation Assembly (ASepA). Recent efforts have focused on the design, fabrication, and testing of these components. The results and conclusions of these efforts will be discussed as well as future plans.

  6. Digital Image Processing for Noise Reduction in Medical Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupas, Thanasis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The purpose of this project was to investigate the application of digital image processing techniques as a means of reducing noise in medical ultrasonic imaging. Ultrasonic images suffer primarily from a type of acoustic noise, known as speckle, which is generally regarded as a major source of image quality degradation. The origin of speckle, its statistical properties as well as methods suggested to eliminate this artifact were reviewed. A simple model which can characterize the statistics of speckle on displays was also developed. A large number of digital noise reduction techniques was investigated. These include frame averaging techniques performed by commercially available devices and spatial filters implemented in software. Among the latter, some filters have been proposed in the scientific literature for ultrasonic, laser and microwave speckle or general noise suppression and the rest are original, developed specifically to suppress ultrasonic speckle. Particular emphasis was placed on adaptive techniques which adjust the processing performed at each point according to the local image content. In this way, they manage to suppress speckle with negligible loss of genuine image detail. Apart from preserving the diagnostically significant features of a scan another requirement a technique must satisfy before it is accepted in routine clinical practice is real-time operation. A spatial filter capable of satisfying both these requirements was designed and built in hardware using low-cost and readily available components. The possibility of incorporating all the necessary filter circuitry into a single VLSI chip was also investigated. In order to establish the effectiveness and usefulness of speckle suppression, a representative sample from the techniques examined here was applied to a large number of abdominal scans and their effect on image quality was evaluated. Finally, further

  7. Do lipids influence the allergic sensitization process?

    PubMed Central

    Bublin, Merima; Eiwegger, Thomas; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-01-01

    Allergic sensitization is a multifactorial process that is not only influenced by the allergen and its biological function per se but also by other small molecular compounds, such as lipids, that are directly bound as ligands by the allergen or are present in the allergen source. Several members of major allergen families bind lipid ligands through hydrophobic cavities or electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. These allergens include certain seed storage proteins, Bet v 1–like and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins from pollens and fruits, certain inhalant allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches, and lipocalins. Lipids from the pollen coat and furry animals and the so-called pollen-associated lipid mediators are codelivered with the allergens and can modulate the immune responses of predisposed subjects by interacting with the innate immune system and invariant natural killer T cells. In addition, lipids originating from bacterial members of the pollen microbiome contribute to the outcome of the sensitization process. Dietary lipids act as adjuvants and might skew the immune response toward a TH2-dominated phenotype. In addition, the association with lipids protects food allergens from gastrointestinal degradation and facilitates their uptake by intestinal cells. These findings will have a major influence on how allergic sensitization will be viewed and studied in the future. PMID:24880633

  8. Do lipids influence the allergic sensitization process?

    PubMed

    Bublin, Merima; Eiwegger, Thomas; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-09-01

    Allergic sensitization is a multifactorial process that is not only influenced by the allergen and its biological function per se but also by other small molecular compounds, such as lipids, that are directly bound as ligands by the allergen or are present in the allergen source. Several members of major allergen families bind lipid ligands through hydrophobic cavities or electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. These allergens include certain seed storage proteins, Bet v 1-like and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins from pollens and fruits, certain inhalant allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches, and lipocalins. Lipids from the pollen coat and furry animals and the so-called pollen-associated lipid mediators are codelivered with the allergens and can modulate the immune responses of predisposed subjects by interacting with the innate immune system and invariant natural killer T cells. In addition, lipids originating from bacterial members of the pollen microbiome contribute to the outcome of the sensitization process. Dietary lipids act as adjuvants and might skew the immune response toward a TH2-dominated phenotype. In addition, the association with lipids protects food allergens from gastrointestinal degradation and facilitates their uptake by intestinal cells. These findings will have a major influence on how allergic sensitization will be viewed and studied in the future.

  9. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in sediments of urban river networks: Spatiotemporal variations and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lv; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Li, Ye; Liu, Sai; Hu, Xiaoting

    2016-12-01

    Urbanizations have increased the loadings of reactive nitrogen in urban riverine environments. However, limited information about dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes and associated contributions to nitrogen removal is available for urban riverine environments. In this study, sediment slurry experiments were conducted with nitrogen isotope-tracing technique to investigate the potential rates of denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and their contributions to nitrate reduction in sediments of urban river networks, Shanghai. The potential rates of denitrification, anammox and DNRA measured in the study area ranged from 0.193 to 98.7 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) dry weight (dw), 0.0387-23.7 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) dw and 0-10.3 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) dw, respectively. Denitrification and DNRA rates were higher in summer than in winter, while anammox rates were greater in winter than in summer for most sites. Dissolved oxygen, total organic carbon, nitrate, ammonium, sulfide, Fe(II) and Fe(III) were found to have significant influence on these nitrate reduction processes. Denitrification contributed 11.5-99.5%% to total nitrate reduction, as compared to 0.343-81.6% for anammox and 0-52.3% for DNRA. It is estimated that nitrogen loss of approximately 1.33 × 10(5) t N year(-1) was linked to both denitrification and anammox processes, which accounted for about 20.1% of total inorganic nitrogen transported annually into the urban river networks of Shanghai. Overall, these results show the potential importance of denitrification and anammox in nitrogen removal and provide new insight into the mechanisms of nitrogen cycles in urban riverine environments.

  10. The Influence of Reduction in Force on Educators in One Texas School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oge, Debra Reviere

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological narrative study was to explore influences of a reduction in force (RIF) on educators in one Texas school district. The four questions that guided the research examined the relationships, job performance, supportive action and suggestions for improvement for districts contemplating a reduction in force. Nine…

  11. Developmental influences of science process skill instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharmann, Lawrence C.

    Science educators have claimed that well-conceived instructional strategies and curricular sequences, emphasizing the process aspects of science, will foster an understanding of the nature of science. Furthermore, a process emphasis on science has been cited for its ability to promote logical thinking skill, develop a locus of control shift, and enhance science content acquisition. The intent of this investigation was to examine the purported influence and developmental nature of a science process emphasis during a given semester of study, as well as over extended curricular sequences, each sequence being representative of three recognized preservice elementary science teacher preparatory programs. Data were collected from 135 elementary preservice teachers enrolled in science teaching methods courses at the endpoint of one of three sequences: (a) introductory process instruction with three subsequent semesters of integrated science content and teaching methods, (b) process instruction with separate subsequent content and teaching methods, and (c) only science content with subsequent teaching methods. Another 29 preservice teachers, assessed prior to entry into instructional sequences, provided a cross-sectional sample for examining developmental changes in locus of control, logical thinking, nature of science, and science content knowledge. Statistical procedures included Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Wilcoxon tests. Results indicated that a one-semester process skills course was influential in developing a basis for science content acquisition and in fostering an understanding of the nature of science. Results further indicate that expected additional gains are significant in science content acquisition through matriculation in an extended curricular sequence. Implications for science educators are discussed.

  12. Hydrogen and oxygen plasma enhancement in the Cu electrodeposition and consolidation processes on BDD electrode applied to nitrate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, A. B.; Santos, L. C. D.; Matsushima, J. T.; Baldan, M. R.; Ferreira, N. G.

    2011-09-01

    Copper nanoparticle electrodeposition and consolidation processes were studied on boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode submitted to hydrogen and oxygen plasma treatments. The modified BDD films were applied as electrodes for nitrate electroreduction. The results showed that both treatments have a strong influence on the copper deposition and dissolution processes. For BDD treated with hydrogen plasma the copper electrodeposit was homogeneous with high particle density. This behavior was attributed to the BDD surface hydrogenation that improved its conductivity. On the other hand, the treatment with oxygen plasma was important for the copper nanoparticle consolidation on BDD surface, confirmed by the result's reproducibility for nitrate reduction. This performance may be associated with the formation of oxygen groups that can act as anchor points for Cu-clusters, enhancing the interfacial adhesion between diamond and the metal coating. The best electrochemical nitrate reduction response was obtained in acid media, where occurred the separation of the nitrate reduction process and the water reduction reaction.

  13. Feasibility of salt reduction in processed foods in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Daniel; Apro, Nicolas; Ferreira, Veronica; Virgolini, Mario; Aguilar, Valentina; Sosa, Miriam; Perel, Pablo; Casas, Juan

    2011-02-01

    To assess an intervention to reduce salt intake based on an agreement with the food industry. Salt content was measured in bakery products through a national survey and biochemical analyses. Low-salt bread was evaluated by a panel of taste testers to determine whether a reduced salt bread could remain undetected. French bread accounts for 25% of the total salt intake in Argentina; hence, reducing its salt concentration from 2% to 1.4% was proposed and tested. A crossover trial was conducted to evaluate the reduction in urinary sodium and blood pressure in participants during consumption of the low-salt bread compared with ordinary bread. Average salt content in bread was 2%. This study evaluated low-salt bread containing 1.4% salt. This reduction remained mostly undetected by the panels of taste testers. In the crossover trial, which included 58 participants, a reduction of 25 milliequivalents in 24 hour urine sodium excretion, a reduction in systolic blood pressure of 1.66 mmHg, and a reduction in diastolic blood pressure of 0.76 mmHg were found during the low-salt bread intake. The study showed that dietary salt reduction was feasible and well accepted in the population studied through a reduction of salt content in bread. Although the effects on urinary sodium and blood pressure were moderate, a country wide intervention could have a greater public health impact.

  14. Reduction in soil aggregation in response to dust emission processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swet, Nitzan; Katra, Itzhak

    2016-09-01

    Dust emission by aeolian (wind) soil erosion depends on the topsoil properties of the source area, especially on the nature of the aggregates where most dust particles are held. Although the key role of soil aggregates in dust emission, the response of soil aggregation to aeolian processes and its implications for dust emission remain unknown. This study focuses on aggregate size distribution (ASD) analyses before and after in-situ aeolian experiments in semiarid loess soils that are associated with dust emission. Wind tunnel simulations show that particulate matter (PM) emission and saltation rates depend on the initial ASD and shear velocity. Under all initial ASD conditions, the content of saltator-sized aggregates (63-250 μm) increased by 10-34% due to erosion of macro-aggregates (> 500 μm), resulting in a higher size ratio (SR) between the saltators and macro-aggregates following the aeolian erosion. The results revealed that the saltator production increases significantly for soils that are subjected to short-term (anthropogenic) disturbance of the topsoil. The findings highlight a decrease in soil aggregation for all initial ASD's in response to aeolian erosion, and consequently its influence on the dust emission potential. Changes in ASD should be considered as a key parameter in dust emission models of complex surfaces.

  15. Influence of physical factors and geochemical conditions on groundwater acidification during enhanced reductive dechlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Barry, D. A.; Robinson, C.; Gerhard, J.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced reductive dehalogenation is an attractive in situ treatment technology for chlorinated contaminants. The process includes two acid-forming microbial reactions: fermentation of an organic substrate resulting in short-chain fatty acids, and dehalogenation resulting in hydrochloric acid. The accumulation of acids and the resulting drop of groundwater pH are controlled by the mass and distribution of chlorinated solvents in the source zone, type of electron donor, availability of alternative terminal electron acceptors and presence of soil mineral phases able to buffer the pH (such as carbonates). Groundwater acidification may reduce or halt microbial activity, and thus dehalogenation, significantly increasing the time and costs required to remediate the aquifer. For this reason, research in this area is gaining increasing attention. In previous work (Robinson et al., 2009 407:4560, Sci. Tot. Environ, Robinson and Barry, 2009 24:1332, Environ. Model. & Software, Brovelli et al., 2010, submitted), a detailed geochemical and groundwater flow model able to predict the pH change occurring during reductive dehalogenation was developed. The model accounts for the main processes influencing groundwater pH, including the groundwater composition, the electron donor used and soil mineral phase interactions. In this study, the model was applied to investigate how spatial variability occurring at the field scale affects groundwater pH and dechlorination rates. Numerical simulations were conducted to examine the influence of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity on the distribution of the injected, fermentable substrate and on the accumulation/dilution of the acidic products of reductive dehalogenation. The influence of the geometry of the DNAPL source zone was studied, as well as the spatial distribution of soil minerals. The results of this study showed that the heterogeneous distribution of the soil properties have a potentially large effect on the remediation efficiency

  16. Molecular Biomarkers for Detecting, Monitoring and Quantifying Reductive Microbial Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    bacteria ,  with  each  strain   capable  of  dehalogenating  a  different   set  of  organohalide   compounds.   Several...observe   changes   in   the   community   composition   of   reductively   dechlorinating   bacteria   in   the   most...reductively   dehalogenating   bacteria .   In  doing  this  we  had  three  goals:  (a)  to

  17. Nonlinear dimensionality reduction for nonadiabatic dynamics: The influence of conical intersection topography on population transfer rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virshup, Aaron M.; Chen, Jiahao; Martínez, Todd J.

    2012-12-01

    Conical intersections play a critical role in the nonadiabatic relaxation of excited electronic states. However, there are an infinite number of these intersections and it is difficult to predict which are actually relevant. Furthermore, traditional descriptors such as intrinsic reaction coordinates and steepest descent paths often fail to adequately characterize excited state reactions due to their highly nonequilibrium nature. To address these deficiencies in the characterization of excited state mechanisms, we apply a nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme (diffusion mapping) to generate reaction coordinates directly from ab initio multiple spawning dynamics calculations. As illustrated with various examples of photoisomerization dynamics, excited state reaction pathways can be derived directly from simulation data without any a priori specification of relevant coordinates. Furthermore, diffusion maps also reveal the influence of intersection topography on the efficiency of electronic population transfer, providing further evidence that peaked intersections promote nonadiabatic transitions more effectively than sloped intersections. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques as powerful tools for elucidating reaction mechanisms beyond the statistical description of processes on ground state potential energy surfaces.

  18. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Erin K. Field; Robin Gerlach; Sridhar Viamajala; Laura K. Jennings; Alfred B. Cunningham; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel

    2011-09-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at Department of Energy (DOE) and other contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the DOE site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in hexavalent chromium remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction. These chemical species are likely to be present in these terrestrial environments during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that there were a number of interactions between these compounds that influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. The type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. When an electron shuttle, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was present in the system, reduction rates increased significantly. Biologically reduced AQDS (AHDS) reduced Cr(VI) almost instantaneously. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II) which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems is the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that is Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  19. Hexavalent chromium reduction by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6: the influence of carbon source, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds.

    PubMed

    Field, Erin K; Gerlach, Robin; Viamajala, Sridhar; Jennings, Laura K; Peyton, Brent M; Apel, William A

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the Department of Energy site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in Cr(VI) remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction rates as these chemical species are likely to be present in, or added to, the environment during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that the type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. Molasses stimulated Cr(VI) reduction more effectively than pure sucrose, presumably due to presence of more easily utilizable sugars, electron shuttling compounds or compounds with direct Cr(VI) reduction capabilities. Cr(VI) reduction rates increased with increasing concentration of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) regardless of the carbon source. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II), which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems was the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that was Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  20. Facile synthesis of single-crystal silver nanowires through a tannin-reduction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xuelin; Li, Juan; Pan, Shilie

    2009-10-01

    A facile aqueous-phase approach for the synthesis of silver nanowires is reported, in which tannin (C76H52O46) is used as a mild reducing agent for silver nitrate. This synthesis is a root-temperature, seedless process, and does not need any surfactant or capping agent to direct the anisotropic growth of the nanoparticles. The obtained silver nanowires are about 25 nm in diameter and up to 20 μm in length. Unlike the usually reported cases of silver nanowires or nanorods, in which the silver nanocrystals were often generated with a multi-twinned structure, in our experiments the nanowires adopt a single-crystal structure with their growth direction along the [100] axis. Investigations on the influence of different experimental conditions indicate that slow rate of the reduction process is a key factor for inducing the anisotropic growth of the nanowires.

  1. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  2. Arsenic Mobilization Influenced By Iron Reduction And Sulfidogenesis Under Dynamic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, B. D.; Stewart, B. D.; Herbel, M.; Fendorf, S.

    2004-12-01

    Sulfidogenesis and iron reduction are ubiquitous processes that occur in a variety of anoxic subsurface and surface environments, which profoundly impact the cycling of arsenic. Of the iron (hydr)oxides, ferrihydrite possesses one of the highest capacities to retain arsenic, and is globally distributed within soils and sediments. Upon dissimilatory iron reduction, ferrihydrite may transform to lower surface area minerals, such as goethite and magnetite, which decreases arsenic retention, thus enhancing its transport. Here we examine how arsenic retained on ferrihydrite is mobilized under dynamic flow in the presence of Sulfurosprillum barnesii strain SES-3, a bacteria capable of reducing both As(V) and Fe(III). Ferrihydrite coated sands, loaded with 150 mg kg-1 As(V), were inoculated with S. barnesii, packed into a column and reacted with a synthetic groundwater solution. Within several days after initiation of flow, the concentration of arsenic in the column effluent increased dramatically coincident with the mineralogical transformation of ferrihydrite and As(V) reduction to As(III). Following the initial pulse of arsenic, effluent concentration then declined to less than 10 μ M. Thus, arsenic release into the aqueous phase is contingent upon the incongruent reduction of As(V) and Fe(III) as mediated by biological activity. Reaction of abiotically or biotically generated dissolved sulfide with iron (hydr)oxides may have a dramatic influence on the fate of arsenic within surface and subsurface environments. Accordingly, we examined the reaction of dissolved bisulfide and iron (hydr)oxide complexed with arsenic in both batch and column systems. Low ratios of sulfide to iron in batch reaction systems result in the formation of elemental sulfur and concomitant arsenic release from the iron (hydr)oxide surface. High sulfide to iron ratios, in contrast, appear to favor the formation of iron and arsenic sulfides. Our findings demonstrate that iron (hydr)oxides may

  3. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K. L.; Rogers, K. L.; Rogers, D.; Johnston, D. T.; Girguis, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep fluctuations in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42-, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in a hydrothermal flange recovered from the Grotto vent in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate reducing organisms at Grotto may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate within the complex gradients inherent to hydrothermal deposits.

  4. Watershed Influences on Residence Time and Oxygen Reduction Rates in an Agricultural Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, C. L.; Tesoriero, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural use of synthetic fertilizers and animal manure has led to increased crop production, but also elevated nitrogen concentrations in groundwater, resulting in impaired water quality. Groundwater oxygen concentrations are a key indicator of potential biogeochemical processes, which control water/aquifer interactions and contaminant transport. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program has a long-history of studying nutrient transport and processing across the United States and the Glacial Aquifer system in particular. A series of groundwater well networks in Eastern Wisconsin is being used to evaluate the distribution of redox reaction rates over a range of scales with a focus on dissolved O2 reduction rates. An analysis of these multi-scale networks elucidates the influence of explanatory variables (i.e.: soil type, land use classification) on reduction rates and redox reactions throughout the Fox-Wolf-Peshtigo watersheds. Multiple tracers including dissolved gasses, tritium, helium, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and carbon-14 were used to estimate groundwater ages (0.8 to 61.2 yr) at over 300 locations. Our results indicate O2 reduction rates along a flowpath study area (1.2 km2) of 0.15 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.12 to 0.18 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) up to 0.41 mg O2 L-1 yr-1 (0.23 to 0.89 mg O2 L-1 yr-1) for a larger scale land use study area (3,300 km2). Preliminary explanatory variables that can be used to describe the variability in reduction rates include soil type (hydrologic group, bulk density) and chemical concentrations (nitrite plus nitrate, silica). The median residence time expected to reach suboxic conditions (≤ 0.4 mg O2 L-1) for the flowpath and the land use study areas was 66 and 25 yr, respectively. These results can be used to elucidate and differentiate the impact of residence time on groundwater quality vulnerability and sustainability in agricultural regions without complex flow models.

  5. The Fastmet[sup SM] direct reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Lepinski, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Fastmet Process offers a simple and economical approach to producing direct reduced iron (DRI). It combines conventional equipment into a reliable ironmaking system. The process is ideally suited for processing U.S. iron oxide concentrates and coals. High iron yields are achievable due to the inherent ability to recycle in-plant fines and dust. Very low residence time of material in the rotary hearth furnace allows rapid adjustment of process parameters and minimal production loss from process upsets. Environmental impact is minimal. The paper gives a description of the process, then describes the economics, test facilities, test results, and scale-up.

  6. Deciphering Piperidine Formation in Polyketide-Derived Indolizidines Reveals a Thioester Reduction, Transamination, and Unusual Imine Reduction Process.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haidong; Wei, Erman; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Yanan; Cheng, Lin; Ma, Hongmin; Deng, Zixin; Qu, Xudong

    2016-12-16

    Piperidine and indolizidine are two basic units of alkaloids that are frequently observed in natural and synthetic compounds. Their biosynthesis in natural products is highly conserved and mostly derived from the incorporation of lysine cyclization products. Through in vitro reconstitution, we herein identified a novel pathway involving a group of polyketide-derived indolizidines, which comprises the processes of tandem two-electron thioester reduction, transamination, and imine reduction to convert acyl carrier protein (ACP)-tethered polyketide chains into the piperidine moieties of their indolizidine scaffolds. The enzymes that catalyze the imine reduction are distinct from previous known imine reductases, which have a fold of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase but do not require flavin for reduction. Our results not only provide a new way for the biosynthesis of the basic units of alkaloids but also show a novel class of imine reductases that may benefit the fields of biocatalysis and biomanufacturing.

  7. Structural parameters that influence the noise reduction characteristics of typical general aviation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Grosveld, F.

    1980-01-01

    Effect of panel curvature and oblique angle of sound incidence on noise reduction characteristics of an aluminum panel are experimentally investigated. Panel curvature results show significant increase in stiffness with comparable decrease of sound transmission through the panel in the frequency region below the panel/cavity resonance frequency. Noise reduction data have been achieved for aluminum panels with clamped, bonded and riveted edge conditions. These edge conditions are shown to influence noise reduction characteristics of aluminum panels. Experimentally measured noise reduction characteristics of flat aluminum panels with uniaxial and biaxial in-plane stresses are presented and discussed. Results indicate important improvement in noise reduction of these panels in the frequency range below the fundamental panel/cavity resonance frequency.

  8. Does the length of the history influence the outcome of pneumatic reduction of intussusception in children?

    PubMed

    Tareen, Farhan; Ryan, Stephanie; Avanzini, Stefano; Pena, Victor; Mc Laughlin, Danielle; Puri, Prem

    2011-06-01

    Intussusception is the most common cause of acute abdomen in infants and preschool children. Nonoperative reduction using air enema is an established treatment in children with intussusception. The aim of this study was to determine whether length of the history influences the outcome of pneumatic reduction of intussusception in children? The medical records of 256 consecutive children with intussusception between July 1998 and June 2010, who underwent air enema reduction regardless of the length of the history were reviewed. In all 256 patients, intussusception was confirmed by ultrasound before proceeding to air enema. The length of history ranged from 2 to 240 h with median time of 18.5 h. The median age in 256 patients was 7 months (range 1 day to 12 years). The presenting clinical features included irritability/abdominal pain (77%), vomiting (80%), bleeding per rectum (36%) and palpable abdominal mass (50%). Air enema reduction was successful in 234 (91.5%) of the 256 patients. In 22 (8.5%) patients, air enema failed to reduce the intussusception and 3 (1.1%) of these patients had colonic perforation during the procedure. All 22 patients required surgery. The duration of symptoms did not influence the outcome of pneumatic reduction. 37 (14%) patients developed recurrence after successful pneumatic reduction of intussusception, with 58% presenting within 48 h of the initial procedure. Our data suggest that pneumatic reduction should be first-line treatment in all children with intussusception regardless of the length of the history.

  9. The influence of energy deposition parameters on laser plasma drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhiguo; Liu, Zhun; Yao, Honglin; Li, Xiuqian

    2013-09-01

    Laser plasma drag reduction is a new method to reduce the wave drag of hypersonic flight. The research of the laser plasma drag reduction performance is an important work. The purpose of this paper is investigating laser plasma drag reduction by numerical simulation to enhance the understanding of the drag reduction mechanism, get the drag reduction performance in different conditions, and provide references for laser plasma drag reduction experiment in the future. Based on summarizing correlative references systematically, through building the model of energy deposition and comparison the simulated results to the empirical formula and computation results to verify the program correctness, the influence of laser energy parameters to laser plasma drag reduction were simulated numerically for optimize the performance. The follow conclusions were got by numerical simulation: The computation program can well simulate the interacting of LSDW(laser supported detonation wave) to the bow shock in front of the blunt body. Results indicate that the blunt body drag could be decreased by injecting laser energy into the incoming hypersonic flow. The correctness of program was verified by compare result to the experiment and computation results. Blunt body drag will be greatly decreased with injected laser power increased, The bigger laser power is injected, the more drag decreases. There's an energy saturation value for each laser power level, the injecting laser power effectiveness values are never quite high for all laser power level. There is an optimized energy deposition location in upstream flow, this location is right ahead of the blunt body. When the distance from deposition location to the surface of blunt body is 5 times the blunt radius, blunt body drag decreased the most. This paper investigated the parameters which primary influence the performance of drag reduction. The numerical simulation data and obtained results are meaningful for laser plasma drag reduction

  10. Process for reduction of volume of contaminated soil by compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Johanan, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    Burial costs for low-level radioactive waste are assessed by the volume of the waste. These costs are presently at $10 per cubic foot and will continue to increase with time. A reduction in waste volume can be directly converted to a reduction in burial costs. A large amount of low-level contaminated soil exists throughout the DOE complex. The Nuclear Complex Modernization Task Force has identified over 5 million cubic feet of contaminated soil for eventual clean-up at the Mound site ($50,000,000 to bury at FY 1991 costs). By using a combination of a rock separator (trommel), crusher, clay soil compactor, automatic loading system, specially designed dust enclosures, and specifically designed containers for both on-site haulage and shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the total waste volume, and burial cost, can be reduced by up to 30% by compacting the soil into high-density bricks (depending upon the compaction quality of the soil). Several tests have been performed on Mound`s cold on-site soils, with resulting densities of 131 pounds per cubic foot. When this is compared to normal LSA metal box filling of 80--90 pounds per cubic foot, one can readily see the savings.

  11. DESIGNING SUSTAINABLE PROCESSES WITH SIMULATION: THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The WAR Algorithm, a methodology for determining the potential environmental impact (PEI) of a chemical process, is presented with modifications that account for the PEI of the energy consumed within that process. From this theory, four PEI indexes are used to evaluate the envir...

  12. DESIGNING SUSTAINABLE PROCESSES WITH SIMULATION: THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The WAR Algorithm, a methodology for determining the potential environmental impact (PEI) of a chemical process, is presented with modifications that account for the PEI of the energy consumed within that process. From this theory, four PEI indexes are used to evaluate the envir...

  13. Reduction in waste load from a meat processing plant: Beef

    SciTech Connect

    1986-10-31

    ;Contents: Introduction (Randolph Packing Company, Meat Plant Wastewaters, Slaughterhouses, Packing Houses, Sources of Wastewater, Secondary Manufacturing Processes, An Example of Water Conservation and Waste Control, Water Conservation Program); Plant Review and Survey (Survey for Product Losses and Wastes, Water Use and Waste Load, Wastewater Discharge Limitations and Costs); Waste Centers, Changes, Costs and Results (In-Plant Control Measures, Water Conservation, Recovery Products, By-Products and Reducing Waste Load, Blood Conservation, Paunch Handling and Processing, Summary of Process Changes, Pretreatment, Advantages and Disadvantages of Pretreatment, Pretreatment Systems).

  14. Reduction and Reoxidation of Humic Acid: Influence on Spectroscopic Properties and Proton Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, F.; Christl, I; Kretzschmar, R

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies on proton and metal binding to humic substances have not considered a potential influence of reduction and oxidation of functional groups. Therefore, we investigated how proton binding of a purified soil humic acid was affected by reduction. Reduction of the humic acid was carried out using an electrochemical cell that allowed us to measure the amounts of electrons and protons involved in reduction reactions. We further applied spectroscopic methods (UV-vis, fluorescence, FT-IR, C-1s NEXAFS) to detect possible chemical changes in the humic acid induced by reduction and reoxidation. The effect of reduction on proton binding was determined with acid-base titrations in the pH range 4-10 under controlled redox conditions. During reduction, 0.54 mol kg{sup -1} protons and 0.55 mol kg{sup -1} electrons were transferred to humic acid. NICA-Donnan modeling revealed an equivalent increase in proton-reactive sites (0.52 mol kg{sup -1}) in the alkaline pH-range. Our results indicate that reduction of humic acid increased the amount of proton-reactive sites by 15% compared to the untreated state. Spectroscopic differences between the untreated and reduced humic acid were minor, apart from a lower UV-vis absorption of the reduced humic acid between 400 and 700 nm.

  15. NO{sub x} reduction by compact electron beam processing

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Wallman, P.H.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1995-11-21

    Among the new methods being investigated for the post-combustion removal of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) are based on non-thermal plasmas. These plasmas can be produced by electrical discharge methods or electron beam irradiation. The application of electron beam irradiation for NO{sub x} removal in power plant flue gases has been investigated since the early 1970`s in both laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments. Electrical discharge methods are relatively new entrants in the field of flue gas cleanup. Pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge techniques are two of the more commonly used electrical discharge methods for producing nonthermal plasmas at atmospheric pressure. There are basically two types of reactions responsible for the depletion of NO by non-thermal plasmas: oxidation and reduction.

  16. Inventory Reduction Using Business Process Reengineering and Simulation Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    center is analyzed using simulation modeling and business process reengineering (BPR) concepts. The two simulation models were designed and evaluated by...reengineering and simulation modeling offer powerful tools to aid the manager in reducing cycle time and inventory levels.

  17. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  18. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L.; Rogers, Karyn L.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Johnston, David T.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42−, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  19. INCORPORATING ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS INTO PROCESS DESIGN: THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general theory known as the WAste Reduction (WASR) algorithm has been developed to describe the flow and the generation of potential environmental impact through a chemical process. This theory integrates environmental impact assessment into chemical process design Potential en...

  20. INCORPORATING ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS INTO PROCESS DESIGN: THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general theory known as the WAste Reduction (WASR) algorithm has been developed to describe the flow and the generation of potential environmental impact through a chemical process. This theory integrates environmental impact assessment into chemical process design Potential en...

  1. Influences on Adoption of Greenhouse Gas Reduction Targets among US States, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Cale, Tabitha M; Reams, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    While the United States has not established federal regulations for greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets, many US states have adopted their own standards and guidelines. In this study we examine state adoption of targets for GHG reductions during the ten-year period of 1998-2008, and identify factors that explain variation in target adoption. Potential influences are drawn from research from the public policy formulation and diffusion literature, and from studies specific to climate policy adoption. Potential influences on GHG reduction efforts among US states include socioeconomic attributes of residents, political and ideological orientations of citizens and state government, interest group activities, environmental pressures, and proximity to other states that have adopted GHG reduction targets. The findings of the multinomial logistic regression analysis indicate that states are more likely to adopt GHG reduction targets if they share a border with another state with a similar climate program and if their citizens are more ideologically liberal. Other factors including socioeconomic resources and interest group activities were not found to be associated with policy adoption. The findings yield insights into the conditions under which states are more likely to take action to reduce GHG's, and are relevant both to state policy makers and residents with an interest in climate planning, and for researchers attempting to estimate future greenhouse gas reduction scenarios.

  2. PCDD/PCDF reduction by the co-combustion process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vinci K C; Cheung, Wai-Hung; McKay, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    A novel process, termed the co-combustion process, has been developed and designed to utilise the thermal treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) in cement clinker production and reduce PCDD/PCDF emissions. To test the conceptual design; detailed engineering design of the process and equipment was performed and a pilot plant was constructed to treat up to 40 tonnes MSW per day. The novel process features included several units external to the main traditional cement rotary kiln: an external calcinations unit in which the hot gas calcined the limestone thus making significant energy savings for this chemical reaction; the lime generated was used in a second chamber to act as a giant acid gas scrubber to remove SOx and particularly HCl (a source of chloride); an external rotary kiln and secondary combustion unit capable of producing a hot gas at 1200 degrees C; a gas cooler to simulate a boiler turbogenerator set for electricity generation; the incorporation of some of the bottom ash, calcined lime and dust collector solids into the cement clinker. A PCDD/PCDF inventory has been completed for the entire process and measured PCDD/PCDF emissions were 0.001 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3) on average which is 1% of the best practical means [Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department, 2001. A guidance note on the best practicable means for incinerators (municipal waste incineration), BPM12/1] MSW incineration emission limit values.

  3. Influence of deposition variables on LPCVD tungsten films deposited by the WF/sub 6//Si reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to isolate and study the Si reduction of WF/sub 6/ by the reduction reaction 2 WF/sub 6/ + 3 Si ..-->.. 2 W + 3 SiF/sub 4/, a systematic study of the influence of temperature, substrate doping, deposition time and variable flow rates of tungsten hexafluoride (WF/sub 6/) was conducted. The effect of varying these parameters on film thickness, layer resistivity, encroachment and adhesion was investigated. A set of operating conditions has been defined that yield stable, adherent, self-limiting films of -100A thickness that are free from encroachment. Film quality was found to be relatively insensitive to moderate variations in process parameters, a favorable indication in terms of process integration and manufacturability.

  4. Vehicle Lightweighting: Mass Reduction Spectrum Analysis and Process Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarin, Anthony; Hannibal, Ted; Raghunathan, Anand; Ivanic, Ziga; Clark, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office, Materials area commissioned a study to model and assess manufacturing economics of alternative design and production strategies for a series of lightweight vehicle concepts. In the first two phases of this effort examined combinations of strategies aimed at achieving strategic targets of 40% and a 45% mass reduction relative to a standard North American midsize passenger sedan at an effective cost of $3.42 per pound (lb) saved. These results have been reported in the Idaho National Laboratory report INL/EXT-14-33863 entitled Vehicle Lightweighting: 40% and 45% Weight Savings Analysis: Technical Cost Modeling for Vehicle Lightweighting published in March 2015. The data for these strategies were drawn from many sources, including Lotus Engineering Limited and FEV, Inc. lightweighting studies, U.S. Department of Energy-funded Vehma International of America, Inc./Ford Motor Company Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Demonstration Project, the Aluminum Association Transportation Group, many United States Council for Automotive Research’s/United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC lightweight materials programs, and IBIS Associates, Inc.’s decades of experience in automotive lightweighting and materials substitution analyses.

  5. A POLLUTION REDUCTION METHODOLOGY FOR CHEMICAL PROCESS SIMULATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution minimization methodology was developed for chemical process design using computer simulation. It is based on a pollution balance that at steady state is used to define a pollution index with units of mass of pollution per mass of products. The pollution balance has be...

  6. Optimization of magnetite carrier precipitation process for transuranic waste reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Aase, S.A.; Babcock, B.D.; Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    Transuranic (TRU) waste that is being generated at Argonne National Laboratory has a TRU activity ranging from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 7} nCi/g with a wide variety of chemical compositions. Currently, the waste is stored in highly acidic solutions that must be neutralized for intermediate storage. A magnetite carrier precipitation process has been adapted to concentrate TRU isotopes in a noncorrosive solid phase. In this paper, the authors report the results of a series of laboratory tests done to optimize the process. The parameters they optimized included (1) magnetite concentration used to precipitate the TRUs from solution, (2) formation of magnetite (in situ or ex situ), (3) processing pH, and (4) temperature and mixing time of the carrier precipitation. They also studied the effects of anions, cations, and complexing agents in the waste solutions on the carrier precipitation and the effect of magnetite solids loading on the filtration equipment. An overview is given of the planned full-scale process, which will be operated in a glovebox.

  7. A POLLUTION REDUCTION METHODOLOGY FOR CHEMICAL PROCESS SIMULATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution minimization methodology was developed for chemical process design using computer simulation. It is based on a pollution balance that at steady state is used to define a pollution index with units of mass of pollution per mass of products. The pollution balance has be...

  8. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing: Untangling process effects from product effects.

    PubMed

    Hutterer, Katariina M; Hong, Robert W; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production.

  9. Process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in an effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1988-09-13

    A process is described for reducing the concentration of nitrogen oxides in an effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel, which process comprises injecting into the effluent ammonia and an enhancer selected from the group consisting of hexamethylenetetramine, a lower carbon alcohol, a hydroxyl amino hydrocarbon, sugar, furfural, furfural derivatives, an amino acid, a protein-containing composition, mixtures of ortho-, meta-, and para-methyl phenols, guanidine, guanidine carbonate, biguanidine, guanylurea sulfate, melamine, dicyandiamide, calcium cyanamide, biuret, 1,1'-azobisformamide, methylol urea, methylol urea-urea condensation product, dimethylol urea, methyl urea, dimethyl urea, and mixtures thereof, at an effluent temperature above about 1300/sup 0/F and a molar ratio of nitrogen in the ammonia and enhancer to the baseline nitrogen oxides level of about 1:5 to about 6:1 wherein the excess of oxygen in the effluent is no greater than about 6%.

  10. A pollution reduction methodology for chemical process simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, S.K.; Cabezas, H.; Bare, J.C.; Sikdar, S.K.

    1996-11-01

    A pollution minimization methodology was developed for chemical process design using computer simulation. It is based on a pollution balance that at steady state is used to define a pollution index with units of mass of pollution per mass of products. The pollution balance has been modified by weighing the mass flowrate of each pollutant by its potential environmental impact score. This converts the mass balance into an environmental impact balance. This balance defines an impact index with units of environmental impact per mass of products. The impact index measures the potential environmental effects of process wastes. Three different schemes for chemical ranking were considered: (1) no ranking, (2) simple ranking from 0 to 3, and (3) ranking by a scientifically derived measure of human health and environmental effects. Use of the methodology is illustrated with two examples from the production of (1) methyl ethyl ketone and (2) synthetic ammonia.

  11. Influence of global climatic processes on environment The Arctic seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmyansky, Mikhael; Anokhin, Vladimir; Kartashov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    One of the most actual problems of the present is changes of environment of Arctic regions under the influence of global climatic processes. Authors as a result of the works executed by them in different areas of the Russian Arctic regions, have received the materials characterising intensity of these processes. Complex researches are carried out on water area and in a coastal zone the White, the Barents, the Kara and the East-Siberian seas, on lake water areas of subarctic region since 1972 on the present. Into structure of researches enter: hydrophysical, cryological observations, direct measurements of temperatures, the analysis of the drill data, electrometric definitions of the parametres of a frozen zone, lithodynamic and geochemical definitions, geophysical investigations of boreholes, studying of glaciers on the basis of visual observations and the analysis of photographs. The obtained data allows to estimate change of temperature of a water layer, deposits and benthonic horizon of atmosphere for last 25 years. On the average they make 0,38⁰C for sea waters, 0,23⁰C for friable deposits and 0,72⁰C for atmosphere. Under the influence of temperature changes in hydrosphere and lithosphere of a shelf cryolithic zone changes the characteristics. It is possible to note depth increase of roof position of the cryolithic zone on the most part of the studied water area. Modern fast rise in temperature high-ice rocks composing coast, has led to avalanche process thermo - denudation and to receipt in the sea of quantity of a material of 1978 three times exceeding level Rise in temperature involves appreciable deviation borders of the Arctic glacial covers. On our monitoring measurements change of the maintenance of oxygen in benthonic area towards increase that is connected with reduction of the general salinity of waters at the expense of fresh water arriving at ice thawing is noticed. It, in turn, leads to change of a biogene part of ecosystem. The executed

  12. Energy reduction in beet sugar processing by cossette liming

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, J.M.; Camirand, W.M.; Neumann, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Under appropriate conditions of temperature and fresh Ca(OH)/sub 2/ application, demethylation occurs in the pectin in the cell walls of sugar beet cossettes, allowing Ca/sup 2 +/ to precipitate the pectin as calcium pectate. The calcium pectate will not degrade and pass into solution during subsequent hot extraction of sugar from the cossettes. This retention of pectin in the pulp was shown by 10 to 20% increases in solids weight in the pulp for a number of processing conditions. The toughened pulp produced by retention of calcium pectate allowed easier mechanical dewatering of the pulp which could save considerably on the heat normally required to dry the pulp for cattle feed. Beyond data reported in this paper, there are qualitative indications that the sugar juice extracted from limed cossettes is purer than standard juice, for pectin and colloidal materials remain in the pulp. Thus, much less purification of the juice with lime would be necessary than is required in standard beet-sugar processing, and the current 2% CaO used for purification may be cut almost in half. This represents another energy saving, for production of CaO at the factory is a major consumer of energy. These, along with other possible energy savings resulting from cossette liming (such as less water used for extraction, cold extraction, ion exchange of the purer juice), could produce an overall saving up to 20% of the energy currently used in beet-sugar processing. Some of these possibilities will be further investigated.

  13. Reduction Behavior of Assmang and Comilog ore in the SiMn Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pyunghwa Peace; Holtan, Joakim; Tangstad, Merete

    The reduction behavior of raw materials from Assmang and Comilog based charges were experimentally investigated with CO gas up to 1600 °C. Quartz, HC FeMn slag or limestone were added to Assmang or Comilog according to the SiMn production charge, and mass loss results were obtained by using a TGA furnace. The results showed that particle size, type of manganese ore and mixture have close relationship to the reduction behavior of raw materials during MnO and SiO2 reduction. The influence of particle size to mass loss was apparent when Assmang or Comilog was mixed with only coke (FeMn) while it became insignificant when quartz and HC FeMn slag (SiMn) were added. This implied that quartz and HC FeMn slag had favored the incipient slag formation regardless of particle size. This explained the similar mass loss tendencies of SiMn charge samples between 1200-1500 °C, contrary to FeMn charge samples where different particle sizes showed significant difference in mass loss. Also, while FeMn charge samples showed progressive mass loss, SiMn charge samples showed diminutive mass loss until 1500 °C. However, rapid mass losses were observed with SiMn charge samples in this study above 1500 °C, and they have occurred at different temperatures. This implied rapid reduction of MnO and SiO2 and the type of ore and addition of HC FeMn slag have significant influence determining these temperatures. The temperatures observed for the rapid mass loss were approximately 1503 °C (Quartz and HC FeMn slag addition in Assmang), 1543 °C (Quartz addition in Assmang) and 1580-1587 °C (Quartz and limestone addition in Comilog), respectively. These temperatures also showed indications of possible SiMn production at process temperatures lower than 1550 °C.

  14. A Non-Aqueous Reduction Process for Purifying 153Gd Produced in Natural Europium Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, Amanda M.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2013-08-01

    Gadolinium-153 is a low-energy gamma-emitter used in nuclear medicine imaging quality assurance. Produced in nuclear reactors using natural Eu2O3 targets, 153Gd is radiochemically separated from europium isotopes by europium reduction. However, conventional aqueous europium reduction produces hydrogen gas, a flammability hazard in radiological hot cells. We altered the traditional reduction method, using methanol as the process solvent to nearly eliminate hydrogen gas production. This new, non-aqueous reduction process demonstrates greater than 98% europium removal and gadolinium yields of 90%.

  15. Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument

    SciTech Connect

    Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

    2012-05-01

    This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

  16. Hyporheic zone as a bioreactor: sediment heterogeneity influencing biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perujo, Nuria; Romani, Anna M.; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean fluvial systems are characterized by frequent periods of low flow or even drought. During low flow periods, water from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is proportionally large in fluvial systems. River water might be vertically transported through the hyporheic zone, and then porous medium acts as a complementary treatment system since, as water infiltrates, a suite of biogeochemical processes occurs. Subsurface sediment heterogeneity plays an important role since it influences the interstitial fluxes of the medium and drives biomass growing, determining biogeochemical reactions. In this study, WWTP water was continuously infiltrated for 3 months through two porous medium tanks: one consisting of 40 cm of fine sediment (homogeneous); and another comprised of two layers of different grain size sediments (heterogeneous), 20 cm of coarse sediment in the upper part and 20 cm of fine one in the bottom. Several hydrological, physicochemical and biological parameters were measured periodically (weekly at the start of the experiment and biweekly at the end). Analysed parameters include dissolved nitrogen, phosphorus, organic carbon, and oxygen all measured at the surface, and at 5, 20 and 40 cm depth. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with time were evaluated. Sediment samples were also analysed at three depths (surface, 20 and 40 cm) to determine bacterial density, chlorophyll content, extracellular polymeric substances, and biofilm function (extracellular enzyme activities and carbon substrate utilization profiles). Preliminary results suggest hydraulic conductivity to be the main driver of the differences in the biogeochemical processes occurring in the subsurface. At the heterogeneous tank, a low nutrient reduction throughout the whole medium is measured. In this medium, high hydraulic conductivity allows for a large amount of infiltrating water, but with a small residence time. Since some biological processes are largely time-dependent, small water

  17. Low-temperature NOx reduction processes using combined systems of pulsed corona discharge and catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Takashima, K.; Katsura, S.; Mizuno, A.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, we will report NOx removal via reduction processes using two types of combined system of pulse corona discharge and catalysts: the single-stage plasma-driven catalyst (PDC) system, and the two-stage plasma-enhanced selective catalytic reduction (PE-SCR) system. Several catalysts, such as γ-alumina catalysts, mechanically mixed catalysts of γ-alumina with BaTiO3 or TiO2, and Co-ZSM-5 were tested. In the PDC system, which is directly activated by the discharge plasma, it was found that the use of additives was necessary to achieve NOx removal by reduction. Removal rates of NO and NOx were linearly increased as the molar ratio of additive to NOx increased. The dependence of NO and NOx removal on the gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) at a fixed specific input energy (SIE) indicates that plasma-induced surface reaction on the catalyst plays an important role in the PDC system. It was found that the optimal GHSV of the PDC system with the γ-alumina catalyst was smaller than 6000 h-1. Mechanical mixing of γ-alumina with BaTiO3 or TiO2 did not enhance NO and NOx removal and γ-alumina alone was found to be the most suitable catalyst. The dielectric constant of the catalyst only influenced the plasma intensity, not the NOx removal. In the PE-SCR system, plasma-treated NOx (mostly NO2) was reduced effectively with NH3 over the Co-ZSM-5 catalyst at a relatively low temperature of 150 °C. Under optimal conditions the energy cost and energy yield were 25 eV/molecule and 21 g-N (kWh)-1, respectively.

  18. Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli show strain dependent reductions under dry-fermented sausage production and post-processing conditions.

    PubMed

    Rode, Tone Mari; Holck, Askild; Axelsson, Lars; Høy, Martin; Heir, Even

    2012-04-16

    Dry-fermented sausages (DFS) are considered possible risk products regarding Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC). We have compared the reduction of 11 E. coli isolates of various serogroups in salami during the sausage production process and during post-process measures including storage, heating and freezing. The 11 E. coli isolates, mainly STEC, included enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) outbreak strains linked to DFS along with apathogenic E. coli. During sausage production, there was a statistically significant difference in reduction between the E. coli strains ranging from 1.3 to 2.4 log₁₀ (p<0.001). When sausages were subjected to post-process heat treatment of 43 °C for 24 h, a total reduction of more than 5 log₁₀ was obtained for all E. coli isolates. Freezing and thawing of DFS with subsequent storage for 1 month at 16 or 20 °C generally contributed to large E. coli reductions with the latter conditions giving an average additional 3.9 log₁₀ reduction, with a range from 3.4 to 4.4 log₁₀. The combination of freezing and 1 month of storage gave higher reductions compared with storage for 2 months for all examined temperatures. No systematic differences in survival of E. coli of different serogroups were detected for the different post-process measures. The reductions were also similar to those of apathogenic control isolates. Isolates showing higher survival during the ripening process did not have a lower reduction when exposed to post-process stress like storage, heating and freezing. The ability of the isolates to survive in salami was also compared with their survival at equivalent conditions in a tryptic soy broth (TSB) model. There was a low and not significant correlation (p>0.1) between the reductions of E. coli in salami and in the TSB broth model. Results based on broth models and/or single or surrogate strains must therefore be interpreted with caution. The EHEC reducing post-processing measures tested can easily be

  19. Radon Reduction Experience at a Former Uranium Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eger, K. J.; Rutherford, L.; Rickett, K.; Fellman, R.; Hungate, S.

    2004-02-29

    Approximately 6,200 cubic meters of waste containing about 2.0E8 MBq of radium-226 are stored in two large silos at the Fernald Site in southwest Ohio. The material is scheduled for retrieval, packaging, off site shipment and disposal by burial. Air in the silos above the stored material contained radon-222 at a concentration of 7.4 E5 Bq/L. Short-lived daughters formed by decay in these headspaces generated dose rates at contact with the top of the silos up to 1.05 mSv/hr and there complicate the process of retrieval. A Radon Control System (RCS) employing carbon adsorption beds has been designed under contract with the Fluor Fernald to remove most of the radon in the headspaces and maintain lower concentrations during periods when work on or above the domes is needed. Removing the radon also removes the short-lived daughters and reduces the dose rate near the domes to 20 to 30 {mu}Sv/hr. Failing to remove the radon would be costly, in the exposure of personnel needed to work extended periods at these moderate dose rates, or in dollars for the application of remote retrieval techniques. In addition, the RCS minimizes the potential for environmental releases. This paper describes the RCS, its mode of operation, and early experiences. The results of the test described herein and the experience gained from operation of the RCS during its first phase of continuous operation, will be used to determine the best air flow, and air flow distribution, the most desirable number and sequence number and sequence of adsorption beds to be used and the optimum application of air recycle within the RCS.

  20. Influence of calcium on microbial reduction of solid phase uranium(VI).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M; Wang, Zheming

    2007-08-15

    The effect of calcium on the dissolution and microbial reduction of a representative solid phase uranyl [U(VI)], sodium boltwoodite (NaUO(2)SiO(3)OH . 1.5H(2)O), was investigated to evaluate the rate-limiting step of microbial reduction of the solid phase U(VI). Microbial reduction experiments were performed in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, in a bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 6.8 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased the rate of Na-boltwoodite dissolution and U(VI) bioavailability by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) collectively revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. Under studied experimental conditions, the overall rate of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was limited by U(VI) dissolution reactions in solutions without calcium and limited by microbial reduction in solutions with calcium. Generally, the overall rate of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) was determined by the coupling of solid phase U(VI) dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) that were all affected by calcium.

  1. Harm reduction and law enforcement in Vietnam: influences on street policing.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Melissa; Crofts, Nick; Monaghan, Geoff; Morrow, Martha

    2012-07-09

    The HIV epidemic in Vietnam has from its start been concentrated among injecting drug users. Vietnam instituted the 2006 HIV/AIDS Law which includes comprehensive harm reduction measures, but these are unevenly accepted and inadequately implemented. Ward police are a major determinant of risk for IDUs, required to participate in drug control practices (especially meeting quotas for detention centres) which impede support for harm reduction. We studied influences on ward level police regarding harm reduction in Hanoi to learn how to better target education and structural change. After document review, we interviewed informants from government, NGOs, INGOs, multilateral agencies, and police, using semi-structured guides. Topics covered included perceptions of harm reduction and the police role in drug law enforcement, and harm reduction training and advocacy among police. Police perceive conflicting responsibilities, but overwhelmingly see their responsibility as enforcing drug laws, identifying and knowing drug users, and selecting those for compulsory detention. Harm reduction training was very patchy, ward police not being seen as important to it; and understanding of harm reduction was limited, tending to reflect drug control priorities. Justification for methadone was as much crime prevention as HIV prevention.Competing pressures on ward police create much anxiety, with performance measures based around drug control; recourse to detention resolves competing pressures more safely. There is much recognition of the importance of discretion, and much use of it to maintain good social order. Policy dissemination approaches within the law enforcement sector were inconsistent, with little communication about harm reduction programs or approaches, and an unfounded assumption that training at senior levels would naturally reach to the street. Ward police have not been systematically included in harm reduction advocacy or training strategies to support or operationalise

  2. Harm reduction and law enforcement in Vietnam: influences on street policing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and rationale The HIV epidemic in Vietnam has from its start been concentrated among injecting drug users. Vietnam instituted the 2006 HIV/AIDS Law which includes comprehensive harm reduction measures, but these are unevenly accepted and inadequately implemented. Ward police are a major determinant of risk for IDUs, required to participate in drug control practices (especially meeting quotas for detention centres) which impede support for harm reduction. We studied influences on ward level police regarding harm reduction in Hanoi to learn how to better target education and structural change. Methods After document review, we interviewed informants from government, NGOs, INGOs, multilateral agencies, and police, using semi-structured guides. Topics covered included perceptions of harm reduction and the police role in drug law enforcement, and harm reduction training and advocacy among police. Results Police perceive conflicting responsibilities, but overwhelmingly see their responsibility as enforcing drug laws, identifying and knowing drug users, and selecting those for compulsory detention. Harm reduction training was very patchy, ward police not being seen as important to it; and understanding of harm reduction was limited, tending to reflect drug control priorities. Justification for methadone was as much crime prevention as HIV prevention. Competing pressures on ward police create much anxiety, with performance measures based around drug control; recourse to detention resolves competing pressures more safely. There is much recognition of the importance of discretion, and much use of it to maintain good social order. Policy dissemination approaches within the law enforcement sector were inconsistent, with little communication about harm reduction programs or approaches, and an unfounded assumption that training at senior levels would naturally reach to the street. Discussion Ward police have not been systematically included in harm reduction advocacy

  3. Influence of processing on trichothecene levels.

    PubMed

    Hazel, Clare M; Patel, Sue

    2004-10-10

    Trichothecene mycotoxins frequently occur in cereal grains that are intended for food production. The process of converting grains into food and drinks for consumers has significant effects on the levels of toxins in the final food. Surveillance of retail food and drinks of cereal origin demonstrates that trichothecenes do survive the production processes employed. Trichothecenes are relatively heat stable chemicals, with high water solubility, properties that affect their processing fate. It is known that the extent of transmission into final food products is dependent on the pattern of Fusarium infection in the grains. For dry-milled products, the most highly contaminated fractions are those that contain the whole or the outer portions of the grain. For wet milling, the trichothecenes primarily transfer to the aqueous fractions, the most contaminated streams enter the animal food chain, although there is no evidence of significant trichothecenes transmission into animal products. However, anomalies remain in the understanding of the processing effects of several major cereal processes used in European food production (e.g. baking and brewing).

  4. Influence of weather-climatic conditions on biospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorushko, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The significance of meteorological processes and phenomena in the biosphere functioning is revealed. The influence of various weather conditions on human health is considered; the factors and mechanisms of their action are described. The impact of meteorological processes on animals is discussed and concrete examples of such impacts are presented. The influence of meteorological processes and phenomena on plants at different stages of their life (pollination, growth, ripening, transport of seeds, damage, and death) and on some abiotic natural components is shown. It is inferred that weather-climatic conditions have a great influence on biospheric processes.

  5. Survival in a Down Economy: A Budget Reduction Process for Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, E. E.; Coffland, Jack A.

    2010-01-01

    Dramatic reductions in the dollars available for public education require a new and systemic approach to balancing school district budgets. This manual provides numerous examples of successful budget reduction strategies based on a six-step process that has demonstrated its effectiveness in small, medium, and large school districts. Supported by…

  6. Effect of abiotic factors on the mercury reduction process by humic acids in aqueous systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mercury (Hg) in the environment can have serious toxic effects on a variety of living organisms, and is a pollutant of concern worldwide. The reduction of mercury from the toxic Hg2+ form to Hg0 is especially important. One pathway for this reduction to occur is through an abiotic process with humic...

  7. Survival in a Down Economy: A Budget Reduction Process for Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, E. E.; Coffland, Jack A.

    2010-01-01

    Dramatic reductions in the dollars available for public education require a new and systemic approach to balancing school district budgets. This manual provides numerous examples of successful budget reduction strategies based on a six-step process that has demonstrated its effectiveness in small, medium, and large school districts. Supported by…

  8. Influences of humic acid, bicarbonate and calcium on Cr(VI) reductive removal by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Rao, Pinhua; Lo, Irene M C

    2009-05-01

    The influences of various geochemical constituents, such as humic acid, HCO(3)(-), and Ca(2+), on Cr(VI) removal by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) were investigated in a batch setting. The collective impacts of humic acid, HCO(3)(-), and Ca(2+) on the Cr(VI) reduction process by Fe(0) appeared to significantly differ from their individual impacts. Humic acid introduced a marginal influence on Fe(0) reactivity toward Cr(VI) reduction, whereas HCO(3)(-) greatly enhanced Cr(VI) removal by maintaining the solution pH near neutral. The Cr(VI) reduction rate constants (k(obs)) were increased by 37.8% and 78.3%, respectively, with 2 mM and 6 mM HCO(3)(-) in solutions where humic acid and Ca(2+) were absent. Singly present Ca(2+) did not show a significant impact to Cr(VI) reduction. However, probably due to the formation of passivating CaCO(3), further addition of Ca(2+) to HCO(3)(-) containing solutions resulted in a decrease of k(obs) compared to solutions containing HCO(3)(-) alone. Ca(2+) enhanced humic acid adsorption led to a minor decrease of Cr(VI) reduction rates. In Ca(2+)-free solutions, humic acid increased the amount of total dissolved iron to 25 mg/l due to the formation of soluble Fe-humate complexes and stably dispersed fine Fe (oxy)hydroxide colloids, which appeared to suppress iron precipitation. In contrast, the coexistence of humic acid and Ca(2+) significantly promoted the aggregation of Fe (oxy)hydroxides, with which humic acid co-aggregated and co-precipitated. These aggregates would progressively be deposited on Fe(0) surfaces and impose long-term impacts on the permeability of PRBs.

  9. The influence of Kinesiology Taping on the reduction of lymphoedema among women after mastectomy – preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Tymczak, Monika; Hałas, Ireneusz; Banaś, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Kinesiology Taping is a method that assists healing processes and improves the physical efficiency. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to assess the influence of Kinesiology Taping on the lymphoedema reduction among women after mastectomy. Material and methods The subject of the research included 44 women underwent single mastectomy along with the removal of lymph nodes. The examination was carried out from the 4th of January to the 4th of February, 2013. The traditional taping method was implemented among 22 women, whereas the own taping method was used among the other 22 women. The therapy took 21 days, during which the tapes were applied three times every 7 days. The measurements were made before every application and at the end of the therapy. In the study, a questionnaire was used and it included questions concerning basic demographic, epidemiological data as well as the evaluation of the therapy effectiveness. The linear measurements of the upper limbs, the measurements of the range of joints’ motion in the upper limb were taken as well as grip strength was made. Results The reduction of the volume of lymphoedema of 55% was reported in the study group, whereas the oedema reduced by 27% in the clinical control one. Conclusions In the reduction of lymphoedema, the greater effectiveness of the own taping method in comparison to the traditional one was reported. Kinesiology Taping exerted an influence on the improvement of the upper limb's joints movability and the grip strength. PMID:24966797

  10. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  11. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  12. Oxidation-reduction processes in ground water at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Braun, Christopher L.; Lee, Roger W.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of trichloroethene in ground water at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in Dallas, Texas, indicate three source areas of chlorinated solvents?building 1, building 6, and an off-site source west of the facility. The presence of daughter products of reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene, which were not used at the facility, south and southwest of the source areas are evidence that reductive dechlorination is occurring. In places south of the source areas, dissolved oxygen concentrations indicated that reduction of oxygen could be the dominant process, particularly south of building 6; but elevated dissolved oxygen concentrations south of building 6 might be caused by a leaking water or sewer pipe. The nitrite data indicate that denitrification is occurring in places; however, dissolved hydrogen concentrations indicate that iron reduction is the dominant process south of building 6. The distributions of ferrous iron indicate that iron reduction is occurring in places south-southwest of buildings 6 and 1; dissolved hydrogen concentrations generally support the interpretation that iron reduction is the dominant process in those places. The generally low concentrations of sulfide indicate that sulfate reduction is not a key process in most sampled areas, an interpretation that is supported by dissolved hydrogen concentrations. Ferrous iron and dissolved hydrogen concentrations indicate that ferric iron reduction is the primary oxidation-reduction process. Application of mean first-order decay rates in iron-reducing conditions for trichloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride yielded half-lives for those solvents of 231, 347, and 2.67 days, respectively. Decay rates, and thus half-lives, at the facility are expected to be similar to those computed. A weighted scoring method to indicate sites where reductive dechlorination might be likely to occur indicated strong evidence for anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents at six sites

  13. Influence of operating conditions on electrochemical reduction of nitrate in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenli; Li, Miao; Zhang, Baogang; Feng, Chuanping; Lei, Xiaohui; Xu, Bin

    2013-03-01

    The influences of current density, initial pH, cation and anion concentrations, and the coexistence of Ca2+ and HCO3- on the efficiency of electrochemical nitrate reduction by a copper cathode and Ti/IrO2 anode in an undivided cell were studied. In the presence of 5 mM of sodium chloride (NaCl), the nitrate-nitrogen concentration decreased from 3.57 to 0.69 mM in 120 minutes, and no ammonia or nitrite byproducts were detected. The nitrate reduction rate increased as the current density increased. The electrochemical method performed well at an initial pH range of 3.0 to 11.0. The rate of nitrate reduction increased as concentrations of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ increased. The anion of the supporting electrolyte decreased the rate of reduction in the order Cl- > HCO3(2-) = CO3(2-) > SO4(2-) at both 5 mM and 10 mM of anion. The coexistence of Ca2+ and HCO3- ions could inhibit nitrate reduction. The concentration of nitrate-nitrogen in polluted groundwater decreased from 2.80 to 0.31 mM after electrolysis for 120 minutes.

  14. Processes affecting reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, L.J.; Tratnyek, P.G.

    1993-12-31

    Zero-valent iron may participate in the reductive dechlorination process by three different mechanisms: direct, electrolytic reduction; reduction by hydrogen produced during the corrosion process; and reduction by dissolved (ferrous) iron that is also produced by corroding iron. The first step of electrolytic reduction is presumably, the transfer of one electron from the metal surface to the organic molecule. This results in an organic anion radical that may then lose a halide anion to give a carbon-centered radical, and oxidized iron, which is eventually released to the solution as Fe{sup 2+}. The goal of this research is to provide a comprehensive survey of the mechanisms that affect the performance of this reactive barrier technology.

  15. Void reduction in autoclave processing of thermoset composites. I - High pressure effects on void reduction. II - Void reduction in a microwave curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boey, F. Y. C.; Lye, S. W.

    1992-07-01

    Two novel methods for reducing void levels in thermoset composites are reported. The first procedure, which eliminates vacuum application, uses high pressure of up to 7000 kPa, by means of an isostatic press, effectively reducing the void levels to below 3 percent. The second process uses microwave curing by means of a modified approach involving vacuum bagging and applied autoclave pressure. This process achieves a void level of 4 percent.

  16. Processes influencing cooling of reactor effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Magoulas, V.E.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1982-06-07

    Discharge of heated reactor cooling water from SRP reactors to the Savannah River is through sections of stream channels into the Savannah River Swamp and from the swamp into the river. Significant cooling of the reactor effluents takes place in both the streams and swamp. The majority of the cooling is through processes taking place at the surface of the water. The major means of heat dissipation are convective transfer of heat to the air, latent heat transfer through evaporation and radiative transfer of infrared radiation. A model was developed which incorporates the effects of these processes on stream and swamp cooling of reactor effluents. The model was used to simulate the effect of modifications in the stream environment on the temperature of water flowing into the river. Environmental effects simulated were the effect of changing radiant heat load, the effect of changes in tree canopy density in the swamp, the effect of total removal of trees from the swamp, and the effect of diverting the heated water from L reactor from Steel Creek to Pen Branch. 6 references, 7 figures.

  17. Reduction of greenhouse gases emissions during anoxic wastewater treatment by strengthening nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ru; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Liping; Ru, Dongyun

    2017-03-20

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is a recently discovered process performed by NC10 phylum, which plays an important role in greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction. In this study, co-existence of n-damo bacteria and methanogens was successfully achieved by using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Reactor with inorganic carbon source (CO2/H2) showed the highest abundance of n-damo bacteria and the highest n-damo potential activity, resulted in its highest nitrogen removal rate. Significant reduction in GHG was obtained after introduction of n-damo process, especially for N2O. Furthermore, GHG emissions decreased with the increase of n-damo bacteria abundance. Community structure analysis found carbon source could influence the diversity of n-damo bacteria indirectly. And phylogenetic analysis showed that all the obtained sequences were assigned to group B, mainly due to in situ production and consumption of CH4.

  18. Investigation of the reduction process of dopamine using paired pulse voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyoung; Oh, Yoonbae; Shin, Hojin; Blaha, Charles D.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of dopamine (DA) around +0.6V potential in anodic sweep and its reduction around −0.1V in cathodic sweep at a relatively fast scanning rate (300 V/s or greater) have been used for identification of DA oxidation in fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). However, compared to the oxidation peak of DA, the reduction peak has not been fully examined in analytical studies, although it has been used as one of the representative features to identify DA. In this study, the reduction process of DA was investigated using paired pulse voltammetry (PPV), which consists of two identical triangle-shaped waveforms, separated by a short interval at the holding potential. Especially, the discrepancies between the magnitude of the oxidation and reduction peaks of DA were investigated based on three factors: (1) the instant desorption of the DA oxidation product (dopamine-o-quinone: DOQ) after production, (2) the effect of the holding potential on the reduction process, and (3) the rate-limited reduction process of DA. For the first test, the triangle waveform FSCV experiment was performed on DA with various scanrates (from 400 to 1000 V/s) and durations of switching potentials of the triangle waveform (from 0.0 to 6.0 ms) in order to vary the duration between the applied oxidation potential at +0.6V and the reduction potential at −0.2V. As a result, the ratio of reduction over oxidation peak current response decreased as the duration became longer. To evaluate the effect of holding potentials during the reduction process, FSCV experiments were conducted with holding potential from 0.0V to −0.8V. We found that more negative holding potentials lead to larger amount of reduction process. For evaluation of the rate-limited reduction process of DA, PPV with a 1Hz repetition rate and various delays (2, 8, 20, 40 and 80ms) between the paired scans were utilized to determine how much reduction process occurred during the holding potential (−0.4V). These tests showed that

  19. Investigation of the reduction process of dopamine using paired pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Hyoung; Oh, Yoonbae; Shin, Hojin; Blaha, Charles D; Bennet, Kevin E; Lee, Kendall H; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2014-03-15

    The oxidation of dopamine (DA) around +0.6V potential in anodic sweep and its reduction around -0.1V in cathodic sweep at a relatively fast scanning rate (300 V/s or greater) have been used for identification of DA oxidation in fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). However, compared to the oxidation peak of DA, the reduction peak has not been fully examined in analytical studies, although it has been used as one of the representative features to identify DA. In this study, the reduction process of DA was investigated using paired pulse voltammetry (PPV), which consists of two identical triangle-shaped waveforms, separated by a short interval at the holding potential. Especially, the discrepancies between the magnitude of the oxidation and reduction peaks of DA were investigated based on three factors: (1) the instant desorption of the DA oxidation product (dopamine-o-quinone: DOQ) after production, (2) the effect of the holding potential on the reduction process, and (3) the rate-limited reduction process of DA. For the first test, the triangle waveform FSCV experiment was performed on DA with various scanrates (from 400 to 1000 V/s) and durations of switching potentials of the triangle waveform (from 0.0 to 6.0 ms) in order to vary the duration between the applied oxidation potential at +0.6V and the reduction potential at -0.2V. As a result, the ratio of reduction over oxidation peak current response decreased as the duration became longer. To evaluate the effect of holding potentials during the reduction process, FSCV experiments were conducted with holding potential from 0.0V to -0.8V. We found that more negative holding potentials lead to larger amount of reduction process. For evaluation of the rate-limited reduction process of DA, PPV with a 1Hz repetition rate and various delays (2, 8, 20, 40 and 80ms) between the paired scans were utilized to determine how much reduction process occurred during the holding potential (-0.4V). These tests showed that

  20. Earthing the human organism influences bioelectrical processes.

    PubMed

    Sokal, Karol; Sokal, Pawel

    2012-03-01

    This article describes interaction of the Earth's mass-electrolytic conductor on the electrical environment of human organism-aqueous environment and skeleton. In this environment, bioelectrical and bioenergetical processes take place. Measurements of electric potential on tongue, teeth, nails, and in venous blood in subjects earthed and unearthed were conducted in Faraday's cage with the use of an electrometer placed outside the cage. Measurements were performed in subjects in lying position and in movements of standing up and lying down. In the unearthed human organism in the lying position, electric potential measured in examined points is around 0  mV. Contact of the Earth by a copper conductor with a moistened surface of the human body evokes a rapid decrease of electrostatic potential on the body and in venous blood to the value of approximately -200  mV. This effect is immediate and general. Interruption of contact with the Earth causes a rapid return of the potential to its initial values in examined points. Changes in electric potential measured in venous blood and on mucosal membrane of the tongue reflect alterations in electric potential of the aqueous, electrical environment. Up-and-down movement of the insulated human organism causes transient changes in potential in the human electrical environment. During the same movement, values of potential in the electrical environment of an earthed human body remain constant. These results indicate that up-and-down movement and the elimination of potentials in the electrical environment of the human organism by the Earth's mass may play a fundamental role in regulation of bioelectrical and bioenergetical processes. The Earth's electromagnetohydrodynamic potential is responsible for this phenomenon.

  1. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mathematical modelling of magnesium reduction in a novel vertical Pidgeon process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Alfred; Hu, Henry; Li, Naiyi

    2002-07-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the phenomenon of heat transfer occurring during a novel magnesium reduction process - the vertical retort technology. The model was based on the control-volume finite difference approach. The simulations were run to determine the effect of various parameters, such as the diameter and thickness of the compound, and slot angle, on the magnesium reduction cycle time. The model predicted the temperature distributions, the heating curves, and the total process time. The predictions were used to optimize the magnesium reduction process including the dimensions of the retort, shapes of charged materials, and reduction cycle time. The computed results show that the utilization of the optimized process parameters leads to a decrease in reduction time and energy consumption, and an increase in production capacities and recovery rates. Consequently, the magnesium thermal reduction process is significantly improved in the vertical retort. The model has been verified in a demo-plant operation with an annual production capacity of 1200 ton magnesium.

  3. Reduction of Biological Sludge Production Applying an Alternating Oxic/anoxic Process in Water Line.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Anna Laura; Panigutti, Maximiliano; Battistoni, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    Alternating oxic/anoxic process, applied for the main objective of the improvement of nitrogen performances, was studied in terms of secondary effect of biomass reduction. The process was carried out in one real water resource recovery facility and the data were compared with the previous conventional period when a conventional process was adopted. The main mechanism of the process for the sludge minimization is recognized in the metabolic uncoupling. In fact, an increase of the specific oxygen uptake rate in the biological reactor was recorded stimulated by the change of the oxidation reduction potential environment. Moreover, the heterotrophic growth yield was measured equal to 0.385 kgVSS/kgCOD. The global percentage of reduction was tested with the mass balance of solids. The process is able to decrease the observed sludge yield up to 20%. The specific energy consumption was evaluated.

  4. Effects of electron acceptors on sulphate reduction activity in activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Rincón, Francisco; Lopez-Vazquez, Carlos; Welles, Laurens; van den Brand, Tessa; Abbas, Ben; van Loosdrecht, Mark; Brdjanovic, Damir

    2017-08-01

    The concentration of sulphate present in wastewater can vary from 10 to 500 mg SO4(2-)/L. During anaerobic conditions, sulphate is reduced to sulphide by sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Sulphide generation is undesired in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Previous research indicated that SRB are inhibited by the presence of electron acceptors (such as O2, NO3 and NO2). However, the contact times and concentrations used in those studies are by far higher than occur in WWTPs. Since sulphide can influence the biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal processes, this research aimed to understand how the different electron acceptors commonly present in biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems can affect the proliferation of SRB. For this purpose, a culture of SRB was enriched in a sequencing batch reactor (approx. 88% of the total bacteria population). Once enriched, the SRB were exposed for 2 h to typical concentrations of electron acceptors like those observed in BNR systems. Their activity was assessed using three different types of electron donors (acetate, propionate and lactate). Oxygen was the most inhibiting electron acceptor regardless the carbon source used. After exposure to oxygen and when feeding acetate, an inactivation time in the sulphate reduction activity was observed for 1.75 h. Once the sulphate reduction activity resumed, only 60% of the original activity was recovered. It is suggested that the proliferation of SRB is most likely to occur in BNR plants with an anaerobic fraction higher than 15% and operating at sludge retention times higher than 20 days (at a temperature of 20 °C). These results can be used to implement strategies to control the growth of sulphate reducers that might compete for organic carbon with phosphate-accumulating organisms.

  5. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-09

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  6. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  7. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  8. Influence of process water quality on hydrothermal carbonization of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaowei; Flora, Joseph R V; Berge, Nicole D

    2014-02-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion process that has been shown to be environmentally and energetically advantageous for the conversion of wet feedstocks. Supplemental moisture, usually in the form of pure water, is added during carbonization to achieve feedstock submersion. To improve process sustainability, it is important to consider alternative supplemental moisture sources. Liquid waste streams may be ideal alternative liquid source candidates. Experiments were conducted to systematically evaluate how changes in pH, ionic strength, and organic carbon content of the initial process water influences cellulose carbonization. Results from the experiments conducted evaluating the influence of process water quality on carbonization indicate that changes in initial water quality do influence time-dependent carbonization product composition and yields. These results also suggest that using municipal and industrial wastewaters, with the exception of streams with high CaCl2 concentrations, may impart little influence on final carbonization products/yields.

  9. Experimental and modeling study of the effects of multicomponent gas additives on selective non-catalytic reduction process.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qingxi; Wu, Shaohua; Lui, Hui; Liu, Dunyu; Qiu, Penghua

    2009-08-01

    The influence of multicomponent additives on NO reduction by selective non-catalytic reduction process has been investigated experimentally in an electricity-heated tube reactor. The multicomponent additives are composed of two species of CO, CH(4) and H(2), and the molar ratio of their two components varies from 1/3 to 3/1. The results show that all the investigated additives could decrease the optimal temperature for NO reduction effectively, but the contributions of their components are different. The performance of multicomponent additive composed of CO and CH(4) depends mainly on CH(4) component. The function of CO component is shifting the temperature window for NO reduction to lower temperature slightly and narrowing the temperature window a little. The temperature window with multicomponent additive composed of H(2) and CH(4) is distinct from that with its each component, so both H(2) and CH(4) component make important contributions. While the fraction of CO is no more than that of H(2) in multicomponent additives composed of them, the performance of multicomponent additives is dominated by H(2) component; while the fraction of CO becomes larger, the influence of CO component becomes notable. Qualitatively the modeling results using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism exhibit the same characteristics of the temperature window shift as observed experimentally. By reaction mechanism analysis, the distinct influences of CO, CH(4) or H(2) component on the property of multicomponent additive are mainly caused by the different production rates of (*)OH radical in their own oxidation process.

  10. Citrate influences microbial Fe hydroxide reduction via a dissolution-disaggregation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Klier, Christine; Schröder, Christian; Händel, Matthias; Bosch, Julian; Totsche, Kai U.; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2014-08-01

    Microbial reduction of ferric iron is partly dependent on Fe hydroxide particle size: nanosized Fe hydroxides greatly exceed the bioavailability of their counterparts larger than 1 μm. Citrate as a low molecular weight organic acid can likewise stabilize colloidal suspensions against aggregation by electrostatic repulsion but also increase Fe bioavailability by enhancing Fe hydroxide solubility. The aim of this study was to see whether adsorption of citrate onto surfaces of large ferrihydrite aggregates results in the formation of a stable colloidal suspension by electrostatic repulsion and how this effect influences microbial Fe reduction. Furthermore, we wanted to discriminate between citrate-mediated colloid stabilization out of larger aggregates and ferrihydrite dissolution and their influence on microbial Fe hydroxide reduction. Dissolution kinetics of ferrihydrite aggregates induced by different concentrations of citrate and humic acids were compared to microbial reduction kinetics with Geobacter sulfurreducens. Dynamic light scattering results showed the formation of a stable colloidal suspension and colloids with hydrodynamic diameters of 69 (±37) to 165 (± 65) nm for molar citrate:Fe ratios of 0.1 to 0.5 and partial dissolution of ferrihydrite at citrate:Fe ratios ⩾ 0.1. No dissolution or colloid stabilization was detected in the presence of humic acids. Adsorption of citrate, necessary for dissolution, reversed the surface charge and led to electrostatic repulsion between sub-aggregates of ferrihydrite and colloid stabilization when the citrate:Fe ratio was above a critical value (⩽ 0.1). Lower ratios resulted in stronger ferrihydrite aggregation instead of formation of a stable colloidal suspension, owing to neutralization of the positive surface charge. At the same time, microbial ferrihydrite reduction increased from 0.029 to 0.184 mM h-1 indicating that colloids stabilized by citrate addition enhanced microbial Fe reduction. Modelling of

  11. Influence of Illite and Kaolin on Chromium(VI) Reduction by Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Yeqing; Kim, Chulsung; Deng, Baolin; Thorton, Edward C.

    2004-03-29

    Use of hydrogen sulfide for reductive chromate immobilization requires us to understand how the minerals in the subsurface environment will affect the reaction. In this study, we examined the effects of illite and kaolin on the reduction of Cr(VI) by hydrogen sulfide under the anaerobic condition at pH ranging from 7.67 to 9.07. The results showed that extremely low concentration of iron dissolved from illite could greatly accelerate the rate of Cr(VI) reduction. An electron cycling process between Fe(II)/Fe(III) was believed to be responsible for the catalysis. The effect of iron could be completely blocked by phenanthroline that formed a strong complex with Fe(II). Elemental sulfur produced as a reaction product was also able to catalyze the reaction in the heterogeneous system. In the kaolin suspension, however, the effect of elemental sulfur could be completely eliminated because of the adsorption of elemental sulfur by kaolin.

  12. Launcher Systems Development Cost: Behavior, Uncertainty, Influences, Barriers and Strategies for Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will report on the activities of the IAA Launcher Systems Economics Working Group in preparations for its Launcher Systems Development Cost Behavior Study. The Study goals include: improve launcher system and other space system parametric cost analysis accuracy; improve launcher system and other space system cost analysis credibility; and provide launcher system and technology development program managers and other decisionmakers with useful information on development cost impacts of their decisions. The Working Group plans to explore at least the following five areas in the Study: define and explain development cost behavior terms and concepts for use in the Study; identify and quantify sources of development cost and cost estimating uncertainty; identify and quantify significant influences on development cost behavior; identify common barriers to development cost understanding and reduction; and recommend practical, realistic strategies to accomplish reductions in launcher system development cost.

  13. Launcher Systems Development Cost: Behavior, Uncertainty, Influences, Barriers and Strategies for Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will report on the activities of the IAA Launcher Systems Economics Working Group in preparations for its Launcher Systems Development Cost Behavior Study. The Study goals include: improve launcher system and other space system parametric cost analysis accuracy; improve launcher system and other space system cost analysis credibility; and provide launcher system and technology development program managers and other decisionmakers with useful information on development cost impacts of their decisions. The Working Group plans to explore at least the following five areas in the Study: define and explain development cost behavior terms and concepts for use in the Study; identify and quantify sources of development cost and cost estimating uncertainty; identify and quantify significant influences on development cost behavior; identify common barriers to development cost understanding and reduction; and recommend practical, realistic strategies to accomplish reductions in launcher system development cost.

  14. Influence of Microbial Iron and Nitrate Reduction on Subsurface Iron Biogeochemistry and Contaminant Metal Mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn W. Picardal

    2002-04-10

    Although toxic metal and radionuclide contaminants can not be destroyed, their toxicity and mobility can be dramatically altered by microbial activity. In addition to toxic metals, many contaminated sites contain both iron-containing minerals and co-contaminants such as nitrate NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Successful implementation of metal and radionuclide bioremediation strategies in such environments requires an understanding of the complex microbial and geochemical interactions that influence the redox speciation and mobility of toxic metals. Our specific objectives have been to (1) determine the effect of iron oxide mineral reduction on the mobility of sorbed, representative toxic metals (Zn{sup 2+}), (2) study the biogeochemical interactions that may occur during microbial reduction of NO{sub 3}{sup -} and iron oxide minerals, and (3) evaluate the kinetics of NO{sub 3}{sup -}-dependent, microbial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}).

  15. Data reduction complex analog-to-digital data processing requirements for onsite test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debbrecht, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The analog to digital processing requirements of onsite test facilities are described. The source and medium of all input data to the Data Reduction Complex (DRC) and the destination and medium of all output products of the analog-to-digital processing are identified. Additionally, preliminary input and output data formats are presented along with the planned use of the output products.

  16. 75 FR 28777 - Information Collection; Pre-Decisional Objection Process for Hazardous Fuel Reduction Projects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Pre-Decisional Objection Process for Hazardous Fuel Reduction... revision, of a currently approved information collection, OMB 0596-0172--Pre-Decisional Objection Process... Standard time, Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Pre-Decisional Objection...

  17. Influence of calcium content of biomass-based materials on simultaneous NOx and SO{sub 2} reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma V. Pisupati; Sumeet Bhalla

    2008-04-01

    Pyrolysis products of biomass (bio-oils) have been shown to cause a reduction in NOx emissions when used as reburn fuels in combustion systems. When these bio-oils are processed with lime, calcium is ion-exchanged and the product is called BioLime. BioLime, when introduced into a combustion chamber, pyrolyzes and produces volatile products that reduce NOx emissions through reburn mechanisms. Simultaneously, calcium reacts with SO{sub 2} to form calcium sulfate and thus reduces SO{sub 2} emissions. This paper reports the characterization of composition and pyrolysis behavior of two BioLime products and the influence of feedstock on pyrolysis products. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and {sup 13}C-CP/MAS NMR techniques were used to study the composition of two biomass-based materials. The composition of the pyrolysis products of BioLime was determined in a laboratory scale flow reactor. The effect of BioLime composition on NOx and SO{sub 2} reduction performance was evaluated in a 146.5 kW pilot-scale, down fired combustor (DFC). The effect of pyrolysis gas composition on NOx reduction is discussed. The TGA weight loss curves of BioLime samples in an inert atmosphere showed two distinct peaks corresponding to the decomposition of light and heavy components of the BioLime and a third distinct peak corresponding to secondary thermal decomposition of char. The study also showed that BioLime sample with lower content of residual lignin derivatives and lower calcium content produced more volatile compounds upon pyrolysis in the combustor and achieved higher NOx reduction (15%). Higher yields of pyrolysis gases increased the NO reduction potential of BioLime through homogeneous gas phase reactions. Calcium in BioLime samples effectively reduced SO{sub 2} emissions (60-85%). 36 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Modeling and sensitivity analysis study of the reduction of NO sub x by HNCO. [RAPRENOx process

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.; Garay, J.

    1992-05-01

    A chemical mechanism for the reduction of NO{sub x} by HNCO has been constructed to allow for the modeling of NO{sub x} in exhausts typical of natural gas combustion (RAPRENOx process). The reduction was modeled assuming plug flow, and either isothermal combustion or constant pressure adiabatic combustion. Variables were initial concentrations of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, and HNCO as well as initial temperatures. Exhaust residence time was nominally 1 s. Reduction was not achieved for prototypical natural gas exhaust'' for a reasonable residence time. Radical generation is crucial for reduction. H{sub 2} addition enhanced ignition and reduction. The final combustion temperature determines where NO{sub x} reduction ceases and NO{sub x} production increases. Reduction increases with HNCO, and breakthrough of NH{sub 3} and HNCO increses as well. N{sub 2}O production is due to NCO + NO, but the reduction of NO also occurs through reactions associated with the Thermal De-NOx chemistry. NH{sub 3} production and reactions are important to the reduction of NO. Sensitivity analysis under easy ignition conditions indicated that the same reactions involving nitrogen species, NH{sub 2} and NNH, important in De-NOx, are important when HNCO is used to reduce NO{sub x}. A real combustion exhaust would contain radicals, but it would be neither isothermal nor adiabatic, and heat release and loss would accompany the reduction process. Three-body recombination reactions are important and need further study.(DLC)

  19. The effects of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction in a SNCR process.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiangtao; Yu, Wei; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Yufei; Zhu, Xiuming

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction during the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process were carried out in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The effects of reaction temperature (Tr), water vapor, Na/K additives (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3) and flyash characteristics on NO reduction were analyzed. The results indicated that NO removal efficiency shows a pattern of increasing first and decreasing later with the increase of the temperature at Tr=850-1150°C. Water vapor can improve the performance of NO reduction, and the NO reduction of 70.5% was obtained while the flue gas containing 4% water vapor at 950°C. Na/K additives have a significant promoting effect on NO reduction and widen the SNCR temperature window, the promoting effect of the test additives is ordered as Na2CO3>KCl>NaCl. NO removal efficiency with 125ppm Na2CO3 and 4% water vapor can reach up to 84.9% at the optimal reaction temperature. The additive concentration has no significant effects on NO reduction while its concentration is above 50ppm. Addition of circulating fluidized combustion (CFB) flyash deteriorates NO reduction significantly. However, CFB flyash and Na/K additives will get a coupling effect on NO reduction during the SNCR process, and the best NO reduction can reach 72.3% while feeding Na2CO3-impregnated CFB flyash at 125ppm Na2CO3 and Tr=950°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptation of U(IV) reductant to Savannah River Plant Purex processes

    SciTech Connect

    Orebaugh, E.G.

    1986-04-01

    Partitioning of uranium and plutonium in the Purex process requires the reduction of the extracted Pu(IV) to the less extractable Pu(III). This valence adjustment at SRP has historically been performed by the addition of ferrous ion, which eventually constitutes a major component of high-level waste solids requiring costly permanent disposal. Uranous nitrate, U(IV), is a kinetically fast reductant which may be substituted for Fe(II) without contributing to waste solids. This report documents U(IV) flowsheet development in the miniature mixer-settler equipment at SRL and provides an insight into the mechanisms responsible for the successful direct substitution of U(IV) for Fe(II) in 1B bank extractant. U(IV) will be the reductant of choice when its fast reduction kinetics are required in centrifugal-contactor-based processing. The flowsheets investigated here should transfer to such equipment with minimal modifications.

  1. Influence of Wall Strain Rate, Polymer Concentration and Channel Height upon Drag Reduction and Turbulent Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    1000 3 - 1 1 1000 5 0 0 2500 4 1 - 1 4000 3 1 1 4000 5 0 - 4" 2500 2.6 -Ŗ 0 380 4 0 o 2500 5.4 0 4620 4 2.8 Burst Detection Analysis In order to...Report PME-FM-89- 1 AD-A215 378 INFLUENCE OF WALL STRAIN RATE, POLYMER CONCENTRATION AND CHANNEL HEIGHT UPON DRAG REDUCTION AND TURBULENT STRUCTURE...RESEARCH So ECO41989 800 North QuineT Street Arlington, VA 22217-5000 n n I r SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (10%an Dea bf~erevd REPCRT

  2. Large space structure model reduction and control system design based upon actuator and sensor influence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Lang, J. H.; Johnson, T. L.; Shih, S.; Staelin, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A model reduction procedure based on aggregation with respect to sensor and actuator influences rather than modes is presented for large systems of coupled second-order differential equations. Perturbation expressions which can predict the effects of spillover on both the aggregated and residual states are derived. These expressions lead to the development of control system design constraints which are sufficient to guarantee, to within the validity of the perturbations, that the residual states are not destabilized by control systems designed from the reduced model. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the application of the aggregation and control system design method.

  3. Large space structure model reduction and control system design based upon actuator and sensor influence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Lang, J. H.; Johnson, T. L.; Shih, S.; Staelin, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A model reduction procedure based on aggregation with respect to sensor and actuator influences rather than modes is presented for large systems of coupled second-order differential equations. Perturbation expressions which can predict the effects of spillover on both the aggregated and residual states are derived. These expressions lead to the development of control system design constraints which are sufficient to guarantee, to within the validity of the perturbations, that the residual states are not destabilized by control systems designed from the reduced model. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the application of the aggregation and control system design method.

  4. COD and BOD reduction from coffee processing wastewater using Avacado peel carbon.

    PubMed

    Devi, Rani; Singh, Vijender; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was the assessment of reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD) of wastewater from coffee processing plant using activated carbon made up of Avacado Peels. The complete study was done in batch mode to investigate the effect of operating parameters. The results of the COD and BOD concentration reduction with avocado peel carbon (APC) and commercial activated carbon (CAC) were compared and optimum operating conditions were determined for maximum reduction. Adsorption isotherm was also studied besides the calculation of optimum treatment parameters for maximum reduction of COD and BOD concentration from effluent of the coffee processing plant. The maximum percentage reduction of COD and BOD concentration under optimum operating conditions using APC was 98.20% and 99.18% respectively and with CAC this reduction was 99.02% and 99.35% respectively. As the adsorption capacity of APC is comparable with that of CAC for reduction of COD and BOD concentration, it could be a lucrative technique for treatment of domestic wastewater generated in decentralized sectors.

  5. A Systematic Process to Prioritize Prevention Activities: Sustaining Progress Toward the Reduction of Military Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    avoids overtraining and utilizes agility- ike training has been found to reduce physical training– elated injuries while meeting desired physical fıtness...M F A P ( S v d v C t 2 P A Systematic Process to Prioritize Prevention Activities Sustaining Progress Toward the Reduction of Military Injuries ...Schaefer, MD, MPH, Galen Barbour, MD, Kenneth S. Yew, MD, Bruce H. Jones, MD, MPH Background: To sustain progress toward injury reduction and other

  6. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments.

  7. Cleaner Production of Ti Powder by a Two-Stage Aluminothermic Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Wang, Yaowu; Feng, Naixiang

    2017-04-01

    A two-stage aluminothermic reduction process for preparing Ti powder under vacuum conditions using Na2TiF6 was investigated. An Al-Ti master alloy and a clean cryolite were simultaneously obtained as co-products. The first-stage reduction was an exothermic process that occurred at approximately 660°C. The Al and O contents of the Ti powder product were 0.18 wt.% and 0.35 wt.%, respectively, with an average particle size <74 μm. Ti(IV), Ti(III), and metallic Ti were present in the Ti-containing cryolite produced by the first-stage reduction, at a total content of approximately 3.13 wt.%. After second-stage reduction, the Ti elemental contents of the clean cryolite were reduced to 0.002 wt.%. The Al-Ti master alloy obtained by second-stage reduction was composed of Al and TiAl3. The mechanisms involved in these reduction processes were also examined.

  8. Phase Transformation of Limonite Nickel Ores with Na2SO4 Addition in Selective Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayangsari, W.; Prasetyo, A. B.

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to observe the transformations, both mineralogy and morphology of limonite nickel ore with coal as reducing agent and Na2SO4 as an additive in the selective reduction processes. A series of selective reduction processes were carried out at various temperatures in Carbolite muffle furnace for 1 hour. The range of reduction temperature was determined from Thermogravimetric-Derivative Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA). The mineralogy of raw and reduced ores was characterized by using XRD analysis. The morphology, particle size, and mapping were characterized by using SEM-EDS analysis. The results showed that goethite was the main component in the raw limonite nickel ore and it was decomposed by losing the crystalline water at 300 °C. The decompositions were continued to lizardite and trevorite at 600 °C and 800 °C respectively, then Fe and Fe-Ni were formed at 900 °C. Metallization continuously occurred by increasing reduction temperature up to 1100 °C. Moreover, the particle size and porosity of reduced ore were greater up to 2.5-times. The addition of Na2SO4 on the selective reduction processes decreased silica content; it also caused the formation of fayalite and FeS at 600 °C and 800 °C respectively. The intensity of fayalite and FeS decreased when the reduction temperature was more than 900 °C.

  9. Cleaner Production of Ti Powder by a Two-Stage Aluminothermic Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Wang, Yaowu; Feng, Naixiang

    2017-10-01

    A two-stage aluminothermic reduction process for preparing Ti powder under vacuum conditions using Na2TiF6 was investigated. An Al-Ti master alloy and a clean cryolite were simultaneously obtained as co-products. The first-stage reduction was an exothermic process that occurred at approximately 660°C. The Al and O contents of the Ti powder product were 0.18 wt.% and 0.35 wt.%, respectively, with an average particle size <74 μm. Ti(IV), Ti(III), and metallic Ti were present in the Ti-containing cryolite produced by the first-stage reduction, at a total content of approximately 3.13 wt.%. After second-stage reduction, the Ti elemental contents of the clean cryolite were reduced to 0.002 wt.%. The Al-Ti master alloy obtained by second-stage reduction was composed of Al and TiAl3. The mechanisms involved in these reduction processes were also examined.

  10. Community Colleges and Parental Influence in the College Choice Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, David; Feller, Rich

    1991-01-01

    Discusses parental influence in college choice process, particularly in terms of considering community colleges as alternative. Argues that there is too little importance given to college choice making, that parents are more significant in the process than assumed, and that community colleges deserve and will receive increasingly more attention…

  11. Lubricant Reduction in Deep Drawing Process by means of Slotted Die Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thipprakmas, Sutasn

    In recent years, the metal forming industries are rapidly and continuously growing and causing sound and waste pollution. Therefore, the reduction of environmental pollution is extremely important. In terms of waste pollution, in this study, the lubricant used in the application of the deep drawing process was considered. In this research, the author explored method for the realization of the reduction of the amount of lubricant used in order to resolve the above issue. Namely, the die was slotted in order to continuously apply lubricants in the process of the drawn part fabrication. Furthermore, the optimization of the amount of lubricant used was also investigated. On the basis of the results, the author clarified that the slotted die method is effective in realizing the reduction of the amount of lubricant used in the deep drawing process.

  12. Treating industrial discharges by thermophilic sulfate reduction process with molasses as electron donor.

    PubMed

    Liamleam, W; Annachhatre, A P

    2007-06-01

    Thermophilic sulfate reduction process with molasses as an electron donor was investigated for the removal of zinc from rayon industry wastewater. Sulfide rich effluent from the process was used to remove zinc as zinc sulfide precipitate. The investigations with sulfate reduction process were conducted with synthetic (Stage I) as well as real wastewater from Rayon industry (Stage II) as feed. The effect of feed COD: sulfate ratio, which is the key factor for operating the sulfate reduction process, was focused on in this study. The experimental results showed that the process could achieve a high sulfate conversion rate of about 7.22 +/- 1.91 g SO4 l(-1).d(-1) at COD: sulfate ratio of 1.5:1 and 7.20 +/- 2.27 g SO4 l(-1).d(-1) at COD: sulfate ratio of 3:1 during stage I and stage II, respectively. At the end of the operation of stage II, a maximum sulfide production of 496.2 mg S l(-1) was achieved at COD: sulfate ratio of 3:1. Furthermore, sulfide rich effluent from sulfate reduction process was used for zinc sulfide precipitation. The results showed that more than 95% of zinc was removed from a high sulfate-containing wastewater.

  13. Social anxiety and cannabis cravings: The influences of parent injunctive norms and tension reduction expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Dawn W.; Ecker, Anthony H.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Buckner, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Socially anxious cannabis users are influenced by cannabis expectancies and normative perceptions. The present study examines the influence of psychosocial factors on cannabis use vulnerability factors as the result of interactions between norms perceptions, social anxiety, and expectancies. Methods Participants were 149 (36.2% female) current cannabis users aged 18-36 (M=21.01, SD=3.09). Hierarchical multiple regressions were employed to investigate the predictive value of the social anxiety X injunctive norms X expectancies interaction on cannabis cravings. Results A three-way interaction emerged in the prediction of cannabis cravings. Simple slopes analyses showed that among individuals with perceptions of greater parent approval of cannabis use (higher injunctive norms), social anxiety was associated with greater cannabis craving when expectancies regarding relaxation and tension reduction were greater (t=2.54, p=.01, β=1.12). Conclusions Among cannabis users with perceptions of greater injunctive norms, social anxiety was associated with greater cannabis craving when tension reduction expectancies were greater. However, social anxiety was unrelated to cannabis craving when expectances were low. This suggests that cannabis craving among socially anxious adults was greatest when cannabis use was viewed as acceptable and expected to reduce tension, and highlights the importance of considering norms, expectancies, and social anxiety in understanding cannabis-related behaviors. PMID:26586926

  14. Social anxiety and cannabis cravings: The influences of parent injunctive norms and tension reduction expectancies.

    PubMed

    Foster, Dawn W; Ecker, Anthony H; Zvolensky, Michael J; Buckner, Julia D

    2015-11-01

    Socially anxious cannabis users are influenced by cannabis expectancies and normative perceptions. The present study examines the influence of psychosocial factors on cannabis use vulnerability factors as the result of interactions between norms perceptions, social anxiety, and expectancies. Participants were 149 (36.2% female) current cannabis users aged 18-36 (M=21.01, SD=3.09). Hierarchical multiple regressions were employed to investigate the predictive value of the social anxiety X injunctive norms X expectancies interaction on cannabis cravings. A three-way interaction emerged in the prediction of cannabis cravings. Simple slopes analyses showed that among individuals with perceptions of greater parent approval of cannabis use (higher injunctive norms), social anxiety was associated with greater cannabis craving when expectancies regarding relaxation and tension reduction were greater (t=2.54, p=.01, β=1.12). Among cannabis users with perceptions of greater injunctive norms, social anxiety was associated with greater cannabis craving when tension reduction expectancies were greater. However, social anxiety was unrelated to cannabis craving when expectances were low. This suggests that cannabis craving among socially anxious adults was greatest when cannabis use was viewed as acceptable and expected to reduce tension, and highlights the importance of considering norms, expectancies, and social anxiety in understanding cannabis-related behaviors.

  15. Ceruloplasmin copper induces oxidant damage by a redox process utilizing cell-derived superoxide as reductant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage by transition metals bound to proteins may be an important pathogenic mechanism. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a Cu-containing plasma protein thought to be involved in oxidative modification of lipoproteins. We have previously shown that Cp increased cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by a process requiring cell-derived superoxide, but the underlying chemical mechanism(s) is (are) unknown. We now show that superoxide reduction of Cp Cu is a critical reaction in cellular LDL oxidation. By bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) binding and by superoxide utilization, we showed that exogenous superoxide reduces a single Cp Cu atom, the same Cu required for LDL oxidation. The Cu atom remained bound to Cp during the redox cycle. Three avenues of evidence showed that vascular cells reduce Cp Cu by a superoxide-dependent process. The 2-fold higher rate of Cp Cu reduction by smooth muscle cells (SMC) compared to endothelial cells (EC) was consistent with their relative rates of superoxide release. Furthermore, Cp Cu reduction by cells was blocked by Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Finally, the level of superoxide produced by EC and SMC was sufficient to cause the amount of Cu reduction observed. An important role of Cp Cu reduction in LDL oxidation was suggested by results showing that SOD1 inhibited Cp Cu reduction and LDL oxidation by SMC with equal potency, while tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated both processes. In summary, these results show that superoxide is a critical cellular reductant of divalent transition metals involved in oxidation, and that protein-bound Cu is a substrate for this reaction. The role of these mechanisms in oxidative processes in vivo has yet to be defined.

  16. Ceruloplasmin copper induces oxidant damage by a redox process utilizing cell-derived superoxide as reductant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage by transition metals bound to proteins may be an important pathogenic mechanism. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a Cu-containing plasma protein thought to be involved in oxidative modification of lipoproteins. We have previously shown that Cp increased cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by a process requiring cell-derived superoxide, but the underlying chemical mechanism(s) is (are) unknown. We now show that superoxide reduction of Cp Cu is a critical reaction in cellular LDL oxidation. By bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) binding and by superoxide utilization, we showed that exogenous superoxide reduces a single Cp Cu atom, the same Cu required for LDL oxidation. The Cu atom remained bound to Cp during the redox cycle. Three avenues of evidence showed that vascular cells reduce Cp Cu by a superoxide-dependent process. The 2-fold higher rate of Cp Cu reduction by smooth muscle cells (SMC) compared to endothelial cells (EC) was consistent with their relative rates of superoxide release. Furthermore, Cp Cu reduction by cells was blocked by Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Finally, the level of superoxide produced by EC and SMC was sufficient to cause the amount of Cu reduction observed. An important role of Cp Cu reduction in LDL oxidation was suggested by results showing that SOD1 inhibited Cp Cu reduction and LDL oxidation by SMC with equal potency, while tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated both processes. In summary, these results show that superoxide is a critical cellular reductant of divalent transition metals involved in oxidation, and that protein-bound Cu is a substrate for this reaction. The role of these mechanisms in oxidative processes in vivo has yet to be defined.

  17. Experiment and mechanism investigation on advanced reburning for NOx reduction: influence of CO and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hua; Zhou, Jun-hu; Zhang, Yan-wei; Lu, Zhi-min; Fan, Jian-ren; Cen, Ke-fa

    2005-01-01

    Pulverized coal reburning, ammonia injection and advanced reburning in a pilot scale drop tube furnace were investigated. Premix of petroleum gas, air and NH3 were burned in a porous gas burner to generate the needed flue gas. Four kinds of pulverized coal were fed as reburning fuel at constant rate of 1g/min. The coal reburning process parameters including 15%~25% reburn heat input, temperature range from 1100 °C to 1400 °C and also the carbon in fly ash, coal fineness, reburn zone stoichiometric ratio, etc. were investigated. On the condition of 25% reburn heat input, maximum of 47% NO reduction with Yanzhou coal was obtained by pure coal reburning. Optimal temperature for reburning is about 1300 °C and fuel-rich stoichiometric ratio is essential; coal fineness can slightly enhance the reburning ability. The temperature window for ammonia injection is about 700 °C~1100 °C. CO can improve the NH3 ability at lower temperature. During advanced reburning, 72.9% NO reduction was measured. To achieve more than 70% NO reduction, Selective Non-catalytic NOx Reduction (SNCR) should need NH3/NO stoichiometric ratio larger than 5, while advanced reburning only uses common dose of ammonia as in conventional SNCR technology. Mechanism study shows the oxidization of CO can improve the decomposition of H2O, which will rich the radical pools igniting the whole reactions at lower temperatures. PMID:15682503

  18. Waste reduction assistance program (WRAP) on-site consultation audit report: Seafood processing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-29

    The waste audit study was conducted at a seafood processing plant in Alaska. The report discusses process descriptions, waste types and quantities, current waste and materials management practices, and waste reduction alternatives. The company's current practices include use of fish waste, burning of used oil and solvents, and water conservation. Additional opportunities include microfiltration of solvents and oils, recycling of used batteries, inventory control and formation of a waste reduction team. Appendices include a summary of state regulations, a fact sheet on used oil, and a list of vendors and services.

  19. Orbiter data reduction complex data processing requirements for the OFT mission evaluation team (level C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This document addresses requirements for post-test data reduction in support of the Orbital Flight Tests (OFT) mission evaluation team, specifically those which are planned to be implemented in the ODRC (Orbiter Data Reduction Complex). Only those requirements which have been previously baselined by the Data Systems and Analysis Directorate configuration control board are included. This document serves as the control document between Institutional Data Systems Division and the Integration Division for OFT mission evaluation data processing requirements, and shall be the basis for detailed design of ODRC data processing systems.

  20. Estimating and mapping ecological processes influencing microbial community assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Ecological community assembly is governed by a combination of (i) selection resulting from among-taxa differences in performance; (ii) dispersal resulting from organismal movement; and (iii) ecological drift resulting from stochastic changes in population sizes. The relative importance and nature of these processes can vary across environments. Selection can be homogeneous or variable, and while dispersal is a rate, we conceptualize extreme dispersal rates as two categories; dispersal limitation results from limited exchange of organisms among communities, and homogenizing dispersal results from high levels of organism exchange. To estimate the influence and spatial variation of each process we extend a recently developed statistical framework, use a simulation model to evaluate the accuracy of the extended framework, and use the framework to examine subsurface microbial communities over two geologic formations. For each subsurface community we estimate the degree to which it is influenced by homogeneous selection, variable selection, dispersal limitation, and homogenizing dispersal. Our analyses revealed that the relative influences of these ecological processes vary substantially across communities even within a geologic formation. We further identify environmental and spatial features associated with each ecological process, which allowed mapping of spatial variation in ecological-process-influences. The resulting maps provide a new lens through which ecological systems can be understood; in the subsurface system investigated here they revealed that the influence of variable selection was associated with the rate at which redox conditions change with subsurface depth. PMID:25983725

  1. Estimating and mapping ecological processes influencing microbial community assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; ...

    2015-05-01

    Ecological community assembly is governed by a combination of (i) selection resulting from among-taxa differences in performance; (ii) dispersal resulting from organismal movement; and (iii) ecological drift resulting from stochastic changes in population sizes. The relative importance and nature of these processes can vary across environments. Selection can be homogeneous or variable, and while dispersal is a rate, we conceptualize extreme dispersal rates as two categories; dispersal limitation results from limited exchange of organisms among communities, and homogenizing dispersal results from high levels of organism exchange. To estimate the influence and spatial variation of each process we extend a recentlymore » developed statistical framework, use a simulation model to evaluate the accuracy of the extended framework, and use the framework to examine subsurface microbial communities over two geologic formations. For each subsurface community we estimate the degree to which it is influenced by homogeneous selection, variable selection, dispersal limitation, and homogenizing dispersal. Our analyses revealed that the relative influences of these ecological processes vary substantially across communities even within a geologic formation. We further identify environmental and spatial features associated with each ecological process, which allowed mapping of spatial variation in ecological-process-influences. The resulting maps provide a new lens through which ecological systems can be understood; in the subsurface system investigated here they revealed that the influence of variable selection was associated with the rate at which redox conditions change with subsurface depth.« less

  2. Estimating and mapping ecological processes influencing microbial community assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan E.

    2015-05-01

    Ecological community assembly is governed by a combination of (i) selection resulting from among-taxa differences in performance; (ii) dispersal resulting from organismal movement; and (iii) ecological drift resulting from stochastic changes in population sizes. The relative importance and nature of these processes can vary across environments. Selection can be homogeneous or variable, and while dispersal is a rate, we conceptualize extreme dispersal rates as two categories; dispersal limitation results from limited exchange of organisms among communities, and homogenizing dispersal results from high levels of organism exchange. To estimate the influence and spatial variation of each process we extend a recently developed statistical framework, use a simulation model to evaluate the accuracy of the extended framework, and use the framework to examine subsurface microbial communities over two geologic formations. For each subsurface community we estimate the degree to which it is influenced by homogeneous selection, variable selection, dispersal limitation, and homogenizing dispersal. Our analyses revealed that the relative influences of these ecological processes vary substantially across communities even within a geologic formation. We further identify environmental and spatial features associated with each ecological process, which allowed mapping of spatial variation in ecological-process-influences. The resulting maps provide a new lens through which ecological systems can be understood; in the subsurface system investigated here they revealed that the influence of variable selection was associated with the rate at which redox conditions change with subsurface depth.

  3. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Matthias J; Gerdes, Antje B M; Reicherts, Philipp; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not - or only partly - affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e., facial expressions of pain). Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing.

  4. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Matthias J.; Gerdes, Antje B. M.; Reicherts, Philipp; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not – or only partly – affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e., facial expressions of pain). Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing. PMID:25352817

  5. Comparison of reduction disintegration characteristics of TiO2-rich burdens prepared with sintering process and composite agglomeration process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zheng-wei; Li, Guang-hui; Liu, Chen; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Zhi-wei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    To reveal the impact of the composite agglomeration process (CAP) on the reduction disintegration properties of TiO2-rich ironmaking burden for a blast furnace, the reduction disintegration indices (RDIs), mineral constituents, and microstructure of the products prepared by the CAP and the traditional sintering process (TSP) were investigated. The results showed that, compared to the sinter with a basicity of 2.0 prepared by the TSP, the RDI+6.3 and the RDI+3.15 of the CAP product with the same basicity increased by 28.2wt% and 13.7wt%, respectively, whereas the RDI-0.5 decreased by 2.7wt%. The analysis of the mineral constituents and microstructure of the products indicated that the decreasing titanohematite content decreased the volume expansion during reduction. Meanwhile, the decreasing perovskite content decreased its detrimental effect on the reduction disintegration properties. In addition, the higher silicoferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) content improved the strength of the CAP product. Together, these factors result in an improvement of the RDI of the CAP products. In addition, compared to the sinter, the reduced CAP products clearly contained fewer cracks, which also led to mitigation of reduction disintegration.

  6. NO x Reduction in the Iron Ore Sintering Process with Flue Gas Recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Fan, Xiaohui; Gan, Min; Chen, Xuling; Lv, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Flue gas recirculation (FGR) has been implemented for exhaust gas emissions reduction in iron ore sintering. However, the mechanism of NO x reduction through FGR is still unclear. In this paper, the laboratory pot-grate sintering test showed a 30% reduction in gas flow and 15.51% reduction in NO x emissions achieved with a 30% FGR ratio, and the sinter indexes almost matched those of the conventional process. In the sinter zone, NO-CO catalytic reduction occurs in the range of 500-900°C. When the sinter temperature is 700°C, the highest nitrogen reduction ratio (NRR) achieved is 8%; however, the NO x reduction is inhibited as the post-combustion of CO starts when the temperature increases beyond 700°C. NO x in the flue gas is mainly a product of the fuel combustion in the combustion zone, as the nitrogen conversion rate reaches 50-60%, because the N-containing intermediates exist during the fuel combustion. The existence of NO in the FGR gas inhibits the NO x generation from the fuel combustion, and the NO elimination—through the NO-carbon reaction—is significant in the combustion zone. The NRR in the combustion zone reaches a range of 18-20%.

  7. NO x Reduction in the Iron Ore Sintering Process with Flue Gas Recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Fan, Xiaohui; Gan, Min; Chen, Xuling; Lv, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Flue gas recirculation (FGR) has been implemented for exhaust gas emissions reduction in iron ore sintering. However, the mechanism of NO x reduction through FGR is still unclear. In this paper, the laboratory pot-grate sintering test showed a 30% reduction in gas flow and 15.51% reduction in NO x emissions achieved with a 30% FGR ratio, and the sinter indexes almost matched those of the conventional process. In the sinter zone, NO-CO catalytic reduction occurs in the range of 500-900°C. When the sinter temperature is 700°C, the highest nitrogen reduction ratio (NRR) achieved is 8%; however, the NO x reduction is inhibited as the post-combustion of CO starts when the temperature increases beyond 700°C. NO x in the flue gas is mainly a product of the fuel combustion in the combustion zone, as the nitrogen conversion rate reaches 50-60%, because the N-containing intermediates exist during the fuel combustion. The existence of NO in the FGR gas inhibits the NO x generation from the fuel combustion, and the NO elimination—through the NO-carbon reaction—is significant in the combustion zone. The NRR in the combustion zone reaches a range of 18-20%.

  8. Study on emission characteristics and reduction strategy of nitrous oxide during wastewater treatment by different processes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shichang; Bao, Zhiyuan; Sun, Dezhi

    2015-03-01

    Given the inexorable increase in global wastewater treatment, increasing amounts of nitrous oxide are expected to be emitted from wastewater treatment plants and released to the atmosphere. It has become imperative to study the emission and control of nitrous oxide in the various wastewater treatment processes currently in use. In the present investigation, the emission characteristics and the factors affecting the release of nitrous oxide were studied via full- and pilot-scale experiments in anoxic-oxic, sequencing batch reactor and oxidation ditch processes. We propose an optimal treatment process and relative strategy for nitrous oxide reduction. Our results show that both the bio-nitrifying and bio-denitrifying treatment units in wastewater treatment plants are the predominant sites for nitrous oxide production in each process, while the aerated treatment units are the critical sources for nitrous oxide emission. Compared with the emission of nitrous oxide from the anoxic-oxic (1.37% of N-influent) and sequencing batch reactor (2.69% of N-influent) processes, much less nitrous oxide (0.25% of N-influent) is emitted from the oxidation ditch process, which we determined as the optimal wastewater treatment process for nitrous oxide reduction, given the current technologies. Nitrous oxide emissions differed with various operating parameters. Controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration at a proper level during nitrification and denitrification and enhancing the utilization rate of organic carbon in the influent for denitrification are the two critical methods for nitrous oxide reduction in the various processes considered.

  9. Influence of Taper of Root Canal Shape on the Intracanal Bacterial Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulou, Mary Th.; Khabbaz, Marouan G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Taper is a factor that determines final root canal dimensions and consequently, the space available for the cleaning action of irrigants. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of taper on intracanal bacterial reduction. Methods: Sterilized root canals of 25 mandibular incisors were inoculated with E. faecalis and then divided into two experimental groups and one control group (A= saline, B= NaOCl + EDTA and C= control, not prepared). Groups A and B were prepared to an apical size of #30/0.04, a culture was obtained and then prepared to #30/0.08 and cultured again. Final irrigation sequence was 30 ml of saline for group A and 10 ml of 17% EDTA followed by 10 ml of 2.5% NaOCl and 10 ml of saline for group B. The CFU ml-1 of the pre- and two post-operative samplings were recorded. Values were compared by performing ANOVA and FDR for multiple hypothesis testing. Results: No statistically significant difference between initial CFU ml-1 readings was recorded, whereas significant differences between group A and B at both 4% and 8% tapers were noted. Furthermore, a linear-dependent reduction of CFU ml-1 was recorded in each group from non-instrumented root canals to #30/0.04 and subsequently to #30/0.08. The positive control group shows the expected reduction of bacterial count. Conclusion: Chemomechanical instrumentation was more efficient at reducing E. faecalis when the taper of root canals increased from 4% to 8% and NaOCl plus EDTA led to a greater intracanal bacterial reduction than saline, regardless of the taper achieved. PMID:27857818

  10. Optimization of process for reduction of antinutritional factors in edible cereal brans.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satinder; Sharma, Savita; Dar, B N; Singh, Baljit

    2012-10-01

    Reduction of various antinutritional factors in cereal brans by different treatments (microwave heating, dry heating and wet heating) were studied. There was significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) in reduction of antinutritional factors of treated cereal brans except for dry heating at low temperature. Microwave heating at 2450 MHz for 2.5 min resulted in 53.85%, 57.21%, 65.00% and 100% reduction in phytic acid, polyphenols, oxalates and saponins, respectively. Wet heating resulted in maximum reduction in trypsin inhibitor activity (83.07%) at 110 °C for 25 min. Processing treatment resulted in increase in bulk density and slight darkening of the brans. The most effective method of detoxifying most of the toxicants was microwave heating for 2.5 min, and therefore it could be exploited for making treated brans an ideal source for potential food application.

  11. A process for the purification of organochlorine contaminated activated carbon: Sequential solvent purging and reductive dechlorination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; Manefield, Mike

    2010-03-01

    A system for the purification of organochlorine contaminated activated carbon is described. The system involves a continuous flow of aqueous ethanol to purge organochlorines from activated carbon. The organochlorine laden solvent is simultaneously treated with zero valent zinc as the bulk electron source, water as the proton source and the electron shuttle cyanocobalamin as a catalyst for reductive dechlorination. The system was characterised by performing batch reactions and extractions before being applied in a continuous flow system. In particular the ratio of water to ethanol in the system needed to be optimised. Water is needed for the reductive dechlorination reaction whilst it is not conducive to the extraction process. An 80% ethanolic solution was found to give optimal reductive dechlorination rates without compromising extraction of organochlorines from activated carbon. Of three electron shuttles evaluated cyanocobalamin was discovered to be the most relevant to the system with respect to reductive dechlorination rates and its ability to avoid absorption to activated carbon.

  12. Influence of volume reduction and cryopreservation methodologies on quality of thawed umbilical cord blood units for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Planelles, Dolores; Carbonell-Uberos, Francisco; Roig, Roberto

    2008-04-01

    Although there is considerable variability in methodology among umbilical cord blood banks, their common goal is to achieve optimal product quality for transplantation. Cryopreservation is a critical issue for a long-term maintenance of cord blood viability and colony-forming capacities. We designed a prospective study to compare controlled (CRF) vs. non-controlled freezing (URF) of volume-reduced cord blood units. In addition, the influence of hydroxy ethyl starch (HES) on cryopreservation was also assayed. To assess the efficiency of protocols used, cell recoveries were measured and the presence of hematopoietic colony-forming units was quantified. In the study phase, we observed similar CB haematopoietc recoveries for CRF and URF strategies, except for TNC recovery that was better for HES volume reduced CB units in the URF group. When we analysed the data of routine processed CB units in samples from satellite cryovials, we found better BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-GEMM and CFU recoveries for those units processed with HES than without HES, in an URF manner. URF of CB units is a cryopreservation procedure that allows similar hematopoietic progenitor recoveries than CRF with programmed devices. However, our study suggests that those banks that cryopreserve CB units in a URF manner should use HES for volume reduction. On the other hand, for CRF cryopreservation methodology volume reduction with and without HES are equally useful.

  13. The impact of the reduction of sodium content in processed foods in salt intake in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Amanda de Moura; Souza, Bárbara da Silva Nalin de; Bezerra, Ilana Nogueira; Sichieri, Rosely

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed at assessing the potential impact of the reduction of sodium content in processed foods in the average salt intake in the Brazilian population. A total of 32,900 participants of the first National Dietary Survey (NDS 2008-2009), age 10 years and older who provided information about food intake over two days were evaluated. The sodium reduction targets established by the Brazilian Ministry of Health in 2010 and 2013 were used as the reference to determine the maximum content of sodium in 21 groups of processed food. The results show that sodium reduction targets in processed food have small impact in mean Brazilian population intake of salt. For 2017, the expected mean reduction is of 1.5%, the average sodium intake being still above the recommended 2,000mg/day maximum. Therefore, it will hardly be possible to reach the necessary reduction in salt intake in Brazil from volunteer agreements like the ones made so far.

  14. Spray automated balancing of rotors - How process parameters influence performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, A. J.; Baldwin, R. M.; Fleming, D. P.; Yuhas, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of spray-automated balancing of rotors, and the influence that various operating parameters will have on balancing performance. Spray-automated balancing uses the fuel-air repetitive explosion process to imbed short, discrete bursts of high velocity, high temperature powder into a rotating part at an angle selected to reduce unbalance of the part. The shortness of the burst, the delay in firing of the gun, the speed of the disk and the variability in speed all influence the accuracy and effectiveness of the automated balancing process. The paper evaluates this influence by developing an analytical framework and supplementing the analysis with empirical data obtained while firing the gun at a rotating disk. Encouraging results are obtained, and it is shown that the process should perform satisfactorily over a wide range of operating parameters. Further experimental results demonstrate the ability of the method to reduce vibration levels induced by mass unbalance in a rotating disk.

  15. Eco-social processes influencing infectious disease emergence and spread.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony A; Betson, Martha; Pfeiffer, Dirk U

    2017-01-01

    The complexity and connectedness of eco-social processes have major influence on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases amongst humans and animals. The disciplinary nature of most research activity has made it difficult to improve our understanding of interactions and feedback loops within the relevant systems. Influenced by the One Health approach, increasing efforts have recently been made to address this knowledge gap. Disease emergence and spread is strongly influenced by host density and contact structures, pathogen characteristics and pathogen population and molecular evolutionary dynamics in different host species, and host response to infection. All these mechanisms are strongly influenced by eco-social processes, such as globalization and urbanization, which lead to changes in global ecosystem dynamics, including patterns of mobility, human population density and contact structures, and food production and consumption. An improved understanding of epidemiological and eco-social processes, including their interdependence, will be essential to be able to manage diseases in these circumstances. The interfaces between wild animals, domestic animals and humans need to be examined to identify the main risk pathways and put in place appropriate mitigation. Some recent examples of emerging infectious disease are described to illustrate eco-social processes that are influencing disease emergence and spread.

  16. Mineralization of 2-chlorophenol by sequential electrochemical reductive dechlorination and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Arellano-González, Miguel Ángel; González, Ignacio; Texier, Anne-Claire

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel approach was applied to obtain the mineralization of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an electrochemical-biological combined system where an electrocatalytic dehydrogenation process (reductive dechlorination) was coupled to a biological denitrification process. Reductive dechlorination of 2-CP was conducted in an ECCOCEL-type reactor on a Pd-Ni/Ti electrode at a potential of -0.40V vs Ag/AgCl(s)/KCl(sat), achieving 100 percent transformation of 2-CP into phenol. The electrochemically pretreated effluent was fed to a rotating cylinder denitrifying bioreactor where the totality of phenol was mineralized by denitrification, obtaining CO2 and N2 as the end products. The total time required for 2-CP mineralization in the combined electrochemical-biological process was 7.5h. This value is close to those previously reported for electrochemical and advanced oxidation processes but in this case, an efficient process was obtained without accumulation of by-products or generation of excessive energy costs due to the selective electrochemical pretreatment. This study showed that the use of electrochemical reductive pretreatment combined with biological processes could be a promising technology for the removal of recalcitrant molecules, such as chlorophenols, from wastewaters by more efficient, rapid, and environmentally friendly processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermodynamic Investigation of the Reduction-Distillation Process for Rare Earth Metals Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, W. D.; Azimi, G.

    2017-10-01

    Owing to their high vapor pressure, the four rare earth metals samarium, europium, thulium, and ytterbium are produced by reduction-distillation whereby their oxides are reduced with metallic lanthanum in vacuo, and the produced metal is subsequently vaporized off. Here, we performed a thorough thermodynamic investigation to establish a fundamental understanding of the reduction-distillation process. Thermodynamic functions including vapor pressures, Gibbs free energies, and enthalpies of reaction were calculated and compared with available experimental data. Furthermore, the kinetics of the process was explored and theoretical evaporation rates were calculated from thermodynamic data. The thermodynamic model developed in this work can help optimize processing conditions to maximize the yield and improve the overall process.

  18. Thermodynamic Investigation of the Reduction-Distillation Process for Rare Earth Metals Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, W. D.; Azimi, G.

    2017-08-01

    Owing to their high vapor pressure, the four rare earth metals samarium, europium, thulium, and ytterbium are produced by reduction-distillation whereby their oxides are reduced with metallic lanthanum in vacuo, and the produced metal is subsequently vaporized off. Here, we performed a thorough thermodynamic investigation to establish a fundamental understanding of the reduction-distillation process. Thermodynamic functions including vapor pressures, Gibbs free energies, and enthalpies of reaction were calculated and compared with available experimental data. Furthermore, the kinetics of the process was explored and theoretical evaporation rates were calculated from thermodynamic data. The thermodynamic model developed in this work can help optimize processing conditions to maximize the yield and improve the overall process.

  19. Influence of phosphorus on the reduction of silicon in regions characterized by droplet flow of the smelting products

    SciTech Connect

    V.A. Kim; N.V. Chainikova

    2008-08-15

    The influence of phosphorus on the thermodynamics of silicon reduction in Fe-Si-C melts is considered. The influence of the theoretical combustion temperature of coke in the tuyeres on the silicon content is studied in the blast-furnace smelting of low-phosphorus hot metal at AO Arcelor Mittal Temirtau.

  20. Dimensional Reduction in Vector Space Methods for Natural Language Processing: Products and Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Sven

    2011-12-01

    We introduce vector space based approaches to natural language processing and some of their similarities with quantum theory when applied to information retrieval. We explain how dimensional reduction is called for from both a practical and theoretical point of view and how this can be achieved through choice of product or through projectors onto subspaces.

  1. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  2. A MIXED CHEMICAL REDUCTANT FOR TREATING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated a method for delivering ferrous iron into the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of Cr(VI) in a chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW). The COPSW is characterized by high pH (8.5 -11.5), high Cr(VI) concentrations in the solid phase (up to 550 mg kg-1) and...

  3. Adaptive sidelobe reduction in SAR and INSAR COSMO-SkyMed image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, Rino; Lombardi, Nunzia; Milillo, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    The main lobe and the side lobes of strong scatterers are sometimes clearly visible in SAR images. Sidelobe reduction is of particular importance when imaging scenes contain objects such as ships and buildings having very large radar cross sections. Amplitude weighting is usually used to suppress sidelobes of the images at the expense of broadening of mainlobe, loss of resolution and degradation of SAR images. The Spatial Variant Apodization (SVA) is an Adaptive SideLobe Reduction (ASLR) technique that provides high effective suppression of sidelobes without broadening mainlobe. In this paper, we apply SVA to process COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) StripMap and Spotlight X-band data and compare the images with the standard products obtained via Hamming window processing. Different test sites have been selected in Italy, Argentina, California and Germany where corner reflectors are installed. Experimental results show clearly the resolution improvement (20%) while sidelobe kept to a low level when SVA processing is applied compared with Hamming windowing one. Then SVA technique is applied to Interferometric SAR image processing (INSAR) using a CSK StripMap interferometric tandem-like data pair acquired on East-California. The interferometric coherence of image pair obtained without sidelobe reduction (SCS_U) and with sidelobe reduction performed via Hamming window and via SVA are compared. High resolution interferometric products have been obtained with small variation of mean coherence when using ASLR products with respect to hamming windowed and no windowed one.

  4. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  5. A MIXED CHEMICAL REDUCTANT FOR TREATING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated a method for delivering ferrous iron into the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of Cr(VI) in a chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW). The COPSW is characterized by high pH (8.5 -11.5), high Cr(VI) concentrations in the solid phase (up to 550 mg kg-1) and...

  6. User's guide to the UTIL-ODRC tape processing program. [for the Orbital Data Reduction Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juba, S. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The UTIL-ODRC computer compatible tape processing program, its input/output requirements, and its interface with the EXEC 8 operating system are described. It is a multipurpose orbital data reduction center (ODRC) tape processing program enabling the user to create either exact duplicate tapes and/or tapes in SINDA/HISTRY format. Input data elements for PRAMPT/FLOPLT and/or BATCH PLOT programs, a temperature summary, and a printed summary can also be produced.

  7. Influence of process parameter on Campylobacter spp. counts on poultry meat in a slaughterhouse environment.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Y; Reich, F; Klein, G

    2014-09-01

    Campylobacter spp. are the most important food-borne pathogens in broilers. Exposure of the consumer can be influenced by the reduction of contaminated broiler meat at various steps along the production line. This study was performed at a poultry slaughterhouse in Germany. Steps within the slaughter process were defined by the slaughterhouse quality control for potential Campylobacter reduction. Their impact was tested for two process variations. The first process variation was the increase of the temperature of the scalding water from 53.0 to 53.9 °C. The second step was the application of an additional outside sprayer which was placed after plucking. The increase of the scalding water temperature was the most effective measure (>2 log reduction), but resulted in defects to the broiler skin. This would limit marketing of fresh broiler meat with skin. The additional water spray after plucking had no additional effect. In fact, numbers of Campylobacter were lower before introduction of the sprayer. In conclusion, modifications of the processing technology have to be evaluated carefully, but can have additional effects for Campylobacter reduction.

  8. Modelling of the nitric acid reduction process: Application to materials behavior in reprocessing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sicsic, D.; Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Tribollet, B.

    2012-07-01

    In France, the recycling process of nuclear waste fuels involves the use of hot concentrated nitric acid. The understanding and the prediction of the structural materials (mainly austenitic stainless steels) behaviour requires the determination of the nitric acid reduction process. Nitric acid is indirectly reduced by an autocatalytic mechanism depending on the cathodic overpotential and the acid concentration. This mechanism has been widely studied. All the authors agree on its autocatalytic nature, characterized by the predominant role of the reduction products. It is also generally admitted that nitric acid or the nitrate ion are not the electro-active species. However, uncertainties remain concerning the nature of the electro-active species, the place where the catalytic species regenerates and the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the reaction intermediates. The aim of this study is to clarify some of these uncertainties by performing an electrochemical investigation of the 4 mol.L -1 nitric acid reduction process at 40 deg. C occurring on an inert electrode (platinum or gold). An inert electrode was chosen as a working electrode in a first step in order to avoid its oxidation and focus the research on the reduction mechanism. This experimental work enabled to suggest a coherent sequence of electrochemical and chemical reactions. Then, a kinetic modelling of this sequence was carried out for a gold rotating disk system. In this objective, a thermodynamic study at 25 deg. C led to the evaluation of the composition of liquid and gaseous phases for nitric acid solutions from 0.5 to 22 mol.L -1. The kinetics of the reduction process of nitric acid 4 mol.L -1 was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chrono-amperometry on an inert electrode at 40 deg. C. A coupling of chrono-amperometry and FTIR in gaseous phase led to the identification of the gaseous reduction products as a function of the cathodic overpotential. These different results showed that for

  9. Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young

    2012-11-15

    The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

  10. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  11. Reaction engineering for materials processing in space: Reduction of ilmenite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shadman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is a consumable material which needs to be produced continuously in most space missions. Its use for propulsion as well as life support makes oxygen one of the largest volume chemicals to be produced in space. Production of oxygen from lunar materials is of particular interest and is very attractive possibility. The kinetics and mechanism of reduction of ilmenite by carbon monoxide and hydrogen at 800 to 1100 C were investigated. The temporal profiles of conversion for carbon monoxide have a sigmoidal shape and indicate the presence of three different stages (induction, acceleration, and deceleration) during the reduction reaction. The apparent activation energy decreases from 18 kcal/mole at 10 percent conversion to 10 kcal/mole at 50 percent conversion. The reaction is first order with respect to carbon monoxide under the experimental conditions studied. Both SEM and EDX analysis show that the diffusion of Fe product away from the reaction front and through the TiO2 phase, followed by the nucleation and growth of a separate Fe phase are important steps affecting the process kinetics. The results from hydrogen reduction show that the mechanism of ilmenite reduction by hydrogen is similar to that by carbon monoxide. However, the titanium dioxide can be further reduced by hydrogen at 800 to 1000 C. The detailed comparison and theoretical modeling of both reduction processes is presented.

  12. Numerical Study of the Reduction Process in an Oxygen Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-02-01

    Based on computational fluid dynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, principles of transfer in metallurgy, and other principles, a multi-fluid model for a traditional blast furnace was established. The furnace conditions were simulated with this multi-fluid mathematical model, and the model was verified with the comparison of calculation and measurement. Then a multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace in the gasifier-full oxygen blast furnace process was established based on this traditional blast furnace model. With the established multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace, the basic characteristics of iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace were summarized, including the changing process of the iron ore reduction degree and the compositions of the burden, etc. The study found that compared to the traditional blast furnace, the magnetite reserve zone in the furnace shaft under oxygen blast furnace condition was significantly reduced, which is conducive to the efficient operation of blast furnace. In order to optimize the oxygen blast furnace design and operating parameters, the iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace was researched under different shaft tuyere positions, different recycling gas temperatures, and different allocation ratios of recycling gas between the hearth tuyere and the shaft tuyere. The results indicate that these three factors all have a substantial impact on the ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace. Moderate shaft tuyere position, high recycling gas temperature, and high recycling gas allocation ratio between hearth and shaft could significantly promote the reduction of iron ore, reduce the scope of the magnetite reserve zone, and improve the performance of oxygen blast furnace. Based on the above findings, the recommendations for improvement of the oxygen blast furnace design and operation were proposed.

  13. Processes through which adolescents believe romantic relationships influence friendship quality.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer J

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how romantic relationships influence adolescents' friendships. The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify behaviors through which adolescents believe romantic relationships influence friendship quality. Intimate exchange, co-rumination, encouragement, and conflict resolution were identified as processes through which romantic relationships influence friendship quality. Associations between these variables and friendship quality were investigated with 340 adolescents. Adolescents believed these processes occurred frequently within friendship. Gender differences suggest girls may be more sensitive to the influence of romantic partners on their friendships than are boys. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that greater intimacy, encouragement, compromise, and less co-rumination were associated with more positive beliefs about friendship quality when one friend has a girlfriend or boyfriend. Greater co-rumination and less encouragement were predictive of negative friendship quality. Thus, these processes may represent avenues through which romantic relationships positively and negatively influence friendship quality. Findings highlight the need to understand friendships as part of a complex social network that includes romantic ties.

  14. Flexible system model reduction and control system design based upon actuator and sensor influence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Johnson, Timothy L.; Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    A model reduction technique based on aggregation with respect to sensor and actuator influence functions rather than modes is presented for large systems of coupled second-order differential equations. Perturbation expressions which can predict the effects of spillover on both the reduced-order plant model and the neglected plant model are derived. For the special case of collocated actuators and sensors, these expressions lead to the derivation of constraints on the controller gains that are, given the validity of the perturbation technique, sufficient to guarantee the stability of the closed-loop system. A case study demonstrates the derivation of stabilizing controllers based on the present technique. The use of control and observation synthesis in modifying the dimension of the reduced-order plant model is also discussed. A numerical example is provided for illustration.

  15. Dimension reduction of multivariable optical emission spectrometer datasets for industrial plasma processes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; McArdle, Conor; Daniels, Stephen

    2013-12-19

    A new data dimension-reduction method, called Internal Information Redundancy Reduction (IIRR), is proposed for application to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) datasets obtained from industrial plasma processes. For example in a semiconductor manufacturing environment, real-time spectral emission data is potentially very useful for inferring information about critical process parameters such as wafer etch rates, however, the relationship between the spectral sensor data gathered over the duration of an etching process step and the target process output parameters is complex. OES sensor data has high dimensionality (fine wavelength resolution is required in spectral emission measurements in order to capture data on all chemical species involved in plasma reactions) and full spectrum samples are taken at frequent time points, so that dynamic process changes can be captured. To maximise the utility of the gathered dataset, it is essential that information redundancy is minimised, but with the important requirement that the resulting reduced dataset remains in a form that is amenable to direct interpretation of the physical process. To meet this requirement and to achieve a high reduction in dimension with little information loss, the IIRR method proposed in this paper operates directly in the original variable space, identifying peak wavelength emissions and the correlative relationships between them. A new statistic, Mean Determination Ratio (MDR), is proposed to quantify the information loss after dimension reduction and the effectiveness of IIRR is demonstrated using an actual semiconductor manufacturing dataset. As an example of the application of IIRR in process monitoring/control, we also show how etch rates can be accurately predicted from IIRR dimension-reduced spectral data.

  16. Dimension Reduction of Multivariable Optical Emission Spectrometer Datasets for Industrial Plasma Processes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; McArdle, Conor; Daniels, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A new data dimension-reduction method, called Internal Information Redundancy Reduction (IIRR), is proposed for application to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) datasets obtained from industrial plasma processes. For example in a semiconductor manufacturing environment, real-time spectral emission data is potentially very useful for inferring information about critical process parameters such as wafer etch rates, however, the relationship between the spectral sensor data gathered over the duration of an etching process step and the target process output parameters is complex. OES sensor data has high dimensionality (fine wavelength resolution is required in spectral emission measurements in order to capture data on all chemical species involved in plasma reactions) and full spectrum samples are taken at frequent time points, so that dynamic process changes can be captured. To maximise the utility of the gathered dataset, it is essential that information redundancy is minimised, but with the important requirement that the resulting reduced dataset remains in a form that is amenable to direct interpretation of the physical process. To meet this requirement and to achieve a high reduction in dimension with little information loss, the IIRR method proposed in this paper operates directly in the original variable space, identifying peak wavelength emissions and the correlative relationships between them. A new statistic, Mean Determination Ratio (MDR), is proposed to quantify the information loss after dimension reduction and the effectiveness of IIRR is demonstrated using an actual semiconductor manufacturing dataset. As an example of the application of IIRR in process monitoring/control, we also show how etch rates can be accurately predicted from IIRR dimension-reduced spectral data. PMID:24451453

  17. Peer influence processes for youth delinquency and depression.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew D; Crea, Thomas M

    2015-08-01

    This study explores the multiple factors that account for peer influence processes of adolescent delinquency and depression using data from Waves I and II of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). Random-effects longitudinal negative binomial models were used to predict depression and delinquency, controlling for social connection variables to account for selection bias. Findings suggest peer depression and delinquency are both predictive of youth delinquency, while peer influences of depression are much more modest. Youth who are more connected to parents and communities and who are more popular within their networks are more susceptible to peer influence, while self-regulating youth are less susceptible. We find support for theories of popularity-socialization as well as weak-ties in explaining social network factors that amplify or constrain peer influence. We argue that practitioners working with youth should consider network-informed interventions to improve program efficacy and avoid iatrogenic effects.

  18. [Influences of humic acids on the dissimilatory iron reduction of red soil in anaerobic condition].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-na; Li, Zhong-pei; Che, Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide is abundant in red soil. Reduction and oxidation of iron oxide are important biogeochemical processes. In this paper, we reported the effects of humic acid on dissimilatory iron reduction (DISSIR) in red soil by adding glucose or humic acid (HA), under an anaerobic condition. Results indicated that DISSIR is weak for the red soil with a low content of organic matter, Glucose that act as electron donators promoted the process of DISSIR in red soil. HA added to soil solely didn't accelerate the DISSIR since it couldn't provide electron donators to microbe. However, adding of both glucose and HA promoted the DISSIR at the beginning of the incubation but then inhibited the process, which maybe caused by the effects of precipitation and adsorption of red soil. Concentrations of HA strongly affected the DISSIR, HA at low concentrations(0.20 and 0.02 g/kg) had weak effects, while HA at a high concentration (2.00 g/kg) promoted the process at the beginning and then inhibited it. HA extracted from different materials had distinct effects on the DISSIR. HA from Weathering coal of Datong in Shanxi Province (HAs), lignite of Gongxian in Henan Province (HAh) and Dianchi Lake sediment in Kunming of Yunnan Province (HAk) all promoted the DISSIR at the beginning of the incubation. However, at the end of incubation, HAk with a low aromaticity still promoted the process, while HAs and HAh with a higher aromaticity weakened the DISSIR. This may be due to the increase in adsorption of soil with the aromaticity of HA.

  19. Liver fat reduction with niacin is influenced by DGAT-2 polymorphisms in hypertriglyceridemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Miao; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Yamashita, Shizuya; Yeung, David Ka Wai; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Masuda, Daisaku; Yang, Yaling; Tomlinson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Niacin reduces plasma triglycerides, but it may increase free fatty acids and insulin resistance during long-term treatment. We examined the effect of extended-release niacin on liver fat content in Chinese patients with dyslipidemia and whether the common diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 (DGAT2) polymorphisms influenced this effect. The 39 patients (baseline liver fat content: 12.8 ± 7.6%, triglycerides: 3.30 ± 1.67 mmol/l) were treated with niacin, gradually increasing the dose to 2 g/day for a total of 23 weeks. The liver fat content and visceral/subcutaneous fat was measured before and after treatment. Subjects were genotyped for the DGAT2 rs3060 and rs101899116 polymorphisms. There were significant (P < 0.001) reductions in plasma triglycerides (−34.9 ± 37.6%), liver fat content (−47.2 ± 32.8%), and visceral fat (−6.3 ± 15.8%, P < 0.05) after niacin treatment. Mean body weight decreased by 1.46 ± 2.7% (1.17 ± 2.44 kg, P < 0.001) during the study, but liver fat changes remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, and body weight changes [mean absolute change (95% CI): −6.1% (−8.0, −4.3), P < 0.001]. The DGAT2 variant alleles were associated with a smaller reduction in liver fat content in response to niacin after adjustment for other covariates (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that niacin treatment may reduce liver fat content in Chinese patients with dyslipidemia and that the mechanism may involve inhibition of DGAT2. However, the findings might have been confounded by the small but significant reductions in body weight during the study. Future large randomized controlled trials are needed to verify these findings. PMID:22315393

  20. Competing Processes of Sibling Influence: Observational Learning and Sibling Deidentification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2007-01-01

    Although commonly cited as explanations for patterns of sibling similarity and difference, observational learning and sibling deidentification processes have rarely been examined directly. Using a person-oriented approach, we identified patterns in adolescents' perceptions of sibling influences and connected these patterns to sibling similarities…

  1. Friendship and Delinquency: Selection and Influence Processes in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knecht, Andrea; Snijders, Tom A. B.; Baerveldt, Chris; Steglich, Christian E. G.; Raub, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Positive association of relevant characteristics is a widespread pattern among adolescent friends. A positive association may be caused by the selection of similar others as friends and by the deselection of dissimilar ones, but also by influence processes where friends adjust their behavior to each other. Social control theory argues that…

  2. The influence of weak impacts on certain processes of nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupik, V. A.; Margolin, V. I.; Potekhin, M. S.

    2017-07-01

    The article deals with the influence of weak and super weak impacts on certain technological processes in nanotechnology related to the synthesis of nanoscale films and coatings. We also touch upon the impacts of weak diffraction fields of complex shape on the formation of fractal films and coatings.

  3. Influence of Appalachian Fatalism on Adolescent Identity Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Tommy M.

    2007-01-01

    The influences of the fatalism frequently associated with Appalachian culture on adolescent identity processes were explored. The sample consisted of 91 Appalachian adolescents and 87 non-Appalachian adolescents. Participants completed measures of fatalism (operationalized in terms of higher hopelessness and lower optimism/efficacy scores) and…

  4. The influence of petroleum products on the methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Choromański, Paweł; Karwowska, Ewa; Łebkowska, Maria

    2016-01-15

    In this study the influence of the petroleum products: diesel fuel and spent engine oil on the sewage sludge digestion process and biogas production efficiency was investigated. Microbiological, chemical and enzymatic analyses were applied in the survey. It was revealed that the influence of the petroleum derivatives on the effectiveness of the methane fermentation of sewage sludge depends on the type of the petroleum product. Diesel fuel did not limit the biogas production and the methane concentration in the biogas, while spent engine oil significantly reduced the process efficacy. The changes in physical-chemical parameters, excluding COD, did not reflect the effect of the tested substances. The negative influence of petroleum products on individual bacterial groups was observed after 7 days of the process, while after 14 days probably some adaptive mechanisms appeared. The dehydrogenase activity assessment was the most relevant parameter to evaluate the effect of petroleum products contamination. Diesel fuel was probably used as a source of carbon and energy in the process, while the toxic influence was observed in case of spent engine oil.

  5. Influence of Appalachian Fatalism on Adolescent Identity Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Tommy M.

    2007-01-01

    The influences of the fatalism frequently associated with Appalachian culture on adolescent identity processes were explored. The sample consisted of 91 Appalachian adolescents and 87 non-Appalachian adolescents. Participants completed measures of fatalism (operationalized in terms of higher hopelessness and lower optimism/efficacy scores) and…

  6. Evaluation of a biological wastewater treatment system combining an OSA process with ultrasound for sludge reduction.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pareja, P M; Aragon, C A; Quiroga, J M; Coello, M D

    2017-05-01

    Sludge production is an undesirable by-product of biological wastewater treatment. The oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process constitutes one of the most promising techniques for reducing the sludge produced at the treatment plant without negative consequences for its overall performance. In the present study, the OSA process is applied in combination with ultrasound treatment, a lysis technique, in a lab-scale wastewater treatment plant to assess whether sludge reduction is enhanced as a result of mechanical treatment. Reported sludge reductions of 45.72% and 78.56% were obtained for the two regimes of combined treatment tested in this study during two respective stages: UO1 and UO2. During the UO1 stage, the general performance and nutrient removal improved, obtaining 47.28% TN removal versus 21.95% in the conventional stage. However, the performance of the system was seriously damaged during the UO2 stage. Increases in dehydrogenase and protease activities were observed during both stages. The advantages of the combined process are not necessarily economic, but operational, as US treatment acts as contributing factor in the OSA process, inducing mechanisms that lead to sludge reduction in the OSA process and improving performance parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Corrosion Testing of Monofrax K-3 Refractory in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Alternate Reductant Feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Jantzen, C.; Burket, P.

    2016-04-06

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) uses a combination of reductants and oxidants while converting high level waste (HLW) to a borosilicate waste form. A reducing flowsheet is maintained to retain radionuclides in their reduced oxidation states which promotes their incorporation into borosilicate glass. For the last 20 years of processing, the DWPF has used formic acid as the main reductant and nitric acid as the main oxidant. During reaction in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), formate and formic acid release measurably significant H2 gas which requires monitoring of certain vessel’s vapor spaces. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (NG) flowsheet from the nitric-formic (NF) flowsheet is desired as the NG flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing from a safety standpoint as close monitoring of the H2 gas concentration could become less critical. In terms of the waste glass melter vapor space flammability, the switch from the NF flowsheet to the NG flowsheet showed a reduction of H2 gas production from the vitrification process as well. Due to the positive impact of the switch to glycolic acid determined on the flammability issues, evaluation of the other impacts of glycolic acid on the facility must be examined.

  8. Influence of dynamical conditions on the reduction of U(VI) at the magnetite-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Ilton, Eugene S; Boily, Jean-François; Buck, Edgar C; Skomurski, Frances N; Rosso, Kevin M; Cahill, Christopher L; Bargar, John R; Felmy, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    The heterogeneous reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by ferrous iron is believed to be a key process influencing the fate and transport of U in the environment. The reactivity of both sorbed and structural Fe(II) has been studied for numerous substrates, including magnetite. Published results from U(VI)-magnetite experiments have been variable, ranging from no reduction to clear evidence for the formation of U(IV). In this contribution, we used XAS and high resolution (+/-cryogenic) XPS to study the interaction of U(VI) with nanoparticulate magnetite. The results indicated that U(VI) was partially reduced to U(V) with no evidence of U(IV). However, thermodynamic calculations indicated that U phases with average oxidation states below (V) should have been stable, indicating that the system was not in redox equilibrium. A reaction pathway that involves incorporation and stabilization of U(V) and U(VI) into secondary phases is invoked to explain the observations. The results suggest an important and previously unappreciated role of U(V) in the fate and transport of uranium in the environment.

  9. Selective catalytic reduction system and process using a pre-sulfated zirconia binder

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.

    2010-06-29

    A selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system, the catalyst system comprising (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4, palladium, and a pre-sulfated zirconia binder. The inclusion of a pre-sulfated zirconia binder substantially increases the durability of a Pd-based SCR catalyst system. A system for implementing the disclosed process is further provided.

  10. Influence of volumetric reduction factor during ozonation of nanofiltration concentrates for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Azaïs, Antonin; Mendret, Julie; Petit, Eddy; Brosillon, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    Global population growth induces increased threat on drinking water resources. One way to address this environmental issue is to reuse water from wastewater treatment plant. The presence of pathogenic microorganisms and potentially toxic organic micropollutants does not allow a direct reuse of urban effluents. Membrane processes such reverse osmosis (RO) or nanofiltration (NF) can be considered to effectively eliminate these pollutants. The integration of membrane processes involves the production of concentrated retentates which require being disposed. To date, no treatment is set up to manage safely this pollution. This work focuses on the application of ozonation for the treatment of NF retentates in the framework of the wastewater reuse. Ozonation is a powerful oxidation process able to react and degrade a wide range of organic pollutants. Four pharmaceutical micropollutants were selected as target molecules: acetaminophen, carbamazepine, atenolol and diatrozic acid. This study highlighted that NF represents a viable alternative to the commonly used RO process ensuring high retention at much lower operating costs. Ozonation appears to be effective to degrade the most reactive pollutants toward molecular ozone but is limited for the reduction of refractory ozone pollutants due to the inhibition of the radical chain by the high content of organic matter in the retentates. The ozonation process appears to be a promising NF retentate treatment, but additional treatments after ozonation are required to lead to a zero liquid discharge treatment scheme.

  11. Brushing Your Spacecrafts Teeth: A Review of Biological Reduction Processes for Planetary Protection Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, D. E. (Betsy); Rummel, J. D.; Conley, Catharine

    2017-01-01

    Much like keeping your teeth clean, where you brush away biofilms that your dentist calls "plaque," there are various methods to clean spaceflight hardware of biological contamination, known as biological reduction processes. Different approaches clean your hardware's "teeth" in different ways and with different levels of effectiveness. We know that brushing at home with a simple toothbrush is convenient and has a different level of impact vs. getting your teeth cleaned at the dentist. In the same way, there are some approaches to biological reduction that may require simple tools or more complex implementation approaches (think about sonicating or just soaking your dentures, vs. brushing them). There are also some that are more effective for different degrees of cleanliness and still some that have materials compatibility concerns. In this article, we review known and NASA-certified approaches for biological reduction, pointing out materials compatibility concerns and areas where additional research is needed.

  12. Relating wetting and reduction processes in the Si-liquid/SiO2-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alphei, L. D.; Grotjahn, R.; Dobbe, C.; Douvidzon, M.; Janhsen, R.; Gebensleben, T.; Alznauer, T.; Becker, V.; Becker, J. A.

    2015-06-01

    A reactive wetting model is presented which includes a gradual reduction of a silicon dioxide substrate lowering the interface tensions and promotes spreading. The gradual reduction is described in terms of a reaction diffusion layer that extends over multiple atomic layers. The formation of silicon-suboxides generated by the reduction leads to time dependent values for the surface tensions, which in turn change the apparent contact angle Θ (t). This model describes the reactive wetting process and its instabilities, provides simple expressions for the oxygen flow, and explains anisotropic wetting patterns observed on crystalline quartz substrates. The latter is achieved by a simple coupling of wetting and an ongoing solid state reaction in the substrate that reflects the symmetry of the crystal.

  13. Brushing Your Spacecrafts Teeth: A Review of Biological Reduction Processes for Planetary Protection Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, D.E. (Betsy); Rummel, J. D.; Conley, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Much like keeping your teeth clean, where you brush away biofilms that your dentist calls plaque, there are various methods to clean spaceflight hardware of biological contamination, known as biological reduction processes. Different approaches clean your hardwares teeth in different ways and with different levels of effectiveness. We know that brushing at home with a simple toothbrush is convenient and has a different level of impact vs. getting your teeth cleaned at the dentist. In the same way, there are some approaches to biological reduction that may require simple tools or more complex implementation approaches (think about sonicating or just soaking your dentures, vs. brushing them). There are also some that are more effective for different degrees of cleanliness and still some that have materials compatibility concerns. In this article, we review known and NASA-certified approaches for biological reduction, pointing out materials compatibility concerns and areas where additional research is needed.

  14. Reduction of N2 by supported tungsten clusters gives a model of the process by nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    Metalloenzymes catalyze difficult chemical reactions under mild conditions. Mimicking their functions is a challenging task and it has been investigated using homogeneous systems containing metal complexes. The nitrogenase that converts N2 to NH3 under mild conditions is one of such enzymes. Efforts to realize the biological function have continued for more than four decades, which has resulted in several reports of reduction of N2, ligated to metal complexes in solutions, to NH3 by protonation under mild conditions. Here, we show that seemingly distinct supported small tungsten clusters in a dry environment reduce N2 under mild conditions like the nitrogenase. N2 is reduced to NH3 via N2H4 by addition of neutral H atoms, which agrees with the mechanism recently proposed for the N2 reduction on the active site of nitrogenase. The process on the supported clusters gives a model of the biological N2 reduction. PMID:22586517

  15. Physicochemical interaction and its influence on deep bed filtration process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-long; Meng, Jun; Li, Gui-ping; Luan, Zhao-kun; Tang, Hong-xiao

    2004-01-01

    The capillary model was used to analyze the hydraulic conditions in the deep bed filtration process. The physicochemical interaction forces between the filter media and suspended particles and their influence on deep bed filtration process were also studied theoretically. Through the comparison of the hydraulic and physicochemical forces, the key influencing factors on the filtration process were proposed and investigated. Pilot study of the microflocculation deep bed filtration was carried out in the No. 9 Potable Water Treatment Plant of Beijing, and the experimental results of hydraulic head loss, particle distribution and entrapment were presented. The theoretical prediction was reasonably consistent with the experimental results under different conditions, which indicated that the regulation and control of micro-flocculation and deep bed filtration could be realized by the evaluation of the physicochemical interactions. Further theoretical and experimental research should be carried out to investigate the interaction mechanism and its application in the deep bed filtration and other cases.

  16. Reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in a NOx scrubber liquor by a denitrifying bacterium and the effects of inorganic sulfur compounds on this process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiyang; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jiti; Li, Ning; Chen, Mingxiang

    2012-09-01

    Biological reduction of Fe(III)EDTA is one of the key steps in nitrogen oxides removal in the integrated approach of metal chelate absorption combined with microbial reduction. Paracoccus denitrificans ZGL1 was used as a model bacterium to evaluate the process of Fe(III)EDTA reduction by such microorganisms that could carry out the simultaneous reduction of NO chelated by Fe(II)EDTA (Fe(II)EDTA-NO) and Fe(III)EDTA. Enzymes analysis indicated Fe(III)EDTA reductase of ZGL1 was located both in the membrane and cytoplasmic fractions. Glucose was identified as the most efficient electron donor for Fe(III)EDTA reduction. Better reduction performance was obtained with higher initial cell concentration corresponding to a specific reduction rate of 8.7 μmol h(-1) mg protein(-1). The presence of sulfate and thiosulfate had no influences on both cell growth and Fe(III)EDTA reduction. Fe(III)EDTA reduction rate and cell growth could be inhibited by addition of sulfite mainly due to its direct and indirect toxic effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of nanoadditives on the tribological properties of process fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakalova, T.; Svobodová, L.; Borůvková, K.; Louda, P.; Voleský, L.

    2016-04-01

    Tribology deals with interaction of surfaces in relative motion depending on their design, friction, wear and lubrication. The proper use of process fluids or lubricants can bring a significant reduction in friction and the amount of wear, thereby leading to a reduction in power consumption. During different technological operations contamination of used process fluids or lubricants occurs. Such contamination leads not only to a reduction of the lifetime of the lubricants but it can also change the functional properties and increase the health risks for operators. The quality of the process fluid is among other things influenced by bacterial attacks. The use of nanoadditives is one method for inhibiting the bacteria and improving the bioavailability and stability of the technological fluids. Nanolubricant is a new system composed of nanometer-sized particles dispersed in a base lubricant. The doping of lubricants with nanoparticles is one of the ways to solve problems with the removal of bacteria, whereby improving the biological, chemical and technological stability of process fluids. In the article, we monitor the effects of doping process fluids with nanoparticles of silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), silver nitrate (AgNO3) and ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) on the friction coefficient and on the wear of friction pairs of Si3N4 balls against steel 16MnCr5, EN 10084-94.

  18. Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrmann, Henning; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

  19. Ochratoxin A reduction in meat sausages using processing methods practiced in households.

    PubMed

    Pleadin, Jelka; Perši, Nina; Kovačević, Dragan; Vulić, Ana; Frece, Jadranka; Markov, Ksenija

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of ochratoxin A (OTA) reduction in home-made meat products. Meat sausages (n = 50) produced from raw materials coming from pigs exposed to OTA-contaminated feed, were subject to common heat processes practiced in households (cooking, frying and baking). Concentrations of OTA in pre- and post-processed products were quantified using a validated immunoassay method, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and confirmed using a high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. In line with the differences in recipes used and the degree of OTA accumulation in raw materials, OTA concentrations established in Mediterranean and roast sausages were lower than those found in liver and blood sausages. Baking of contaminated sausages at the temperatures of 190-220°C (for 60 min) resulted in significant reduction of OTA levels (75.8%), while 30-min cooking (at 100°C) and frying (at 170°C) proved to be significantly less effective (e.g. yielding OTA reductions of 7.4% and 12.6%, respectively). The results pointed out that despite high OTA stability, heat processes are capable of reducing its concentration in home-made meat products, depending on the processing modality used.

  20. Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

    2013-07-10

    This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

  1. Synthesis of Hierarchical Nanoporous Microstructures via the Kirkendall Effect in Chemical Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ling; Pang, Chao; He, Dafang; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2015-11-01

    A series of novel hierarchical nanoporous microstructures have been synthesized through one-step chemical reduction of micron size Cu2O and Co3O4 particles. By controlling the reduction time, non-porous Cu2O microcubes sequentially transform to nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites and hollow eightling-like Cu microparticles. The mechanism involved in the complex structural evolution is explained based on oxygen diffusion and Kirkendall effect. The nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites exhibit superior electrochemical performance as compared to solid Cu2O microcubes. The reduction of nonporous Co3O4 also exhibits a uniform sequential reduction process from nonporous Co3O4 to porous Co3O4/CoO composites, porous CoO, porous CoO/Co composites, and porous foam-like Co particles. Nanoscale channels originate from the particle surface and eventually develop inside the entire product, resulting in porous foam-like Co microparticles. The Kirkendall effect is believed to facilitate the formation of porous structures in both processes.

  2. Synthesis of Hierarchical Nanoporous Microstructures via the Kirkendall Effect in Chemical Reduction Process

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Pang, Chao; He, Dafang; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel hierarchical nanoporous microstructures have been synthesized through one-step chemical reduction of micron size Cu2O and Co3O4 particles. By controlling the reduction time, non-porous Cu2O microcubes sequentially transform to nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites and hollow eightling-like Cu microparticles. The mechanism involved in the complex structural evolution is explained based on oxygen diffusion and Kirkendall effect. The nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites exhibit superior electrochemical performance as compared to solid Cu2O microcubes. The reduction of nonporous Co3O4 also exhibits a uniform sequential reduction process from nonporous Co3O4 to porous Co3O4/CoO composites, porous CoO, porous CoO/Co composites, and porous foam-like Co particles. Nanoscale channels originate from the particle surface and eventually develop inside the entire product, resulting in porous foam-like Co microparticles. The Kirkendall effect is believed to facilitate the formation of porous structures in both processes. PMID:26552845

  3. Does an aerobic endurance programme have an influence on information processing in migraineurs?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a disorder of central information processing which is characterized by a reduced habituation of event-related potentials. There might be positive effects of aerobic exercise on brain function and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of exercise on information processing and clinical course of migraine. Methods 33 patients completed a ten-week aerobic exercise programme. To examine the influence of the treatment on information processing and attention, Trail Making Test (TMT) A and B, d2-Letter Cancellation Test (LCT) and recordings of the Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) were performed before and after the training. Results Patients showed a significant reduction of the migraine attack frequency, the iCNV-amplitude and the processing time for TMT-A and TMT-B after treatment. Moreover, there was a significant increase of the habituation and positive changes in parameters of attention (d2-LCT) after the training. Conclusions This study demonstrates that aerobic exercise programme influences central information processing and leads to clinical effects on the migraine symptomatology. The results can be interpreted in terms of an improvement of a dysfunctional information processing and a stimulus selection under aerobic exercise. PMID:24528557

  4. Influences of smoking and caffeine consumption on trigeminal pain processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many human and animal studies have shown the influence of nicotine and caffeine on pain perception and processing. This study aims to investigate whether smoking or caffeine consumption influences trigeminal pain processing. Methods Sixty healthy subjects were investigated using simultaneous recordings of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) and pain related evoked potentials (PREP) following nociceptive electrical stimulation on both sides of the forehead (V1). Thirty subjects were investigated before and after smoking a cigarette, as well as before and after taking a tablet of 400 mg caffeine. Results After smoking PREP showed decreased N2 and P2 latencies indicating central facilitation at supraspinal (thalamic or cortical) level. PREP amplitudes were not changed. NBR showed a decreased area under the curve (AUC) indicating central inhibition at brainstem level. After caffeine intake no significant changes were observed comparing nBR and PREP results before consumption. Conclusions Smoking influences trigeminal pain processing on supraspinal and brainstem level. In the investigated setting, caffeine consumption does not significantly alter trigeminal pain processing. This observation might help in the further understanding of the pathophysiology of pain disorders that are associated with excessive smoking habits such as cluster headache. Previous smoking has to be taken into account when performing electrophysiological studies to avoid bias of study results. PMID:24928141

  5. Influences of smoking and caffeine consumption on trigeminal pain processing.

    PubMed

    Holle, Dagny; Heber, Anke; Naegel, Steffen; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Katsarava, Zaza; Obermann, Mark

    2014-06-13

    Many human and animal studies have shown the influence of nicotine and caffeine on pain perception and processing. This study aims to investigate whether smoking or caffeine consumption influences trigeminal pain processing. Sixty healthy subjects were investigated using simultaneous recordings of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) and pain related evoked potentials (PREP) following nociceptive electrical stimulation on both sides of the forehead (V1). Thirty subjects were investigated before and after smoking a cigarette, as well as before and after taking a tablet of 400 mg caffeine. After smoking PREP showed decreased N2 and P2 latencies indicating central facilitation at supraspinal (thalamic or cortical) level. PREP amplitudes were not changed. NBR showed a decreased area under the curve (AUC) indicating central inhibition at brainstem level. After caffeine intake no significant changes were observed comparing nBR and PREP results before consumption. Smoking influences trigeminal pain processing on supraspinal and brainstem level. In the investigated setting, caffeine consumption does not significantly alter trigeminal pain processing. This observation might help in the further understanding of the pathophysiology of pain disorders that are associated with excessive smoking habits such as cluster headache. Previous smoking has to be taken into account when performing electrophysiological studies to avoid bias of study results.

  6. Rigid Facial Motion Influences Featural, But Not Holistic, Face Processing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Naiqi; Quinn, Paul C.; Ge, Liezhong; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    We report three experiments in which we investigated the effect of rigid facial motion on face processing. Specifically, we used the face composite effect to examine whether rigid facial motion influences primarily featural or holistic processing of faces. In Experiments 1, 2, and 3, participants were first familiarized with dynamic displays in which a target face turned from one side to another; then at test, participants judged whether the top half of a composite face (the top half of the target face aligned or misaligned with the bottom half of a foil face) belonged to the target face. We compared performance in the dynamic condition to various static control conditions in Experiments 1, 2, and 3, which differed from each other in terms of the display order of the multiple static images or the inter stimulus interval (ISI) between the images. We found that the size of the face composite effect in the dynamic condition was significantly smaller than that in the static conditions. In other words, the dynamic face display influenced participants to process the target faces in a part-based manner and consequently their recognition of the upper portion of the composite face at test became less interfered with by the aligned lower part of the foil face. The findings from the present experiments provide the strongest evidence to date to suggest that the rigid facial motion mainly influences facial featural, but not holistic, processing. PMID:22342561

  7. Microbial community in anoxic-oxic-settling-anaerobic sludge reduction process revealed by 454 pyrosequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xinqiang; Qiao, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Gao, Xu

    2014-12-01

    Modification of the anoxic-oxic (AO) process by inserting a sludge holding tank (SHT) into the sludge return line forms an anoxic-oxic-settling-anaerobic (A+OSA) process that can achieve a 48.98% sludge reduction rate. The 454 pyrosequencing method was used to obtain the microbial communities of the AO and A+OSA processes. Results showed that the microbial community structures of the 2 processes were different as a result of the SHT insertion. Bacteria assigned to the phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes commonly existed and dominated the microbial populations of the 2 processes. However, the relative abundance of these populations shifted in the presence of SHT. The relative abundance of Proteobacteria decreased during the A+OSA process. A specific comparison at the class level showed that Sphingobacteria was enriched in the A+OSA process. The result suggested that the fermentative bacteria Sphingobacteria may have key functions in reducing the sludge from the A+OSA process. Uncultured Nitrosomonadaceae gradually became the dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and the nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrospira was enriched in the A+OSA process. Both occurrences were favorable for stabilized nitrogen removal. The known denitrifying species in the A+OSA process were similar to those in the AO process; however, their relative abundance also decreased.

  8. An attempt of reduction of optimization costs of complex industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztangret, Łukasz; Kusiak, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Reduction of computational costs of optimization of real industrial processes is crucial, because the models of these processes are often complex and demand time consuming numerical computations. Iterative optimization procedures have to run the simulations many times and therefore the computational costs of the optimization may be unacceptable high. This is why a new optimization methods and strategies which need less simulation runs are searched. The paper is focused on the problem of reduction of computational costs of optimization procedure. The main goal is the presentation of developed by the Authors new, efficient Approximation Based Optimization (ABO) and Modified Approximation Based Optimization (MABO) methods which allow finding the global minimum in smaller number of objective function calls. Detailed algorithm of the MABO method as well as the results of tests using several benchmark functions are presented. The efficiency of MABO method was compared with heuristic methods and the results show that MABO method reduces the computational costs and improve the optimization accuracy.

  9. Deoxygenative C-C Bond-Forming Processes via a Net Four-Electron Reductive Coupling.

    PubMed

    Todd, David P; Thompson, Benjamin B; Nett, Alex J; Montgomery, John

    2015-10-14

    The nickel-catalyzed coupling of enones or enals with alkynes in the presence of silane and titanium alkoxide reductants provides direct access to skipped diene products. The process involves a net four-electron reductive coupling and proceeds with deoxygenation of the starting enone or enal. A new class of well-defined nickel(0) precatalysts bearing an unhindered N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, which was developed in optimization of the process, is essential for the efficiency of the transformation. The strategy allows the high reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl substrates to be utilized in couplings with simultaneous extrusion of the oxygen atom, thus enabling a traceless strategy for alkene installation.

  10. Adiabatic reduction of a model of stochastic gene expression with jump Markov process.

    PubMed

    Yvinec, Romain; Zhuge, Changjing; Lei, Jinzhi; Mackey, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    This paper considers adiabatic reduction in a model of stochastic gene expression with bursting transcription considered as a jump Markov process. In this model, the process of gene expression with auto-regulation is described by fast/slow dynamics. The production of mRNA is assumed to follow a compound Poisson process occurring at a rate depending on protein levels (the phenomena called bursting in molecular biology) and the production of protein is a linear function of mRNA numbers. When the dynamics of mRNA is assumed to be a fast process (due to faster mRNA degradation than that of protein) we prove that, with appropriate scalings in the burst rate, jump size or translational rate, the bursting phenomena can be transmitted to the slow variable. We show that, depending on the scaling, the reduced equation is either a stochastic differential equation with a jump Poisson process or a deterministic ordinary differential equation. These results are significant because adiabatic reduction techniques seem to have not been rigorously justified for a stochastic differential system containing a jump Markov process. We expect that the results can be generalized to adiabatic methods in more general stochastic hybrid systems.

  11. Influence of sulfate reduction rates on the Phanerozoic sulfur isotope record.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Halevy, Itay; Bradley, Alexander S; Johnston, David T

    2013-07-09

    Phanerozoic levels of atmospheric oxygen relate to the burial histories of organic carbon and pyrite sulfur. The sulfur cycle remains poorly constrained, however, leading to concomitant uncertainties in O2 budgets. Here we present experiments linking the magnitude of fractionations of the multiple sulfur isotopes to the rate of microbial sulfate reduction. The data demonstrate that such fractionations are controlled by the availability of electron donor (organic matter), rather than by the concentration of electron acceptor (sulfate), an environmental constraint that varies among sedimentary burial environments. By coupling these results with a sediment biogeochemical model of pyrite burial, we find a strong relationship between observed sulfur isotope fractionations over the last 200 Ma and the areal extent of shallow seafloor environments. We interpret this as a global dependency of the rate of microbial sulfate reduction on the availability of organic-rich sea-floor settings. However, fractionation during the early/mid-Paleozoic fails to correlate with shelf area. We suggest that this decoupling reflects a shallower paleoredox boundary, primarily confined to the water column in the early Phanerozoic. The transition between these two states begins during the Carboniferous and concludes approximately around the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, indicating a prolonged response to a Carboniferous rise in O2. Together, these results lay the foundation for decoupling changes in sulfate reduction rates from the global average record of pyrite burial, highlighting how the local nature of sedimentary processes affects global records. This distinction greatly refines our understanding of the S cycle and its relationship to the history of atmospheric oxygen.

  12. Influence of sulfate reduction rates on the Phanerozoic sulfur isotope record

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Halevy, Itay; Bradley, Alexander S.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Phanerozoic levels of atmospheric oxygen relate to the burial histories of organic carbon and pyrite sulfur. The sulfur cycle remains poorly constrained, however, leading to concomitant uncertainties in O2 budgets. Here we present experiments linking the magnitude of fractionations of the multiple sulfur isotopes to the rate of microbial sulfate reduction. The data demonstrate that such fractionations are controlled by the availability of electron donor (organic matter), rather than by the concentration of electron acceptor (sulfate), an environmental constraint that varies among sedimentary burial environments. By coupling these results with a sediment biogeochemical model of pyrite burial, we find a strong relationship between observed sulfur isotope fractionations over the last 200 Ma and the areal extent of shallow seafloor environments. We interpret this as a global dependency of the rate of microbial sulfate reduction on the availability of organic-rich sea-floor settings. However, fractionation during the early/mid-Paleozoic fails to correlate with shelf area. We suggest that this decoupling reflects a shallower paleoredox boundary, primarily confined to the water column in the early Phanerozoic. The transition between these two states begins during the Carboniferous and concludes approximately around the Triassic–Jurassic boundary, indicating a prolonged response to a Carboniferous rise in O2. Together, these results lay the foundation for decoupling changes in sulfate reduction rates from the global average record of pyrite burial, highlighting how the local nature of sedimentary processes affects global records. This distinction greatly refines our understanding of the S cycle and its relationship to the history of atmospheric oxygen. PMID:23733944

  13. Influence of organic ligands on the reduction of polyhalogenated alkanes by iron(II).

    PubMed

    Bussan, Adam L; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2007-10-01

    Experimental work demonstrates that polyhalogenated alkanes (PHAs) are rapidly reduced in aqueous solutions containing Fe(II) complexes with organic ligands that possess either catechol or organothiol Lewis base groups in their structure and are representative of extracellular ligands and metal-complexing moieties within humic substances (tiron, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, thioglycolic acid, and 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid). In solutions containing Fe(II)-tiron complexes, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) is reduced quantitativelyto acetaldehyde, a product previously reported for reactions with Cr(II), but not with Fe-based reductants. Observed pseudo-first-order rate constants for 1,1,1-TCA reduction by Fe(II)-organic complexes (k'(obs)) generally increase with increasing pH and ligand concentration when Fe(II) concentration is fixed. For the Fe(II)-tiron system, k'(obs) is linearly correlated with the concentration of the 1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex (FeL2(6-)), and kinetic trends can be described by k'(obs) = k(FeL2)6- [FeL2(6-)], where k(FeL2)6- is the bimolecular rate constant for PHA reaction with the 1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex. Comparing reaction rates for 14 polyhalogenated ethanes and methanes reveals linear free energy relationships (LFERs) with molecular descriptors for PHA reduction (D(R-X'), deltaG(0'), and E(LUMO)), with the strongest correlation being obtained using carbon-halogen bond dissociation energies, D(R-X'). The collective experimental results are consistent with a dissociative one-electron transfer process occurring during the rate-limiting step.

  14. Phreatophyte influence on reductive dechlorination in a shallow aquifer contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.; Jones, S.A.; Kuniansky, E.L.; Harvey, G.; Lollar, B.S.; Slater, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    Phytoremediation uses the natural ability of plants to degrade contaminants in groundwater. A field demonstration designed to remediate aerobic shallow groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene began in April 1996 with the planting of cottonwood trees, a short-rotation woody crop, over an approximately 0.2-ha area at the Naval Air Station, Fort Worth, Texas. The project was developed to demonstrate capture of contaminated groundwater and degradation of contaminants by phreatophytes. Analyses from samples of groundwater collected from July 1997 to June 1998 indicate that tree roots have the potential to create anaerobic conditions in the groundwater that will facilitate degradation of trichloroethene by microbially mediated reductive dechlorination. Organic matter from root exudates and decay of tree roots probably stimulate microbial activity, consuming dissolved oxygen. Dissolved oxygen concentrations, which varied across the site, were smallest near a mature cottonwood tree (about 20 years of age and 60 meters southwest of the cottonwood plantings) where degradation products of trichloroethene were measured. Oxidation of organic matter is the primary microbially mediated reaction occurring in the groundwater beneath the planted trees whereas near the mature cottonwood tree, data indicate that methanogenesis is the most probable reaction occurring. Reductive dechlorination in groundwater either is not occurring or is not a primary process away from the mature tree. Carbon-13 isotope values for trichloroethene are nearly identical at locations away from the mature tree, further confirming that dechlorination is not occurring at the site.

  15. Influence of feature set reduction on breast cancer malignancy classification of fine needle aspiration biopsies.

    PubMed

    Jeleń, Łukasz; Krzyżak, Adam; Fevens, Thomas; Jeleń, Michał

    2016-12-01

    Grading of breast cancer malignancy is a key step in its diagnosis, which in turn helps to determine its prognosis and a course of treatment. In this paper, we consider the application of pattern recognition and image processing techniques to perform computer-assisted automatic breast cancer malignancy grading from cytological slides of fine needle aspiration biopsies. To determine a classification of the malignancy of the slide, a feature set is first determined from imagery of the slides. In this paper we investigated the nature of a wide set of features extracted from biopsy images to determine their discriminatory power and cross-correlation. Feature vector reduction is studied using a correlation map of the features, determining discriminatory power using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, significant feature selection, and stepwise feature selection. The reduction of the feature vector simplifies the complexity of classification scheme and does not impair the classification accuracy. In some cases a decrease of the error rate is noted. Based on this analysis, we present an improved classification system for cancer malignancy grading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influences on particle shape in underwater pelletizing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kast, O. E-mail: matthias.musialek@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Musialek, M. E-mail: matthias.musialek@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Geiger, K. E-mail: matthias.musialek@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C. E-mail: matthias.musialek@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de

    2014-05-15

    Underwater pelletizing has gained high importance within the last years among the different pelletizing technologies, due to its advantages in terms of throughput, automation, pellet quality and applicability to a large variety of thermoplastics. The resulting shape and quality of pellets, however, differ widely, depending on material characteristics and effects not fully understood yet. In an experimental set-up, pellets of different volumes and shapes were produced and the medium pellet mass, the pellet surface and the bulk density were analyzed in order to identify the influence of material properties and process parameters. Additionally, the shaping kinetics at the die opening were watched with a specially developed camera system. It was found that rheological material properties correlate with process parameters and resulting particle form in a complex way. Higher cutting speeds were shown to have a deforming influence on the pellets, leading to less spherical s and lower bulk densities. More viscous materials, however, showed a better resistance against this. Generally, the viscous properties of polypropylene proofed to be dominant over the elastic ones in regard to their influence on pellet shape. It was also shown that the shapes filmed at the die opening and the actual form of the pellets after a cooling track do not always correlate, indicating a significant influence of thermodynamic properties during the cooling.

  17. Influence of the apical enlargement size on the endotoxin level reduction of dental root canals

    PubMed Central

    MARINHO, Ariane Cassia Salustiano; MARTINHO, Frederico Canato; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto; FERRAZ, Caio Cezar Randi; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria play an essential role in endodontic infections because they have virulence factors such as endotoxin. Due to its potential cytotoxic activity, special attention has been given to the removal/neutralization of this endotoxin in the root canal system. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the apical enlargement size (AES) by using rotary instruments on the endotoxin level reduction of dental root canals. Material and Methods Forty root canals of the mandibular premolar teeth were used. Escherichia coli endotoxin (055: B55) was inoculated into thirty root canals. Ten teeth served as the negative control group. After the incubation period, the first endotoxin samples were collected from the root canals with a sterile/apyrogenic paper point for the analysis of the endotoxin units (EU/mL) present before instrumentation (S1). Specimen instrumentation was performed with the Mtwo® rotary system in the sequence 10/.04, 15/.05, 20/.06, 25/.06, 30/.05, 35/.04 and 40/.04. To monitor the effectiveness of increasing apical enlargement on endotoxin removal, the second endotoxin samples were collected from all the root canals after instrumentation with the following instruments: #25/.06- (S2); #30/.05- (S3); # 35/.04- (S4); and #40/.04- (S5). Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) was used to quantify the levels of endotoxin. The results were statistically compared by using repeated measures of ANOVA with post hoc Tukey testing. Results Increasing levels of endotoxin removal was achieved by large sized apical enlargement: S2 (AES #25/.06)- 89.2%, S3 (AES #30/.05)- 95.9%, S4 (AES #35/.04)- 97.8% and S5 (AES #40/.04)- 98.2%. Substantial reduction of endotoxin content was obtained in S4 and S5 compared to S2 (p<0.05), however, the root canal preparation was not able to eliminate the endotoxin. Conclusions Under the conditions of this study, it was concluded that the reduction of endotoxin levels of the dental root canals could be predicted

  18. The Use of Metallurgical Oil Sludge as a Reductant in a High Temperature Metallurgical Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shu-Jing; Qin, Ying; Hwang, Jiann-Yang

    Metallurgical Oil Sludge (MOS) is a byproduct created in the process of steelmaking. More than a million tons of MOS are generated each year throughout the world. The material contains hazardous components such as heavy metals and pathogenic organics, which can cause serious environmental problems and health issues. Landfill, combustion, and pyrolysis have been investigated for the disposal of MOS. However, these methods are unsatisfactory since they are unable to reach the clean environment goal. In this study, we investigate the possibility of using MOS as a reductant in a high temperature metallurgical process. The results are reported and discussed.

  19. Plant functions in wetland and aquatic systems: influence of intensity and capacity of soil reduction.

    PubMed

    DeLaune, R D; Pezeshki, S R

    2001-11-07

    Wetland or hydric soils, in addition to excess water and limited air-filled porosity, are characterized by anaerobic or reducing conditions. Wetland plants have developed physiological and morphological adaptations for growing under these conditions. Various methods exist for measuring plant responses to reducing conditions in wetland and aquatic environments, including assessment of radial oxygen transport, cellular enzymatic transformations, changes in root structure, and nutrient uptake. However, a gap exists in quantifying the chemical properties and reducing nature of soil environment in which plant roots are grown. The variation in reducing conditions, oxygen demand, and other associated processes that occur in wetland soils makes it difficult to truly compare the plant responses reported in the literature. This review emphasizes soil-plant interactions in wetlands, drawing attention to the importance of quantifying the intensity and capacity of reduction and/or oxygen demand in wetland soils to allow proper evaluation of wetland plant responses to such conditions.

  20. Reduction of influence of task difficulty on perceptual decision making by STN deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Green, Nikos; Bogacz, Rafal; Huebl, Julius; Beyer, Ann-Kristin; Kühn, Andrea A; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2013-09-09

    Neurocomputational models of optimal decision making ascribe a crucial role-the computation of conflict between choice alternatives-to the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Specifically, these models predict that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN will diminish the influence of decision conflict on decision making. In this work, patients with Parkinson's disease judged the direction of motion in random dot stimuli while ON and OFF DBS. To induce decision conflict, we varied the task difficulty (motion coherence), leading to increased reaction time (RT) in trials with greater task difficulty in healthy subjects. Results indicate that DBS significantly influences performance for perceptual decisions under high decision conflict. RT increased substantially OFF DBS as the task became more difficult, and a diffusion model best accounted for behavioral data. In contrast, ON DBS, the influence of task difficulty on RT was significantly reduced and a race model best accounted for the observed data. Individual data fits of evidence accumulation models demonstrate different information processing under distinct DBS states. Furthermore, ON DBS, speed-accuracy tradeoffs affected the magnitude of decision criterion adjustment significantly less compared to OFF DBS. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role for the STN in adjusting decision making during high-conflict trials in perceptual decision making.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of safeguards neutron counter for oxide reduction process feed material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hee; Lee, Chaehun; Oh, Jong-Myeong; An, Su Jung; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Park, Se-Hwan; Ku, Jeong-Hoe

    2016-10-01

    One of the options for spent-fuel management in Korea is pyroprocessing whose main process flow is the head-end process followed by oxide reduction, electrorefining, and electrowining. In the present study, a well-type passive neutron coincidence counter, namely, the ACP (Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process) safeguards neutron counter (ASNC), was redesigned for safeguards of a hot-cell facility related to the oxide reduction process. To this end, first, the isotopic composition, gamma/neutron emission yield and energy spectrum of the feed material ( i.e., the UO2 porous pellet) were calculated using the OrigenARP code. Then, the proper thickness of the gammaray shield was determined, both by irradiation testing at a standard dosimetry laboratory and by MCNP6 simulations using the parameters obtained from the OrigenARP calculation. Finally, the neutron coincidence counter's calibration curve for 100- to 1000-g porous pellets, in consideration of the process batch size, was determined through simulations. Based on these simulation results, the neutron counter currently is under construction. In the near future, it will be installed in a hot cell and tested with spent fuel materials.

  2. In situ treatment of chromium VI with an iron reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.; Crosbie, J.; O`Neil, S.

    1994-12-31

    Chromium VI is a fairly soluble compound and a known human carcinogen. Consequently, groundwater contamination with Chromium VI often represents a sensitive environmental issue. Removal of Chromium VI from groundwater has most often required long term and expensive pump and treat systems. Chromium III, on the other hand, is an essential nutrient and is, in most forms, highly insoluble. The conversion of Chromium VI, the soluble carcinogenic form, to the non-hazardous, insoluble Chromium III is the basis of many of the commercial water treatment processes such as the Andco{trademark} process or the Unocal, Unipure{trademark} process. Both processes are based on the reaction of Chromium VI with ferrous iron (Fe{sup +2}) to give Chromium III and Iron III, both of which are highly insoluble. This same technology -- iron reduction and precipitation of Chromium VI -- was successfully applied in situ to treat a perched aquifer contaminated with Chromium VI at a former industrial facility. The site was located on the Delaware River in an ecologically sensitive area. Groundwater concentrations of {approximately}85 ppm Chromium VI were successfully reduced to below 50 ppb across most of the site and discharge of Chromium VI into the Delaware River was stopped by the injection of a ferrous sulfate solution. This paper will discuss the selection, laboratory testing, regulatory approval, design and implementation of this in situ iron reduction process. The alternative to this in situ approach is a multi-year pump and treat operation involving high capital expenditure.

  3. The Henry ford production system: effective reduction of process defects and waste in surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Zarbo, Richard J; D'Angelo, Rita

    2007-12-01

    By adopting a cultural transformation in its employees' approach to work and using manufacturing based continuous quality improvement methods, the surgical pathology division of Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, focused on reducing commonly encountered defects and waste in processes throughout the testing cycle. At inception, the baseline in-process defect rate was measured at nearly 1 in 3 cases (27.9%). After the year-long efforts of 77 workers implementing more than 100 process improvements, the number of cases with defects was reduced by 55% to 1 in 8 cases (12.5%), with a statistically significant reduction in the overall distribution of defects (P = .0004). Comparison with defects encountered in the pre-improvement period showed statistically significant reductions in pre-analytic (P = .0007) and analytic (P = .0002) test phase processes in the post-improvement period that included specimen receipt, specimen accessioning, grossing, histology slides, and slide recuts. We share the key improvements implemented that were responsible for the overall success in reducing waste and re-work in the broad spectrum of surgical pathology processes.

  4. NO sub x reduction by the Econ-Nox trademark SCR process

    SciTech Connect

    Hardison, L.C.; Nagl, G.J.; Addison, G.E. )

    1991-11-01

    SCR systems are used extensively in Japan and West Germany to eliminate 80-90% NO{sub x} emissions from utility boilers and industrial furnace stacks. Costs have been lowered considerably over the past ten years. Further reduced costs and stringent regulations on NO{sub x} emission make this simple system attractive for refinery and industrial process heaters, boilers, and gas turbines. The Econ-Nox{trademark} process uses a fluidized catalyst bed to accomplish selective total reduction of oxides of nitrogen to elemental nitrogen using ammonia as a reactant. The process can be designed for operating temperatures between 550 F and 750 F and for a wide range of operating variables. The process brings together some old technology on selective reduction chemistry, relatively new fluidized bed oxidation techniques and a non-precious metal Econ-Acat{trademark} catalyst which permits operation over a broader temperature range than has been practical in the past. This paper reports some of the distinctions made between this reactor configuration and the historical thermal and catalytic systems used for this type of process.

  5. The influence of cryogenic processes on the erosional Arctic shoreface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Are, F.; Reimnitz, E.; Grigoriev, M.; Hubberten, H.-W.; Rachold, V.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal dynamics and shoreface relief in ice-free seas are a function of hydrodynamic interactions between the sea and bottom sediments. In the Arctic, additional, cryogenic factors such as permafrost and the action of sea ice influence coastal processes. The goal of our paper is to assess this influence, mainly on the profile shape. Mathematical analyses of the shape of 63 shoreface profiles from the Laptev, Beaufort, and Chukchi Seas were carried out. The shapes of Arctic shoreface profiles and those of ice-free seas are compared. We found that large ice and silt content in perennially frozen sediments composing Arctic coasts favor their erosion. Sea ice plays an important role in sediment transport on the shoreface and correspondingly changes shoreface relief significantly. Some effects of ice intensify coastal erosion considerably, but others play a protective role. The overall influence of cryogenic processes on Arctic coasts composed of loose sediments is seen in that the average rate of coastal retreat is larger than in the temperate environments, even though Arctic coasts are protected by a continuous ice cover most of the year. The shape of the shoreface profile in the Arctic does not differ from that in ice-free seas, and is satisfactorily described by the Bruun/Dean equilibrium profile equation. The explanation of this fact is that all changes of the profile shape, caused by cryogenic processes, are short lived and quickly eliminated by wave action.

  6. Storm track processes and the opposing influences of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, T. A.; Baldwin, M.; Barnes, E. A.; Caballero, R.; Garfinkel, C. I.; Hwang, Y.-T.; Li, C.; O'Gorman, P. A.; Rivière, G.; Simpson, I. R.; Voigt, A.

    2016-09-01

    Extratropical cyclones are storm systems that are observed to travel preferentially within confined regions known as storm tracks. They contribute to precipitation, wind and temperature extremes in mid-latitudes. Cyclones tend to form where surface temperature gradients are large, and the jet stream influences their speed and direction of travel. Storm tracks shape the global climate through transport of energy and momentum. The intensity and location of storm tracks varies seasonally, and in response to other natural variations, such as changes in tropical sea surface temperature. A hierarchy of numerical models of the atmosphere-ocean system -- from highly idealized to comprehensive -- has been used to study and predict responses of storm tracks to anthropogenic climate change. The future position and intensity of storm tracks depend on processes that alter temperature gradients. However, different processes can have opposing influences on temperature gradients, which leads to a tug of war on storm track responses and makes future projections more difficult. For example, as climate warms, surface shortwave cloud radiative changes increase the Equator-to-pole temperature gradient, but at the same time, longwave cloud radiative changes reduce this gradient. Future progress depends on understanding and accurately quantifying the relative influence of such processes on the storm tracks.

  7. Fairness influences early signatures of reward-related neural processing.

    PubMed

    Massi, Bart; Luhmann, Christian C

    2015-12-01

    Many humans exhibit a strong preference for fairness during decision-making. Although there is evidence that social factors influence reward-related and affective neural processing, it is unclear if this effect is mediated by compulsory outcome evaluation processes or results from slower deliberate cognition. Here we show that the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and late positive potential (LPP), two signatures of early hedonic processing, are modulated by the fairness of rewards during a passive rating task. We find that unfair payouts elicit larger FRNs than fair payouts, whereas fair payouts elicit larger LPPs than unfair payouts. This is true both in the time-domain, where the FRN and LPP are related, and in the time-frequency domain, where the two signals are largely independent. Ultimately, this work demonstrates that fairness affects the early stages of reward and affective processing, suggesting a common biological mechanism for social and personal reward evaluation.

  8. Influence of the element silicon on laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2005-01-01

    Laser cutting had been widely used in the material processing field with the increase of the requirements on the quality and work efficiency. As to the laser cutting, there had many factors that could affect the quality of cuts. Among them, the chemical composition played an important role because laser processing was a kind of interaction among laser beam, shielding gas and materials. Compared with the other element, silicon element had a deleterious effect on the laser processing which resulted in cuts with a dross and brittleness in the welded seam. However, many kinds of steel with high amount of silicon need to be processed by laser technology in recent years. In this paper, the influence of silicon element on the quality of laser cutting and laser welding was discussed. Continuous CO2 laser was used to cut and weld materials with different amount of silicon. Results showed that with the increase amount of silicon, the speed of laser cutting and laser welding decreased in order to obtain the good cuts and welds. Silicon had the obvious influence on the laser processing technology and quality. Microstructure of the laser welds for materials with high amount of silicon was also analyzed in this paper.

  9. Influences of Multisensory Experience on Subsequent Unisensory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Ladan; Wozny, David R.; Kim, Robyn; Seitz, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Multisensory perception has been the focus of intense investigation in recent years. It is now well-established that crossmodal interactions are ubiquitous in perceptual processing and endow the system with improved precision, accuracy, processing speed, etc. While these findings have shed much light on principles and mechanisms of perception, ultimately it is not very surprising that multiple sources of information provides benefits in performance compared to a single source of information. Here, we argue that the more surprising recent findings are those showing that multisensory experience also influences the subsequent unisensory processing. For example, exposure to auditory–visual stimuli can change the way that auditory or visual stimuli are processed subsequently even in isolation. We review three sets of findings that represent three different types of learning ranging from perceptual learning, to sensory recalibration, to associative learning. In all these cases exposure to multisensory stimuli profoundly influences the subsequent unisensory processing. This diversity of phenomena may suggest that continuous modification of unisensory representations by multisensory relationships may be a general learning strategy employed by the brain. PMID:22028697

  10. Environmental guideline for the reduction of volatile organic compound emissions from the plastics processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to environmental regulatory agencies, manufacturers, and operators of plastics processing plants regarding the means of reducing emissions containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are released to the environment in the course of production. Sectors covered by the guideline are expanded polystyrene, cellular polyethylene foams, polyvinyl chloride, and reinforced plastics and composites made from thermoset polyester resins. The guideline focuses on the reduction of VOC emissions from processing and clean-up operations, the handling and storage of VOC-containing materials, and the handling and disposal of wastes. The guideline contains material, equipment, process, and operating standards for plastics processing facilities, record keeping and training standards, recommended operating practices, and testing protocols.

  11. Nutritional impact of sodium reduction strategies on sodium intake from processed foods

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, M A H; Verkaik-Kloosterman, J; Noort, M W; van Raaij, J M A

    2015-01-01

    Background/objectives: Sodium intake in the Netherlands is substantially above the recommended intake of 2400 mg/day. This study aimed to estimate the effect of two sodium reduction strategies, that is, modification of the composition of industrially processed foods toward the technologically feasible minimum level or alteration of consumers' behavior on sodium intake in the Netherlands. Subjects/methods: Data from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (2007–2010) and the Food Composition Table (2011) were used to estimate the current sodium intake. In the first scenario, levels in processed foods were reduced toward their technologically feasible minimum level (sodium reduction in processed foods scenario). The minimum feasible levels were based on literature searches or expert judgment. In the second scenario, foods consumed were divided into similar food (sub)groups. Subsequently, foods were replaced by low-sodium alternatives (substitution of processed foods scenario). Sodium intake from foods was calculated based on the mean of two observation days for the current food consumption pattern and the scenarios. Results: Sodium levels of processed foods could be reduced in most food groups by 50%, and this may reduce median sodium intake from foods by 38% (from 3042 to 1886 mg/day in adult men). Substitution of foods may reduce sodium intake by 47% (from 3042 to 1627 mg/day in adult men), owing to many low-sodium alternatives within food groups. Conclusions: In the Netherlands, reduction of sodium intake by modification of food composition or by alteration of behavior may substantially reduce the median sodium intake from foods below the recommended sodium intake. PMID:25782426

  12. A Mathematical Model for the Reduction Stage of the CAS-OB Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulasalmi, Petri; Visuri, Ville-Valtteri; Kärnä, Aki; Järvinen, Mika; Ollila, Seppo; Fabritius, Timo

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for modeling the reduction stage of the CAS-OB process (composition adjustment by sealed argon bubbling-oxygen blowing). Our previous study proposed a model for the heating stage of the CAS-OB process; the purpose of the present study is to extend this work toward a more comprehensive model for the process in question. The CAS-OB process is designed for homogenization and control of the composition and temperature of steel. During the reduction stage, the steel phase is stirred intensely by employing the gas nozzles at the bottom of the ladle, which blow argon gas. It is assumed that the reduction rate of the top slag is dictated by the formation of slag droplets at the steel-slag interface. Slag droplets, which are generated due to turning of the steel flow in the spout, contribute mainly by increasing the interfacial area between the steel and slag phases. This phenomenon has been taken into account based on our previous study, in which the droplet size distribution and generation rate at different steel flow velocities. The reactions considered between the slag and steel phases are assumed to be mass transfer controlled and reversible. We validated the results from the model against the measurements from the real CAS-OB process. The results indicate that the model accurately predicts the end compositions of slag and steel. Moreover, it was discovered that the cooling rate of steel during the gas stirring given by the model is consistent with the results reported in the literature.

  13. Reduced Graphene Oxides: Influence of the Reduction Method on the Electrocatalytic Effect towards Nucleic Acid Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Báez, Daniela F; Pardo, Helena; Laborda, Ignacio; Marco, José F; Yáñez, Claudia; Bollo, Soledad

    2017-07-04

    For the first time a critical analysis of the influence that four different graphene oxide reduction methods have on the electrochemical properties of the resulting reduced graphene oxides (RGOs) is reported. Starting from the same graphene oxide, chemical (CRGO), hydrothermal (hTRGO), electrochemical (ERGO), and thermal (TRGO) reduced graphene oxide were produced. The materials were fully characterized and the topography and electroactivity of the resulting glassy carbon modified electrodes were also evaluated. An oligonucleotide molecule was used as a model of DNA electrochemical biosensing. The results allow for the conclusion that TRGO produced the RGOs with the best electrochemical performance for oligonucleotide electroanalysis. A clear shift in the guanine oxidation peak potential to lower values (~0.100 V) and an almost two-fold increase in the current intensity were observed compared with the other RGOs. The electrocatalytic effect has a multifactorial explanation because the TRGO was the material that presented a higher polydispersity and lower sheet size, thus exposing a larger quantity of defects to the electrode surface, which produces larger physical and electrochemical areas.

  14. Reduced Graphene Oxides: Influence of the Reduction Method on the Electrocatalytic Effect towards Nucleic Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Báez, Daniela F.; Pardo, Helena; Laborda, Ignacio; Marco, José F.; Yáñez, Claudia; Bollo, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    For the first time a critical analysis of the influence that four different graphene oxide reduction methods have on the electrochemical properties of the resulting reduced graphene oxides (RGOs) is reported. Starting from the same graphene oxide, chemical (CRGO), hydrothermal (hTRGO), electrochemical (ERGO), and thermal (TRGO) reduced graphene oxide were produced. The materials were fully characterized and the topography and electroactivity of the resulting glassy carbon modified electrodes were also evaluated. An oligonucleotide molecule was used as a model of DNA electrochemical biosensing. The results allow for the conclusion that TRGO produced the RGOs with the best electrochemical performance for oligonucleotide electroanalysis. A clear shift in the guanine oxidation peak potential to lower values (~0.100 V) and an almost two-fold increase in the current intensity were observed compared with the other RGOs. The electrocatalytic effect has a multifactorial explanation because the TRGO was the material that presented a higher polydispersity and lower sheet size, thus exposing a larger quantity of defects to the electrode surface, which produces larger physical and electrochemical areas. PMID:28677654

  15. Reduction of the Influence of Laser Beam Directional Dithering in a Laser Triangulation Displacement Probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongwei; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Zhengqi; Zhao, Siwei; Yin, Xiaoqia; Zhao, Hui

    2017-05-15

    Directional dithering of a laser beam potentially limits the detection accuracy of a laser triangulation displacement probe. A theoretical analysis indicates that the measurement accuracy will linearly decrease as the laser dithering angle increases. To suppress laser dithering, a scheme for reduction of the influence of laser beam directional dithering in a laser triangulation displacement probe, which consists of a collimated red laser, a laser beam pointing control setup, a receiver lens, and a charge-coupled device, is proposed in this paper. The laser beam pointing control setup is inserted into the source laser beam and the measured object and can separate the source laser beam into two symmetrical laser beams. Hence, at the angle at which the source laser beam dithers, the positional averages of the two laser spots are equal and opposite. Moreover, a virtual linear function method is used to maintain a stable average of the positions of the two spots on the imaging side. Experimental results indicate that with laser beam pointing control, the estimated standard deviation of the fitting error decreases from 0.3531 mm to 0.0100 mm , the repeatability accuracy can be lowered from ±7 mm to ±5 μ m , and the nonlinear error can be reduced from ±6 % FS (full scale) to ±0.16 % FS.

  16. Reduction of the Influence of Laser Beam Directional Dithering in a Laser Triangulation Displacement Probe

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongwei; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Zhengqi; Zhao, Siwei; Yin, Xiaoqia; Zhao, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Directional dithering of a laser beam potentially limits the detection accuracy of a laser triangulation displacement probe. A theoretical analysis indicates that the measurement accuracy will linearly decrease as the laser dithering angle increases. To suppress laser dithering, a scheme for reduction of the influence of laser beam directional dithering in a laser triangulation displacement probe, which consists of a collimated red laser, a laser beam pointing control setup, a receiver lens, and a charge-coupled device, is proposed in this paper. The laser beam pointing control setup is inserted into the source laser beam and the measured object and can separate the source laser beam into two symmetrical laser beams. Hence, at the angle at which the source laser beam dithers, the positional averages of the two laser spots are equal and opposite. Moreover, a virtual linear function method is used to maintain a stable average of the positions of the two spots on the imaging side. Experimental results indicate that with laser beam pointing control, the estimated standard deviation of the fitting error decreases from 0.3531 mm to 0.0100 mm, the repeatability accuracy can be lowered from ±7 mm to ±5 μm, and the nonlinear error can be reduced from ±6 % FS (full scale) to ±0.16 % FS. PMID:28505131

  17. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part I. The role and kinetics of volatile reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2005-10-06

    With iron ore reduction processes using coal-ore pellets or mixtures, it is possible that volatiles can contribute to reduction. By simulating the constituents of the individual reducing species in the volatiles, the rates for H{sub 2} and CO were investigated in the temperature and reduction range of interest; hydrogen is the major reductant and was studied in detail. The kinetics of the reduction by H{sub 2} has been found to be a complex mechanism with, initially, nucleation and growth controlling the rate. There is a catalytic effect by the existing iron nuclei, followed by a mixed control of chemical kinetics and pore diffusion. This results in a topochemical reduction of these iron oxide particles. Up to 1173 K, reduction by H{sub 2} is considerably faster than by carbon in the pellet/mixture or by CO. It was also found that H{sub 2}S, which is involved with the volatiles, does not affect the rate at the reduction range of interest.

  18. Influence of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction on CT calcium scores: a multi-manufacturer dynamic phantom study.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, N R; Willemink, M J; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W; Leiner, T

    2017-01-19

    To evaluate the influence of dose reduction in combination with iterative reconstruction (IR) on coronary calcium scores (CCS) in a dynamic phantom on state-of-the-art CT systems from different manufacturers. Calcified inserts in an anthropomorphic chest phantom were translated at 20 mm/s corresponding to heart rates between 60 and 75 bpm. The inserts were scanned five times with routinely used CCS protocols at reference dose and 40 and 80% dose reduction on four high-end CT systems. Filtered back projection (FBP) and increasing levels of IR were applied. Noise levels were determined. CCS, quantified as Agatston and mass scores, were compared to physical mass and scores at FBP reference dose. For the reference dose in combination with FBP, noise level variation between CT systems was less than 18%. Decreasing dose almost always resulted in increased CCS, while at increased levels of IR, CCS decreased again. The influence of IR on CCS was smaller than the influence of dose reduction. At reference dose, physical mass was underestimated 3-30%. All CT systems showed similar CCS at 40% dose reduction in combinations with specific reconstructions. For some CT systems CCS was not affected at 80% dose reduction, in combination with IR. This multivendor study showed that radiation dose reductions of 40% did not influence CCS in a dynamic phantom using state-of-the-art CT systems in combination with specific reconstruction settings. Dose reduction resulted in increased noise and consequently increased CCS, whereas increased IR resulted in decreased CCS.

  19. METHANE de-NOX process as a NO{sub x} reduction technology for stoker boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Rabovitser, I.; Roberts, M.; Chan, I.; Loviska, T.; Morrow, R.; Bonner, T.; Hall, D.

    1996-12-31

    The most common NO{sub x} control technology utilized in stokers is selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) systems. The natural gas industry has developed the patented METHANE de-NOX reburning process for stokers to reduce NO{sub x} emissions to the levels set by current EPA regulations without increasing the levels of other undesirable emissions. In contrast to conventional reburning, where the reburn fuel is injected above the combustion zone to create a fuel-rich reburn zone, with METHANE de-NOX, natural gas is injected directly into the combustion zone above the grate; this results in a reduction of NO{sub x} formed in the coal bed and also limits its formation through decomposition of the NO{sub x} precursors to form molecular nitrogen rather than nitrogen oxides. The METHANE de-NOX process was field tested at the Olmsted County waste-to-energy facility in Rochester, Minnesota, and at an incineration plant in Japan. Compared to baseline levels, about 60% NO{sub x} reduction and an increase in boiler efficiency were achieved. IGT, Detroit Stoker Company, and Cogentrix are presently demonstrating the METHANE de-NOX technology on a coal-fired 390 MM Btu/h stoker boiler at a 240 MW cogeneration plant in Richmond, Virginia. Baseline tests were conducted which indicated that 50 to 60% NO{sub x} can be reduced by utilization of METHANE de-NOX.

  20. Cost reductions of fuel cells for transport applications: fuel processing options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Bentley, J.; Barnett, B.

    The highly favorable efficiency/environmental characteristics of fuel cell technologies have now been verified by virtue of recent and ongoing field experience. The key issue regarding the timing and extent of fuel cell commercialization is the ability to reduce costs to acceptable levels in both stationary and transport applications. It is increasingly recognized that the fuel processing subsystem can have a major impact on overall system costs, particularly as ongoing R&D efforts result in reduction of the basic cost structure of stacks which currently dominate system costs. The fuel processing subsystem for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, which is the focus of transport applications, includes the reformer, shift reactors, and means for CO reduction. In addition to low cost, transport applications require a fuel processor that is compact and can start rapidly. This paper describes the impact of factors such as fuel choice, operating temperature, material selection, catalyst requirements, and controls on the cost of fuel processing systems. There are fuel processor technology paths which manufacturing cost analyses indicate are consistent with fuel processor subsystem costs of under 150/kW in stationary applications and 30/kW in transport applications. As such, the costs of mature fuel processing subsystem technologies should be consistent with their use in commercially viable fuel cell systems in both application categories.

  1. Study of user influence in routine SPM data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečas, D.; Klapetek, P.

    2017-03-01

    The quantitative results obtained using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are influenced not only by instrumentation factors, but also by humans—the SPM users that perform the data processing and the evaluation of statistical characteristics, dimensions and other parameters from the images. We investigate this user influence empirically by performing several experiments in which real humans process SPM data in different settings using the same software, and statistically characterise the results. Two types of experiments are conducted: one in a well-defined laboratory setting where prescribed procedures requiring user input are applied by experienced users to large ensembles of similar data; the other in an open setting in which a large group of SPM users evaluate the same images to obtain specified parameters but without external guidance. The open study in particular brings about results that should be alarming for the SPM community and SPM metrology in particular. We also attempt to derive some guidance for the design of SPM data processing software functions from the results and classify the amount of user input in the data processing functions.

  2. Face Context Influences Local Part Processing: An ERP Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Sun, Yaoru; Zhao, Lun

    2017-01-01

    Perception of face parts on the basis of features is thought to be different from perception of whole faces, which is more based on configural information. Face context is also suggested to play an important role in face processing. To investigate how face context influences the early-stage perception of facial local parts, we used an oddball paradigm that tested perceptual stages of face processing rather than recognition. We recorded the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by whole faces and face parts presented in four conditions (upright-normal, upright-thatcherised, inverted-normal and inverted-thatcherised), as well as the ERPs elicited by non-face objects (whole houses and house parts) with corresponding conditions. The results showed that face context significantly affected the N170 with increased amplitudes and earlier peak latency for upright normal faces. Removing face context delayed the P1 latency but did not affect the P1 amplitude prominently for both upright and inverted normal faces. Across all conditions, neither the N170 nor the P1 was modulated by house context. The significant changes on the N170 and P1 components revealed that face context influences local part processing at the early stage of face processing and this context effect might be specific for face perception. We further suggested that perceptions of whole faces and face parts are functionally distinguished.

  3. Key role of surface oxidation and reduction processes in the coarsening of Pt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Solano, Eduardo; Dendooven, Jolien; Ramachandran, Ranjith K; Van de Kerckhove, Kevin; Dobbelaere, Thomas; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Detavernier, Christophe

    2017-09-14

    Particle coarsening is the main cause for thermal deactivation and lifetime reduction of supported Pt nanocatalysts. Here, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) was used to prepare a model system of Pt nanoparticles with high control over the metal loading and the nanoparticle size and coverage. A series of samples with distinct as-deposited size and interparticle spacing was annealed under different oxygen environments while Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS) was employed as in situ tool for monitoring the change in average nanoparticle size. The obtained results revealed three morphological stages during the thermal treatment, which can be explained by (I) the formation of a PtO2 shell on stable Pt nanoparticles at low temperature (below 300 °C), (II) the reduction of the PtO2 shell at moderate temperature (300 to 600 °C), creating mobile species that trigger particle coarsening until a steady morphological state is reached, and (III) the evaporation of PtO2 at high temperature (above 650 °C), causing particle instability and coarsening reactivation. The onset temperatures for stages (II) and (III) were found to depend on the initial particle size and spacing as well as on the O2 partial pressure during annealing, and could be summarized in a morphological stability diagram for Pt nanoparticles. The coarsening model indicates an important role for the reduction of the PtO2 shell in inducing particle coarsening. The key role of the reduction process was corroborated through isothermal experiments under decreasing O2 partial pressure and through forced reduction experiments near room temperature via H2 exposure.

  4. Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the Continuous Casting Bloom in the Heavy Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cheng; Wu, Chen-hui; Zhu, Miao-yong

    2016-12-01

    A two-stage sequential heavy reduction (HR) method, in which the reduction amount was increased both before and after the solidification end, is presented to simultaneously improve the homogeneity and compactness of the continuous casting bloom. With bearing steel GCr15 chosen as the specific research steel, a three-dimensional thermal-mechanical finite element model was developed to simulate and analyze the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the continuous casting bloom during the HR process. In order to ensure the accuracy of the simulation, the constitutive model parameters were derived from the experimental results. The predicted temperature distribution and shell thickness were verified using a thermal infrared camera and nail shooting results, respectively. The real measured relationship between the HR pressure and amount were applied to verify the mechanical model. The explorative application results showed that the quality of the bloom center and compactness of rolled bars have both been significantly improved after the HR was applied.

  5. Interim glycol flowsheet reduction/oxidation (redox) model for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Williams, M. S.; Zamecnik, J. R.; Missimer, D. M.

    2016-03-08

    Control of the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of glasses containing high concentrations of transition metals, such as High Level Waste (HLW) glasses, is critical in order to eliminate processing difficulties caused by overly reduced or overly oxidized melts. Operation of a HLW melter at Fe+2/ΣFe ratios of between 0.09 and 0.33, a range which is not overly oxidizing or overly reducing, helps retain radionuclides in the melt, i.e. long-lived radioactive 99Tc species in the less volatile reduced Tc4+ state, 104Ru in the melt as reduced Ru+4 state as insoluble RuO2, and hazardous volatile Cr6+ in the less soluble and less volatile Cr+3 state in the glass. The melter REDOX control balances the oxidants and reductants from the feed and from processing additives such as antifoam. Currently, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is running a formic acid-nitric acid (FN) flowsheet where formic acid is the main reductant and nitric acid is the main oxidant. During decomposition formate and formic acid releases H2 gas which requires close control of the melter vapor space flammability. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (GN) flowsheet is desired as the glycolic acid flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing. Development of an EE term for glycolic acid in the GN flowsheet is documented in this study.

  6. Influence of scatter reduction method and monochromatic beams on image quality and dose in mammography.

    PubMed

    Moeckli, Raphaël; Verdun, Francis R; Fiedler, Stefan; Pachoud, Marc; Bulling, Shelley; Schnyder, Pierre; Valley, Jean-François

    2003-12-01

    In mammography, the image contrast and dose delivered to the patient are determined by the x-ray spectrum and the scatter to primary ratio S/P. Thus the quality of the mammographic procedure is highly dependent on the choice of anode and filter material and on the method used to reduce the amount of scattered radiation reaching the detector. Synchrotron radiation is a useful tool to study the effect of beam energy on the optimization of the mammographic process because it delivers a high flux of monochromatic photons. Moreover, because the beam is naturally flat collimated in one direction, a slot can be used instead of a grid for scatter reduction. We have measured the ratio S/P and the transmission factors for grids and slots for monoenergetic synchrotron radiation. In this way the effect of beam energy and scatter rejection method were separated, and their respective importance for image quality and dose analyzed. Our results show that conventional mammographic spectra are not far from optimum and that the use of a slot instead of a grid has an important effect on the optimization of the mammographic process. We propose a simple numerical model to quantify this effect.

  7. Motor force field learning influences visual processing of target motion.

    PubMed

    Brown, Liana E; Wilson, Elizabeth T; Goodale, Melvyn A; Gribble, Paul L

    2007-09-12

    There are reciprocal connections between visual and motor areas of the cerebral cortex. Although recent studies have provided intriguing new insights, in comparison with volume of research on the visual control of movement, relatively little is known about how movement influences vision. The motor system is perfectly suited to learn about environmental forces. Does environmental force information, learned by the motor system, influence visual processing? Here, we show that learning to compensate for a force applied to the hand influenced how participants predicted target motion for interception. Ss trained in one of three constant force fields by making reaching movements while holding a robotic manipulandum. The robot applied forces in a null [null force field (NFF)], leftward [leftward force field (LFF)], or [rightward force field (RFF)] direction. Training was followed immediately with an interception task. The target accelerated from left to right and Ss's task was to stab it. When viewing time was optimal for prediction, the RFF group initiated their responses earlier and hit more targets, and the LFF group initiated their responses later and hit fewer targets, than the NFF group. In follow-up experiments, we show that motor learning is necessary, and we rule out the possibility that explicit force direction information drives how Ss altered their predictions of visual motion. Environmental force information, acquired by motor learning, influenced how the motion of nearby visual targets was predicted.

  8. Reduction of Ochratoxin A in Oat Flakes by Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Dahal, Samjhana; Perez, Enrique Garcia; Kowalski, Ryan Joseph; Ganjyal, Girish M; Ryu, Dojin

    2017-10-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most important mycotoxins owing to its widespread occurrence and toxicity, including nephrotoxicity and potential carcinogenicity to humans. OTA has been detected in a wide range of agricultural commodities, including cereal grains and their processed products. In particular, oat-based products show a higher incidence and level of contamination. Extrusion cooking is widely used in the manufacturing of breakfast cereals and snacks and may reduce mycotoxins to varying degrees. Hence, the effects of extrusion cooking on the stability of OTA in spiked (100 μg/kg) oat flake was investigated by using a laboratory-scale twin-screw extruder with a central composite design. Factors examined were moisture content (20, 25, and 30% dry weight basis), temperature (140, 160, and 180°C), screw speed (150, 200, and 250 rpm), and die size (1.5, 2, and 3 mm). Both nonextruded and extruded samples were analyzed for reductions of OTA by high-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with fluorescence detection. The percentage of reductions in OTA in the contaminated oat flakes upon extrusion processing were in the range of 0 to 28%. OTA was partially stable during extrusion, with only screw speed and die size having significant effect on reduction (P < 0.005). The highest reduction of 28% was achieved at 180°C, 20% moisture, 250 rpm screw speed, and a 3-mm die with 193 kJ/kg specific mechanical energy. According to the central composite design analyses, up to 28% of OTA can be reduced by a combination of 162°C, 30% moisture, and 221 rpm, with a 3-mm die.

  9. Removal of PCBs in contaminated soils by means of chemical reduction and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Rybnikova, V; Usman, M; Hanna, K

    2016-09-01

    Although the chemical reduction and advanced oxidation processes have been widely used individually, very few studies have assessed the combined reduction/oxidation approach for soil remediation. In the present study, experiments were performed in spiked sand and historically contaminated soil by using four synthetic nanoparticles (Fe(0), Fe/Ni, Fe3O4, Fe3 - x Ni x O4). These nanoparticles were tested firstly for reductive transformation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and then employed as catalysts to promote chemical oxidation reactions (H2O2 or persulfate). Obtained results indicated that bimetallic nanoparticles Fe/Ni showed the highest efficiency in reduction of PCB28 and PCB118 in spiked sand (97 and 79 %, respectively), whereas magnetite (Fe3O4) exhibited a high catalytic stability during the combined reduction/oxidation approach. In chemical oxidation, persulfate showed higher PCB degradation extent than hydrogen peroxide. As expected, the degradation efficiency was found to be limited in historically contaminated soil, where only Fe(0) and Fe/Ni particles exhibited reductive capability towards PCBs (13 and 18 %). In oxidation step, the highest degradation extents were obtained in presence of Fe(0) and Fe/Ni (18-19 %). The increase in particle and oxidant doses improved the efficiency of treatment, but overall degradation extents did not exceed 30 %, suggesting that only a small part of PCBs in soil was available for reaction with catalyst and/or oxidant. The use of organic solvent or cyclodextrin to improve the PCB availability in soil did not enhance degradation efficiency, underscoring the strong impact of soil matrix. Moreover, a better PCB degradation was observed in sand spiked with extractable organic matter separated from contaminated soil. In contrast to fractions with higher particle size (250-500 and <500 μm), no PCB degradation was observed in the finest fraction (≤250 μm) having higher organic matter content. These findings

  10. Recharge processes drive sulfate reduction in an alluvial aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Martha A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Christenson, Scott C.

    2006-08-01

    may be present in the root zone, and SO 42- reduction may be coupled to methane oxidation. The results show that sulfur (and possibly nitrogen) redox processes within the top 2 m of the aquifer are directly related to recharge timing and seasonal water level changes in the aquifer. The results suggest that SO 42- reduction associated with the infiltration of recharge may be a significant factor affecting natural attenuation of contaminants in alluvial aquifers.

  11. Recharge processes drive sulfate reduction in an alluvial aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Christenson, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    present in the root zone, and SO42- reduction may be coupled to methane oxidation. The results show that sulfur (and possibly nitrogen) redox processes within the top 2??m of the aquifer are directly related to recharge timing and seasonal water level changes in the aquifer. The results suggest that SO42- reduction associated with the infiltration of recharge may be a significant factor affecting natural attenuation of contaminants in alluvial aquifers. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Consumer perception of dry-cured sheep meat products: Influence of process parameters under different evoked contexts.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Juliana Cunha; Nalério, Elen Silveira; Giongo, Citieli; de Barcellos, Marcia Dutra; Ares, Gastón; Deliza, Rosires

    2017-08-01

    The development of high-quality air-dried cured sheep meat products adapted to meet consumer demands represent an interesting option to add value to the meat of adult animals. The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of process parameters on consumer choice of two products from sheep meat under different evoked contexts, considering product concepts. A total of 375 Brazilian participants completed a choice-based conjoint task with three 2-level variables for each product: maturation time, smoking, and sodium reduction for dry-cured sheep ham, and natural antioxidant, smoking, and sodium reduction for sheep meat coppa. A between-subjects experimental design was used to evaluate the influence of consumption context on consumer choices. All the process parameters significantly influenced consumer choice. However, their relative importance was affected by evoked context. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effects of process parameters in synthesizing Sn nanoparticles via chemical reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee, Sang-Soo; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2012-02-01

    In order to prepare solder particles for fine pitch interconnections, Sn nanoparticles were synthesized via chemical reduction methods. A number of the process parameters, i.e., injection rate of a precursor solution, application of sonication, reaction temperature, types of reaction medium and capping agent, and drying temperature, are varied in order to study their effect on this process. Using a methanol solution containing 1,10-phenathroline monohydrate, the size of Sn nanoparticles collected after the synthesis decreases as the injection rate increases. An increase in the drying temperature strengthens the degree of agglomeration between Sn nanoparticles, and, in addition, the application of sonication accelerates the process of agglomeration and aggregation between nanoparticles during synthesis. Much smaller Sn nanoparticles are synthesized in diethylene-glycol solutions containing PVP, compared to the methanol solutions with 1,10-phenathroline monohydrate. In the synthesis using diethylene-glycol solutions, the Sn nanoparticle size increases quickly with the reaction temperature.

  14. Reduction of chromium in Ni-base superalloys through element substitution and rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, H. D.; Muddl, B. C.

    1982-01-01

    The reduction in the use of Cr in Ni base superalloys by the combined approaches of both elemental substitution and rapid solidification processing is studied. The elements Si, Zr, Y and Hf were chosen as potential partial substitutes for Cr in Waspaloy and IN 713LC sine their separate addition to other alloys has previously resulted in enhanced oxidation resistance. The roles of Cr and these replacement elements in determining the microstructure and properties are evaluated. The elements Si, Zr, and Y and Hf are used as partial replacements for Cr in the base superalloys and these resultant alloys are processed using rapid solidification techniques. The mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of the processed materials are evaluated. The microstructure is characterized using state of the art techniques (e.g. analytical transmission electron microscopy), and the mechanism by which these structures are produced is determined.

  15. Chemical treatment of plutonium with hydrogen peroxide before nitrate anion exchange processing. [Reduction to (IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Gallegos, T.D.

    1987-05-01

    The major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is anion exchange in nitric acid. This process is highly selective for plutonium; however, all plutonium must be as Pu(IV) to form the strongly sorbed anionic nitrato complex. The previous ''full-reduction treatment'' used at Los Alamos to obtain Pu(IV) results in a three- to fourfold increase in the feed solution volume and the introduction of kilogram quantities of extraneous salts immediately before a process whose function is to remove such impurities. That treatment has been successfully replaced by a single reagent, hydrogen peroxide, which converts all plutonium to Pu(IV), minimally increases the feed volume, and introduces no residual impurities. Safety aspects of this revised chemical treatment are addressed.

  16. Reduction of chromium in Ni-base superalloys through element substitution and rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, H. D.; Muddl, B. C.

    1982-01-01

    The reduction in the use of Cr in Ni base superalloys by the combined approaches of both elemental substitution and rapid solidification processing is studied. The elements Si, Zr, Y and Hf were chosen as potential partial substitutes for Cr in Waspaloy and IN 713LC sine their separate addition to other alloys has previously resulted in enhanced oxidation resistance. The roles of Cr and these replacement elements in determining the microstructure and properties are evaluated. The elements Si, Zr, and Y and Hf are used as partial replacements for Cr in the base superalloys and these resultant alloys are processed using rapid solidification techniques. The mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of the processed materials are evaluated. The microstructure is characterized using state of the art techniques (e.g. analytical transmission electron microscopy), and the mechanism by which these structures are produced is determined.

  17. Simple Process for the Reduction in the Nucleic Acid Content in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zee, J. A.; Simard, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A simple one-step process for the nucleic acid reduction in Rhodotorula glutinis is described. The process consists of submitting the yeast cells to a heat treatment in an acidic (pH 2) spent medium. The optimal temperature for pH 2 medium is 90 C and the final nucleic acid content in treated yeasts was 1.2%. Heat treatment at acidic pH is preferred to that at alkaline pH because it offers a better protection for amino acids and crude protein, while being more efficient in lowering the nucleic acid level. The new process is economic and rapid and could be easily used for industrial application. PMID:234157

  18. Reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Ding, Lili

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the reduction of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), intI1 and 16S rRNA genes, by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely Fenton oxidation (Fe(2+)/H2O2) and UV/H2O2 process. The ARGs include sul1, tetX, and tetG from municipal wastewater effluent. The results indicated that the Fenton oxidation and UV/H2O2 process could reduce selected ARGs effectively. Oxidation by the Fenton process was slightly better than that of the UV/H2O2 method. Particularly, for the Fenton oxidation, under the optimal condition wherein Fe(2+)/H2O2 had a molar ratio of 0.1 and a H2O2 concentration of 0.01molL(-1) with a pH of 3.0 and reaction time of 2h, 2.58-3.79 logs of target genes were removed. Under the initial effluent pH condition (pH=7.0), the removal was 2.26-3.35 logs. For the UV/H2O2 process, when the pH was 3.5 with a H2O2 concentration of 0.01molL(-1) accompanied by 30min of UV irradiation, all ARGs could achieve a reduction of 2.8-3.5 logs, and 1.55-2.32 logs at a pH of 7.0. The Fenton oxidation and UV/H2O2 process followed the first-order reaction kinetic model. The removal of target genes was affected by many parameters, including initial Fe(2+)/H2O2 molar ratios, H2O2 concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. Among these factors, reagent concentrations and pH values are the most important factors during AOPs.

  19. Influence of Process Parameters on the Process Efficiency in Laser Metal Deposition Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güpner, Michael; Patschger, Andreas; Bliedtner, Jens

    Conventionally manufactured tools are often completely constructed of a high-alloyed, expensive tool steel. An alternative way to manufacture tools is the combination of a cost-efficient, mild steel and a functional coating in the interaction zone of the tool. Thermal processing methods, like laser metal deposition, are always characterized by thermal distortion. The resistance against the thermal distortion decreases with the reduction of the material thickness. As a consequence, there is a necessity of a special process management for the laser based coating of thin parts or tools. The experimental approach in the present paper is to keep the energy and the mass per unit length constant by varying the laser power, the feed rate and the powder mass flow. The typical seam parameters are measured in order to characterize the cladding process, define process limits and evaluate the process efficiency. Ways to optimize dilution, angular distortion and clad height are presented.

  20. Persistence and effect of processing on reduction of chlorpyriphos residues in okra fruits.

    PubMed

    Samriti; Chauhan, Reena; Kumari, Beena

    2011-08-01

    Residue levels of chlorpyriphos were determined in unprocessed and processed okra fruits to evaluate the effect of different processes (washing and washing followed by boiling/cooking) on reduction of residues of this pesticide in okra. The study was carried out on okra crop (Variety, Varsha Uphar) in research farm of Chaudhary Charan Singh, Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar with application of chlorpyriphos (Radar 20 EC) at 200 g a.i./ha and 400g a.i./ha (Single Dose, T(1)) and 400 g a.i./ha (Double Dose, T(2)). Samples of okra fruits were collected on 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 days and at harvest after treatment. Residues were estimated by GC-ECD system and reached BDL of 0.010 mg kg(-1) on 7th and 15th day in case of single and double dose, respectively. The residues dissipated with half-life period of 3.15 days at lower dose and 3.46 days at higher dose following biphasic first order kinetics. Processing was found very effective in reducing the levels of chlorpyriphos residues in okra fruits. Maximum reduction (64-77%) was observed by washing + boiling followed by washing (13-35%).

  1. Reduction of overestimation in interval arithmetic simulation of biological wastewater treatment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, Andreas; Kletting, Marco; Aschemann, Harald; Hofer, Eberhard P.

    2007-02-01

    A novel interval arithmetic simulation approach is introduced in order to evaluate the performance of biological wastewater treatment processes. Such processes are typically modeled as dynamical systems where the reaction kinetics appears as additive nonlinearity in state. In the calculation of guaranteed bounds of state variables uncertain parameters and uncertain initial conditions are considered. The recursive evaluation of such systems of nonlinear state equations yields overestimation of the state variables that is accumulating over the simulation time. To cope with this wrapping effect, innovative splitting and merging criteria based on a recursive uncertain linear transformation of the state variables are discussed. Additionally, re-approximation strategies for regions in the state space calculated by interval arithmetic techniques using disjoint subintervals improve the simulation quality significantly if these regions are described by several overlapping subintervals. This simulation approach is used to find a practical compromise between computational effort and simulation quality. It is pointed out how these splitting and merging algorithms can be combined with other methods that aim at the reduction of overestimation by applying consistency techniques. Simulation results are presented for a simplified reduced-order model of the reduction of organic matter in the activated sludge process of biological wastewater treatment.

  2. Black liquor viscosity reduction through salt additives: A novel environmentally benign processing alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.E.; Khan, S.A.; Spontak, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Processing black liquor at high solids would reduce SO{sub x} emissions, facilitate the use of non-chlorine bleaching techniques and enhance the energy efficiency of the pulping process. However, black liquor exhibits and exponential increase in viscosity as its solids content rises, thus hindering its processability in the composition range of interest (>70% solids). In this study, we present a new approach for controlling viscosity at high solids content by {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} black liquor through addition of thiocyanate salts. These salts increases the solubility of the polymer constituents in black liquor leading to a decrease in its viscosity. Several salts capable of viscosity reduction by as much as two orders of magnitude have been identified. The effects of cation size, solution pH and temperature on viscosity reduction is presented and interpreted in terms of the underlying principles of {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} and how it affects aqueous solution structure.

  3. Decontamination and size reduction of plutonium contaminated process exhaust ductwork and glove boxes

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrate, P.; Elliott, J.; Valasquez, M.

    1996-11-15

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Program has decontaminated and demolished two filter plenum buildings at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). During the project a former hot cell was retrofitted to perform decontamination and size reduction of highly Pu contaminated process exhaust (1,100 ft) and gloveboxes. Pu-238/239 concentrations were as high a 1 Ci per linear foot and averaged approximately 1 mCi/ft. The Project decontamination objective was to reduce the plutonium contamination on surfaces below transuranic levels. If possible, metal surfaces were decontaminated further to meet Science and Ecology Group (SEG) waste classification guidelines to enable the metal to be recycled at their facility in oak Ridge, Tennessee. Project surface contamination acceptance criteria for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), transuranic waste, and SEG waste acceptance criteria will be presented. Ninety percent of all radioactive waste for the project was characterized as LLRW. Twenty percent of this material was shipped to SEG. Process exhaust and glove boxes were brought to the project decontamination area, an old hot cell in Building 4 North. This paper focuses on process exhaust and glovebox decontamination methodology, size reduction techniques, waste characterization, airborne contamination monitoring, engineering controls, worker protection, lessons learned, and waste minimization. Decontamination objectives are discussed in detail.

  4. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  5. Geologic processes influence the effects of mining on aquatic ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Travis S.; Clements, William H.; Wanty, Richard B.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Church, Stanley E.; San Juan, Carma A.; Fey, David L.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; DeWitt, Ed H.; Klein, Terry L.

    2012-01-01

    Geologic processes strongly influence water and sediment quality in aquatic ecosystems but rarely are geologic principles incorporated into routine biomonitoring studies. We test if elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment are restricted to streams downstream of mines or areas that may discharge mine wastes. We surveyed 198 catchments classified as “historically mined” or “unmined,” and based on mineral-deposit criteria, to determine whether water and sediment quality were influenced by naturally occurring mineralized rock, by historical mining, or by a combination of both. By accounting for different geologic sources of metals to the environment, we were able to distinguish aquatic ecosystems limited by metals derived from natural processes from those due to mining. Elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment were not restricted to mined catchments; depauperate aquatic communities were found in unmined catchments. The type and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the mineral deposit type were important determinants of water and sediment quality as well as the aquatic community in both mined and unmined catchments. This study distinguished the effects of different rock types and geologic sources of metals on ecosystems by incorporating basic geologic processes into reference and baseline site selection, resulting in a refined assessment. Our results indicate that biomonitoring studies should account for natural sources of metals in some geologic environments as contributors to the effect of mines on aquatic ecosystems, recognizing that in mining-impacted drainages there may have been high pre-mining background metal concentrations.

  6. Geologic processes influence the effects of mining on aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Travis S; Clements, William H; Wanty, Richard B; Verplanck, Philip L; Church, Stanley E; San Juan, Carma A; Fey, David L; Rockwell, Barnaby W; DeWitt, Ed H; Klein, Terry L

    2012-04-01

    Geologic processes strongly influence water and sediment quality in aquatic ecosystems but rarely are geologic principles incorporated into routine biomonitoring studies. We test if elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment are restricted to streams downstream of mines or areas that may discharge mine wastes. We surveyed 198 catchments classified as "historically mined" or "unmined," and based on mineral-deposit criteria, to determine whether water and sediment quality were influenced by naturally occurring mineralized rock, by historical mining, or by a combination of both. By accounting for different geologic sources of metals to the environment, we were able to distinguish aquatic ecosystems limited by metals derived from natural processes from those due to mining. Elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment were not restricted to mined catchments; depauperate aquatic communities were found in unmined catchments. The type and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the mineral deposit type were important determinants of water and sediment quality as well as the aquatic community in both mined and unmined catchments. This study distinguished the effects of different rock types and geologic sources of metals on ecosystems by incorporating basic geologic processes into reference and baseline site selection, resulting in a refined assessment. Our results indicate that biomonitoring studies should account for natural sources of metals in some geologic environments as contributors to the effect of mines on aquatic ecosystems, recognizing that in mining-impacted drainages there may have been high pre-mining background metal concentrations.

  7. Influence of Processing Method on the Grain Boundary Character Distribution and Network Connectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M; King, W.E.

    1999-12-20

    There exists a growing body of literature that correlates the fraction of ''special'' boundaries in a microstructure, as described by the Coincident Site Lattice Model, to properties such as corrosion resistance, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, creep, etc. Several studies suggest that the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD), which is defined in terms of the relative fractions of ''special'' and ''random'' grain boundaries, can be manipulated through thermomechanical processing. This investigation evaluates the influence of specific thermomechanical processing methods on the resulting GBCD in FCC materials such as oxygen-free electronic (ofe) copper and Inconel 600. We also demonstrate that the primary effect of thermomechanical processing is to reduce or break the connectivity of the random grain boundary network. Samples of ofe Cu were subjected to a minimum of three different deformation paths to evaluate the influence of deformation path on the resulting GBCD. These include: rolling to 82% reduction in thickness, compression to 82% strain, repeated compression to 20% strain followed by annealing. In addition, the influence of annealing temperature was probed by applying, for each of the processes, three different annealing temperatures of 400, 560, and 800 C. The observations obtained from automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) characterization of the microstructure are discussed in terms of deformation path, annealing temperature, and processing method. Results are compared to previous reports on strain-annealed ofe Cu and sequential processed Inconel 600. These results demonstrate that among the processes considered, sequential processing is the most effective method to disrupt the random grain boundary network and improve the GBCD.

  8. Influence of an injury reduction program on injury and fitness outcomes among soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, J; Bullock, S; Canada, S; Toney, E; Wells, J; Hoedebecke, E; Jones, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the influence of a multiple injury control intervention on injury and physical fitness outcomes among soldiers attending United States Army Ordnance School Advanced Individual Training. Methods: The study design was quasiexperimental involving a historical control group (n = 2559) that was compared to a multiple intervention group (n = 1283). Interventions in the multiple intervention group included modified physical training, injury education, and a unit based injury surveillance system (UBISS). The management responsible for training independently formed an Injury Control Advisory Committee that examined surveillance reports from the UBISS and recommended changes to training. On arrival at school, individual soldiers completed a demographics and lifestyle questionnaire and took an army physical fitness test (APFT: push-ups, sit-ups, and two mile run). Injuries among soldiers were tracked by a clinic based injury surveillance system that was separate from the UBISS. Soldiers completed a final APFT eight weeks after arrival at school. Results: Cox regression (survival analysis) was used to examine differences in time to the first injury while controlling for group differences in demographics, lifestyle characteristics, and physical fitness. The adjusted relative risk of a time loss injury was 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 1.8) times higher in the historical control men and 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.8) times higher in the historical control women compared with the multiple intervention men and women, respectively. After correcting for the lower initial fitness of the multiple intervention group, there were no significant differences between the multiple intervention and historical control groups in terms of improvements in push-ups, sit-ups, or two mile run performance. Conclusions: This multiple intervention program contributed to a reduction in injuries while improvements in physical fitness were similar to a

  9. Influence of an injury reduction program on injury and fitness outcomes among soldiers.

    PubMed

    Knapik, J J; Bullock, S H; Canada, S; Toney, E; Wells, J D; Hoedebecke, E; Jones, B H

    2004-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a multiple injury control intervention on injury and physical fitness outcomes among soldiers attending United States Army Ordnance School Advanced Individual Training. The study design was quasiexperimental involving a historical control group (n = 2559) that was compared to a multiple intervention group (n = 1283). Interventions in the multiple intervention group included modified physical training, injury education, and a unit based injury surveillance system (UBISS). The management responsible for training independently formed an Injury Control Advisory Committee that examined surveillance reports from the UBISS and recommended changes to training. On arrival at school, individual soldiers completed a demographics and lifestyle questionnaire and took an army physical fitness test (APFT: push-ups, sit-ups, and two mile run). Injuries among soldiers were tracked by a clinic based injury surveillance system that was separate from the UBISS. Soldiers completed a final APFT eight weeks after arrival at school. Cox regression (survival analysis) was used to examine differences in time to the first injury while controlling for group differences in demographics, lifestyle characteristics, and physical fitness. The adjusted relative risk of a time loss injury was 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 1.8) times higher in the historical control men and 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.8) times higher in the historical control women compared with the multiple intervention men and women, respectively. After correcting for the lower initial fitness of the multiple intervention group, there were no significant differences between the multiple intervention and historical control groups in terms of improvements in push-ups, sit-ups, or two mile run performance. This multiple intervention program contributed to a reduction in injuries while improvements in physical fitness were similar to a traditional physical training program

  10. A novel signal processing technique for clutter reduction in GPR measurements of small, shallow land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Merwe, Andria

    The global land mine crisis is creating immense social and economic problems worldwide. Safe and cost effective methods for clearing these mines are therefore needed. A promising sensor for detecting small anti-personnel mines is the ground penetrating radar (GPR). However, GPR performs inadequately due to clutter which dominates the return and obscures the mine information. In this dissertation a signal processing technique is developed which can be used to reduce clutter in GPR data. It is assumed that the GPR system is designed to reduce the system clutter by calibration and also that it is operated to reduce the time duration of the clutter by using normal incidence angles. The new preprocessing employs a parametric modeling approach for clutter reduction. Frequency domain basis functions are developed to represent the clutter and the mine contributions in the GPR data. An iterative signal processing technique is developed to estimate the unknown parameters in the basis functions and reduce the clutter. The new technique also improves existing signal processing techniques by incorporating an adaptive basis function for clutter representation. The new algorithm is robust to the variability of clutter between measurements and accounts for the uncertainty in the GPR clutter characteristics. The facts that land mines are buried at shallow depths, that their returns are small relative to that of the clutter are compensated for in the new processing technique. The returns from subsurface inhomogeneities, for example rocks and tree roots are also treated as part of the clutter. To assess the performance of the clutter reduction technique, the cross correlation between a reference signature of the target of interest and the clutter reduced data is used. To quantify the performance of clutter reduction, improvement in detection is assessed though the detector receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves. A simple matched filter, formulated to account for the

  11. Analysis of civilian processing programs in reduction of excess separated plutonium and high-enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation is to explore alternatives and strategies aimed at the gradual reduction of the excess inventories of separated plutonium and high-enriched uranium (HEU) in the civilian nuclear power industry. The study attempts to establish a technical and economic basis to assist in the formation of alternative approaches consistent with nonproliferation and safeguards concerns. The analysis addresses several options in reducing the excess separated plutonium and HEU, and the consequences on nonproliferation and safeguards policy assessments resulting from the interacting synergistic effects between fuel cycle processes and isotopic signatures of nuclear materials.

  12. Psychoneuroendocrine processes in human pregnancy influence fetal development and health.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Pathik D

    2005-09-01

    Individual differences in psychoneuroendocrine function play an important role in health and disease. Developmental models postulate that these individual differences evolve through a progressive series of dynamic time-, place- and context-dependent interactions between genes and environments in fetal, infant and adult life. The effects of early experience have longer-lasting and more permanent consequences than those later in life. Experimental studies in animals have provided convincing evidence to support a causal role for stress-related psychoneuroendocrine processes in negatively influencing critical developmental and health outcomes over the life span, and have also offered valuable insights into putative physiological mechanisms. However, the generalizability of these findings from animals to humans may be limited by the existence of large inter-species differences in physiology and the developmental time-line. We have initiated a program of research in behavioral perinatology and conducted studies over the past several years to examine the effects of stress-related psychoneuroendocrine processes in human pregnancy on fetal developmental and health outcomes. Our findings support a significant and independent role for maternal prenatal stress in the etiology of prematurity-related outcomes, and suggest that these effects are mediated, in part, by the maternal-placental-fetal neuroendocrine axis, and specifically by placental corticotropin-releasing hormone. Our findings also suggest that the use of a fetal challenge paradigm offers a novel way to quantify fetal neurobehavioral maturity in utero, and that the maternal environment exerts a significant influence on the fetal neurodevelopmental processes related to recognition, memory and habituation. Finally, our findings provide preliminary evidence to support the notion that the influence of prenatal stress and maternal-placental hormones on the developing fetus may persist after birth, as assessed by measures

  13. The Influence of Various Factors on the Methane Fermentation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbanova, M. G.; Egushova, E. A.; Pozdnjakova, OG

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the stages of the methane fermentation process. The phases of methane formation are characterized. The results of the experimental data based on the study of various factors influencing the rate of biogas production and its yield are presented. Such factors as the size of the substrate particles and temperature conditions in the reactor are considered. It is revealed on the basis of experimental data which of the farm animals and poultry excrements are exposed to the most complete fermentation without special preparation. The relationship between fermentation regime, particle size of the feedstock and biogas yield is graphically presented.

  14. Effects of imposed salinity gradients on dissimilatory arsenate reduction, sulfate reduction, and other microbial processes in sediments from two California soda lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulp, T.R.; Han, S.; Saltikov, C.W.; Lanoil, B.D.; Zargar, K.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Salinity effects on microbial community structure and on potential rates of arsenate reduction, arsenite oxidation, sulfate reduction, denitrification, and methanogenesis were examined in sediment slurries from two California soda lakes. We conducted experiments with Mono Lake and Searles Lake sediments over a wide range of salt concentrations (25 to 346 g liter-1). With the exception of sulfate reduction, rates of all processes demonstrated an inverse relationship to total salinity. However, each of these processes persisted at low but detectable rates at salt saturation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes amplified from As(V) reduction slurries revealed that distinct microbial populations grew at low (25 to 50 g liter-1), intermediate (100 to 200 g liter-1), and high (>300 g liter-1) salinity. At intermediate and high salinities, a close relative of a cultivated As-respiring halophile was present. These results suggest that organisms adapted to more dilute conditions can remain viable at high salinity and rapidly repopulate the lake during periods of rising lake level. In contrast to As reduction, sulfate reduction in Mono Lake slurries was undetectable at salt saturation. Furthermore, sulfate reduction was excluded from Searles Lake sediments at any salinity despite the presence of abundant sulfate. Sulfate reduction occurred in Searles Lake sediment slurries only following inoculation with Mono Lake sediment, indicating the absence of sulfate-reducing flora. Experiments with borate-amended Mono Lake slurries suggest that the notably high (0.46 molal) concentration of borate in the Searles Lake brine was responsible for the exclusion of sulfate reducers from that ecosystem. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Effects of imposed salinity gradients on dissimilatory arsenate reduction, sulfate reduction, and other microbial processes in sediments from two California soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Kulp, T R; Han, S; Saltikov, C W; Lanoil, B D; Zargar, K; Oremland, R S

    2007-08-01

    Salinity effects on microbial community structure and on potential rates of arsenate reduction, arsenite oxidation, sulfate reduction, denitrification, and methanogenesis were examined in sediment slurries from two California soda lakes. We conducted experiments with Mono Lake and Searles Lake sediments over a wide range of salt concentrations (25 to 346 g liter(-1)). With the exception of sulfate reduction, rates of all processes demonstrated an inverse relationship to total salinity. However, each of these processes persisted at low but detectable rates at salt saturation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of partial 16S rRNA genes amplified from As(V) reduction slurries revealed that distinct microbial populations grew at low (25 to 50 g liter(-1)), intermediate (100 to 200 g liter(-1)), and high (>300 g liter(-1)) salinity. At intermediate and high salinities, a close relative of a cultivated As-respiring halophile was present. These results suggest that organisms adapted to more dilute conditions can remain viable at high salinity and rapidly repopulate the lake during periods of rising lake level. In contrast to As reduction, sulfate reduction in Mono Lake slurries was undetectable at salt saturation. Furthermore, sulfate reduction was excluded from Searles Lake sediments at any salinity despite the presence of abundant sulfate. Sulfate reduction occurred in Searles Lake sediment slurries only following inoculation with Mono Lake sediment, indicating the absence of sulfate-reducing flora. Experiments with borate-amended Mono Lake slurries suggest that the notably high (0.46 molal) concentration of borate in the Searles Lake brine was responsible for the exclusion of sulfate reducers from that ecosystem.

  16. A non-aqueous reduction process for purifying ¹⁵³Gd produced in natural europium targets.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Amanda M; Soderquist, Chuck Z; McNamara, Bruce K; Fisher, Darrell R

    2013-12-01

    Gadolinium-153 is a low-energy gamma-emitter used in nuclear medicine imaging quality assurance. Produced in nuclear reactors using natural Eu₂O₃ targets, ¹⁵³Gd is radiochemically separated from europium isotopes by europium reduction. However, conventional aqueous europium reduction produces hydrogen gas, a flammability hazard in radiological hot cells. We altered the traditional reduction method, using methanol as the process solvent to nearly eliminate hydrogen gas production. This new, non-aqueous reduction process demonstrates greater than 98% europium removal and gadolinium yields of 90%.

  17. Advanced sewage treatment process with excess sludge reduction and phosphorus recovery.

    PubMed

    Saktaywin, W; Tsuno, H; Nagare, H; Soyama, T; Weerapakkaroon, J

    2005-03-01

    An advanced sewage treatment process has been developed, in which excess sludge reduction by ozonation and phosphorus recovery by crystallization process are incorporated to a conventional anaerobic/oxic (A/O) phosphorus removal process. The mathematical model was developed to describe the mass balance principal at a steady state of this process. Sludge ozonation experiments were carried out to investigate solubilization characteristics of sludge and change in microbial activity by using sludge cultured with feed of synthetic sewage under A/O process. Phosphorus was solubilized by ozonation as well as organics, and acid-hydrolyzable phosphorus (AHP) was the most part of solubilized phosphorus for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) containing sludge. At solubilization of 30%, around 70% of sludge was inactivated by ozonation. The results based on these studies indicated that the proposed process configuration has potential to reduce the excess sludge production as well as to recover phosphorus in usable forms. The system performance results show that this system is practical, in which 30% of solubilization degree was achieved by ozonation. In this study, 30% of solubilization was achieved at 30 mgO(3)/gSS of ozone consumption.

  18. Reduction of influence of gain errors on performance of adaptive sub-ranging A/D converters with simplified architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejewski, Konrad; Malkiewicz, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the results of studies pertaining to the influence of gain errors of inter-stage amplifiers on performance of adaptive sub-ranging analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). It focuses on adaptive sub-ranging ADCs with simplified architecture of the analog part - using only one amplifier and a low resolution digital-to-analog converter, that is identical to that of known conventional sub-ranging ADCs. The only difference between adaptive subranging ADCs with simplified architecture and conventional sub-ranging ADCs is the process of determination of output codes of converted samples. The adaptive sub-ranging ADCs calculate the output codes on the basis of sub-codes obtained in particular stages of conversion using an adaptive algorithm. Thanks to application of the optimal adaptive algorithm, adjusted to the parameters of possible components imperfections and internal noises, the adaptive ADCs outperform, in terms of effective resolution per cycle, conventional sub-ranging ADCs forming the output codes using simple lower-level bit operations. Optimization of the conversion algorithm used in adaptive ADCs leads however to high sensitivity of adaptive ADCs performance to the inter-stage gain error. An effective method for reduction of this sensitivity in adaptive sub-ranging ADCs with simplified architecture is proposed and discussed in the paper.

  19. TiO2 Processed by pressurized hot solvents as a novel photocatalyst for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reli, Martin; Kobielusz, Marcin; Matějová, Lenka; Daniš, Stanislav; Macyk, Wojciech; Obalová, Lucie; Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Rokicińska, Anna; Kočí, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Anatase-brookite TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles and processing by pressurized hot solvents-water/methanol/water (TiO2(M)) and water/ethanol/water (TiO2(E)), as an unconventional alternative to common calcination. The main goal of this work was to prepare anatase-brookite mixtures by processing by two different alcohols (methanol and ethanol) and evaluate the influence of the alcohol on the photocatalytic activity. Prepared photocatalysts were characterized by organic elemental analysis, nitrogen physisorption, XRD, UV-vis, photoelectrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements and XPS. The prepared photocatalysts efficiency was tested on the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide and compared with commercial TiO2 Evonik P25. Both prepared nanocomposites were more efficient towards methane production but Evonik P25 was the most efficient towards hydrogen generated through water splitting. The higher performance of anatase-brookite mixture towards methane production can be explained by (i) a higher photocatalytic activity of brookite than rutile; (ii) a large surface area of anatase-brookite composites enabling better carbon dioxide adsorption; (iii) the photoinduced electron transfer from the brookite conduction band to the anatase conduction band. On the other hand, a higher production of hydrogen in the presence of Evonik P25 is caused by a better charge separation in anatase-rutile than anatase-brookite phase compositions. TiO2(M) appeared more active than TiO2(E) in the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide due to a lower density of defects created in the crystal lattice.

  20. [Characterisation of excess sludge reduction in an anoxic + oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu; Lu, Yan-Hua; Guo, Jin-Song

    2009-05-15

    An energy balance analysis method with auto calorimeter being adopted was introduced to determine calorific values of sludge samples in influent and effluent of uncoupling tank in an anoxic (A) + oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process and a reference system. The affiliation of sludge amount change and its energy content were studied, as well as potential of excess sludge reduction was evaluated through modifying performance of uncoupling tank. The characteristi s and causes of sludge reduction in OSA system were deduced according to energy and matter balance analysis. Results show that when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of uncoupling tank are 5.56 h, 7.14 h and 9 h, the excess sludge reduction of whole A + OS Asystem are 1.236 g/d, 0.771 g/d and 0.599 g/d respectively. Energy content of sludge flows into and out of the uncoupling tank changes, the specific calorific value of sludge in effluent is inclined to be higher than that in influent with the HRT of the tank increasing: there isn't any significant difference of sludge calorific values between influent and effluent at 5.56 h, while the differences are in 99-113 J/g at 7.14 h, and 191-329 J/g at 9 h. Sludge in uncoupling tank would decay and longer HRT will result in more attenuation. It could be concluded that excess sludge reduction of A + OSA system is caused by both of sludge decay in uncoupling tank and sludge proliferation in AO reaction zone.

  1. Influence of BH3 and alkaline cation released from the reduction agent on a tandem reduction/acylation reaction-A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Nevena I.; Nikolova, Rositca D.; Bojilova, Anka G.; Vayssilov, Georgi N.

    When an alkaline boron hydride is used as reduction reagent two byproducts are released, BH3 and alkaline cation, and both of them could influence the following reaction steps if a multi-step reaction is performed in tandem one-pot fashion. We report a theoretical study on the stability of possible complexes of the Lewis acids, BH3 and alkaline cations, with reaction intermediate, solvent molecules and basic additives in a tandem hydride reduction/acylation reaction of 3-diethylphosphonocoumarin. Both chelate complexes of the intermediate anion with the alkali cations (Li+, Na+, or K+) and complexes of BH3 bound to C or O center of the ambident anionic intermediate have been investigated. Since the formation of the latter complexes blocks the intermediate for further acylation, the reaction could take place only if BH3 is bound in a complex with a strong base as DMAP. The binding energy of BH3 to DMAP was found higher than to the intermediate for Li+ and Na+ as counter cations, while for K+ BH3 is bound to the intermediate stronger than to DMAP. Formation of the intermediate is facilitated in presence of Li+ cations, but the alteration of the alkali cation does not influence the selectivity of the reaction-C-acylations is preferred in all cases.

  2. Effect of fruit and vegetable processing on reduction of synthetic pyrethroid residues.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Reena; Kumari, Beena; Rana, M K

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize that the advantages associated with applying pesticides to enhance agricultural productivity must be weighed against the possible health hazards arising from the appearance of toxic pesticide residues in food. First and foremost, pesticides should be handled and applied in compliance with good agricultural practices to minimize environmental or food commodity contamination.In developing countries, good agricultural practices are not fully abided by.When vegetables are produced in such countries, pesticides are applied or prospectively applied at each growth stage of the crop. Hence, contamination of vegetables and other food commodities occur. It is well known that processing of food derived from pesticide treated crop commodities can serve to reduce residues that reach consumers. Food safety can therefore partially be enhanced by employing suitable food processing techniques and appropriate storage periods, even in developing countries. Even common and simple household processing techniques for certain foods acquire significance as means to reduce the intake of harmful pesticide food residues.Pesticide residue levels in post-harvest raw agricultural commodities (RAC) are affected by the storage, handling and the processing steps they pass through, while being prepared for human consumption. The review of cogent literature presented in this article demonstrated differences among the pyrethroid insecticide residues present on or in foods, depending on how the RAC from which they came were processed for consumption. Peeling vegetables or fruit reduced pyrethroid residues the most (60-100% ), and juicing was nearly as effective in reducing residues (70-100% ). The least reduction occurred for foodstuffs that were only washed with tap water (I 0-70% ). Washing RACs with saline water and detergent was more effective(34-60%) in reducing residues than was simple washing under tap water. Freezing is also effective in reducing residue levels and

  3. A frequency diversity process for speckle reduction in real-time ultrasonic images.

    PubMed

    Galloway, R L; McDermott, B A; Thurstone, F L

    1988-01-01

    A pair of concurrent real-time B-mode image lines has been formed using a parallel processing system. In this system a wideband received echo is partitioned by a frequency diversity process and separate image lines are formed. Due to their differing constituent frequencies, these image lines have decorrelated speckle patterns. Upon averaging these filtered lines, the amount of speckle in the resultant displayed image is reduced. The reduction in image speckle and its accompanying improvement in perceived resolution is accomplished with no sacrifice of temporal resolution or real-time format. The effects of filter separation and filter quality factor (Q) are investigated through statistical analysis of images containing speckle-producing targets. A measurable improvement in image signal-to-noise ratio has been achieved.

  4. [Sulfate reduction and microbial processes of the methane cycle in the sediments of the Sevastopol bay].

    PubMed

    Pimenov, N V; Egorov, V N; Kanapatskiĭ, T A; Malakhova, T V; Artemov, Iu G; Sigalevich, P A; Malakhova, L V

    2013-01-01

    The rates of microbial processes of sulfate reduction and of the methane cycle were measured in the bottom sediments of the Sevastopol basin, where seeps of gaseous methane have been previously found. Typically for marine environments, sulfate reduction played the major role in the terminal phase of decomposition of organic matter (OM) in reduced sediments of this area. The rate of this process depended on the amount of available OM. The rate of methanogenesis in the sediments increased with depth, peaking in the subsurface horizons, where decreased sulfate concentration was detected in the pore water. The highest rates of sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation were found close to the methane-sulfate transition zone as is typical of most investigated marine sediments. The data on the carbon isotopic composition of gaseous methane from the seeps and dissolved CH4 from the bottom sediments, as well as on the rates of microbial methanogenesis and methane oxidation indicate that the activity of the methane seeps results from accumulation of biogenic methane in the cavities of the underlying geological structures with subsequent periodic release of methane bubbles into the water column.

  5. Oscillatory behavior of the surface reduction process of multilayer graphene oxide at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voylov, Dmitry; Ivanov, Ilia; Bykov, Valerii; Tsybenova, Svetlana; Merkulov, Igor; Kurochkin, Sergei; Holt, Adam; Kisliuk, Alexandr

    The graphene oxide (GO) is one of 2D materials which continues to be studied intensively since it is thought can be used as a precursor of graphene. Recently, it was found that the chemical composition of multilayer GO is metastable on the time scale of one month even at room temperature. The observed changes in chemical composition were attributed to a reduction process controlled by the in-plane diffusion of functional groups which progresses through radical reactions. Here we report the observation of oscillatory oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions on the surface of multilayer GO films at room temperature. The redox reactions exhibited dampened oscillatory behavior with a period of about 5 days and found to be dependent on the time elapsed from GO deposition. The kinetic behavior of the processes and observed metastability of the surface functional groups are adequately described by two models involving reactions between functional groups of GO and reactant diffusion. US team acknowledges partial financial support from the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  6. Radiation dose reduction in digital radiography using wavelet-based image processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruyuki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Lee, Yongbum; Matsuyama, Eri; Kojima, Katsuyuki

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of the use of wavelet transform for image processing on radiation dose reduction in computed radiography (CR), by measuring various physical characteristics of the wavelet-transformed images. Moreover, we propose a wavelet-based method for offering a possibility to reduce radiation dose while maintaining a clinically acceptable image quality. The proposed method integrates the advantages of a previously proposed technique, i.e., sigmoid-type transfer curve for wavelet coefficient weighting adjustment technique, as well as a wavelet soft-thresholding technique. The former can improve contrast and spatial resolution of CR images, the latter is able to improve the performance of image noise. In the investigation of physical characteristics, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and contrast-to-noise ratio of CR images processed by the proposed method and other different methods were measured and compared. Furthermore, visual evaluation was performed using Scheffe's pair comparison method. Experimental results showed that the proposed method could improve overall image quality as compared to other methods. Our visual evaluation showed that an approximately 40% reduction in exposure dose might be achieved in hip joint radiography by using the proposed method.

  7. Reduction of carbon contamination during the melting process of Czochralski silicon crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Gao, Bing; Nakano, Satoshi; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    Generation, incorporation, and accumulation of carbon (C) were investigated by transient global simulations of heat and mass transport during the melting process of Czochralski silicon (CZ-Si) crystal growth. Contact reaction between the quartz crucible and graphite susceptor was introduced as an extra origin of C contamination. The contribution of the contact reaction on C accumulation is affected by the back diffusion of C monoxide (CO) from the gap between the gas-guide and the crucible. The effect of the gas-guide coating on C reduction was elucidated by taking the reaction between the silicon carbide (SiC) coating and gaseous Si monoxide (SiO) into account. Application of the SiC coating on the gas-guide could effectively reduce the C contamination because of its higher thermochemical stability relative to that of graphite. Gas flow control on the back diffusion of the generated CO was examined by the parametric study of argon gas flow rate. Generation and back diffusion of CO were both effectively suppressed by the increase in the gas flow rate because of the high Péclet number of species transport. Strategies for C content reduction were discussed by analyzing the mechanisms of C accumulation process. According to the elucidated mechanisms of C accumulation, the final C content depends on the growth duration and contamination flux at the gas/melt interface.

  8. Influence of Digital Camera Errors on the Photogrammetric Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sužiedelytė-Visockienė, Jūratė; Bručas, Domantas

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the calibration of digital camera Canon EOS 350D, often used for the photogrammetric 3D digitalisation and measurements of industrial and construction site objects. During the calibration data on the optical and electronic parameters, influencing the distortion of images, such as correction of the principal point, focal length of the objective, radial symmetrical and non-symmetrical distortions were obtained. The calibration was performed by means of the Tcc software implementing the polynomial of Chebichev and using a special test-field with the marks, coordinates of which are precisely known. The main task of the research - to determine how parameters of the camera calibration influence the processing of images, i. e. the creation of geometric model, the results of triangulation calculations and stereo-digitalisation. Two photogrammetric projects were created for this task. In first project the non-corrected and in the second the corrected ones, considering the optical errors of the camera obtained during the calibration, images were used. The results of analysis of the images processing is shown in the images and tables. The conclusions are given.

  9. Influence of atomic processes on the implosion of plasma liners

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyoungkeun; Zhang Lina; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2012-08-15

    The influence of atomic physics processes on the implosion of plasma liners for magneto-inertial nuclear fusion has been investigated numerically by using the method of front tracking in spherically symmetric geometry and equation of state models accounting for dissociation and ionization. Simulation studies of the self-collapse of argon liners to be used in the Los Alamos Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) program have been performed as well as studies of implosion of deuterium and argon liners on plasma targets. Results show that atomic processes in converging liners reduce the temperature of liners and increase the Mach number that results in the increase of the stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain. For deuterium and argon liners imploding on plasma targets, dissociation and ionization increased the stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain by the factor of 1.5 (deuterium) and 2 (argon) correspondingly. Similarly, ionization during the self-collapse of argon liners leads to approximately doubling of the Mach number and the stagnation pressure. The influence of the longitudinal density spread of the liner has also been investigated. The self-collapse stagnation pressure decreased by the factor of 8.7 when the initial position of the liner was shifted from the merging radius (33 cm) to the PLX chamber edge (137.2 cm). Simulations with and without the heat conduction demonstrated that the heat conduction has negligible effect on the self-collapse pressure of argon liners.

  10. Automated and Scalable Data Reduction in the textsc{Sofia} Data Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzaczek, R.; Shuping, R.; Charcos-Llorens, M.; Alles, R.; Vacca, W.

    2015-09-01

    In order to provide suitable data products to general investigators and other end users in a timely manner, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy SOFIA) has developed a framework supporting the automated execution of data processing pipelines for the various instruments, called the Data Processing System (DPS), see Shuping et al. (2014) for overview). The primary requirement is to process all data collected from a flight within eight hours, allowing data quality assessments and inspections to be made the following day. The raw data collected during a flight requires processing by a number of different software packages and tools unique to each combination of instrument and mode of operation, much of it developed in-house, in order to create data products for use by investigators and other end-users. The requirement to deliver these data products in a consistent, predictable, and performant manner presents a significant challenge for the observatory. Herein we present aspects of the DPS that help to achieve these goals. We discuss how it supports data reduction software written in a variety of languages and environments, its support for new versions and live upgrades to that software and other necessary resources (e.g., calibrations), its accommodation of sudden processing loads through the addition (and eventual removal) of computing resources, and close with an observation of the performance achieved in the first two observing cycles of SOFIA.

  11. The influence of stress on fear memory processes.

    PubMed

    Martijena, I D; Molina, V A

    2012-04-01

    It is well recognized that stressful experiences promote robust emotional memories, which are well remembered. The amygdaloid complex, principally the basolateral complex (BLA), plays a pivotal role in fear memory and in the modulation of stress-induced emotional responses. A large number of reports have revealed that GABAergic interneurons provide a powerful inhibitory control of the activity of projecting glutamatergic neurons in the BLA. Indeed, a reduced GABAergic control in the BLA is essential for the stress-induced influence on the emergence of associative fear memory and on the generation of long-term potentiation (LTP) in BLA neurons. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) subfamily of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the BLA plays a central role in the consolidation process and synaptic plasticity. In support of the view that stress facilitates long-term fear memory, stressed animals exhibited a phospho-ERK2 (pERK2) increase in the BLA, suggesting the involvement of this mechanism in the promoting influence of threatening stimuli on the consolidation fear memory. Moreover, the occurrence of reactivation-induced lability is prevented when fear memory is encoded under intense stressful conditions since the memory trace remains immune to disruption after recall in previously stressed animals. Thus, the underlying mechanism in retrieval-induced instability seems not to be functional in memories formed under stress. All these findings are indicative that stress influences both the consolidation and reconsolidation fear memory processes. Thus, it seems reasonable to propose that the emotional state generated by an environmental challenge critically modulates the formation and maintenance of long-term fear memory.

  12. Class Size Reduction in Practice: Investigating the Influence of the Elementary School Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Patricia; Theoharis, George; Rauscher, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Class size reduction (CSR) has emerged as a very popular, if not highly controversial, policy approach for reducing the achievement gap. This article reports on findings from an implementation study of class size reduction policy in Wisconsin entitled the Student Achievement Guarantee in Education (SAGE). Drawing on case studies of nine schools,…

  13. Class Size Reduction in Practice: Investigating the Influence of the Elementary School Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Patricia; Theoharis, George; Rauscher, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Class size reduction (CSR) has emerged as a very popular, if not highly controversial, policy approach for reducing the achievement gap. This article reports on findings from an implementation study of class size reduction policy in Wisconsin entitled the Student Achievement Guarantee in Education (SAGE). Drawing on case studies of nine schools,…

  14. Study on the influences of reduction temperature on nickel-yttria-stabilized zirconia solid oxide fuel cell anode using nickel oxide-film electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Zhenjun; Ueno, Ai; Suzuki, Yuji; Shikazono, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the reduction processes of nickel oxide at different temperatures were investigated using nickel-film anode to study the influences of reduction temperature on the initial performances and stability of nickel-yttria-stabilized zirconia anode. Compared to conventional nickel-yttria-stabilized zirconia composite cermet anode, nickel-film anode has the advantage of direct observation at nickel-yttria-stabilized zirconia interface. The microstructural changes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The reduction process of nickel oxide is considered to be determined by the competition between the mechanisms of volume reduction in nickel oxide-nickel reaction and nickel sintering. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was applied to analyze the time variation of the nickel-film anode electrochemical characteristics. The anode performances and microstructural changes before and after 100 hours discharging and open circuit operations were analyzed. The degradation of nickel-film anode is considered to be determined by the co-effect between the nickel sintering and the change of nickel-yttria-stabilized zirconia interface bonding condition.

  15. Characteristics influencing weight reduction among veterans in the MOVE!® Program.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Jane T; Marion, Lucy N; Narsavage, Georgia L; Finnegan, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a common health problem for veterans. This study explored background and program characteristics associated with a 5% weight reduction for veterans enrolled in MOVE!(®), a weight management program. For data analysis, 404 veteran records were examined using logistic regression. Background characteristics included socio-demographic variables, comorbidity, body mass index, rurality, and Veterans Administration (VA) priority group. Program characteristics included the program type (group attendee or self-managed) as well as the number and type of provider contacts. Thirteen percent of participants achieved a 5% weight reduction. Age in years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04) and the number of group visits (OR = 1.05) were significant predictors for achieving a 5% weight reduction. Given the importance of weight reduction, health professionals should consider these significant predictors when planning weight-reduction programs for veterans.

  16. Influence of Titration of Neurohormonal Antagonists and Blood Pressure Reduction on Renal Function and Decongestion in Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, F. Perry; Brisco, Meredith A.; Bellumkonda, Lavanya; Jacoby, Daniel; Coca, Steven G.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Testani, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP reduction) during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is strongly and independently associated with worsening renal function (WRF). Our objective was to determine if SBP reduction or titration of oral neurohormonal antagonists during ADHF treatment negatively influences diuresis and decongestion. Methods and Results SBP reduction was evaluated from admission to discharge in consecutive ADHF admissions (n=656). Diuresis and decongestion was examined across a range of parameters such as diuretic efficiency, fluid output, hemoconcentration, and diuretic dose. The average reduction in SBP was 14.4 ± 19.4 mmHg and 77.6% of the population had discharge SBP lower than admission. SBP reduction was strongly associated with WRF (OR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.2-2.9, p=0.004), a finding that persisted after adjusting for parameters of diuresis and decongestion (OR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.2, p=0.002). However, SBP reduction did not negatively impact diuresis or decongestion (p≥0.25 for all parameters). Uptitration of neurohormonal antagonists occurred in over 50% of admissions and was associated with a modest additional reduction in blood pressure (≤ 5.6 mmHg). Notably, WRF was not increased and diuretic efficiency was significantly improved with the uptitration of neurohormonal antagonists. Conclusions Despite a higher rate of WRF, blood pressure reduction was not associated with worsening of diuresis or decongestion. Furthermore, titration of oral neurohormonal antagonists was actually associated with improved diuresis in this cohort. These results provide reassurance that the guideline recommended titration of chronic oral medication during ADHF hospitalization may not be antagonistic to the short-term goal of decongestion. PMID:26699390

  17. Influence of different natural physical fields on biological processes.

    PubMed

    Mashinsky, A L

    2001-01-01

    In space flight conditions gravity, magnetic, and electrical fields as well as ionizing radiation change both in size, and in direction. This causes disruptions in the conduct of some physical processes, chemical reactions, and metabolism in living organisms. In these conditions organisms of different phylogenetic level change their metabolic reactions undergo changes such as disturbances in ionic exchange both in lower and in higher plants, changes in cell morphology for example, gyrosity in Proteus (Proteus vulgaris), spatial disorientation in coleoptiles of Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings, mutational changes in Crepis (Crepis capillaris) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedling. It has been found that even in the absence of gravity, gravireceptors determining spatial orientation in higher plants under terrestrial conditions are formed in the course of ontogenesis. Under weightlessness this system does not function and spatial orientation is determined by the light flux gradient or by the action of some other factors. Peculiarities of the formation of the gravireceptor apparatus in higher plants, amphibians, fish, and birds under space flight conditions have been observed. It has been found that the system in which responses were accompanied by phase transition have proven to be gravity-sensitive under microgravity conditions. Such reactions include also the process of photosynthesis which is the main energy production process in plants. In view of the established effects of microgravity and different natural physical fields on biological processes, it has been shown that these processes change due to the absence of initially rigid determination. The established biological effect of physical fields influence on biological processes in organisms is the starting point for elucidating the role of gravity and evolutionary development of various organisms on Earth.

  18. Influence of different natural physical fields on biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinsky, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    In space flight conditions gravity, magnetic, and electrical fields as well as ionizing radiation change both in size, and in direction. This causes disruptions in the conduct of some physical processes, chemical reactions, and metabolism in living organisms. In these conditions organisms of different phylogenetic level change their metabolic reactions undergo changes such as disturbances in ionic exchange both in lower and in higher plants, changes in cell morphology for example, gyrosity in Proteus ( Proteus vulgaris), spatial disorientation in coleoptiles of Wheat ( Triticum aestivum) and Pea ( Pisum sativum) seedlings, mutational changes in Crepis ( Crepis capillaris) and Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana) seedling. It has been found that even in the absence of gravity, gravireceptors determining spatial orientation in higher plants under terrestrial conditions are formed in the course of ontogenesis. Under weightlessness this system does not function and spatial orientation is determined by the light flux gradient or by the action of some other factors. Peculiarities of the formation of the gravireceptor apparatus in higher plants, amphibians, fish, and birds under space flight conditions have been observed. It has been found that the system in which responses were accompanied by phase transition have proven to be gravity-sensitive under microgravity conditions. Such reactions include also the process of photosynthesis which is the main energy production process in plants. In view of the established effects of microgravity and different natural physical fields on biological processes, it has been shown that these processes change due to the absence of initially rigid determination. The established biological effect of physical fields influence on biological processes in organisms is the starting point for elucidating the role of gravity and evolutionary development of various organisms on Earth.

  19. Humor processing in children: influence of temperament, age and IQ.

    PubMed

    Vrticka, Pascal; Black, Jessica M; Neely, Michelle; Walter Shelly, Elizabeth; Reiss, Allan L

    2013-11-01

    Emerging evidence from fMRI studies suggests that humor processing is a specific social cognitive-affective human function that comprises two stages. The first stage (cognitive humor component) involves the detection and resolution of incongruity, and is associated with activity in temporo-occipito-parietal brain areas. The second stage (emotional humor component) comprises positive feelings related to mirth/reward, and is linked with reward-related activity in mesocorticolimbic circuits. In healthy adults, humor processing was shown to be moderated by temperament traits like intro-/extraversion, neuroticism, or social anxiety, representing risk factors for psychopathology. However, comparable data from early developmental stages is crucially lacking. Here, we report for the first time data from 22 children (ages 6 to 13) revealing an influence of temperament on humor processing. Specifically, we assessed the effects of Emotionality, Shyness, and Sociability, which are analogous to neuroticism, behavioral inhibition/fear and extraversion in adults. We found Emotionality to be positively, but Shyness negatively associated with brain activity linked with both cognitive and emotional humor components. In addition, Shyness and Sociability were positively related to activity in the periaqueductal gray region during humor processing. These findings are of potential clinical relevance regarding the early detection of childhood psychopathology. Previous data on humor processing in both adults and children furthermore suggest that intelligence (IQ) supports incongruity detection and resolution, whereas mirth and associated brain activity diminishes with increasing age. Here, we found that increasing age and IQ were linked with stronger activity to humor in brain areas implicated in the cognitive component of humor. Such data suggest that humor processing undergoes developmental changes and is moderated by higher IQ scores, both factors likely improving incongruity detection

  20. Influence of Urbanization on Ecological Processes in Wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Richter, Klaus O.; Hibler, Lyle F.; Mark Wigmosta and Stephen Burges

    2001-01-23

    Wetlands provide a wide variety of ecological functions and services critical to the overall functioning of many ecosystems. Since, by definition, wetlands are wet for a significant portion of a year, the ability of wetlands to provide these functions is highly dependent on hydrology. Over half of the wetlands globally have been destroyed over the past 150 years or so. Degradation of remaining wetlands is significant in places here studies have been carried out. Much of this degradation has been due to alteration of hydrology through reduction in inputs through construction of hard surfaces, channelization, damming of outflows, introduction of contaminants, introduction of exotic species, and a variety of other impacts. Studies in the Puget Sound trough and in the Portland, Oregon, region, have intensively investigated hydrological alterations and wetlands. In general, increases of impervious surfaces and rerouting of natural hydrology have affected plant and animal species composition and production and have altered the processes of primary production, nutrient cycling, groundwater recharge rates, and sediment dynamics. The close coupling of wetland functions, plant and animal populations, and hydrology is clearly illustrated in these case studies. The studies have resulted in significant contributions to the management of wetland systems in these areas through consideration of the hydrologic processes.

  1. A process for reduction in viscosity of coffee extract by enzymatic hydrolysis of mannan.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Prakram Singh; Sharma, Prince; Puri, Neena; Gupta, Naveen

    2014-07-01

    Mannan is the main polysaccharide component of coffee extract and is responsible for its high viscosity, which in turn negatively affects the technological processing involved in making instant coffee. In our study, we isolated mannan from coffee beans and extract of commercial coffee and it was enzymatically hydrolyzed using alkali-thermostable mannanase obtained from Bacillus nealsonii PN-11. As mannan is found to be more soluble under alkaline conditions, an alkali-thermostable mannanase is well suited for its hydrolysis. The process of enzymatic hydrolysis was optimized by response surface methodology. Under the following optimized conditions viz enzyme dose of 11.50 U mannanase g(-1) coffee extract, temperature of 44.50 °C and time of 35.80 min, significant twofold decrease in viscosity (50 mPas to 26.00 ± 1.56 mPas) was achieved. The application of this process in large-scale industrial production of coffee will help in reduction of energy consumption used during freeze-drying. It will also make technological processing involved in making coffee more economical.

  2. An environmentally-friendly vacuum reduction metallurgical process to recover germanium from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingen; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-07-15

    The demand for germanium in the field of semiconductor, electronics, and optical devices is growing rapidly; however, the resources of germanium are scarce worldwide. As a secondary material, coal fly ash could be further recycled to retrieve germanium. Up to now, the conventional processes to recover germanium have two problems as follows: on the one hand, it is difficult to be satisfactory for its economic and environmental effect; on the other hand, the recovery ratio of germanium is not all that could be desired. In this paper, an environmentally-friendly vacuum reduction metallurgical process (VRMP) was proposed to recover germanium from coal fly ash. The results of the laboratory scale experiments indicated that the appropriate parameters were 1173K and 10Pa with 10wt% coke addition for 40min, and recovery ratio germanium was 93.96%. On the basis of above condition, the pilot scale experiments were utilized to assess the actual effect of VRMP for recovery of germanium with parameter of 1473K, 1-10Pa and heating time 40min, the recovery ratio of germanium reached 94.64%. This process considerably enhances germanium recovery, meanwhile, eliminates much of the water usage and residue secondary pollution compared with other conventional processes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A Biophysicochemical Model for NO Removal by the Chemical Absorption-Biological Reduction Integrated Process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingkai; Xia, Yinfeng; Li, Meifang; Li, Sujing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-08-16

    The chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process is regarded as a promising technology for NOx removal from flue gas. To advance the scale-up of the CABR process, a mathematic model based on mass transfer with reaction in the gas, liquid, and biofilm was developed to simulate and predict the NOx removal by the CABR system in a biotrickling filter. The developed model was validated by the experimental results and subsequently was used to predict the system performance under different operating conditions, such as NO and O2 concentration and gas and liquid flow rate. NO distribution in the gas phase along the biotrickling filter was also modeled and predicted. On the basis of the modeling results, the liquid flow rate and total iron concentration were optimized to achieve >90% NO removal efficiency. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis of the model revealed that the performance of the CABR process was controlled by the bioreduction activity of Fe(III)EDTA. This work will provide the guideline for the design and operation of the CABR process in the industrial application.

  4. [The influence of economic processes on population development].

    PubMed

    Balek, A

    1982-01-01

    The author poses the question as to what causes the fluctuations in the birthrate and in population increments in the socialist countries. In order to arrive at an answer, he first analyzes demographic development in Czechoslovakia during the period 1869-1980. By comparing the differences between demographic development in Slovakia and the Czech lands, he shows the changes in demographic processes are not essentially determined by national, historical, or other factors, but are above all a complex reflection of changes in the economic mechanism. In the 2nd part of the article, the author examines in detail economic processes influencing natality and the development of population, as well as the mechanism of mutual influence which exists between demographic and economic processes. He points out that the different causes of demographic development cannot be derived from the level of the living standard, but from its changes (and/or changes in economic development). By analyzing data for the period 1948-80, the author arrives at a more precise definition of these changes in the economy. They include, for instance, changes in the rate of growth of the national economy, changes in the ratio of accumulation and consumption, changes in the ratio of national income formation and use, changes in the structure of the living standard, changes in the development of the economy and consumption in the direction of equilibrium or disequilibrium. At the same time, the author shows how these changes act toward their mutual synthesis. In each stage of development, the decisive factor for the size of population increments and natality is whether the ratio between resources and consumption is adequate, i.e., whether the relevant structure of the living standard is in accord with it. The author also examines the time lag between influences caused by changes in the economy and natality; he demonstrates that changes in the economy are effective only in this context if they overcome a

  5. Internal model of gravity influences configural body processing.

    PubMed

    Barra, Julien; Senot, Patrice; Auclair, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Human bodies are processed by a configural processing mechanism. Evidence supporting this claim is the body inversion effect, in which inversion impairs recognition of bodies more than other objects. Biomechanical configuration, as well as both visual and embodied expertise, has been demonstrated to play an important role in this effect. Nevertheless, the important factor of body inversion effect may also be linked to gravity orientation since gravity is one of the most fundamental constraints of our biology, behavior, and perception on Earth. The visual presentation of an inverted body in a typical body inversion paradigm turns the observed body upside down but also inverts the implicit direction of visual gravity in the scene. The orientation of visual gravity is then in conflict with the direction of actual gravity and may influence configural processing. To test this hypothesis, we dissociated the orientations of the body and of visual gravity by manipulating body posture. In a pretest we showed that it was possible to turn an avatar upside down (inversion relative to retinal coordinates) without inverting the orientation of visual gravity when the avatar stands on his/her hands. We compared the inversion effect in typical conditions (with gravity conflict when the avatar is upside down) to the inversion effect in conditions with no conflict between visual and physical gravity. The results of our experiment revealed that the inversion effect, as measured by both error rate and reaction time, was strongly reduced when there was no gravity conflict. Our results suggest that when an observed body is upside down (inversion relative to participants' retinal coordinates) but the orientation of visual gravity is not, configural processing of bodies might still be possible. In this paper, we discuss the implications of an internal model of gravity in the configural processing of observed bodies.

  6. Enzymatic oxidation-reduction processes under magnetic fields up to 8 T (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1994-05-01

    The question of whether magnetic fields affect enzymatic activities or not is of considerable interest in biochemistry and in biomagnetics. Xanthine oxidase, contained in liver, lungs, intestine, and other organs, catalyzes the degradation of hypoxanthine to xanthine, and xanthine to uric acid, which is the terminal waste of purine nucleotides in mammals. During the oxidation of xanthine, the enzyme releases superoxide anion radicals as intermediates which reduce ferricytochrome c (Fe3+). Superoxide anion, as well as any type of free radical, is also paramagnetic. The study is focused on whether these magnetically related enzymatic activities can be affected by magnetic fields. There is a possibility that free radicals, as intermediates, can be modified by magnetic fields of specific intensities. In our previously reported study, we examined a possible effect of magnetic fields up to 1.0 T on biochemical reaction catalyzed by xanthine oxidase, and obtained negative results. In the present abstract, we examine the effect of magnetic fields up to 8 T on this oxidation-reduction process. Reduced cytochrome c (Fe2+) has an absorption maximum at 550 nm which can be detected by a spectrophotometer. Xanthine oxidase was assayed by superoxide dismutase—inhibitable reduction of cytochrome c. We measured optical absorbance of reduced cytochrome c by superoxide anion which was produced by the reaction catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The absorbances of the mixture exposed to an 8 T magnetic field at 25 °C were higher than control samples in the re-oxidation proces of cytochrome c. The results show that the 8 T magnetic fields altered the rate of reduction of cytochrome c by superoxide anion which was produced by the reaction catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. It may conclude that the electron transfer from xanthine to molecular oxygen or the transfer from superoxide anion to cytochrome c, can be affected by the magnetic fields up to 8 T.

  7. Long-term treatment issues with chromite ore processing residue (COPR): Cr(6+) reduction and heave.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Wazne, Mahmoud; Dermatas, Dimitris; Christodoulatos, Christos; Sanchez, Adriana M; Grubb, Dennis G; Chrysochoou, Maria; Kim, Min Gyu

    2007-05-17

    A pugmill treatability study was conducted to remediate chromite ore processing residue (COPR) using ferrous sulfate heptahydrate (FeSO(4) x 7H(2)O) as a reductant. Two different types of COPR, with respect to particle size and mineralogy, were tested in this study. Two different stoichiometric ratios of FeSO(4) x 7H(2)O to Cr(6+) (5x and 8x) were applied to reduce Cr(6+) to Cr(3+). The effectiveness of FeSO(4).7H(2)O treatment was assessed using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses. TCLP results obtained from the pugmill treatability study showed that TCLP Cr concentrations were less than the TCLP regulatory limit of 5mg/L upon 8x FeSO(4) x 7H(2)O treatment for up to 420 days but may fail to meet this regulatory limit in the long-term. XANES results obtained from samples cured for 300 days showed that all of the treated samples failed the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) clean up level for Cr(6+) of 240 mg/kg. However, the Cr(6+) concentration from the sample with the smaller particle size approached 240 mg/kg (338 mg/kg), suggesting that particle size reduction prior to the addition of reductant may improve the effectiveness of the treatment. COPR heaving was investigated with unconfined swell tests upon 5x and 8x FeSO(4) x 7H(2)O treatment. The formation of ettringite, an expansive material, was investigated following the swell tests using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Significant heaving (>50 vol%) was observed at curing times of 138 days for the 5x treatment and the ettringite formation was identified by XRPD analyses.

  8. Beyond Homophily: A Decade of Advances in Understanding Peer Influence Processes

    PubMed Central

    Brechwald, Whitney A.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews empirical and theoretical contributions to a multidisciplinary understanding of peer influence processes in adolescence over the past decade. Five themes of peer influence research from this decade were identified, including a broadening of the range of behaviors for which peer influence occurs, distinguishing the sources of influence, probing the conditions under which influence is amplified/attenuated (moderators), testing theoretically based models of peer influence processes (mechanisms), and preliminary exploration of behavioral neuroscience perspectives on peer influence. This review highlights advances in each of these areas, underscores gaps in current knowledge of peer influence processes, and outlines important challenges for future research. PMID:23730122

  9. Cultural influences on social feedback processing of character traits

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Christoph W.; Fan, Yan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Chenbo; Han, Shihui; Heekeren, Hauke R.

    2014-01-01

    Cultural differences are generally explained by how people see themselves in relation to social interaction partners. While Western culture emphasizes independence, East Asian culture emphasizes interdependence. Despite this focus on social interactions, it remains elusive how people from different cultures process feedback on their own (and on others') character traits. Here, participants of either German or Chinese origin engaged in a face-to-face interaction. Consequently, they updated their self- and other-ratings of 80 character traits (e.g., polite, pedantic) after receiving feedback from their interaction partners. To exclude potential confounds, we obtained data from German and Chinese participants in Berlin [functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)] and in Beijing (behavior). We tested cultural influences on social conformity, positivity biases, and self-related neural activity. First, Chinese conformed more to social feedback than Germans (i.e., Chinese updated their trait ratings more). Second, regardless of culture, participants processed self- and other-related feedback in a positively biased way (i.e., they updated more toward desirable than toward undesirable feedback). Third, changes in self-related medial prefrontal cortex activity were greater in Germans than in Chinese during feedback processing. By investigating conformity, positivity biases, and self-related activity in relation to feedback obtained in a real-life interaction, we provide an essential step toward a unifying framework for understanding the diversity of human culture. PMID:24772075

  10. Kinetics of the Reduction of Hematite Concentrate Particles by Carbon Monoxide Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Mohassab, Yousef; Zhang, Shengqin; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2015-08-01

    A novel ironmaking process is under development at the University of Utah to produce iron directly from iron oxides concentrates by the gas-solid flash reaction using gaseous fuels and reductants. This process will reduce energy consumption and minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Having investigated the hydrogen reduction kinetics of magnetite and hematite concentrate particles relevant to the novel flash ironmaking process, the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles (average particle size 21 µm) was determined in the temperature range 1473 K to 1623 K (1200 °C to 1350 °C) under various carbon monoxide partial pressures. At 1623 K (1350 °C) and residence time 5 seconds, the reduction degree of hematite concentrate particles was more than 90 pct under a pure carbon monoxide. This is slower than reduction by hydrogen but still significant, indicating that CO will contribute to the reduction of hematite concentrate in the flash process. The kinetics of CO reduction separately from hydrogen is important for understanding and analyzing the complex kinetics of hematite reduction by the H2 + CO mixtures. The nucleation and growth rate equation with the Avrami parameter n = 1.0 adequately described the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles. The reduction rate is of 1st order with respect to the partial pressure of carbon monoxide and the activation energy of the reaction was 231 kJ/mol, indicating strong temperature dependence. The following complete rate equation was developed that can satisfactorily predict the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles and is suitable for the design of a flash reactor where X is the fraction of oxygen removed from iron oxide, R is 8.314 J/mol K, T is in K, p is in atm, and t is in seconds.

  11. The Motivating Influence of Retest and Repeated Dietary Counseling on Cholesterol Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, P.; Townsend, J. C.; Villafana, C.; Arnoldi, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis was made of retest and followup counselling effects on the reduction of hypercholesterolemia levels in NASA employees. Criteria used to measure such control include motivation, age of patient, personality of patient, job stress, and physical exercise.

  12. The Motivating Influence of Retest and Repeated Dietary Counseling on Cholesterol Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, P.; Townsend, J. C.; Villafana, C.; Arnoldi, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis was made of retest and followup counselling effects on the reduction of hypercholesterolemia levels in NASA employees. Criteria used to measure such control include motivation, age of patient, personality of patient, job stress, and physical exercise.

  13. Process design of press hardening with gradient material property influence

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, R.; Schieck, F.; Rautenstrauch, A.

    2011-05-04

    Press hardening is currently used in the production of automotive structures that require very high strength and controlled deformation during crash tests. Press hardening can achieve significant reductions of sheet thickness at constant strength and is therefore a promising technology for the production of lightweight and energy-efficient automobiles. The manganese-boron steel 22MnB5 have been implemented in sheet press hardening owing to their excellent hot formability, high hardenability, and good temperability even at low cooling rates. However, press-hardened components have shown poor ductility and cracking at relatively small strains. A possible solution to this problem is a selective increase of steel sheet ductility by press hardening process design in areas where the component is required to deform plastically during crash tests. To this end, process designers require information about microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of the wide spectrum of cooling rates and sequences and austenitizing treatment conditions that can be encountered in production environments. In the present work, a Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagram with corresponding material properties of sheet steel 22MnB5 was determined for a wide spectrum of cooling rates. Heating and cooling programs were conducted in a quenching dilatometer. Motivated by the importance of residual elasticity in crash test performance, this property was measured using a micro-bending test and the results were integrated into the CCT diagrams to complement the hardness testing results. This information is essential for the process design of press hardening of sheet components with gradient material properties.

  14. Three-dimensional mandibular motion after closed and open reduction of unilateral mandibular condylar process fractures.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Ugolini, Alessandro; Sozzi, Davide; Galante, Domenico; Mapelli, Andrea; Bozzetti, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    To detect the changes in 3D mandibular motion after two types of condylar fracture therapies. Using a 3D motion analyzer, free mandibular border movements were recorded in 21 patients successfully treated for unilateral fractures of the mandibular condylar process (nine patients: open reduction, rigid internal fixation, and functional treatment; 12 patients: closed reduction and functional treatment; follow-up: 6-66 months), and in 25 control subjects. No differences were found among the groups at maximum mouth opening (MO), protrusion and in lateral excursions. During opening, the patients had a larger maximal deviation to the fractured side than the controls (controls 2.3 mm, open treatment 3.9 mm, closed treatment 4.2 mm; Kruskal-Wallis test, p=0.014; closed treatment vs. controls, p=0.004), with a larger coronal plane angle (controls 2.4°, open treatment 3.6°, closed treatment 4.4°; p=0.016; closed treatment vs. controls, p=0.013). In the closed treatment patients, a longer follow-up was related to increased maximum MO (p=0.04), sagittal plane angle (p=0.03), and reduced lateral mandibular deviation during MO (p=0.03). Mandibular condylar fractures can recover good function; some kinematic variables of mandibular motion were more similar to the norm in the open treatment patients than in closed treatment patients. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sequential reductive and oxidative biodegradation of chloroethenes stimulated in a coupled bioelectro-process.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Svenja T; Becker, Dirk; Mangold, Klaus-Michael; Tiehm, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    This article for the first time demonstrates successful application of electrochemical processes to stimulate sequential reductive/oxidative microbial degradation of perchloroethene (PCE) in mineral medium and in contaminated groundwater. In a flow-through column system, hydrogen generation at the cathode supported reductive dechlorination of PCE to cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and ethene (ETH). Electrolytically generated oxygen at the anode allowed subsequent oxidative degradation of the lower chlorinated metabolites. Aerobic cometabolic degradation of cDCE proved to be the bottleneck for complete metabolite elimination. Total removal of chloroethenes was demonstrated for a PCE load of approximately 1.5 μmol/d. In mineral medium, long-term operation with stainless steel electrodes was demonstrated for more than 300 days. In contaminated groundwater, corrosion of the stainless steel anode occurred, whereas DSA (dimensionally stable anodes) proved to be stable. Precipitation of calcareous deposits was observed at the cathode, resulting in a higher voltage demand and reduced dechlorination activity. With DSA and groundwater from a contaminated site, complete degradation of chloroethenes in groundwater was obtained for two months thus demonstrating the feasibility of the sequential bioelectro-approach for field application.

  16. Determination of 5-log pathogen reduction times for heat-processed, acidified vegetable brines.

    PubMed

    Breidt, F; Hayes, J S; Osborne, J A; McFeeters, R F

    2005-02-01

    Recent outbreaks of acid-resistant food pathogens in acid foods, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. We determined pasteurization times and temperatures needed to assure a 5-log reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella strains in acidified cucumber pickle brines. Cocktails of five strains of each pathogen were (separately) used for heat-inactivation studies between 50 and 60 degrees C in brines that had an equilibrated pH value of 4.1. Salmonella strains were found to be less heat resistant than E. coli O157:H7 or L. monocytogenes strains. The nonlinear killing curves generated during these studies were modeled using a Weibull function. We found no significant difference in the heat-killing data for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes (P = 0.9709). The predicted 5-log reduction times for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes were found to fit an exponential decay function. These data were used to estimate minimum pasteurization times and temperatures needed to ensure safe processing of acidified pickle products and show that current industry pasteurization practices offer a significant margin of safety.

  17. Spark-eroded particles: Influence of processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrey, J.; Radousky, H. B.; Berkowitz, A. E.

    2004-02-01

    Ni particles were prepared by spark erosion in a fixed-gap apparatus, and in the usual "shaker-pot" assembly, in an investigation of the influence of various processing parameters on the particles' properties. The sizes of the particles were studied as functions of spark energies ranging from 10 μJ to 1 J, and a scaling relation derived from a simple model was verified. Several different static and rotating electrode configurations were compared with respect to their suitability for producing significant yields of small particles. The advantages of stirring the dielectric with the fixed-gap apparatus and of rotating the electrodes were demonstrated. Water, kerosene, and liquid argon and nitrogen were used as dielectric liquids. When compounds were formed, the reaction with the dielectric proceeded inversely with particle size. Spark erosion in kerosene at low spark energies, followed by annealing, proved to be an effective method to produce fine nickel particles.

  18. The influence of musical experience on lateralisation of auditory processing.

    PubMed

    Spajdel, Marián; Jariabková, Katarína; Riecanský, Igor

    2007-11-01

    The influence of musical experience on free-recall dichotic listening to environmental sounds, two-tone sequences, and consonant-vowel (CV) syllables was investigated. A total of 60 healthy right-handed participants were divided into two groups according to their active musical competence ("musicians" and "non-musicians"). In both groups, we found a left ear advantage (LEA) for nonverbal stimuli (environmental sounds and two-tone sequences) and a right ear advantage (REA) for CV syllables. Dichotic listening to environmental sounds was uninfluenced by musical experience. The total accuracy of recall for two-tone sequences was higher in musicians than in non-musicians but the lateralisation was similar in both groups. For CV syllables a lower REA was found in male but not female musicians in comparison to non-musicians. The results indicate a specific sex-dependent effect of musical experience on lateralisation of phonological auditory processing.

  19. Influence of the Target - Density Effects on Electron - Capture Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstikhina, I.Yu.; Shevelko, V.P.

    2004-12-01

    The influence of the target density on the electron-capture (EC) processes in collisions of fast ions with atoms and molecules is considered. The partial EC cross sections {sigma}n on the principal quantum number n of the scattered projectile, as well as the total {sigma}tot values are calculated for highly charged ions interacting with gaseous and solid targets in the energy range of E = 100 keV/amu to 10 MeV/amu. It is shown that with the target density increasing, the population of the excited states of the scattered projectiles, formed via the EC channel, is suppressed due to projectile ionization by the target particles and, as a result, the effective EC cross sections drastically decrease.

  20. Family Process and Peer Influences on Substance Use by Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Alice Yuen; Mak, Yim-wah

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the association of family process and peer influences with risk behaviors of adolescents. A total of 805 students were recruited from secondary schools. The results showed that adolescents who have parents who are “authoritarian” (OR = 1.856) were more likely to smoke. Adolescents who have conflicts with their parents (OR = 1.423) were more likely to drink. Those who have parents who are “permissive” were less likely to drink (OR = 0.885). Having friends who smoked (OR = 5.446) or drank (OR = 1.894), and friends’ invitation to smoke (OR = 10.455) or drink (OR = 11.825) were the dominant contributors to adolescent smoking and drinking. Interventions are needed that recognize the strength of the parent-child relationship, as well as strengthen family functioning through improved interpersonal, parenting, and monitoring skills. PMID:23985772

  1. Influence of chloride and Fe(II) content on the reduction of Hg(II) by magnetite.

    PubMed

    Pasakarnis, Timothy S; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M; Mishra, Bhoopesh; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Parkin, Gene; Scherer, Michelle M

    2013-07-02

    Abiotic reduction of inorganic mercury by natural organic matter and native soils is well-known, and recently there is evidence that reduced iron (Fe) species, such as magnetite, green rust, and Fe sulfides, can also reduce Hg(II). Here, we evaluated the reduction of Hg(II) by magnetites with varying Fe(II) content in both the absence and presence of chloride. Specifically, we evaluated whether magnetite stoichiometry (x = Fe(II)/Fe(III)) influences the rate of Hg(II) reduction and formation of products. In the absence of chloride, reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) is observed over a range of magnetite stoichiometries (0.29 < x < 0.50) in purged headspace reactors and unpurged low headspace reactors, as evidenced by Hg recovery in a volatile product trap solution and Hg L(III)-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). In the presence of chloride, however, XANES spectra indicate the formation of a metastable Hg(I) calomel species (Hg2Cl2) from the reduction of Hg(II). Interestingly, Hg(I) species are only observed for the more oxidized magnetite particles that contain lower Fe(II) content (x < 0.42). For the more reduced magnetite particles (x ≥ 0.42), Hg(II) is reduced to Hg(0) even in the presence of high chloride concentrations. As previously observed for nitroaromatic compounds and uranium, magnetite stoichiometry appears to influence the rate of Hg(II) reduction (both in the presence and absence of chloride) confirming that it is important to consider magnetite stoichiometry when assessing the fate of contaminants in Fe-rich subsurface environments.

  2. Influence of reducing gases on the reduction behavior of water-atomized Fe-Cr-Mo powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Basit; Choi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, So-Yeon; Sim, Jae-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Seo, Seok-Jun; Kim, Taek-Soo; Kim, Dae-Guen; Lim, Kyoung-Mook; Lee, Tae-Hyuk; Park, Kyoung-Tae

    2016-11-01

    In this study, Fe-based powder of composition Fe-3 wt% Cr-0.5 wt% Mo was prepared using a water atomization process. After atomization, the total oxide content of the powder was calculated as ca. 2.09 wt%. Gas reduction of the as-atomized powder using CO, CH4, and H2 gases was carried out in a horizontal vacuum tubetype furnace at 900 °C. Thermodynamic and kinetic calculations for the reduction reactions were carried out using FactSage and HSC Chemistry programs. The results showed that the reduction proceeded in two stages: from Fe3O4 to FeO, and finally to Fe. Each reducing gas was evaluated and compared based on the oxide reduction capability. The lowest oxygen content was achieved for CH4 (0.49 wt%). However, with CH4, cementite (Fe3C) was also detected due to cracking of CH4.

  3. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  4. The Effect of Mechanical Milling and Temperature to the Carbothermal Reduction Process of Silica Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Ghapur, E. A.; Mustapha, M.; Ismail, F.; Sidek, I.; Meh, B.

    2008-05-20

    This paper presents the investigation carried out to study the formation of silicon nitride and silicon carbide compound from the reaction of silica sand powders with carbon in nitrogen with 5% hydrogen atmosphere at temperatures between 1350 deg. C to 1550 deg. C. The effect of mechanical milled silica sand and different temperature during carbothermal reduction process was determined. The morphology of the synthesis products was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and its composition was determined by elemental and X-ray phase analysis. The formation of silicon nitride compound was facilitated by using silica sand with distorted structure by mechanical milling method. Further increased on temperature will lead to the formation of silicon carbide compound.

  5. A hybrid ED/RO process for TDS reduction of produced waters

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.P.; Datta, R.; Frank, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Large volumes of produced waters are generated from natural gas production. In the United States the prevailing management practice for produced waters is deep well injection, but this practice is costly. Therefore minimizing the need for deep well injection is desirable. A major treatment issue for produced waters is the reduction of total dissolved solids (TDS), which consist mostly of inorganic salts. A hybrid electrodialysis/reverse-osmosis (ED/RO) treatment process is being developed to concentrate the salts in produced waters and thereby reduce the volume of brine that needs to be managed for disposal. The desalted water can be used beneficially or discharged. In this study, laboratory feasibility experiments were conducted by using produced waters from multiple sites. A novel-membrane configuration approach to prevent fouling and scale formation was developed and demonstrated. Results of laboratory experiments and plans for field demonstration are discussed.

  6. Defining Constellation Suit Helmet Field of View Requirements Employing a Mission Segment Based Reduction Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane

    2009-01-01

    Field of view has always been a design feature paramount to helmets, and in particular space suits, where the helmet must provide an adequate field of view for a large range of activities, environments, and body positions. For Project Constellation, a different approach to helmet requirement maturation was utilized; one that was less a direct function of body position and suit pressure and more a function of the mission segment in which the field of view will be required. Through taxonimization of various parameters that affect suited field of view, as well as consideration for possible nominal and contingency operations during that mission segment, a reduction process was employed to condense the large number of possible outcomes to only six unique field of view angle requirements that still captured all necessary variables while sacrificing minimal fidelity.

  7. An Interactive Procedure to Preserve the Desired Edges during the Image Processing of Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Yu; Huang, Hsuan-Yu; Lee, Lin-Tsang

    2010-12-01

    The paper propose a new procedure including four stages in order to preserve the desired edges during the image processing of noise reduction. A denoised image can be obtained from a noisy image at the first stage of the procedure. At the second stage, an edge map can be obtained by the Canny edge detector to find the edges of the object contours. Manual modification of an edge map at the third stage is optional to capture all the desired edges of the object contours. At the final stage, a new method called Edge Preserved Inhomogeneous Diffusion Equation (EPIDE) is used to smooth the noisy images or the previously denoised image at the first stage for achieving the edge preservation. The Optical Character Recognition (OCR) results in the experiments show that the proposed procedure has the best recognition result because of the capability of edge preservation.

  8. Defining Constellation Suit Helmet Field of View Requirements Employing a Mission Segment Based Reduction Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane

    2009-01-01

    Field of view has always been a design feature paramount to helmets, and in particular space suits, where the helmet must provide an adequate field of view for a large range of activities, environments, and body positions. For Project Constellation, a different approach to helmet requirement maturation was utilized; one that was less a direct function of body position and suit pressure and more a function of the mission segment in which the field of view will be required. Through taxonimization of various parameters that affect suited field of view, as well as consideration for possible nominal and contingency operations during that mission segment, a reduction process was employed to condense the large number of possible outcomes to only six unique field of view angle requirements that still captured all necessary variables while sacrificing minimal fidelity.

  9. High-temperature corrosion observed in austenitic coils and tubes in a direct reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, B.; Gonzalez, C.; Hernandez-Duque, G.; Juarez-Islas, J.A.

    2000-02-01

    The subject of this study is related to the performance of austenitic steel coils and tubes, in a range of temperatures between 425 and 870 C for the transport of reducing gas, in an installation involving the direct reduction of iron-ore by reforming natural gas. Evidence is presented that metal dusting is not the only unique high-temperature corrosion mechanism that caused catastrophic failures of austenitic 304 (UNS S30400) coils and HK-40 (UNS J94204) tubes. Sensitization as well as stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304 stainless steel coils and metal dusting took place in HK-40 tubes, a high resistance alloy. The role of continuous injection of H{sub 2}S into the process is suggested to avoid the high resistance metal dusting corrosion mechanism found in this kind of installation.

  10. Speckle reduction process based on digital filtering and wavelet compounding in optical coherence tomography for dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Valverde, Juan J.; Ortuño, Juan E.; Guerra, Pedro; Hermann, Boris; Zabihian, Behrooz; Rubio-Guivernau, José L.; Santos, Andrés.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has shown a great potential as a complementary imaging tool in the diagnosis of skin diseases. Speckle noise is the most prominent artifact present in OCT images and could limit the interpretation and detection capabilities. In this work we propose a new speckle reduction process and compare it with various denoising filters with high edge-preserving potential, using several sets of dermatological OCT B-scans. To validate the performance we used a custom-designed spectral domain OCT and two different data set groups. The first group consisted in five datasets of a single B-scan captured N times (with N<20), the second were five 3D volumes of 25 Bscans. As quality metrics we used signal to noise (SNR), contrast to noise (CNR) and equivalent number of looks (ENL) ratios. Our results show that a process based on a combination of a 2D enhanced sigma digital filter and a wavelet compounding method achieves the best results in terms of the improvement of the quality metrics. In the first group of individual B-scans we achieved improvements in SNR, CNR and ENL of 16.87 dB, 2.19 and 328 respectively; for the 3D volume datasets the improvements were 15.65 dB, 3.44 and 1148. Our results suggest that the proposed enhancement process may significantly reduce speckle, increasing SNR, CNR and ENL and reducing the number of extra acquisitions of the same frame.

  11. Photomask defect tracing, analysis, and reduction with chemically amplified resist process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-ming; Lai, Rick; Huang, W. H.; Wang, B. C.; Chen, C. Y.; Kung, C. H.; Yoo, Chue-San; Chen, Jieh-Jang; Lee, Sheng-Cha

    2003-08-01

    The features of optical proximity correction are becoming very aggressive as production technology migrates into 90nm/130 nm regime. The complicated optical proximity correction (OPC) patterns often result in un-repairable defects, a major yield loss mechanisms in a mask production line. Defect control is increasingly important. A methodology for identifying defect sources and reduction is demonstrated in this paper. The mechanisms and causes of defect formation could be determined with corresponding process step on the strength of sequence inspections. The cause of half-etched opaque defect on negative CAR process was found from PR fragment contamination of e-beam exposure step. After clean-up of e-beam chamber, yield was increased over 20%. Big pinhole defect and contact of AttPSM positive process was found on ADI step. The possible cause was poor CAR adhesion. These two type defects were decreased by modification of developing recipe, special on rinse step. Design experiment with Taguchi method was used to optimize the interactive recipe of plasma descum and rinse step on developing step of implanted layer. Average defect density was decreased from 0.99 to 0.27, and percentage of zero defect rate has been increased from 29.5 to 63.3%.

  12. Streamlining an IRAF data reduction process Pythonically with Astropy and NDMapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, James

    2016-03-01

    In the course of re-writing my typical top-level GMOS-IFU data reduction sequence in Python for a research project, I have developed a small module that helps express the scientific process in a relatively intuitive way as a Pythonic series of operations on NDData collections, mapped to files, with existing IRAF steps integrated almost seamlessly (pending their eventual replacement). For scientific end-user purposes, this experiment aims to obviate a need for pipeline machinery, favouring simple control flow in the main script and retaining a smooth transition from high-level process description to lower-level libraries by encapsulating necessary bookeeping within the data representation and simple wrappers. The I/O abstraction should make support for file formats other than FITS (eg. ASDF) straightforward to add. This work-in-progress can be found at https://github.com/jehturner/ndmapper and I intend to split its functionality involving IRAF or instrument processing into a separate "ndprocess" module as the prototype nears completion, leaving a core "ndmapper" package, without any special dependencies, as a general add-on for nddata.

  13. Sulfonamide antibiotic reduction in aquatic environment by application of fenton oxidation process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Presence of antibiotics in the environment may cause potential risk for aquatic environment and organisms. In this research, Fenton oxidation process was offered as an effective method for removal of antibiotic sulfamethoxazole from aqueous solutions. The experiments were performed on laboratory-scale study under complete mixing at 25±2°C. The effects of initial antibiotic concentration, molar ratio of H2O2/Fe+2, solution pH, concentration of H2O2, Fe+2 and reaction time was studied on the oxidation of sulfamethoxazole in three level. The results indicated that the optimal parameters for Fenton process were as follows: molar ratio of [H2O2]/[Fe+2] = 1.5, pH= 4.5, and contact time= 15 min. In this situation, the antibiotic removal and COD reduction were achieved 99.99% and 64.7-70.67%, respectively. Although, Fenton reaction could effectively degrade antibiotic sulfamethoxazole under optimum experimental conditions, however, the rate of mineralization was not completed. This process can be considered to eliminate other refractory antibiotics with similar structure or to increase their biodegradability. PMID:23570238

  14. Effect of home processing on the distribution and reduction of pesticide residues in apples.

    PubMed

    Kong, Z; Shan, W; Dong, F; Liu, X; Xu, J; Li, M; Zheng, Y

    2012-08-01

    The effect of home processing (washing, peeling, coring and juicing) on residue levels of chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim in apple segments was investigated. The pesticide residues were determined by UPLC-MS/MS and GC with a flame photometric (FPD) and electron capture detection (ECD). The results indicated that the pesticide residue levels in the apple peel and core were higher compared with in the apple flesh. After peeled and cored apple was processed into apple juice and pomace, chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin and tebuconazole were concentrated in the apple pomace. However, residues of acetamiprid and carbendazim were exceptions. The apple pomace was free of acetamiprid, which was mainly present in the apple juice. After washing the mean loss of chlorpyrifos, β-cypermethrin, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim from apples under recommended dosage and twofold higher dosage were 17-21%, 6.7-7.1%, 13-32%, 42-67% and 47-50%, respectively. The pesticide residues were significantly reduced in the edible part of the apple except for β-cypermethrin during peeling and coring process. The removal effect of apple juicing was found to be the most pronounced on β-cypermethrin residue, which was reduced in the range of 81-84%, and the reductions of chlorpyrifos, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim upon apple juicing were in the range of 15-36%.

  15. A systematic process to prioritize prevention activities sustaining progress toward the reduction of military injuries.

    PubMed

    Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Hooper, Tomoko I; Brennan, Fred H; Craig, Stephen C; Girasek, Deborah C; Schaefer, Richard A; Barbour, Galen; Yew, Kenneth S; Jones, Bruce H

    2010-01-01

    To sustain progress toward injury reduction and other health promotion goals, public health organizations need a systematic approach based on data and an evaluation of existing scientific evidence on prevention. This paper describes a process and criteria developed to systematically and objectively define prevention program and policy priorities. Military medical surveillance data were obtained and summarized, and a working group of epidemiology and injury experts was formed. After reviewing the available data, the working group used predefined criteria to score leading military unintentional injury causes on five main criteria that assessed factors contributing to program and policy success: (1) importance of the problem, (2) effectiveness of existing prevention strategies, (3) feasibility of establishing programs and policies, (4) timeliness of implementation and results, and (5) potential for evaluation. Injury problems were ranked by total median score. Causes with the highest total median scores were physical training (34 points), military parachuting (32 points), privately-owned vehicle crashes (31 points), sports (29 points), falls (27 points), and military vehicle crashes (27 points). Using a data-driven, criteria-based process, three injury causes (physical training, military parachuting, and privately owned-vehicle crashes) with the greatest potential for successful program and policy implementation were identified. Such information is useful for public health practitioners and policymakers who must prioritize among health problems that are competing for limited resources. The process and criteria could be adapted to systematically assess and prioritize health issues affecting other communities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A HTAP Multi-Model Assessment of the Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and the Role of Intercontinental Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; West, J. Jason; Atherton, Cynthia S.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bergmann, Dan; Bey, Isabelle; Bian, Huisheng; Diehl, Thomas; Forberth, Gerd; hide

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we assess changes of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and direct radiative forcing (DRF) in response to the reduction of anthropogenic emissions in four major pollution regions in the northern hemisphere by using results from 10 global chemical transport models in the framework of the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP). The multi-model results show that on average, a 20% reduction of anthropogenic emissions in North America, Europe, East Asia and South Asia lowers the global mean AOD and DRF by about 9%, 4%, and 10% for sulfate, organic matter, and black carbon aerosol, respectively. The impacts of the regional emission reductions on AOD and DRF extend well beyond the source regions because of intercontinental transport. On an annual basis, intercontinental transport accounts for 10-30% of the overall AOD and DRF in a receptor region, with domestic emissions accounting for the remainder, depending on regions and species. While South Asia is most influenced by import of sulfate aerosol from Europe, North America is most influenced by import of black carbon from East Asia. Results show a large spread among models, highlighting the need to improve aerosol processes in models and evaluate and constrain models with observations.

  17. The influence of process parameters on electromigration lifetime statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschildt, M.; Gall, M.; Justison, P.; Hernandez, R.; Ho, P. S.

    2008-08-01

    Even after the successful introduction of Cu-based metallization, the electromigration failure risk has remained one of the important reliability concerns for advanced process technologies mostly due to ever increasing operating current densities. The main factors that require understanding are the activation energy related to the dominating diffusion mechanism, the median lifetimes, and the lognormal standard deviation sigma of experimentally obtained lifetime distributions. This study investigates the effect of different process parameters on electromigration lifetime statistics in Cu interconnects. First, the failure distributions of single damascene interconnects with smaller line height are examined, followed by an analysis of the influence of different passivation layers on electromigration statistics. A third part focuses on samples with dual damascene technology. It is observed that the first two process modifications change the median time to failure but do not alter the sigma value. Geometrical and kinetic models developed to describe the electromigration characteristics in Cu/SiN interconnects are successfully employed to explain this observation. These models imply that the lifetime statistics depend on variations in void sizes, geometrical and experimental factors of the electromigration test, and kinetic aspects of the mass transport process. The sigma value in dual damascene interconnects is found to be larger compared to corresponding single damascene structures as a result of an increase in possible void shapes and sizes for void growth into the via in addition to evolution along the line. Furthermore, simulations of expected characteristics of lifetime distributions for future technology nodes using the above models and current electromigration data are discussed.

  18. Potential of front-face fluorescence to monitor OM reduction in drinking water during potabilization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacotte, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Elimination of OM in drinking water represents a great challenge for municipalities and technical actors to ensure that it can be safely used for consumption purposes. Indeed, current indicators such as Total Organic Carbon (TOC), turbidity or UV-Absorbance at 254 nm (UVA254) enable only non-specific overview of the amount of organic residuals in water. Fluorescence EEMs are a potent tool for discrimination and deep analysis of OM detailed composition and behaviour. It has been shown that several forms of OM co-exist in raw water, and come from various origins (bacteria, humic compounds…). Potabilization operation is composed of different steps that aim at decreasing all forms of OM using chemical as well as physical methods (ozone oxidation, filtration on activated carbon or sand, flocculation etc.). Unfortunately, it has been observed that reduction of OM during this process was not identical for all the forms, and the process showed a particular lack of efficiency during raining periods. 130 samples of water at various stages of potabilization were analyzed using home-made compact fluorometer, an apparatus composed of UV excitation LEDs. Using chemometrical treatment of spectral data, we put into highlight 5 different forms of OM that were identified according to litterature data. We evidenced the critical steps of the purification on OM reduction, as well as the relative content of each form from raw to product water. In particular, we showed that two forms were less reduced than the other three, so that progressive enrichment of total OM in the former was observed throughout the process. Moreover, a study was carried out in order to establish calibration models over conventional analyses using the spectral information. Highly satisfying models were thus obtained over TOC, turbidity and UVA254, with average RMSEC values of 13%, 7% and 16% respectively. These results demonstrate the potential of the fluorescence analyzer to simultaneously predict three major

  19. Influence of soil minerals on chromium(VI) reduction by sulfide under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yeqing; Deng, Baolin; Kim, Chulsung; Thornton, Edward C

    2007-04-12

    The effects of soil minerals on chromate (CrVIO42-, noted as Cr(VI)) reduction by sulfide were investigated in the pH range of 7.67 to 9.07 under the anoxic condition. The examined minerals included montmorillonite (Swy-2), illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), aluminum oxide (gamma-Al2O3), titanium oxide (TiO2, P-25, primarily anatase), and silica (SiO2). Based on their effects on Cr(VI) reduction, these minerals were categorized into three groups: (i) minerals catalyzing Cr(VI) reduction - illite; (ii) minerals with no effect - Al2O3; and (iii) minerals inhibiting Cr(VI) reduction- kaolinite, montmorillonite, SiO2 and TiO2 . The catalysis of illite was attributed primarily to the low concentration of iron solubilized from the mineral, which could accelerate Cr(VI) reduction by shuttling electrons from sulfide to Cr(VI). Additionally, elemental sulfur produced as the primary product of sulfide oxidation could further catalyze Cr(VI) reduction in the heterogeneous system. Previous studies have shown that adsorption of sulfide onto elemental sulfur nanoparticles could greatly increase sulfide reactivity towards Cr(VI) reduction. Consequently, the observed rate constant, kobs, increased with increasing amounts of both iron solubilized from illite and elemental sulfur produced during the reaction. The catalysis of iron, however, was found to be blocked by phenanthroline, a strong complexing agent for ferrous iron. In this case, the overall reaction rate at the initial stage of reaction was pseudo first order with respect to Cr(VI), i.e., the reaction kinetics was similar to that in the homogeneous system, because elemental sulfur exerted no effect at the initial stage prior to accumulation of elemental sulfur nanoparticles. In the suspension of kaolinite, which belonged to group (iii), an inhibitive effect to Cr(VI) reduction was observed and subsequently examined in more details. The inhibition was due to the sorption of elemental sulfur onto kaolinite, which reduced or

  20. Influence of soil minerals on chromium(VI) reduction by sulfide under anoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yeqing; Deng, Baolin; Kim, Chulsung; Thornton, Edward C

    2007-01-01

    The effects of soil minerals on chromate (CrVIO42-, noted as Cr(VI)) reduction by sulfide were investigated in the pH range of 7.67 to 9.07 under the anoxic condition. The examined minerals included montmorillonite (Swy-2), illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), aluminum oxide (γ-Al2O3), titanium oxide (TiO2, P-25, primarily anatase), and silica (SiO2). Based on their effects on Cr(VI) reduction, these minerals were categorized into three groups: (i) minerals catalyzing Cr(VI) reduction – illite; (ii) minerals with no effect – Al2O3; and (iii) minerals inhibiting Cr(VI) reduction- kaolinite, montmorillonite, SiO2 and TiO2 . The catalysis of illite was attributed primarily to the low concentration of iron solubilized from the mineral, which could accelerate Cr(VI) reduction by shuttling electrons from sulfide to Cr(VI). Additionally, elemental sulfur produced as the primary product of sulfide oxidation could further catalyze Cr(VI) reduction in the heterogeneous system. Previous studies have shown that adsorption of sulfide onto elemental sulfur nanoparticles could greatly increase sulfide reactivity towards Cr(VI) reduction. Consequently, the observed rate constant, kobs, increased with increasing amounts of both iron solubilized from illite and elemental sulfur produced during the reaction. The catalysis of iron, however, was found to be blocked by phenanthroline, a strong complexing agent for ferrous iron. In this case, the overall reaction rate at the initial stage of reaction was pseudo first order with respect to Cr(VI), i.e., the reaction kinetics was similar to that in the homogeneous system, because elemental sulfur exerted no effect at the initial stage prior to accumulation of elemental sulfur nanoparticles. In the suspension of kaolinite, which belonged to group (iii), an inhibitive effect to Cr(VI) reduction was observed and subsequently examined in more details. The inhibition was due to the sorption of elemental sulfur onto kaolinite, which reduced

  1. Influence of organic carbon and nitrate loading on partitioning between dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and N2 production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardison, Amber K.; Algar, Christopher K.; Giblin, Anne E.; Rich, Jeremy J.

    2015-09-01

    Biologically available nitrogen is removed from ecosystems through the microbial processes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or denitrification, while dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) retains it. A mechanistic understanding of controls on partitioning among these pathways is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to conduct a manipulative experiment to determine the influence of organic C and NO3- loading on partitioning. Sediment was collected from a location on the southern New England shelf (78 m water depth) and sieved. Half of the sediment was mixed with freeze-dried phytoplankton and the other half was not. Sediment was then spread into 1.5 mm, "thin discs" closed at the bottom and placed in large aquarium tanks with filtered, N2/CO2 sparged seawater to maintain O2 limited conditions. Half of the discs received high NO3- loading, while the other half received low NO3- loading, resulting in a multifactorial design with four treatments: no C addition, low NO3- (-C-N); C addition, low NO3- (+C-N); no C addition, high NO3- (-C+N); and C addition, high NO3- (+C+N). Sediment discs were incubated in the tanks for 7 weeks, during which time inorganic N (NH4+, NO3-, and NO2-) was monitored, and sediment discs were periodically removed from the tanks to conduct 15N isotope labeling experiments in vials to measure potential rates of anammox, denitrification, and DNRA. Temporal dynamics of inorganic N concentrations in the tanks were indicative of anoxic N metabolism, with strong response of the build up or consumption of the intermediate NO2-, depending on treatments. Vial incubation experiments with added 15NO2- + 14NH4+ indicated significant denitrification and DNRA activity in sediment thin discs, but incubations with added 15NH4+ + 14NO2- indicated anammox was not at all significant. Inorganic N concentrations in the tanks were fit to a reactive transport model assuming different N transformations. Organic C decomposition rates

  2. Elevated acetate concentrations in the rhizosphere of Spartina alterniflora and potential influences on sulfate reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Tugel, Joyce B.; Giblin, A. E.; Banta, G. T.; Hobbie, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Acetate is important in anaerobic metabolism of non-vegetated sediments but its role in salt marsh soils was not investigated thoroughly. Acetate concentrations, oxidation (C-14) and SO4(2-) reduction (S-35) were measured in S. alterniflora soils in NH and MA. Pore water from cores contained greater than 0.1 mM acetate and in some instances greater than 1.0 mM. Non-destructive samples contained less than 0.01 mM. Acetate was associated with roots and concentrations were highest during vegetative growth and varied with changes in plant physiology. Acetate turnover was very low whether whole core or slurry incubations were used. Radiotracers injected directly into soils yielded rates of SO4(2-) reduction and acetate oxidation not significantly different from core incubation techniques. Regardless of incubation method, acetate oxidation did not account for a significant percentage of SO4(2-) reduction. These results differ markedly from data for non-vegetated coastal sediments where acetate levels are low, oxidation rate constants are high and acetate oxidation rates greatly exceed rates of SO4(2-) reduction. The discrepancy between rates of acetate oxidation and SO4(2-) reduction in marsh soils may be due either to the utilization of substrates other than acetate by SO4(2-) reducers or artifacts associated with measurements of organic utilization by rhizosphere bacteria.

  3. Processing and nanostructure influences on mechanical properties of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Robert David

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials are materials that can generate an electric current from a thermal gradient, with possible service in recovery of waste heat such as engine exhaust. Significant progress has been made in improving TE conversion efficiency, typically reported according to the figure of merit, ZT, with several recent papers publishing ZT values above 2. Furthermore, cost reductions may be made by the use of lower cost elements such as Mg, Si, Sn, Pb, Se and S in TE materials, while achieving ZT values between 1.3 and 1.8. To be used in a device, the thermoelectric material must be able to withstand the applied thermal and mechanical forces without failure. However, these materials are brittle, with low fracture toughness typically less than 1.5 MPa-m1/2, and often less than 0.5 MPa-m1/2. For comparison, window glass is approximately 0.75 MPa-m1/2. They have been optimized with nanoprecipitates, nanoparticles, doping, alterations in stoichiometry, powder processing and other techniques, all of which may alter the mechanical properties. In this study, the effect of SiC nanoparticle additions in Mg2Si, SnTe and Ag nanoparticle additions in the skutterudite Ba0.3Co 4Sb12 on the elastic moduli, hardness and fracture toughness are measured. Large changes (˜20%) in the elastic moduli in SnTe 1+x as a function of x at 0 and 0.016 are shown. The effect on mechanical properties of doping and precipitates of CdS or ZnS in a PbS or PbSe matrix have been reported. Changes in sintering behavior of the skutterudite with the Ag nanoparticle additions were explored. Possible liquid phase sintering, with associated benefits in lower processing temperature, faster densification and lower cost, has been shown. A technique has been proposed for determining additional liquid phase sintering aids in other TE materials. The effects of porosity, grain size, powder processing method, and sintering method were explored with YbAl3 and Ba0.3Co4Sb 12, with the porosity dependence of

  4. Influence of the Mold Current on the Electroslag Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Mathilde; Dussoubs, Bernard; Jardy, Alain; Escaffre, Jessica; Poisson, Henri

    2016-08-01

    The electroslag remelting process is widely used to produce high value-added alloys. The use of numerical simulation has proven to be a valuable way to improve its understanding. In collaboration with Aubert & Duval, the Institute Jean Lamour has developed a numerical transient model of the process. The consumable electrode is remelted within a mold assumed to be electrically insulated by the solidified slag skin. However, this assumption has been challenged by some recent studies: the solidified slag skin may actually allow a part of the melting current to reach the mold. In this paper, the evolution of our model, in order to take into account this possibility, is presented and discussed. Numerical results are compared with experimental data, while several sensitivity studies show the influence of some slag properties and operating parameters on the quality of the ingot. Even, a weakly conductive solidified slag skin at the inner surface of the mold may be responsible for a non-negligible amount of current circulating between the slag and crucible, which in turn modifies the fluid flow and heat transfer in the slag and ingot liquid pool. The fraction of current concerned depends mainly on the electrical conductivities of both the liquid and solidified slag.

  5. Influence of processing parameters on the quality of soycurd (tofu).

    PubMed

    Rekha, C R; Vijayalakshmi, G

    2013-02-01

    Tofu, a non-fermented soybean curd is a nutritious and digestible product with a high quality protein. Tofu making procedure includes soaking of beans, grinding, filtering, boiling, coagulating and moulding. The flavour, quality and the texture of tofu produced is significantly influenced by its processing parameters. Studies were carried out on the processing parameters like solid content of milk, thermal treatment of soybeans with sodium bicarbonate, stirring time after adding coagulant and moulding of tofu on the texture and quality of tofu. Our studies showed that the texture of the final product depended on the solid content of milk before coagulation. Pretreatment of soybeans with sodium bicarbonate, for 10 min and milk obtained with low solid content of 7° Brix resulted in regular, smooth textured tofu with less beany flavour. Duration of stirring during coagulation and moulding parameters had a significant effect on the yield of tofu. Stirring the milk after adding the coagulant for 5 s before settling and pressing the tofu with a load of 1,000 g initially for 15 min followed by 500 g for another 15 min, yielded (22.6 g/100 ml of milk) soft textured firm tofu.

  6. Influence of the processed sunflower oil on the cement properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleysher, A. U.; Tokarchuk, V. V.; Sviderskiy, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Used oils (vegetable oil, animal oil, engine oil, etc.), which are essentially industrial wastes, have found application as secondary raw materials in some braches of industry. In particular, the only well-known and commonly-used way of utilizing wastes of vegetable oils is to apply them as raw materials in the production of biodiesel. The goal of the present study is to develop a conceptually new way of vegetable oil wastes utilization in the building industry. The test admixture D-148 was obtained from the processing of wastes of sunflower oil and it mainly consists of fatty acid diethanolamide. The test admixture was added to the cement system for the purpose of studying its influence on water demand, flowability, setting times, compressive strength and moisture adsorption. The test admixture D-148 at the optimal content 0. 2 weight % causes 10% decrease in water demand, 1.7 time increase in flowability (namely spread diameter), 23% increase in grade strength and 34% decrease in moisture adsorption. The results of the present investigation make it possible to consider the final product of the waste sunflower oil processing as multifunctional plasticizing-waterproofing admixture.

  7. Influence of processing parameters on morphology of polymethoxyflavone in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yuwen; Li, Colin C; Wang, Yin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Huang, Qingrong

    2015-01-21

    Polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) are groups of compounds isolated from citrus peels that have been documented with wide arrays of health-promoting bioactivities. Because of their hydrophobic structure and high melting point, crystallized PMFs usually have poor systemic bioavailability when consumed orally. To improve the oral efficiency of PMFs, a viscoelastic emulsion system was formulated. Because of the crystalline nature, the inclusion of PMFs into the emulsion system faces great challenges in having sufficient loading capacity and stabilities. In this study, the process of optimizing the quality of emulsion-based formulation intended for PMF oral delivery was systematically studied. With alteration of the PMF loading concentration, processing temperature, and pressure, the emulsion with the desired droplet and crystal size can be effectively fabricated. Moreover, storage temperatures significantly influenced the stability of the crystal-containing emulsion system. The results from this study are a good illustration of system optimization and serve as a great reference for future formulation design of other hydrophobic crystalline compounds.

  8. Chatter reduction in boring process by using piezoelectric shunt damping with experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigit, Ufuk; Cigeroglu, Ender; Budak, Erhan

    2017-09-01

    Chatter is a self-excited type of vibration that develops during machining due to process-structure dynamic interactions resulting in modulated chip thickness. Chatter is an important problem as it results in poor surface quality, reduced productivity and tool life. The stability of a cutting process is strongly influenced by the frequency response function (FRF) at the cutting point. In this study, the effect of piezoelectric shunt damping on chatter vibrations in a boring process is studied. In piezoelectric shunt damping method, an electrical impedance is connected to a piezoelectric transducer which is bonded on cutting tool. Electrical impedance of the circuit consisting of piezoceramic transducer and passive shunt is tuned to the desired natural frequency of the cutting tool in order to maximize damping. The optimum damping is achieved in analytical and finite element models (FEM) by using a genetic algorithm focusing on the real part of the tool point FRF rather than the amplitude. Later, a practical boring bar is considered where the optimum circuit parameters are obtained by the FEM. Afterwards, the effect of the optimized piezoelectric shunt damping on the dynamic rigidity and absolute stability limit of the cutting process are investigated experimentally by modal analysis and cutting tests. It is both theoretically and experimentally shown that application of piezoelectric shunt damping results in a significant increase in the absolute stability limit in boring operations.

  9. Direct Electrolytic Reduction of Solid Ta2O5 to Ta with SOM Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaoyi; Yang, Xiaqiong; Li, Junqi; Lu, Xionggang; Yang, Shufeng

    2016-06-01

    A process that uses the solid-oxide-oxygen-ion conducting membrane has been investigated to produce tantalum directly from solid Ta2O5 in molten CaCl2 or a molten mixture of 55.5MgF2-44.5CaF2 (in wt pct). The sintered porous Ta2O5 pellet was employed as the cathode, while the liquid copper alloy, saturated with graphite powder and encased in a one-end-closed yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) tube, acted as the anode. The electrolysis potential in this method is higher than that of the Fray-Farthing-Chen Cambridge process because the YSZ membrane tube blocks the melts to electrolyze, and only Ta2O5 is will be electrolyzed. The microstructures of reduced pellets and a cyclic voltammogram of solid Ta2O5 in molten CaCl2 were analyzed. In addition, the influence of particle size and porosity of the cathode pellets on metal-oxide-electrolyte, three-phase interlines was also discussed. The results demonstrate that the sintering temperature of cathode pellets and electrolytic temperature play important roles in the electrochemical process. Furthermore, this process can be used to produce Ta metal efficiently without the expensive cost of pre-electrolysis and generation of harmful by-products.

  10. Neoliberalist influences on nursing hospital work process and organization.

    PubMed

    Souza, Norma Valéria Dantas de Oliveira; Gonçalves, Francisco Gleidson de Azevedo; Pires, Ariane da Silva; David, Helena Maria Scherlowski Leal

    2017-01-01

    To describe and analyze the influence of the neoliberal economic and political model on the nursing hospital work process and organization. Qualitative descriptive research, having as its scenery a university hospital. The subjects were 34 nursing workers. The data collection took place from March to July 2013, through semi-structured interview. The data treatment technique used was content analysis, which brought up the following category: working conditions precariousness and its consequences to the hospital work process and organization in the neoliberal context. The consequences of neoliberalism on hospital work process and organization were highlighted, being observed physical structure, human resources and material inadequacies that harms the assistance quality. In addition to wage decrease that cause the need of second jobs and work overload. There is a significant influence of the neoliberal model on hospital work, resulting on working conditions precariousness. Descrever e analisar a influência do modelo econômico e político neoliberal na organização e no processo de trabalho hospitalar de enfermagem. Pesquisa qualitativa e descritiva, tendo como cenário um hospital universitário. Os participantes foram 34 trabalhadores de enfermagem. A coleta ocorreu de março a julho de 2013, por meio de entrevista semiestruturada. A técnica de tratamento dos dados foi a análise de conteúdo, que fez emergir a seguinte categoria: precarização das condições laborais e suas repercussões para organização e processo de trabalho hospitalar no contexto neoliberal. Evidenciaram-se repercussões do neoliberalismo na organização e no processo de trabalho hospitalar, verificando-se inadequações na estrutura física, nos recursos humanos e materiais, que afetavam a qualidade da assistência. Além de perdas salariais que levam à necessidade de outros empregos e sobrecarga de trabalho. Há forte influência do modelo neoliberal no trabalho hospitalar, resultando

  11. Theoretical study on influence of CaO and MgO on the reduction of FeO by CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hong; Er, Dequan; Wen, Liangying

    2017-03-01

    Coating of CaO or MgO on the particle surface can prevent the sticking among iron ore particles effectively during fluidization process. However, CaO and MgO promote the formation of iron whiskers at high temperature, leading to the catastrophic defluidization. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations were implemented to investigate the influence of CaO and MgO on reduction of FeO/Fe2O2 by CO. Our results show that the CO molecule tends to bind to FeO/Fe2O2 on CaO(100) and MgO(100) surfaces through newly formed C-Fe and Csbnd O bonds. The CaO(100) surface will accelerate the reduction reactions which occur on it, in particular, in the initial stage of reactions, however, will slow down the reactions in the posterior stage. For the MgO(100) surface, the reduction reactions which occur on it will be promoted. The positive roles displayed by CaO and MgO in promoting the reduction of FeO by CO accelerate the precipitation of fresh iron and therefore, leading to the formation of iron whiskers.

  12. Influence of processing on the allergenic properties of pistachio nut assessed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Noorbakhsh, Reihaneh; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali; Sankian, Mojtaba; Shahidi, Fakhri; Maleki, Soheila J; Nasiraii, Leila Roozbeh; Falak, Reza; Sima, Hamid Reza; Varasteh, AbdolReza

    2010-09-22

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera) is a tree nut that has been reported to cause IgE-mediated allergic reactions. This study was undertaken to investigate the distinctions between different cultivars of pistachio nut and the influence of different processing on the IgE-binding capacity of whole pistachio protein extracts. The influence of different processes on allergenicity was investigated using competitive inhibition ELISA and Western blotting assays. The Western blotting results of extracts from pistachio cultivars showed no marked difference among them. The IgE-binding capacity was significantly lower for the protein extract prepared from steam-roasted than from raw and dry-roasted pistachio nuts. The results of sensory evaluation analysis and hedonic rating proved no significant differences in color, taste, flavor, and overall quality of raw, roasted, and steam-roasted pistachio nut treatments. The most significant finding of the present study was the successful reduction of IgE-binding by pistachio extracts using steam-roast processing without any significant changes in sensory quality of product.

  13. Influence of nanomechanical crystal properties on the comminution process of particulate solids in spiral jet mills.

    PubMed

    Zügner, Sascha; Marquardt, Karin; Zimmermann, Ingfried

    2006-02-01

    Elastic-plastic properties of single crystals are supposed to influence the size reduction process of bulk materials during jet milling. According to Pahl [M.H. Pahl, Zerkleinerungstechnik 2. Auflage. Fachbuchverlag, Leipzig (1993)] and H. Rumpf: [Prinzipien der Prallzerkleinerung und ihre Anwendung bei der Strahlmahlung. Chem. Ing. Tech., 3(1960) 129-135.] fracture toughness, maximum strain or work of fracture for example are strongly dependent on mechanical parameters like hardness (H) and young's modulus of elasticity (E). In addition the dwell time of particles in a spiral jet mill proved to correlate with the hardness of the feed material [F. Rief: Ph. D. Thesis, University of Würzburg (2001)]. Therefore 'near-surface' properties have a direct influence on the effectiveness of the comminution process. The mean particle diameter as well as the size distribution of the ground product may vary significantly with the nanomechanical response of the material. Thus accurate measurement of crystals' hardness and modulus is essential to determine the ideal operational micronisation conditions of the spiral jet mill. The recently developed nanoindentation technique is applied to examine subsurface properties of pharmaceutical bulk materials, namely calcite, sodium ascorbate, lactose and sodium chloride. Pressing a small sized tip into the material while continuously recording load and displacement, characteristic diagrams are derived. The mathematical evaluation of the force-displacement-data allows for calculation of the hardness and the elastic modulus of the investigated material at penetration depths between 50-300 nm. Grinding experiments performed with a modified spiral jet mill (Type Fryma JMRS 80) indicate the strong impact of the elastic-plastic properties of a given substance on its breaking behaviour. The fineness of milled products produced at constant grinding conditions but with different crystalline powders varies significantly as it is dependent on the

  14. Array Processing for Radar Clutter Reduction and Imaging of Ice-Bed Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogineni, P.; Leuschen, C.; Li, J.; Hoch, A.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Ledford, J.; Jezek, K.

    2007-12-01

    A major challenge in sounding of fast-flowing glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica is surface clutter, which masks weak returns from the ice-bed interface. The surface clutter is also a major problem in sounding and imaging sub-surface interfaces on Mars and other planets. We successfully applied array-processing techniques to reduce clutter and image ice-bed interfaces of polar ice sheets. These techniques and tools have potential applications to planetary observations. We developed a radar with array-processing capability to measure thickness of fast-flowing outlet glaciers and image the ice-bed interface. The radar operates over the frequency range from 140 to 160 MHz with about an 800- Watt peak transmit power with transmit and receive antenna arrays. The radar is designed such that pulse width and duration are programmable. The transmit-antenna array is fed with a beamshaping network to obtain low sidelobes. We designed the receiver such that it can process and digitize signals for each element of an eight- channel array. We collected data over several fast-flowing glaciers using a five-element antenna array, limited by available hardpoints to mount antennas, on a Twin Otter aircraft during the 2006 field season and a four-element array on a NASA P-3 aircraft during the 2007 field season. We used both adaptive and non-adaptive signal-processing algorithms to reduce clutter. We collected data over the Jacobshavn Isbrae and other fast-flowing outlet glaciers, and successfully measured the ice thickness and imaged the ice-bed interface. In this paper, we will provide a brief description of the radar, discuss clutter-reduction algorithms, present sample results, and discuss the application of these techniques to planetary observations.

  15. Enantioselective reductive transformation of climbazole: A concept towards quantitative biodegradation assessment in anaerobic biological treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Brienza, Monica; Chiron, Serge

    2017-06-01

    An efficient chiral method-based using liquid chromatography-high resolution-mass spectrometry analytical method has been validated for the determination of climbazole (CBZ) enantiomers in wastewater and sludge with quantification limits below the 1 ng/L and 2 ng/g range, respectively. On the basis of this newly developed analytical method, the stereochemistry of CBZ was investigated over time in sludge biotic and sterile batch experiments under anoxic dark and light conditions and during wastewater biological treatment by subsurface flow constructed wetlands. CBZ stereoselective degradation was exclusively observed under biotic conditions, confirming the specificity of enantiomeric fraction variations to biodegradation processes. Abiotic CBZ enantiomerization was insignificant at circumneutral pH and CBZ was always biotransformed into CBZ-alcohol due to the specific and enantioselective reduction of the ketone function of CBZ into a secondary alcohol function. This transformation was almost quantitative and biodegradation gave good first order kinetic fit for both enantiomers. The possibility to apply the Rayleigh equation to enantioselective CBZ biodegradation processes was investigated. The results of enantiomeric enrichment allowed for a quantitative assessment of in situ biodegradation processes due to a good fit (R(2) > 0.96) of the anoxic/anaerobic CBZ biodegradation to the Rayleigh dependency in all the biotic microcosms and was also applied in subsurface flow constructed wetlands. This work extended the concept of applying the Rayleigh equation towards quantitative biodegradation assessment of organic contaminants to enantioselective processes operating under anoxic/anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The influence of polyvinylacetate additive in water on turbulent velocity field and drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodes, A.; Macho, V.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of polymer concentration on drag reduction was studied experimentally with diluted water solutions of polyvinylacetate in a 2.4 cm I. D. pipe. The instantaneous local velocities of the velocity fields were measured by a one-channel differential laser-Doppler anemometer DISA Mark II, with forward scattering. Concentrations of water-polyvinylacetate over the range from 10 to 2,000 ppm were used. The drag reduction coefficient is proportional to the concentration and hydrolysis degree of the saponificated polyvinylacetate (PVAC) employed. A mechanical degradation in the turbulent shear flow was not observed.

  17. Influence of emotional processing on working memory in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Karla; Barch, Deanna

    2011-09-01

    Research on emotional processing in schizophrenia suggests relatively intact subjective responses to affective stimuli "in the moment." However, neuroimaging evidence suggests diminished activation in brain regions associated with emotional processing in schizophrenia. We asked whether given a more vulnerable cognitive system in schizophrenia, individuals with this disorder would show increased or decreased modulation of working memory (WM) as a function of the emotional content of stimuli compared with healthy control subjects. In addition, we examined whether higher anhedonia levels were associated with a diminished impact of emotion on behavioral and brain activation responses. In the present study, 38 individuals with schizophrenia and 32 healthy individuals completed blocks of a 2-back WM task in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning session. Blocks contained faces displaying either only neutral stimuli or neutral and emotional stimuli (happy or fearful faces), randomly intermixed and occurring both as targets and non-targets. Both groups showed higher accuracy but slower reaction time for negative compared to neutral stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia showed intact amygdala activity in response to emotionally evocative stimuli, but demonstrated altered dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and hippocampal activity while performing an emotionally loaded WM-task. Higher levels of social anhedonia were associated with diminished amygdala responses to emotional stimuli and increased DLPFC activity in individuals with schizophrenia. Emotional arousal may challenge dorsal-frontal control systems, which may have both beneficial and detrimental influences. Our findings suggest that disturbances in emotional processing in schizophrenia relate to alterations in emotion-cognition interactions rather than to the perception and subjective experience of emotion per se.

  18. The influence of contrast on coherent motion processing in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Elizabeth G; Lilleskaret, Gry; Wright, Craig M; Power, Garry F

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the experiments was to investigate how manipulating the contrast of the signal and noise dots in a random dot kinematogram (RDK), influenced on motion coherence thresholds in adults with dyslexia. In the first of two experiments, coherent motion thresholds were measured when the contrasts of the signal and noise dots in an RDK were manipulated. A significantly greater processing benefit was found for the group with dyslexia than a control group when the signal dots were of higher contrast than the noise dots. However, a significant processing disadvantage was found for the group with dyslexia relative to the control group when the signal dots were of lower contrast than the noise dots. These findings were interpreted as supporting evidence for the noise exclusion hypothesis of dyslexia. In Experiment 2, the effect on coherent motion thresholds of presenting a cue that alerted observers to which stimuli, high or low contrast contained the signals dots was investigated. When the cue directed attention to low contrast signal dots presented in high contrast noise, coherent motion thresholds were only enhanced for the group with dyslexia. This manipulation produced equivalent coherent motion thresholds in the reader groups. In other conditions, the group with dyslexia had significantly higher coherent motion thresholds than the control group. It was concluded that adults with dyslexia who show evidence of a coherent motion deficit (37% of the dyslexia group in each experiment), have a specific difficulty in noise exclusion. This appears to occur as consequence of a sensory processing deficit in the magnocellular or dorsal stream.

  19. Influence of Emotional Processing on Working Memory in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Karla; Barch, Deanna

    2011-01-01

    Research on emotional processing in schizophrenia suggests relatively intact subjective responses to affective stimuli “in the moment.” However, neuroimaging evidence suggests diminished activation in brain regions associated with emotional processing in schizophrenia. We asked whether given a more vulnerable cognitive system in schizophrenia, individuals with this disorder would show increased or decreased modulation of working memory (WM) as a function of the emotional content of stimuli compared with healthy control subjects. In addition, we examined whether higher anhedonia levels were associated with a diminished impact of emotion on behavioral and brain activation responses. In the present study, 38 individuals with schizophrenia and 32 healthy individuals completed blocks of a 2-back WM task in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning session. Blocks contained faces displaying either only neutral stimuli or neutral and emotional stimuli (happy or fearful faces), randomly intermixed and occurring both as targets and non-targets. Both groups showed higher accuracy but slower reaction time for negative compared to neutral stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia showed intact amygdala activity in response to emotionally evocative stimuli, but demonstrated altered dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and hippocampal activity while performing an emotionally loaded WM-task. Higher levels of social anhedonia were associated with diminished amygdala responses to emotional stimuli and increased DLPFC activity in individuals with schizophrenia. Emotional arousal may challenge dorsal-frontal control systems, which may have both beneficial and detrimental influences. Our findings suggest that disturbances in emotional processing in schizophrenia relate to alterations in emotion-cognition interactions rather than to the perception and subjective experience of emotion per se. PMID:20176860

  20. Mechanism and Influencing Factors of Iron Nuggets Forming in Rotary Hearth Furnace Process at Lower Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hongliang; Duan, Dongping; Chen, Siming; Yuan, Peng

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of slag and iron separation, a new idea of "the separation of slag (solid state) and iron (molten state) in rotary hearth furnace process at lower temperature" is put forward. In this paper, the forming process of iron nuggets has been investigated. Based on those results, the forming mechanisms and influencing factors of iron nugget at low temperature are discussed experimentally using an electric resistance furnace simulating a rotary hearth furnace process. Results show that the reduction of iron ore, carburization of reduced iron, and the composition and quantity of slag are very important for producing iron nuggets at lower temperature. Reduction reaction of carbon-containing pellets is mainly at 1273 K and 1473 K (1000 °C and 1200 °C). When the temperature is above 1473 K (1200 °C), the metallization rate of carbon-containing pellets exceeds 93 pct, and the reduction reaction is substantially complete. Direct carburization is the main method for carburization of reduced iron. This reaction occurs above 1273 K (1000 °C), with carburization degree increasing greatly at 1473 K and 1573 K (1200 °C and 1300 °C) after particular holding times. Besides, to achieve the "slag (solid state) and iron (molten state) separation," the melting point of the slag phase should be increased. Slag (solid state) and iron (molten state) separation can be achieved below 1573 K (1300 °C), and when the holding time is 20 minutes, C/O is 0.7, basicity is less than 0.5 and a Na2CO3 level of 3 pct, the recovery rate of iron can reach 90 pct, with a proportion of iron nuggets more than 3.15 mm of nearly 90 pct. This study can provide theoretical and technical basis for iron nugget production.

  1. ANION ANALYSES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR THE ALTERNATE REDUCTANT DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Best, D.

    2010-08-04

    The Process Science Analytical Laboratory (PSAL) at the Savannah River National Laboratory was requested by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to develop and demonstrate an Ion Chromatography (IC) method for the analysis of glycolate, in addition to eight other anions (fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate and phosphate) in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples. The method will be used to analyze anions for samples generated from the Alternate Reductant Demonstrations to be performed for the DWPF at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL). The method is specific to the characterization of anions in the simulant flowsheet work. Additional work will be needed for the analyses of anions in radiological samples by Analytical Development (AD) and DWPF. The documentation of the development and demonstration of the method fulfills the third requirement in the TTQAP, SRNL-RP-2010-00105, 'Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Glycolic-Formic Acid Flowsheet Development, Definition and Demonstrations Tasks 1-3'.

  2. Fractionation of 238U/235U by reduction during low temperature uranium mineralisation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Melissa J.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Kaltenbach, Angela; Turner, Simon P.; Schaefer, Bruce F.

    2014-02-01

    Investigations of ‘stable’ uranium isotope fractionation during low temperature, redox transformations may provide new insights into the usefulness of the 238U/235U isotope system as a tracer of palaeoredox processes. Sandstone-hosted uranium deposits accumulate at an oxidation/reduction interface within an aquifer from the low temperature reduction of soluble U(VI) complexes in groundwaters, forming insoluble U(IV) minerals. This setting provides an ideal environment in which to investigate the effects of redox transformations on 238U/235U fractionation. Here we present the first coupled measurements of 238U/235U isotopic compositions and U concentrations for groundwaters and mineralised sediment samples from the same redox system in the vicinity of the high-grade Pepegoona sandstone-hosted uranium deposit, Australia. The mineralised sediment samples display extremely variable 238U/235U ratios (herein expressed as δUCRM145238, the per-mil deviation from the international NBL standard CRM145). The majority of mineralised sediment samples have δUCRM145238 values between -1.30±0.05 and 0.55±0.12‰, spanning a ca. 2‰ range. However, one sample has an unusually light isotopic composition of -4.13±0.05‰, which suggests a total range of U isotopic variability of up to ca. 5‰, the largest variation found thus far in a single natural redox system. The 238U/235U isotopic signature of the mineralised sediments becomes progressively heavier (enriched in 238U) along the groundwater flow path. The groundwaters show a greater than 2‰ variation in their 238U/235U ratios, ranging from δUCRM145238 values of -2.39±0.07 to -0.71±0.05‰. The majority of the groundwater data exhibit a clear systematic relationship between 238U/235U isotopic composition and U concentration; samples with the lowest U concentrations have the lowest 238U/235U ratios. The preferential incorporation of 238U during reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and precipitation of uranium minerals leaves

  3. Defining Constellation Suit Helmet Field of View Requirements Employing a Mission Segment Based Reduction Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.

    2008-01-01

    Field of view has always been a design feature paramount to helmet design, and in particular space suit design, where the helmet must provide an adequate field of view for a large range of activities, environments, and body positions. For Project Constellation, a slightly different approach to helmet requirement maturation was utilized; one that was less a direct function of body position and suit pressure and more a function of the mission segment in which the field of view is required. Through taxonimization of various parameters that affect suited FOV, as well as consideration for possible nominal and contingency operations during that mission segment, a reduction process was able to condense the large number of possible outcomes to only six unique field of view angle requirements that still captured all necessary variables without sacrificing fidelity. The specific field of view angles were defined by considering mission segment activities, historical performance of other suits, comparison between similar requirements (pressure visor up versus down, etc.), estimated requirements from other teams for field of view (Orion, Altair, EVA), previous field of view tests, medical data for shirtsleeve field of view performance, and mapping of visual field data to generate 45degree off-axis field of view requirements. Full resolution of several specific field of view angle requirements warranted further work, which consisted of low and medium fidelity field of view testing in the rear entry ISuit and DO27 helmet prototype. This paper serves to document this reduction progress and followup testing employed to write the Constellation requirements for helmet field of view.

  4. Reduction of Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity in Sensorimotor and Visual Information Processing Pathways in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Xu; Wang, Le; Zhuo, Chuan-Jun; Jia, Feng; Wang, Li-Na; Wang, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have demonstrated interhemispheric functional connectivity alterations in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between these alterations and the disease state of schizophrenia is largely unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate this relationship using voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) method. Methods: This study enrolled 36 schizophrenia patients with complete remission, 58 schizophrenia patients with incomplete remission and 55 healthy controls. The VMHC was calculated based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Differences in VMHC among three groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance. A brain region with a significant difference in VMHC was defined as a region of interest (ROI), and the mean VMHC value in the ROI was extracted for the post hoc analysis, i.e., pair-wise comparisons across the three groups. Results: VMHC in the visual region (inferior occipital and fusiform gyri) and the sensorimotor region (paracentral lobule) showed significant differences among the three groups (P < 0.05, a false discovery rate method corrected). Pair-wise comparisons in the post hoc analysis showed that VMHC of the visual and sensorimotor regions in schizophrenia patients with complete remission and incomplete remission was lower than that in healthy controls (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected); however, there was no significant difference between the two patient subgroups. Conclusions: Interhemispheric functional connectivity in the sensorimotor and visual processing pathways was reduced in patients with schizophrenia, but this reduction was unrelated to the disease state; thus, this reduction may serve as a trait marker of schizophrenia. PMID:27748333

  5. Defining Constellation Suit Helmet Field of View Requirements Employing a Mission Segment Based Reduction Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.

    2008-01-01

    Field of view has always been a design feature paramount to helmet design, and in particular space suit design, where the helmet must provide an adequate field of view for a large range of activities, environments, and body positions. For Project Constellation, a slightly different approach to helmet requirement maturation was utilized; one that was less a direct function of body position and suit pressure and more a function of the mission segment in which the field of view is required. Through taxonimization of various parameters that affect suited FOV, as well as consideration for possible nominal and contingency operations during that mission segment, a reduction process was able to condense the large number of possible outcomes to only six unique field of view angle requirements that still captured all necessary variables without sacrificing fidelity. The specific field of view angles were defined by considering mission segment activities, historical performance of other suits, comparison between similar requirements (pressure visor up versus down, etc.), estimated requirements from other teams for field of view (Orion, Altair, EVA), previous field of view tests, medical data for shirtsleeve field of view performance, and mapping of visual field data to generate 45degree off-axis field of view requirements. Full resolution of several specific field of view angle requirements warranted further work, which consisted of low and medium fidelity field of view testing in the rear entry ISuit and DO27 helmet prototype. This paper serves to document this reduction progress and followup testing employed to write the Constellation requirements for helmet field of view.

  6. High-performance Bi-stage process in reduction of graphene oxide for transparent conductive electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahbakhshi, Masoud; Fallahi, Afsoon; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Fathollahi, Mohammad-Reza; Taromi, Faramarz Afshar; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    A novel and innovative approach to develop reduction of graphene oxide (GO) solution for fabrication of highly and truly transparent conductive electrode (TCE) has been presented. Thanks to outstanding mechanical and electronic properties of graphene which offer practical applications in synthesizing composites as well as fabricating various optoelectronic devices, in this study, conductive reduced graphene oxide (r-GO) thin films were prepared through sequential chemical and thermal reduction process of homogeneously dispersed GO solutions. The conductivity and transparency of r-GO thin film is regulated using hydroiodic acid (HI) as reducing agent following by vacuum thermal annealing. The prepared r-GO is characterized by XRD, AFM, UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy. the AFM topographic images reveal surface roughness almost ∼11 nm which became less than 2 nm for the 4 mg/mL solution. Moreover, XRD analysis and Raman spectra substantiate the interlayer spacing between rGO layers has been reduced dramatically and also electronic conjugation has been ameliorated after using HI chemical agent and 700 °C thermal annealing sequentially. Subsequently providing r-GO transparent electrode with decent and satisfactory transparency, acceptable conductivity and suitable work function, it has been exploited as the anode in organic light emitting diode (OLED). The maximum luminance efficiency and maximum power efficiency reached 4.2 cd/A and 0.83 lm/W, respectively. We believe that by optimizing the hole density, sheet resistance, transparency and surface morphology of the r-GO anodes, the device efficiencies can be remarkably increased further.

  7. In Situ Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium in Alkaline Soils Enriched with Chromite Ore Processing Residue.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Thomas E; Halloran, Amy R; Dobbins, Maribeth E; Pittignano, Alex J

    1998-11-01

    In investigating chromium sites in New Jersey, it has been observed that an organic-rich 0.5- to 4-foot-thick layer of decayed vegetation (locally known as "meadowmat") underlying the chromium-containing material acts as a natural barrier to the migration of Cr(VI). The groundwater in a sand layer directly beneath the meadowmat has been shown to contain low or nondetectable levels of chromium. The meadowmat is under highly reduced conditions due to bacterial activity associated with the organic material. Based on the observed ability of the meadowmat to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III), the feasibility of in situ reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at chromite ore processing residue (COPR) sites was investigated in biologically-active, laboratory-scale test columns. COPR typically has a high pH (in excess of 12) and may contain total chromium concentrations as high as 70,000 mg/kg. Experimental results demonstrated that the addition of a mineral acid (to lower the pH to between 7.0 and 9.5) and a bacteria-rich organic substrate (fresh manure) resulted in the reduction of Cr(VI) to the less toxic and less mobile trivalent form. Pore water Cr(VI) was reduced from approximately 800 mg/L to less than 0.05 mg/L over a period of eight months. This is less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for chromium in drinking water of 0.1 mg/L. Solid phase Cr(VI) concentrations decreased from approximately 2,000 mg/kg to less than 10 mg/kg in the columns over a period of 11 months while the total chromium concentrations remained unchanged. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract from the treated columns met the regulatory limit of 5 mg/L of Cr, whereas the untreated samples had TCLP extract concentrations greater than 40 mg/L. This study demonstrated the potential applicability of in situ reduction to soils contaminated with Cr(VI) by adjusting the pH to between 7.0 and 9.5 and mixing in a bacteria-rich organic substrate.

  8. In situ reduction of hexavalent chromium in alkaline soils enriched with chromite ore processing residue

    PubMed

    Higgins; Halloran; Dobbins; Pittignano

    1998-11-01

    In investigating chromium sites in New Jersey, it has been observed that an organic-rich 0.5- to 4-foot-thick layer of decayed vegetation (locally known as "meadowmat") underlying the chromium-containing material acts as a natural barrier to the migration of Cr(VI). The groundwater in a sand layer directly beneath the meadowmat has been shown to contain low or nondetectable levels of chromium. The meadowmat is under highly reduced conditions due to bacterial activity associated with the organic material. Based on the observed ability of the meadowmat to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III), the feasibility of in situ reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at chromite ore processing residue (COPR) sites was investigated in biologically-active, laboratory-scale test columns. COPR typically has a high pH (in excess of 12) and may contain total chromium concentrations as high as 70,000 mg/kg. Experimental results demonstrated that the addition of a mineral acid (to lower the pH to between 7.0 and 9.5) and a bacteria-rich organic substrate (fresh manure) resulted in the reduction of Cr(VI) to the less toxic and less mobile trivalent form. Pore water Cr(VI) was reduced from approximately 800 mg/L to less than 0.05 mg/L over a period of eight months. This is less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for chromium in drinking water of 0.1 mg/L. Solid phase Cr(VI) concentrations decreased from approximately 2,000 mg/kg to less than 10 mg/kg in the columns over a period of 11 months while the total chromium concentrations remained unchanged. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract from the treated columns met the regulatory limit of 5 mg/L of Cr, whereas the untreated samples had TCLP extract concentrations greater than 40 mg/L. This study demonstrated the potential applicability of in situ reduction to soils contaminated with Cr(VI) by adjusting the pH to between 7.0 and 9.5 and mixing in a bacteria-rich organic substrate.

  9. Influence of competitive electron acceptors during reduction and effective immobilization of technetium by reduced nontronite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisi, D. P.; Dong, H.; Heald, S. M.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Plymale, A. E.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction and immobilization of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) in nontronite (NAu-2) was studied in the presence of iron and manganese oxides and nitrate, the coexisting competitive terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) in several DOE subsurface contamination sites, to understand how these TEAs might inhibit Tc(VII) reduction or promote reoxidation of reduced Tc. Manganese oxides (birnessite and manganite) and iron oxides (goethite and hematite) were synthesized and their mineralogical, morphological and surface properties were characterized by XRD, SEM, and BET surface and pore area measurements, respectively. Batch Tc(VII) reduction experiments were performed at different concentrations of Tc and Fe(II) and competing electron acceptors were added at different times. Separate experiments performed with NAu-2 and a TEA only (in the absence of Tc) showed that that the electron transfer from Fe(II) in NAu-2 to manganese oxides was very fast, but the transfer from Fe(II) to nitrate was almost absent. The Tc(VII) reduction was enhanced when iron oxides (goethite and hematite) was added, irrespective of time, however the enhancement was low at later phases of Tc reduction. The addition of manganese oxides during Tc reduction stopped any additional Tc(VII) reduction, but reoxidation of already reduced Tc was not observed at low Tc concentration. In general, the extent of reoxidation of reduced Tc (by manganese oxide) in old samples was slow suggesting that the higher rate of particle aggregation in reduced NAu-2 inhibited the reoxidation of reduced Tc. However, Tc(IV) reoxidation was not observed in the presence of nitrate. The preliminary EXAFS analysis showed that a fraction of reduced Tc occurred as Tc-Fe complex in a ferrihydrite-like solid, in addition to separate TcO2.nH2O particles, which might have promoted additional NAu-2 particle aggregation and thereby incorporation of reduced Tc into NAu-2 aggregates. These results are promising for long-term in-situ immobilization of

  10. Research and Industrial Application of a Process for Direct Reduction of Molten High-Lead Smelting Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Zhan, Jing; Fan, Yanqing; Wei, Chang; Zhang, Chuanfu; Hwang, Jiann-Yang

    2017-01-01

    A pyrometallurgical process for the direct reduction of molten high-lead smelting slag obtained by the Shuikoushan (SKS) method was reported in this article using solid anthracite as the fuel and reductant. The chemical composition, the lead phase composition, and the physical properties of the molten high-lead slag were examined. The effects of the process parameters on the recovery rate of valued metals were investigated in the laboratory. According to the experimental results, a new efficient bottom blow reduction furnace was employed in the pilot-scale test for high-lead slag reduction. The results showed the average recovery rate of lead was more than 96.0% with lower Pb and high Zn content of the reducing slag under the condition of reduction temperature 1100-1200°C, coal ratio 5.5-7.5%, reduction time 90-150 min, CaO/SiO2 ratio 0.35-0.45, and FeO/SiO2 ratio 1.4-1.55. Moreover, nearly 250 kg of standard coal per ton of crude Pb output was reduced compared with the blast furnace reduction process.

  11. Investigation of Mercury Reduction in Gold Stripping Process at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramudya, Irawan

    Mercury is present in many gold ores. By processing these ores, there is a potential of emitting mercury to the environment. Carbon regeneration kiln stacks have been observed as one of the primary source of mercury emission into the atmosphere. Before it is recycled back into the carbon in leach (CIL) or carbon in columns (CIC), carbon used in the gold extraction process needs to be reactivated thermally. Emission of mercury can be minimized by keeping the mercury left in the carbon low before it goes to the carbon regeneration kiln stacks. The objective of this study is establishing the optimum elution conditions of mercury cyanide from loaded carbon (which includes the eluent, concentration, temperature and elution time) with respect to gold stripping. Several methods such as acid washing (UNR-100, HCl or ethanol/UNR-100) were investigated prior to the stripping process. Furthermore, conventional pressurized Zadra and modified Zadra were also studied with regards to mercury concentration in the solution and vapor state as well as maximizing the gold stripping from industrial loaded carbon. 7% UNR-100 acid washing of loaded carbon at 80°C was able to wash out approximately 90% of mercury while maintaining the gold adsorption on the carbon (selective washing). The addition of alcohol in the UNR-100 acid washing solution was able to enhance mercury washing from 90% to 97%. Furthermore, mercury stripping using conventional pressurized (cyanide-alkaline) Zadra was best performed at 80°C (minimal amount of mercury reduced and volatilized) whereas using the same process only 40% of gold was stripped, which makes this process not viable. When alcohol was added to the stripping solution, at 80°C, 95% of gold was detected in the solution while keeping the reduction and volatilization of mercury low. The outcome of this study provides a better understanding of mercury behavior during the acid washing and stripping processes so that the risk of mercury exposure and

  12. High-pressure processing of Gorgonzola cheese: influence on Listeria monocytogenes inactivation and on sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Carminati, D; Gatti, M; Bonvini, B; Neviani, E; Mucchetti, G

    2004-08-01

    The presence of Listeria monocytogenes on the rind of Gorgonzola cheese is difficult to avoid. This contamination can easily occur as a consequence of handling during ripening. The aims of this study were to determine the efficiency of high-pressure processing (HPP) for inactivation of L. monocytogenes on cheese rind and to evaluate the influence of HPP treatments on sensory characteristics. Gorgonzola cheese rinds, after removal, were inoculated (about 7.0 log CFU/g) with L. monocytogenes strains previously isolated from other Gorgonzola cheeses. The inoculated cheese rinds were processed with an HPP apparatus under conditions of pressure and time ranging from 400 to 700 MPa for 1 to 15 min. Pressures higher than 600 MPa for 10 min or 700 MPa for 5 min reduced L. monocytogenes more than 99%. A reduction higher than 99.999% was achieved pressurizing cheese rinds at 700 MPa for 15 min. Lower pressure or time treatments were less effective and varied in effectiveness with the cheese sample. Changes in sensory properties possibly induced by the HPP were evaluated on four different Gorgonzola cheeses. A panel of 18 members judged the treated and untreated cheeses in a triangle test. Only one of the four pressurized cheeses was evaluated as different from the untreated sample. HPP was effective in the reduction of L. monocytogenes on Gorgonzola cheese rinds without significantly changing its sensory properties. High-pressure technology is a useful tool to improve the safety of this type of cheese.

  13. Changes in organic matter biodegradatility influencing sulfate reduction in an aquifer contaminated by landfill leachate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Steve H.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    In situ experiments were conducted to measure sulfate reduction rates and identify rate-limiting factors in a shallow, alluvial aquifer contaminated with municipal landfill leachate. Single-well, push–pull tests conducted in a well adjacent to the landfill with >8 mM dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exhibited a sulfate reduction rate of 3.2 μmol SO4−2 (L sediment)−1 day−1, a value in close agreement with laboratory-derived estimates. Identical tests conducted in wells located 90 m downgradient where DOC levels remained high (>3 mM) showed no detectable sulfate consumption, and laboratory assays confirmed this observation. However, the rates of sulfate reduction in sediment samples obtained from this site were three times larger when they were amended with filter-sterilized groundwater from the upgradient location. The effect of various amendments on sulfate reduction rates was further examined in laboratory incubations using sediment collected from the downgradient site amended with 35S sulfate. Unamended sediments showed only weak conversion of the tracer to 35S sulfide (5 to 7 cpm/cm2), whereas the addition of Desulfovibrio cells increased 35S sulfide production to 44 cpm/cm2. However, the application of heat-killed Desulfovibrio had a similar stimulatory effect, as did a lactate amendment. Collectively, these findings indicate that the lack of measurable sulfate reduction at the downgradient site was not due to the absence of the necessary metabolic potential, the presence of lower sulfate concentration, or the quantity of electron donor, but by its biodegradability. The findings also indicate that field bioaugmentation attempts should be interpreted with caution.

  14. Influence of nitrate and sulfate reduction in the bioelectrochemically assisted dechlorination of cis-DCE.

    PubMed

    Lai, Agnese; Verdini, Roberta; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigated the reductive dechlorination (RD) of cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) (average influent 14.2±0.7 μM) by a bioelectrochemical system (BES), in the presence of real contaminated groundwater containing high levels of nitrate and sulfate. The BES enhanced both the RD and competing reactions, such as nitrate and sulfate reductions, which occurred with neither an external organic carbon source nor any inoculum other than the indigenous microbial consortia in the real groundwater. In preliminary batch tests, RD and full nitrate removal occurred after a short lag phase, whereas sulfate reduction occurred slowly and alongside the RD. Under continuous flow conditions (hydraulic retention time, HRT, 1.4 d), the competition of different electron acceptors was strongly affected by the cathodic potential in the range -550 to -750 mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). Nitrate reduction was driven to completion at all tested cathodic potentials, whereas sulfate reduction and the RD rate increased as the cathodic potential became more negative. At -750 mV vs. SHE, strong methanogenesis was also observed and became the most important sink of electrons. The overall coulombic efficiency decreased while the potential became more negative. The RD contribution was always less than 1%. Hence, greater energy consumption was required to obtain higher RD rate and better conversion. Anodic oxidation was only observed at -750 mV vs. SHE where almost 39% of residual vinyl chloride (VC) was oxidized and the sulfate was formed back from sulfide (further contributing to electric waste). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrocortical consequences of image processing: The influence of working memory load and worry.

    PubMed

    White, Evan J; Grant, DeMond M

    2017-03-30

    Research suggests that worry precludes emotional processing as well as biases attentional processes. Although there is burgeoning evidence for the relationship between executive functioning and worry, more research in this area is needed. A recent theory suggests one mechanism for the negative effects of worry on neural indicators of attention may be working memory load, however few studies have examined this directly. The goal of the current study was to document the influence of both visual and verbal working memory load and worry on attention allocation during processing of emotional images in a cued image paradigm. It was hypothesized that working memory load will decrease attention allocation during processing of emotional images. This was tested among 38 participants using a modified S1-S2 paradigm. Results indicated that both the visual and verbal working memory tasks resulted in a reduction of attention allocation to the processing of images across stimulus types compared to the baseline task, although only for individuals low in worry. These data extend the literature by documenting decreased neural responding (i.e., LPP amplitude) to imagery both the visual and verbal working memory load, particularly among individuals low in worry.

  16. Influence of thermal processing on the allergenicity of peanut proteins.

    PubMed

    Mondoulet, L; Paty, E; Drumare, M F; Ah-Leung, S; Scheinmann, P; Willemot, R M; Wal, J M; Bernard, H

    2005-06-01

    Peanuts are one of the most common and severe food allergens. Nevertheless, the occurrence of peanut allergy varies between countries and depends on both the exposure and the way peanuts are consumed. Processing is known to influence the allergenicity of peanut proteins. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of thermal processing on the IgE-binding capacity of whole peanut protein extracts and of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2. Whole proteins, Ara h 1, and Ara h 2 were extracted and purified from raw, roasted and boiled peanuts using selective precipitation and multiple chromatographic steps, and were then characterized by electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The immunoreactivity of whole peanut extracts and purified proteins was analyzed by the enzyme allergosorbent test (EAST) and EAST inhibition using the sera of 37 peanut-allergic patients. The composition of the whole protein extracts was modified after heat processing, especially after boiling. The electrophoretic pattern showed protein bands of low molecular weight that were less marked in boiled than in raw and roasted peanuts. The same low-molecular-weight proteins were found in the cooking water of peanuts. Whole peanut protein extracts obtained after the different processes were all recognized by the IgE of the 37 patients. The IgE-binding capacity of the whole peanut protein extracts prepared from boiled peanuts was 2-fold lower than that of the extracts prepared from raw and roasted peanuts. No significant difference was observed between protein extracts from raw and roasted peanuts. It is noteworthy that the proteins present in the cooking water were also recognized by the IgE of peanut-allergic patients. IgE immunoreactivity of purified Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 prepared from roasted peanuts was higher than that of their counterparts prepared from raw and boiled peanuts. The IgE-binding capacity of purified Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 was altered by heat treatment and in particular was

  17. Impact of Noise Reduction Algorithm in Cochlear Implant Processing on Music Enjoyment.

    PubMed

    Kohlberg, Gavriel D; Mancuso, Dean M; Griffin, Brianna M; Spitzer, Jaclyn B; Lalwani, Anil K

    2016-06-01

    Noise reduction algorithm (NRA) in speech processing strategy has positive impact on speech perception among cochlear implant (CI) listeners. We sought to evaluate the effect of NRA on music enjoyment. Prospective analysis of music enjoyment. Academic medical center. Normal-hearing (NH) adults (N = 16) and CI listeners (N = 9). Subjective rating of music excerpts. NH and CI listeners evaluated country music piece on three enjoyment modalities: pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness. Participants listened to the original version and 20 modified, less complex versions created by including subsets of musical instruments from the original song. NH participants listened to the segments through CI simulation and CI listeners listened to the segments with their usual speech processing strategy, with and without NRA. Decreasing the number of instruments was significantly associated with increase in the pleasantness and naturalness in both NH and CI subjects (p < 0.05). However, there was no difference in music enjoyment with or without NRA for either NH listeners with CI simulation or CI listeners across all three modalities of pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness (p > 0.05): this was true for the original and the modified music segments with one to three instruments (p > 0.05). NRA does not affect music enjoyment in CI listener or NH individual with CI simulation. This suggests that strategies to enhance speech processing will not necessarily have a positive impact on music enjoyment. However, reducing the complexity of music shows promise in enhancing music enjoyment and should be further explored.

  18. Hexavalent chromium reduction in solution and in chromite ore processing residue-enriched soil by tartaric Acid with isopropyl alcohol and divalent manganese as co-reductants.

    PubMed

    Brose, Dominic A; James, Bruce R

    2013-01-01

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR), the solid waste product from the high-temperature alkaline processing of ferrochromite (FeO·CrO), contains Cr(VI) in soluble and insoluble compounds formed in the roasting process. This research investigated tartaric acid in combination with Mn and isopropyl alcohol (IPOH ) as co-reductants for reagent- and COPR-derived Cr(VI). The reduction of Cr(VI) by tartaric acid alone at pH 5.0 or greater was negligible; however, in the presence of Mn or IPOH, reduction occurred in hours. Isopropyl alcohol enhanced Cr(VI) reduction, probably via formation of a termolecular complex with the alcohol, tartaric acid, and Cr(VI). In aqueous solutions of reagent-derived Cr(VI) at pH 4, 12 mmol L tartaric acid with 1.0 mmol L Mn or 1.0 mmol L Mn and 0.29 mol L (2% v/v) IPOH reduced 1.0 mmol L Cr(VI) in 48 h. The same treatments at pH 5.5 reduced 0.60 and 0.58 mmol L Cr(VI) (60%) in 96 h, respectively. A minimum half-life of 10.2 h was calculated from first-order rate constants obtained from Mn and IPOH-Mn co-reductant treatments with tartaric acid at pH 4. The most COPR-derived Cr(VI) reduced in suspension was by IPOH and Mn at high acidity (pH 5.8), which reduced 0.52 mmol L (52%) of the COPR-derived soluble Cr(VI) at 96 h. The enhanced reduction of soluble Cr(VI) by tartaric acid by the addition of Mn proceeds within a complex formed by an esterification reaction between tartaric acid and Cr(VI) with Mn bound to tartaric acid. The combined treatment of tartaric acid, IPOH, Mn, and a strong acid to lower the pH of COPR-enriched soils would be effective in field applications of this chemistry. By creating a slurry of the field soil with these amendments, mass transfer limitations would be overcome, and Cr(VI) would be reduced to Cr(III) in days.

  19. Reduction of nitrous oxide emissions from partial nitrification process by using innovative carbon source (mannitol).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinwen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Xiaoyu; Wei, Dong; Lan, Wei; Hu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mannitol as carbon source on nitrogen removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during partial nitrification (PN) process. Laboratory-scale PN sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated with mannitol and sodium acetate as carbon sources, respectively. Results showed that mannitol could remarkably reduce N2O-N emission by 41.03%, without influencing the removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N. However, it has a significant influence on nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) and TN removal, which were 19.97% and 13.59% lower than that in PN with sodium acetate, respectively. Microbial analysis showed that the introduction of mannitol could increase the abundance of bacteria encoding nosZ genes. In addition, anti-oxidant enzymes (T-SOD, POD and CAT) activities were significantly reduced and the dehydrogenase activity had an obvious increase in mannitol system, indicating that mannitol could alleviate the inhibition of N2O reductase (N2OR) activities caused by high NO2(-)-N concentration.

  20. Influence of Manufacturing Processes on the Performance of Phantom Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, Richard J.

    2008-10-01

    Chest counting is an important tool for estimating the radiation dose to individuals who have inhaled radioactive materials. Chest counting systems are calibrated by counting the activity in the lungs of phantoms where the activity in the phantom lungs is known. In the United States a commonly used calibration phantom was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is referred to as the Livermore Torso Phantom. An important feature of this phantom is that the phantom lungs can be interchanged so that the counting system can be challenged by different combinations of radionuclides and activity. Phantom lungs are made from lung tissue substitutes whose constituents are foaming plastics and various adjuvants selected to make the lung tissue substitute similar to normal healthy lung tissue. Some of the properties of phantom lungs cannot be readily controlled by phantom lung manufacturers. Some, such as density, are a complex function of the manufacturing process, while others, such as elemental composition of the bulk plastic are controlled by the plastics manufacturer without input, or knowledge of the phantom manufacturer. Despite the fact that some of these items cannot be controlled, they can be measured and accounted for. This report describes how manufacturing processes can influence the performance of phantom lungs. It is proposed that a metric that describes the brightness of the lung be employed by the phantom lung manufacturer to determine how well the phantom lung approximates the characteristics of a human lung. For many purposes, the linear attenuation of the lung tissue substitute is an appropriate surrogate for the brightness.

  1. Reduction of the Harmonic Series Influences Musical Enjoyment With Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Nemer, John S; Kohlberg, Gavriel D; Mancuso, Dean M; Griffin, Brianna M; Certo, Michael V; Chen, Stephanie Y; Chun, Michael B; Spitzer, Jaclyn B; Lalwani, Anil K

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is associated with poor music perception and enjoyment. Reducing music complexity has been shown to enhance music enjoyment in cochlear implant (CI) recipients. In this study, we assess the impact of harmonic series reduction on music enjoyment. Prospective analysis of music enjoyment in normal-hearing (NH) individuals and CI recipients. Single tertiary academic medical center. NH adults (N = 20) and CI users (N = 8) rated the Happy Birthday song on three validated enjoyment modalities-musicality, pleasantness, and naturalness. Subjective rating of music excerpts. Participants listened to seven different instruments play the melody, each with five levels of harmonic reduction (Full, F3+F2+F1+F0, F2+F1+F0, F1+F0, F0). NH participants listened to the segments both with and without CI simulation. Linear mixed effect models (LME) and likelihood ratio tests were used to assess the impact of harmonic reduction on enjoyment. NH listeners without simulation rated segments with the first four harmonics (F3+F2+F1+F0) most pleasant and natural (p <0.001, p = 0.004). NH listeners with simulation rated the first harmonic alone (F0) most pleasant and natural (p <0.001, p = 0.003). Their ratings demonstrated a positive linear relationship between harmonic reduction and both pleasantness (slope estimate = 0.030, SE = 0.004, p <0.001, LME) and naturalness (slope estimate = 0.012, SE = 0.003, p = 0.003, LME). CI recipients also found the first harmonic alone (F0) to be most pleasant (p = 0.003), with a positive linear relationship between harmonic reduction and pleasantness (slope estimate = 0.029, SE = 0.008, p <0.001, LME). Harmonic series reduction increases music enjoyment in CI and NH individuals with or without CI simulation. Therefore, minimization of the harmonics may be a useful strategy for enhancing musical enjoyment among both NH and CI listeners.

  2. [Research on carbon reduction potential of electric vehicles for low-carbon transportation and its influencing factors].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Qing; Li, Xiao-Nuo; Yang, Jian-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Transportation is the key industry of urban energy consumption and carbon emissions. The transformation of conventional gasoline vehicles to new energy vehicles is an important initiative to realize the goal of developing low-carbon city through energy saving and emissions reduction, while electric vehicles (EV) will play an important role in this transition due to their advantage in energy saving and lower carbon emissions. After reviewing the existing researches on energy saving and emissions reduction of electric vehicles, this paper analyzed the factors affecting carbon emissions reduction. Combining with electric vehicles promotion program in Beijing, the paper analyzed carbon emissions and reduction potential of electric vehicles in six scenarios using the optimized energy consumption related carbon emissions model from the perspective of fuel life cycle. The scenarios included power energy structure, fuel type (energy consumption per 100 km), car type (CO2 emission factor of fuel), urban traffic conditions (speed), coal-power technologies and battery type (weight, energy efficiency). The results showed that the optimized model was able to estimate carbon emissions caused by fuel consumption more reasonably; electric vehicles had an obvious restrictive carbon reduction potential with the fluctuation of 57%-81.2% in the analysis of six influencing factors, while power energy structure and coal-power technologies play decisive roles in life-cycle carbon emissions of electric vehicles with the reduction potential of 78.1% and 81.2%, respectively. Finally, some optimized measures were proposed to reduce transport energy consumption and carbon emissions during electric vehicles promotion including improving energy structure and coal technology, popularizing energy saving technologies and electric vehicles, accelerating the battery R&D and so on. The research provides scientific basis and methods for the policy development for the transition of new energy vehicles

  3. Mercury Reduction and Removal from High Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 12511

    SciTech Connect

    Behrouzi, Aria; Zamecnik, Jack

    2012-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site during production of enriched uranium and plutonium required by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. One of the constituents in the nuclear waste is mercury, which is present because it served as a catalyst in the dissolution of uranium-aluminum alloy fuel rods. At high temperatures mercury is corrosive to off-gas equipment, this poses a major challenge to the overall vitrification process in separating mercury from the waste stream prior to feeding the high temperature melter. Mercury is currently removed during the chemical process via formic acid reduction followed by steam stripping, which allows elemental mercury to be evaporated with the water vapor generated during boiling. The vapors are then condensed and sent to a hold tank where mercury coalesces and is recovered in the tank's sump via gravity settling. Next, mercury is transferred from the tank sump to a purification cell where it is washed with water and nitric acid and removed from the facility. Throughout the chemical processing cell, compounds of mercury exist in the sludge, condensate, and off-gas; all of which present unique challenges. Mercury removal from sludge waste being fed to the DWPF melter is required to avoid exhausting it to the environment or any negative impacts to the Melter Off-Gas system. The mercury concentration must be reduced to a level of 0.8 wt% or less before being introduced to the melter. Even though this is being successfully accomplished, the material balances accounting for incoming and collected mercury are not equal. In addition, mercury has not been effectively

  4. The implications of thermomechanical processing for microbiologically influenced corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.W.

    1999-11-01

    This work examined the effect of systematic variation in the amounts of cerium, sulfur and silicon on corrosion resistance in an AISI 8630 base material and weldments exposed to sterile and biologically active anaerobic aqueous solutions. Significant correlation between microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) susceptibility and sulfide inclusion size, shape, chemical stability and spatial distribution were found in these materials. In addition, significant correlation was found between these factors and bacterial attachment, particularly during a critical time period in film evolution. These factors were found to affect the evolution of microbial consortia at metal surfaces and subsequent corrosion at attachment sites, as measured by pit initiation and maximum pit size. The results suggest mitigation strategies based on microstructural design. A two-level, three-factor full factorial experiment, with AISI 8630 (UNS G86300) as the master composition, was used to relate minor element composition to both MIC susceptibility and microbial attachment in weld composite zones, partially melted zones (PMZ) and adjacent base metal regions. In all cases studied, MIC susceptibility was greatest in the PMZ. In addition, the MIC susceptibility of materials tested was significantly altered by differences in fabrication procedure as measured by changes to heat input. Samples exposed to sterile solutions were significantly less corroded. Higher energy density processes and lower heat inputs diminished MIC sensitivity. In both base metal and welded samples the addition of Cerium was found to diminish MIC susceptibility. Cerium creates this benefit through its profound effect on inclusion geometry, chemical stability and thermal stability.

  5. Influence of sensory neuropeptides on human cutaneous wound healing process.

    PubMed

    Chéret, J; Lebonvallet, N; Buhé, V; Carre, J L; Misery, L; Le Gall-Ianotto, C

    2014-06-01

    Close interactions exist between primary sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and skin cells. The PNS may be implicated in the modulation of different skin functions as wound healing. Study the influence of sensory neurons in human cutaneous wound healing. We incubated injured human skin explants either with rat primary sensory neurons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or different neuropeptides (vasoactive intestinal peptide or VIP, calcitonin gene-related peptide or CGRP, substance P or SP) at various concentrations. Then we evaluated their effects on the proliferative and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling phases, dermal fibroblasts adhesion and differentiation into myofibroblasts. Thus, DRG and all studied neuromediators increased fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation and act on the expression ratio between collagen type I and type III in favor of collagen I, particularly between the 3rd and 7th day of culture. Furthermore, the enzymatic activities of matrix metalloprotesases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were increased in the first days of wound healing process. Finally, the adhesion of human dermal fibroblasts and their differentiation into myofibroblasts were promoted after incubation with neuromediators. Interestingly, the most potent concentrations for each tested molecules, were the lowest concentrations, corresponding to physiological concentrations. Sensory neurons and their derived-neuropeptides are able to promote skin wound healing. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational beaches. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed beaches act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in beach sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target beach design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago beach identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in beach management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.

  7. EPIC: A C++ Service Oriented Inter-process Messaging Framework and its Usage in the PFS Reduction Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, C.; Chabaud, P.-Y.

    2015-09-01

    We present EPIC: a C++ library for managing inter process communication in the Prime Focus Spectrograph Data Reduction Pipeline (PFS/DRP). The aim of EPIC is to provide a consistent framework for building distributed softwares that can be efficiently used in various kind of astronomical data processing pipeline. The Prime Focus Spectrograph multi-fiber system will allow more than 2000 simultaneous spectral observations of astronomical targets at the same time, leading the need of a high throughput system for processing data reduction of each observations. This framework provide a load balanced, messages and services oriented system, where nodes communicate with each other using a set of C++ APIs.

  8. Hydrazine generation for the reduction process using small-scale plasmas in an argon/ammonia mixed gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Hiraoka, Yu; Sakai, Osamu

    2013-06-01

    The generation of hydrazine (N2H4) molecules, which are useful for various reduction processes, by a small-scale dry process enables us to realize surface reduction processes without hazardous N2H4 transportation. We investigated N2H4 generation by plasmas in an atmospheric-pressure argon and ammonia (Ar/NH3) mixed gas flow with an in-line spectroscopic monitoring system. The generated N2H4 concentration was monitored by deep-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The reduction process of silver (I) nitrite (AgNO3) in water solvent was achieved successfully by the generated N2H4 molecules, leading to the formation of sub-µm Ag particles.

  9. The Validation of Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide Microbial Reduction for Planetary Protection and a Proposed Vacuum Process Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack; Kern, Roger; Koukol, Robert; Cash, Howard

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected the vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal is to include this technique, with an appropriate specification, in NPR 8020.12C as a low temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process.To meet microbial reduction requirements for all Mars in-situ life detection and sample return missions, various planetary spacecraft subsystems will have to be exposed to a qualified sterilization process. This process could be the elevated temperature dry heat sterilization process (115 C for 40 hours) which was used to sterilize the Viking lander spacecraft. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements.The VHP process is widely used by the medical industry to sterilize surgical instruments and biomedical devices, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material properties. Our goal for this study was to determine the minimum VHP process conditions to achieve microbial reduction levels acceptable for planetary protection.

  10. The Validation of Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide Microbial Reduction for Planetary Protection and a Proposed Vacuum Process Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack; Kern, Roger; Koukol, Robert; Cash, Howard

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected the vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal is to include this technique, with an appropriate specification, in NPR 8020.12C as a low temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process.To meet microbial reduction requirements for all Mars in-situ life detection and sample return missions, various planetary spacecraft subsystems will have to be exposed to a qualified sterilization process. This process could be the elevated temperature dry heat sterilization process (115 C for 40 hours) which was used to sterilize the Viking lander spacecraft. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements.The VHP process is widely used by the medical industry to sterilize surgical instruments and biomedical devices, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material properties. Our goal for this study was to determine the minimum VHP process conditions to achieve microbial reduction levels acceptable for planetary protection.

  11. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovely, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination.

  12. Influence of Ceria on the NOx Storage/Reduction Behavior of Lean NOx Trap Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Choi, Jae-Soon; Toops, Todd J; Crocker, Dr. Mark; Naseri, Mojghan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of La2O3-stabilized ceria incorporation on the functioning of fully formulated lean NOx trap catalysts was investigated. Monolithic catalysts were prepared, corresponding to loadings of 0, 50 and 100 g CeO2/L, together with a catalyst containing 100 g/L of ceria-zirconia (Ce0.7Zr0.3O2). Loadings of the other main components (Pt, Rh and BaO) were held constant. Catalyst evaluation was performed on a bench flow reactor under simulated diesel exhaust conditions, employing NOx storage/reduction cycles. NOx storage efficiency in the temperature range 150-350 C was observed to increase with ceria loading, resulting in higher NOx conversion levels. At 150 C, high rich phase NOx slip was observed for all of the catalysts, resulting from an imbalance in the rates of nitrate decomposition and NOx reduction. Optimal NOx conversion was obtained in the range 250-350 C for all the catalysts, while at 450 C high rich phase NOx slip from the most highly loaded ceria-containing catalyst resulted in lower NOx conversion than for the ceria-free formulation. N2O was the major NOx reduction product at 150 C over all of the catalysts, although low NOx conversion levels limited the N2O yield. At higher temperatures N2 was the main product of NOx reduction, although NH3 formation was also observed. Selectivity to NH3 decreased with increasing ceria loading, indicating that NH3 is consumed by reaction with stored oxygen in the rear of the catalyst.

  13. Influence of Bicarbonate, Sulfate, and Electron Donors on Biological reduction of Uranium and Microbial Community Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wensui; Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Weimin; Yan, Tingfen; Criddle, Craig; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2007-01-01

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 mM or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and geoundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction.

  14. Aroma-related cross-modal interactions for sugar reduction in milk desserts: Influence on consumer perception.

    PubMed

    Alcaire, Florencia; Antúnez, Lucía; Vidal, Leticia; Giménez, Ana; Ares, Gastón

    2017-07-01

    Reformulation of industrialized products has been regarded as one of the most cost-effective strategies to reduce sugar intake. Although non-nutritive sweeteners have been extensively used to reduce the added sugar content of these products, increasing evidence about the existence of compensatory energy intake mechanisms makes it necessary to develop alternative strategies to achieve rapid sugar reductions. In this context, the aim of the present work was to evaluate aroma-related cross modal interactions for sugar reduction in vanilla milk desserts. In particular, the influence of increasing vanilla concentration and the joint increase of vanilla and starch concentration on consumer sensory and hedonic perception was assessed. Two studies with 100 consumers each were conducted, in which a total of 15 samples were evaluated. For each sample, consumers rated their overall liking and answered a check-all-that-apply (CATA) question comprising 12 flavour and texture terms. Sugar reduction caused significant changes in the flavour and texture characteristics of the desserts. An increase in vanilla concentration had a minor effect on their sensory characteristics. However, increasing both vanilla and starch concentration led to an increase in vanilla flavour and sweetness perception and reduced changes in consumer hedonic perception. These results showed the potential of aroma-related cross modal interactions for minimizing the sensory changes caused by sugar reduction. These strategies could contribute to product reformulation without the need to use non-nutritive sweeteners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of yeast immobilization on fermentation and aldehyde reduction during the production of alcohol-free beer.

    PubMed

    van Iersel MF; Brouwer-Post; Rombouts; Abee

    2000-05-01

    Production of alcohol-free beer by limited fermentation is optimally performed in a packed-bed reactor. This highly controllable system combines short contact times between yeast and wort with the reduction of off-flavors to concentrations below threshold values. In the present study, the influence of immobilization of yeast to DEAE-cellulose on sugar fermentation and aldehyde reduction was monitored. Immobilized cells showed higher activities of hexokinase and pyruvate decarboxylase compared to cells grown in batch culture. In addition,