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Sample records for reemplazo valvular mitral

  1. [A Case of Mitral Valvular Re-repair in a Patient with Hemolytic Anemia after Mitral Valvular Repair].

    PubMed

    Tomino, Mikiko; Miyata, Kazuto; Takeshita, Yuji; Kaneko, Koki; Kanazawa, Hiroko; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    A 54-year-old woman was admitted for mitral valvular repair. After folding plasty to A3, a 30 mm Cosgrove-Edwards ring was placed. There was no mitral regurgitation jet observed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during the operation. However, high blood pressure was monitored and treated in the intensive care unit, hemolytic anemia developed, and the serum lactate dehydrogenase level was elevated. Two weeks after the operation, serum lactate dehydrogenase was again elevated. TEE showed mild mitral regurgitation and the regurgitation jet colliding with the annuloplasty ring. Multiple transfusions of red blood cells were required. Repeat surgery was therefore undertaken. Lam and associates previously studying patients on hemolysis after mitral valvular repair noted high grade mitral regurgitation jets fragmented or accelerated. In the present case, mitral regurgitation was mild, but the high velocity and manner of regurgitation (collision with the annuloplasty ring) could cause hemolytic anemia. In the present case, high blood pressure might have caused chordae rupture. Furthermore, a flexible ring, such as the Cosgrove-Edwards ring, is likely to cause hemolytic anemia. As contributing factors to hemolysis after mitral valvular repair, perioperative blood pressure management and type of ring are significant.

  2. Floppy Mitral Valve (FMV) - Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) - Mitral Valvular Regurgitation and FMV/MVP Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Pitsis, Antonios A; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) results from the systolic movement of a portion(s) or segment(s) of the mitral valve leaflet(s) into the left atrium during left ventricular (LV) systole. It should be emphasised that MVP alone, as defined by imaging techniques, may comprise a non-specific finding because it also depends on the LV volume, myocardial contractility and other LV hemodynamics. Thus, a floppy mitral valve (FMV) should be the basis for the diagnosis of MVP. Two types of symptoms may be defined in these patients. In one group, symptoms are directly related to progressive mitral regurgitation and its complications. In the other group, symptoms cannot be explained only by the degree of mitral regurgitation alone; neuroendocrine dysfunction has been implicated for the explanation of symptoms in this group of patients that today is referred as the FMV/MVP syndrome. When significant mitral regurgitation is present in a patient with FMV/MVP, surgical intervention is recommended. In patients with a prohibitive risk for surgery, transcatheter mitral valve repair using a mitraclip device may be considered. Furthermore, transcatheter mitral valve replacement may represent an option in the near future as clinical trials are underway. In this brief review, the current concepts related to FMV/MVP and FMV/MVP syndrome will be discussed.

  3. Simultaneous transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement and transcatheter mitral valve replacement for native valvular stenosis.

    PubMed

    Elkharbotly, Ali; Delago, Augustin; El-Hajjar, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is well established for patients who cannot undergo surgery (Leon et al., N Engl J Med 2010;363:1597) or are high risk for surgery (Smith et al., N Engl J Med 2011;364:2187-2198). Experience with the TAVR procedure has led to recent reports of successful transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures (Cheung et al., J Am Coll Cardiol 2014;64:1814; Seiffert et al., J Am Coll Cardiol Interv 2012;5:341-349) separately or simultaneously with the TAVR. However, these reports were of simultaneous valve-in-valve procedures (Cheung Anson, et al. J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;61:1759-1766). A recent report from Portugal also reported simultaneous transpical implantation of an inverted transcatheter aortic valve-in-ring in the mitral position and transcatheter aortic valve (Hasan et al., Circulation 2013;128:e74-e76). There has been an experience of TMVR only in native mitral valve for mitral valve stenosis, but none in both aortic and mitral valves. We report the first in human case of simultaneous transapical TAVR and TMVR in native valves secondary to valvular stenosis. Our patient was not a candidate for percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty secondary to a high Wilkins Score. Sizing of the aortic valve was based on the transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), whereas sizing of the mitral valve was based on TEE measurements and balloon inflation during left ventriculography. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Thrombotic valvular dysfunction with transcatheter mitral interventions for postsurgical failures.

    PubMed

    Eng, Marvin H; Greenbaum, Adam; Wang, Dee Dee; Wyman, Janet; Dnp; Arjomand, Heider; Yadav, Pradeep; Nemeh, Hassan; Paone, Gaetano; Guerrero, Mayra; O'Neill, William

    2017-08-01

    Degenerated surgical mitral valve repairs or surgical prostheses are currently being treated with transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR). We report the procedural and mid-term assessment of thirteen cases. From 12/2013 to 12/2015, 13 consecutive patients with degenerated mitral valve repair or valve replacement were treated. Patients were assessed for mitral valve academic valve consortium (MVARC) defined outcomes. Immediate procedural MVARC defined technical success was 92%. At 30 days MVARC device and procedure success were 61% and 84%, respectively. Mean follow-up was 150 days [IQR 40-123 days]. There were 2 late major adverse outcomes, a noncardiac related death (628 days) and a stroke (382 days). The mean mitral gradient decreased from 9.5 ± 3.4 to 5.5 ± 2.6 mm Hg (P < 0.01). Three patients were found to have high gradients, two presented with heart failure while another patient was found to have reduced leaflet motion and abnormal thickening postprocedure. The two patients with heart failure were treated with enoxaparin, which caused subsequent resolution of increased valve gradients in one patient. The other patient could not tolerate prolonged treatment from anticoagulation due to gastrointestinal bleeding. Three of 13 patients were treated with dual-antiplatelet therapy and were suspected to have valve thrombosis. Thrombotic related dysfunction post-TMVR occurred in 15% (2/13) of patients and one patient had abnormal leaflet thickening that may have been thrombus related. Dual-antiplatelet therapy was used in all 3 cases suggesting the possible need for oral anticoagulation postmitral valve-in-valve therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Study of left ventricular function in valvular cardiopathies (mitral insufficiency and aortic insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Herreman, F; Brun, P; Cannet, G; Savin, E; Vannier, D

    1974-10-01

    A study of the left ventricular function based on the haemodynamic data combined with those provided by biplane cineangiography was performed in 35 cases with left ventricular volume overload (20 cases of mitral incompetence and 15 of aortic insufficiency). The importance of the haemodynamic changes and of the adaptation mechanisms set up were described. The more intense dilatation-hypertrophy of aortic incompetence than of mitral incompetence plays an essential part. The role of Starling's mechanism is underlined. Estimation of the contractile value of the myocardium, taken into account the mechanical overload and the conditions of late-diastolic lengthening of the fibre and of impedance to left ventricular ejection was determined. An obvious myocardial failure, demonstrated in approximately one third of the cases, by determination of some contractility indices estimated in the ejection phase, Vf sigma max in particular, the only one valid in the presence of valvular regurgitation. In the other cases, the moderate decrease of myocardial contractility was masked by compensatory mechanisms.

  6. Evaluation of serum myeloperoxidase concentration in dogs with heart failure due to chronic mitral valvular insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-In; Suh, Sang-Il; Hyun, Changbaig

    2017-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a leukocyte-derived enzyme involved in the process of heart failure and is found to have good diagnostic and prognostic values in humans with chronic heart failure. This study evaluated the relationship between serum MPO levels and the severity of heart failure (HF) due to chronic mitral valvular insufficiency (CMVI) in dogs. Eighty-two client-owned dogs consisting of 69 dogs with different stages of HF due to CMVI and 13 age-matched healthy dogs were enrolled in this study. Serum MPO concentrations in the healthy and CMVI groups were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a canine-specific monoclonal anti-MPO antibody. Serum MPO concentrations were 273.3 ± 179.6 ng/L in the controls, 140.8 ± 114.1 ng/L in the International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council (ISACHC) I group, 109.0 ± 85.2 ng/L in the ISACHC II group, and 106.0 ± 42.3 ng/L in the ISACHC III group. Close negative correlation to serum MPO concentration was found in the severity of heart failure (ISACHC stage). Although this study found a modest relationship between serum MPO levels and the severity of HF due to CMVI in dogs, it also suggested that serum MPO levels decreased as the severity of HF increased.

  7. Ultrastructure of sarcoplasmic reticulum in atrial myocardium of patients with mitral valvular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Thiedermann, K. U.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1976-01-01

    Alterations observed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells in left and right atrial myocardium from 10 patients with mitral valvular disease consisted of: a) proliferation of rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, which formed large cisterns in perinuclear areas of hypertrophied cells and was considered indicative of increased protein synthesis; b) proliferation of free sarcoplasmic reticulum, a change that occurred in degenerated cells and appeared to be related to loss of contractile elements; c) two types of aggregates of tubules of free SR--one type was associated wtih abnormal Z-band material and was found only in cells showing loss of myofibrils and proliferation of free SR, whereas the other was not associated with either of these changes and occurred in less severely altered cells; and d) proliferation and enlargement of cisterns of extended junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum, which formed two distinct types of complexes: the first of these consisted of large, convoluted (Type A) cisterns that were wide (550 to 650 A in thickness) and did not have a central dense lamina; the second was composed of stacks of concentric or parallel (Type B) cisterns that were narrower (220 to 300 A in thickness), had a central dense lamina, and were separated from one another by layers of glycogen granules. The formation of these complexes of cisterns was regarded as an extreme form of overdevelopment of extended junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum in atrial muscle cells. Images Figure 21 Figures 22-25 Figures 1-3 Figures 26-29 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figures 30 and 31 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 32-36 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figures 37-39 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figures 40 and 41 Figure 18 Figures 19 and 20 PMID:1275054

  8. [A new mitral valve prosthesis (Cooley-Cutter). Experiences on 241 cases of valvular replacement (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sandiford, M; Cooley, D A

    1976-01-01

    A new mitral valve prosthesis (Cooley-Cutter) is described, which incorporated a low profile design, an excentric sewing cuff, a full flow orifice, a controlled regurgitation for self-washing and symmetrical peripheral flow. The new prosthesis has a titanium double-caged frame, a Pyrolite carbon poppet and a Teflon knit sewing cuff. We have attempted to incorporate in the design of this new prosthesis tre most favorable features of each of many types of prosthesis used at the Texas Heart Institute since 1962. Isolated prosthetic mitral valve replacement for severe congenital or acquired valvular disease was performed in 541 patients from June 1971 to ne 1975. Of these, 66 patients received a concomitant aortocoronary bypass and 31 tricuspid annuloplasty. In 72 patients a malfunctioning mitral prosthesis of other types was replaced with the new Cooley-Cutter prosthesis. There were 49 early deaths (9.1%) and 33 late deaths (6.1%). The most gratifying results were a low incidence of late thrombo-embolic phenomena (1.8%) and absence of hemolisis, malfunction, infection and material failure of the prosthesis.

  9. Valvular repair or replacement for mitral endocarditis: 7-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tom Kai Ming; Oh, Timothy; Voss, Jamie; Gamble, Greg; Kang, Nicholas; Pemberton, James

    2014-10-01

    A few studies have compared mitral valve repair and replacement in the setting of infective endocarditis, with varying results. We compared the characteristics and outcomes of mitral repair and replacement in endocarditis patients. All patients undergoing mitral valve repair or replacement for active mitral endocarditis during 2005-2011 were included. Operative and follow-up mortality, composite morbidity, recurrent endocarditis, and redo operations were prespecified endpoints for analyses. There were 25 and 35 patients undergoing mitral valve repair and replacement, respectively. They were followed-up for 3.9 ± 2.5 years. Valve replacement patients were older (p = 0.029), had a higher prevalence of intracardiac abscess (p = 0.035), previous endocarditis (p = 0.036), atrial fibrillation (p = 0.001), worse renal function (p = 0.013), higher risk scores (p = 0.004-0.020), and longer operation times (p < 0.001). Repair and replacement had similar rates of operative mortality (4.0% vs. 8.6%, p = 0.634), composite morbidity (16.0% vs. 28.6%, p = 0.357), survival (p = 0.564), recurrent endocarditis (p = 0.081), and redo operations (p = 0.813). Independent predictors of operative mortality were preoperative inotropic or intraaortic balloon pump support. The independent predictor of mortality during follow-up was dialysis. Independent predictors of composite morbidity were intracardiac abscess and hypercholesterolemia. The independent predictor of recurrent endocarditis was previous endocarditis, and the independent predictor of redo operation was previous stroke. Mitral valve replacement candidates had more baseline risk factors and higher raw rates of postoperative mortality and morbidity, which did not reach statistical significance. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Biomechanical evaluation of the pathophysiologic developmental mechanisms of mitral valve prolapse: effect of valvular morphologic alteration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; McPherson, David D; Kim, Hyunggun

    2016-05-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) refers to an excessive billowing of the mitral valve (MV) leaflets across the mitral annular plane into the left atrium during the systolic portion of the cardiac cycle. The underlying mechanisms for the development of MVP and mitral regurgitation in association with MV tissue remodeling are still unclear. We performed computational MV simulations to investigate the pathophysiologic developmental mechanisms of MVP. A parametric MV geometry model was utilized for this study. Posterior leaflet enlargement and posterior chordal elongation models were created by adjusting the geometry of the posterior leaflet and chordae, respectively. Dynamic finite element simulations of MV function were performed over the complete cardiac cycle. Computational simulations demonstrated that enlarging posterior leaflet area increased large stress concentration in the posterior leaflets and chordae, and posterior chordal elongation decreased leaflet coaptation. When MVP was accompanied by both posterior leaflet enlargement and chordal elongation simultaneously, the posterior leaflet was exposed to extremely large prolapse with a substantial lack of leaflet coaptation. These data indicate that MVP development is closely related to tissue alterations of the leaflets and chordae. This biomechanical evaluation strategy can help us better understand the pathophysiologic developmental mechanisms of MVP.

  11. AN INVERSE MODELING APPROACH FOR STRESS ESTIMATION IN MITRAL VALVE ANTERIOR LEAFLET VALVULOPLASTY FOR IN-VIVO VALVULAR BIOMATERIAL ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Hao; Amini, Rouzbeh; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of regional tissue stresses in the functioning heart valve remains an important goal in our understanding of normal valve function and in developing novel engineered tissue strategies for valvular repair and replacement. Methods to accurately estimate regional tissue stresses are thus needed for this purpose, and in particular to develop accurate, statistically informed means to validate computational models of valve function. Moreover, there exists no currently accepted method to evaluate engineered heart valve tissues and replacement heart valve biomaterials undergoing valvular stresses in blood contact. While we have utilized mitral valve anterior leaflet valvuloplasty as an experimental approach to address this limitation, robust computational techniques to estimate implant stresses are required. In the present study, we developed a novel numerical analysis approach for estimation of the in-vivo stresses of the central region of the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) delimited by a sonocrystal transducer array. The in-vivo material properties of the MVAL were simulated using an inverse FE modeling approach based on three pseudo-hyperelastic constitutive models: the neo-Hookean, exponential-type isotropic, and full collagen-fiber mapped transversely isotropic models. A series of numerical replications with varying structural configurations were developed by incorporating measured statistical variations in MVAL local preferred fiber directions and fiber splay. These model replications were then used to investigate how known variations in the valve tissue microstructure influence the estimated ROI stresses and its variation at each time point during a cardiac cycle. Simulations were also able to include estimates of the variation in tissue stresses for an individual specimen dataset over the cardiac cycle. Of the three material models, the transversely anisotropic model produced the most accurate results, with ROI averaged stresses at the fully

  12. Prognostication of valvular aortic stenosis using tissue Doppler echocardiography: underappreciated importance of late diastolic mitral annular velocity.

    PubMed

    Poh, Kian-Keong; Chan, Mark Yan-Yee; Yang, Hong; Yong, Quek-Wei; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Ling, Lieng H

    2008-05-01

    Intact left atrial booster pump function helps maintain cardiac compensation in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). Because late diastolic mitral annular (A') velocity reflects left atrial systolic function, we hypothesized that A' velocity correlates with plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level and clinical outcome in AS. We prospectively enrolled 53 consecutive patients (median age 74 years) with variable degrees of AS, in sinus rhythm, and left ventricular ejection fraction greater than 50%. Indices of valvular stenosis, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, and mitral annular motion were correlated with plasma NT-proBNP and a composite clinical end point comprising cardiac death and symptom-driven aortic valve replacement. Tissue Doppler echocardiographic parameters, including early diastolic (E') velocity and A' velocity and ratio of early diastolic transmitral (E) to E' velocity (E/E') at the annular septum correlated better with NT-proBNP levels than body surface area-indexed aortic valve area. Eighteen patients had the composite end point, which was univariately predicted by body surface area-indexed aortic valve area, NT-proBNP, and all tissue Doppler echocardiographic indices. This outcome was most strongly predicted by the combination of septal A' velocity and E/E' ratio in bivariate Cox modeling. Septal annular A' velocity less than 9.6 cm/s was associated with significantly reduced event-free survival (Kaplan Meier log rank = 27.3, P < .0001) and predicted the end point with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 94%, 80%, and 85%, respectively. In patients with AS and normal ejection fraction, annular tissue Doppler echocardiographic indices may better reflect the physiologic consequences of afterload burden on the left ventricle than body surface area-indexed aortic valve area. Lower A' velocity is a predictor of cardiac death and need for valve surgery, suggesting an important role for compensatory left atrial

  13. Evaluation of serum cystatin-C and symmetric dimethylarginine concentrations in dogs with heart failure from chronic mitral valvular insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bom-Sul; Moon, Hyeong-Sun; Seo, Sang-Hyuk; Hyun, Changbaig

    2017-01-20

    Reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a common complication in advanced stages of heart failure (HF). The convenient and precise assessment for GFR would be useful for early detection of renal impairment in HF dogs. Our hypothesis of this study was the GFR would be reduced in advanced stages of HF from chronic mitral valvular insufficiency (CMVI), as indicated by renal markers including serum cystatin-C (Cys-C) and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) concentrations. Forty-three client-owned dogs consisting of 33 dogs with different stages of HF from CMVI and 10 age-matched healthy dogs were enrolled in this study. Serum Cys-C and SDMA concentrations along with other renal (i.e., urea nitrogen and creatinine) and echocardiographic markers were evaluated in healthy and CMVI dogs. Serum Cys-C concentrations were 1.4 ± 0.4 mg/l in control, 2.1 ± 0.9 mg/l in ISACHC I, 2.9 ± 0.8 mg/l in ISACHC II and 3.6 ± 0.6 mg/l in ISACHC III dogs, whereas serum SDMA concentrations were 8 ± 2 µg/dl in control, 14 ± 3 µg/dl in ISACHC I, 18 ± 6 µg/dl in ISACHC II and 22 ± 7 µg/dl in ISACHC III dogs. There was close correlation of serum Cys-C and SDMA concentrations to serum creatinine, urea nitrogen and the severity of HF. Our study demonstrated that the GFR was decreased in dogs with CMVI having earlier stages of HF.

  14. Evaluation of serum cystatin-C and symmetric dimethylarginine concentrations in dogs with heart failure from chronic mitral valvular insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, Bom-Sul; MOON, Hyeong-Sun; SEO, Sang-Hyuk; HYUN, Changbaig

    2016-01-01

    Reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a common complication in advanced stages of heart failure (HF). The convenient and precise assessment for GFR would be useful for early detection of renal impairment in HF dogs. Our hypothesis of this study was the GFR would be reduced in advanced stages of HF from chronic mitral valvular insufficiency (CMVI), as indicated by renal markers including serum cystatin-C (Cys-C) and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) concentrations. Forty-three client-owned dogs consisting of 33 dogs with different stages of HF from CMVI and 10 age-matched healthy dogs were enrolled in this study. Serum Cys-C and SDMA concentrations along with other renal (i.e., urea nitrogen and creatinine) and echocardiographic markers were evaluated in healthy and CMVI dogs. Serum Cys-C concentrations were 1.4 ± 0.4 mg/l in control, 2.1 ± 0.9 mg/l in ISACHC I, 2.9 ± 0.8 mg/l in ISACHC II and 3.6 ± 0.6 mg/l in ISACHC III dogs, whereas serum SDMA concentrations were 8 ± 2 µg/dl in control, 14 ± 3 µg/dl in ISACHC I, 18 ± 6 µg/dl in ISACHC II and 22 ± 7 µg/dl in ISACHC III dogs. There was close correlation of serum Cys-C and SDMA concentrations to serum creatinine, urea nitrogen and the severity of HF. Our study demonstrated that the GFR was decreased in dogs with CMVI having earlier stages of HF. PMID:27725349

  15. [Valvular surgery for an exercise-induced functional mitral regurgitation in heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: a case study].

    PubMed

    Attari, M; Legrand, M; Philippe, C; Rosak, P

    2013-08-01

    We here report the case of a 67-year-old woman with moderate mitral regurgitation without significant structural abnormalities that get worse during severe recurrent heart failures and preserved ejection fraction with concomitant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation became permanent and despite a well-controlled cardiac frequency, new heart failure episodes occurred. Exercise doppler echocardiography showed that the mechanism of this mitral regurgitation was a two leaflet mitral tenting. We discuss here the different mechanisms that could induce these kinds of mitral regurgitation with excessive tenting. We emphasize the interest of early detection by exercise doppler echocardiography even when a triggering factor like atrial fibrillation seems to be involved. We also discuss the interest of mitral valve replacement for these patients.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked cardiac valvular dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition congenital valvular heart disease CVD1 filamin-A-associated myxomatous mitral valve disease ... Valves (image) Encyclopedia: Mitral Valve Prolapse Health Topic: Heart Valve Diseases Health Topic: Mitral Valve Prolapse Genetic and Rare ...

  17. Epidemiology of acquired valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iung, Bernard; Vahanian, Alec

    2014-09-01

    Population-based studies including systematic echocardiographic examinations are required to assess the prevalence of valvular heart disease. In industrialized countries, the prevalence of valvular heart disease is estimated at 2.5%. Because of the predominance of degenerative etiologies, the prevalence of valvular disease increases markedly after the age of 65 years, in particular with regard to aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, which accounts for 3 in 4 cases of valvular disease. Rheumatic heart disease still represents 22% of valvular heart disease in Europe. The prevalence of secondary mitral regurgitation cannot be assessed reliably but it seems to be a frequent disease. The incidence of infective endocarditis is approximately 30 cases per million individiuals per year. Its stability is associated with marked changes in its presentation. Patients are getting older and staphylococcus is now becoming the microorganism most frequently responsible. Heath care-associated infections are the most likely explanation of changes in the microbiology of infective endocarditis. In developing countries, rheumatic heart disease remains the leading cause of valvular heart disease. Its prevalence is high, between 20 and 30 cases per 1000 subjects when using systematic echocardiographic screening. In conclusion, the temporal and geographical heterogeneity illustrates the effect of socioeconomic status and changes in life expectancy on the frequency and presentation of valvular heart disease. A decreased burden of valvular disease would require the elaboration of preventive strategies in industrialized countries and an improvement in the socioeconomic environment in developing countries.

  18. [Indications for surgery for valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Halbach, Marcel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Baldus, Stephan; Rudolph, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Due to the demographic change, chronic valvular heart disease becomes increasingly important - especially age-related primary diseases of the aortic and mitral valve as well as secondary diseases of the mitral and tricuspid valve caused by other age-related cardiac disorders. Medical treatment is limited to symptom relief by use of diuretics. Specific drugs or drugs with a prognostic benefit are not available. Thus, valve repair or replacement are the key options for treatment of relevant valvular heart disease. While open heart surgery was the only approach for a long time, interventional, catheter-based therapies have evolved in the last decade. This article describes up-to-date recommendations on indications for surgery for the most prevalent valvular heart diseases in adults - aortic stenosis, and aortic, mitral and tricuspid regurgitation).

  19. Valve replacement for appetite suppressant-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S S; Donovan, C L; Forbess, J M; Royal, S H; Landolfo, K P

    1999-06-01

    Valvular heart disease associated with the use of appetite-suppressant medication is a recently described clinical entity. Although the mechanism of valvular injury remains elusive pathologically, the valvular abnormalities resemble those observed in carcinoid syndrome. The incidence of clinically evident valvular heart disease is low with short-term (less than 3 months) exposure to appetite-suppressant drugs. Prolonged exposure to higher doses in addition to combination drug therapy confers an excess risk for valvular pathologic changes. We report the case of a patient with severe mitral regurgitation who had short-term exposure (3 weeks) to the combination of fenfluramine (20 mg) and phenteramine (15 mg).

  20. Radiation-associated valvular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.G.; Mayfield, W.R.; Normann, S.; Alexander, J.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The prevalence of radiation-associated cardiac disease is increasing due to prolonged survival following mediastinal irradiation. Side effects of radiation include pericarditis, accelerated coronary artery disease, myocardial fibrosis and valvular injury. We evaluated the cases of three young patients with evidence of significant valvular disease following mediastinal irradiation. One patient underwent the first reported successful aortic and mitral valve replacement for radiation-associated valvular disease (RAVD) as well as concurrent coronary artery revascularization. A review of the literature revealed 35 reported cases of RAVD, with only one successful case of valve replacement that was limited to the aortic valve. Asymptomatic RAVD is diagnosed 11.5 years after mediastinal irradiation compared with 16.5 years for symptomatic patients, emphasizing that long-term follow-up is important for patients receiving mediastinal irradiation. This study defines a continuum of valvular disease following radiation that begins with mild asymptomatic valvular thickening and progresses to severe valvular fibrosis with hemodynamic compromise requiring surgical intervention. 32 refs.

  1. Valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Windram, Jonathan D; Colman, Jack M; Wald, Rachel M; Udell, Jacob A; Siu, Samuel C; Silversides, Candice K

    2014-05-01

    In women with valvular heart disease, pregnancy-associated cardiovascular changes can contribute to maternal, foetal and neonatal complications. Ideally, a woman with valvular heart disease should receive preconception assessment and counselling from a cardiologist with expertise in pregnancy. For women with moderate- and high-risk valve lesions, appropriate risk stratification and management during pregnancy will optimise outcomes. Pregnancy in women with high-risk lesions, such as severe aortic stenosis, severe mitral stenosis and those with mechanical valves, requires careful planning and coordination of antenatal care by a multidisciplinary team. The purpose of this overview is to describe the expected haemodynamic changes in pregnancy, review pregnancy risks for women with valvular heart disease and discuss strategies for management.

  2. Clinical characteristics and outcomes with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation but underlying native mitral and aortic valve disease participating in the ROCKET AF trial.

    PubMed

    Breithardt, Günter; Baumgartner, Helmut; Berkowitz, Scott D; Hellkamp, Anne S; Piccini, Jonathan P; Stevens, Susanna R; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Patel, Manesh R; Halperin, Jonathan L; Singer, Daniel E; Hankey, Graeme J; Hacke, Werner; Becker, Richard C; Nessel, Christopher C; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Fox, Keith A A; Califf, Robert M

    2014-12-14

    We investigated clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with significant valvular disease (SVD) in the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF) trial. ROCKET AF excluded patients with mitral stenosis or artificial valve prostheses. We used Cox regression to adjust comparisons for potential confounders. Among 14 171 patients, 2003 (14.1%) had SVD; they were older and had more comorbidities than patients without SVD. The rate of stroke or systemic embolism with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin was consistent among patients with SVD [2.01 vs. 2.43%; hazard ratio (HR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55-1.27] and without SVD (1.96 vs. 2.22%; HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.75-1.07; interaction P = 0.76). However, rates of major and non-major clinically relevant bleeding with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin were higher in patients with SVD (19.8% rivaroxaban vs. 16.8% warfarin; HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05-1.49) vs. those without (14.2% rivaroxaban vs. 14.1% warfarin; HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.94-1.10; interaction P = 0.034), even when controlling for risk factors and potential confounders. In intracranial haemorrhage, there was no interaction between patients with and without SVD where the overall rate was lower among those randomized to rivaroxaban. Many patients with 'non-valvular atrial fibrillation' have significant valve lesions. Their risk of stroke is similar to that of patients without SVD after controlling for stroke risk factors. Efficacy of rivaroxaban vs. warfarin was similar in patients with and without SVD; however, the observed risk of bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban in patients with SVD but was the same among those without SVD. Atrial fibrillation patients with and without SVD experience the same stroke-preventive benefit of oral anticoagulants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  3. Clinical characteristics and outcomes with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation but underlying native mitral and aortic valve disease participating in the ROCKET AF trial

    PubMed Central

    Breithardt, Günter; Baumgartner, Helmut; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Stevens, Susanna R.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Patel, Manesh R.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hacke, Werner; Becker, Richard C.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We investigated clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with significant valvular disease (SVD) in the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF) trial. Methods and results ROCKET AF excluded patients with mitral stenosis or artificial valve prostheses. We used Cox regression to adjust comparisons for potential confounders. Among 14 171 patients, 2003 (14.1%) had SVD; they were older and had more comorbidities than patients without SVD. The rate of stroke or systemic embolism with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin was consistent among patients with SVD [2.01 vs. 2.43%; hazard ratio (HR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55–1.27] and without SVD (1.96 vs. 2.22%; HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.75–1.07; interaction P = 0.76). However, rates of major and non-major clinically relevant bleeding with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin were higher in patients with SVD (19.8% rivaroxaban vs. 16.8% warfarin; HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05–1.49) vs. those without (14.2% rivaroxaban vs. 14.1% warfarin; HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.94–1.10; interaction P = 0.034), even when controlling for risk factors and potential confounders. In intracranial haemorrhage, there was no interaction between patients with and without SVD where the overall rate was lower among those randomized to rivaroxaban. Conclusions Many patients with ‘non-valvular atrial fibrillation’ have significant valve lesions. Their risk of stroke is similar to that of patients without SVD after controlling for stroke risk factors. Efficacy of rivaroxaban vs. warfarin was similar in patients with and without SVD; however, the observed risk of bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban in patients with SVD but was the same among those without SVD. Atrial fibrillation patients with and without SVD experience the same stroke-preventive benefit of oral anticoagulants. PMID:25148838

  4. Valvular and aortic diseases in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Arvin; Fayers, Trevor; Clarke, Sophie; Parsonage, William

    2013-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inheritable connective tissue disorder caused by defective collagen synthesis with the principal manifestations of bone fragility. OI has been associated with left sided valvular regurgitation and aortic dilation. Valve and aortic surgery are technically feasible in patients with OI but are inherently high risk due to the underlying connective tissue defect. This report reviews the valvular and aortic pathology associated with OI and their management. We describe two cases of patients with OI who have significant aortic and mitral valve regurgitation, one of whom has been managed conservatively and the other who has undergone successful mitral valve repair and aortic valve replacement. The latter case represents the fifth case of mitral valve repair in a patient with OI reported in the medical literature. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of cardiac magnetic resonance in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Mattei, Juan C; Shah, Dipan J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of valvular heart disease is increasing as the population ages. In diagnosing individuals with valve disease, echocardiography is the primary imaging modality used by clinicians both for initial assessment and for longitudinal evaluation. However, in some cases cardiovascular magnetic resonance has become a viable alternative in that it can obtain imaging data in any plane prescribed by the scan operator, which makes it ideal for accurate investigation of all cardiac valves: aortic, mitral, pulmonic, and tricuspid. In addition, CMR for valve assessment is noninvasive, free of ionizing radiation, and in most instances does not require contrast administration. The objectives of a comprehensive CMR study for evaluating valvular heart disease are threefold: (1) to provide insight into the mechanism of the valvular lesion (via anatomic assessment), (2) to quantify the severity of the valvular lesion, and (3) to discern the consequences of the valvular lesion.

  6. [Offer early attention and intervention to patients with valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shengli; Ren, Chonglei

    2015-02-01

    As a key feature of the updates, early intervention of valvular heart disease is highlighted in the 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease. This article reviewed the new guideline in regards to the issue of early intervention of diseases such as aortic stenosis, aortic insufficiency, mitral stenosis, mitral insufficiency, tricuspid insufficiency, and infective endocarditis, with discussion on the related topics according to the authors' understanding and practical experience in China. We conclude that valvular heart disease should receive early intervention and attention should also be paid on the progress of disease.

  7. Ischemic mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Cristiano, Spadaccio; Nenna, Antonio; Chello, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic mitral prolapse (IMP) is a pathologic entity encountered in about one-third among the patients undergoing surgery for ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR). IMP is generally the result of a papillary muscle injury consequent to myocardial, but the recent literature is progressively unveiling a more complex pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying its development regards the impairment of one or more components of the mitral apparatus, which comprises the annulus, the chordae tendineae, the papillary muscle and the left ventricular wall. IMP is not only a disorder of valvular function, but also entails coexistent aspects of a geometric disturbance of the mitral valve configuration and of the left ventricular function and dimension and a correct understanding of all these aspects is crucial to guide and tailor the correct therapeutic strategy to be adopted. Localization of prolapse, anatomic features of the prolapsed leaflets and the subvalvular apparatus should be carefully evaluated as also constituting the major determinants defining patient’s outcomes. This review will summarize our current understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical evidence on IMP with a particular focus on the surgical treatment. PMID:28149574

  8. Role of modern 3D echocardiography in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography has been conceived as one of the most promising methods for the diagnosis of valvular heart disease, and recently has become an integral clinical tool thanks to the development of high quality real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). In particular, for mitral valve diseases, this new approach has proven to be the most unique, powerful, and convincing method for understanding the complicated anatomy of the mitral valve and its dynamism. The method has been useful for surgical management, including robotic mitral valve repair. Moreover, this method has become indispensable for nonsurgical mitral procedures such as edge to edge mitral repair and transcatheter closure of paravaluvular leaks. In addition, color Doppler 3D echo has been valuable to identify the location of the regurgitant orifice and the severity of the mitral regurgitation. For aortic and tricuspid valve diseases, this method may not be quite as valuable as for the mitral valve. However, the necessity of 3D echo is recognized for certain situations even for these valves, such as for evaluating the aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. It is now clear that this method, especially with the continued development of real-time 3D TEE technology, will enhance the diagnosis and management of patients with these valvular heart diseases. PMID:25378966

  9. Transcatheter mitral valve repair therapies for primary and secondary mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Al Amri, Ibtihal; van der Kley, Frank; Schalij, Martin J; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Delgado, Victoria

    2015-03-01

    Mitral regurgitation is one of the most prevalent valvular heart diseases and its prevalence is related to population aging. Elderly patients with age-associated co-morbidities have an increased risk for conventional mitral valve surgery. Transcatheter mitral valve repair has emerged as a feasible and safe alternative in patients with contraindications for surgery or high operative risk. Several transcatheter mitral repair technologies have been developed during the last decade. While the development of some devices was abandoned due to suboptimal results, others demonstrated to be safe and effective and have been included in current practice guidelines. Not all technologies are suitable for all mitral anatomies and regurgitation mechanisms. Therefore, accurate evaluation of mitral valve anatomy and function are pivotal to the success of these therapies. Cardiac imaging plays a central role in selecting patients, guiding the procedure and evaluating the durability of the repair at follow-up.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of left valvular heart diseases during atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca; Anselmino, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, frequently presents in patients with underlying valvular disease, its hemodynamic contributions are not fully understood. The present work aimed to computationally study how physical conditions imposed by pathologic valvular anatomy act on AF hemodynamics. Methods: We simulated AF with different severity grades of left-sided valvular diseases and compared the cardiovascular effects that they exert during AF, compared to lone AF. The fluid dynamics model used here has been recently validated for lone AF and relies on a lumped parameterization of the four heart chambers, together with the systemic and pulmonary circulation. The AF modelling involves: (i) irregular, uncorrelated and faster heart rate; (ii) atrial contractility dysfunction. Three different grades of severity (mild, moderate, severe) were analyzed for each of the four valvulopathies (AS, aortic stenosis, MS, mitral stenosis, AR, aortic regurgitation, MR, mitral regurgitation), by varying–through the valve opening angle–the valve area. Results: Regurgitation was hemodynamically more relevant than stenosis, as the latter led to inefficient cardiac flow, while the former introduced more drastic fluid dynamics variation. Moreover, mitral valvulopathies were more significant than aortic ones. In case of aortic valve diseases, proper mitral functioning damps out changes at atrial and pulmonary levels. In the case of mitral valvulopathy, the mitral valve lost its regulating capability, thus hemodynamic variations almost equally affected regions upstream and downstream of the valve. In particular, the present study revealed that both mitral and aortic regurgitation strongly affect hemodynamics, followed by mitral stenosis, while aortic stenosis has the least impact among the analyzed valvular diseases. Discussion: The proposed approach can provide new mechanistic insights as to which valvular pathologies merit more aggressive treatment of

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of left valvular heart diseases during atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca; Anselmino, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, frequently presents in patients with underlying valvular disease, its hemodynamic contributions are not fully understood. The present work aimed to computationally study how physical conditions imposed by pathologic valvular anatomy act on AF hemodynamics. We simulated AF with different severity grades of left-sided valvular diseases and compared the cardiovascular effects that they exert during AF, compared to lone AF. The fluid dynamics model used here has been recently validated for lone AF and relies on a lumped parameterization of the four heart chambers, together with the systemic and pulmonary circulation. The AF modelling involves: (i) irregular, uncorrelated and faster heart rate; (ii) atrial contractility dysfunction. Three different grades of severity (mild, moderate, severe) were analyzed for each of the four valvulopathies (AS, aortic stenosis, MS, mitral stenosis, AR, aortic regurgitation, MR, mitral regurgitation), by varying-through the valve opening angle-the valve area. Regurgitation was hemodynamically more relevant than stenosis, as the latter led to inefficient cardiac flow, while the former introduced more drastic fluid dynamics variation. Moreover, mitral valvulopathies were more significant than aortic ones. In case of aortic valve diseases, proper mitral functioning damps out changes at atrial and pulmonary levels. In the case of mitral valvulopathy, the mitral valve lost its regulating capability, thus hemodynamic variations almost equally affected regions upstream and downstream of the valve. In particular, the present study revealed that both mitral and aortic regurgitation strongly affect hemodynamics, followed by mitral stenosis, while aortic stenosis has the least impact among the analyzed valvular diseases. The proposed approach can provide new mechanistic insights as to which valvular pathologies merit more aggressive treatment of AF. Present findings, if clinically confirmed

  12. [Valvular heart disease in women].

    PubMed

    Tornos, Pilar

    2006-08-01

    Very few studies of valvular heart disease have been specifically carried out in women. It is well known that the prevalence of some types of valve disease is influenced by sex: rheumatic mitral stenosis is very common in women but degenerative valve disease affects both sexes similarly. A number of sex differences in the physiopathology of degenerative aortic stenosis have been reported: the degree of calcification is less in women than men and women's ventricles respond to equivalent reductions in valve area with a greater increase in gradient and greater contractility. With regard to prognosis, it is generally accepted that mortality associated with heart surgery is higher in women than men, for both coronary artery and valve surgery. The underlying reasons for the increase in mortality are not clear. Pregnancy presents particular difficulties for women with valvular heart disease. In those with significant valve lesions, it is advisable to correct the valve disease before pregnancy is considered. Anticoagulant treatment involves serious problems for pregnant women with a mechanical prosthesis. They suffer increased risks of prosthetic valve thrombosis and of fetal embryopathy if they take oral anticoagulants during the first trimester.

  13. Impact of valvular heart disease on oral anticoagulant therapy in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: results from the RAMSES study.

    PubMed

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı; Kalaycıoğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalçık, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altıntaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kırma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2017-02-01

    The definition of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is controversial. We aimed to assess the impact of valvular heart disease on stroke prevention strategies in NVAF patients. The RAMSES study was a multicenter and cross-sectional study conducted on NVAF patients (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). The study population was divided into patients with significant valvular disease (SVD) and non-significant valvular disease (NSVD), whether they had at least one moderate valvular disease or not. Patients with a mechanical prosthetic valve and mitral stenosis were excluded. Baseline characteristics and oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapies were compared. In 5987 patients with NVAF, there were 3929 (66%) NSVD and 2058 (34%) SVD patients. The predominant valvular disease was mitral regurgitation (58.1%), followed by aortic regurgitation (24.1%) and aortic stenosis (17.8%). Patients with SVD had higher CHA2DS2VASc [3.0 (2.0; 4.0) vs. 4.0 (2.0; 5.0), p < 0.001] and HAS-BLED [2.0 (1.0; 2.0) vs. 2.0 (1.0; 2.0), p = 0.004] scores compared to patients with NSVD. Overall, 2763 (71.2%) of NSVD and 1515 (73.8%) of SVD patients were on OAC therapy (p = 0.035). When the patients with SVD were analyzed separately, the mean CHA2DS2VASc and HAS-BLED scores were higher in patients with mitral regurgitation compared to patients with aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis [4.0 (3.0; 5.0), 3.0 (2.0; 4.0), 3.0 (2.0; 4.0) p < 0.001 and 2.0 (1.0; 3.0), 1.0 (1.0; 2.0), 1.0 (0.0; 2.0) p < 0.001, respectively]. In patients with SVD, 65.7% of mitral regurgitation, 82.6% of aortic regurgitation and 88.0% of aortic stenosis patients were on OAC therapy. One out of three NVAF patients had at least one moderate valvular heart disease with the predominance of mitral regurgitation. Patients with SVD were at greater risk of stroke and bleeding compared to patients with NSVD. Although patients with mitral regurgitation should be given more aggressive anticoagulant therapy

  14. Maternal valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Roeder, Hilary A; Kuller, Jeffrey A; Barker, Piers C A; James, Andra H

    2011-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is common in pregnancy. Maternal physiology changes significantly during gestation with substantial increases in cardiac output and blood volume; this can cause unmasking or worsening of cardiac disease. Acquired valvular lesions most frequently arise from rheumatic fever, especially in patients who have emigrated from developing nations. Congenital lesions are also encountered. The most common conditions seen, mitral stenosis and regurgitation and aortic stenosis and regurgitation, each require a specific evaluation and management and are associated with their own set of possible complications. Patients with prosthetic valves require anticoagulation, and maternal and fetal risks and benefits must be carefully weighed. Patients with heart disease should be meticulously managed preconceptionally up to the postpartum period by maternal-fetal medicine specialists, obstetricians, cardiologists, and anesthesiologists using a multi-disciplinary approach to their cardiac conditions. Obstetricians & Gynecologists and Family Physicians. After the completing the CME activity, physicians should be better able to examine the epidemiology of valvular heart disease in pregnancy, categorize key physiologic parameters that change in the cardiovascular system during pregnancy, classify the pathophysiology of valvular lesions, and evaluate the general principles of maternal and fetal management for cardiac disease.

  15. Three-dimensional Echocardiography in Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kurklinsky, Andrew; Mankad, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Recent technologic advances in 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography, using parallel processing to scan a pyramidal volume, have allowed for a superior ability to describe valvular anatomy using both transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. Although still in evolution and at an early phase of adaptation with respect to its clinical application, 3D echocardiography has emerged as an important clinical tool in the assessment of valvular heart disease. Three-dimensional echocardiography provides unique perspectives of valvular structures by presenting "en face" views of valvular structures, allowing for a better understanding of the topographical aspects of pathology, and a refined definition of the spatial relationships of intracardiac structures. Three-dimensional echocardiography makes available indices not described by 2D echocardiography and has been demonstrated to be superior to 2D echocardiography in a variety of valvular disease scenarios. The information gained from 3D echocardiography has especially made an impact in guiding clinical decisions in the evaluation of mitral valve (MV) disease. The decision of early surgery in degenerative MV disease is based on the suitability of repair, and the suitability of repair is generally based on echocardiography. The superior understanding of MV anatomy afforded by 3D echocardiography has been shown to be quite valuable in this setting. This review will describe the contemporary use of 3D echocardiography in the assessment of valvular heart disease, including MV, aortic, tricuspid, and prosthetic valve abnormalities. This article illustrates how 3D echocardiography can complement current echocardiography techniques in the management of valvular heart disease.

  16. CMR predictors of mitral regurgitation in mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Delling, Francesca N; Kang, Lih Lisa; Yeon, Susan B; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Manning, Warren J; Han, Yuchi

    2010-10-01

    We sought to assess the correlation between mitral valve characteristics and severity of mitral regurgitation (MR) in subjects with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) undergoing cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Compared with extensive echocardiographic studies, CMR predictors of MVP-related MR are unknown. The severity of MR at the time of diagnosis has prognostic implication for patients; therefore, the identification of determinants of MR and its progression may be important for risk stratification, follow-up recommendations, and surgical decision making. Seventy-one MVP patients (age 54 ± 11 years, 58% males, left ventricular [LV] ejection fraction 65 ± 5%) underwent cine CMR to assess annular dimensions, maximum systolic anterior and posterior leaflet displacement, papillary muscle (PM) distance to coaptation point and prolapsed leaflets, as well as diastolic anterior and posterior leaflet thickness and length, and LV volumes and mass. Velocity-encoded CMR was used to obtain aortic outflow and to quantify MR volume. Using multiple linear regression analysis including all variables, LV mass (p < 0.001), anterior leaflet length (p = 0.006), and posterior displacement (p = 0.01) were the best determinants of MR volume with a model-adjusted R(2) = 0.6. When the analysis was restricted to valvular characteristics, MR volume correlated with anterior mitral leaflet length (p < 0.001), posterior mitral leaflet displacement (p = 0.003), posterior leaflet thickness (p = 0.008), and the presence of flail (p = 0.005) with a model-adjusted R(2) = 0.5. We also demonstrated acceptable intraobserver and interobserver variability in these measurements. Anterior leaflet length, posterior leaflet displacement, posterior leaflet thickness, and the presence of flail are the best CMR valvular determinants of MVP-related MR. The acceptable intraobserver and interobserver variability of our measurements confirms the role of CMR as an imaging modality for assessment of MVP patients

  17. [Valvular heart disease: preoperative assessment and postoperative care].

    PubMed

    Nägele, Reto; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2013-10-30

    Patients with valvular heart disease or with a prosthetic heart valve replacement are seen with increasing frequency in clinical practice. The medical care and evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease before valve surgery, but also the post-operative treatment is complex and managed by general practitioners, cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. In this mini-review we will first discuss the preoperative assessment of the two most common valvulopathies, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. Then we will discuss the post-operative care, which includes the management of anticoagulation, serial follow up and as well as the diagnostic assessment of complications such as thromboembolism, hemolysis, endocarditis and valve dysfunction.

  18. Mitral valve disease--morphology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert A; Hagége, Albert A; Judge, Daniel P; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N; Dietz, Harry C; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D; Jensen, Morten O; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-12-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but--even in adult life--remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular-ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease.

  19. Pathophysiology of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y I; Sun, Rongrong; Li, Xianchi; Liu, Min; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-04-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is caused by either damage or defect in one of the four heart valves, aortic, mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary. Defects in these valves can be congenital or acquired. Age, gender, tobacco use, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and type II diabetes contribute to the risk of disease. VHD is an escalating health issue with a prevalence of 2.5% in the United States alone. Considering the likely increase of the aging population worldwide, the incidence of acquired VHD is expected to increase. Technological advances are instrumental in identifying congenital heart defects in infants, thereby adding to the growing VHD population. Almost one-third of elderly individuals have echocardiographic or radiological evidence of calcific aortic valve (CAV) sclerosis, an early and subclinical form of CAV disease (CAVD). Of individuals ages >60, ~2% suffer from disease progression to its most severe form, calcific aortic stenosis. Surgical intervention is therefore required in these patients as no effective pharmacotherapies exist. Valvular calcium load and valve biomineralization are orchestrated by the concerted action of diverse cell-dependent mechanisms. Signaling pathways important in skeletal morphogenesis are also involved in the regulation of cardiac valve morphogenesis, CAVD and the pathobiology of cardiovascular calcification. CAVD usually occurs without any obvious symptoms in early stages over a long period of time and symptoms are identified at advanced stages of the disease, leading to a high rate of mortality. Aortic valve replacement is the only primary treatment of choice. Biomarkers such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, fetuin-A, calcium phosphate product, natriuretic peptides and osteopontin have been useful in improving outcomes among various disease states. This review, highlights the current understanding of the biology of VHD, with particular reference to molecular and cellular aspects of its regulation. Current clinical questions

  20. Beginning and development of surgery for acquired valvular heart disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiro

    2009-11-01

    The initiation and development of surgery for acquired valvular heart disease in Japan was reviewed. The first series of attempts at closed valvular surgery were performed in 1951-1952 by collaboration between the brothers Tohru and Shigeru Sakakibara in patients with pulmonary or mitral stenosis. During the popularization of closed valvular surgery, open heart surgery under direct vision was successfully performed by Shigeru Sakakibara with cooling of the body in 1954 and by using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in 1956. With the development of CPB and artificial heart valves, closed valvular heart surgery was replaced by open surgery, which expanded rapidly during the 1960s and 1970s. Along with the serial introduction and improvement of mechanical vales thereafter, bioprosthetic valves were also introduced and were adopted for certain patients. Use of bioprosthetic valves in the aortic position exceeded 50% in 2005, along with the increase of elderly patients. Although trials of mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation were first done during the 1950s to 1960s in Japan, interest in valve plasty only increased during the late 1970s. Considering the patient's quality of life and the long-term results, mitral valve plasty became the major procedure (exceeding valve replacement) from 2004. In 2002, the Guideline for Surgical and Interventional Treatment of Valvular Heart Disease was published by a joint committee of the relevant academic societies, and it has made an important contribution to improving surgical outcomes.

  1. [Valvular heart disease in patients with anti-phospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Rodríguez, F J; Reverter Calatayud, J C; Font Franco, J; Espinosa Garriga, G; Tàssies Penella, D; Ingelmo Morin, M

    2002-10-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APA) may involve heart and valvular heart disease seems to be the most common clinical manifestation. To study the prevalence and characteristics of valvular heart disease in a large patient population with anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and also to analyze the clinical and immunological profile of patients with valvular involvement compared with those without involvement. Patients and methods. Retrospective analysis of 113 patients diagnosed of APS. Eighty-one percent were females and the mean age was 39 years (SD:14). Sixty-two percent of patients were diagnosed of primary APS (70 patients) and the remaining 38% (43 patients) corresponded to patients with APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The median follow-up of patients was 55 months (range: 7-144 months). The cardiologic assessment was performed by means of transthoracic echocardiogram. The study of anti-lupus anticoagulant (AL) was performed by means of coagulometric assays and measurement of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), anti-beta2 glycoprotein I (abeta2-PGI) and anti-prothrombin (aPT) by ELISA. The prevalence of valvular heart disease was 19%. The mitral valve was mostly involved (91%) and the most common structural abnormality corresponded to mitral insufficiency. Valvular replacement was required in 24% of patients. In the subgroup of patients with valvular heart disease, a significantly higher prevalence was observed in the following parameters: total thrombosis (71% versus 49%; p = 0.05), arterial thrombosis (57% versus 23%; p = 0.002), stroke (38% versus 13%; p = 0.01), trombocitopenia (71% versus 45%; p = 0.02), hemolytic anemia (29% versus 9%; p = 0.02), and livedo reticularis (48% versus 3%; p < 0.0001). As for immunological differences, only a higher prevalence of LA was found (81% versus 59%; p= 0.04) and abeta2-GPI (IgG isotype) (43% versus 22%; p = 0.05) in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is more frequent in pa

  2. Mitral stenosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Mitral stenosis is a heart valve disorder that narrows or obstructs the mitral valve opening. Narrowing of the mitral ... the body. The main risk factor for mitral stenosis is a history of rheumatic fever but it ...

  3. Standard transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography views of mitral pathology that every surgeon should know

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    The mitral valve is the most commonly diseased heart valve and the prevalence of mitral valve disease increases proportionally with age. Echocardiography is the primary diagnostic imaging modality used in the assessment of patients with mitral valve disease. It is a noninvasive method which provides accurate anatomic and functional information regarding the mitral valve and can identify the mechanism of mitral valve pathology. This is especially useful as it may guide surgical repair. This is increasingly relevant given the growing trend of patients undergoing mitral valve repair. Collaboration between cardiac surgeons and echocardiographers is critical in the evaluation of mitral valve disease and for identification of complex valvular lesions that require advanced surgical skill to repair. This article will provide an overview of transthoracic and transesophageal assessment of common mitral valve pathology that aims to aid surgical decision making. PMID:26539350

  4. Role of echocardiography for catheter-based management of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Catheter-based treatment of valvular heart disease, such as transvalvular aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or mitral clip procedure, has been increasingly accepted as a treatment choice for the past several years. Such new treatment options have been changing the management of patients with valvular heart disease drastically while socio-economic factors regarding their application need to be taken into consideration. The use of echocardiography, including transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), for such catheter-based treatments is essential for the success of the procedures. Severe hypotension after TAVR is a life-threatening emergency. Rapid assessment and diagnosis in the catheterization or hybrid laboratory is essential for safety and a positive outcome. Possible diagnoses in this critical situation would include severe left ventricular dysfunction due to coronary obstruction, cardiac tamponade, aortic rupture, acute severe aortic and/or mitral valve regurgitation, and hypovolemia due to bleeding. Although new types of TAVR valves reduce para-valvular aortic regurgitation (AR) significantly, it is still important to judge the severity of para-valvular AR correctly in the laboratory. As for mitral clip procedure, TEE is vital for guiding and monitoring the entire process. Accurate identification of the location and the geometry of the regurgitant orifice is necessary for proper placement of the clip. Real-time 3D TEE provides helpful en face view of the mitral valve and clip together to this end. Residual mitral regurgitation (MR) after the first clip is not uncommon. Quick and precise imaging of the residual MR (location and severity) with TEE is extremely important for the interventionist to place the second clip and possibly third clip properly. After the completion of the clip procedure, mitral valve stenosis and also iatrogenic atrial septal defect need to be checked by TEE. Echocardiography, especially TEE, is also vital for the success of other newer trans

  5. [Interventional mitral valve replacement. Current status].

    PubMed

    Lutter, G; Frank, D

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 30 % of patients suffering from severe valvular heart disease, such as mitral valve regurgitation are non-compliant to the gold standard of minimally invasive surgery, reconstruction or valve replacement. The number of these mostly old patients with severe comorbidities is increasing; therefore, transcatheter interventions have been developed to address an unmet clinical need and may be an alternative therapeutic option to the reference standard. Apart from the successful MitraClip therapy, alternative transcatheter reconstruction technologies are being developed. As with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures, the off-pump implantation of a valved stent into the mitral position mainly via a transapical approach will be of great benefit. Recently, the feasibility of transcatheter mitral valved stent implantation in high-risk patients has already been reported.

  6. Percutaneous Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement: Patient-specific Three-dimensional Computer-based Heart Model and Prototyping.

    PubMed

    Vaquerizo, Beatriz; Theriault-Lauzier, Pascal; Piazza, Nicolo

    2015-12-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent valvular heart disease worldwide. Despite the widespread availability of curative surgical intervention, a considerable proportion of patients with severe mitral regurgitation are not referred for treatment, largely due to the presence of left ventricular dysfunction, advanced age, and comorbid illnesses. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement is a promising therapeutic alternative to traditional surgical valve replacement. The complex anatomical and pathophysiological nature of the mitral valvular complex, however, presents significant challenges to the successful design and implementation of novel transcatheter mitral replacement devices. Patient-specific 3-dimensional computer-based models enable accurate assessment of the mitral valve anatomy and preprocedural simulations for transcatheter therapies. Such information may help refine the design features of novel transcatheter mitral devices and enhance procedural planning. Herein, we describe a novel medical image-based processing tool that facilitates accurate, noninvasive assessment of the mitral valvular complex, by creating precise three-dimensional heart models. The 3-dimensional computer reconstructions are then converted to a physical model using 3-dimensional printing technology, thereby enabling patient-specific assessment of the interaction between device and patient. It may provide new opportunities for a better understanding of the mitral anatomy-pathophysiology-device interaction, which is of critical importance for the advancement of transcatheter mitral valve replacement. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called “coconut atrium”, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rheumatic heart disease is unknown; however, possible mechanisms include chronic strain force in the atrial wall and inflammation. We report here a patient with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease with coconut atrium. Case Report: A 76-year-old man presented with breathlessness and leg edema due to right-sided heart failure. He was diagnosed with rheumatic fever at 8 years of age. Mitral commissurotomy and the mitral and aortic valve replacement were previously performed to treat mitral and aortic valvular stenosis. The profile view of the chest X-ray indicated a diffuse calcified outline of the LA wall. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hyper-tension and dilatation of both atria. Moreover, computed tomography showed nearly circumferential calcification of the LA wall. Despite intense medical treatment, he succumbed to heart failure. An autopsy demonstrated that the LA was markedly dilated, its wall was calcified, and its appearance was similar to the surface of an atherosclerotic aorta. Microscopic examination revealed intensive calcification in the endocardium. Minimal accumulation of inflammatory cells was noted. Although slight fibrosis was observed, the cardiac musculature was preserved. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that identifies the histological changes of LA calcification associated with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease. PMID:25819539

  8. [Intraoperative evaluation of mitral valve reconstruction using two-dimensional contrast echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Viossat, J; Chauvaud, S; Mihaileanu, S; Pillière, R; Sicre, P; Schnebert, B; Abbou, B; Lafont, A; Julien, J; Marino, J P

    1986-09-01

    20 patients who underwent reconstructive surgery for mitral regurgitation were peroperatively investigated by contrasted bidimensional echocardiography using intraventricular injection of 20 ml of physiologic saline. Before the valvuloplasty, the peroperative quantitation of mitral leakage was in all cases closely correlated with the data obtained preoperatively. After the mitral reparation, three groups of patients could be observed: group I (12 cases): absent or minimal regurgitation (0-+); group II (5 cases): moderate mitral regurgitation (++); group III (3 cases): marked regurgitation ( - +) necessitating an immediate ECC. In two cases it was possible to improve successfully the valvular function, in the third case valvular replacement was necessary. The correlation between the data of peroperative contrasted echography at one hand and the clinical examination and the postoperative paraclinical investigations on the other hand was excellent in all cases. Thus the contrasted bidimensional peroperative echocardiography represents a reliable method for predicting the immediate results of mitral reconstructive surgery.

  9. Role of Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Hion; Arzamendi, Dabit; Carreras, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent valvular heart disease in the United States and the second most prevalent in Europe. Patients with severe mitral regurgitation have a poor prognosis with medical therapy once they become symptomatic or develop signs of significant cardiac dysfunction. However, as many as half of these patients are inoperable because of advanced age, ventricular dysfunction, or other comorbidities. Studies have shown that surgery increases survival in patients with organic mitral regurgitation due to valve prolapse but has no clinical benefit in those with functional mitral regurgitation. In this scenario, percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation in native valves provides alternative management of valvular heart disease in patients at high surgical risk. Percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation is a growing field that relies heavily on imaging techniques to diagnose functional anatomy and guide repair procedures. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise testing and stress imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Henri, Christine; Piérard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Pibarot, Philippe; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2014-09-01

    The role of exercise testing and stress imaging in the management of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) is reviewed in this article. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology/European Association of Cardiothoracic Surgery have recently put emphasis on the role of exercise testing to clarify symptom status and the use of stress imaging to assess the dynamic component of valvular abnormalities and unmask subclinical myocardial dysfunction that could be missed at rest. Recent studies have demonstrated the incremental prognostic value of exercise echocardiography for asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, moderate-severe mitral stenosis, and severe primary mitral regurgitation. In patients with low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis, dobutamine stress echocardiography is recommended to differentiate true severe from pseudosevere aortic stenosis. Data on the prognostic value of stress echocardiography in aortic regurgitation and functional mitral regurgitation are less robust. Data are sparse on the use of stress imaging in right-sided VHD, however recent studies using stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging offer some prognostic information. Although the strongest recommendations for surgical treatment continue to be based on symptom status and resting left ventricular repercussions, stress imaging can be useful to optimize risk stratification and timing of surgery in VHD. Randomized clinical trials are required to confirm that clinical decision-making based on stress imaging can lead to improved outcomes.

  11. Myxomatous Mitral Valve with Prolapse and Flail Scallop

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jerry; Timbrook, Alexa; Said, Sarmad; Babar, Kamran; Teleb, Mohamed; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Myxomatous mitral valve with prolapse are classically seen with abnormal leaflet apposition during contraction of the heart. Hemodynamic disorders can result from eccentric mitral regurgitation usually caused by chordae tendinae rupture or papillary muscle dysfunction. Echocardiography is the gold standard for evaluation of leaflet flail and prolapse due to high sensitivity and specificity. Though most mitral valve prolapse are asymptomatic those that cause severe regurgitation need emergent surgical intervention to prevent disease progression. Case Report We report a 54 year old Hispanic male who presented with progressively worsening dyspnea and palpitations. Initial evaluation was significant for atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram with subsequent echocardiography revealing myxomatous mitral valve with prolapse. Following surgical repair of the mitral valve, the dyspnea and palpitations resolved. Conclusions Mitral valve prolapse is a common valvular abnormality but the pathogenic cause of myxomatous valves has not been elucidated. Several theories describe multiple superfamilies of proteins to be involved in the process. Proper identification of these severe mitral regurgitation due to these disease valves will help relieve symptomatic mitral valve prolapse patients. PMID:27279924

  12. Exuberant accessory mitral valve tissue with possible true parachute mitral valve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Aleksandra; Joksimovic, Zoran; Jovovic, Ljiljana

    2012-09-11

    A parachute mitral valve is defined as a unifocal attachment of mitral valve chordae tendineae independent of the number of papillary muscles. Data from the literature suggests that the valve can be distinguished on the basis of morphological features as either a parachute-like asymmetrical mitral valve or a true parachute mitral valve. A parachute-like asymmetrical mitral valve has two papillary muscles; one is elongated and located higher in the left ventricle. A true parachute mitral valve has a single papillary muscle that receives all chordae, as was present in our patient. Patients with parachute mitral valves during childhood have multilevel left-side heart obstructions, with poor outcomes without operative treatment. The finding of a parachute mitral valve in an adult patient is extremely rare, especially as an isolated lesion. In adults, the unifocal attachment of the chordae results in a slightly restricted valve opening and, more frequently, valvular regurgitation. A 40-year-old Caucasian female patient was admitted to a primary care physician due to her recent symptoms of heart palpitation and chest discomfort on effort. Transthoracic echocardiography showed chordae tendineae which were elongated and formed an unusual net shape penetrating into left ventricle cavity. The parasternal short axis view of her left ventricle showed a single papillary muscle positioned on one side in the posteromedial commissure receiving all chordae. Her mitral valve orifice was slightly eccentric and the chordae were converting into a single papillary muscle. Mitral regurgitation was present and it was graded as moderate to severe. Her left atrium was enlarged. There were no signs of mitral stenosis or a subvalvular ring. She did not have a bicuspid aortic valve or coarctation of the ascending aorta. The dimensions and systolic function of her left ventricle were normal. Our patient had a normal body habitus, without signs of heart failure. Her functional status was graded

  13. Exuberant accessory mitral valve tissue with possible true parachute mitral valve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A parachute mitral valve is defined as a unifocal attachment of mitral valve chordae tendineae independent of the number of papillary muscles. Data from the literature suggests that the valve can be distinguished on the basis of morphological features as either a parachute-like asymmetrical mitral valve or a true parachute mitral valve. A parachute-like asymmetrical mitral valve has two papillary muscles; one is elongated and located higher in the left ventricle. A true parachute mitral valve has a single papillary muscle that receives all chordae, as was present in our patient. Patients with parachute mitral valves during childhood have multilevel left-side heart obstructions, with poor outcomes without operative treatment. The finding of a parachute mitral valve in an adult patient is extremely rare, especially as an isolated lesion. In adults, the unifocal attachment of the chordae results in a slightly restricted valve opening and, more frequently, valvular regurgitation. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian female patient was admitted to a primary care physician due to her recent symptoms of heart palpitation and chest discomfort on effort. Transthoracic echocardiography showed chordae tendineae which were elongated and formed an unusual net shape penetrating into left ventricle cavity. The parasternal short axis view of her left ventricle showed a single papillary muscle positioned on one side in the posteromedial commissure receiving all chordae. Her mitral valve orifice was slightly eccentric and the chordae were converting into a single papillary muscle. Mitral regurgitation was present and it was graded as moderate to severe. Her left atrium was enlarged. There were no signs of mitral stenosis or a subvalvular ring. She did not have a bicuspid aortic valve or coarctation of the ascending aorta. The dimensions and systolic function of her left ventricle were normal. Our patient had a normal body habitus, without signs of heart failure

  14. Minimally invasive surgical treatment of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Andrew B; Joseph Woo, Y

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is in the midst of a practice revolution. Traditionally, surgery for valvular heart disease consisted of valve replacement via conventional sternotomy using cardiopulmonary bypass. However, over the past 20 years, the increasing popularity of less-invasive procedures, accompanied by advancements in imaging, surgical instrumentation, and robotic technology, has motivated and enabled surgeons to develop and perform complex cardiac surgical procedures through small incisions, often eliminating the need for sternotomy or cardiopulmonary bypass. In addition to the benefits of improved cosmesis, minimally invasive mitral valve surgery was pioneered with the intent of reducing morbidity, postoperative pain, blood loss, hospital length of stay, and time to return to normal activity. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art of minimally invasive approaches to the surgical treatment of valvular heart disease.

  15. MitraClip catheter-based mitral valve repair system.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Anders; Settergren, Magnus

    2010-07-01

    The ongoing evolution of transcatheter valve technology is impressive. Mitral valve regurgitation is the most common type of heart valve insufficiency and mitral valve surgery is, next to aortic valve surgery, the second leading valvular surgical procedure in the western world. However, there is a large patient population suffering from mitral valve regurgitation that is currently not treated with heart surgery because of significant morbidity and mortality risks. This large underserved patient population could benefit from a less invasive treatment. The MitraClip system (Abbott Vascular, Menlo Park, CA, USA) is the first commercially available medical technology providing a catheter-based nonsurgical repair alternative for patients suffering from mitral valve regurgitation and has the greatest clinical experience compared with other alternative devices. The device is currently in late-stage clinical trials in the USA and has received the CE mark.

  16. A pathoanatomic approach to the management of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, Vinay; Smith, Anson J C; Cavalcante, João L

    2016-02-01

    Mitral regurgitation remains the most common global valvular heart disease. From otherwise unsuspecting healthy patients without overt symptoms to those with recalcitrant heart failure, mitral valve (MV) disease touches millions of patients per year. While MV prolapse without regurgitation remains benign, once regurgitation begins, quantification of severity is related to prognosis. Understanding the mechanism of regurgitation guides appropriate treatment. Current management guidelines emphasize early therapy after careful assessment of both anatomy and severity of mitral regurgitation. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the treatment of MV disease and to offer additional granularity on pathoanatomic decision making that may aid a more precise application of optimal guideline-directed therapy of primary and secondary mitral regurgitation.

  17. Severe mitral regurgitation unmasked after bilateral lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Udoji, Timothy N; Force, Seth D; Pelaez, Andres

    2013-09-01

    Abstract A 33-year-old female patient with advanced idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension underwent bilateral lung transplantation. The postsurgical course was complicated by prolonged mechanical ventilation and acute hypoxemia with recurrent episodes of pulmonary edema. An echocardiogram revealed improved right-sided pressures along with a dilated left atrium, a structurally normal mitral valve, and a new posterior-oriented severe mitral regurgitation. The patient's condition improved after treatment with arterial vasodilators and diuretics, and she has remained in World Health Organization functional class I after almost 36 months of follow-up. We hypothesize that cardiac ventricle remodeling and a geometric change in mitral valve apparatus after transplantation led to the hemodynamic changes and recurrent pulmonary edema seen in our patient. Our case is, to our knowledge, the second report of severe valvular regurgitation in a structurally normal mitral valve apparatus in the postoperative period and the first of a patient to be treated without valve replacement.

  18. RVOT mural and mitral valve endocarditis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Maadh; Cardozo, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Mural endocarditis is a very rare condition. This entity involves bacterial growth on cardiac walls. In addition, concomitant valvular endocarditis, along with mural endocarditis, is an extremely rare combination. The diagnosis of mural endocarditis is difficult and requires more advanced cardiac imaging, such as a transesophageal echocardiogram. The differential diagnoses of mural masses include vegetations, thrombi, metastasis, and benign and malignant tumors. We present a rare and unusual case of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with findings of both right ventricular outflow tract mural endocarditis and valvular endocarditis involving the mitral valve.

  19. RVOT mural and mitral valve endocarditis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jawad, Maadh; Cardozo, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Mural endocarditis is a very rare condition. This entity involves bacterial growth on cardiac walls. In addition, concomitant valvular endocarditis, along with mural endocarditis, is an extremely rare combination. The diagnosis of mural endocarditis is difficult and requires more advanced cardiac imaging, such as a transesophageal echocardiogram. The differential diagnoses of mural masses include vegetations, thrombi, metastasis, and benign and malignant tumors. We present a rare and unusual case of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with findings of both right ventricular outflow tract mural endocarditis and valvular endocarditis involving the mitral valve. PMID:26702695

  20. Fatal postoperative systemic pulmonary hypertension in benfluorex-induced valvular heart disease surgery

    PubMed Central

    Baufreton, Christophe; Bruneval, Patrick; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Fouquet, Olivier; Giraud, Raphael; Banfi, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DI-VHD) remains an under-recognized entity. Patient concerns: This report describes a heart valve replacement which was complicated by intractable systemic pulmonary arterial hypertension in a 61-year-old female with severe restrictive mitral and aortic disease. The diagnosis of valvular disease was preceded by a history of unexplained respiratory distress. The patient had been exposed to benfluorex for 6.5 years. Diagnoses: The diagnostic procedure documented specific drug-induced valvular fibrosis. Interventions: Surgical mitral and aortic valve replacement was performed. Outcomes: Heart valve replacement was postoperatively complicated by unanticipated disproportionate pulmonary hypertension. This issue was fatal despite intensive care including prolonged extracorporeal life support. Lessons: Benfluorex is a fenfluramine derivative which has been marketed between 1976 and 2009. Although norfenfluramine is the common active and toxic metabolite of all fenfluramine derivatives, the valvular and pulmonary arterial toxicity of benfluorex was much less known than that of fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine. The vast majority of benfluorex-induced valvular heart disease remains misdiagnosed as hypothetical rheumatic fever due to similarities between both etiologies. Better recognition of DI-VHD is likely to improve patient outcome. PMID:28079786

  1. Transventricular mitral valve operations.

    PubMed

    Joseph Woo, Y; McCormick, Ryan C

    2011-10-01

    We report transventricular mitral valve operations in 2 patients with severe mitral regurgitation and postinfarction left ventricular rupture and pseudoaneurysm. The first patient had direct papillary muscle involvement necessitating replacement of the mitral valve. The second patient had indirect mitral involvement allowing for placement of an atrial mitral annuloplasty ring via the left ventricle. Both patients showed no mitral valve regurgitation after replacement or repair and had uneventful postoperative recoveries. These cases demonstrate a feasible, alternative, transventricular approach to mitral valve replacement and repair.

  2. En bloc aortic and mitral valve replacement and left ventricular outflow tract enlargement using a combined transaortic and trans-septal atrial approach.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammed; Windsor, Jimmy; Ricci, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Aortic and mitral valve replacement with division and reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body has been described in clinical situations involving infective endocarditis, extensive annular calcifications and diminutive valve annuli. Herein, we describe a combined transaortic and trans-septal approach with division of the inter-valvular fibrosa for combined aortic and mitral valve replacement. The reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body, atrial walls and aortic root was carried out using a 'three-patch' technique with bovine pericardium.

  3. Mitral valve repair for traumatic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Taro; Kogure, Shuhei; Muro, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu

    2016-06-01

    Mitral valve injury after blunt chest trauma is a rare clinical condition. We describe a case of mitral valve repair for severe mitral regurgitation due to blunt chest trauma 5 years previously. A 22-year-old man was referred to our hospital for surgical correction of severe mitral regurgitation. Echocardiography demonstrated a partial tear of the anterolateral papillary muscle which lacerated to the apex. The entire anterolateral part of the mitral valve including the anterior commissure and posterior leaflets had prolapsed. Reimplantation of the papillary muscle to the posterior left ventricular wall and ring annuloplasty were successfully performed without residual regurgitation.

  4. A quantitative approach to the intraoperative echocardiographic assessment of the mitral valve for repair.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Feroze; Matyal, Robina

    2015-07-01

    Intraoperative echocardiography of the mitral valve has evolved from a qualitative assessment of flow-dependent variables to quantitative geometric analyses before and after repair. In addition, 3-dimensional echocardiographic data now allow for a precise assessment of mitral valve apparatus. Complex structures, such as the mitral annulus, can be interrogated comprehensively without geometric assumptions. Quantitative analyses of mitral valve apparatus are particularly valuable for identifying indices of left ventricular and mitral remodeling to establish the chronicity and severity of mitral regurgitation. This can help identify patients who may be unsuitable candidates for repair as the result of irreversible remodeling of the mitral valve apparatus. Principles of geometric analyses also have been extended to the assessment of repaired mitral valves. Changes in mitral annular shape and size determine the stress exerted on the mitral leaflets and, therefore, the durability of repair. Given this context, echocardiographers may be expected to diagnose and quantify valvular dysfunction, assess suitability for repair, assist in annuloplasty ring sizing, and determine the success and failure of the repair procedure. As a result, anesthesiologists have progressed from being mere service providers to participants in the decision-making process. It is therefore prudent for them to acquaint themselves with the principles of intraoperative quantitative mitral valve analysis to assist in rational and objective decision making.

  5. Incidence of coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, G W; Thomas, R D; Grimmer, S F; Silverton, P N; Smith, D R

    1980-01-01

    The case notes, cardiac catheterisation data, and coronary arteriograms of 239 patients investigated for valvular heart disease during a five year period were reviewed. Angina present in 13 of 95 patients with isolated mitral valve disease, 43 of 90 patients with isolated aortic valve disease, and 18 of 54 patients with combined mitral and aortic valve disease. Significant coronary artery disease was present in 85 per cent of patients with mitral valve disease and angina, but in only 33 per cent of patients with aortic valve disease and angina. Patients with no chest pain still had a high incidence of coronary artery disease, significant coronary obstruction being present in 22 per cent with mitral valve disease, 22 per cent with aortic valve disease, and 11 per cent with combine mitral and aortic valve disease. Several possible clinical markers of coronary artery disease were examined but none was found to be of practical help. There was, however, a significant inverse relation between severity of coronary artery disease and severity of valve disease in patients with aortic valve disease. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease is not uncommon in patients with valvular heart disease and if it is policy to perform coronary artery bypass grafting in such patients, routine coronary arteriography must be part of the preoperative investigation. PMID:7459146

  6. Study of Effectiveness and Safety of Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvulotomy for Treatment of Pregnant Patients with Severe Mitral Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Hasit Sureshbhai; Deshmukh, Jagjeet Kishanrao; Prajapati, Jayesh Somabhai; Sahoo, Sibasis Shahsikant; Vyas, Pooja Maheshbhai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In pregnant women mitral stenosis is the commonest cardiac valvular lesion. When it is present in majorly severe condition it leads to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. In mitral stenosis pregnancy can lead to development of heart failure. Aim To evaluate the safety and efficacy of balloon mitral valvulotomy (BMV) in pregnant females with severe mitral stenosis. Materials and Methods A total of 30 pregnant patients who underwent BMV were included in the study from July 2011 to November 2013. Clinical follow-up during pregnancy was done every 3 months until delivery and after delivery. The mean follow up time after BMV was 6.72±0.56 months. Results From the 30 pregnant females 14 (46.67%) and 16 (53.3%) patients underwent BMV during the third and second trimester of pregnancy respectively. The mean mitral valve area was 0.85+0.16 cm2 before BMV that increased to 1.60+0.27 cm2 (p<0.0001) immediately after BMV. Peak and mean diastolic gradients had decreased significantly within 48 hours after the procedure (p<0.001) but remained very much unchanged at 6.72 month period of follow-up. Two patients had an increase in mitral regurgitation by 2 grades. Conclusion During pregnancy BMV technique is safe and effective in patients with severe mitral stenosis. This results in marked symptomatic relief along with long term maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:26816932

  7. [Factors facilitating development of degenerative aortic valvular stenosis].

    PubMed

    Andropova, O V; Polubentseva, E I; Anokhin, V N

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine factors of risk and progress of aortal valvular calcinosis (AVC) and aortic ostium stenosis (AOS). The subjects were 85 patients with AVC (42--with aortic valvular stenosis (AVS), and 43--without AOS). The study, which included analysis of the lipid and mineral metabolism, and immunological tests, shows that potential factors of AVC are: age (p < 0. 001), osteoporosis (p < 0.03), mitral ring calcification (p = 0.047), dislipidemia (high serum level of total cholesterol, cholesterol of low density lipoproteins, and apoB, atherogenic shift of apoB/apoA-1 ratio, low level of cholesterol of high density lipoproteins (CHDLP)), disbalance between intecellular matrix synthesis and destruction (high concentration of alkaline phosphatase and its bone fraction, and accelerated deoxypyridinoline excretion), inflammation (high concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6)). The factors of AOS were: age (p < 0.001), smoking (p < 0.001), osteoporosis (p = 0.004), AVC (p < 0.001), mitral ring calcinosis (p = 0.033), dislipidemia (high levels of cholesterol of low density and very low density lipoproteins, low concentrations of CHDLP, and apoA-1), degradation of extracellular matrix, and inflammation (high concentrations of CRP, fibrinogen, IL-6, and IL-8). Thus, atherogenic dislipidemia and mineral dysmetabolism disorder facilitate AVC. The revealed immune status changes imply the role of inflammation in the development and progress of AVS.

  8. A comparison of different feature extraction methods for diagnosis of valvular heart diseases using PCG signals.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, M; Abdoli, R

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel method for diagnosis of valvular heart disease (VHD) based on phonocardiography (PCG) signals. Application of the pattern classification and feature selection and reduction methods in analysing normal and pathological heart sound was investigated. After signal preprocessing using independent component analysis (ICA), 32 features are extracted. Those include carefully selected linear and nonlinear time domain, wavelet and entropy features. By examining different feature selection and feature reduction methods such as principal component analysis (PCA), genetic algorithms (GA), genetic programming (GP) and generalized discriminant analysis (GDA), the four most informative features are extracted. Furthermore, support vector machines (SVM) and neural network classifiers are compared for diagnosis of pathological heart sounds. Three valvular heart diseases are considered: aortic stenosis (AS), mitral stenosis (MS) and mitral regurgitation (MR). An overall accuracy of 99.47% was achieved by proposed algorithm.

  9. Quantitation of the mitral tetrahedron in patients with ischemic heart disease using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography to evaluate the geometric determinants of ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Yu, Hsi-Yu; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Lin, Lung-Chun; Hsu, Kwan-Lih; Wu, Chau-Chung

    2013-05-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is common in ischemic heart disease and results in poor prognosis. However, the exact mechanism of IMR has not been fully elucidated. Quantitation of the mitral tetrahedron using three-dimentianl (3D) echocardiography is capable of evaluating the geometric determinants and mechanisms of IMR. Forty patients with a history of ST-elevation myocardial infarction at least 6 months earlier were studied. Parameters of mitral deformation and global left ventricular (LV) function and shape were evaluated by 2-dimensional echocardiography. The effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) of IMR was obtained by the quantitative continuous-wave Doppler technique. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography was applied to assess the mitral tetrahedron. Mitral valvular tenting area (P < 0.001), mitral annular area (P = 0.032), dilation of the LV in diastole, impairment of the LV ejection fraction, and volume of the spherically shaped LV in systole were greater in patients with an ERO ≥20 mm(2) than in those with an ERO <20 mm(2). In the mitral tetrahedron, only the interpapillary muscle roots distance showed a significant difference (P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis with the logistic regression model showed the systolic mitral tenting area (odds ratio [OR]: 280.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.59-1.72 × 10(4), P = 0.007) and interpapillary muscle distance (OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03-2.19, P = 0.036) to be independent factors in predicting significant IMR (ERO ≥20 mm(2)). 3D echocardiography can be effectively applied in measuring the mitral tetrahedron and evaluating the mechanism of IMR. Mitral valvular tenting and interpapillary muscle distance are 2 independent factors of significant IMR. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mitral Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are ... Transplantation End-stage Lung Disease Adult Lung Transplantation Pediatric Lung ... Aortic Aneurysm Mitral Valve Disease Overview The mitral valve is ...

  11. [Percutaneous mitral commissurotomy using Inoue's balloon during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Murillo, H; Ayala, F; Badui, E; Almazán, A; Solorio, S; Enciso, R; Madrid, R; Lepe, L; Rangel Abundis, A; Chávez, E

    1996-01-01

    The authors present three cases of pregnant women with symptomatic severe mitral stenosis with a mean age of 28.6 +/- 2.3 years, and during 27.6 +/- 1.52 weeks of pregnancy. Two patients were in class III and one in class IV of the New York Heart Association (NYHA). All patients had a mitral valvular area equal or less than 1 cm2, with a Wilkins score of 7 to 9 and mitral insufficiency grade I in two cases; two, had severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (mean > 50 mm Hg). After Percutaneous Mitral Valvuloplasty (PMV) the mitral valve measured by 2D echocardiography increased form 0.83 +/- 0.2 cm2 to 1.8 +/- 0.15 cm2; the mean transmitral gradient diminished from 13 +/- 3.4 mm Hg to 3.6 +/- 1.15 mm Hg; the degree of mitral insufficiency was no modified in neither case. Hemodynamic results revealed increasing of the mitral valve from 0.83 +/- 0.18 cm2 to 2.23 +/- 0.3 cm2; the mean mitral gradient decreased from 21.6 +/- 9 to 4.3 +/- 0.5 mm Hg; the mean left atrial pressure from 30 +/- 12 to 12.3 +/- 4 mm Hg; the mean pressure of the pulmonary artery diminished suddenly from 44.3 +/- 16 to 25.6 +/- 11 mm Hg. The average fluoroscopic time was 15.3 +/- 3 minutes. There were no complications. The patients were discharged 48 hours after the procedure and continued their pregnancies in class I NYHA, which resolved in a non complicated vaginal delivery with normal products. We conclude that PMV is a safe and useful therapy in pregnant patient with severe mitral stenosis refractory to medical treatment.

  12. Valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Anthony, John; Osman, Ayesha; Sani, Mahmoud U

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease may be a pre-existing complication of pregnancy or it may be diagnosed for the first time during pregnancy. Accurate diagnosis, tailored therapy and an understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy are necessary components of management, best achieved through the use of multidisciplinary clinics. This review outlines the management of specific lesions, with particular reference to post-rheumatic valvular heart disease.

  13. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Walter W.

    1992-01-01

    The author discusses the pathophysiology of mitral valve prolapse and provides guidelines to identify and treat low-to high-risk mitral valve prolapse. An approach to diagnosing bacterial endocarditis and its prophylaxis are also discussed. The author reviews mitral valve prolapse syndrome and the risk of sudden death.

  14. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Sarano, Maurice Enriquez-; McEvoy, John W

    2017-01-16

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality.

  15. Advanced imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2017-04-01

    Although echocardiography remains the mainstay imaging technique for the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), innovations in noninvasive imaging in the past few years have provided new insights into the pathophysiology and quantification of VHD, early detection of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and advanced prognostic assessment. The severity grading of valve dysfunction has been refined with the use of Doppler echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and CT imaging. LV ejection fraction remains an important criterion when deciding whether patients should be referred for surgery. However, echocardiographic strain imaging can now detect impaired LV systolic function before LV ejection fraction reduces, thus provoking the debate on whether patients with severe VHD should be referred for surgery at an earlier stage (before symptom onset). Impaired LV strain correlates with the amount of myocardial fibrosis detected with CMR techniques. Furthermore, accumulating data show that the extent of fibrosis associated with severe VHD has important prognostic implications. The present Review focuses on using these novel imaging modalities to assess pathophysiology, early LV dysfunction, and prognosis of major VHDs, including aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, and aortic regurgitation.

  16. Review of mitral valve insufficiency: repair or replacement

    PubMed Central

    Madesis, Athanasios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Kesisis, George; Tsiouda, Theodora; Beleveslis, Thomas; Koletas, Alexander; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve (MV) dysfunction is the second-most common clinically significant form of valvular defect in adults. MV regurgitation occurs with the increasing frequency of degenerative changes of the aging process. Moreover, other causes of clinically significant MV regurgitation include cardiac ischemia, infective endocarditis and rhematic disease more frequently in less developed countries. Recent evidence suggests that the best outcomes after repair of severe degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) are achieved in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients, who are selected for surgery soon after diagnosis on the basis of echocardiography. This review will focus on the surgical management of mitral insufficiency according to its aetiology today and will give insight to some of the perspectives that lay in the future. PMID:24672698

  17. [Diagnosis and differential therapy of mitral stenosis].

    PubMed

    Fassbender, D; Schmidt, H K; Seggewiss, H; Mannebach, H; Bogunovic, N

    1998-11-01

    Clinical symptoms and diagnostic findings in patients with mitral stenosis are usually determined by the extent of the stenosis. Compared to a normal mitral valve area (MVA) of > 4 cm2, MVA in patients with severe mitral stenosis is usually reduced to < 1.5 cm2. In older patients symptoms are frequently influenced by concomitant diseases (e.g. atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension or lung disease). An important diagnostic element besides anamnesis, auscultation, ECG and chest X-ray is echocardiography, which is required in order to measure non-invasively and reliably the mitral valve gradient (MVG), the MVA and morphologic changes to the valves, as well as concomitant valvular disease, ventricular functions and, where appropriate, left-atrial thrombi. In addition to the surgical treatment of patients with severe mitral stenosis, which has been an established procedure for 50 years, percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (MVP) has recently established itself as an alternative option. At the current time, the Inoue technique seems to display the most advantages. Following transseptal puncture, the Inoue balloon is guided transvenously into the left atrium and then into the left ventricle using a special support wire. The balloon is short and soft. Its special unfolding character enables it to be placed securely in the mitral valve without any risk of ventricular perforation (Figure 1). As with surgical commissurotomy, balloon valvuloplasty leads to a separation of fused commissures. This results in a significant reduction of MVG, accompanied by an increase in the MVA (Figure 2). The results and success of MVP are influenced by the morphology of the valves and the changes to the subvalvular apparatus. In randomized studies, the results of surgical commissurotomy were comparable with those of balloon mitral valvulotomy. In our hospital, an increase in MVA from 1.0 to 1.8 cm2 could be achieved in 899 patients (mean age 56 +/- 3 years). In younger patients with

  18. Mitral valve prolapse in Cavalier King Charles spaniel: a review and case study.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Changbaig

    2005-03-01

    A 5 year-old spayed female Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was presented after a 3- to 5-day onset of severe respiratory distress. The dog also had a history of several episodes of syncope prior to presentation. A comprehensive diagnostic investigation revealed a midsystolic click sound on cardiac auscultation, signs of left sided cardiac enlargement in ECG and thoracic radiography, mitral valvular leaflet protrusion into left the atrium, decreased E-point-to septal separation (EPSS) and mitral regurgitated flow in echocardiography, all of which are characteristic signs of mitral valvular prolapse. After intensive care with diuretics [corrected] and a vasodilator with oxygen supplement, the condition of the dog was stabilized. The dog was then released and is being medicated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor with regular follow-up.

  19. Atypical Early Aspergillus Endocarditis Post Prosthetic Mitral Valve Repair: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Abuzaid, Ahmed AbdulAziz; Zaki, Mahmood; Tarif, Habib

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old female operated 1 month previous for mitral valve repair presented with acute respiratory distress and dyspnea. Echocardiography showed large echogenic valvular mass measuring 2.3 × 1.3 cm with severe mitral regurgitation and dehiscence of the mitral ring posteriorly. The mass was attached subvalvularly to the ventricular septal-free wall and eroding through it, which required complete aggressive dissection of the infected tissues. Diagnosis was confirmed after resection of the valve by multiple negative blood cultures and positive valvular tissue for Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis. She was treated with high dose of voriconazole for 3 months. Her postoperative period was complicated by acute-on-chronic renal failure. She responded very well to the management. PMID:25838877

  20. Accuracy of 3-Dimensional Transoesophageal Echocardiography in Assessment of Prosthetic Mitral Valve Dehiscence with Comparison to Anatomical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Martin R.; Javorsky, George; Platts, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of echocardiography from 2-Dimensional Transthoracic Echo through to real time 3-Dimensional Transoesophageal Echo has enabled more accurate visualisation and quantification of valvular disorders especially prosthetic mitral valve paravalvular regurgitation. However, validation of accuracy is rarely confirmed by surgical or post-mortem specimens. We present a case directly comparing different echocardiographic modality images to post mortem specimens in a patient with prosthetic mitral valve paravalvular regurgitation. PMID:20886015

  1. [Moderate or severe aquired valvular heart disease in pregnancy--what does determine the management? Experence, intuition or guidelines?].

    PubMed

    Greszata, Lidia; Stępińska, Janina

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology of acquired valvular heart diseases has changed significantly over last decades. Degenerative aortic valve stenosis is the most common acquired valvular disease with high prevalence in elderly population. Another common disorder is ischemic mitral regurgitation secondary to myocardial infarction. Both above-mentioned heart disorders are not typical for women in reproductive age. Rheumatic heart valve disease has become infrequent in Polish population. Mitral stenosis, the most prevalent of rheumatic valvular disorders, affects 5% of pregnant women with heart disease and rheumatic aortic stenosis is responsible for 0.5-3% of heart diseases in this population. Despite the fact that acquired valvular disorders are becoming less common among pregnant women, they still remain an important issue and their management should be well known. Discussion about pregnancy should be a part of management of young women with valvular heart disease. Severe valve disorders should be corrected when planning pregnancy. The final management should always be based on collaborative decision made by the patient and health professionals.

  2. Genetic predisposition to calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification.

    PubMed

    Kutikhin, Anton G; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E; Brusina, Elena B; Ponasenko, Anastasia V; Golovkin, Alexey S; Barbarash, Olga L

    2014-09-01

    Valvular calcification precedes the development of valvular stenosis and may represent an important early phenotype for valvular heart disease. It is known that development of valvular calcification is likely to occur among members of a family. However, the knowledge about the role of genomic predictive markers in valvular calcification is still elusive. Aims of this review are to assess the impact of gene polymorphisms on risk and severity of aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. According to the results of the investigations carried out, all polymorphisms may be divided into the three groups conferring the level of evidence of their association with valvular stenosis. It is possible to conclude that apoB (XbaI, rs1042031, and rs6725189), ACE (rs4340), IL10 (rs1800896 and rs1800872), and LPA (rs10455872) gene polymorphisms may be associated with valvular calcific stenosis with a relatively high level of evidence. A number of other polymorphisms, such as PvuII polymorphism within the ORα gene, rs1042636 polymorphism within the CaSR gene, rs3024491, rs3021094, rs1554286, and rs3024498 polymorphisms within the IL10 gene, rs662 polymorphism within the PON1 gene, rs2276288 polymorphism within the MYO7A gene, rs5194 polymorphism within the AGTR1 gene, rs2071307 polymorphism within the ELN gene, rs17659543 and rs13415097 polymorphisms within the IL1F9 gene may correlate with a risk of calcific valve stenosis with moderate level of evidence. Finally, rs1544410 polymorphism within the VDR gene, E2 and E4 alleles within the apoE gene, rs6254 polymorphism within the PTH gene, and rs1800871 polymorphism within the IL10 gene may be associated with aortic stenosis with low level of evidence.

  3. Stroke prevention strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart valve abnormalities: perceptions of 'valvular' atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H; Larsen, Torben B; Madrid, Antonio; Dobreanu, Dan; Jędrzejczyk-Patej, Ewa; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Survey was to assess the perceptions of 'valvular' atrial fibrillation (AF) and management of AF patients with various heart valve abnormalities in daily clinical practice in European electrophysiology (EP) centres. Questionnaire survey was sent via the Internet to the EHRA-EP Research Network Centres. Of the 52 responding centres, 42 (80.8%) were university hospitals. Choosing the most comprehensive definition of valvular AF, a total of 49 centres (94.2%) encountered a mechanical prosthetic heart valve and significant rheumatic mitral stenosis, 35 centres (67.3%) also considered bioprosthetic valves, and 25 centres (48.1%) included any significant valvular heart disease, requiring surgical repair in the definition of valvular AF. Only three centres (5.8%) would define valvular AF as the presence of any (even mild) valvular abnormality. None of the centres would use non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in AF patients with mechanical prosthetic valves, only 5 centres (9.8%) would use NOACs in patients with significant mitral stenosis, 17 centres (32.7%) would consider the use of NOACs in patients with bioprosthetic valves, and 21 centres (41.2%) would use NOACs in patients with a non-recent transcatheter valve replacement/implantation, while 13 centres (25.5%) would never consider the use of NOACs in AF patients with even mild native heart valve abnormality. Our survey showed marked heterogeneity in the definition of valvular AF and thromboprophylactic treatments, with the use of variable NOACs in patients with valvular heart disease other than prosthetic heart valves or significant mitral stenosis, indicating that this term may be misleading and should not be used.

  4. Valvular heart disease associated with benfluorex therapy: results from the French multicentre registry.

    PubMed

    Le Ven, Florent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Habib, Gilbert; Gueffet, Jean-Pierre; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Eicher, Jean-Christophe; Blanchard-Lemoine, Bénédicte; Rousseau, Juliette; Hénon, Pierre; Jobic, Yannick; Etienne, Yves

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to report clinical characteristics, consequences, echocardiographic features, and pathological findings encountered in patients suffering from valvular disease associated with benfluorex exposure in a multicentre French registry. Forty patients suffering from unexplained restrictive valvular disease with a previous exposition to benfluorex, a fenfluramine derivative, were identified from eight French university hospitals. Patients were mostly women (87.5%) with a mean age of 57 ± 9 years and high body mass index of 30 ± 7 kg/m²; 37.5% of them presented with severe heart failure symptoms (NYHA class III and IV). Benfluorex mean daily dose was 415 ± 131 mg with total therapy duration of 72 ± 53 months. Resulting cumulative dose was 910 ± 675 g. Common echocardiographic findings were leaflets and sub-valvular apparatus thickening and retraction. Aortic and mitral valve regurgitations resulting from leaflets loss of coaptation were the most frequent findings (87.5 and 82.5%) and were severe in 29 patients (72.5%). Multiple valve involvements were present in 31 cases (77.5%). Pulmonary arterial hypertension was identified in 20 cases (50%). Histopathological examination demonstrated abundant extra cellular matrix encasing the leaflets without modification of valve architecture. Fifteen patients (37.5%) underwent valvular surgery. Benfluorex-related valvulopathy shares numerous characteristics with other drug-induced valvular disease. Clinical consequences may be serious with severe heart failure symptoms that may lead to surgical treatment.

  5. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Valvular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jack C.; Fremes, Stephen E.; Rubens, Fraser D.; Teoh, Kevin H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antithrombotic therapy in valvular disease is important to mitigate thromboembolism, but the hemorrhagic risk imposed must be considered. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: In rheumatic mitral disease, we recommend vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy when the left atrial diameter is > 55 mm (Grade 2C) or when complicated by left atrial thrombus (Grade 1A). In candidates for percutaneous mitral valvotomy with left atrial thrombus, we recommend VKA therapy until thrombus resolution, and we recommend abandoning valvotomy if the thrombus fails to resolve (Grade 1A). In patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO) and stroke or transient ischemic attack, we recommend initial aspirin therapy (Grade 1B) and suggest substitution of VKA if recurrence (Grade 2C). In patients with cryptogenic stroke and DVT and a PFO, we recommend VKA therapy for 3 months (Grade 1B) and consideration of PFO closure (Grade 2C). We recommend against the use of anticoagulant (Grade 1C) and antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1B) for native valve endocarditis. We suggest holding VKA therapy until the patient is stabilized without neurologic complications for infective endocarditis of a prosthetic valve (Grade 2C). In the first 3 months after bioprosthetic valve implantation, we recommend aspirin for aortic valves (Grade 2C), the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin if the aortic valve is transcatheter (Grade 2C), and VKA therapy with a target international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.5 for mitral valves (Grade 2C). After 3 months, we suggest aspirin therapy (Grade 2C). We recommend early bridging of mechanical valve patients to VKA therapy with unfractionated heparin (DVT dosing) or low

  6. Mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, Jahan; Chen, Frederick Y

    2015-05-01

    Mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral valve regurgitation remains controversial. In moderate mitral regurgitation (MR), controversy exists whether revascularization alone will be adequate to restore native valve geometry or whether intervention on the valve (repair) should be performed concomitantly. When MR is severe, the need for valve intervention is not disputed. Rather, the controversy is whether repair versus replacement should be undertaken. In contrast to degenerative or myxomatous disease that directly affects leaflet integrity and morphology, ischemic FMR results from a distortion and dilation of native ventricular geometry that normally supports normal leaflet coaptation. To address this, the first and most crucial step in successful valve repair is placement of an undersized, complete remodeling annuloplasty ring to restore the annulus to its native geometry. The following article outlines the steps for repair of ischemic mitral regurgitation.

  7. The Role of Interleukin-13 in Patients with Rheumatic Valvular Fibrosis: A Clinical and Histological Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Qiao, Wei-Hua; Li, Fei-fei; Deng, Peg; Hu, Zhi-Wei

    2015-07-01

    Interleukin (IL)-13 is a major inducer of fibrosis in many chronic infectious diseases, yet few studies have reported its role in valvular fibrosis in patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The study aim was to investigate the role of IL-13 in mitral valvular fibrosis in patients with RHD. Peripheral blood samples were collected from surgical patients with RHD (n = 18) and from healthy controls (n = 9). Serum levels of IL-13 and interferon (IFN)-gamma were analyzed using ELISA. Rheumatic mitral valves removed from surgical patients with RHD, and normal mitral valves, were obtained at autopsy. The expression and distribution of collagen I, collagen III, and IL-13Ralpha1 were examined by immunohistochemical staining, the degree of which was measured using computed imaging analysis. Higher IL-13 levels were observed in RHD patients (15.16 +/- 9.62 pg/ml; p < 0.05) than in healthy controls (7.78 +/- 3.87 pg/ml). RHD patients had high levels of IFN-gamma (9.95 +/- 0.77 pg/ml; p <0.05) compared to healthy controls (5.95 +/- 0.69 pg/ml). Immunohistochemistry showed that, compared to normal valves, rheumatic mitral valves expressed high levels of collagen I (0.01931 +/- 0.00159 versus 0.01183 +/- 0.00207; p < 0.05), collagen III (0.00726 +/- 0.00078 versus 0.00342 +/- 0.00124; p <0.05), and IL-13Rcxl (0.00454 +/- 0.00086 versus 0.00017 +/- 0.00008; p <0.01). Collagens I and III were each expressed in heart interstitial cells, while IL-13Ralpha1 was expressed in the endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of the blood vessels, and in interstitial cells. Patients with RHD showed increased serum levels of IL-13 compared to healthy controls. IFN-gamma levels were clearly different among RHD patients and healthy controls. The expression of collagens I and III and IL-13Ralpha1 was higher in rheumatic mitral valves compared to normal mitral valves. IL-13 may induce mitral valvular fibrosis in RHD.

  8. Chest ultrasonography in emergency Cesarean delivery in multi-valvular heart disease with pulmonary edema during spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Ghatak, Tanmoy; Grover, V K

    2014-05-01

    Valvular heart disease in a parturient presenting for Cesarean section is challenging. A 25 year old primigravida parturient with severe mitral stenosis, mild mitral regurgitation, mild aortic regurgitation, and mild pulmonary arterial hypertension required Cesarean delivery after developing pulmonary edema. Low-dose spinal with hyperbaric bupivacine 0.5% 1.8 mL plus 25 μg of fentanyl was used for anesthesia. Chest ultrasonography (US) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were used for monitoring purposes. Spinal-induced preload reduction improved the pulmonary edema, as evidenced by chest US. Chest US and TTE helped in fluid management.

  9. What forces act on a flat rigid mitral annuloplasty ring?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Morten Ø; Jensen, Henrik; Nielsen, Sten L; Smerup, Morten; Johansen, Peter; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael

    2008-05-01

    Increasing mitral valve repair durability requires successful restoration and support with annuloplasty rings. The stress distribution in these devices indirectly determines the success of the repair. It is hypothesized that changes in annular geometry throughout the cardiac cycle result in adverse strain distribution in stiff, flat annuloplasty rings, and hence non-physiological loading of the myocardium. The study aim was to identify the three-dimensional (3-D) force distribution in mitral annuloplasty rings. Eight animals were included in an acute porcine study. The mitral annulus 3-D dynamic geometry was assessed with sonomicrometry prior to ring insertion. Strain gauges mounted on dedicated D-shaped rigid flat annuloplasty rings enabled dynamic force measurements to be made perpendicular to the annulus plane. The average systolic annular height to commissural width ratio before ring implantation was 13.7 +/- 1.4%. Following ring implantation, the annulus was fixed in the diastolic flat configuration (p <0.01). Force accumulation was seen from the anterior (0.7 +/- 0.4 N) and commissural (1.4 +/- 1.0 N) annular segments; both forces were acting in opposite directions and were statistically significantly larger than zero (p <0.01; n = 8). These data demonstrate highest strains at the anterior and commissural areas of flat mitral annuloplasty rings, and support the hypothesis that the mitral valve annulus and its attached valvular and subvalvular structures apply systolic torque onto the flat annuloplasty ring in an attempt to conform it into the saddle-shaped configuration.

  10. The "Polar Light Sign" is a useful tool to detect discrete membranous supravalvular mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Christine; Haas, Nikolaus A; Habash, Sheeraz; Hanslik, Andreas; Kececioglu, Deniz; Sandica, Eugen; Laser, Kai-Thorsten

    2015-02-01

    Mitral valve stenosis caused by a discrete supravalvular membrane is a rare congenital malformation haemodynamically leading to significant mitral valve stenosis. When the supravalvular mitral stenosis consists of a discrete supravalvular membrane adherent to the mitral valve, it is usually not clearly detectable by routine echocardiography. We report about the typical echocardiographic finding in three young patients with this rare form of a discrete membranous supravalvular stenosis caused by a membrane adherent to the mitral valve. These cases present a typical echocardiographic feature in colour Doppler generated by the pathognomonic supramitral flow acceleration. Whereas typical supravalvular mitral stenosis caused by cor triatriatum or a clearly visible supravalvular ring is easily detectable by echocardiography, a discrete supravalvular membrane adjacent to the mitral valve leaflets resembling valvular mitral stenosis is difficult to differentiate by routine echocardiography. In our opinion, this colour phenomenon does resemble the visual impression of polar lights in the northern hemisphere; owing to its typical appearance, it may therefore be named as "Polar Light Sign". This phenomenon may help to detect this anatomical entity by echocardiography in time and therefore improve the prognosis for repair.

  11. Mitral valve repair is not always needed in patients with functional mitral regurgitation undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, J.E.; Jaarsma, W.; Kelder, J.C.; Morshuis, W.J.; Visser, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and aim Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is defined as mitral regurgitation in the absence of intrinsic valvular abnormalities. We prospectively evaluated the effect of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and/or aortic valve replacement (AVR), without additional mitral valve repair, on the degree of moderate or severe FMR. Study design and methods From a cohort of 2829 patients undergoing CABG and/or AVR in the St. Antonius Hospital, 67 patients were identified with moderate or severe FMR by transthoracic and transoesophageal Doppler echocardiography. Results Two out of the 67 patients (3%) died perioperatively. During follow-up (3-18 months) mitral regurgitation decreased by one grade in 29 patients, by two grades in 28, by three grades in five patients and remained unchanged in one patient (p=0.0001). Of all patients, 85% had grade I mitral regurgitation or less. Grade II mitral regurgitation remained in nine patients with a previous large myocardial infarction and/or annular calcifications. NYHA class improved from 3.1+0.5 to 1.4+0.4 (p=0.0001). Ejection fraction increased from 46 to 55% (p=0.0001). Overall, left atrial and left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions decreased significantly. In contrast, no decrease in dimensions was seen in patients with postoperative grade II mitral regurgitation. Conclusion FMR may improve significantly following CABG and/or AVR, although a previous large myocardial infarction and/or annular calcifications may affect outcome. PMID:25696484

  12. Mitral valve surgery for mitral regurgitation caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis: a report of four cases and a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Wobbe; Klinkenberg, Theo J; van der Horst, Iwan C C; Wijdh-den Hamer, Inez J; Erasmus, Michiel E; Bijl, Marc; Suurmeijer, Albert J H; Zijlstra, Felix; Mariani, Massimo A

    2010-03-23

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis of the mitral valve was first described by Libman and Sacks in 1924. Currently, the sterile verrucous vegetative lesions seen in Libman-Sacks endocarditis are regarded as a cardiac manifestation of both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Although typically mild and asymptomatic, complications of Libman-Sacks endocarditis may include superimposed bacterial endocarditis, thromboembolic events, and severe valvular regurgitation and/or stenosis requiring surgery. In this study we report two cases of mitral valve repair and two cases of mitral valve replacement for mitral regurgitation (MR) caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis. In addition, we provide a systematic review of the English literature on mitral valve surgery for MR caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis. This report shows that mitral valve repair is feasible and effective in young patients with relatively stable SLE and/or APS and only localized mitral valve abnormalities caused by Libman-Sacks endocarditis. Both clinical and echocardiographic follow-up after repair show excellent mid- and long-term results.

  13. [Modern mitral valve surgery].

    PubMed

    Bothe, W; Beyersdorf, F

    2016-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, Cutler and Levine performed the first successful surgical treatment of a stenotic mitral valve, which was the only treatable heart valve defect at that time. Mitral valve surgery has evolved significantly since then. The introduction of the heart-lung machine in 1954 not only reduced the surgical risk, but also allowed the treatment of different mitral valve pathologies. Nowadays, mitral valve insufficiency has become the most common underlying pathomechanism of mitral valve disease and can be classified into primary and secondary mitral insufficiency. Primary mitral valve insufficiency is mainly caused by alterations of the valve (leaflets and primary order chords) itself, whereas left ventricular dilatation leading to papillary muscle displacement and leaflet tethering via second order chords is the main underlying pathomechanism for secondary mitral valve regurgitation. Valve reconstruction using the "loop technique" plus annuloplasty is the surgical strategy of choice and normalizes life expectancy in patients with primary mitral regurgitation. In patients with secondary mitral regurgitation, implanting an annuloplasty is not superior to valve replacement and results in high rates of valve re-insufficiency (up to 30 % after 3 months) due to ongoing ventricular dilatation. In order to improve repair results in these patients, we add a novel subvalvular technique (ring-noose-string) to the annuloplasty that aims to prevent ongoing ventricular remodeling and re-insufficiency. In modern mitral surgery, a right lateral thoracotomy is the approach of choice with excellent repair and cosmetic results.

  14. Direct oral anticoagulant use in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation with valvular heart disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Owens, Ryan E; Kabra, Rajesh; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2016-12-22

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are indicated for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), which, according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines, excludes patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis, a mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve, or mitral valve repair. However, the data regarding use of DOACs in AF patients with other types of valvular heart disease (VHD) are unclear. We aimed to summarize and evaluate the literature regarding the safety and efficacy of DOAC use in NVAF patients with other types of VHD. After an extensive literature search, a total of 1 prospective controlled trial, 4 subanalyses, and 1 abstract were identified. Efficacy of the DOAC agents in NVAF patients with VHD mirrored the overall trial results. Bleeding risk was significantly increased in VHD patients treated with rivaroxaban, but not for dabigatran or apixaban. Of the bioprosthetic valve patients enrolled in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial, no safety or efficacy concerns were identified. In conclusion, subanalyses of DOAC landmark AF trials revealed that dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban may be safely used in AF patients with certain types of VHD: aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, and mitral regurgitation. More evidence is needed before routinely recommending these agents for patients with bioprosthetic valves or mild mitral stenosis. Patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis or mechanical valves should continue to receive warfarin, as these patients were excluded from all landmark AF trials.

  15. Evaluation of Acquired Valvular Heart Disease by the Pediatrician: When to Follow, When to Refer for Intervention? Part I.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anita

    2015-11-01

    Lesions of the heart valves are the commonest acquired cardiac abnormalities seen in pediatric age group. In India, the underlying cause for most valvular diseases is chronic rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The aim of evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease is not only to make a diagnosis, but also to decide the management plan. The pediatrician or physician is usually the first health care provider to whom such patients (or their parents) report. It is therefore imperative that the general physician and pediatricians are well versed with valvular heart diseases. Valvular abnormalities produce characteristic murmurs and a bedside diagnosis is possible in majority. However, further investigations such as X ray of the chest and an ECG are useful tools to refine the diagnosis. Echocardiography is now widely available to most of the patients in India and is very useful for assessing the severity of valve lesion and to identify the underlying etiology. Serial echocardiography is instrumental in deciding the timing of intervention. Mitral valve is most commonly affected followed by aortic; in some patients both valves may be affected. The valve may not close properly, resulting in regurgitation of blood flow in reverse direction or does not open fully (stenosis). In mitral regurgitation (MR), the blood flows in the reverse direction. MR can occur secondary to several causes, but in India, the commonest cause is RHD. Patient may remain asymptpmatic for a long period of time. Symptoms include fatigue, palpitations and later exertional breathlessness. MR typically produces a pansystolic murmur at apex, which may radiate to left axilla. Surgical intervention is reserved for all symptomatic patients with severe MR. Valve repair is preferred over prosthetic valve replacement. Mitral stenosis (MS) is almost always due to RHD. Severe MS results in pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular failure and tricuspid regurgitation. Patients are often symptomatic with dyspnea

  16. Prognosis of patients with carcinoid heart disease after valvular surgery.

    PubMed

    Manoly, Imthiaz; McAnelly, Sarah-Louise; Sriskandarajah, Sanjeevan; McLaughlin, Kenneth Edward

    2014-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We addressed the following question: in patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease (CHD), do valvular surgeries improve their prognosis? Fifty percent of the patients with clinically diagnosed carcinoid syndrome had cardiac involvement which was present either as valvular dysfunction or as cardiac metastases. These patients often require surgery due to their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 217 relevant papers were identified as a result of the below-mentioned search, of which 10 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Of the patients who were identified to have carcinoid heart disease in different studies, 193 patients had valve procedure, mainly replacements at tricuspid, mitral and aortic valve positions and either valvuloplasty or replacement at pulmonary valve. Tricuspid and pulmonary valves represented the majority of the excised valves among patients undergoing valvular surgery for CHD. The pathology of carcinoid valve was attributed to the presence of plaque, causing thickening and retraction. Pure regurgitation was the most common finding in all the valves except pulmonary valve which had both stenosis and insufficiency. Thirty-day mortality was 17% (range 1-63%) and long-term survivors were reported to be alive at an average of 58 months (28-80 months) after the valve surgery. The evidence demonstrates that surgical intervention can lead to improved prognosis and reduce the symptoms of heart failure. Postoperative mortality was mainly due to the carcinoid disease itself and not as a complication of the surgery. Therefore, surgery could be considered for symptomatic palliation in carefully selected individuals.

  17. Sinus Rhythm in Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis after Balloon Mitral Valvotomy: Is it Feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anand N; Shah, Saurin; Nayak, Vidya; Prabhu, Sridevi; Pai, Umesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is largely present in patients with rheumatic valvular disease, leading to hospitalizations. Aim We aimed to study the restoration and maintenance of Sinus Rhythm (SR) in rheumatic patients with Mitral Stenosis (MS) and AF after Balloon Mitral Valvotomy (BMV) and evaluated the factors which affect the maintenance of SR. Materials and Methods A total of 50 patients who underwent BMV at U. N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Centre from 2010 November to 2013 January were included in the study. Subsequently, all patients were treated with amiodarone and electrical cardioversion was applied in patients in whom it was necessary. The patients were followed for six months for conversion and maintenance of SR. Results Total 34 (68%) patients reverted to SR. Twelve patients reverted to SR with amiodarone and 22 patients with electrical cardioversion and amiodarone. Out of the total, 29 patients and 26 patients remained in SR at the end of follow up at 3 months and 6 months respectively. Conclusion Smaller Left Atrial (LA) size and greater Mitral Valve Area (MVA) are the chief predictors of restoration and maintenance of SR. Combining BMV with an aggressive anti-arrhythmic strategy offers the best prospect of rhythm control. PMID:28384905

  18. The unnatural history of valvular heart disease: late results with silastic ball valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Freimanis, I; Starr, A

    1984-01-01

    The development of prosthetic heart valves successfully arrested the dismal natural history of valvular heart disease for thousands of patients. The experiences of numerous investigators provided a setting wherein the design and implantation of the silastic ball valves led to improved survival with both aortic and mitral valve replacement. Refinement of the caged-ball design was based on clinical and laboratory findings. In the mitral position, valve related thromboembolism was reduced from 38% to 3%. With the aortic prostheses the problem of ball variance was overcome by reducing trauma to the poppet and altering its heat curing process. In 1967 a completely cloth covered valve was introduced to reduce further the thromboembolic rate. Significant improvement in the embolus-free rate was ultimately found to be dependent on the year of operation with introduction of the time-frame concept. The current mitral silastic ball valve, Model 6120, yields an actuarial survival of 72 (+/- 3%), 54 (+/- 5%), and 37 (+/- 5%) for five, ten and fifteen years respectively. For aortic valve replacement, current Model 1260, the actuarial survival is 71 (+/- 2%), 58 (+/- 3%) and 48 (+/- 4%) for five, ten and fifteen years respectively. Late results are compared to other valvular prostheses.

  19. Platelet function and activation in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Linda J; Hosgood, Giselle L; French, Anne T; Irwin, Peter J; Shiel, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess platelet closure time (CT), mean platelet component (MPC) concentration, and platelet component distribution width (PCDW) in dogs with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease. ANIMALS 89 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and 39 control dogs (not CKCSs). PROCEDURES Platelet count, MPC concentration, PCDW, and Hct were measured by use of a hematology analyzer, and CT was measured by use of a platelet function analyzer. Murmur grade and echocardiographic variables (mitral valve regurgitant jet size relative to left atrial area, left atrial-to-aortic diameter ratio, and left ventricular internal dimensions) were recorded. Associations between explanatory variables (sex, age, murmur grade, echocardiographic variables, platelet count, and Hct) and outcomes (CT, MPC concentration, and PCDW) were examined by use of multivariate regression models. RESULTS A model with 5 variables best explained variation in CT (R(2), 0.74), with > 60% of the variance of CT explained by mitral valve regurgitant jet size. The model of best fit to explain variation in MPC concentration included only platelet count (R(2), 0.24). The model of best fit to explain variation in PCDW included platelet count and sex (R(2), 0.25). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, a significant effect of mitral valve regurgitant jet size on CT was consistent with platelet dysfunction. However, platelet activation, as assessed on the basis of the MPC concentration and PCDW, was not a feature of subclinical chronic valvular heart disease in CKCSs.

  20. Problem: Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Vascular Health Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Problem: Mitral Valve Regurgitation Updated:Sep 21,2016 What is mitral valve ... blood flows from the ventricle through the aortic valve — as it should — and some blood flows ...

  1. Reversible mitral and aortic regurgitation due to pioglitazone.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil K; Tripathy, Prabhas R; Kota, Siva K; Jammula, Sruti; Panda, Sandip; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2012-01-01

    To report the occurrence of pioglitazone-induced reversible valvular regurgitant lesions. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging data are reported on a patient with known type 2 diabetes mellitus, who was prescribed pioglitazone to achieve better glycemic control. We present a case report of a 50-year-old woman, in whom diabetes had been diagnosed 5 years previously, who developed severe mitral and aortic regurgitation during 5 months of treatment with pioglitazone along with clinical and laboratory indications of fluid retention. Echocardiography 5 months after discontinued use of pioglitazone showed regression of regurgitant lesions and normalization of pertinent laboratory variables. Five months of treatment with pioglitazone could potentially induce major cardiac valvular dysfunction, which was reversible in our patient. This report emphasizes the importance of carefully monitoring patients during treatment with thiazolidinediones.

  2. Overexpression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in the valvular fibrosis of chronic rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lucia; Kim, Do Kyun; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Dong Hwan; Jung, Ick Mo; Park, Han Ki; Chang, Byung Chul

    2008-02-01

    For the purpose of determining the pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta 1) in the mechanism of chronic rheumatic heart disease, we evaluated the expression of TGF-beta 1, proliferation of myofibroblasts, and changes in extracellular matrix components including collagen and proteoglycan in 30 rheumatic mitral valves and in 15 control valves. High TGF-beta 1 expression was identified in 21 cases (70%) of rheumatic mitral valves, whereas only 3 cases (20%) of the control group showed high TGF-beta 1 expression (p<0.001). Additionally, increased proliferation of myofibroblasts was observed in the rheumatic valves. High TGF-beta1 expression positively correlated with the proliferation of myofibroblasts (p=0.004), valvular fibrosis (p<0.001), inflammatory cell infiltration (p=0.004), neovascularization (p=0.007), and calcification (p<0.001) in the valvular leaflets. The ratio of proteoglycan to collagen deposition inversely correlated with TGF-beta 1 expression in mitral valves (p=0.040). In conclusion, an ongoing inflammatory process, the expression of TGF-beta 1, and proliferation of myofibroblasts within the valves have a potential role in the valvular fibrosis, calcification, and changes in the extracellular matrix that lead to the scarring sequelae of rheumatic heart disease.

  3. Exercise stress echocardiography in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Newby, David E; Stewart, Ralph A H; Lee, Mildred; Gabriel, Ruvin; Van Pelt, Niels; Kerr, Andrew J

    2015-09-01

    Stress echocardiography is recommended for the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe valvular heart disease (VHD) when there is discrepancy between symptoms and resting markers of severity. The aim of this study is to determine the prognostic value of exercise stress echocardiography in patients with common valve lesions. One hundred and fifteen patients with VHD (aortic stenosis (n=28); aortic regurgitation (n=35); mitral regurgitation, (n=26); mitral stenosis (n=26)), and age- and sex-matched controls (n=39) with normal ejection fraction underwent exercise stress echocardiography. The primary endpoint was a composite of death or hospitalization for heart failure. Asymptomatic VHD patients had lower exercise capacity than controls and 37% of patients achieved <85% of their predicted metabolic equivalents (METS). There were three deaths and four hospital admissions, and 24 patients underwent surgery during follow-up. An abnormal stress echocardiogram (METS <5, blood pressure rise <20 mmHg, or pulmonary artery pressure post exercise >60 mmHg) was associated with an increased risk of death or hospital admission (14% vs 1%, P<0.0001). The assessment of contractile reserve did not offer additional predictive value. In conclusion, an abnormal stress echocardiogram is associated with death and hospitalization with heart failure at 2 years. Stress echocardiography should be considered as part of the routine follow-up of all asymptomatic patients with VHD.

  4. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  5. Genetics of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    LaHaye, Stephanie; Lincoln, Joy; Garg, Vidu

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and often the result of congenital malformations. However, the prevalence is increasing in adults not only because of the growing aging population, but also because of improvements in the medical and surgical care of children with congenital heart valve defects. The success of the Human Genome Project and major advances in genetic technologies, in combination with our increased understanding of heart valve development, has led to the discovery of numerous genetic contributors to heart valve disease. These have been uncovered using a variety of approaches including the examination of familial valve disease and genome-wide association studies to investigate sporadic cases. This review will discuss these findings and their implications in the treatment of valvular heart disease.

  6. New procedure for treatment of atrial fibrillation in patients with valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Safaie, Naser; Maghamipour, Nasrollah; Jodati, Ahmad Reza; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Dashtaki, Leila; Hakimzadeh, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease suffer from atrial fibrillation for more than 12 months after valve surgery and have a low probability of remaining in sinus rhythm. We performed an intra-operative procedure similar to surgical maze ІІІ procedure for conversion of this arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. We did this study to evaluate the efficacy of this procedure to restore the sinus rhythm in patients with valvular heart disease. 28 patients with valvular heart disease and chronic persistent atrial fibrillation underwent different combinations of valve surgery and concomitant reduction of left and right atrial size and resection of both atrial auricles in Shahid Madani cardiothoracic center from September 2004 to October 2008. The procedure for atrial fibrillation treatment was performed with cardiopulmonary bypass and after mitral valve replacement. There was one in-hospital death postoperatively because of respiratory failure, but no other complication till 6 months after the operation. Out of 28 patients, 23 were in sinus rhythm one week after the operation, one patient had junctional rhythm after the operation that restored to sinus rhythm and 4 patients had persistent atrial fibrillation. During the 12-month follow up, atrial fibrillation was corrected in 82.14%. Doppler echocardiography in these patients with sinus rhythm demonstrated good atrial contractility. This procedure on both atria is effective and less invasive than the original maze procedure to eliminate the atrial fibrillation, and can be performed in patients with valvular heart disease without increasing the risk of operation.

  7. Trileaflet Mitral Valve with Three Papillary Muscles Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Novel Case.

    PubMed

    Rosanio, Salvatore; Simonsen, Cameron J; Starwalt, John; Keylani, Abdul M; Vitarelli, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mitral valve (MV) malformations are uncommon, except for MV prolapse. Despite their infrequency, most of them are well-known and defined entities, such as congenital MV stenosis with two papillary muscles, parachute MV, supravalvular mitral ring, hypoplastic MV, isolated cleft in the anterior and/or posterior leaflets, and double-orifice MV. A trileaflet MV with three separate papillary muscles with concordant atrioventricular and ventricle-arterial connections is exceptionally rare. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it has been reported only once in association with subaortic valvular stenosis. We hereby describe a novel case associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surgical treatment of acute infective valvular endocarditis (18 years experience).

    PubMed

    Knyshov, G V; Rudenko, A V; Vorobyova, A M; Atamanyuk, M Y; Krykunov, O A

    2001-01-01

    Infective endocarditis morbidity remains high: 3 to 8 cases per 100,000 of population. Antibiotic therapy is ineffective. Its surgical treatment experience is relatively limited. To share the surgical treatment experience of 855 patients with acute infective valvular endocarditis (AIVE) treated during 1982 to 2000 in the Institute of Cardiovascular Surgery AMS, Ukraine. 855 (75.4%) of 1128 hospitalized patients with AIVE were operated upon. Surgical interventions included removal of diseased tissues, heart chambers treatment with antiseptic solutions, wash out with normal saline solution, replacement or plastic procedure of valves. Heart abscesses were found in 132 (15.5%) patients. Hospital mortality was after aortic valve replacement 12.6%; mitral valve replacement 9.7%; plastic procedure on mitral valve 0%; aortic and mitral valve replacement 30%; tricuspid valve replacement 15.4%; and plastic procedure on tricuspid valve 6.1%. Recurrences of infective process occurred in 51 (6.0%) patients. Infections were observed more frequently in patients with heart abscesses: 10.6% versus 5.7% (p < 0.02). 716 (96.7%) patients were studied 2 to 194 (87.4+/-39.4) months postoperatively. Tenth year postoperative survival was 62.1+/-27.7% including hospital mortality. (1) AIVE has become one of the most frequent causes of acquired heart lesions in the postChernobyl nuclear power station catastrophe era. (2) Heart failure development in postoperative period is stipulated by the disease duration. (3) Presence of heart abscesses favors recurrence of development of infective endocarditis. (4) Postoperative antibiotic therapy for more than 3 weeks does not help in prevention of recurrences.

  9. [Heart murmur--auscultation or echocardiography in the diagnostic assessment of congenital or valvular heart disease?].

    PubMed

    Attenhofer Jost, C H

    2006-07-01

    The incidence of patients with degenerative valvular but also of patients with congenital heart disease surviving until adulthood or even old age will increase in the next decades. Auscultation with the stethoscope remains an important diagnostic means in the detection and treatment of heart disease. Heart murmurs (especially systolic heart murmurs) are extremely common. There are helpful clues to differentiate heart murmurs. It can occasionally be relatively simple to differentiate a systolic murmur due to valvular heart disease from an innocent, ejection murmur; however, there are important limitations of auscultation. Overall, auscultation and clinical examination alone do not suffice to correctly diagnose and treat patients with heart failure or a murmur Clinically significant aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation and mitral regurgitation as well as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are not uncommonly missed or misinterpreted. An echocardiographic exam is mandatory in all patients with more than a soft systolic murmur, any diastolic murmur, cardiac symptoms and/or ECG changes.

  10. [ESC guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. What has changed and what is new?].

    PubMed

    Mangner, N; Schuler, G

    2013-12-01

    In 2012 the new and collaborative "Guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease (version 2012)" were published by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS). These guidelines emphasize that decision-making in patients with valvular heart disease should ideally be carried out by a"heart team" with particular expertise in valvular heart disease. In aortic regurgitation pathologies of the aortic root are frequent and in patients with Marfan syndrome, surgery is indicated when the maximal ascending aortic diameter is ≥50 mm, while the threshold for intervention should be lower in patients with risk factors for progression. Regarding aortic stenosis, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) should be performed only in hospitals with on-site cardiac surgery and with a"heart team" available to assess patient risks. The TAVI procedure is indicated in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are judged by the"heart team" to be unsuitable for surgery but have sufficient life expectancy. It should be considered for high-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis based on the individual risk profile assessed by the"heart team". Furthermore, low flow - low gradient aortic stenosis with normal ejection fraction and the difficult topic of asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis and the indications for aortic valve replacement are discussed. With respect to mitral regurgitation, valve repair should be the preferred technique when it is expected to be durable. The topics of asymptomatic mitral regurgitation as well as percutaneous mitral valve repair using the edge to edge technique as an alternative for high risk patients are discussed. Tricuspid disease should not be forgotten and during left-sided valve surgery, tricuspid valve surgery should be considered in the presence of mild to moderate secondary regurgitation if there is significant annular dilatation. Last but not least

  11. Mechanics of mitral valve edge-to-edge-repair and MitraClip procedure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shamik; He, Zhaoming

    2015-01-01

    The edge-to-edge repair (ETER) technique has been used as a stand-alone procedure, or as a secondary procedure with ring annuloplasty for degenerative, functional mitral regurgitation, or for mitral regurgitation of other kinds of valvular etiologies. The percutaneous MitraClip technique based on ETER has been used in patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. However, adverse events such as residual mitral regurgitation, and clip detachment or fracture indicate that the mechanics underlying these procedures is not well understood. Therefore, current studies on mitral valve functionality and mechanics related to the ETER and MitraClip procedures are reviewed to improve the efficacy and safety of both procedures. Extensive in vivo, in vitro, and in silico studies related to ETER and MitraClip procedures along with MitraClip clinical trial results are presented and discussed herein. The ETER suture force and the mitral valve tissue mechanics and hemodynamics of each procedure are discussed. A quantitative understanding of the interplay of mitral valve components and as to biological response to the procedures remains challenging. Based on mitral valve mechanics, ETER or MitraClip therapy can be optimized to enhance repair efficacy and durability.

  12. [Mitral valve replacement for four times with three kinds of prosthetic valve dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Nozomi; Ito, Satoshi; Sakano, Yasuhito; Konishi, Hiroaki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    There are 2 major types of prosthetic valve replacement complications; structural valvular deterioration and nonstructural dysfunction. Nonstructural dysfunction includes valve thrombosis, paravalvular leak, prosthetic valve endocarditis and bleeding event. Primary tissue failure is the most common reason for mitral valve replacement (MVR) with tissue valves, and paravalvular leak is also a common factor of MVR in repeated MVR cases. We report a case of a woman who has undergone MVR for four times. She underwent the 1st MVR with a tissue valve 19 years ago because of mitral valve regurgitation. Nine years after the initial operation, structural valvular deterioration developed and she underwent the 2nd MVR with a mechanical prosthesis. Two years after the 2nd operation, she underwent the 3rd MVR because of repeated prosthetic valve thrombosis. Paravalvular leak was recognized 8 years after the 3rd operation and she underwent the 4th MVR. Her postoperative course was uneventful.

  13. [Spontaneous return of sinus rhythm in mitralic fibrillation of long duration (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, M; Cappelletti, F; Maiolino, P; Morlino, T; Ometto, R

    1976-01-01

    A case of mitral valvular disease in which spontaneous return of sinus rhythm occurred after 12 years of atrial fibrillation is reported. The course of the disease, complicated by A.V. and intraventricular conduction disturbances which made the insertion of a pacemaker necessary, suggests that return to sinus rhythm should not be considered necessarily an improvement in the clinical picture and in the prognosis in such patients.

  14. Mitral Valve Prolapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergy, Gordon G.

    1980-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is the most common heart disease seen in college and university health services. It underlies most arrhythmia and many chest complaints. Activity and exercise restrictions are usually unnecessary. (Author/CJ)

  15. Mitral Valve Prolapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergy, Gordon G.

    1980-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is the most common heart disease seen in college and university health services. It underlies most arrhythmia and many chest complaints. Activity and exercise restrictions are usually unnecessary. (Author/CJ)

  16. [Ischaemic mitral insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Messas, E

    2004-06-01

    Ischaemic mitral insufficiency (IMI) due to regurgitation of an anatomically normal valve, due to dysfunction directly related to myocardial ischaemia, is observed in over 20% of post-infarction patients and is associated with a doubling of the risk of death. The responsibility of ventricular remodelling with displacement of the papillary muscles in the genesis of IMI has been demonstrated experimentally. 3-D echocardiography has improved our understanding of the central role of geometrical changes of the subvalvular apparatus. The inconsistent results of surgery using an undersized mitral annulus have led to the search for alternative techniques. The correction of mitral insufficiency at coronary bypass surgery is a current topic of research. The application of new techniques of mitral valvuloplasty seems more effective and should provide an answer to this problem.

  17. Mathematical multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including mitral valve dynamics. Application to ischemic mitral insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Valve dysfunction is a common cardiovascular pathology. Despite significant clinical research, there is little formal study of how valve dysfunction affects overall circulatory dynamics. Validated models would offer the ability to better understand these dynamics and thus optimize diagnosis, as well as surgical and other interventions. Methods A cardiovascular and circulatory system (CVS) model has already been validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics using Heaviside functions to simulate a physiologically accurate "open on pressure, close on flow" law. However, it does not consider real-time valve opening dynamics and therefore does not fully capture valve dysfunction, particularly where the dysfunction involves partial closure. This research describes an updated version of this previous closed-loop CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve, and is defined over the full cardiac cycle. Results Simulations of the cardiovascular system with healthy mitral valve are performed, and, the global hemodynamic behaviour is studied compared with previously validated results. The error between resulting pressure-volume (PV) loops of already validated CVS model and the new CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve is assessed and remains within typical measurement error and variability. Simulations of ischemic mitral insufficiency are also performed. Pressure-Volume loops, transmitral flow evolution and mitral valve aperture area evolution follow reported measurements in shape, amplitude and trends. Conclusions The resulting cardiovascular system model including mitral valve dynamics provides a foundation for clinical validation and the study of valvular dysfunction in vivo. The overall models and results could readily be generalised to other cardiac valves. PMID:21942971

  18. Impact of anesthesia on valvular function in normal rats during echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Droogmans, Steven; Lauwers, Rinaldo; Cosyns, Bernard; Roosens, Bram; Franken, Philippe R; Weytjens, Caroline; Bossuyt, Axel; Lahoutte, Tony; Schoors, Danny; Van Camp, Guy

    2008-10-01

    Anesthetic agents have different effects on hemodynamic and cardiac functional parameters. The influence of these changes on valvular function has not been studied in small animals. For this purpose, 48 male Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups. An echocardiogram was performed under inhaled isoflurane 2% gas (group I) or under intraperitoneal pentobarbital 50 mg/kg (group II) or ketamine/xylazine (group III) 40/8 mg/kg. Aortic regurgitation was only found in group III (80%, p < 0.0001 vs. groups I and II). Pulmonary and mitral regurgitation (PR, MR) were observed in all groups but were more frequent in group III (PR 67%, MR 100%) compared with group I (PR 13%, p = 0.003; MR 44%, p = 0.001 vs. group III) and group II (PR 19%, p = 0.011; MR 25%, p < 0.0001 vs. group III). Moreover, valvular regurgitations in group III (except tricuspid regurgitation) were more severe compared with groups I and II. The findings in group III were the result of increased blood pressure and afterload, left ventricular (LV) dilation and decreased function. Also in group III, the regurgitations diminished over time as the blood pressure decreased and LV function recovered. Isoflurane and pentobarbital had less pronounced effects on valvular function (5 and 10 min after induction, respectively) compared with ketamine/xylazine and, therefore, might be the anesthetics of choice for valvular evaluation in male Wistar rats. In conclusion, anesthesia causes hemodynamic changes that may result in functional valvular regurgitations in normal rats.

  19. Percutaneous mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Block, Peter C

    2003-02-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) associated with, ischemic, and degenerative (prolapse) disease, contributes to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction due to remodeling, and LV dilation, resulting in worsening of MR. Mitral valve (MV) surgical repair has provided improvement in survival, LV function and symptoms, especially when performed early. Surgical repair is complex, due to diverse etiologies and has significant complications. The Society for Thoracic Surgery database shows that operative mortality for a 1st repair is 2% and for re-do repair is 4 times that. Cardiopulmonary bypass and cardiac arrest are required. The attendant morbidity prolongs hospitalization and recovery. Alfieri simplified mitral repair using an edge-to-edge technique which subsequently has been shown to be effective for multiple etiologies of MR. The MV leaflers are typically brought together by a central suture producing a double orifice MV without stenosis. Umana reported that MR decreased from grade 3.6 +/- 0.5 to 0.8 +/- 0.4 (P < 0.0001) and LV ejection fraction increased from 33 +/- 13% to 45 +/- 11% (P = 0.0156). In 121 patients, Maisano reported freedom from re-operation of 95 +/- 4.8% with up to 6 year follow-up. Oz developed a MV "grasper" that is directly placed via a left ventriculotomy and coapts both leaflets which are then fastened by a graduated spiral screw. An in-vitro model using explanted human valves showed significant reduction in MR and in canine studies, animals followed by serial echo had persistent MV coaptation. At 12 weeks the device was endothelialized. These promising results have paved the way for a percutaneous or minimally invasive-off pump mitral repair. Evalve has developed catheter-based technology, which, by apposing the edges of a regurgitant MV, results in edge-to-edge repair. Release of the device is done after echo and fluoroscopic evaluation under normal loading conditions. If the desired effect is not produced the device can be repositioned or retrieved

  20. Spontaneous echo contrast masking thrombus in giant left atrium of mitral stenosis-a dilemma in clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Akm Monwarul; Salam, Md Abdus; Sayeed, Md Zahidus; Kibria, Md Golam

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous echo contrast (SEC) and thrombus in enlarged left atrium (LA) are common in mitral valvular disease (MVD) and SEC is considered to be a prethrombotic condition. Reliable exclusion of LA thrombus is important before any definitive curative attempts like percutaneous transluminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC), closed mitral commissurotomy (CMC) or innovative therapies like pulmonary vein isolation and percutaneous closure of the LA appendage. Echocardiography, particularly the transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is considered to be the gold standard for the diagnosis and to exclude LA thrombus. However, LA thrombus may remain rarely undetected even by TEE potentially making the interventions a risky job. We present a case of mitral stenosis (MS) with giant LA where profuse, dense SEC masked the underlying thrombus in the LA cavity.

  1. Spontaneous echo contrast masking thrombus in giant left atrium of mitral stenosis-a dilemma in clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Islam, AKM Monwarul; Salam, Md. Abdus; Sayeed, Md. Zahidus; Kibria, Md. Golam

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous echo contrast (SEC) and thrombus in enlarged left atrium (LA) are common in mitral valvular disease (MVD) and SEC is considered to be a prethrombotic condition. Reliable exclusion of LA thrombus is important before any definitive curative attempts like percutaneous transluminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC), closed mitral commissurotomy (CMC) or innovative therapies like pulmonary vein isolation and percutaneous closure of the LA appendage. Echocardiography, particularly the transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is considered to be the gold standard for the diagnosis and to exclude LA thrombus. However, LA thrombus may remain rarely undetected even by TEE potentially making the interventions a risky job. We present a case of mitral stenosis (MS) with giant LA where profuse, dense SEC masked the underlying thrombus in the LA cavity. PMID:26649032

  2. [Physiopathology of mitral mechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Groupe de travail "Cardiomyopathies et insuffisance cardiaque" de la Société Française de Cardiologie].

    PubMed

    Hagège, A; Desnos, M; Komajda, M; Dubourg, O; Isnard, R; Guicheney, P; Schwartz, K; Lévine, R A

    1994-10-01

    Ventricular hypertrophy, the only indisputable phenotypical marker of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is the basis of the physiopathology and treatment of the disease. Mitral valve abnormalities are usually considered to be secondary to the hypertrophy but the genesis of systolic anterior motion by the Venturi effect has been questioned by many clinical and experimental observations. Abnormalities of the mitral valve apparatus may in themselves (elongation of the valves, antero-internal malposition of the mitral papillary muscles and/or hyperlaxicity of antero-internal corhdae tendinae) create systolic anterior motion or subaortic obstruction in the absence of septal hypertrophy and/or increased subaortic flow velocities. Anatomo-clinical studies have confirmed this hypothesis: a high prevalence of mitral valve disease (increased valvular surface and length) has been found in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The recognition of these abnormalities is of value from the therapeutic (mitral valvuloplasty) diagnostic (in borderline cases) and genetic (when the primary nature of the abnormalities is confirmed) points of view.

  3. Silent destruction of aortic and mitral valve by Klebsiella pneumoniae endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, K H; Sharma, Rajni; Agrawal, Navin; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella endocarditis rarely affects the native valve especially in the immunocompromised and the elderly. We report a case of Klebsiella endocarditis in a 60-year-old man who had a nidus of infection on the aortic valve which led to severe aortic regurgitation. This possibly spread to the anterior mitral leaflet (AML) leading to AML perforation therefore causing moderate mitral regurgitation. The reason for this suspicion was that there was perforation of the AML in the absence of vegetation. Noteworthy is that he was asymptomatic apart from generalised fatigue. This case draws our attention to the nature of Klebsiella valvular affection due to the fact that it had bitten the aortic and mitral valve silently and compelled the patient to undergo double valve replacement without having a prolonged duration of symptomatic illness thereby calling for high suspicion especially in individuals in the extremes of ages where the symptoms are less-guiding than the signs. PMID:24057412

  4. Timing surgery in mitral regurgitation: defining risk and optimising intervention using stress echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nicola C; Ray, Simon; Steeds, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the second most common form of valvular disease requiring surgery. Correct identification of surgical candidates and optimising the timing of surgery are key in management. For primary MR, this relies upon a balance between the peri-operative risks and rates of successful repair in patients undergoing early surgery when asymptomatic with the potential risk of irreversible left ventricular dysfunction if intervention is performed too late. For secondary MR, recognition that this is a highly dynamic condition where MR severity may change is key, although data on outcomes in determining whether concomitant valve intervention is performed with revascularisation has raised questions regarding timing of surgery. There has been substantial interest in the use of stress echocardiography to risk stratify patients in mitral regurgitation. This article reviews the role of stress echocardiography in both primary and secondary mitral regurgitation and discusses how this can help clinicians tackle the challenges of this prevalent condition. PMID:27737905

  5. Genetic Associations with Valvular Calcification and Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Thanassoulis, George; Campbell, Catherine Y.; Owens, David S.; Smith, J. Gustav; Smith, Albert V.; Peloso, Gina M.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Budoff, Matthew J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Malhotra, Rajeev; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Kamstrup, Pia R.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Allison, Matthew A.; Aspelund, Thor; Criqui, Michael H.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Liu, Yongmei; Sjogren, Marketa; van der Pals, Jesper; Kälsch, Hagen; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Caslake, Muriel; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Danesh, John; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Wong, Quenna; Erbel, Raimund; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease. METHODS We determined genomewide associations with the presence of aorticvalve calcification (among 6942 participants) and mitral annular calcification (among 3795 participants), as detected by computed tomographic (CT) scanning; the study population for this analysis included persons of white European ancestry from three cohorts participating in the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium (discovery population). Findings were replicated in independent cohorts of persons with either CT-detected valvular calcification or clinical aortic stenosis. RESULTS One SNP in the lipoprotein(a) (LPA) locus (rs10455872) reached genomewide significance for the presence of aorticvalve calcification (odds ratio per allele, 2.05; P = 9.0×10−10), a finding that was replicated in additional white European, African-American, and Hispanic-American cohorts (P<0.05 for all comparisons). Genetically determined Lp(a) levels, as predicted by LPA genotype, were also associated with aorticvalve calcification, supporting a causal role for Lp(a). In prospective analyses, LPA genotype was associated with incident aortic stenosis (hazard ratio per allele, 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32 to 2.15) and aortic-valve replacement (hazard ratio, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.27) in a large Swedish cohort; the association with incident aortic stenosis was also replicated in an independent Danish cohort. Two SNPs (rs17659543 and rs13415097) near the proinflammatory gene IL1F9 achieved genomewide significance for mitral annular calcification (P = 1.5×10−8 and P = 1.8×10−8, respectively), but the findings were not replicated consistently. CONCLUSIONS Genetic variation in the LPA locus, mediated by Lp(a) levels, is associated with aorticvalve calcification across multiple ethnic groups and with incident

  6. Cohort profile: prevalence of valvular heart disease in community patients with suspected heart failure in UK

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Anna; Glover, Keli; Sharma, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of suspected heart failure patients with significant valvular heart disease. Early diagnosis of valve disease is essential as delay can limit treatment and negatively affect prognosis for undiagnosed patients. The prevalence of unsuspected valve disease in the community is uncertain. Participants We prospectively evaluated 79 043 patients, between 2001 and 2011, who were referred to a community open access echocardiography service for suspected heart failure. All patients underwent a standard transthoracic echocardiogram according to British Society of Echocardiography guidelines. Findings to date Of the total number, 29 682 patients (37.5%) were diagnosed with mild valve disease, 8983 patients (11.3%) had moderate valve disease and 2134 (2.7%) had severe valve disease. Of the total number of patients scanned, the prevalence of aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, mitral stenosis, mitral regurgitation was 10%, 8.4%, 1%, and 12.5% respectively. 18% had tricuspid regurgitation. 5% had disease involving one or more valves. Conclusions Of patients with suspected heart failure in the primary care setting, a significant proportion have important valvular heart disease. These patients are at high risk of future cardiac events and will require onward referral for further evaluation. We recommend that readily available community echocardiography services should be provided for general practitioners as this will result in early detection of valve disease. PMID:28131996

  7. Assessment of trans-aortic pressure gradient using a coronary pressure wire in patients with mechanical aortic and mitral valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kherada, Nisharahmed; Brenes, Juan Carlos; Kini, Annapoorna S; Dangas, George D

    2017-03-15

    Accurate evaluation of trans-aortic valvular pressure gradients is challenging in cases where dual mechanical aortic and mitral valve prostheses are present. Non-invasive Doppler echocardiographic imaging has its limitations due to multiple geometric assumptions. Invasive measurement of trans-valvular gradients with cardiac catheterization can provide further information in patients with two mechanical valves, where simultaneous pressure measurements in the left ventricle and ascending aorta must be obtained. Obtaining access to the left ventricle via the mitral valve after a trans-septal puncture is not feasible in the case of a concomitant mechanical mitral valve, whereas left ventricular apical puncture technique is associated with high procedural risks. Retrograde crossing of a bileaflet mechanical aortic prosthesis with standard catheters is associated with the risk of catheter entrapment and acute valvular regurgitation. In these cases, the assessment of trans-valvular gradients using a 0.014˝ diameter coronary pressure wire technique has been described in a few case reports. We present the case of a 76-year-old female with rheumatic valvular heart disease who underwent mechanical aortic and mitral valve replacement in the past. She presented with decompensated heart failure and echocardiographic findings suggestive of elevated pressure gradient across the mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. The use of a high-fidelity 0.014˝ diameter coronary pressure guidewire resulted in the detection of a normal trans-valvular pressure gradient across the mechanical aortic valve. This avoided a high-risk third redo valve surgery in our patient. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Atrioventricular valvular anomalies and their role in the etiopathogenesis of cardiorespiratory syndrome in farmed common foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Noszczyk-Nowak, Agnieszka; Piasecki, Tomasz; Cepiel, Alicja; Nowak, Marcin; Janus, Izabela; Pasławska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory syndrome of common foxes is associated with a mortality rate ranging from 2.1% to 20%. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of cardiac abnormalities in common foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Polish farms with a history of cardiorespiratory syndrome. The prevalence of cardiac abnormalities in common foxes from a Polish farm with a history of cardiorespiratory syndrome was assessed as well as morphological examination of 60 heart specimens from clinically healthy animals. In addition, 38 foxes were examined echocardiographically and subjected to postmortem examination. Atrioventricular valvular abnormalities were found in 57 out of the 98 (58%) analyzed hearts. The abnormalities of the mitral valve documented in more than 20% of the foxes in involved tendinous chords (completely lacking or shortened), papillary muscles and mitral cusps associated with both insufficiency and stenosis of the left atrioventricular orifice. Abnormalities of the tricuspid valve included significant shortening of the tendinous chords and thickening of the valve cusps with the impairment of their mobility. The results of the echocardiographic and postmortem examination were consistent in 79% of the cases. The specimens collected from animals with and without atrioventricular valvular anomalies did not differ significantly in terms of cardiomyocyte width, number of inflammatory cells, adipose tissue content and presence of polychromatic cardiomyocytes. Congenital atrioventricular valvular defects may be involved in the etiology of cardiorespiratory syndrome in common foxes, and echocardiography can be used as a measure of stock's health and a criterion for selection for mating.

  9. Evaluation of Congenital Valvular Heart Diseases by the Pediatrician: When to Follow, When to Refer for Intervention?

    PubMed

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Raman Krishna

    2015-11-01

    Isolated congenital valvular heart disease in children constitutes a small fraction of congenital heart diseases. Valve involvement is seen more along with other congenital diseases. The most commonly involved valve is the pulmonary valve followed by the aortic valve. Stenotic lesions of the pulmonary and aortic valves are more frequently encountered than mitral and tricuspid valvular lesions. The presentation depends on the severity of the lesion and the age of the patient. Symptoms range from asymptomatic status to florid symptoms of valve obstruction and/or leak. Detailed clinical assessment and various imaging techniques confirm the diagnosis and help in management planning. Transcatheter balloon dilatation for obstructive pulmonary valve has very good long-term outcomes. The results of balloon dilation of aortic valve are also good enough for it to be the treatment of choice. Significant lesions of the mitral and tricuspid valve, regurgitant lesions, sub and supra valvular obstructions require surgical correction. Most valvar lesions mandate regular follow up. Communication and coordination between the pediatric cardiologist and the pediatrician helps in the optimal management.

  10. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  11. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding.

  12. Examination of mitral regurgitation with a goat heart model for the development of intelligent artificial papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Y; Yambe, T; Yoshizawa, M; Hashimoto, H; Yamada, A; Miura, H; Hashem, M; Kitano, T; Shiga, T; Homma, D

    2012-01-01

    Annuloplasty for functional mitral or tricuspid regurgitation has been made for surgical restoration of valvular diseases. However, these major techniques may sometimes be ineffective because of chamber dilation and valve tethering. We have been developing a sophisticated intelligent artificial papillary muscle (PM) by using an anisotropic shape memory alloy fiber for an alternative surgical reconstruction of the continuity of the mitral structural apparatus and the left ventricular myocardium. This study exhibited the mitral regurgitation with regard to the reduction in the PM tension quantitatively with an originally developed ventricular simulator using isolated goat hearts for the sophisticated artificial PM. Aortic and mitral valves with left ventricular free wall portions of isolated goat hearts (n=9) were secured on the elastic plastic membrane and statically pressurized, which led to valvular leaflet-papillary muscle positional change and central mitral regurgitation. PMs were connected to the load cell, and the relationship between the tension of regurgitation and PM tension were measured. Then we connected the left ventricular specimen model to our hydraulic ventricular simulator and achieved hemodynamic simulation with the controlled tension of PMs.

  13. [Atrial fibrillation concomitant with valvular heart disease].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease frequently have atrial fibrillation(AF) due to elevated pressure and dilatation of the left and right atria and pulmonary veins. Guidelines for valvular heart disease and AF recommend that surgical treatment for the valvular heart disease should be performed concomitantly with AF surgery. The Full-Maze procedure has evolved into the gold standard of treatment for medically refractory AF. In addition to the pulmonary vein isolation, the right and left atrial incisions of the Full-Maze procedure are designed to block potential macroreentrant pathways. According to the mechanisms of AF with valvular heart disease, the Full-Maze procedure is more effective for the patients than the pulmonary vein isolation alone.

  14. Radiation-associated valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, Daniel S; Aertker, Robert A; Clark, Alexandra N; Kiefer, Todd; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Bashore, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    Therapeutic ionizing radiation, such as that used in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, can cause cardiac valvular damage that may take several years to manifest as radiation-associated valvular heart disease. Treatment can be complicated by comorbid radiation injury to other cardiac and mediastinal structures that lead to traditional surgical valve replacement or repair becoming high-risk. A representative case is presented that demonstrates the complexity of radiation-associated valvular heart disease and its successful treatment with percutaneous transcatheter valve replacement. The prevalence and pathophysiologic mechanism of radiation-associated valvular injury are reviewed. Anthracycline adjuvant therapy appears to increase the risk of valvular fibrosis. Left-sided heart valves are more commonly affected than right-sided heart valves. A particular pattern of calcification has been noted in some patients, and experimental data suggest that radiation induction of an osteogenic phenotype may be responsible. A renewed appreciation of the cardiac valvular effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for mediastinal malignancies is important, and the treatment of such patients may be assisted by the development of novel, less-invasive approaches.

  15. Additional value of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography for patients with mitral valve stenosis undergoing balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Langerveld, Jorina; Valocik, Gabriel; Plokker, H W Thijs; Ernst, Sjef M P G; Mannaerts, Herman F J; Kelder, Johannes C; Kamp, Otto; Jaarsma, Wybren

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the additional value of 3-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) for patients with mitral valve stenosis undergoing percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy (PTMV). Therefore, in a series of 21 patients with severe mitral valve stenosis selected for PTMV, 3D TEE was performed before and after PTMV. The mitral valve area was assessed by planimetry pre- and post-PTMV; the mitral valve volume was assessed and attention was paid to the amount of fusion of the commissures. These results were compared with findings by 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography using pressure half-time method for assessment of mitral valve area, and were analyzed for the prediction of successful outcome. Pre-PTMV the mitral valve area assessed by 3D TEE was 1.0 +/- 0.3 cm(2) vs 1.2 +/- 0.4 cm(2) assessed by 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (P =.03) and post-PTMV it was 1.8 +/- 0.5 cm(2) vs 1.9 +/- 0.6 cm(2) (not significant), respectively. The mitral valve volume could be assessed by 3D TEE (mean 2.4 +/- 2.5 cm(3)) and was inversely correlated to a successful PTMV procedure (P <.001). The 3D TEE method enabled a better description of the mitral valvular anatomy, especially post-PTMV. We conclude that 3D TEE will have additional value over 2-dimensional echocardiography in this group of patients, for selection of patients pre-PTMV, and for analyzing pathology of the mitral valve afterward.

  16. Valvular heart disease in the community: a European experience.

    PubMed

    Iung, Bernard; Baron, Gabriel; Tornos, Pilar; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Butchart, Eric G; Vahanian, Alec

    2007-11-01

    The Euro Heart Survey on valvular heart disease included 5001 patients from 92 centers in 25 European countries in 2001: 71.9% had native valve disease and 28.1% had previously undergone valve surgery. Aortic stenosis (AS) and mitral regurgitation (MR) accounted for 43.1 and 33.6%, respectively, of single-valve diseases and were mostly caused by degenerative diseases. Mean age was 69 and 65 years, respectively, and at least one comorbidity was present in 36.3% of patients with AS and 41.7% with MR. Analysis of the therapeutic decision in patients with severe valve diseases showed that symptomatic patients were frequently denied surgery (32.3% in AS after the age of 75 and 51.3% in MR), more on the basis of age and left ventricular function than comorbidities. There was a better concordance between practice and guidelines concerning interventions in asymptomatic patients. These findings underline the need for better implementation of guidelines.

  17. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis with Jaccoud's arthropathy and valvular heart disease: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Amano, H; Furuhata, N; Tamura, N; Tokano, Y; Takasaki, Y

    2008-09-01

    We describe a female Japanese patient with concomitant hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, Jaccoud's arthropathy and valvular heart disease. In 1996, she developed arthritis with swelling of both proximal interphalangeal joints and urticarial vasculitis on both arms that was resolved by administration of glucocorticoid (prednisolone 30 mg/day). Tests for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor gave negative results. The findings of a skin biopsy examination were consistent with 'leukocytoclastic vasculitis'. During 10 years of observation, the patient manifested polyarthritis leading to progressive deformity of the joints of the hands and feet (without loss of cartilage or erosion of bone), persistent urticaria exacerbated by cold and accompanied by hypocomplementemia and progressive cardiac valvular disease with mitral valve regurgitation. There are only three reports described previously documenting five patients with this rare combination of manifestations.

  18. Association Between Echocardiography Laboratory Accreditation and the Quality of Imaging and Reporting for Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Thaden, Jeremy J; Tsang, Michael Y; Ayoub, Chadi; Padang, Ratnasari; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Tucker, Stephen F; Cassidy, Cynthia S; Bremer, Merri; Kane, Garvan C; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2017-08-01

    It is presumed that echocardiographic laboratory accreditation leads to improved quality, but there are few data. We sought to compare the quality of echocardiographic examinations performed at accredited versus nonaccredited laboratories for the evaluation of valvular heart disease. We enrolled 335 consecutive valvular heart disease subjects who underwent echocardiography at our institution and an external accredited or nonaccredited institution within 6 months. Completeness and quality of echocardiographic reports and images were assessed by investigators blinded to the external laboratory accreditation status and echocardiographic results. Compared with nonaccredited laboratories, accredited sites more frequently reported patient sex (94% versus 78%; P<0.001), height and weight (96% versus 63%; P<0.001), blood pressure (86% versus 39%; P<0.001), left ventricular size (96% versus 83%; P<0.001), right ventricular size (94% versus 80%; P=0.001), and right ventricular function (87% versus 73%; P=0.006). Accredited laboratories had higher rates of complete and diagnostic color (58% versus 35%; P=0.002) and spectral Doppler imaging (45% versus 21%; P<0.0001). Concordance between external and internal grading of external studies was improved when diagnostic quantification was performed (85% versus 69%; P=0.003), and in patients with mitral regurgitation, reproducibility was improved with higher quality color Doppler imaging. Accredited echocardiographic laboratories had more complete reporting and better image quality, while echocardiographic quantification and color Doppler image quality were associated with improved concordance in grading valvular heart disease. Future quality improvement initiatives should highlight the importance of high-quality color Doppler imaging and echocardiographic quantification to improve the accuracy, reproducibility, and quality of echocardiographic studies for valvular heart disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. A novel left heart simulator for the multi-modality characterization of native mitral valve geometry and fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2013-02-01

    Numerical models of the mitral valve have been used to elucidate mitral valve function and mechanics. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional fully coupled fluid structure interaction models. However, to date these models lack direct one-to-one experimental validation. As computational solvers vary considerably, experimental benchmark data are critically important to ensure model accuracy. In this study, a novel left heart simulator was designed specifically for the validation of numerical mitral valve models. Several distinct experimental techniques were collectively performed to resolve mitral valve geometry and hemodynamics. In particular, micro-computed tomography was used to obtain accurate and high-resolution (39 μm voxel) native valvular anatomy, which included the mitral leaflets, chordae tendinae, and papillary muscles. Three-dimensional echocardiography was used to obtain systolic leaflet geometry. Stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry provided all three components of fluid velocity through the mitral valve, resolved every 25 ms in the cardiac cycle. A strong central filling jet (V ~ 0.6 m/s) was observed during peak systole with minimal out-of-plane velocities. In addition, physiologic hemodynamic boundary conditions were defined and all data were synchronously acquired through a central trigger. Finally, the simulator is a precisely controlled environment, in which flow conditions and geometry can be systematically prescribed and resultant valvular function and hemodynamics assessed. Thus, this work represents the first comprehensive database of high fidelity experimental data, critical for extensive validation of mitral valve fluid structure interaction simulations.

  20. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are associated with severe mitral valve regurgitation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Higuera-Ortiz, Violeta; Mora-Arias, Tania; Castillo-Martinez, Diana; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis M

    2017-05-01

    To assess whether anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are associated with cardiac valve disease in lupus. A single-center, medical chart review was performed. Lupus patients were divided according to its anti-Ro/SSA status and subgroups were compared for valvular abnormalities and other characteristics. Dependence of anti-Ro/SSA reactivity to anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies was also evaluated. Eighty-nine lupus patients were analyzed. The most common valvular abnormalities were tricuspid (60%), mitral (41%) and pulmonary (14%) regurgitation. Thirty-six patients were positive and 53 negative for anti-Ro/SSA antibodies. In patients positive to anti-Ro/SSA, a difference was noted for anti-dsDNA (67 versus 45%; p = 0.04) and anti-La/SSB (19 versus 2%; p = 0.004) antibodies. An association between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and severe mitral regurgitation was observed; indeed, 4/15 patients with anti-Ro/SSA and mitral regurgitation had severe forms of valvulopathy as compared to only 1/22 patients with mitral regurgitation but negative to such antibody (27 versus 5%; p = 0.02). Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies significantly elevated the risk of severe mitral regurgitation (OR = 5). Anti-Ro52/TRIM21 levels (103 ± 29 versus 42 ± 43 U/mL; p = 0.03) and anti-Ro52/TRIM21: anti-Ro/SSA ratios (0.88 ± 0.02 versus 0.35 ± 0.37; p = 0.03) were higher in patients with mitral valve regurgitation than in those with no valvulopathy. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, mainly against Ro52/TRIM21 antigens, may be pathologically involved in lupus-associated mitral valve regurgitation.

  1. A Novel Left Heart Simulator for the Multi-modality Characterization of Native Mitral Valve Geometry and Fluid Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical models of the mitral valve have been used to elucidate mitral valve function and mechanics. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional fully coupled fluid structure interaction models. However, to date these models lack direct one-to-one experimental validation. As computational solvers vary considerably, experimental benchmark data are critically important to ensure model accuracy. In this study, a novel left heart simulator was designed specifically for the validation of numerical mitral valve models. Several distinct experimental techniques were collectively performed to resolve mitral valve geometry and hemodynamics. In particular, micro-computed tomography was used to obtain accurate and high-resolution (39 µm voxel) native valvular anatomy, which included the mitral leaflets, chordae tendinae, and papillary muscles. Threedimensional echocardiography was used to obtain systolic leaflet geometry for direct comparison of resultant leaflet kinematics. Stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry provided all three components of fluid velocity through the mitral valve, resolved every 25 ms in the cardiac cycle. A strong central filling jet was observed during peak systole, with minimal out-of-plane velocities (V~0.6m/s). In addition, physiologic hemodynamic boundary conditions were defined and all data were synchronously acquired through a central trigger. Finally, the simulator is a precisely controlled environment, in which flow conditions and geometry can be systematically prescribed and resultant valvular function and hemodynamics assessed. Thus, these data represent the first comprehensive database of high fidelity experimental data, critical for extensive validation of mitral valve fluid structure interaction simulations. PMID:22965640

  2. How Is Mitral Valve Prolapse Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Mitral Valve Prolapse Treated? Most people who have mitral valve ... all hospitals offer this method. Valve Repair and Valve Replacement In mitral valve surgery, the valve is repaired or replaced. ...

  3. Antidepressants and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Empirical evidence regarding the association between antidepressants and valvular heart disease (VHD) is scarce. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research database, this nested case-control study assessed the association between antidepressants and VHD in a Chinese population. Among a cohort of patients who used at least 3 prescription antidepressants, 874 cases with VHD and 3496 matched controls (1:4 ratio) were identified. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the timing, duration, dose and type of antidepressants use, and the risk of VHD. Current use of antidepressants was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of VHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.77). Among current users, a dose–response association was observed in terms of the cumulative duration and the cumulative antidepressant dose. Significantly higher risks of VHD were observed among the current users of tricyclic antidepressants (aOR 1.40 [1.05–1.87]). We found that the use of antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of VHD and that the risks varied according to different antidepressants. PMID:27057841

  4. [Mitral percutaneous valvuloplasty with Inoue balloon. Long-term results at the National Medical Center " 20 of November" ISSSTE Mexico].

    PubMed

    Flores Flores, Jesús; Sánchez Pazarán, José Luis; Vargas Cruz, Antonio; Jiménez Valverde, Arnoldo; Zaragoza Rodríguez, Gregorio; de la Cruz Díaz Cabañas, Alejandro; Robledo Nolasco, Rogelio; Blanco Canto, Mario

    2003-01-01

    Balloon mitral valvuloplasty has, over the last 15 years, become an established interventional procedure for patients with pliable non-calcified mitral stenosis. In this article we describe the long-term outcome of 100 patients from our hospital (National Medical Center "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE, Mexico City), who were treated with this procedure. Average follow-up was 38.72 +/- 22.4 months. The procedure was successful in 83.3% of the patients. After the procedure, the average valvular area changed from 0.95 +/- 0.16 to 1.62 +/- 0.24 cm2 (P < 0.001) and, at the end of the follow-up time, it was 1.57 +/- 0.29. The trans-valvular mean gradient changed from 8.80 +/- 3.67 mm Hg to 4.74 +/- 1.90 mmHg (P < or = 0.001). Complications occurred in 7.0% of the patients, the most important one being acute mitral insufficiency due to valvular rupture. No deaths occurred. Balloon valvuloplasty is an effective method in patients with Wilkins score of 8 or less, with minimal risk of complications, and long lasting results. At the end of the follow-up time, patients were in NYAH functional class I.

  5. Morphofunctional Abnormalities of Mitral Annulus and Arrhythmic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Cristina; De Lazzari, Manuel; Rizzo, Stefania; Cipriani, Alberto; Giorgi, Benedetta; Lacognata, Carmelo; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Bauce, Barbara; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    Background— Arrhythmic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is characterized by myxomatous leaflets and left ventricular (LV) fibrosis of papillary muscles and inferobasal wall. We searched for morphofunctional abnormalities of the mitral valve that could explain a regional mechanical myocardial stretch. Methods and Results— Thirty-six (27 female patients; median age: 44 years) arrhythmic MVP patients with LV late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance and no or trivial mitral regurgitation, and 16 (6 female patients; median age: 40 years) MVP patients without LV late gadolinium enhancement were investigated by morphofunctional cardiac magnetic resonance. Mitral annulus disjunction (median: 4.8 versus 1.8 mm; P<0.001), end-systolic mitral annular diameters (median: 41.2 versus 31.5; P=0.004) and end-diastolic mitral annular diameters (median: 35.5 versus 31.5; P=0.042), prevalence of posterior systolic curling (34 [94%] versus 3 [19%]; P<0.001), and basal to mid LV wall thickness ratio >1.5 (22 [61%] versus 4 [25%]; P=0.016) were higher in MVP patients with late gadolinium enhancement than in those without. A linear correlation was found between mitral annulus disjunction and curling (R=0.85). A higher prevalence of auscultatory midsystolic click (26 [72%] versus 6 [38%]; P=0.018) was also noted. Histology of the mitral annulus showed a longer mitral annulus disjunction in 50 sudden death patients with MVP and LV fibrosis than in 20 patients without MVP (median: 3 versus 1.5 mm; P<0.001). Conclusions— Mitral annulus disjunction is a constant feature of arrhythmic MVP with LV fibrosis. The excessive mobility of the leaflets caused by posterior systolic curling accounts for a mechanical stretch of the inferobasal wall and papillary muscles, eventually leading to myocardial hypertrophy and scarring. These mitral annulus abnormalities, together with auscultatory midsystolic click, may identify MVP patients who would need arrhythmic risk stratification. PMID

  6. Morphofunctional Abnormalities of Mitral Annulus and Arrhythmic Mitral Valve Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Basso, Cristina; De Lazzari, Manuel; Rizzo, Stefania; Cipriani, Alberto; Giorgi, Benedetta; Lacognata, Carmelo; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Bauce, Barbara; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is characterized by myxomatous leaflets and left ventricular (LV) fibrosis of papillary muscles and inferobasal wall. We searched for morphofunctional abnormalities of the mitral valve that could explain a regional mechanical myocardial stretch. Thirty-six (27 female patients; median age: 44 years) arrhythmic MVP patients with LV late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance and no or trivial mitral regurgitation, and 16 (6 female patients; median age: 40 years) MVP patients without LV late gadolinium enhancement were investigated by morphofunctional cardiac magnetic resonance. Mitral annulus disjunction (median: 4.8 versus 1.8 mm; P<0.001), end-systolic mitral annular diameters (median: 41.2 versus 31.5; P=0.004) and end-diastolic mitral annular diameters (median: 35.5 versus 31.5; P=0.042), prevalence of posterior systolic curling (34 [94%] versus 3 [19%]; P<0.001), and basal to mid LV wall thickness ratio >1.5 (22 [61%] versus 4 [25%]; P=0.016) were higher in MVP patients with late gadolinium enhancement than in those without. A linear correlation was found between mitral annulus disjunction and curling (R=0.85). A higher prevalence of auscultatory midsystolic click (26 [72%] versus 6 [38%]; P=0.018) was also noted. Histology of the mitral annulus showed a longer mitral annulus disjunction in 50 sudden death patients with MVP and LV fibrosis than in 20 patients without MVP (median: 3 versus 1.5 mm; P<0.001). Mitral annulus disjunction is a constant feature of arrhythmic MVP with LV fibrosis. The excessive mobility of the leaflets caused by posterior systolic curling accounts for a mechanical stretch of the inferobasal wall and papillary muscles, eventually leading to myocardial hypertrophy and scarring. These mitral annulus abnormalities, together with auscultatory midsystolic click, may identify MVP patients who would need arrhythmic risk stratification. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Modeling the Mitral Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The mitral valve is one of four valves in the human heart. The valve opens to allow oxygenated blood from the lungs to fill the left ventricle, and closes when the ventricle contracts to prevent backflow. The valve is composed of two fibrous leaflets which hang from a ring. These leaflets are supported like a parachute by a system of strings called chordae tendineae. In this talk, I will describe a new computational model of the mitral valve. To generate geometry, general information comes from classical anatomy texts and the author's dissection of porcine hearts. An MRI image of a human heart is used to locate the tips of the papillary muscles, which anchor the chordae tendineae, in relation to the mitral ring. The initial configurations of the valve leaflets and chordae tendineae are found by solving solving an equilibrium elasticity problem. The valve is then simulated in fluid (blood) using the immersed boundary method over multiple heart cycles in a model valve tester. We aim to identify features and mechanisms that influence or control valve function. Support from National Science Foundation, Graduate Research Fellowship Program, Grant DGE 1342536.

  8. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Hemodynamic Changes in Left-Sided Heart Valves in Pregnant Women With Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Samiei, Niloufar; Amirsardari, Mandana; Rezaei, Yousef; Parsaee, Mozhgan; Kashfi, Fahimeh; Hantoosh Zadeh, Sedigheh; Beikmohamadi, Somayeh; Fouladi, Masoumeh; Hosseini, Saeid; Peighambari, Mohammad Mehdi; Mohebbi, Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    Physiologic changes during pregnancy can deteriorate or improve patients' hemodynamic status in the setting of valvular heart disease. There are sparse data regarding the effect of pregnancy on valve hemodynamics in normal pregnant women with known valvular heart disease. In a prospective study from July 2014 to January 2016, a total of 52 normal pregnant women who had mitral stenosis, aortic stenosis, or a history of mitral valve or aortic valve replacements were assessed. All patients underwent echocardiographic examinations and hemodynamic parameters were measured for both the mitral valve and aortic valve at first, second, and third trimesters. The parameters included mean gradient, peak gradient, mean gradient/heart rate, peak gradient/heart rate, pressure halftime, dimensionless velocity index, and valve area. Although most hemodynamic parameters (i.e., mean gradient, peak gradient, mean gradient/heart rate, and peak gradient/heart rate) increased approximately 50% from first to second trimester and first to third trimester (p <0.05) but those remained stable at third compared with second trimester (p >0.05). The ratio of changes between trimesters for valve area and dimensionless velocity index were comparable. No clinical decompensations were observed except for 3 and 7 cases of deterioration to functional class II at second and third trimesters, respectively. In conclusion, during a full-term and uncomplicated pregnancy, mitral and aortic valve gradients increase without significant changes in valve area that are more marked between the second and first trimester than between the third and second trimester. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting recurrent mitral regurgitation after mitral valve repair for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kron, Irving L; Hung, Judy; Overbey, Jessica R; Bouchard, Denis; Gelijns, Annetine C; Moskowitz, Alan J; Voisine, Pierre; O'Gara, Patrick T; Argenziano, Michael; Michler, Robert E; Gillinov, Marc; Puskas, John D; Gammie, James S; Mack, Michael J; Smith, Peter K; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor; Gardner, Timothy J; Ailawadi, Gorav; Zeng, Xin; O'Sullivan, Karen; Parides, Michael K; Swayze, Roger; Thourani, Vinod; Rose, Eric A; Perrault, Louis P; Acker, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    The Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network recently reported no difference in the primary end point of left ventricular end-systolic volume index at 1 year postsurgery in patients randomized to repair (n = 126) or replacement (n = 125) for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation. However, patients undergoing repair experienced significantly more recurrent mitral regurgitation than patients undergoing replacement (32.6% vs 2.3%). We examined whether baseline echocardiographic and clinical characteristics could identify those who will develop moderate/severe recurrent mitral regurgitation or die. Our analysis includes 116 patients who were randomized to and received mitral valve repair. Logistic regression was used to estimate a model-based probability of recurrence or death from baseline factors. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed from these estimated probabilities to determine classification cut-points maximizing accuracy of prediction based on sensitivity and specificity. Of the 116 patients, 6 received a replacement before leaving the operating room; all other patients had mild or less mitral regurgitation on intraoperative echocardiogram after repair. During the 2-year follow-up period, 76 patients developed moderate/severe mitral regurgitation or died (53 mitral regurgitation recurrences, 13 mitral regurgitation recurrences and death, and 10 deaths). The mechanism for recurrent mitral regurgitation was largely mitral valve leaflet tethering. Our model (including age, body mass index, sex, race, effective regurgitant orifice area, basal aneurysm/dyskinesis, New York Heart Association class, history of coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous coronary intervention, or ventricular arrhythmias) yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.82. The model demonstrated good discrimination in identifying patients who will survive 2 years without recurrent mitral regurgitation after mitral valve repair. Although our

  10. Cardiac valvular pathology: comparative pathology and animal models of acquired cardiac valvular diseases.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Kevin B

    2008-02-01

    Recent voluntary withdrawal of the ergoline-derivative Alzheimers' drug Pergolide (Permax) resulting from demonstrated risk of cardiac valve injury illustrates the increased importance of valve injury in pharmaceutical toxicology. Following the 2001 landmark discovery of cardiac valve injury associated with the widely prescribed anti-obesity drug combination fenfluramine-phentermine, and subsequent withdrawal, the need to understand and assess cardiac valve biology and pathology both preclinically and clinically has been accentuated. Unique aspects of the developmental biology, anatomy, and physiology of cardiac valves compared to main cardiac tissue have been discovered, and key elements of the pathophysiology of various valvular injury mechanisms have been described. Although general clinical cardiac valvular disease in humans has been well characterized, animal modeling of valvular injury has proved to be difficult and undersubscribed. Additionally, both the preclinical, pharmaceutical, toxicologic assessment of valvular injury and the understanding of species-comparative valvular pathology have been limited. As discoveries and awareness grows, the purpose of this paper is to review the structure and function of cardiac valves, mechanisms, and outcomes of the common acquired human cardiac valve diseases, including those that are drug-related; to summarize comparative laboratory animal valvular pathology; and to review the literature of contemporary animal models of valvular injury.

  11. Mechanics of the mitral valve: a critical review, an in vivo parameter identification, and the effect of prestrain.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Manuel K; Famaey, Nele; Shultz, Tyler O'Brien; Bothe, Wolfgang; Miller, D Craig; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-10-01

    Alterations in mitral valve mechanics are classical indicators of valvular heart disease, such as mitral valve prolapse, mitral regurgitation, and mitral stenosis. Computational modeling is a powerful technique to quantify these alterations, to explore mitral valve physiology and pathology, and to classify the impact of novel treatment strategies. The selection of the appropriate constitutive model and the choice of its material parameters are paramount to the success of these models. However, the in vivo parameters values for these models are unknown. Here, we identify the in vivo material parameters for three common hyperelastic models for mitral valve tissue, an isotropic one and two anisotropic ones, using an inverse finite element approach. We demonstrate that the two anisotropic models provide an excellent fit to the in vivo data, with local displacement errors in the sub-millimeter range. In a complementary sensitivity analysis, we show that the identified parameter values are highly sensitive to prestrain, with some parameters varying up to four orders of magnitude. For the coupled anisotropic model, the stiffness varied from 119,021 kPa at 0 % prestrain via 36 kPa at 30 % prestrain to 9 kPa at 60 % prestrain. These results may, at least in part, explain the discrepancy between previously reported ex vivo and in vivo measurements of mitral leaflet stiffness. We believe that our study provides valuable guidelines for modeling mitral valve mechanics, selecting appropriate constitutive models, and choosing physiologically meaningful parameter values. Future studies will be necessary to experimentally and computationally investigate prestrain, to verify its existence, to quantify its magnitude, and to clarify its role in mitral valve mechanics.

  12. Myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs: Does size matter?

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Heidi G.; Kilroy-Glynn, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most commonly diagnosed cardiovascular disease in the dog accounting for more than 70% of all cardiovascular disease in dogs. As are most canine diseases with genetic underpinnings, risk of MMVD is greatly increased in a subset of breeds. What is uncommon is that the vast majority of the breeds at elevated risk for MMVD are small or toy breeds with average adult weights under 9 kg. These breeds appear to have little in common other than their diminutive size. In the following review we propose a number of mechanisms by which relatively unrelated small breeds may have developed a predisposition for chronic valvular disorders. Although factors such as age are key in the expression of MMVD, taking a comprehensive look at the commonalities, as well as the differences, between the susceptible breeds may assist in finding the causal variants responsible for MMVD and translating them to improved treatments for both dogs and humans. PMID:22356836

  13. Lipomatous hamartoma of mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Seetharama P S; Gowda, Girish S L; Chikkatur, Raghavendra; Nanjappa, Manjunath C

    2016-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are very rare, and tumors arising from cardiac valves are extremely rare. We present a case of lipomatous hamartoma of the mitral valve in a young female. This is the 6th case of lipomatous hamartoma of the mitral valve to be reported. We discuss the operative and histopathological findings.

  14. The Diagnosis of Mitral Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, D. S.; Rally, C. R.

    1963-01-01

    The diagnosis of classical mitral stenosis is easy, but many pitfalls lead to over-diagnosis or under-diagnosis. These have been considered in detail and variations in symptoms and signs have been illustrated by case histories. Such variations include: (1) Embolism producing the Leriche syndrome; (2) mitral stenosis with insignificant hemodynamic effect; (3) myxoma masquerading as mitral stenosis; (4) mitral stenosis without apical murmurs, and (5) mitral stenosis with a systolic murmur predominant or alone. In cases of combined mitral and aortic stenosis, the history, radiographic configuration, and incidence of hemoptysis, edema, bronchitis, embolism and atrial fibrillation resemble such findings in cases of isolated mitral stenosis, but the auscultatory signs of the latter may be obscured. The degree of aortic stenosis is difficult to determine in cases of combined stenosis. In the diagnosis of re-stenosis the condition of the valve at the first commissurotomy, the precise procedure performed and the degree of regurgitation produced are of prime importance. Congenital mitral stenosis is rare and is associated with a high incidence of other defects. PMID:13936649

  15. Effects of acute ischemic mitral regurgitation on three-dimensional mitral leaflet edge geometry.

    PubMed

    Bothe, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Tom C; Ennis, Daniel B; Itoh, Akinobu; Carlhäll, Carl Johan; Lai, David T; Ingels, Neil B; Miller, D Craig

    2008-02-01

    in this setting is a holosystolic phenomenon. Despite discrete postero-lateral myocardial ischemia, Post-MOA was not disproportionately larger. Acute ovine IMR was associated with leaflet restriction near the central and the anterior commissure leaflet edges. This entire constellation of annular, valvular, and subvalvular ischemic alterations should be considered in the approach to mitral repair for IMR.

  16. EFFECTS OF ACUTE ISCHEMIC MITRAL REGURGITATION ON THREE DIMENSIONAL MITRAL LEAFLET EDGE GEOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Tom C.; Ennis, Daniel B.; Itoh, Akinobu; Carlhäll, Carl Johan; Lai, David T.; Ingels, Neil B.; Miller, D. Craig

    2008-01-01

    this setting is a holosystolic phenomenon; (2) Despite discrete posterolateral myocardial ischemia, Post-MOA was not disproportionately larger; (3) Acute ovine IMR was associated with leaflet restriction near the central and the anterior commissure leaflet edges. This entire constellation of annular, valvular, and subvalvular ischemic alterations should be considered in the approach to mitral repair for IMR. PMID:18321461

  17. Computational mitral valve evaluation and potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Krishnan B; Kim, Hyunggun

    2015-06-01

    The mitral valve (MV) apparatus consists of the two asymmetric leaflets, the saddle-shaped annulus, the chordae tendineae, and the papillary muscles. MV function over the cardiac cycle involves complex interaction between the MV apparatus components for efficient blood circulation. Common diseases of the MV include valvular stenosis, regurgitation, and prolapse. MV repair is the most popular and most reliable surgical treatment for early MV pathology. One of the unsolved problems in MV repair is to predict the optimal repair strategy for each patient. Although experimental studies have provided valuable information to improve repair techniques, computational simulations are increasingly playing an important role in understanding the complex MV dynamics, particularly with the availability of patient-specific real-time imaging modalities. This work presents a review of computational simulation studies of MV function employing finite element structural analysis and fluid-structure interaction approach reported in the literature to date. More recent studies towards potential applications of computational simulation approaches in the assessment of valvular repair techniques and potential pre-surgical planning of repair strategies are also discussed. It is anticipated that further advancements in computational techniques combined with the next generations of clinical imaging modalities will enable physiologically more realistic simulations. Such advancement in imaging and computation will allow for patient-specific, disease-specific, and case-specific MV evaluation and virtual prediction of MV repair.

  18. COMPUTATIONAL MITRAL VALVE EVALUATION AND POTENTIAL CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Krishnan B.; Kim, Hyunggun

    2014-01-01

    The mitral valve (MV) apparatus consists of the two asymmetric leaflets, the saddle-shaped annulus, the chordae tendineae, and the papillary muscles. MV function over the cardiac cycle involves complex interaction between the MV apparatus components for efficient blood circulation. Common diseases of the MV include valvular stenosis, regurgitation, and prolapse. MV repair is the most popular and most reliable surgical treatment for early MV pathology. One of the unsolved problems in MV repair is to predict the optimal repair strategy for each patient. Although experimental studies have provided valuable information to improve repair techniques, computational simulations are increasingly playing an important role in understanding the complex MV dynamics, particularly with the availability of patient-specific real-time imaging modalities. This work presents a review of computational simulation studies of MV function employing finite element (FE) structural analysis and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach reported in the literature to date. More recent studies towards potential applications of computational simulation approaches in the assessment of valvular repair techniques and potential pre-surgical planning of repair strategies are also discussed. It is anticipated that further advancements in computational techniques combined with the next generations of clinical imaging modalities will enable physiologically more realistic simulations. Such advancement in imaging and computation will allow for patient-specific, disease-specific, and case-specific MV evaluation and virtual prediction of MV repair. PMID:25134487

  19. [Homografts for mitral valve replacement in florid endocarditis--an alternative to prosthetic replacement].

    PubMed

    Gulbins, H; Kreuzer, E; Haushofer, M; Uhlig, A; Reichart, B

    1999-05-01

    Homografts for valve replacement are indicated in acute valve endocarditis. It is assumed that they possess anti-infective properties. Homografts are an established indication in aortic valve replacement. We present our early results with homografts for mitral valve replacement in acute endocarditis. Between July 1996 and March 1998 we used cryopreserved homografts for mitral valve replacement in seven patients. In three cases (age 24, 42, and 34 years) the indication was an acute endocarditis with subsequent severe mitral valve insufficiency. The size of the required homograft was measured preoperatively using transesophageal echocardiography. For implantation the technique described by A. Carpentier was used; for stabilization of the mitral anulus a valvular ring (Physio) was implanted. Follow-up was done every six months including clinical and echocardiographical examinations. After the first postoperative year an Ultrafast-CT was done in addition. One patient had complete mitral valve replacement, in the other two cases the diseased parts of the valve were completely excised and the valve was repaired using a partial homograft. There were no perioperative deaths. In the follow-ups, up to 24 months of uneventful homograft function was documented by echocardiography; no insufficiency > degree I was seen on color Doppler echocardiography. At the last follow-up (mean follow-up 16 months, range 12 to 24 months) the average mitral valve orifice was 2.5 +/- 0.5 cm2, the mean pressure gradient 2.8 +/- 0.8 mm Hg. In Ultrafast-CT no morphological abnormalities of the mitral valves and no dilatation of the left ventricle were seen. There were no signs of a recurrence of the endocarditis in any patient during the follow-up period. Homografts for mitral valve replacement are an interesting alternative to prosthetic valve replacement, especially in younger patients. In cases with acute endocarditis, in which mechanical prosthesis should not be used, a reconstruction or

  20. Immediate Outcome of Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty with JOMIVA Balloon during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ramona; Kaliappan, Tamilarasu; Gopalan, Rajendiran; Palanimuthu, Ramasmy; Anandhan, Premkrishna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic mitral stenosis is the most common Valvular Heart Disease encountered during pregnancy. Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty (BMV) is one of the treatment option available if the symptoms are refractory to the medical management and the valve anatomy is suitable for balloon dilatation. BMV with Inoue balloon is the most common technique being followed worldwide. Over the wire BMV is a modified technique using Joseph Mitral Valvuloplasty (JOMIVA) balloon catheter which is being followed in certain centres. Aim To assess the immediate post procedure outcome of over the wire BMV with JOMIVA balloon. Materials and Methods Clinical and echocardiographic parameters of pregnant women with significant mitral stenosis who underwent elective BMV with JOMIVA balloon in our institute from 2005 to 2015 were analysed retrospectively. Severity of breathlessness (New York Heart Association Functional Class), and duration of pregnancy was included in the analysis. Pre procedural echocardiographic parameters which included severity of mitral stenosis and Wilkin’s scoring were analysed. Clinical, haemodynamic and echocardiographic outcomes immediately after the procedure were analysed. Results Among the patients who underwent BMV in our Institute 38 were pregnant women. Twenty four patients (63%) were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III. All of them were in sinus rhythm except two (5%) who had atrial fibrillation. Thirty four patients (89.5%) were in second trimester of pregnancy at the time of presentation and four (10.5%) were in third trimester. Echocardiographic analysis of the mitral valve showed that the mean Wilkin’s score was 7.3. Mean mitral valve area pre procedure was 0.8 cm2. Mean gradient across the valve was 18 mmHg. Ten patients (26.5%) had mild mitral regurgitation and none had more than mild mitral regurgitation. Thirty six patients had pulmonary hypertension as assessed by tricuspid regurgitation jet velocity. All of them underwent BMV

  1. The Mitral Valve Prolapsus: Quantification of the Regurgitation Flow Rate by Experimental Time-Dependant PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, F.; Coisne, D.; Sanchez, L.; Perrault, R.

    2001-10-01

    Color Doppler is routinely used for visualisation of intra cardiac flows and quantification of valvular heart disease, Nevertheless the 2D visualization of a complex 3D phenomenon is the major limitation of this technique, In particular, in clinical setting, the flow rate calculation upstream a regurgitant orifice (i,e, mitral valve insufficiency), assumes that the velocity field in the convergent region have hemispheric shapes and introduce miscalculation specially in case of prolaps regurgitant orifices, The main objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic 3D velocity field of the convergent region upstream a prolaps model of regurgitant orifice based on 2D time dependent PIV reconstruction.

  2. Complete resolution of a mitral valve vegetation with anticoagulation in seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yuheng; Bridges, Jonathan S; Kumar, Kapil; Raphael, Jonelle A; Acharjee, Subroto; Welty, Francine K

    2008-12-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a disorder characterized by recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis and/or fetal loss; involvement of cardiac valves is also seen. A seronegative variant has been described previously. We report a case of a woman with recurrent pregnancy loss, prior strokes, and a negative workup for known antiphospholipid antibodies. During her current pregnancy, she presented with acute stroke and mitral valve vegetation. Her workup for antiphospholipid syndrome and other thrombophilias remained negative even after the stroke. Her mitral valve vegetation resolved completely with aspirin, heparin, and warfarin. We believe this to be the first report of complete resolution of valvular vegetation with antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy alone in a patient with seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome. Moreover, this appears to be the first report of stroke associated with this condition.

  3. [Infectious mitral endocarditis after radiofrequency catheter ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway].

    PubMed

    Benito Bartolomé, F; Sánchez Fernández-Bernal, C

    2001-08-01

    A 2-years-old child with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with life-threatening symptoms underwent radiofrequency ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway. A deflectable 5F bipolar electrode catheter positioned above the atrioventricular groove by transeptal approach was used for ablation. The catheters were repeatedly used after ethylene oxide sterilisation. Although immediate post-ablation echocardiography demonstrated no complications, the patient was readmitted two days later with fever and a new mitral murmur. Penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated and intravenous antibiotics were administered. In the following weeks, the patient developed constrictive pericarditis requiring surgical treatment and acute hemiplegia caused by brain embolism arising from valvular vegetation. At 5 years of follow-up the patient presents residual hemiparesia and grade II/IV mitral insufficiency.

  4. Mitral Valve Annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Manuel K.; Bothe, Wolfgang; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Swanson, Julia C.; Miller, D. Craig; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Mitral valve annuloplasty is a common surgical technique used in the repair of a leaking valve by implanting an annuloplasty device. To enhance repair durability, these devices are designed to increase leaflet coaptation, while preserving the native annular shape and motion; however, the precise impact of device implantation on annular deformation, strain, and curvature is unknown. Here we quantify how three frequently used devices significantly impair native annular dynamics. In controlled in vivo experiments, we surgically implanted eleven flexible-incomplete, eleven semi-rigid-complete, and twelve rigid-complete devices around the mitral annuli of 34 sheep, each tagged with 16 equally-spaced tantalum markers. We recorded four-dimensional marker coordinates using biplane videofluoroscopy, first with device and then without, which were used to create mathematical models using piecewise cubic splines. Clinical metrics (characteristic anatomical distances) revealed significant global reduction in annular dynamics upon device implantation. Mechanical metrics (strain and curvature fields) explained this reduction via a local loss of anterior dilation and posterior contraction. Overall, all three devices unfavorably reduced annular dynamics. The flexible-incomplete device, however, preserved native annular dynamics to a larger extent than the complete devices. Heterogeneous strain and curvature profiles suggest the need for heterogeneous support, which may spawn more rational design of annuloplasty devices using design concepts of functionally graded materials. PMID:22037916

  5. Quantitation of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Topilsky, Yan; Grigioni, Francesco; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most frequent valve disease. Nevertheless, evaluation of MR severity is difficult because standard color flow imaging is plagued by considerable pitfalls. Modern surgical indications in asymptomatic patients require precise assessment of MR severity. MR severity assessment is always comprehensive, utilizing all views and methods. Determining trivial/mild MR is usually easy, based on small jet and flow convergence. Specific signs of severe MR (pulmonary venous flow systolic reversal or severe mitral lesion) are useful but insensitive. Quantitative methods, quantitative Doppler (measuring stroke volumes) and flow convergence (aka PISA method), measure the lesion severity as effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) and volume overload as regurgitant volume (RVol). Interpretation of these numbers should be performed in context of specific MR type. In organic MR (intrinsic valve lesions) ERO ≥ 0.40 cm(2) and RVol ≥ 60 mL are associated with poor outcome, while in functional MR ERO ≥ 0.20 cm(2) and RVol ≥ 30 mL mark reduced survival. While MR assessment should always be comprehensive, quantitative assessment of MR provides measures that are strongly predictive of outcome and should be the preferred approach. The ERO and RVol measured by these methods require interpretation in causal context to best predict outcome and determine MR management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Valvular Abnormalities Detected by Echocardiography in 5-Year Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Helena J. van der; Caron, Huib N.; Kremer, Leontien C.; Dalen, Elvira C. van

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of valvular abnormalities after radiation therapy involving the heart region and/or treatment with anthracyclines and to identify associated risk factors in a large cohort of 5-year childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of all 626 eligible 5-year CCS diagnosed with childhood cancer in the Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center between 1966 and 1996 and treated with radiation therapy involving the heart region and/or anthracyclines. We determined the presence of valvular abnormalities according to echocardiograms. Physical radiation dose was converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Using multivariable logistic regression analyses, we examined the associations between cancer treatment and valvular abnormalities. Results: We identified 225 mainly mild echocardiographic valvular abnormalities in 169 of 545 CCS (31%) with a cardiac assessment (median follow-up time, 14.9 years [range, 5.1-36.8 years]; median attained age 22.0 years [range, 7.0-49.7 years]). Twenty-four CCS (4.4%) had 31 moderate or higher-graded abnormalities. Most common abnormalities were tricuspid valve disorders (n=119; 21.8%) and mitral valve disorders (n=73; 13.4%). The risk of valvular abnormalities was associated with increasing radiation dose (using EQD{sub 2}) involving the heart region (odds ratio 1.33 per 10 Gy) and the presence of congenital heart disease (odds ratio 3.43). We found no statistically significant evidence that anthracyclines increase the risk. Conclusions: Almost one-third of CCS treated with potentially cardiotoxic therapy had 1 or more asymptomatic, mostly mild valvular abnormalities after a median follow-up of nearly 15 years. The most important risk factors are higher EQD{sub 2} to the heart region and congenital heart disease. Studies with longer follow-up are necessary to investigate the clinical course of asymptomatic valvular abnormalities in

  7. Risk of valvular heart disease after treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cutter, David J; Schaapveld, Michael; Darby, Sarah C; Hauptmann, Michael; van Nimwegen, Frederika A; Krol, Augustinus D G; Janus, Cecile P M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aleman, Berthe M P

    2015-04-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at increased risk of developing valvular heart disease (VHD). We evaluated the determinants of the risk and the radiation dose-response. A case-control study was nested in a cohort of 1852 five-year HL survivors diagnosed at ages 15 to 41 years and treated between 1965 and 1995. Case patients had VHD of at least moderate severity as their first cardiovascular diagnosis following HL treatment. Control patients were matched to case patients for age, gender, and HL diagnosis date. Treatment and follow-up data were abstracted from medical records. Radiation doses to heart valves were estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative computed tomography datasets. All statistical tests were two-sided. Eighty-nine case patients with VHD were identified (66 severe or life-threatening) and 200 control patients. Aortic (n = 63) and mitral valves (n = 42) were most frequently affected. Risks increased more than linearly with radiation dose. For doses to the affected valve(s) of less than or equal to 30, 31-35, 36-40, and more than 40 Gy, VHD rates increased by factors of 1.4, 3.1, 5.4, and 11.8, respectively (P trend < .001). Approximate 30-year cumulative risks were 3.0%, 6.4%, 9.3%, and 12.4% for the same dose categories. VHD rate increased with splenectomy by a factor of 2.3 (P = .02). Radiation dose to the heart valves can increase the risk of clinically significant VHD, especially at doses above 30 Gy. However, for patients with mediastinal involvement treated today with 20 or 30 Gy, the 30-year risk will be increased by only about 1.4%. These findings may be useful for patients and doctors both before treatment and during follow-up. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Risk for Valvular Heart Disease After Treatment for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cutter, David J.; Schaapveld, Michael; Darby, Sarah C.; Hauptmann, Michael; van Nimwegen, Frederika A.; Krol, Augustinus D. G.; Janus, Cecile P. M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at increased risk for developing valvular heart disease (VHD). We evaluated the determinants of the risk and the radiation dose-response. Methods: A case-control study was nested in a cohort of 1852 five-year HL survivors diagnosed at ages 15 to 41 years and treated between 1965 and 1995. Case patients had VHD of at least moderate severity as their first cardiovascular diagnosis following HL treatment. Control patients were matched to case patients for age, gender, and HL diagnosis date. Treatment and follow-up data were abstracted from medical records. Radiation doses to heart valves were estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative computed tomography datasets. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Eighty-nine case patients with VHD were identified (66 severe or life-threatening) and 200 control patients. Aortic (n = 63) and mitral valves (n = 42) were most frequently affected. Risks increased more than linearly with radiation dose. For doses to the affected valve(s) of less than or equal to 30, 31–35, 36–40, and more than 40 Gy, VHD rates increased by factors of 1.4, 3.1, 5.4, and 11.8, respectively (P trend < .001). Approximate 30-year cumulative risks were 3.0%, 6.4%, 9.3%, and 12.4% for the same dose categories. VHD rate increased with splenectomy by a factor of 2.3 (P = .02). Conclusions: Radiation dose to the heart valves can increase the risk for clinically significant VHD, especially at doses above 30 Gy. However, for patients with mediastinal involvement treated today with 20 or 30 Gy, the 30-year risk will be increased by only about 1.4%. These findings may be useful for patients and doctors both before treatment and during follow-up. PMID:25713164

  9. Kingella kingae endocarditis: A rare case of mitral valve perforation

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Anthony A; Hung, Tawny; Human, Derek G; Campbell, Andrew I M

    2011-01-01

    Kingella kingae, a HACEK (Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae) organism, is a common resident of the upper airway in children; it has been associated with endocarditis in children with pre-existing heart conditions. This case report describes K. kingae endocarditis leading to valvular damage in a previously healthy 18-month-old child. Our patient developed a K. kingae bacteremia that was later complicated by meningitis, septic embolic stroke, and endocarditis of the mitral valve, leading to perforation of the posterolateral leaflet. The patient was initially treated conservatively with cefotaxime but, subsequently, required a mitral valve repair with a pericardial patch and annuloplasty. This report draws attention to the need for clinicians to be aware of the potentially serious complications of K. kingae infection in young children. If K. kingae infection is suspected then therapy should be initiated promptly with a β-lactam, followed by early echocardiographic assessment. This case also highlights the lack of specific guidelines available for K. kingae endocarditis. PMID:21976892

  10. Kingella kingae endocarditis: A rare case of mitral valve perforation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Anthony A; Hung, Tawny; Human, Derek G; Campbell, Andrew I M

    2011-07-01

    Kingella kingae, a HACEK (Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae) organism, is a common resident of the upper airway in children; it has been associated with endocarditis in children with pre-existing heart conditions. This case report describes K. kingae endocarditis leading to valvular damage in a previously healthy 18-month-old child. Our patient developed a K. kingae bacteremia that was later complicated by meningitis, septic embolic stroke, and endocarditis of the mitral valve, leading to perforation of the posterolateral leaflet. The patient was initially treated conservatively with cefotaxime but, subsequently, required a mitral valve repair with a pericardial patch and annuloplasty. This report draws attention to the need for clinicians to be aware of the potentially serious complications of K. kingae infection in young children. If K. kingae infection is suspected then therapy should be initiated promptly with a β-lactam, followed by early echocardiographic assessment. This case also highlights the lack of specific guidelines available for K. kingae endocarditis.

  11. Role of regional mechanical dyssynchrony as a determinant of functional mitral regurgitation in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Agricola, E; Oppizzi, M; Galderisi, M; Pisani, M; Meris, A; Pappone, C; Margonato, A

    2006-10-01

    To assess regional mechanical dyssynchrony as a determinant of the degree of functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). Tertiary cardiology clinic. 74 consecutive patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (ejection fraction < 40%, mean 32.2 (SD 7.3)%) were evaluated. Effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area, indices of mitral deformation (systolic valvular tenting, mitral annular contraction) and of global LV function and remodelling (ejection fraction, end systolic volume, sphericity index) and local remodelling (papillary-fibrosa distance, regional wall motion score index), and tissue Doppler-derived dyssynchrony index (DI) (regional DI, defined as the standard deviation of time to peak myocardial systolic contraction of eight LV segments supporting the papillary muscles attachment) were measured. All the assessed variables correlated significantly with ERO. By multivariate analysis, systolic valvular tenting was the strongest independent predictor of ERO (R(2) = 0.77, p = 0.0001), with a minor influence of papillary-fibrosa distance (R(2) = 0.77, p = 0.01) and regional DI (R(2) = 0.77, p = 0.03). Local LV remodelling (regional wall motion score index: R(2) = 0.58, p = 0.001; papillary-fibrosa distance: R(2) = 0.58, p = 0.002) and global remodelling indices (sphericity index: R(2) = 0.58, p = 0.003) were the main determinants of systolic valvular tenting, whereas regional DI did not enter into the model. Regional DI was an independent predictor of ERO (R(2) = 0.56, p = 0.005) in patients with non-ischaemic LV dysfunction but not in patients with ischaemic LV dysfunction when these groups were analysed separately. The degree of FMR is associated mainly with mitral deformation indices. The regional dyssynchrony also has an independent association with ERO but with a minor influence; however, it is not a determinant of FMR in patients with ischaemic LV dysfunction.

  12. [Color Doppler identification of early diastolic turbulence in the left atrium in patients with mitral valve insufficiency: persistence of regurgitation or inertia phenomenon?].

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, G; Moro, E; Nicolosi, G L; Dall'Aglio, V; Mimo, R; Mangano, S; Zanuttini, D

    1990-08-01

    Color Doppler flow mapping represents the most recent non invasive diagnostic tool for the visualization of intracardiac blood flow. By using the color Doppler flow mapping technique, two independent observers identified the persistence of turbulence in early diastole inside the left atrium in a selected group of 8 patients (3 F and 5 M) with mitral insufficiency. All the patients had moderate or severe mitral insufficiency, due to dilated cardiomyopathy and/or ischemic cardiomyopathy and/or valvular disease. The persistence of early diastolic turbulence inside the left atrium was documented and confirmed by using 30 degrees color sector images, which show the highest possible frame rate. The frame by frame analysis facilitated the identification of two simultaneous flow velocities during early diastole, after the mitral valve was open. The first flow was anterograde and was coded as a red signal; it flowed from the mitral valve into the left ventricle and represented early diastolic left ventricular filling. The second flow was retrograde, and was coded as a blue mosaic signal, due to turbulent aliased jet, extending from the mitral valve into the left atrium, away from the transducer. The interpretation of these two dimensional color Doppler findings is uncertain. We believe, however, that these turbulent velocity signals which persist in early diastole and flow from the mitral valve into the left atrium are probably caused by inertial blood flow due to the impact of regurgitant mitral jets during the previous systole.

  13. PREVALENCE OF VALVULAR REGURGITATIONS IN CLINICALLY HEALTHY CAPTIVE LEOPARDS AND CHEETAHS: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY FROM THE WILDLIFE CARDIOLOGY (WLC) GROUP (2008-2013).

    PubMed

    Chai, Norin; Petit, Thierry; Kohl, Muriel; Bourgeois, Aude; Gouni, Vassiliki; Trehiou-Sechi, Emilie; Misbach, Charlotte; Petit, Amandine; Damoiseaux, Cécile; Garrigou, Audrey; Guepin, Raphaëlle; Pouchelon, Jean Louis; Chetboul, Valérie

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate transthoracic echocardiograms from clinically healthy large felids for the presence of valvular regurgitations (VR). Physiologic VR commonly occur in normal dogs and cats, but the percentage of large felids with VR has not been previously reported. During a 5-yr study period (2008-2013), 28 healthy animals were evaluated under general anesthesia: 16 cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus soemmeringuii) with a mean age of 1.5±0.8 yr (range 0.7-3.5 yr), 5 Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis), 1 snow leopard (Uncia uncia), and 6 clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa). For this study, all the leopards were gathered in one so-called "leopards group" with a mean age of 2.8±3.4 yr (range 0.3-10.7 yr). All valves observed in each view were examined for evidence of regurgitant jets and turbulent blood flow using the color-flow Doppler mode. Valves were also examined for structural changes. Mitral valve and aortic cusp abnormalities were considered to be of congenital origin. Mitral valve lesions led to mitral insufficiency in all the felids. Aortic cusp abnormalities led to aortic regurgitation in 94% of the cheetahs and 67% of the leopards. Leopards showed a predominance of early systolic mitral regurgitations, whereas all the mitral regurgitation jets in cheetahs were holosystolic. Tricuspid regurgitation was found in 81% of the cheetahs and in 50% of the leopards, whereas pulmonic regurgitation was detected in 44% of the cheetahs and 33% of the leopards. Interestingly, none of these tricuspid and pulmonic regurgitations were associated with two-dimensional structural valve abnormalities, thus suggesting their physiologic origin, as described in humans, cats, and dogs. In conclusion, subclinical valvular diseases are common in apparently healthy leopards and cheetahs. Longitudinal follow-up of affected animals is therefore required to assess their clinical outcome.

  14. Percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy: six-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dighero, H; Zepeda, F; Sepúlveda, P; Soto, J R; Aranda, W

    2001-12-01

    Percutaneous mitral valvotomy (PMV) is an alternative to the surgical treatment of mitral stenosis. Results obtained with PMV appear to depend on the echocardiographical characteristics of the valvular apparatus. The purpose of this study was to report the immediate and late-term results with PMV. The incidence of late events (restenosis, mitral valve replacement and death), and their correlation with echocardiographic score (Wilkin's score) are also discussed. Between December 1987 and August 1999, a total of 160 PMVs were performed at our institution. Ninety-six patients with a minimum of 6 months follow-up and echocardiographic evaluation of the mitral valve (Wilkin's score) before and after the procedure were selected for this study. Follow-up was available for 99% of the patients, with a mean follow-up of 33 +/- 22 months (range, 6 months to 11 years). Hazard ratio (HR) and Cox's regression were used for statistical analyses. PMV was successfully performed in 97% of the cases; in 84%, the result was considered optimal. The incidence of complications related to the procedure was 10%; no mortality was observed due to PMV. Severe mitral regurgitation was observed in 7% of the patients, but only 3% of the total group developed ventricular dysfunction or worsened their New York Heart Association functional class. Eight-four percent of the patients were free of late events at the end of the follow-up period. A restenosis rate of 34% was observed during follow-up; this rate did not correlate with age, functional class or atrial fibrillation. Restenosis was associated with pulmonary hypertension (HR 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-11.80). Also, Wilkin's score was not useful to predict the development of restenosis or clinical events in the mid- to long-term. In our series, PMV had a high immediate success rate and a low incidence of complications due to the procedure. Incidence of late events was also low and was unrelated to the Wilkin's score; however

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance characterization of mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuchi; Peters, Dana C; Salton, Carol J; Bzymek, Dorota; Nezafat, Reza; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig V; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Manning, Warren J; Yeon, Susan B

    2008-05-01

    This study sought to develop cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) diagnostic criteria for mitral valve prolapse (MVP) using echocardiography as the gold standard and to characterize MVP using cine CMR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)-CMR. Mitral valve prolapse is a common valvular heart disease with significant complications. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance is a valuable imaging tool for assessing ventricular function, quantifying regurgitant lesions, and identifying fibrosis, but its potential role in evaluating MVP has not been defined. To develop CMR diagnostic criteria for MVP, characterize mitral valve morphology, we analyzed transthoracic echocardiography and cine CMR images from 25 MVP patients and 25 control subjects. Leaflet thickness, length, mitral annular diameters, and prolapsed distance were measured. Two- and three-dimensional LGE-CMR images were obtained in 16 MVP and 10 control patients to identify myocardial regions of fibrosis in MVP. We found that a 2-mm threshold for leaflet excursion into the left atrium in the left ventricular outflow tract long-axis view yielded 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for CMR using transthoracic echocardiography as the clinical gold standard. Compared with control subjects, CMR identified MVP patients as having thicker (3.2 +/- 0.1 mm vs. 2.3 +/- 0.1 mm) and longer (10.5 +/- 0.5 mm/m(2) vs. 7.1 +/- 0.3 mm/m(2)) indexed posterior leaflets and larger indexed mitral annular diameters (27.8 +/- 0.7 mm/m(2) vs. 21.5 +/- 0.5 mm/m(2) for long axis and 22.9 +/-0.7 mm/m(2) vs. 17.8 +/- 0.6 mm/m(2) for short axis). In addition, we identified focal regions of LGE in the papillary muscles suggestive of fibrosis in 10 (63%) of 16 MVP patients and in 0 of 10 control subjects. Papillary muscle LGE was associated with the presence of complex ventricular arrhythmias in MVP patients. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance image can identify MVP by the same echocardiographic criteria and can identify myocardial fibrosis

  16. P2Y2 receptor-mediated Ca2+ signaling and spontaneous Ca2+ releases in human valvular myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Liang, Willmann; McDonald, Paul; McManus, Bruce; van Breemen, Cornelis; Wang, Xiaodong

    2008-03-01

    Valvular myofibroblasts (VMFs), being the most predominant cells in the cardiac valve, perform a variety of functions to maintain normal valvular physiology. These functions, such as contraction, proliferation, and wound repair, are all directly or indirectly mediated by intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca (2+)](i)). Knowing how [Ca(2+)](i) is regulated by vasoactive agents in VMFs enriches the understanding of valvular biology in both health and diseases. In this study we examined the characteristics of purinergic agonist-induced [Ca(2+)] (i) responses and observed spontaneous Ca(2+) releases in cultured human VMFs. Secondary cultures of human mitral VMFs were incubated with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent indicator fura-2 or fluo-4 and visualized with fluorescence microscopy. Both ATP and UTP activated P(2Y2) receptors and induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) influx. The lack of [Ca(2+)](i) responses in VMFs challenged with the selective P(2Y1) agonists ADPbetaS and 2-Me-S-ATP further supported that functional P(2Y2) receptors are responsible for the Ca(2+) signals. Finally, in a small number of VMFs spontaneous Ca(2+) releases in localized areas were observed. Blockade of the RyR elongated the latency period between each Ca(2+) releasing event, demonstrating the presence of functional RyRs in VMFs.

  17. Initial experience of percutaneous treatment of mitral regurgitation with MitraClip® therapy in Spain.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Chinchilla, Fernando; Arzamendi, Dabit; Romero, Miguel; Gimeno de Carlos, Federico; Alonso-Briales, Juan Horacio; Li, Chi-Hion; Mesa, Maria Dolores; Arnold, Roman; Serrador Frutos, Ana María; Pan, Manuel; Roig, Eulalia; Rodríguez-Bailón, Isabel; de la Fuente Galán, Luis; Hernández, José María; Serra, Antonio; Suárez de Lezo, José

    2014-12-01

    Symptomatic mitral regurgitation has an unfavorable prognosis unless treated by surgery. However, the European registry of valvular heart disease reports that 49% of patients with this condition do not undergo surgery. Percutaneous treatment of mitral regurgitation with MitraClip® has been proved a safe, efficient adjunct to medical treatment in patients with this profile. The objective of the present study is to describe initial experience of MitraClip® therapy in Spain. Retrospective observational study including all patients treated between November 2011 and July 2013 at the 4 Spanish hospitals recording the highest numbers of implantations. A total of 62 patients (77.4% men) were treated, mainly for restrictive functional mitral regurgitation (85.4%) of grade III (37%) or grade IV (63%), mean (standard deviation) ejection fraction 36% (14%), and New York Heart Association functional class III (37%) or IV (63%). Device implantation was successful in 98% of the patients. At 1 year, 81.2% had mitral regurgitation ≤ 2 and 90.9% were in New York Heart Association functional class ≤ II. One periprocedural death occurred (sepsis at 20 days post-implantation) and another 3 patients died during follow-up (mean, 9.1 months). Two patients needed a second implantation due to partial dehiscence of the first device and 2 others underwent heart transplantation. In Spain, MitraClip® therapy has principally been aimed at patients with functional mitral regurgitation, significant systolic ventricular dysfunction, and high surgical risk. It is considered a safe alternative treatment, which can reduce mitral regurgitation and improve functional capacity. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential MicroRNA Expression Profile in Myxomatous Mitral Valve Prolapse and Fibroelastic Deficiency Valves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yei-Tsung; Wang, Juan; Wee, Abby S. Y.; Yong, Quek-Wei; Tay, Edgar Lik-Wui; Woo, Chin Cheng; Sorokin, Vitaly; Richards, Arthur Mark; Ling, Lieng-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral valve prolapse (MMVP) and fibroelastic deficiency (FED) are two common variants of degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD), which is a leading cause of mitral regurgitation worldwide. While pathohistological studies have revealed differences in extracellular matrix content in MMVP and FED, the molecular mechanisms underlying these two disease entities remain to be elucidated. By using surgically removed valvular specimens from MMVP and FED patients that were categorized on the basis of echocardiographic, clinical and operative findings, a cluster of microRNAs that expressed differentially were identified. The expressions of has-miR-500, -3174, -17, -1193, -646, -1273e, -4298, -203, -505, and -939 showed significant differences between MMVP and FED after applying Bonferroni correction (p < 0.002174). The possible involvement of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of DMVD were further suggested by the presences of in silico predicted target sites on a number of genes reported to be involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis and marker genes for cellular composition of mitral valves, including decorin (DCN), aggrecan (ACAN), fibromodulin (FMOD), α actin 2 (ACTA2), extracellular matrix protein 2 (ECM2), desmin (DES), endothelial cell specific molecule 1 (ESM1), and platelet/ endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM1), as well as inverse correlations of selected microRNA and mRNA expression in MMVP and FED groups. Our results provide evidence that distinct molecular mechanisms underlie MMVP and FED. Moreover, the microRNAs identified may be targets for the future development of diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutics. PMID:27213335

  19. Differential MicroRNA Expression Profile in Myxomatous Mitral Valve Prolapse and Fibroelastic Deficiency Valves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yei-Tsung; Wang, Juan; Wee, Abby S Y; Yong, Quek-Wei; Tay, Edgar Lik-Wui; Woo, Chin Cheng; Sorokin, Vitaly; Richards, Arthur Mark; Ling, Lieng-Hsi

    2016-05-18

    Myxomatous mitral valve prolapse (MMVP) and fibroelastic deficiency (FED) are two common variants of degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD), which is a leading cause of mitral regurgitation worldwide. While pathohistological studies have revealed differences in extracellular matrix content in MMVP and FED, the molecular mechanisms underlying these two disease entities remain to be elucidated. By using surgically removed valvular specimens from MMVP and FED patients that were categorized on the basis of echocardiographic, clinical and operative findings, a cluster of microRNAs that expressed differentially were identified. The expressions of has-miR-500, -3174, -17, -1193, -646, -1273e, -4298, -203, -505, and -939 showed significant differences between MMVP and FED after applying Bonferroni correction (p < 0.002174). The possible involvement of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of DMVD were further suggested by the presences of in silico predicted target sites on a number of genes reported to be involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis and marker genes for cellular composition of mitral valves, including decorin (DCN), aggrecan (ACAN), fibromodulin (FMOD), α actin 2 (ACTA2), extracellular matrix protein 2 (ECM2), desmin (DES), endothelial cell specific molecule 1 (ESM1), and platelet/ endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM1), as well as inverse correlations of selected microRNA and mRNA expression in MMVP and FED groups. Our results provide evidence that distinct molecular mechanisms underlie MMVP and FED. Moreover, the microRNAs identified may be targets for the future development of diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutics.

  20. Asymptotic Model of Fluid-Tissue Interaction for Mitral Valve Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Domenichini, Federico; Pedrizzetti, Gianni

    2015-06-01

    The vortex formation process inside the left ventricle is intrinsically connected to the dynamics of the mitral leaflets while they interact with the flow crossing the valve during diastole. The description of the dynamics of a natural mitral valve still represents a challenging issue, especially because its material properties are not measurable in vivo. Medical imaging can provide some indications about the geometry of the valve, but not about its mechanical properties. In this work, we introduce a parametric model of the mitral valve geometry, whose motion is described in the asymptotic limit under the assumption that it moves with the flow, without any additional resistance other than that given by its shape, and without the need to specify its material properties. The mitral valve model is coupled with a simple description of the left ventricle geometry, and their dynamics is solved numerically together with the equations ruling the blood flow. The intra-ventricular flow is analyzed in its relationship with the valvular motion. It is found that the initial valve opening anticipates the peak velocity of the Early filling wave with little influence of the specific geometry; while subsequent closure and re-opening are more dependent on the intraventricular vortex dynamics and thus on the leaflets' geometry itself. The limitations and potential applications of the proposed model are discussed.

  1. Infective endocarditis causing mitral valve stenosis - a rare but deadly complication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hart, Michael A; Shroff, Gautam R

    2017-02-17

    Infective endocarditis rarely causes mitral valve stenosis. When present, it has the potential to cause severe hemodynamic decompensation and death. There are only 15 reported cases in the literature of mitral prosthetic valve bacterial endocarditis causing stenosis by obstruction. This case is even more unusual due to the mechanism by which functional mitral stenosis occurred. We report a case of a 23-year-old white woman with a history of intravenous drug abuse who presented with acute heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography failed to show valvular vegetation, but high clinical suspicion led to transesophageal imaging that demonstrated infiltrative prosthetic valve endocarditis causing severe mitral stenosis. Despite extensive efforts from a multidisciplinary team, she died as a result of her critical illness. The discussion of this case highlights endocarditis physiology, the notable absence of stenosis in modified Duke criteria, and the utility of transesophageal echocardiography in clinching a diagnosis. It advances our knowledge of how endocarditis manifests, and serves as a valuable lesson for clinicians treating similar patients who present with stenosis but no regurgitation on transthoracic imaging, as a decision to forego a transesophageal echocardiography could cause this serious complication of endocarditis to be missed.

  2. Myocardial Infarction Alters Adaptation of the Tethered Mitral Valve

    PubMed Central

    Dal-Bianco, Jacob P.; Aikawa, Elena; Bischoff, Joyce; Guerrero, J. Luis; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Szymanski, Catherine; Bartko, Philipp E.; Seybolt, Margo M.; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Sullivan, Suzanne; Garcia, Michael L.; Mauskapf, Adam; Titus, James S.; Wylie-Sears, Jill; Irvin, Whitney S.; Chaput, Miguel; Messas, Emmanuel; Hagège, Albert A.; Carpentier, Alain; Levine, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In patients with myocardial infarction (MI), leaflet tethering by displaced papillary muscles induces mitral regurgitation (MR), which doubles mortality. Mitral valves (MVs) are larger in such patients but fibrosis sets in counterproductively. The investigators previously reported that experimental tethering alone increases mitral valve area in association with endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. OBJECTIVES This study explored the clinically relevant situation of tethering and MI, testing the hypothesis that ischemic milieu modifies MV adaptation. METHODS Twenty-three adult sheep were examined. Under cardiopulmonary bypass, the PM tips in 6 sheep were retracted apically to replicate tethering, short of producing MR (tethered-alone). PM retraction was combined with apical MI created by coronary ligation in another 6 sheep (tethered + MI), and left ventricular (LV) remodeling was limited by external constraint in 5 additional sheep (LV constraint). Six sham-operated sheep were controls. Diastolic MV surface area was quantified by 3-dimensional echocardiography at baseline and after 58 ± 5 days, followed by histopathology and flow cytometry of excised leaflets. RESULTS Tethered + MI leaflets were markedly thicker than tethered-alone valves and sham controls. Leaflet area also increased significantly. EMT, detected as α-smooth muscle actin-positive endothelial cells, significantly exceeded that in tethered-alone and control valves. Transforming growth factor-β, matrix metalloproteinase expression, and cellular proliferation were markedly increased. Uniquely, tethering + MI showed endothelial activation with vascular adhesion molecule expression, neovascularization, and cells positive for CD45, considered a hematopoietic cell marker. Tethered + MI findings were comparable with external ventricular constraint. CONCLUSIONS MI altered leaflet adaptation, including a profibrotic increase in valvular cell activation, CD45-positive cells, and matrix turnover

  3. Practice gaps in the care of mitral valve regurgitation: Insights from the American College of Cardiology mitral regurgitation gap analysis and advisory panel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew; Grayburn, Paul; Foster, Jill A; McCulloch, Marti L; Badhwar, Vinay; Gammie, James S; Costa, Salvatore P; Benitez, Robert Michael; Rinaldi, Michael J; Thourani, Vinod H; Martin, Randolph P

    2016-02-01

    The revised 2014 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association valvular heart disease guidelines provide evidenced-based recommendations for the management of mitral regurgitation (MR). However, knowledge gaps related to our evolving understanding of critical MR concepts may impede their implementation. The ACC conducted a multifaceted needs assessment to characterize gaps, practice patterns, and perceptions related to the diagnosis and treatment of MR. A key project element was a set of surveys distributed to primary care and cardiovascular physicians (cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons). Survey and other gap analysis findings were presented to a panel of 10 expert advisors from specialties of general cardiology, cardiac imaging, interventional cardiology, and cardiac surgeons with expertise in valvular heart disease, especially MR, and cardiovascular education. The panel was charged with assessing the relative importance and potential means of remedying identified gaps to improve care for patients with MR. The survey results identified several knowledge and practice gaps that may limit implementation of evidence-based recommendations for MR care. Specifically, half of primary care physicians reported uncertainty regarding timing of intervention for patients with severe primary or functional MR. Physicians in all groups reported that quantitative indices of MR severity were frequently not reported in clinical echocardiographic interpretations, and that these measurements were not consistently reviewed when provided in reports. In the treatment of MR, nearly 30% of primary care physician and general cardiologists did not know the volume of mitral valve repair surgeries by their reference cardiac surgeons and did not have a standard source to obtain this information. After review of the survey results, the expert panel summarized practice gaps into 4 thematic areas and offered proposals to address deficiencies and promote better alignment

  4. Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2 centimeters) each. The surgeon uses a special computer to control robotic arms during the surgery. A ... heart and mitral valve are displayed on a computer in the operating room. You will need a ...

  5. Mitral Valve Prolapse (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System Congenital Heart Defects Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Heart Murmurs Marfan Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse EKG ( ...

  6. Mitral Valve Prolapse (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... be cleared by the doctor to participate in sports. This may involve some additional tests. Although any heart condition can be frightening, mitral valve prolapse likely will not have any effect on your child's everyday life and activities. If ...

  7. Apixaban in Comparison With Warfarin in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease: Findings From the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) Trial.

    PubMed

    Avezum, Alvaro; Lopes, Renato D; Schulte, Phillip J; Lanas, Fernando; Gersh, Bernard J; Hanna, Michael; Pais, Prem; Erol, Cetin; Diaz, Rafael; Bahit, M Cecilia; Bartunek, Jozef; De Caterina, Raffaele; Goto, Shinya; Ruzyllo, Witold; Zhu, Jun; Granger, Christopher B; Alexander, John H

    2015-08-25

    Apixaban is approved for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. However, the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial included a substantial number of patients with valvular heart disease and only excluded patients with clinically significant mitral stenosis or mechanical prosthetic heart valves. We compared the effect of apixaban and warfarin on rates of stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, and death in patients with and without moderate or severe valvular heart disease using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Of the 18 201 patients enrolled in ARISTOTLE, 4808 (26.4%) had a history of moderate or severe valvular heart disease or previous valve surgery. Patients with valvular heart disease had higher rates of stroke or systemic embolism and bleeding than patients without valvular heart disease. There was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban over warfarin in patients with and without valvular heart disease in reducing stroke and systemic embolism (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51-0.97 and HR, 0.84; 95%, CI 0.67-1.04; interaction P=0.38), causing less major bleeding (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61-1.04 and HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.55-0.77; interaction P=0.23), and reducing mortality (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.84-1.22 and HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.96; interaction P=0.10). More than a quarter of the patients in ARISTOTLE with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation had moderate or severe valvular heart disease. There was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban over warfarin in reducing stroke or systemic embolism, causing less bleeding, and reducing death in patients with and without valvular heart disease. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00412984. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Synthesis of glycosaminoglycans in differently loaded regions of collagen gels seeded with valvular interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Werdenberg, Jennifer A; Blevins, Tracy L; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2007-01-01

    Cells respond to changes in mechanical strains by varying their production of extracellular matrix macromolecules. Because differences in strain patterns between mitral valve leaflets and chordae tendineae have been linked to different quantities and types of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), we investigated the effects of various strain conditions on GAG synthesis by valvular interstitial cells (VICs) using an in vitro 3-dimensional tissue-engineering model. VICs from leaflets or chordae were seeded within collagen gels and subjected to uniaxial or biaxial static tension for 1 week. GAGs synthesized within the collagen gels and secreted into the surrounding medium were analyzed using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. In constrained conditions, more 4-sulfated GAGs were retained within the collagen gel, whereas more hyaluronan was secreted into the surrounding medium. Selected GAG classes were found in significantly different proportions in collagen gels seeded with leaflet cells versus chordal cells. The only significant difference between uniaxial and biaxial regions was found for 6-sulfated GAGs in the gels seeded with chordal cells (p<0.05). This study suggests how mechanical loading may influence GAG production and localization in the remodeling of the mitral valve and has design implications for engineered tissues.

  9. Timing in resolution of left heart dilation according to the degree of mitral regurgitation in children with ventricular septal defect after surgical closure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwa Jin; Ma, Jae Sook; Cho, Young Kuk; Ahn, Byoung Hee; Na, Kook Joo; Jeong, In Seok

    2014-01-01

    Children with ventricular septal defects (VSD) can have chronic volume overload, which can result in changes of left heart echocardiographic parameters. To evaluate the changes before and after surgical closure, the children were divided into three groups according to the degree of mitral regurgitation (MR), and their echocardiographic characteristics were reviewed at serial follow-up after surgical closure. The preoperative, and one-, three-, and 12-month postoperative echocardiographic data of 40 children who underwent surgical closure of VSD were retrospectively reviewed. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD), left ventricular end-systolic dimension (LVESD), mitral valvular characteristics, including degree of MR and mitral valve annulus, and left atrial (LA) characteristics, including volume and dimensions, were observed. Preoperative LVEDV, LVEDD, LVESD, mitral valvular annulus, LA volume, and LA dimensions were significantly larger in children with MR. Additionally, there were significant decreases in LVEDV, LVEDD, LA volume, and LA dimensions at one, three, and 12 months postoperatively. The degree of MR also improved to a lower grade after surgical closure of the VSD without additional mitral valve repair. The echocardiographic parameters of left heart dilation and MR in children with VSD improved within the first year after surgical closure without additional mitral valve repair. Furthermore, in all of the patients with VSD, regardless of MR, LA dilation was reduced within three months after surgical closure of the VSD; however, LV and mitral valve annular dilatation decreased within 12 months. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence and patterns of valvular heart disease in a tertiary care high-volume cardiac center: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, C N; Srinivas, P; Ravindranath, K S; Dhanalakshmi, C

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of the heart valves constitute a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) being the dominant form of valvular heart disease (VHD) in developing nations. The current study was undertaken at a tertiary care cardiac center with the objective of establishing the incidence and patterns of VHD by Echocardiography (Echo). Among the 136,098 first-time Echocardiograms performed between January 2010 and December 2012, an exclusion criterion of trivial and functional regurgitant lesions yielded a total of 13,289 cases of organic valvular heart disease as the study cohort. In RHD, the order of involvement of valves was mitral (60.2%), followed by aortic, tricuspid and pulmonary valves. Mitral stenosis, predominantly seen in females, was almost exclusively of rheumatic etiology (97.4%). The predominant form of isolated MR was rheumatic (41.1%) followed closely by myxomatous or mitral valve prolapse (40.8%). Isolated AS, more common in males, was the third most common valve lesion seen in 7.3% of cases. Degenerative calcification was the commonest cause of isolated AS (65.0%) followed by bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) (33.9%) and RHD (1.1%). Multiple valves were involved in more than a third of all cases (36.8%). The order of involvement was MS + MR > MS + AR > MR + AR > AS + AR > MR + AS > MS + AS. Overall, 9.7% of cases had organic tricuspid valve disease. RHD contributed most to the burden of VHD in the present study with calcific degeneration, myxomatous disease and BAV being the other major forms of VHD. Multiple valves were affected in more than a third of all cases. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Valvular heart disease: multidetector computed tomography evaluation].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Fernández-Pérez, G C; Tomás-Mallebrera, M; Badillo-Portugal, S; Orejas, M

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a clinical problem that has been studied with classical imaging techniques like echocardiography and MRI. Technological advances in CT make it possible to obtain static and dynamic images that enable not only a morphological but also a functional analysis in many cases. Although it is currently indicated only in patients with inconclusive findings at echocardiography and MRI or those in whom these techniques are contraindicated, multidetector CT makes it possible to diagnose stenosis or regurgitation through planimetry, to evaluate and quantify valvular calcium, and to show the functional repercussions of these phenomena on the rest of the structures of the heart. Given that multidetector CT is being increasingly used in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, we think it is interesting for radiologists to know its potential for the study of valvular disease. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Appetite suppressants and valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Weissman, N J

    2001-04-01

    The association between valvular heart disease and diet pills was discovered several years ago in a small cohort of patients. Subsequent uncontrolled surveys and reports suggested a prevalence of cardiac abnormalities as high as 30%. These results led to widespread concern by millions of appetite suppressant users and the withdrawal of both fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine from the market. Through this review of the literature, it becomes apparent that we have better defined the association between valvular heart disease and appetite suppressants; nonetheless, many questions and controversies remain. Most large scale, multicenter, controlled studies have shown that a prevalence of significant valve regurgitation is between 2 and 12% and that the likelihood of disease increases with increasing dose and/or duration of appetite suppressant use, but several other issues, such as the mechanism of action, remain unanswered.

  13. Quantitative histologic analysis of the mitral valve anterior leaflet: ischemic alterations and implications for valve replacement design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, David W.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.; Cochran, Richard P.

    1999-06-01

    There is a current trend to design innovative mitral valve replacements that mimic the native mitral valve (MV). A prerequisite for these new designs is the characterization of MV structure. This study was conducted to determine the distribution of MV collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) in MV anterior leaflets. Methods: Specimens from the mid-line of eight sheep MV anterior leaflets were stained with aniline blue (collagen) and alcian blue (GAGs). These specimens were analyzed using an image analysis system running Optimas software. Based on the luminance of stains within individual valve layers, the distribution of valvular collagen and GAGs from leaflet annulus to free-edge were determined. Results: Near the annulus, 100% of MV thickness is fibrosa (collagen dominated layer). Moving towards the free-edge, fibrosa prominence decreases and there is a transition to spongiosa (GAG dominated layer). Near the free-edge 100% of MV thickness is dominated by the spongiosa. Conclusions: Valvular collagen dominates MV structure near the annulus to support the stresses of bending and pressurization. Valvular GAGs dominate the MV near the free-edge to absorb the impact of leaflet coaptation. Image analysis has proven to be an effective tool to evaluate MV structure and facilitate the design of valve replacements.

  14. [Experience of Mitral Valve Replacement Using a Pulmonary Autograft (Ross II Operation) in an Infant;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Tomohisa; Egawa, Yoshiyasu; Yoshida, Homare; Shimoe, Yasushi; Onishi, Tatsuya; Miyagi, Yuhichi; Terada, Kazuya; Ohta, Akira

    2015-07-01

    A 24-day-old boy suddenly developed progressive heart failure and was transported to our hospital. Echocardiography showed massive mitral regurgitation due to chordal rupture. Mitral valve repair was performed at 28 days of life, but postoperative valvular function was not satisfactory. A mechanical valve was implanted in the supra-annular position at 37 days of life. Two months after valve replacement, the mechanical valve was suddenly stuck. Emergent redo valve replacement was performed, but the prosthetic valve became stuck again 2 months after the 3rd operation, despite sufficient anti-coagulation therapy. At the 4th operation (6 months after birth), we implanted a pulmonary autograft in the mitral position instead of another mechanical valve in an emergent operation. The right ventricular outflow tract was reconstructed with a valved conduit. A postoperative catheter examination, which was performed 1 year after the Ross II operation, showed mild mitral stenosis with no regurgitation. Previous reports of Ross II operations in infants are rare and long-term results are unknown. However, we advocate that this procedure should be a rescue operation for mitral valve dysfunction in the early period of infants.

  15. Lipid Interventions in Aortic Valvular Disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang Jin; Tsomidou, Christiana; Lerakis, Stamatios; Madanieh, Raef; Vittorio, Timothy J; Kosmas, Constantine E

    2015-10-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in the elderly population. Presently, there is increasing evidence that aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process of lipid deposition, inflammation, fibrosis and calcium deposition. The pathogenesis of AS shares many similarities to that of atherosclerosis; therefore, it was hypothesized that certain lipid interventions could prevent or slow the progression of aortic valve stenosis. Despite the early enthusiasm that statins may slow the progression of AS, recent large clinical trials did not consistently demonstrate a decrease in the progression of AS. However, some researchers believe that statins may have a benefit early on in the disease process, where inflammation (and not calcification) is the predominant process, in contrast to severe or advanced AS, where calcification (and not inflammation) predominates. Positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-sodium fluoride can demonstrate the relative contributions of valvular calcification and inflammation in AS, and thus this method might potentially be useful in providing the answer as to whether lipid interventions at the earlier stages of AS would be more effective in slowing the progression of the disease. Currently, there is a strong interest in recombinant apolipoprotein A-1 Milano and in the development of new pharmacological agents, targeting reduction of lipoprotein (a) levels and possibly reduction of the expression of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, as potential means to slow the progression of aortic valvular stenosis.

  16. Neurologic complications of valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is frequently associated with neurologic complications; cerebral embolism is the most common of these since thrombus formation results from the abnormalities in the valvular surfaces or from the anatomic and physiologic changes associated with valve dysfunction, such as atrial or ventricular enlargement, intracardiac thrombi, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Prosthetic heart valves, particularly mechanical valves, are very thrombogenic, which explains the high risk of thromboembolism and the need for anticoagulation for the prevention of embolism. Infective endocarditis is a disease process with protean manifestations that include not only cerebral embolism but also intracranial hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysms, and systemic manifestations such as fever and encephalopathy. Other neurologic complications include nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, a process associated with systemic diseases such as cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus. For many of these conditions, anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment to prevent cerebral embolism, therefore it is the potential complications of anticoagulation that can explain other neurologic complications in patients with VHD. The prevention and management of these complications requires an understanding of their natural history in order to balance the risks posed by valvular disease itself against the risks and benefits associated with treatment.

  17. Prosthetic Valve Dysfunction 35 Years after Mitral Valve Replacement with a Starr-Edwards Caged-disc Valve.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Ohara, Takahiro; Takashio, Seiji; Sakamoto, Mari; Wada, Yuko; Nakamura, Kenji; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Okamoto, Yoko; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of dyspnea. He had a history of mitral valve replacement (MVR) with a Starr-Edwards (SE) caged-disc valve at the age of 14. Echocardiography revealed elevated trans-valvular pressure gradient of the mitral prosthetic valve with neither disk motion abnormality nor abnormal structure. Catheterization confirmed an elevation of the mean diastolic gradient of the mitral valve to 12.3 mmHg. Re-MVR was performed, and abnormal tissue attached to the cage of the valve and proliferating beneath the valve was observed. Histologic examination revealed them as fibrinous tissue and mild pannus proliferation, respectively. This rare case report focuses on long-term follow-up and the complication of a SE caged-disc valve. A SE caged-disc valve may become stenotic, only detected with a trans-valvular pressure gradient without any disk motion abnormality or abnormal structure during a prolonged follow-up period.

  18. Differentiating the aging of the mitral valve from human and canine myxomatous degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Patrick S.; Han, Richard I.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2012-01-01

    During the course of both canine and human aging, the mitral valve remodels in generally predictable ways. The connection between these aging changes and the morbidity and mortality that accompany pathologic conditions has not been made clear. By exploring work that has investigated the specific valvular changes in both age and disease, with respect to the cells and the extracellular matrix found within the mitral valve, heretofore unexplored connections between age and myxomatous valve disease can be found. This review addresses several studies that have been conducted to explore such age and disease related changes in extracellular matrix, valvular endothelial and interstitial cells, and valve innervation, and also reviews attempts to correlate aging and myxomatous disease. Such connections can highlight avenues for future research and help provide insight as to when an individual diverts from an aging pattern into a diseased pathway. Recognizing these patterns and opportunities could result in earlier intervention and the hope of reduced morbidity and mortality for patients. PMID:22364720

  19. QCT Volumetric Bone Mineral Density and Vascular and Valvular Calcification: The Framingham Study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jimmy J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Kiel, Douglas P; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Hoffmann, Udo; Samelson, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that bone and vascular calcification share common pathogenesis. Little is known about potential links between bone and valvular calcification. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between spine bone mineral density (BMD) and vascular and valvular calcification. Participants included 1317 participants (689 women, 628 men) in the Framingham Offspring Study (mean age 60 years). Integral, trabecular, and cortical volumetric bone density (vBMD) and arterial and valvular calcification were measured from computed tomography (CT) scans and categorized by sex-specific quartiles (Q4 = high vBMD). Calcification of the coronary arteries (CAC), abdominal aorta (AAC), aortic valve (AVC), and mitral valve (MVC) were quantified using the Agatston Score (AS). Prevalence of any calcium (AS >0) was 69% for CAC, 81% for AAC, 39% for AVC, and 20% for MVC. In women, CAC increased with decreasing quartile of trabecular vBMD: adjusted mean CAC = 2.1 (Q4), 2.2 (Q3), 2.5 (Q2), 2.6 (Q1); trend p = 0.04. However, there was no inverse trend between CAC and trabecular vBMD in men: CAC = 4.3 (Q4), 4.3 (Q3), 4.2 (Q2), 4.3 (Q1); trend p = 0.92. AAC increased with decreasing quartile of trabecular vBMD in both women (AAC = 4.5 [Q4], 4.8 [Q3], 5.4 [Q2], 5.1 [Q1]; trend p = 0.01) and men (AAC = 5.5 [Q4], 5.8 [Q3], 5.9 [Q2], 6.2 [Q1]; trend p = 0.01). We observed no association between trabecular vBMD and AVC or MVC in women or men. Finally, cortical vBMD was unrelated to vascular calcification and valvular calcification in women and men. Women and men with low spine vBMD have greater severity of vascular calcification, particularly at the abdominal aorta. The inverse relation between AAC and spine vBMD in women and men may be attributable to shared etiology and may be an important link on which to focus treatment efforts that can target individuals at high risk of both fracture and cardiovascular events. PMID:25871790

  20. [A methodological study of measuring quantitatively turbulent shear stree downstream of mitral stenosis in vivo using Doppler echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guimin; Shi, Yingkang; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Eryong; Guo, Zhongsan; Fan, Yubo; Pu, Fang; Zengzhi

    2002-01-01

    In order to establish a method for measuring quantitatively turbulent shear stress (TSS) downstream of mitral stenosis in vivo based on Doppler echocardiography and computer-aided image analysis, we used doppler echocardiography to record the spectrum of flow velocity downstream of mitral valve at several locations in normal persons and in patients with mitral stenosis. With the computer-aided analysis of spectrum images, the magnitude of TSS was measured at the locations. The results demonstrate that no matter how severe the mitral stenosis is, the TSS and relative turbulent intensity(Irel) at the central locations of jet are lower than those at the marginal ones. A significant difference in the quantitative items of TSS, Irel and flow field uniformity between normal persons and patients with varying-degree of mitral stenosis was noticed (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between these items and effective orifice area (EOA), and we found that the smaller EOA is, the more severe the extent of stenosis is and the greater the magnitude of both TSS and Irel are, and that the highest magnitude of TSS is focused on the marginal area of jet. These results indicate that there is an obvious correlation between TSS(measured by Doppler echocardiography combined with computer-aided image analysis) and flow field uniformity. They can coincidently reveal the hemodynamic changes resulting from mitral stenosis of varied severeness, implying that our method could exactly depict the magnitude of TSS downstream of mitral stenosis in vivo and is non-invasive and good for anti-disturbance. The method can be used to analyze quantitatively TSS in the flow field of heart valve in patients with valvular diseases.

  1. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  2. [Mitral valve repair with the MitraClip following surgical mitral annuloplasty failure].

    PubMed

    Picard, F; Tadros, V-X; Millán, X; Asgar, A W

    2016-10-28

    Mitral repair using the MitraClip device is on ongoing expansion and has been evaluated in different patterns of mitral regurgitation. Nevertheless, surgical approaches to mitral regurgitation remain the standard of care, at least in absence of contraindication. We report the first Canadian experience of mitral valve repair with the MitraClip following surgical mitral annuloplasty failure. Therapeutic considerations and potential challenges are discussed.

  3. Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery II

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, J. Alan; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Farivar, R. Saeid; Khan, Junaid H.; Hargrove, W. Clark; Moront, Michael G.; Ryan, William H.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Agnihotri, Arvind K.; Hummel, Brian W.; Fayers, Trevor M.; Grossi, Eugene A.; Guy, T. Sloane; Lehr, Eric J.; Mehall, John R.; Murphy, Douglas A.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Salemi, Arash; Segurola, Romualdo J.; Shemin, Richard J.; Smith, J. Michael; Smith, Robert L.; Weldner, Paul W.; Lewis, Clifton T. P.; Barnhart, Glenn R.; Goldman, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Techniques for minimally invasive mitral valve repair and replacement continue to evolve. This expert opinion, the second of a 3-part series, outlines current best practices for nonrobotic, minimally invasive mitral valve procedures, and for postoperative care after minimally invasive mitral valve surgery. PMID:27654406

  4. Planar biaxial creep and stress relaxation of the mitral valve anterior leaflet.

    PubMed

    Grashow, Jonathan S; Sacks, Michael S; Liao, Jun; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2006-10-01

    A fundamental assumption in mitral valve (MV) therapies is that a repaired or replaced valve should mimic the functionality of the native valve as closely as possible. Thus, improvements in valvular treatments are dependent on the establishment of a complete understanding of the function and mechanical properties of the native normal MV. In a recent study [Grashow et al. ABME 34(2), 2006] we demonstrated that the planar biaxial stress-strain relationship of the MV anterior leaflet (MVAL) exhibited minimal hysteresis and a stress-strain response independent of strain rate, suggesting that MVAL could be modeled as a "quasi-elastic" material. The objective of our current study was to expand these results to provide a more complete picture of the time-dependent mechanical properties of the MVAL. To accomplish this, biaxial stress-relaxation and creep studies were performed on porcine MVAL specimens. Our primary finding was that while the MVAL leaflet exhibited significant stress relaxation, it exhibited negligible creep over the 3-h test. These results furthered our assertion that the MVAL functionally behaves not as a linear or non-linear viscoelastic material, but as an anisotropic quasi-elastic material. These results appear to be unique in the soft tissue literature; suggesting that valvular tissues are unequalled in their ability to withstand significant loading without time-dependent material effects. Moreover, insight into these specialized characteristics can help guide and inform efforts directed toward surgical repair and engineered valvular tissue replacements.

  5. MitraClip Therapy for Mitral Regurgitation: Secondary Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Mehta, Arjun; Guerrero, Mayra; Levisay, Justin P; Salinger, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Therapy for mitral regurgitation (MR) has been synonymous with mitral valve surgery. Operative approaches for degenerative MR repair have been associated with excellent results, with durable long term outcomes. Surgery for functional MR has been less successful. MitraClip has shown promise for functional MR, especiall in patinets who are high risk for surgery. The aggregate of nonrandomized global experience with MitraClip in functional MR has been consistent in showing improvements in symptoms and left ventricular remodeling. It remains to be seen how MitraClip therapy will compare with best medical therapy. The COAPT trial will clarify this question.

  6. Robotics in valvular surgery: 2003 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kypson, Alan P; Felger, Jason E; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2004-03-01

    Currently, cardiac surgery is an evolving field. Not only has there been a technologic explosion, but there is also a strong interest in minimally invasive operations. Mitral valve surgery can now be performed with the use of sophisticated robotic systems through small incisions, and a review of recent advances is warranted. Various groups have now documented that robotic valve surgery is feasible and safe. Despite an initial learning curve, facility with the procedure is gained with increasing experience. Robotic mitral valve surgery is a procedure that is gaining widespread popularity. The patient of today and the future will demand minimally invasive operations. Initial clinical experience with robotic systems will allow further developments. Ultimately, this may result in completely endoscopic heart surgery.

  7. Recommendations for the management of individuals with acquired valvular heart diseases who are involved in leisure-time physical activities or competitive sports.

    PubMed

    Mellwig, Klaus Peter; van Buuren, Frank; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Bjørnstad, Hans Halvor

    2008-02-01

    Physical check-ups among athletes with valvular heart disease are of significant relevance. In athletes with mitral valve stenosis the extent of allowed physical activity is dependant on the size of the left atrium and the severity of the valve defect. Patients with mild-to-moderate mitral valve regurgitation can participate in all types of sport associated with low and moderate isometric stress and moderate dynamic stress. Patients under anticoagulation should not participate in any type of contact sport. Asymptomatic athletes with mild aortic valve stenosis can take part in all types of sport, as long as left ventricular function and size are normal, a normal response to exercise at the level performed during athletic activities is present and there are no arrhythmias. Asymptomatic athletes with moderate aortic valve stenosis should only take part in sports with low dynamic and static stress. Aortic valve regurgitation is often present due to connective tissue disease of a bicuspid valve. Athletes with mild aortic valve regurgitation, with normal end diastolic left ventricular size and systolic function can participate in all types of sport. A mitral valve prolapse is often associated with structural diseases of the myocardium and endocardium. In patients with mitral valve prolapse Holter-ECG monitoring should also be performed to detect significant arrhythmias. All athletes with known valvular heart disease, a previous history of infective endocarditis and valve surgery should receive endocarditis prophylaxis before dental, oral, respiratory, intestinal and genitourinary procedures associated with bacteraemia. Sport activities have to be avoided during active infection with fever.

  8. Model-driven physiological assessment of the mitral valve from 4D TEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Ingmar; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Houle, Helene; Huber, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-02-01

    Disorders of the mitral valve are second most frequent, cumulating 14 percent of total number of deaths caused by Valvular Heart Disease each year in the United States and require elaborate clinical management. Visual and quantitative evaluation of the valve is an important step in the clinical workflow according to experts as knowledge about mitral morphology and dynamics is crucial for interventional planning. Traditionally this involves examination and metric analysis of 2D images comprising potential errors being intrinsic to the method. Recent commercial solutions are limited to specific anatomic components, pathologies and a single phase of cardiac 4D acquisitions only. This paper introduces a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of the mitral valve based on a 4D model estimated from ultrasound data. A physiological model of the mitral valve, covering the complete anatomy and eventual shape variations, is generated utilizing parametric spline surfaces constrained by topological and geometrical prior knowledge. The 4D model's parameters are estimated for each patient using the latest discriminative learning and incremental searching techniques. Precise evaluation of the anatomy using model-based dynamic measurements and advanced visualization are enabled through the proposed approach in a reliable, repeatable and reproducible manner. The efficiency and accuracy of the method is demonstrated through experiments and an initial validation based on clinical research results. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time such a patient specific 4D mitral valve model is proposed, covering all of the relevant anatomies and enabling to model the common pathologies at once.

  9. TexMi: Development of Tissue-Engineered Textile-Reinforced Mitral Valve Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ricardo; Gesche, Valentine N.; Hurtado-Aguilar, Luis G.; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Frese, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation together with aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in Europe and North America. Mechanical and biological prostheses available for mitral valve replacement have significant limitations such as the need of a long-term anticoagulation therapy and failure by calcifications. Both types are unable to remodel, self-repair, and adapt to the changing hemodynamic conditions. Moreover, they are mostly designed for the aortic position and do not reproduce the native annular-ventricular continuity, resulting in suboptimal hemodynamics, limited durability, and gradually decreasing ventricular pumping efficiency. A tissue-engineered heart valve specifically designed for the mitral position has the potential to overcome the limitations of the commercially available substitutes. For this purpose, we developed the TexMi, a living textile-reinforced mitral valve, which recapitulates the key elements of the native one: annulus, asymmetric leaflets (anterior and posterior), and chordae tendineae to maintain the native annular-ventricular continuity. The tissue-engineered valve is based on a composite scaffold consisting of the fibrin gel as a cell carrier and a textile tubular structure with the twofold task of defining the gross three-dimensional (3D) geometry of the valve and conferring mechanical stability. The TexMi valves were molded with ovine umbilical vein cells and stimulated under dynamic conditions for 21 days in a custom-made bioreactor. Histological and immunohistological stainings showed remarkable tissue development with abundant aligned collagen fibers and elastin deposition. No cell-mediated tissue contraction occurred. This study presents the proof-of-principle for the realization of a tissue-engineered mitral valve with a simple and reliable injection molding process readily adaptable to the patient's anatomy and pathological situation by producing a patient-specific rapid prototyped mold. PMID:24665896

  10. Durability of mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation due to degenerative mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    David, Tirone E

    2015-09-01

    Degenerative diseases of the mitral valve (MV) are the most common cause of mitral regurgitation in the Western world and the most suitable pathology for MV repair. Several studies have shown excellent long-term durability of MV repair for degenerative diseases. The best follow-up results are obtained with isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet, however even with isolated prolapse of the anterior leaflet or prolapse of both leaflets the results are gratifying, particularly in young patients. The freedom from reoperation on the MV at 15 years exceeds 90% for isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet and it is around 70-85% for prolapse of the anterior leaflet or both leaflets. The degree of degenerative change in the MV also plays a role in durability of MV repair. Most studies have used freedom from reoperation to assess durability of the repair but some studies that examined valve function late after surgery suggest that recurrent mitral regurgitation is higher than estimated by freedom from reoperation. We can conclude that MV repair for degenerative mitral regurgitation is associated with low probability of reoperation for up to two decades after surgery. However, almost one-third of the patients develop recurrent moderate or severe mitral regurgitation suggesting that surgery does not arrest the degenerative process.

  11. Durability of mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation due to degenerative mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative diseases of the mitral valve (MV) are the most common cause of mitral regurgitation in the Western world and the most suitable pathology for MV repair. Several studies have shown excellent long-term durability of MV repair for degenerative diseases. The best follow-up results are obtained with isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet, however even with isolated prolapse of the anterior leaflet or prolapse of both leaflets the results are gratifying, particularly in young patients. The freedom from reoperation on the MV at 15 years exceeds 90% for isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet and it is around 70-85% for prolapse of the anterior leaflet or both leaflets. The degree of degenerative change in the MV also plays a role in durability of MV repair. Most studies have used freedom from reoperation to assess durability of the repair but some studies that examined valve function late after surgery suggest that recurrent mitral regurgitation is higher than estimated by freedom from reoperation. We can conclude that MV repair for degenerative mitral regurgitation is associated with low probability of reoperation for up to two decades after surgery. However, almost one-third of the patients develop recurrent moderate or severe mitral regurgitation suggesting that surgery does not arrest the degenerative process. PMID:26539345

  12. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  13. Mitral disc-valve variance

    PubMed Central

    Berroya, Renato B.; Escano, Fernando B.

    1972-01-01

    This report deals with a rare complication of disc-valve prosthesis in the mitral area. A significant disc poppet and struts destruction of mitral Beall valve prostheses occurred 20 and 17 months after implantation. The resulting valve incompetence in the first case contributed to the death of the patient. The durability of Teflon prosthetic valves appears to be in question and this type of valve probably will be unacceptable if there is an increasing number of disc-valve variance in the future. Images PMID:5017573

  14. Recent developments in percutaneous mitral valve treatment.

    PubMed

    La Canna, Giovanni; Denti, Paolo; Buzzatti, Nicola; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, various percutaneous techniques have been introduced for the treatment of mitral regurgitation (MR), including direct leaflet repair, annuloplasty and left ventricular remodeling. Percutaneous mitral repair targets both primary degenerative and secondary mitral valve regurgitation and may be considered in selected high-surgical-risk patients. The assessment of mitral functional anatomy by echocardiography and computed tomography is crucial when selecting the appropriate repair strategy, according to the regurgitant valve lesion and the surrounding anatomy. The ongoing clinical use of new devices in annuloplasty and percutaneous mitral valve replacement is a promising new scenario in the treatment of MR that goes beyond the conventional surgical approach.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Ashley E.; Pantoja, Joe Luis; Weinsaft, Jonathan; Grossi, Eugene; Guccione, Julius M.; Ge, Liang; Ratcliffe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a complex structure regulating forward flow of blood between the left atrium and left ventricle (LV). Multiple disease processes can affect its proper function, and when these diseases cause severe mitral regurgitation (MR), optimal treatment is repair of the native valve. The mitral valve (MV) is a dynamic structure with multiple components that have complex interactions. Computational modeling through finite element (FE) analysis is a valuable tool to delineate the biomechanical properties of the mitral valve and understand its diseases and their repairs. In this review, we present an overview of relevant mitral valve diseases, and describe the evolution of FE models of surgical valve repair techniques. PMID:26632260

  16. Rare Case of Unileaflet Mitral Valve.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jainil; Jain, Tarun; Shah, Sunay; Mawri, Sagger; Ananthasubramaniam, Karthikeyan

    2016-06-01

    Unileaflet mitral valve is the rarest of the congenital mitral valve anomalies and is usually life threatening in infancy due to severe mitral regurgitation (MR). In most asymptomatic individuals, it is mostly due to hypoplastic posterior mitral leaflet. We present a 22-year-old male with palpitations, who was found to have an echocardiogram revealing an elongated anterior mitral valve leaflet with severely hypoplastic posterior mitral valve leaflet appearing as a unileaflet mitral valve without MR. Our case is one of the 11 reported cases in the literature so far. We hereby review those cases and conclude that these patients are likely to be at risk of developing worsening MR later in their lives.

  17. Investigation of the Left Ventricular Flow Dynamics in the Presence of Severe Mitral Annular Calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayegh, Batoul; Kadem, Lyes; di Labbio, Giuseppe; Pressman, Gregg S.; Obasare, Edinrin

    2016-11-01

    Valvular calcification is frequent with aging and diverse diseases. Mitral annular calcification (MAC) is a degenerative process where the fibrous annulus of the mitral valve degrades. MAC can be found in approximately 40% of people aged over 65. It is associated with increased occurrence of cardiovascular diseases including stroke. This experimental work is aimed to investigate the effects of MAC on the left ventricle (LV) hemodynamics and to develop new clinical parameters. Two patient-specific 3D-printed mitral valves with moderate and severe MACs were placed in a left heart simulator. The velocity fields in the LV were acquired using time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) and compared to normal LV flow. The velocity fields were used to evaluate the temporal evolution of the vorticity fields and viscous energy loss in the LV. The presence of MAC disturbed the flow in the LV leading to markedly increased viscous energy losses. As the severity of MAC increased, the velocity of the inflow jet also increased causing significant perturbations to the normally-occurring vortex in the LV.

  18. Robotically assisted mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changqing; Yang, Ming; Xiao, Cangsong; Wang, Gang; Wu, Yang; Wang, Jiali; Li, Jiachun

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, we determined the safety and efficacy of robotic mitral valve replacement using robotic technology. From January 2007 through March 2011, more than 400 patients underwent various types of robotic cardiac surgery in our department. Of these, 22 consecutive patients underwent robotically assisted mitral valve replacement. Of the 22 patients with isolated rheumatic mitral valve stenosis (9 men and 13 women), the mean age was 44.7 ± 19.8 years (range, 32-65). Preoperatively, all patients underwent a complete workup, including coronary angiography and transthoracic echocardiography. Of the 22 patients, 15 had concomitant atrial fibrillation. The surgical approach was through 4 right-side chest ports with femoral perfusion. Aortic occlusion was performed with a Chitwood crossclamp, and antegrade cardioplegia was administered directly by way of the anterior chest. Using 3 port incisions in the right side of the chest and a 2.5- to 3.0-cm working port, all the procedures were completed with the da Vinci S robot. All patients underwent successful robotic surgery. Of the 22 patients, 16 received a mechanical valve and 6 a tissue valve. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic crossclamp time was 137.1 ± 21.9 minutes (range, 105-168) and 99.3 ± 17.9 minutes (range, 80-133), respectively. No operative deaths, stroke, or other complications occurred, and no incisional conversions were required. After surgery, all the patients were followed up echocardiographically. Robotically assisted mitral valve replacement can be performed safely in patients with isolated mitral valve stenosis, and surgical results are excellent. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A hospital-based survey of patients with severe valvular heart disease in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Po; Liu, Xian-Bao; Liang, Jie; Zhu, Qi-Feng; Pu, Chao-Xia; Tang, Meng-Yao; Wang, Jian-An

    2017-03-15

    Due to increasing aging, the epidemiology of VHD may have changed in China. This study aimed to provide contemporary information on the prevalence, distribution patterns, and etiology of severe VHD in China. This was a retrospective survey at Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, which included all consecutive patients between 2010 and 2015. In all, 139,496 patients were enrolled. Among severe valve diseases, MR was the most frequent (n=946, 0.68%) followed by MS (n=524, 0.38%), AS (n=392, 0.28%), and AR (n=371, 0.27%). Severe MR and AS prevalence rates increased strikingly with age. Rheumatic heart disease had an prevalence of 1.56% (n=2179), and remained one of the most common causes of severe VHD in patients younger than 65years old (99.5% of MS with rheumatic; 27.6% of MR with rheumatic; 25.7% of AS with rheumatic; 31.6% of AR with rheumatic). Aortic valve calcification was the predominant AS etiology, and its prevalence greatly increased with age. In severe AR, rheumatic fever was the most common etiology in patients below 65; in those above 65, etiology was mostly degenerative. In severe primary MR, mitral valve prolapse was the most common cause. Prevalence of secondary MR increased with age, from 16.4% in 18-44years old to 51.7% in individuals ≥75. Severe valvular diseases are very common; rheumatic fever and degenerative valvular changes remain predominant causes in patients below 65 and older ones, respectively. Young adults present mainly with primary MR, while secondary MR is more common in elderly ones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early Clinical Outcome of Mitral Valve Replacement Using a Newly Designed Stentless Mitral Valve for Failure of Initial Mitral Valve Repair.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hidefumi; Kasegawa, Hitoshi; Kin, Hajime; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2016-12-21

    Here we report the early outcome of mitral valve replacement using a newly designed stentless mitral valve for failure of initial mitral valve repair. Mitral valve plasty (MVP) for mitral regurgitation is currently a standard technique performed worldwide. However, whether mitral valve repair should be performed for patients with advanced leaflet damage or complicated pathology remains controversial. Mitral valve replacement might be feasible for patients who have undergone failed initial MVP; however, it is not an optimal treatment because of poor valve durability and the need for anticoagulative therapy. We report two cases of successful mitral valve replacement using a newly designed stentless mitral valve made of fresh autologous pericardium, which may have a potential benefit over mitral valve repair or mitral valve replacement with a mechanical or bioprosthetic valve.

  1. Mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, H; Hamanaka, Y; Hirai, S; Mitsui, N; Kobayashi, T

    2001-06-01

    A 21 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of chest and back pain after blunt chest trauma. On admission, consciousness was clear and a physical examination showed labored breathing. Her vital signs were stable, but her breathing gradually worsened, and artificial respiration was started. The chest roentgenogram and a subsequent chest computed tomographic scans revealed contusions, hemothorax of the left lung and multiple rib fractures. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and mild mitral regurgitation (MR). TTE was carried out repeatedly, and revealed gradually progressive MR and prolapse of the posterior medial leaflet, although there was no congestive heart failure. After her general condition had recovered, surgery was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed torn chordae at the posterior medial leaflet. The leaflet where the chorda was torn was cut and plicated, and posterior mitral annuloplasty was performed using a prosthetic ring. One month later following discharge, the MR had disappeared on TTE.

  2. The role of valvular and thoracic aortic calcifications in distinction between ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Atak, Ramazan; Ileri, Mehmet; Yetkin, Ozkan; Yetkin, Ertan; Turhan, Hasan; Senen, Kubilay; Sahin, Onur; Ozbakir, Cemal; Demikan, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Determination of underlying etiology in patients with dilated and globally hypokinetic left ventricles may sometimes be difficult even after detailed history and complete clinical evaluation. Cardiac valvular and thoracic aortic calcifications have previously been reported to be used as a window to diffuse atherosclerosis of the vascular system. The authors prospectively examined the predictive value of mitral annular calcification (MAC), aortic valve calcification (AVC), and thoracic aortic calcification (TAC) in diagnosis of coronary artery disease as the underlying cause of diffuse left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction. The study included 98 consecutive patients (male/female = 76/22, mean age = 58.9 +/- 10.7 years, range: 33 to 75 years) over the age of 30 years admitted to their clinics between October 1999 and December 2001 with signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure associated with documented cardiomegaly. Transthoracic echocardiography and coronary angiography were performed in all patients for the evaluation of valvular calcifications and coronary status. Although there was no significant difference between the groups with and without coronary artery stenosis (CAS), with regard to presence of MAC, patients with CAS tended to have MAC more frequently (12/61, 20% vs 4/37, 11%, p > 0.05). AVC and TAC were found to be significantly more frequent in patients with CAS compared to those without CAS (AVC, 35/61, 57% vs 4/37, 11%, p < 0.001 and TAC, 28/61, 46% vs 2/37, 5%, p < 0.001). While all 3 calcifications had sensitivity under 60%, and specificity and positive predictive value over 75% individually, the presence of any of them had a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 86%, positive predictive value of 91%, and negative predictive value of 73%. Thus the presence of any of these calcifications distinguished patients with coronary artery disease with a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 86%. The presence of aortic valvular valve and

  3. Appetite suppressants and valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Seghatol, Frank F; Rigolin, Vera H

    2002-09-01

    Appetite suppressants fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine, and phentermine have been used alone or in combination as an alternative to diet and surgery in the management of obesity. This therapy was halted in 1997 after reports of valvular lesions affecting almost one third of patients treated with these drugs. Fortunately, most cases of appetite suppressant-related valve disease are mild or moderate and rarely required valve repair or replacement. Follow-up studies have suggested improvement in valvulopathy after discontinuation of the treatment. The mechanism of valve disease induced by these drugs is speculative and may be related to their serotonergic effects. Echocardiographic features are similar to carcinoid heart disease and valvulopathy associated with ergot use. Most cases require only follow-up and endocarditis prophylaxis; surgery is rarely needed.

  4. Serotonergic Drugs and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The serotonin (5-HT) releasers (±)-fenfluramine and (+)-fenfluramine were withdrawn from clinical use due to increased risk of valvular heart disease. One prevailing hypothesis (i.e., the “5-HT hypothesis”) suggests that fenfluramine-induced increases in plasma 5-HT underlie the disease. Objective Here we critically evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for fenfluramine-associated valve disease. Methods Findings from in vitro and in vivo experiments performed in our laboratory are reviewed. The data are integrated with existing literature to address the validity of the 5-HT hypothesis and suggest alternative explanations. Conclusions The overwhelming majority of evidence refutes the 5-HT hypothesis. A more likely cause of fenfluramine-induced valvulopathy is activation of 5-HT2B receptors on heart valves by the metabolite norfenfluramine. Future serotonergic medications should be designed to lack 5-HT2B agonist activity. PMID:19505264

  5. Mitral Valve Replacement After Failed Mitral Ring Insertion With or Without Leaflet/Chordal Repair for Pure Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William C; Moore, Meagan; Ko, Jong Mi; Hamman, Baron L

    2016-06-01

    Mitral repair operations for correction of pure mitral regurgitation (MR) are generally quite successful. Occasionally, however, the reparative procedure incompletely corrects the MR or the MR recurs. From March 1993 to January 2016, twenty nine patients had mitral valve replacement after the initial mitral repair operation, and observations in them were analyzed. All 29 patients at the repair operation had an annular ring inserted and later (<1 year in 6 and >1 year in 21) mitral valve replacement. The cause of the MR before the repair operation appears to have been prolapse in 16 patients (55%), secondary (functional) in 12 (41%) (ischemic in 5), and infective endocarditis which healed in 1 (3%). At the replacement operation the excised anterior mitral leaflet was thickened in all 29 patients. Some degree of stenosis appeared to have been present in 16 of the 29 patients before the replacement operation, although only 10 had an echocardiographic or hemodynamic recording of a transvalvular gradient; at least 11 patients had restricted motion of the posterior mitral leaflet; 10, ring dehiscence; 2, severe hemolysis; and 2, left ventricular outflow obstruction. In conclusion, there are multiple reasons for valve replacement after earlier mitral repair. Uniformly, at the time of the replacement, the mitral leaflets were thickened by fibrous tissue. Measurement of the area enclosed by the 360° rings and study of the excised leaflet suggest that the ring itself may have contributed to the leaflet scarring and development of some transmitral stenosis.

  6. Natural history of valvular regurgitation using side-by-side echocardiographic analysis in anorexigen-treated subjects.

    PubMed

    Klein, Allan L; Griffin, Brian P; Grimm, Richard A; Rodriguez, L Leonardo; Sallach, John A; Morehead, Annitta J

    2005-12-15

    In 1997, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported valvular regurgitation (aortic regurgitation [AR] mild or greater and/or mitral regurgitation [MR] moderate or greater) in 32.8% of patients treated with anorexigens. This study sought to determine the natural history of valvular regurgitation in patients who were included in the FDA's original report. This was a nonrandomized, natural history study of these subjects. Cohort I consisted of 155 of 186 patients (83%) who were reported to the FDA. Cohort II consisted of a similar group of 311 patients who were not included. Initial echocardiograms were obtained for medical indications before the study initiation, and study echocardiograms were standardized and obtained at 3-month intervals. Level III echocardiographers performed blinded, side-by-side comparison of the first and last study echocardiograms at a core laboratory. Cohorts I and II consisted of predominantly female, middle-aged, obese subjects. At enrollment, patients in cohorts I and II had mild or greater AR (17.9%, 13.5%) and moderate or greater MR (3.3%, 4.0%), respectively, which was less than in the FDA's report. At follow-up, there were no statistically significant changes in the degree of valvular regurgitation in either cohort when the first and last study echocardiograms were read side by side. In conclusion, this natural history follow-up study demonstrates that MR and AR in long-term anorexigen-treated patients was less than reported to the FDA, did not progress, and remained echocardiographically stable during the 10-month duration of the study.

  7. Successful balloon mitral valvotomy in a rare coexistence of Ebstein's anomaly and rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Navdeep Singh; Kondethimmanahally Rangaiah, Sunil Kumar; Ramesh, Dwarikaprasad; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa

    2016-05-05

    Co-existence of Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve with rheumatic mitral stenosis is a very rare occurrence. We report the case of a young man who presented with progressive dyspnoea and was found to have rheumatic mitral stenosis with pulmonary hypertension and Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve. The patient underwent successful balloon mitral valvotomy resulting in marked improvement of symptoms.

  8. Functional mitral regurgitation: predictor for atrial substrate remodeling and poor ablation outcome in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Wu, Lingmin; Hou, Bingbo; Sun, Wei; Zheng, Lihui; Ding, Ligang; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shu; Yao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is not uncommon in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. We sought to investigate the association between FMR and atrial substrate remodeling as well as the ablation outcome in paroxysmal AF (PAF) patients. We retrospectively analyzed a prospectively enrolled cohort of 132 patients (age 55.1 ± 9.6 years, 75.8% male) with symptomatic PAF who underwent initial ablation in our institute. Functional mitral regurgitation was defined as regurgitation jet area to left atrium (LA) area ratio ≥ 0.1 without any primary valvular disease. Voltage mapping of LA was performed under sinus rhythm. Low voltage zones (LVZs) were semi-quantitatively estimated and presented as low voltage index. Follow-up for AF recurrence ≥ 12 months was performed. In total, 40 patients (29.6%) were detected with FMR, who were older than the non-FMR patients (P = 0.007) and had larger LA diameters (P = 0.02). Left atrium LVZs were observed in 64.9% of patients with FMR versus 22.1% patients without FMR (P < 0.001). Functional mitral regurgitation independently predicted the presence of LVZs (OR 7.286; 95% CI 3.023–17.562; P < 0.001). During a mean follow-up of 22.9 ± 6.5 months, 38 patients (28.8%) experienced AF recurrence. The recurrence rate was 60.0% and 19.5% in FMR and non-FMR cohort, respectively (log rank P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that FMR was an independent predictor for AF recurrence (HR 2.291; 95% CI 1.062–4.942; P = 0.03). Functional mitral regurgitation was strongly associated with atrial substrate remodeling. Furthermore, patients with FMR have substantial risk for AF recurrence post ablation. PMID:27472715

  9. Assessment of aortic and mitral annuli dynamics during the cardiac cycle using speckle tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenjuan; Li, Hui; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Ye; Rao, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were i) to evaluate mitral and aortic annuli excursion, and aortomitral angle (AMA) during the cardiac cycle in healthy adults using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography, ii) to assess two annuli dynamics and coupling behaviors as an integral, and iii) to detect the relation between two annuli and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). A total of 74 healthy adults underwent transthoracic echocardiography. In the parasternal long-axis view, a number of points were extracted, including right coronary aortic annular, aortomitral fibrous junction, and posterior mitral annular points. The annuli excursion and AMA were measured using a speckle tracking-derived software during the cardiac cycle. During the isovolumic contraction and the isovolumic relaxation phase, annuli excursion and AMA remain stable for a short time. During the systole, annuli excursion increased sharply to the maximum, while AMA narrowed quickly to the minimum value. During the diastole, there are three patterns of decrease in annuli excursion and AMA expansion in different phases. The annuli excursion of three points correlates well with the LVEF (right coronary aortic annulus excursion, r=0.71, P<0.05; non-coronary aortic annulus excursion, r=0.70, P<0.05; posterior mitral annulus excursion, r=0.82, P<0.05). Moreover, there are positive correlations between annuli excursion and the variation of AMA (r=0.60, P<0.05). The annuli excursion and AMA have various regular patterns in healthy adults. The interactions of mitral and aortic annuli correlate with the left ventricular function. Our findings may have relevance to the evaluation of left ventricular function and presurgical planning of patients with valvular diseases.

  10. Treatment of Chronic Atrial Fibrillation During Surgery for Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Flavio Donizete; Leite, Valdir Gonçalves; Leite, Vanusa Gonçalves; Maia, Marcelo Alves; Gomes, Otoni Moreira; Lima, Melchior Luiz; Osterne, Evandro César Vidal; Kallás, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The result of surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation remains controversial, although prospective and randomized studies have shown significant differences in the return to sinus rhythm in patients treated with ablation versus control group. Surgery of the Labyrinth, proposed by Cox and colleagues, is complex and increases the morbidity rate. Therefore, studies are needed to confirm the impact on clinical outcomes and quality of life of these patients. Objective To analyze the results obtained in the treatment of atrial fibrillation by surgical approach, by Gomes procedure, for mitral valve surgery in patients with rheumatic heart disease associated with chronic atrial fibrillation. Methods We studied 20 patients with mitral valve dysfunction of rheumatic etiology, evolving with chronic atrial fibrillation, submitted to surgical treatment of valvular dysfunction and atrial fibrillation by Gomes procedure. Results The mean duration of infusion ranged from 65.8±11.22 and aortic clamping of 40.8±7.87 minutes. Of 20 patients operated, 19 (95%) patients were discharged with normal atrial heart rhythm. One (5%) patient required permanent endocardial pacing. In the postoperative follow-up of six months, 18 (90%) patients continued with regular atrial rhythm, one (5%) patient returned to atrial fibrillation and one (5%) patient continued to require endocardial pacemaker to maintain regular rhythm. Conclusion Gomes procedure associated with surgical correction of mitral dysfunction simplified the surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease and persistent atrial fibrillation. The results showed that it is a safe and effective procedure. PMID:27849305

  11. Conservative surgery for mitral valve disease: clinical and echocardiographic analysis of results.

    PubMed Central

    Adebo, O A; Ross, J K

    1983-01-01

    Eighty-five patients underwent mitral valve reconstruction by the Carpentier method from January 1976 to December 1981. Concomitant procedures were performed in 30 patients (aortic valve replacement in 23, coronary revascularisation in six, and tricuspid valve repair in seven). Before operation 76 patients (89%) were in clinical class II or III (New York Heart Association) and atrial fibrillation was present in 50. Thirty-six patients had valvular incompetence, while 26 had pure stenosis. The aetiology was rheumatic in 57 cases and dysplastic in 21. The patients were assessed for clinical improvement, durability of valve repair, thromboembolism, and survival. There was one death, an operative mortality rate of 1.2%, and 63 of 74 patients followed for one to six years were in clinical class I after operation. The actuarial survival was 92% with a 93% incidence of freedom from thromboemboli at five years. Six patients had embolic episodes, four of whom had aortic valve replacement. Three patients had a repeat operation 16-20 months later, a valve failure rate of 6.7%. Nineteen patients with ruptured chordae had postoperative echocardiographic assessment of myocardial and mitral valve functions; the peak rates of dimension changes of the left ventricular cavity (indicative of flow across the mitral valve) fell to normal in most patients, and the left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions decreased significantly from 6.4 (1.53) to 5.09 (1.31) cm (mean and SD)--p less than 0.05. Our results confirm that reconstructive mitral surgery is able to restore and maintain normal valve function in addition to providing satisfactory relief of symptoms. Images PMID:6612646

  12. [Immediate Results of Mitral Valve Surgery in Asymptomatic Patients With Severe Mitral Regurgitation Due to Degenerative Mitral VaIve Disease].

    PubMed

    Nazarov, V M; Afanasyev, A V; Zheleznev, S I; Bogachev-Prokophiev, A V; Demin, I I; Karaskov, A M

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative mitral valve disease nowadays is the most common cause of mitral insufficiency in developed countries and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In the last decades repairing the mitral valve has become the operation of choice for treatment of the mitral valve prolapse, enabling to improve the geometry and function of the left ventricle and long-term survival. Nevertheless, the problem of choice of method of management of severe mitral regurgitation in asymptomatic patients with degenerative mitral valve disease remains unsolved. In this article we present immediate results of a prospective comparative study of mitral valve surgery in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients in dependence on NYHA class of heart failure.

  13. Drug-induced valvular heart disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Andrejak, Michel; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Numerous reports have shown an unquestionable association between fibrotic valve disease and the following drugs: ergot alkaloids (such as methysergide and ergotamine), ergot-derived dopaminergic agonists (such as pergolide and cabergoline) and drugs metabolized into norfenfluramine (such as fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine and benfluorex). This review focuses on different aspects of drug-induced valvular heart disease: historical background; echocardiographic features; different drugs recognized as being responsible for valvular heart disease; and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of Acquired Valvular Heart Disease by the Pediatrician: When to Follow, When to Refer for Intervention? Part II.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anita

    2015-11-01

    Lesions of the heart valves are the commonest acquired cardiac abnormalities seen in pediatric age group. Aortic regurgitation (AR) results from abnormality of the valve leaflets or of the aortic root. Mitral valve lesion may be associated in patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Left ventricle dilates and may develop dysfunction in advanced states. Coronary perfusion also tends to suffer in severe AR. The symptoms develop later and include dyspnea and palpitations. An early diastolic, high pitched murmur, best heard at base of the heart is the hallmark of AR. All symptomatic patients with severe AR and those with left ventricular dysfunction should undergo surgical intervention. Aortic stenosis (AS) is often due to congenitally bicuspid or unicuspid valve. RHD rarely results in AS; associated AR is common in such cases. The most common cause of tricuspid valve involvement is secondary to dilatation of right ventricle and tricuspid annulus resulting in tricuspid regurgitation (TR). Rarely RHD affects the tricuspid valve directly; resulting in stenosis with TR. Involvement of both mitral and aortic valves is almost pathognomonic of RHD etiology. Severity of individual lesions may be difficult to ascertain as proximal valve lesion tends to modify the assessment of the distal valve lesion. It is important to understand that all valvular lesions do not require surgery. Regular secondary prophylaxis with long acting penicillin (for patients with RHD) may retard further progression of valve lesion and must be emphasized to the family. For mild and asymptomatic moderate valvular lesions, periodic monitoring with clinical examination and echocardiography is sufficient. No guidelines are available for timing of intervention in such children; data may have to be extrapolated from published guidelines for adult patients. Various types of surgical options are available for regurgitant valves, but none is ideal. The pediatricians are required to have knowledge of

  15. A complex transcatheter mitral valve replacement and repair for the treatmemt of refractory severe mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Condado, Jose F; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Thourani, Vinod H; Jensen, Hanna K; Kim, Dennis W; Kaebnick, Brian W; Block, Peter C; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2017-01-23

    Hybrid transcatheter Mitral Valve-in-Ring and Mitral Valve-in-Valve procedures can be an alternative to traditional surgical valve replacement in patients with high surgical risk. We present a case of a 65-year-old male with recurrent severe mitral regurgitation (MR) that failed two traditional surgical attempts due to severe chest fibrosis. We performed a mitral valve-in ring replacement with a Sapien valve followed by a mitral valve-in-valve replacement with a Melody valve. Patient had a residual paravalvular leak that was closed with a vascular plug. Our case proves that is feasible to treat selected patients with MR using a hybrid transcatheter approach.

  16. Percutaneous Rescue for Critical Mitral Stenosis Late After Mitral Valve Repair.

    PubMed

    Salenger, Rawn; Diao, Xavier; Dawood, Murtaza Y; Herr, Daniel L; Sample, George A; Pichard, Augusto; Gammie, James S

    2016-11-01

    We report a case of catastrophic hemodynamic compromise secondary to pannus ingrowth and severe mitral stenosis occurring years after repair of a nonrheumatic mitral valve. The initial repair included closure of a posterior leaflet cleft and implantation of an annuloplasty ring. We describe a hybrid treatment strategy for this severely compromised patient, which included initial placement of a right ventricular assist device followed by percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and, eventually, a definitive mitral valve reoperation. This case report reinforces the importance of routine clinical and echocardiographic follow-up for patients after mitral valve repair, and it includes the description of a novel therapeutic approach.

  17. A Remnant Mitral Subvalvular Apparatus Mimicking Aortic Valve Vegetation after Mitral Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Sung; Kim, Jun-Sung; Kim, Myung-A

    2012-01-01

    Preservation of the subvalvular apparatus has the merits of postoperative outcomes during mitral valve replacement for mitral regurgitation. We performed mitral valve replacement with anterior and posterior leaflet chordal preservation in a 65-year-old woman. On the 2nd postoperative day, routine postoperative trans-thoracic echocardiography showed an unknown aortic subvalvular mobile mass. We report a case of a remnant mitral subvalvular apparatus detected by echocardiography after chordal preserving mitral valve replacement which was confused with postoperative aortic valve vegetation. PMID:22509443

  18. Successful treatment of double-orifice mitral stenosis with percutaneous balloon mitral commissurotomy.

    PubMed

    Patted, Suresh V; Halkati, Prabhu C; Ambar, Sameer S; Sattur, Ameet G

    2012-01-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve (DOMV) is an uncommon congenital anomaly, being present in 0.05% of the general population. The isolated occurrence of this anomaly is very rare and, to our knowledge, no data are currently available on the incidence of an isolated DOMV. A DOMV is characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus with 2 orifices opening into the left ventricle (LV). Subvalvular structures, especially the tensor apparatus, invariably show various degrees of abnormality. It can substantially obstruct mitral valve inflow or cause mitral valve incompetence. We present a rare case of nineteen-year-old male who underwent percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy in stenotic DOMV.

  19. Diagnostic approach to assessment of valvular heart disease using MRI—Part I: a practical approach for valvular regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chaothawee, Lertlak

    2012-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases from any cause are divided into two categories: stenosis and regurgitation. Acquired knowledge of the pathological aetiology and disease severity are the important clues for optimal treatment, which may be medication or combination with surgery. The non-invasive techniques have been established for valvular heart disease evaluation for many years especially in demonstrating valvular structure and assessing severity. Transthoracic echocardiography still plays the major role. However, not every case can be clearly evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography because of rib space window limitation. In the present-day practice, MRI has been extensively used for the evaluation of heart diseases in both unique and complementary categories. However, valvular heart disease assessment using cardiac MRI still remains an important challenge. PMID:27326026

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess myocardial fibrosis in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Podlesnikar, Tomaz; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J

    2017-06-22

    The left ventricular (LV) remodeling process associated with significant valvular heart disease (VHD) is characterized by an increase of myocardial interstitial space with deposition of collagen and loss of myofibers. These changes occur before LV systolic function deteriorates or the patient develops symptoms. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) permits assessment of reactive fibrosis, with the use of T1 mapping techniques, and replacement fibrosis, with the use of late gadolinium contrast enhancement. In addition, functional consequences of these structural changes can be evaluated with myocardial tagging and feature tracking CMR, which assess the active deformation (strain) of the LV myocardium. Several studies have demonstrated that CMR techniques may be more sensitive than the conventional measures (LV ejection fraction or LV dimensions) to detect these structural and functional changes in patients with severe left-sided VHD and have shown that myocardial fibrosis may not be reversible after valve surgery. More important, the presence of myocardial fibrosis has been associated with lesser improvement in clinical symptoms and recovery of LV systolic function. Whether assessment of myocardial fibrosis may better select the patients with severe left-sided VHD who may benefit from surgery in terms of LV function and clinical symptoms improvement needs to be demonstrated in prospective studies. The present review article summarizes the current status of CMR techniques to assess myocardial fibrosis and appraises the current evidence on the use of these techniques for risk stratification of patients with severe aortic stenosis or regurgitation and mitral regurgitation.

  1. [Valvular surgical treatment concurrent with myocardial revascularization].

    PubMed

    Lavítola, P de L; Dallan, L A; Tarasoutchi, F; Grinberg, M; da Luz, P L; Pileggi, F; Jatene, A D

    1992-12-01

    To study the morbidity and mortality due to valvar surgical treatment performed concomitantly to myocardial revascularization. From 1650 patients submitted to mitral or aortic valve surgical treatment, 103 (6.24%) had it associated to myocardial revascularization. Coronary insufficiency was associated to aortic valvar lesion in 66 (64.0%) patients, group I, with mean age of 62.3 +/- 8 years; and in 37 (35.9%) patients with mitral valve lesion, group II, with mean age of 57.8 +/- 5.8 years. Diagnosis was based upon the anamnesis, physical examination and confirmed by cine-coronarographic findings. I-Complications at the immediate postoperative; a) mortality 11 (10.6%) patients, 6 (9.09%) from group I: by low cardiac output 3, uncontrolled arrhythmia 1, mediastinitis 1; acute infarction with cardiogenic shock 1, and 5 (134.5%) of group II: uncontrolled hemorrhage 2, sudden death 1, saphenous vein graft occlusion, respiratory insufficiency and sepsis 2; b) controlled intercurrences that increased the time of hospitalization: mental disorder 5 patients; CVA 7, diabetes decompensation 2, worsening of chronic renal insufficiency 1, upper level digestive hemorrhage 1 and respiratory insufficiency 3 patients. II-late postoperative complications of 77 (83.6%) patients which could be followed up during a period of 60 months: 1) mortality: 3 (3.89%) patients; 2 due to cardiomyopathy and 1 by acute myocardial infarction; 2) late evolution-functional capacity III (NYHA) by cardiomyopathy 6; I/II 68 patients; mild angina 6 patients, 2 underwent revascularization at the end of final 36-42 months. The clinical improvement and mortality indexes statistically similar to the isolate surgical acts stimulate us to keep up with such associate procedures.

  2. Cardiovascular Event Prediction and Risk Reclassification by Coronary, Aortic, and Valvular Calcification in the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Udo; Massaro, Joseph M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Kathiresan, Sekar; Fox, Caroline S; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2016-02-22

    We determined whether vascular and valvular calcification predicted incident major coronary heart disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and all-cause mortality independent of Framingham risk factors in the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Coronary artery calcium (CAC), thoracic and abdominal aortic calcium, and mitral or aortic valve calcium were measured by cardiac computed tomography in participants free of CVD. Participants were followed for a median of 8 years. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine association of CAC, thoracic and abdominal aortic calcium, and mitral and aortic valve calcium with end points. Improvement in discrimination beyond risk factors was tested via the C-statistic and net reclassification index. In this cohort of 3486 participants (mean age 50±10 years; 51% female), CAC was most strongly associated with major coronary heart disease, followed by major CVD, and all-cause mortality independent of Framingham risk factors. Among noncoronary calcifications, mitral valve calcium was associated with major CVD and all-cause mortality independent of Framingham risk factors and CAC. CAC significantly improved discriminatory value beyond risk factors for coronary heart disease (area under the curve 0.78-0.82; net reclassification index 32%, 95% CI 11-53) but not for CVD. CAC accurately reclassified 85% of the 261 patients who were at intermediate (5-10%) 10-year risk for coronary heart disease based on Framingham risk factors to either low risk (n=172; no events observed) or high risk (n=53; observed event rate 8%). CAC improves discrimination and risk reclassification for major coronary heart disease and CVD beyond risk factors in asymptomatic community-dwelling persons and accurately reclassifies two-thirds of the intermediate-risk population. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Mitral valve replacement in children and adolescents with rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Stanley, J; Munsi, S; Sukumar, I P; Cherian, G

    1976-09-01

    To our knowledge, no documented hemodynamic studies in larger series of young patients undergoing valve replacement for rheumatic valvular disease have been reported previously. It seems to us that the natural history of rheumatic heart disease in India often follows a rapid and fulminant course which makes an aggressive surgical approach mandatory. An operative mortality of 22 % was seen in this series. Pronounced cardiac disability together with the poor general condition and the low nutritional status contributed in no small measure to this figure. Patients have been followed for periods ranging from 6 months to 6 years following corrective surgery. A remarkable absence of thrombo-embolic phenomena was a striking feature in the follow-up. There has been no evidence of rheumatic reactivation in any of these patients. This communication reinforces the beneficial results of valve replacement even at this young age when severe mitral incompetence exists refractory to medical treatment.

  4. Mitral Valve Perforation in Libman-Sacks Endocarditis: A Heart-Wrenching Case of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Aby, Elizabeth S; Rosol, Zachary; Simegn, Mengistu A

    2016-08-01

    Libman-Sacks (LS) endocarditis is one of the most common cardiac manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Rarely, however, it can lead to serious complications, including severe valvular regurgitation or superimposed bacterial endocarditis. We describe the initial diagnostic challenges, clinical course, imaging studies and histopathological findings of a patient who presented with life-threatening lupus complicated by hemoptysis and respiratory failure secondary to a rare complication of LS endocarditis, acute mitral valve perforation. We review the current literature on valve perforation in the setting of LS endocarditis. In conclusion, although the disease is often asymptomatic and hemodynamically insignificant, it can result in serious and potentially fatal complications secondary to valve perforation, which may demand emergency surgical management.

  5. Percutaneous mitral valvotomy in rheumatic mitral stenosis: a new approach.

    PubMed Central

    Commeau, P; Grollier, G; Huret, B; Foucault, J P; Potier, J C

    1987-01-01

    Three patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis were treated with percutaneous mitral valvotomy. A Brockenbrough catheter was advanced transseptally into the left atrium and then into the left ventricle over a long guide wire. An angle wire loop retriever was advanced through a 10 Fr straight catheter via the femoral artery into the left ventricle. The retriever was used to catch the flexible end of the long guide wire. This end of the long guide wire was then drawn out of the right femoral artery by the retriever through the straight catheter. The straight catheter was left in the descending aorta; the Brockenbrough catheter was removed and a 7 Fr balloon catheter was introduced percutaneously over the long guide wire through the femoral vein. This balloon catheter was used for interatrial septal dilatation and right femoral venous dilatation. In two patients this catheter was replaced over the long guide wire with a 9 Fr Schneider-Medintag Grüntzig catheter (3 X 12 mm diameter when inflated) and in the other by a Mansfield (18 mm diameter when inflated). The procedure was well tolerated in these three patients and there were no complications. Haemodynamic function improved, there was appreciable decrease in dyspnoea, and exercise tolerance was increased. This procedure has several advantages: the balloon is more easily positioned through the mitral valve; the stability of the balloon during inflation is improved by traction at both ends of the long guide wire; and there is the option of rapidly exchanging one balloon for a larger one over the long guide wire. This technique seems to be less arrhythmogenic and results in less blood loss because manual compression of the femoral vessels after the procedure is easier. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:3620253

  6. Degenerative mitral valve regurgitation: best practice revolution

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David H.; Rosenhek, Raphael; Falk, Volkmar

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative mitral valve disease often leads to leaflet prolapse due to chordal elongation or rupture, and resulting in mitral valve regurgitation. Guideline referral for surgical intervention centres primarily on symptoms and ventricular dysfunction. The recommended treatment for degenerative mitral valve disease is mitral valve reconstruction, as opposed to valve replacement with a bioprosthetic or mechanical valve, because valve repair is associated with improved event free survival. Recent studies have documented a significant number of patients are not referred in a timely fashion according to established guidelines, and when they are subjected to surgery, an alarming number of patients continue to undergo mitral valve replacement. The debate around appropriate timing of intervention for asymptomatic severe mitral valve regurgitation has put additional emphasis on targeted surgeon referral and the need to ensure a very high rate of mitral valve repair, particularly in the non-elderly population. Current clinical practice remains suboptimal for many patients, and this review explores the need for a ‘best practice revolution’ in the field of degenerative mitral valve regurgitation. PMID:20624767

  7. Robotic Mitral Valve Replacement in Pectus Excavatum.

    PubMed

    Onan, Burak; Bakir, Ihsan

    2016-05-01

    Exposure of the mitral valve can be challenging using conventional sternotomy and thoracotomy incisions in patients with pectus deformity. We report the use of a robotic approach to replace a rheumatic mitral valve in a patient with pectus excavatum. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12740 (J Card Surg 2016;31:306-308). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mitral valve disease—morphology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert A.; Hagége, Albert A.; Judge, Daniel P.; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P.; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H.; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N.; Dietz, Harry C.; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Jensen, Morten O.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P.; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R.; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P.; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A.; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but—even in adult life—remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular–ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease. PMID:26483167

  9. Parachute deformity of the mitral valve

    PubMed Central

    Bett, J. H. N.; Stovin, P. G. I.

    1969-01-01

    A case of parachute deformity of the mitral valve, a rare congenital form of mitral stenosis characterized by insertion of the chordae tendineae into a single posterior papillary muscle, is described in an 11-year-old girl. The eleven other cases in the English literature are reviewed. Images PMID:5348334

  10. Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery I

    PubMed Central

    Ailawadi, Gorav; Agnihotri, Arvind K.; Mehall, John R.; Wolfe, J. Alan; Hummel, Brian W.; Fayers, Trevor M.; Farivar, R. Saeid; Grossi, Eugene A.; Guy, T. Sloane; Hargrove, W. Clark; Khan, Junaid H.; Lehr, Eric J.; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Murphy, Douglas A.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Ryan, William H.; Salemi, Arash; Segurola, Romualdo J.; Shemin, Richard J.; Smith, J. Michael; Smith, Robert L.; Weldner, Paul W.; Goldman, Scott M.; Lewis, Clifton T. P.; Barnhart, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Widespread adoption of minimally invasive mitral valve repair and replacement may be fostered by practice consensus and standardization. This expert opinion, first of a 3-part series, outlines current best practices in patient evaluation and selection for minimally invasive mitral valve procedures, and discusses preoperative planning for cannulation and myocardial protection. PMID:27654407

  11. Hypervolemia, hypoalbuminemia and mitral calcification as markers of cardiovascular risk in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Querido, Sara; Quadros Branco, Patrícia; Silva Sousa, Henrique; Adragão, Teresa; Araújo Gonçalves, Pedro; Gaspar, Maria Augusta; Barata, José Diogo

    2017-09-01

    Mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease is higher than in the general population. This is linked to traditional and non-traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, as well as with risk factors associated with end-stage renal disease itself. The aim of this study is to identify CV risk markers in patients beginning peritoneal dialysis (PD) and their association with CV events and CV mortality. This was a retrospective cohort study of 112 incident PD patients, in which demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters, valvular calcifications, types of PD solutions, hospitalizations, CV events and death were analyzed. Occurrence of CV events or death due to a CV event after PD initiation was defined as the primary endpoint. The use of icodextrin solution was taken as a marker of hypervolemia. Mean age was 53.7±16.1 years. Patients were treated with PD for 29.3±17.4 months. Eighteen patients (16.1%) had valvular calcifications at baseline, 15 patients (13.4%) had major CV events and 11 patients (9.8%) died from CV-related causes. Cox proportional hazards analysis of CV events or CV-related mortality revealed that mitral calcification, use of icodextrin solution and low albumin were independent predictors of CV events or mortality. Traditional CV risk factors appear to have little impact on CV complications in PD patients. Nevertheless, hypervolemia, hypoalbuminemia and mitral calcifications were independent predictors of CV events or mortality in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Misconceptions and Facts About Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Borer, Jeffrey S; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-09-01

    Mitral regurgitation is a common heart valve disease. It is defined to be primary when it results from the pathology of the mitral valve apparatus itself and secondary when it is caused by distortion of the architecture or function of the left ventricle. Although the diagnosis and management of mitral regurgitation rely heavily on echocardiography, one should bear in mind the caveats and shortcomings of such an approach. Clinical decision making commonly focuses on the indications for surgery, but it is complex and mandates precise assessment of the mitral pathology, symptom status of the patient, and ventricular performance (right and left) among other descriptors. It is important for healthcare providers at all levels to be familiar with the clinical picture, diagnosis, disease course, and management of mitral regurgitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pituitary Apoplexy Following Mitral Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Cha, Seung Heon

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a rare but potentially life-threatening clinical syndrome caused by the sudden enlargement of a pituitary adenoma secondary to hemorrhage or infarction. Pituitary apoplexy after cardiac surgery is a very rare perioperative complication. Factors associated with open heart surgery that may lead to pituitary apoplexy include hemodynamic instability during cardiopulmonary bypass and systemic heparinization. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy after mitral valvuloplasty with cardiopulmonary bypass. After early pituitary tumor resection and hormonal replacement therapy, the patient made a full recovery. PMID:25932297

  14. Saddle-shaped mitral valve annuloplasty rings improve leaflet coaptation geometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten O.; Jensen, Henrik; Levine, Robert A.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J. Michael; Nielsen, Sten L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mitral valve annulus naturally conforms to a saddle shape in systole. This configuration is believed to put the leaflets into a lower-energy equilibrium with the annulus and subvalvular apparatus. Conventional flat annuloplasty rings restrict posterior leaflet motion, which may result in a “monocusp” valve, affecting valvular stress distribution. It is hypothesized that saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings cause less distortion of the physiologic leaflet geometry than do flat rings. Methods Twelve pigs were studied in an acute setting with 3-dimensional echocardiography and sonomicrometry before and after implantation of rigid flat (n = 5) and saddle-shaped (n = 7) annuloplasty rings. The rings were true sized to the annulus with equal anterior–posterior and commissure–commissure circumferential dimensions. The saddle-shaped rings had an annular height to commissural width ratio of 15%. Results Saddle-shaped rings maintained both leaflets operational (P <.01). Flat rings made the posterior leaflet immobile and the anterior leaflet aligned flat along the annulus in systole, effectively resulting in monoleaflet function. The average distance from the papillary muscle tips to the posterior annulus decreased by 2.4 ± 0.4 mm after flat ring implantation (P <.01). Conclusions Saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings provide better leaflet coaptation geometry than do flat rings by not hoisting the papillary muscles toward the posterior annulus through the commissural chordae, allowing greater leaflet mobility. This entails a potentially beneficial impact on valvular stress distribution that could affect durability of the repaired valve. PMID:21329946

  15. Association between mitral and aortic valve calcification and preferential left or right coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Yosefy, Chaim; Malushitsky, Ariela; Jamal, Jafary; Sahar, Gideon; Katz, Amos

    2009-11-01

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) and aortic valve calcification (AVC) are predictive of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, no data exist concerning the association between preferential CAD side localization to the left or right coronary arteries and MAC or AVC. A cohort analysis was performed of 1,000 consecutive coronary angiographies recorded in patients with CAD. The angiographies were divided according to the distribution of CAD to the isolated right coronary tree disease, left coronary tree disease, or both. The echocardiograms were reviewed for MAC, AVC or combined valvular calcification (CVC). Significant CAD (lumenal stenosis > 70%) was observed in 688 patients, among whom 167 had isolated (right or left) CAD and 521 double-sided coronary tree disease. Valvular calcification (VC) was observed in 70 (42%) of the isolated CAD patients; of these, 41 had isolated left CAD and 29 isolated right CAD. Among the isolated left CAD patients with VC, 13 (32%) had AVC, 22 (53%) had CVC, and only six (15%) had MAC (p < 0.01). Among the isolated right CAD patients with VC, 18 (62%) had MAC, nine (31%) had CVC, and only two (7%) had AVC (p < 0.01). VC was observed in 266 patients (51%) with mixed CAD; of these, 152 (57%) had CVC, 103 (39%) had AVC, and 11 (4%) had MAC (p < 0.01). Isolated left CAD is associated with AVC or CVC more frequently than with MAC. In contrast, isolated right CAD is associated with MAC or CVC, but rarely with AVC.

  16. Mitral valve leaflet remodelling during pregnancy: insights into cell-mediated recovery of tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rego, Bruno V; Wells, Sarah M; Lee, Chung-Hao; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about how valvular tissues grow and remodel in response to altered loading. In this work, we used the pregnancy state to represent a non-pathological cardiac volume overload that distends the mitral valve (MV), using both extant and new experimental data and a modified form of our MV structural constitutive model. We determined that there was an initial period of permanent set-like deformation where no remodelling occurs, followed by a remodelling phase that resulted in near-complete restoration of homeostatic tissue-level behaviour. In addition, we observed that changes in the underlying MV interstitial cell (MVIC) geometry closely paralleled the tissue-level remodelling events, undergoing an initial passive perturbation followed by a gradual recovery to the pre-pregnant state. Collectively, these results suggest that valvular remodelling is actively mediated by average MVIC deformations (i.e. not cycle to cycle, but over a period of weeks). Moreover, tissue-level remodelling is likely to be accomplished by serial and parallel additions of fibrillar material to restore the mean homeostatic fibre stress and MVIC geometries. This finding has significant implications in efforts to understand and predict MV growth and remodelling following such events as myocardial infarction and surgical repair, which also place the valve under altered loading conditions.

  17. Transcatheter mitral valve repair in osteogenesis imperfecta associated mitral valve regurgitation.

    PubMed

    van der Kley, Frank; Delgado, Victoria; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Schalij, Martin J

    2014-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is associated with increased prevalence of significant mitral valve regurgitation. Surgical mitral valve repair and replacement are feasible but are associated with increased risk of bleeding and dehiscence of implanted valves may occur more frequently. The present case report describes the outcomes of transcatheter mitral valve repair in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. A 60 year-old patient with osteogenesis imperfecta and associated symptomatic moderate to severe mitral regurgitation underwent transthoracic echocardiography which showed a nondilated left ventricle with preserved systolic function and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. On transoesophageal echocardiography the regurgitant jet originated between the anterolateral scallops of the anterior and posterior leaflets (A1-P1). Considering the comorbidities associated with osteogenesis imperfecta the patient was accepted for transcatheter mitral valve repair using the Mitraclip device (Abbott vascular, Menlo, CA). Under fluoroscopy and 3D transoesophageal echocardiography guidance, a Mitraclip device was implanted between the anterolateral and central scallops with significant reduction of mitral regurgitation. The postoperative evolution was uneventful. At one month follow-up, transthoracic echocardiography showed a stable position of the Mitraclip device with no mitral regurgitation. Transcatheter mitral valve repair is feasible and safe in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta and associated symptomatic significant mitral regurgitation. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Recurrent stuck mitral valve: eosinophilia an unusual pathology.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Neeraj; Bhat, Yasser; Radhakrishnan, S; Sharma, Rajesh

    2015-03-01

    Eosinophilia is a very unusual and rare cause of thrombosis of prosthetic mitral valve. We report a 10-year-old male child of recurrent stuck prosthetic mitral valve. The child underwent mitral valve replacement for severe mitral regurgitation secondary to Rheumatic heart disease. He had recurrent prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, despite desired INR levels. There was associated eosinophilia. The child was treated on the lines of tropical eosinophilia with oral prednisolone and diethylcarbamazine, the eosinophil count dropped significantly with no subsequent episode of stuck mitral valve. We discuss the management of recurrent stuck mitral valve and also eosinophilia as a causative factor for the same.

  19. Extracellular matrix remodeling in wound healing of critical size defects in the mitral valve leaflet.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Nguyen, Tom C; Blazejewski, Jack G; Vekilov, Dragoslava P; Connell, Jennifer P; Itoh, Akinobu; Ingels, Neil B; Miller, D Craig; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2016-07-01

    The details of valvular leaflet healing following valvuloplasty and leaflet perforation from endocarditis are poorly understood. In this study, the synthesis and turnover of valvular extracellular matrix due to healing of a critical sized wound was investigated. Twenty-nine sheep were randomized to either CTRL (n = 11) or HOLE (n = 18), in which a 2.8-4.8 mm diameter hole was punched in the posterior mitral leaflet. After 12 weeks, posterior leaflets were harvested and histologically stained to localize extracellular matrix components. Immunohistochemistry was also performed to assess matrix components and markers of matrix turnover. A semi-quantitative grading scale was used to quantify differences between HOLE and CTRL. After 12 weeks, the hole diameter was reduced by 71.3 ± 1.4 % (p < 0.001). Areas of remodeling surrounding the hole contained more activated cells, greater expression of proteoglycans, and markers of matrix turnover (prolyl 4-hydroxylase, metalloproteases, and lysyl oxidase, each p ≤ 0.025), along with fibrin accumulation. Two distinct remodeling regions were evident surrounding the hole, one directly bordering the hole rich in versican and hyaluronan and a second adjacent region with abundant collagen and elastic fiber turnover. The remodeling also caused reduced delineation between valve layers (p = 0.002), more diffuse staining of matrix components and markers of matrix turnover (p < 0.001), and disruption of the collagenous fibrosa. In conclusion, acute valve injury elicited distinct, heterogeneous alterations in valvular matrix composition and structure, resulting in partial wound closure. Because these changes could also affect leaflet mechanics and valve function, it will be important to determine their impact on healing wounds.

  20. Cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary oedema in an infant with severe residual mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Joong, Anna; Lai, Wyman W; Ferris, Anne

    2017-01-01

    An infant with residual severe mitral regurgitation following mitral commissurotomy developed cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary oedema and subsegmental atelectasis that resolved with mechanical mitral valve replacement.

  1. Surgical treatment of moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter K; Puskas, John D; Ascheim, Deborah D; Voisine, Pierre; Gelijns, Annetine C; Moskowitz, Alan J; Hung, Judy W; Parides, Michael K; Ailawadi, Gorav; Perrault, Louis P; Acker, Michael A; Argenziano, Michael; Thourani, Vinod; Gammie, James S; Miller, Marissa A; Pagé, Pierre; Overbey, Jessica R; Bagiella, Emilia; Dagenais, François; Blackstone, Eugene H; Kron, Irving L; Goldstein, Daniel J; Rose, Eric A; Moquete, Ellen G; Jeffries, Neal; Gardner, Timothy J; O'Gara, Patrick T; Alexander, John H; Michler, Robert E

    2014-12-04

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. For surgical patients with moderate regurgitation, the benefits of adding mitral-valve repair to coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) are uncertain. We randomly assigned 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation to CABG alone or CABG plus mitral-valve repair (combined procedure). The primary end point was the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI), a measure of left ventricular remodeling, at 1 year. This end point was assessed with the use of a Wilcoxon rank-sum test in which deaths were categorized as the lowest LVESVI rank. At 1 year, the mean LVESVI among surviving patients was 46.1±22.4 ml per square meter of body-surface area in the CABG-alone group and 49.6±31.5 ml per square meter in the combined-procedure group (mean change from baseline, -9.4 and -9.3 ml per square meter, respectively). The rate of death was 6.7% in the combined-procedure group and 7.3% in the CABG-alone group (hazard ratio with mitral-valve repair, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.38 to 2.12; P=0.81). The rank-based assessment of LVESVI at 1 year (incorporating deaths) showed no significant between-group difference (z score, 0.50; P=0.61). The addition of mitral-valve repair was associated with a longer bypass time (P<0.001), a longer hospital stay after surgery (P=0.002), and more neurologic events (P=0.03). Moderate or severe mitral regurgitation was less common in the combined-procedure group than in the CABG-alone group (11.2% vs. 31.0%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events, deaths, readmissions, functional status, or quality of life at 1 year. In patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation, the addition of mitral-valve repair to CABG did not result in a higher degree of left ventricular reverse remodeling. Mitral-valve repair was associated with a reduced prevalence of moderate or

  2. Aortic and/or mitral valve surgery in patients with pulmonary hypertension performed via a minimally invasive approach

    PubMed Central

    Gosain, Priyanka; Larrauri-Reyes, Maiteder; Mihos, Christos G.; Escolar, Esteban; Santana, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the setting of left-sided valvular heart disease is common, and significantly increases the risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing aortic and/or mitral valve surgery. Minimally invasive valve surgery is associated with a decreased incidence of perioperative complications, and a faster recovery, when compared with conventional sternotomy. In the present study, the outcomes of 569 patients with PH who underwent minimally invasive aortic and/or mitral valve surgery were analysed. The operative mortality was 3.5%, and postoperative strokes occurred in 1.4%. The mean intensive care unit and hospital length of stays were 50 ± 14 h and 7 ± 1 days, respectively. Patients with severe PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥40 mmHg) had a longer duration of postoperative ventilation and intensive care unit length of stay, when compared with mild/moderate PH, and similar clinical outcomes. In conclusion, a minimally invasive approach to aortic and/or mitral valve surgery in patients with PH is safe and feasible, and may be considered as an alternative to conventional median sternotomy. PMID:26892195

  3. Papillary fibroelastoma of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Prifti, Edvin; Ikonomi, Majlinda; Veshti, Altin; Demiraj, Aurel; Xhaxho, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The papillary fibroelastoma (PFE) is a rare and benign primary cardiac tumor, and the mostly frequently found tumor occurring in cardiac valves. Case presentation We describe a 52 year old female presenting a history of 2 weeks of fever due to wound infection after breast’s surgery. A preoperative echocardiography demonstrated a mass >1 cm2 originating from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation. The patient underwent successful surgical removal of the PFE. The histologic evaluation demonstrated a PFE. Discussion With the introduction of echocardiography, the diagnosis of these tumors in living patients has been reported sporadically. PFE have been found most often on valve leaflets, chordae tendineae, and both ventricles. The differential diagnosis of PFE includes other cardiac tumors, thrombus, vegetation, and Lambl’s excrescences. Conclusion To summarize, we report a PFE of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination after surgical removal. Finally, careful echocardiographic analyses during evaluation of valvular masses are strongly recommended for differential diagnosis. PMID:26209756

  4. Papillary fibroelastoma of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Edvin; Ikonomi, Majlinda; Veshti, Altin; Demiraj, Aurel; Xhaxho, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The papillary fibroelastoma (PFE) is a rare and benign primary cardiac tumor, and the mostly frequently found tumor occurring in cardiac valves. We describe a 52 year old female presenting a history of 2 weeks of fever due to wound infection after breast's surgery. A preoperative echocardiography demonstrated a mass >1cm(2) originating from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation. The patient underwent successful surgical removal of the PFE. The histologic evaluation demonstrated a PFE. With the introduction of echocardiography, the diagnosis of these tumors in living patients has been reported sporadically. PFE have been found most often on valve leaflets, chordae tendineae, and both ventricles. The differential diagnosis of PFE includes other cardiac tumors, thrombus, vegetation, and Lambl's excrescences. To summarize, we report a PFE of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination after surgical removal. Finally, careful echocardiographic analyses during evaluation of valvular masses are strongly recommended for differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Percutaneous repair or surgery for mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Foster, Elyse; Glower, Donald D; Glower, Donald G; Kar, Saibal; Rinaldi, Michael J; Fail, Peter S; Smalling, Richard W; Siegel, Robert; Rose, Geoffrey A; Engeron, Eric; Loghin, Catalin; Trento, Alfredo; Skipper, Eric R; Fudge, Tommy; Letsou, George V; Massaro, Joseph M; Mauri, Laura

    2011-04-14

    Mitral-valve repair can be accomplished with an investigational procedure that involves the percutaneous implantation of a clip that grasps and approximates the edges of the mitral leaflets at the origin of the regurgitant jet. We randomly assigned 279 patients with moderately severe or severe (grade 3+ or 4+) mitral regurgitation in a 2:1 ratio to undergo either percutaneous repair or conventional surgery for repair or replacement of the mitral valve. The primary composite end point for efficacy was freedom from death, from surgery for mitral-valve dysfunction, and from grade 3+ or 4+ mitral regurgitation at 12 months. The primary safety end point was a composite of major adverse events within 30 days. At 12 months, the rates of the primary end point for efficacy were 55% in the percutaneous-repair group and 73% in the surgery group (P=0.007). The respective rates of the components of the primary end point were as follows: death, 6% in each group; surgery for mitral-valve dysfunction, 20% versus 2%; and grade 3+ or 4+ mitral regurgitation, 21% versus 20%. Major adverse events occurred in 15% of patients in the percutaneous-repair group and 48% of patients in the surgery group at 30 days (P<0.001). At 12 months, both groups had improved left ventricular size, New York Heart Association functional class, and quality-of-life measures, as compared with baseline. Although percutaneous repair was less effective at reducing mitral regurgitation than conventional surgery, the procedure was associated with superior safety and similar improvements in clinical outcomes. (Funded by Abbott Vascular; EVEREST II ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00209274.).

  6. Valvular heart disease: classic teaching and emerging paradigms.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, D Marshall; Gelfand, Eli V

    2013-12-01

    Valvular heart disease is both prevalent and increases with age. The final pathway of valvular disease is heart failure and sometimes sudden death, so clinicians must identify and treat it before these endpoints occur. Noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as echocardiography, exercise tolerance testing, and cardiac magnetic resonance provide additional quantitative, qualitative, and prognostic data. Studies have elucidated predictors of disease progression and potential medical therapies, but the niche of valvular disease has benefited relatively less from randomized controlled clinical trials than other cardiovascular disease fields. New invasive techniques like transcatheter valve replacement offer hope for high-risk operative candidates. We review classic teaching with current guidelines and emphasize recent advances in disease management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Challenging mitral valve repair for double-orifice mitral valve with noncompaction of left ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Manabu; Misumi, Hiroyasu; Abe, Kohei; Kawazoe, Kohei

    2017-02-25

    Double-orifice mitral valve (DOMV) is a relatively rare cardiac anomaly. Although usually associated with various cardiac anomalies, co-presence of DOMV and noncompaction of left ventricular myocardium (NCLVM) is extremely rare. Here, we present a 24-year-old male who underwent mitral valve repair using artificial chordae and annuloplasty at the posterior commissure for severe mitral regurgitation (MR), resulting from flail anterior leaflet of the larger postero-medial orifice and dilatation of left ventricle with NCLVM. One year later, he underwent second mitral valve repair for recurrence of MR. Further endoscopic evaluation of the left ventricle, and reinforcement via artificial ring, enabled us to achieve repair.

  8. Transapical Mitral Valve Replacement for Mixed Native Mitral Stenosis and Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Bedzra, Edo; Don, Creighton W; Reisman, Mark; Aldea, Gabriel S

    2016-08-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure. He had undergone transapical mitral valve replacement for mixed mitral stenosis and mitral regurgitation. At the 1 month follow-up, the patient reported symptom resolution. An echocardiogram revealed a low gradient and no regurgitation. Our case shows that with careful multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative planning, and patient selection, percutaneous mitral intervention can become an alternative therapy for high-risk patients who cannot undergo conventional surgical therapy.

  9. Valvular heart disease with the use of fenfluramine-phentermine.

    PubMed

    Surapaneni, Phani; Vinales, Karyne L; Najib, Mohammad Q; Chaliki, Hari P

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to the anorectic drug fenfluramine, alone or in combination with phentermine, a noradrenergic central nervous system stimulant, has been associated with unusual cardiac valvular morphology and resultant regurgitation of the left- and right-sided heart valves. The prevalence of significant valvular disease associated with the use of these anorectic drugs is reported to be as high as 23%. Herein, we report the occurrence of multivalvular disease and pulmonary hypertension associated with fenfluramine-phentermine use, discovered in an obese 59-year-old woman before expected gastric bypass surgery.

  10. Stress echocardiography in valvular heart disease: a current appraisal.

    PubMed

    Naji, Peyman; Patel, Krishna; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2015-03-01

    Stress echocardiography is increasingly used in the management of patients with valvular heart disease and can aid in evaluation, risk stratification and clinical decision making in these patients. Evaluation of symptoms, exercise capacity and changes in blood pressure can be done during the exercise portion of the test, whereas echocardiographic portion can reveal changes in severity of disease, pulmonary artery pressure and left ventricular function in response to exercise. These parameters, which are not available at rest, can have diagnostic and prognostic importance. In this article, we will review the indications and diagnostic implications, prognostic implications, and clinical impact of stress echocardiography in decision making and management of patients with valvular heart disease.

  11. The use of a high-power laser on swine mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Nathali Cordeiro; Chavantes, M Cristina; Zezell, Denise; Deana, Alessandro; Benetti, Carolina; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Lopes, Luciana Almeida; Martins, Rodrigo A B Lopes; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M A

    2016-08-01

    Worldwide, rheumatic fever remains a significant cause of mitral valve insufficiency. It is responsible for approximately 90 % of early childhood valvular surgeries in Brazil. Elongated or flail chordae are frequently responsible and require surgical correction. The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare the histological tissues of the mitral valve chordae and the mechanical resistance generated by the chordae, both with and without the application of a high-power laser. Twenty normal porcine mitral valve chordae were measured and divided randomly into the following two groups: control group (not subjected to a high-power laser) and laser group (subjected to photonic irradiation). Laser surgery was performed under controlled conditions, using following parameters: λ = 980-nm wavelength, power = 3 W, and energy = 60 J. A mechanical test machine was used in combination with a subsequent histological study to measure chordae tensile properties. A histological analysis demonstrated a typical collagen bundle arrangement in the control group; however, under a particular reached temperature range (48), the collagen bundles assumed different arrangements in the laser group. Significant reductions in the chordae tendineae lengths and changes in their resistance in the laser group were observed, as these chordae exhibited less rigid fibers. The chordae tendineae of normal porcine valves subjected to a high-power laser exhibited its length reduction and less stiffness compared to the control group. A histological analysis of the laser treatment specimens demonstrated differences in collagen bundle spatial organization, following slight changes into tissue temperature.

  12. Advanced left-atrial fibrosis is associated with unsuccessful maze operation for valvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kainuma, Satoshi; Masai, Takafumi; Yoshitatsu, Masao; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yamauchi, Takashi; Takeda, Koji; Morii, Eiichi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2011-07-01

    Atrial dilatation and fibrosis are considered to be important factors in the occurrence and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the relationship between those structural remodeling and postoperative sinus conversions after a maze operation has been rarely studied. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pathological evaluation of atrial tissues was useful for predicting an unsuccessful maze operation in patients with valvular AF. Between March 2006 and June 2007, left-atrial tissues in the posterior wall and right-atrial appendage were obtained from 47 consecutive patients (24 patients with chronic AF, and 23 with sinus rhythm) undergoing mitral valve surgery (MVS). A concomitant maze operation was performed for all patients with chronic AF. Atrial cell diameters were measured using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and quantitative assessment of atrial fibrosis was performed with Masson trichrome staining using an image analyzer (Image Processor for Analytical Pathology, Sumika Technoservice Co., Hyogo, Japan). Successful MVS was performed for all patients and there were no complications associated with tissue sampling. Patients with chronic AF had more advanced histological features in both atria as compared with those with sinus rhythm. Sixteen of 24 patients, who underwent a maze operation, had successfully restored sinus rhythm (successful maze group), while that in the remaining eight was not restored (unsuccessful maze group). Patients in the unsuccessful maze group had a larger left-atrial dimension and cardiothoracic ratio as compared with those in the successful group, whereas the duration of AF was not significantly different. Patients in the unsuccessful maze group also had greater hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and more extensive intercellular fibrosis in the left atrium, while there were no differences for right-atrial pathological features between the groups. Multivariate logistic analysis confirmed that a larger amount of left

  13. Mitral Valve Clip for Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammed T.; Ahmadzai, Nadera; Coyle, Kathryn; Coyle, Doug; Moher, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of the 500,000 North American patients with chronic mitral regurgitation may be poor candidates for mitral valve surgery. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the comparative effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness of percutaneous mitral valve repair using mitral valve clips in candidates at prohibitive risk for surgery. Data Sources We searched articles in MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library published from 1994 to February 2014 for evidence of effectiveness and harms; for economic literature we also searched NHS EED and Tufts CEA registry. Grey literature was also searched. Review Methods Primary studies were sought from existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screening methods. Newer studies were sought by searching the period subsequent to the last search date of the review. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. We used the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized, generic assessment for non-randomized studies, and the Phillips checklist for economic studies. Results Ten studies including 1 randomized trial were included. The majority of the direct comparative evidence compared the mitral valve clip repair with surgery in patients not particularly at prohibitive surgical risk. Irrespective of degenerative or functional chronic mitral regurgitation etiology, evidence of effectiveness and harms is inconclusive and of very low quality. Very-low-quality evidence indicates that percutaneous mitral valve clip repair may provide a survival advantage, at least during the first 1 to 2 years, particularly in medically managed chronic functional mitral regurgitation. Because of limitations in the design of studies, the cost-effectiveness of mitral valve clips in patients at prohibitive risk for surgery also could not be established. Limitations Because of serious concerns of risk of bias, indirectness, and imprecision, evidence is of very low quality. Conclusions No meaningful

  14. Computational Analysis of Pumping Efficacy of a Left Ventricular Assist Device according to Cannulation Site in Heart Failure with Valvular Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) causes blood to flow in two directions during contraction of the left ventricle (LV), that is, forward into the aorta and backward into the left atrium (LA). In aortic valve regurgitation (AR), leakage occurs from the aorta into the LV during diastole. Our objective is to analyze the contribution of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) to MR and AR for the following two different cannulation sites: from the LA to the aorta (LAAO) and from the LV to the aorta (LVAO). Using a computational method, we simulated three ventricular conditions (normal [HF without valvular regurgitation], 5% MR, and 5% AR) in three groups (control [no LVAD], LAAO, and LVAO). The results showed that LVAD with LAAO cannulation is appropriate for recovery of the MR heart, and the LVAD with LVAO cannulation is appropriate for treating the AR heart. PMID:28115981

  15. Parabolic resection for mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Drake, Daniel H; Drake, Charles G; Recchia, Dino

    2010-02-01

    Parabolic resection, named for the shape of the cut edges of the excised tissue, expands on a common 'trick' used by experienced mitral surgeons to preserve tissue and increase the probability of successful repair. Our objective was to describe and clinically analyze this simple modification of conventional resection. Thirty-six patients with mitral regurgitation underwent valve repair using parabolic resection in combination with other techniques. Institution specific mitral data, Society of Thoracic Surgeons data and preoperative, post-cardiopulmonary bypass (PCPB) and postoperative echocardiography data were collected and analyzed. Preoperative echocardiography demonstrated mitral regurgitation ranging from moderate to severe. PCPB transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no regurgitation or mild regurgitation in all patients. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 2.8%. Serial echocardiograms demonstrated excellent repair stability. One patient (2.9%) with rheumatic disease progressed to moderate regurgitation 33 months following surgery. Echocardiography on all others demonstrated no or mild regurgitation at a mean follow-up of 22.8+/-12.8 months. No patient required mitral reintervention. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated 80% freedom from cardiac death, reintervention and greater than moderate regurgitation at four years following repair. Parabolic resection is a simple technique that can be very useful during complex mitral reconstruction. Early and intermediate echocardiographic studies demonstrate excellent results.

  16. Double-orifice mitral valve treated by percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Thomas George; Revankar, Vinod Raghunath; Papanna, Monica; Srinivasan, Harshini

    2016-07-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve is an rare anomaly characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus and 2 orifices that open into the left ventricle. It is often associated with other congenital anomalies, most commonly atrioventricular canal defects, and rarely associated with a stenotic or regurgitant mitral valve. A patient who was diagnosed with congenital double-orifice mitral valve with severe mitral stenosis was treated successfully by percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy rather than the conventional open surgical approach, demonstrating the utility of percutaneous correction of this anomaly.

  17. Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Their Relation to Future Surgery for Valvular Heart Disease or Ascending Aortic Disease: A Case-Referent Study.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Johan; Johansson, Bengt; Engström, Karl Gunnar; Albertsson, Elin; Holmer, Paul; Norberg, Margareta; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Söderberg, Stefan

    2017-05-05

    Risk factors for developing heart valve and ascending aortic disease are based mainly on retrospective data. To elucidate these factors in a prospective manner, we have performed a nested case-referent study using data from large, population-based surveys. A total of 777 patients operated for heart valve disease or disease of the ascending aorta had previously participated in population-based health surveys in Northern Sweden. Median time (interquartile range) from survey to surgery was 10.5 (9.0) years. Primary indications for surgery were aortic stenosis (41%), aortic regurgitation (12%), mitral regurgitation (23%), and dilatation/dissection of the ascending aorta (17%). For each case, referents were allocated, matched for age, sex, and geographical area. In multivariable models, surgery for aortic stenosis was predicted by hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus, and active smoking. Surgery for aortic regurgitation was associated with a low cholesterol level, whereas a high cholesterol level predicted surgery for mitral regurgitation. Hypertension, blood pressure, and previous smoking predicted surgery for disease of the ascending aorta whereas diabetes mellitus was associated with reduced risk. After exclusion of cases with coronary atherosclerosis, only the inverse associations between cholesterol and aortic regurgitation and between diabetes mellitus and disease of the ascending aorta remained. This is the first truly prospective study of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and their association with valvular heart disease and disease of the ascending aorta. We confirm the strong association between traditional risk factors and aortic stenosis, but only in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease. In isolated valvular heart disease, the impact of traditional risk factors is varying. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. Successful Treatment of Double-Orifice Mitral Stenosis with Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Commissurotomy

    PubMed Central

    Patted, Suresh V.; Halkati, Prabhu C.; Ambar, Sameer S.; Sattur, Ameet G.

    2012-01-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve (DOMV) is an uncommon congenital anomaly, being present in 0.05% of the general population. The isolated occurrence of this anomaly is very rare and, to our knowledge, no data are currently available on the incidence of an isolated DOMV. A DOMV is characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus with 2 orifices opening into the left ventricle (LV). Subvalvular structures, especially the tensor apparatus, invariably show various degrees of abnormality. It can substantially obstruct mitral valve inflow or cause mitral valve incompetence. We present a rare case of nineteen-year-old male who underwent percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy in stenotic DOMV. PMID:24826244

  19. Valvular Heart Disease in Women, Differential Remodeling, and Response to New Therapies.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Dangas, George; Mehran, Roxana

    2017-09-11

    In the United States, valvular heart disease (VHD) has a prevalence of 2.5%, most commonly presenting as aortic stenosis (AS) or mitral valve regurgitation (MR) and increasingly observed to be of a degenerative etiology. Women frequently have latent symptoms despite significant disease, and it is therefore pertinent to consider both clinical symptoms and imaging findings for decision-making on treatment. Indeed, significant advances have been made in noninvasive imaging allowing for more accurate diagnosis and disease prognostication. While echo remains the standard diagnostic test, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide complementary information on aortic valve calcification and left ventricular (LV) function, respectively. For any given calcification load or increase in calcification density of the aortic valve, women have greater increase in aortic valve stenosis severity than men; thus, moderate AS in women warrants closer attention. MRI allows identification of different patterns of hypertrophy and remodeling, extent of LV fibrosis, and insights into differential reverse remodeling and clinical outcomes in men and women. In conjunction with surgical treatment, percutaneous technologies are being increasingly used in the management of VHD. Nearly 50% of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are women. In high- or intermediate-risk subjects with significant symptomatic AS, TAVR has been shown to be noninferior to surgical AVR (SAVR). Notably, whereas both treatment strategies are equally effective in men, transfemoral TAVR has been shown to be superior to SAVR resulting in better survival in women. Analogously, few data have examined sex differences with percutaneous MitraClip devices in the treatment of degenerative MR, and men and women appear to have equivalent composite outcomes. Randomized clinical trial data are presently awaited for outcomes in the percutaneous treatment of

  20. Emergency mitral valve replacement for acute severe mitral regurgitation following balloon mitral valvotomy: pathophysiology of hemodynamic collapse and peri-operative management issues.

    PubMed

    Bayya, Praveen Reddy; Varma, Praveen Kerala; Raman, Suneel Puthuvassery; Neema, Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Severe mitral regurgitation (MR) following balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) needing emergent mitral valve replacement is a rare complication. The unrelieved mitral stenosis is compounded by severe MR leading to acute rise in pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular afterload, decreased coronary perfusion, ischemia and right ventricular failure. Associated septal shift and falling left ventricular preload leads to a vicious cycle of myocardial ischemia and hemodynamic collapse and needs to be addressed emergently before the onset of end organ damage. In this report, we describe the pathophysiology of hemodynamic collapse and peri-operative management issues in a case of mitral valve replacement for acute severe MR following BMV.

  1. Effects of Mitral Annulus Remodeling Following MitraClip Procedure on Reduction of Functional Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco; Mesa, Dolores; Ruiz, Martín; Delgado, Mónica; Rodríguez, Sara; Pardo, Laura; Pan, Manuel; López, Amador; Romero, Miguel A; Suárez de Lezo, José

    2016-11-01

    The percutaneous mitral valve repair procedure (MitraClip) appears to reduce mitral annulus diameter in patients with functional mitral regurgitation, but the relationship between this and regurgitation severity has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of mitral annulus remodeling on the reduction of mitral regurgitation in patients with functional etiology. The study included all patients with functional mitral regurgitation treated with MitraClip at our hospital until January 2015. Echocardiogram (iE33 model, Philips) was performed in all patients immediately after device positioning. Changes in the mitral annulus correlated with mitral regurgitation severity, as assessed using the effective regurgitant orifice area. The study included 23 patients (age, 65±14 years; 74% men; left ventricular ejection fraction, 31%±13%; systolic pulmonary artery pressure, 47±10 mmHg). After the procedure, the regurgitant orifice area decreased by 0.30 cm(2)±0.04 cm(2) (P<.0005), from a baseline of 0.49 cm(2)±0.09 cm(2). Anteroposterior diameter decreased by 3.14 mm±1.01 mm (P<.0005) from a baseline of 28.27 mm±4.9 mm, with no changes in the intercommissural diameter (0.50 mm±0.91 mm vs 40.68 mm±4.7 mm; P=.26). A significant association was seen between anteroposterior diameter reduction and regurgitant orifice area reduction (r=.49; P=.020). In patients with functional mitral regurgitation, the MitraClip device produces an immediate reduction in the anteroposterior diameter. This remodeling may be related to the reduction in mitral regurgitation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation and valvular heart disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Daniel; David, Cláudio; Costa, João; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Pinto, Fausto J

    2017-09-06

    The non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were approved for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) but this term may be misnomer. Thus, the term non-mechanical and rheumatic mitral valvular (non-MARM) AF was proposed to exclude patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) without contraindications for NOACs. We aimed to review the efficacy and safety of NOACs in patients with AF and VHD compared to Vitamin K Antagonists (VKA). A systematic review with meta-analysis (PROSPERO CRD42015024837) including data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) retrieved in November 2016. The efficacy and safety data were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses using the hazard ratio (HR) with the 95% confidence interval (95%CI). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) was performed in statistical significant results to evaluate whether cumulative sample size was powered for the obtained effect. In 5 RCTs (with 12653 VHD AF patients), NOACs significantly reduced the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (HR 0.73, 95%CI:0.60-0.90; TSA showed estimate was robust - O'Brien-Fleming α-spending boundary crossed before reaching the estimated information size) and intracranial hemorrhage (HR 0.45, 95%CI:0.24-0.87) compared with VKA. Major bleeding risk was not significantly different. In patients with bioprosthesis (3 trials-280 patients) the risks of thromboembolism (HR 0.65, 95%CI:0.20-2.08) and major bleeding (HR 0.94, 95%CI:0.28-3.18) with NOACs were similar to VKA. NOACs are efficacious and safe in patients with non-MARM VHD AF, showing significant reduction in the risk of stroke and systemic embolism and intracranial hemorrage compared with VKA.

  3. Bioprosthetic mitral valve dysfunction due to native valve preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yukihiro; Mori, Yoshio; Umeda, Yukio; Takiya, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Mitral valve replacement with preservation of the mitral leaflets and subvalvular apparatus is considered to maintain left ventricular geometry and function and reduce the risk of myocardial rupture. However, the routine use of this technique may lead to early complications such as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and even mitral inflow obstruction, requiring reoperation. We describe a rare case of bioprosthetic mitral valve dysfunction caused by a native valve preserving procedure.

  4. Unusual redo mitral valve replacement for bleeding in Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villarreal, Ovidio A; Fernández-Ceseña, Ernesto; Solano-Ricardi, Mercedes; Aguilar-García, Alma L; Vega-Hernández, Raquel; Del Angel-Soto, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 23-year-old man with mitral valve regurgitation and Glanzmann thrombasthenia, who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement. Warfarin therapy was devastating, causing bilateral hemothorax, pericardial effusion, gastrointestinal bleeding, and hematuria. Redo mitral valve replacement with a biological prosthesis was required to resolve this critical situation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mitral valve replacement in Glanzmann thrombasthenia, highlighting the danger of oral anticoagulation in this pathology.

  5. Acute severe mitral regurgitation. Pathophysiology, clinical recognition, and management.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Nestico, P F; Morganroth, J

    1985-02-01

    Acute severe mitral regurgitation often goes unrecognized as an emergency requiring prompt, lifesaving treatment. Its causes, physical signs, natural history, echocardiographic features, and findings on chest roentgenography, electrocardiography, and nuclear scintigraphic scanning are reviewed. Acute severe mitral insufficiency can be differentiated from chronic severe mitral insufficiency by noninvasive two-dimensional echocardiography. M-mode echocardiography is a valuable tool in evaluating mitral prosthetic paravalvular regurgitation.

  6. Minimally invasive, robotic, and off-pump mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph; Rodriguez, Evelio; Atluri, Pavan; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2006-01-01

    A significant transformation is occurring in the management of mitral valve disease. Earlier surgery is now recommended. Mitral valve repair is the standard of care, and newer methods of reconstructing the mitral valve are developing. Surgery with videoscopic assistance can be effectively performed without sternotomy. Robotics systems are gaining wider adoption. Implantable devices to repair or replace the mitral valve off-pump and percutaneously are emerging.

  7. Mitral annuloplasty with biodegradable ring for infective endocarditis: a new tool for the surgeon for valve repair in childhood.

    PubMed

    Kazaz, Hakki; Celkan, Mehmet Adnan; Ustunsoy, Hasim; Baspinar, Osman

    2005-08-01

    The incidence of bacterial endocarditis and valvular involvement is rare in the childhood period. If the patient is unresponsive to medical treatment and some complications occur, early surgical treatment is indicated. Debridement of vegetation combined with valve repair techniques sparing the native valve is the ideal surgical procedure instead of replacement, especially for children. Annuloplasty is the key step during valve repair procedures. On the other hand, absence of appropriate sized annuloplasty rings on the market for this group of patients is the main problem. Nondegradable annuloplasty rings might lead to stenosis as the child grows. Thus, biodegradable tissue engineered materials are new solutions for such patients since the fibrous tissue induced by implanted ring grows with time. We describe a pediatric patient with Brucella endocarditis at the mitral position who was treated successfully with valve repair using a biodegradable annuloplasty ring (Kalangos Biodegradable Ring).

  8. Mitral Valve Prolapse in Persons with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; Werner, John Christian

    1994-01-01

    Examination of 36 home-reared young adults with Down's syndrome found that 20 had abnormal echocardiographic findings. Thirteen had mitral valve prolapse, three had mitral valve prolapse and aortic insufficiency, two had only aortic insufficiency, and two had other mitral valve disorders. Theories of pathogenesis and relationship to exercise and…

  9. Right Atrial Clot Formation Early after Percutaneous Mitral Balloon Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ahmet Hakan; Aksakal, Aytekin; Yücel, Huriye; Atasoy Günaydın, İlksen; Ekbul, Adem; Yaman, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Mitral balloon valvuloplasty which has been used for the treatment of rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS) for several decades can cause serious complications. Herein, we presented right atrial clot formation early after percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty which was treated successfully with unfractioned heparin infusion. PMID:28105049

  10. Usefulness of atrial deformation analysis to predict left atrial fibrosis and endocardial thickness in patients undergoing mitral valve operations for severe mitral regurgitation secondary to mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Cameli, Matteo; Lisi, Matteo; Righini, Francesca Maria; Massoni, Alberto; Natali, Benedetta Maria; Focardi, Marta; Tacchini, Damiana; Geyer, Alessia; Curci, Valeria; Di Tommaso, Cristina; Lisi, Gianfranco; Maccherini, Massimo; Chiavarelli, Mario; Massetti, Massimo; Tanganelli, Piero; Mondillo, Sergio

    2013-02-15

    In patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) referred for cardiac surgery, left atrial (LA) remodeling and enlargement are accompanied by mechanical stress, mediated cellular hypertrophy, and interstitial fibrosis that finally lead to LA failure. Speckle tracking echocardiography is a novel non-Doppler-based method that allows an objective quantification of LA myocardial deformation, becoming useful for LA functional analysis. We conducted a study to evaluate the relation between the traditional and novel atrial indexes and the extent of ultrastructural alterations, obtained from patients with severe MR who were undergoing surgical correction of the valvular disease. The study population included 46 patients with severe MR, referred to our echocardiographic laboratory for a diagnostic examination before cardiac surgery. The global peak atrial longitudinal strain (PALS) was measured in all subjects by averaging all atrial segments. LA tissue samples were obtained from all patients. Masson's trichrome staining was performed to assess the extent of the fibrosis. The LA endocardial thickness was measured. A close negative correlation between the global PALS and grade of LA myocardial fibrosis was found (r = -0.82, p <0.0001), with poorer correlations for the LA indexed volume (r = 0.51, p = 0.01), LA ejection fraction (r = 0.61, p = 0.005), and E/E' ratio (0.14, p = NS). Of these indexes, global PALS showed the best diagnostic accuracy to detect LA fibrosis (area under the curve 0.89), and it appears to be a strong and independent predictor of LA fibrosis. Furthermore, we also demonstrated an inverse correlation between the global PALS and LA endocardial thickness (r = -0.66, p = 0.0001). In conclusion, in patients with severe MR referred for cardiac surgery, impairment of LA longitudinal deformation, as assessed by the global PALS, correlated strongly with the extent of LA fibrosis and remodeling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bosentan for patients with echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension due to long-standing rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Vlachogeorgos, Georgios S; Daskalopoulos, Nicholaos; Blatsiotis, Panayiotis; Kourbeti, Irene S; Mantas, Ioannis; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-01-01

    Vasoconstrictive endothelin signaling is not limited to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, but has also been implicated in pulmonary hypertension due to valvular heart disease. The efficacy and safety of endothelin receptor antagonists in these patients is unknown. We investigated the effects of bosentan in patients with transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) evidence of pulmonary hypertension due to mitral stenosis associated with rheumatic fever. This was a prospective, single-center, open-label, uncontrolled study of bosentan in outpatients with uncorrected mitral stenosis due to rheumatic fever. The primary endpoint was exercise capacity at six months, as determined by six-minute walking distance (6MWD) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO₂max). Secondary endpoints were the BORG dyspnea index (BDI), echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), serum pro-brain natriuretic peptide (proBNP), and adverse events at six months. Ten patients (eight females; mean age 75 years) were enrolled. Bosentan was well tolerated by nine, whereas one withdrew from treatment. By intention-to-treat analysis, bosentan resulted in a marked increase in 6MWD (+32 m, p=0.015), but a significant reduction in VO₂max (-0.45 mL/min/kg, p=0.011). Peak PAP did not change significantly, but mean PAP dropped by 16% (p=0.03) and LVEF increased by 6.5% (p=0.003). Profound reductions were observed in BDI and serum proBNP (-67% and -37%, p=0.002 and p=0.011, respectively). Adverse events included minor reductions in body mass and hematocrit. The results of this pilot study suggest that endothelin receptor antagonism improves the functional status of patients with TTE evidence of pulmonary hypertension due to valvular heart disease. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the results.

  12. Acute mitral regurgitation in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Wang, Zhen; Lecomte, Milena; Ennezat, Pierre V; Blanchard, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a well-recognised entity that commonly manifests with chest pain, ST segment abnormalities and transient left ventricular apical ballooning without coronary artery obstructive disease. This syndrome usually portends a favourable outcome. In the rare haemodynamically unstable TTC patients, acute mitral regurgitation (MR) related to systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) is to be considered. Bedside echocardiography is key in recognition of this latter condition as vasodilators, inotropic agents or intra-aortic balloon counter-pulsation worsen the patient's clinical status. We discuss here a case of TTC where nitrate-induced subaortic obstruction and mitral regurgitation led to haemodynamic instability.

  13. Transcatheter mitral valve implantation: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Mylotte, Darren; Piazza, Nicolo

    2015-09-01

    In the last year transcatheter mitral valve implantation (TMVI) has seen a major jump in development. This technique offers the potential to treat a great number of elderly and/or high-risk patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). Such patients are declined surgical intervention either because the institutional Heart Team considers the risk of intervention to exceed the potential benefit, or because the patients and their families believe the morbidity of mitral surgery to be excessive. The advent of a less invasive transcatheter treatment could, therefore, potentially appeal to both clinicians and patients alike. In this overview paper, we describe briefly these recent developments in TVMI technologies as an introduction to the dedicated TVMI technical device parade later in this supplement.

  14. Surgical Treatment of Congenital Mitral Valve Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Padalino, Massimo; Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    Congenital mitral valve (MV) dysplasia is a relatively rare and highly complex cardiac disease. We present our results and illustrate the techniques used to repair these valves. Between 1972 and 2014, 100 consecutive patients underwent surgical repair of congenital MV dysplasia at our institution. Predominant MV regurgitation was present in 53 patients (53%) whereas mitral stenosis was prevalent in 47 (47%). There were five early (5%) and eight late deaths (9%). Actuarial survival was 95%, 94%, and 93% at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively. Sixteen patients (18%) required reintervention due to subsequent MV dysfunction. Actuarial freedom from reintervention for MV dysfunction was 95%, 92%, and 89% at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively. The mechanism underlying the valve dysfunction in congenital mitral valve dysplasia is multifactorial and requires the application of a variety of surgical techniques for repair. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12743 (J Card Surg 2016;31:352-356). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Use of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography to evaluate mitral valve morphology for risk stratification prior to mitral valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Francis, Loren; Finley, Alan; Hessami, Walead

    2017-02-01

    Mitral stenosis is often managed percutaneously with an interventional procedure such as balloon commissurotomy. Although this often results in an increased mitral valve area and improved clinical symptoms, this procedure is not benign and may have serious complications including the development of hemodynamically significant mitral valve regurgitation. Multiple scoring systems have been developed to attempt to risk stratify these patients prior to their procedure.

  16. Primary Prevention of Sudden Death in Patients With Valvular Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Barrio-López, María Teresa; Assi, Emad Abu; Expósito-García, Víctor; Bertomeu-González, Vicente; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan Miguel; González-Torres, Luis; García-Bolao, Ignacio; Gaztañaga, Larraitz; Cabanas-Grandío, Pilar; Iglesias-Bravo, José Antonio; Arce-León, Álvaro; la Huerta, Ana Andrés; Fernández-Armenta, Juan; Peinado, Rafael; Arias, Miguel Angel; Díaz-Infante, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    Few data exist on the outcomes of valvular cardiomyopathy patients referred for defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. The aim of the present study was to describe the outcomes of this cardiomyopathy subgroup. This multicenter retrospective study included consecutive patients referred for defibrillator implantation to 15 Spanish centers in 2010 and 2011, and to 3 centers after 1 January 2008. Of 1174 patients, 73 (6.2%) had valvular cardiomyopathy. These patients had worse functional class, wider QRS, and a history of atrial fibrillation vs patients with ischemic (n=659; 56.1%) or dilated (n=442; 37.6%) cardiomyopathy. During a follow-up of 38.1 ± 21.3 months, 197 patients (16.7%) died, without significant differences among the groups (19.2% in the valvular cardiomyopathy group, 15.8% in the ischemic cardiomyopathy group, and 17.9% in the dilated cardiomyopathy group; P=.2); 136 died of cardiovascular causes (11.6%), without significant differences among the groups (12.3%, 10.5%, and 13.1%, respectively; P=.1). Although there were no differences in the proportion of appropriate defibrillator interventions (13.7%, 17.9%, and 18.8%; P=.4), there was a difference in inappropriate interventions (8.2%, 7.1%, and 12.0%, respectively; P=.03). All-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with valvular cardiomyopathy were similar to those in other patients referred for defibrillator implantation. They also had similar rates of appropriate interventions. These data suggest that defibrillator implantation in this patient group confers a similar benefit to that obtained by patients with ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitral valve repair over five decades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It has become evident that mitral valve (MV) repair is the preferable treatment for the majority of patients presenting with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). This success clearly testifies that the surgical procedure is accessible, reproducible and is carrying excellent long-lasting results. From the pre-extracorporeal circulation’s era to the last percutaneous approaches, a large variety of techniques have been proposed to address the different features of MV diseases. This article aimed at reviewing chronologically the development of these dedicated techniques through their origins and the debates that they generated in the literature. PMID:26309841

  18. Isolation and Culture of Avian Embryonic Valvular Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Gretchen; Gould, Russell; Butcher, Johnathan

    2010-01-01

    Proper formation and function of embryonic heart valves is critical for developmental progression. The early embryonic heart is a U-shaped tube of endocardium surrounded by myocardium. The myocardium secretes cardiac jelly, a hyaluronan-rich gelatinous matrix, into the atrioventricular (AV) junction and outflow tract (OFT) lumen. At stage HH14 valvulogenesis begins when a subset of endocardial cells receive signals from the myocardium, undergo endocardial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT), and invade the cardiac jelly. At stage HH25 the valvular cushions are fully mesenchymalized, and it is this mesenchyme that eventually forms the valvular and septal apparatus of the heart. Understanding the mechanisms that initiate and modulate the process of EMT and cell differentiation are important because of their connection to serious congenital heart defects. In this study we present methods to isolate pre-EMT endocardial and post-EMT mesenchymal cells, which are the two different cell phenotypes of the prevalvular cushion. Pre-EMT endocardial cells can be cultured with or without the myocardium. Post-EMT AV cushion mesenchymal cells can be cultured inside mechanically constrained or stress-free collagen gels. These 3D in vitro models mimic key valvular morphogenic events and are useful for deconstructing the mechanisms of early and late stage valvulogenesis. PMID:21085095

  19. Severe mitral regurgitation due to an extraordinary heart defect.

    PubMed

    García-Ropero, Álvaro; Cortés García, Marcelino; Aldamiz Echevarría, Gonzalo; Farré Muncharaz, Jerónimo

    2016-09-01

    A previously non-described cause of mitral regurgitation is presented. An asymptomatic 50-year old male who was casually diagnosed of mitral valve Barlow's disease underwent cardiac surgery due to severe mitral regurgitation. In the operating theatre, a longitudinal fissure of 1.5-2.0 cm length, along the posterior mitral leaflet, was found responsible for the insufficiency. This defect had features of a potential congenital origin and it was successfully repaired with direct suture. Whether it is an atypical mitral cleft, a variation of Barlow's morphology spectrum or a new congenital heart defect remains unclear.

  20. Novel Annular and Subvalvular Enlargement in Congenital Mitral Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Nels D; Beers, Kevin M; Maldonado, Elaine M; Calhoon, John H; Husain, S Adil

    2016-09-01

    Reparative procedures are not always feasible in congenitally abnormal mitral valves. Mechanical prosthesis has been accepted as the choice for valve replacement in the pediatric population. This report describes a case of congenital mitral valve disease requiring mitral valve replacement. The infant's mitral valve annulus was not amenable to placement of the smallest available mechanical prosthesis. The approach used here for annular and subvalvular enlargement facilitated implantation of a larger prosthesis for congenital mitral valve replacement. Five-year outcomes in a single patient may indicate broader applicability and avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitral valve dynamics in structural and fluid-structure interaction models.

    PubMed

    Lau, K D; Diaz, V; Scambler, P; Burriesci, G

    2010-11-01

    Modelling and simulation of heart valves is a challenging biomechanical problem due to anatomical variability, pulsatile physiological pressure loads and 3D anisotropic material behaviour. Current valvular models based on the finite element method can be divided into: those that do model the interaction between the blood and the valve (fluid-structure interaction or 'wet' models) and those that do not (structural models or 'dry' models). Here an anatomically sized model of the mitral valve has been used to compare the difference between structural and fluid-structure interaction techniques in two separately simulated scenarios: valve closure and a cardiac cycle. Using fluid-structure interaction, the valve has been modelled separately in a straight tubular volume and in a U-shaped ventricular volume, in order to analyse the difference in the coupled fluid and structural dynamics between the two geometries. The results of the structural and fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the stress distribution in the closure simulation is similar in all the models, but the magnitude and closed configuration differ. In the cardiac cycle simulation significant differences in the valvular dynamics were found between the structural and fluid-structure interaction models due to difference in applied pressure loads. Comparison of the fluid domains of the fluid-structure interaction models have shown that the ventricular geometry generates slower fluid velocity with increased vorticity compared to the tubular geometry. In conclusion, structural heart valve models are suitable for simulation of static configurations (opened or closed valves), but in order to simulate full dynamic behaviour fluid-structure interaction models are required.

  2. Saddle-shaped mitral valve annuloplasty rings improve leaflet coaptation geometry.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Morten O; Jensen, Henrik; Levine, Robert A; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nielsen, Sten L

    2011-09-01

    The mitral valve annulus naturally conforms to a saddle shape in systole. This configuration is believed to put the leaflets into a lower-energy equilibrium with the annulus and subvalvular apparatus. Conventional flat annuloplasty rings restrict posterior leaflet motion, which may result in a "monocusp" valve, affecting valvular stress distribution. It is hypothesized that saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings cause less distortion of the physiologic leaflet geometry than do flat rings. Twelve pigs were studied in an acute setting with 3-dimensional echocardiography and sonomicrometry before and after implantation of rigid flat (n = 5) and saddle-shaped (n = 7) annuloplasty rings. The rings were true sized to the annulus with equal anterior-posterior and commissure-commissure circumferential dimensions. The saddle-shaped rings had an annular height to commissural width ratio of 15%. Saddle-shaped rings maintained both leaflets operational (P < .01). Flat rings made the posterior leaflet immobile and the anterior leaflet aligned flat along the annulus in systole, effectively resulting in monoleaflet function. The average distance from the papillary muscle tips to the posterior annulus decreased by 2.4 ± 0.4 mm after flat ring implantation (P < .01). Saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings provide better leaflet coaptation geometry than do flat rings by not hoisting the papillary muscles toward the posterior annulus through the commissural chordae, allowing greater leaflet mobility. This entails a potentially beneficial impact on valvular stress distribution that could affect durability of the repaired valve. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitral valve dynamics in structural and fluid–structure interaction models

    PubMed Central

    Lau, K.D.; Diaz, V.; Scambler, P.; Burriesci, G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling and simulation of heart valves is a challenging biomechanical problem due to anatomical variability, pulsatile physiological pressure loads and 3D anisotropic material behaviour. Current valvular models based on the finite element method can be divided into: those that do model the interaction between the blood and the valve (fluid–structure interaction or ‘wet’ models) and those that do not (structural models or ‘dry’ models). Here an anatomically sized model of the mitral valve has been used to compare the difference between structural and fluid–structure interaction techniques in two separately simulated scenarios: valve closure and a cardiac cycle. Using fluid–structure interaction, the valve has been modelled separately in a straight tubular volume and in a U-shaped ventricular volume, in order to analyse the difference in the coupled fluid and structural dynamics between the two geometries. The results of the structural and fluid–structure interaction models have shown that the stress distribution in the closure simulation is similar in all the models, but the magnitude and closed configuration differ. In the cardiac cycle simulation significant differences in the valvular dynamics were found between the structural and fluid–structure interaction models due to difference in applied pressure loads. Comparison of the fluid domains of the fluid–structure interaction models have shown that the ventricular geometry generates slower fluid velocity with increased vorticity compared to the tubular geometry. In conclusion, structural heart valve models are suitable for simulation of static configurations (opened or closed valves), but in order to simulate full dynamic behaviour fluid–structure interaction models are required. PMID:20702128

  4. MicroRNAs in Valvular Heart Diseases: Potential Role as Markers and Actors of Valvular and Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Oury, Cécile; Servais, Laurence; Bouznad, Nassim; Hego, Alexandre; Nchimi, Alain; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are a class of over 5000 noncoding RNAs that regulate more than half of the protein-encoding genes by provoking their degradation or preventing their translation. miRNAs are key regulators of complex biological processes underlying several cardiovascular disorders, including left ventricular hypertrophy, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, hypertension and arrhythmias. Moreover, circulating miRNAs herald promise as biomarkers in acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. In this context, this review gives an overview of studies that suggest that miRNAs could also play a role in valvular heart diseases. This area of research is still at its infancy, and further investigations in large patient cohorts and cellular or animal models are needed to provide strong data. Most studies focused on aortic stenosis, one of the most common valvular diseases in developed countries. Profiling and functional analyses indicate that miRNAs could contribute to activation of aortic valve interstitial cells to a myofibroblast phenotype, leading to valvular fibrosis and calcification, and to pressure overload-induced myocardial remodeling and hypertrophy. Data also indicate that specific miRNA signatures, in combination with clinical and functional imaging parameters, could represent useful biomarkers of disease progression or recovery after aortic valve replacement. PMID:27420053

  5. Mitral Valve Stenosis after Open Repair Surgery for Non-rheumatic Mitral Valve Regurgitation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Shabsigh, Muhammad; Lawrence, Cassidy; Rosero-Britton, Byron R; Kumar, Nicolas; Kimura, Satoshi; Durda, Michael Andrew; Essandoh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitral stenosis (MS) after mitral valve (MV) repair is a slowly progressive condition, usually detected many years after the index MV surgery. It is defined as a mean transmitral pressure gradient (TMPG) >5 mmHg or a mitral valve area (MVA) <1.5 cm(2). Pannus formation around the mitral annulus or extending to the mitral leaflets is suggested as the main mechanism for developing delayed MS after MV repair. On the other hand, early stenosis is thought to be a direct result of an undersized annuloplasty ring. Furthermore, in MS following ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) repair, subvalvular tethering is the hypothesized pathophysiology. MS after MV repair has an incidence of 9-54%. Several factors have been associated with a higher risk for developing MS after MV repair, including the use of flexible Duran annuloplasty rings versus rigid Carpentier-Edwards rings, complete annuloplasty rings versus partial bands, small versus large anterior leaflet opening angle, and anterior leaflet tip opening length. Intraoperative echocardiography can measure the anterior leaflet opening angle, the anterior leaflet tip opening dimension, the MVA and the mean TMPG, and may help identify patients at risk for developing MS after MV repair.

  6. Mitral Valve Stenosis after Open Repair Surgery for Non-rheumatic Mitral Valve Regurgitation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shabsigh, Muhammad; Lawrence, Cassidy; Rosero-Britton, Byron R.; Kumar, Nicolas; Kimura, Satoshi; Durda, Michael Andrew; Essandoh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitral stenosis (MS) after mitral valve (MV) repair is a slowly progressive condition, usually detected many years after the index MV surgery. It is defined as a mean transmitral pressure gradient (TMPG) >5 mmHg or a mitral valve area (MVA) <1.5 cm2. Pannus formation around the mitral annulus or extending to the mitral leaflets is suggested as the main mechanism for developing delayed MS after MV repair. On the other hand, early stenosis is thought to be a direct result of an undersized annuloplasty ring. Furthermore, in MS following ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) repair, subvalvular tethering is the hypothesized pathophysiology. MS after MV repair has an incidence of 9–54%. Several factors have been associated with a higher risk for developing MS after MV repair, including the use of flexible Duran annuloplasty rings versus rigid Carpentier–Edwards rings, complete annuloplasty rings versus partial bands, small versus large anterior leaflet opening angle, and anterior leaflet tip opening length. Intraoperative echocardiography can measure the anterior leaflet opening angle, the anterior leaflet tip opening dimension, the MVA and the mean TMPG, and may help identify patients at risk for developing MS after MV repair. PMID:27148540

  7. Successful surgical repair of the parachute mitral valve with mitral valve regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman with exercise-related dyspnea was admitted to our hospital. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a large anomalous papillary muscle that originated from the posterior wall of the left ventricle and severe mitral valve regurgitation in systole. Cleft suture, 5-0 polytetrafluoroethylene sutures from a single papillary muscle to the anterior commissure leaflet (AC), 5-0 polypropylene sutures between AC and A1, and between A1 and A2, the double-orifice technique, and ring plasty with 32-mm semi-rigid ring was performed. Postoperative echocardiography showed an improvement in severe mitral valve regurgitation. At the 2-month follow-up, the patient was in good health. In the present case, the elderly patient with an isolated parachute mitral valve but without any other cardiac anomaly and presenting with mitral valve regurgitation is extremely rare. This case of mitral valvuloplasty for a parachute mitral valve with a single papillary muscle in an elderly woman has not been reported before.

  8. Non-rheumatic `subvalvar' mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Caves, P. K.; Paneth, M.

    1973-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients with non-rheumatic subvalvar mitral regurgitation are reported, representing 16% of all patients with mitral regurgitation submitted to open operation over a five-and-a-half-year period. In 22 older patients with `idiopathic' chordal lesions, the commonest finding was rupture of chordae to the posterior leaflet. The aortic leaflet chordae were most frequently involved following myocardial infarction (7 patients) or bacterial endocarditis (3 patients). Three other younger patients had ruptured chordae and two patients had rupture of the posteromedial papillary muscle following acute myocardial infarction. The mitral valve was repaired in 16 patients with ruptured chordae, of whom only eight obtained a satisfactory late result. In the other 21 patients the valve was replaced with a mounted aortic homograft or a Starr-Edwards prosthesis. It is concluded that mitral valve repair should be reserved for patients with symmetrical rupture of the chordae controlling the centre of the posterior leaflet, as regurgitation may reappear after other forms of repair due to progressive rupture of other abnormal chordae or breakdown of the repair. The early and late mortality in the patients with a definite antecedent myocardial infarction was much higher than in the other groups, and emergency valve replacement soon after rupture of the papillary muscle was unsuccessful in both patients. Images PMID:4731107

  9. Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery III

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Eric J.; Guy, T. Sloane; Smith, Robert L.; Grossi, Eugene A.; Shemin, Richard J.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Ailawadi, Gorav; Agnihotri, Arvind K.; Fayers, Trevor M.; Hargrove, W. Clark; Hummel, Brian W.; Khan, Junaid H.; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Mehall, John R.; Murphy, Douglas A.; Ryan, William H.; Salemi, Arash; Segurola, Romualdo J.; Smith, J. Michael; Wolfe, J. Alan; Weldner, Paul W.; Barnhart, Glenn R.; Goldman, Scott M.; Lewis, Clifton T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Minimally invasive mitral valve operations are increasingly common in the United States, but robotic-assisted approaches have not been widely adopted for a variety of reasons. This expert opinion reviews the state of the art and defines best practices, training, and techniques for developing a successful robotics program. PMID:27662478

  10. Mitral Valve Prolapse in Young Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFaul, Richard C.

    1987-01-01

    A review of research regarding mitral valve prolapse in young children indicates that up to five percent of this population have the condition, with the majority being asymptomatic and requiring reassurance that the condition usually remains mild. Beta-blocking drugs are prescribed for patients with disabling chest pain, dizziness, palpitation, or…

  11. [Mitral valve prolapse and cusp elasticity].

    PubMed

    Curti, H J; Ferreira, M C; Silveira, S A; Sanches, P C; Carvalhal, S

    1994-06-01

    To verify if systolic bulging of floppy mitral cusps can to elastic behavior of their myxomatous collagen tissue. Five hearts with floppy mitral valves obtained from autopsies were distended with air (20 to 250 mmHg) through a catheter connected to the left ventricle. It was observed if some area of the atrial surface of the coapted cusps showed variable bulging according to the variation of air injection pressures. Molding of those surfaces (gypsum) allowed the same kind of analysis by other four researches. It was analyzed the cut surfaces of these radially sectioned molds. Lately, isolated tendinae chords were submitted to repeated tractions and observed if they exhibited elastic behavior. Histological study defined the presence of collagen myxomatous degeneration and quantified the amount of elastic tissue. In no case it was detected elastic bulding of mitral cusps. Cut surfaces of the molds confirmed that no increment of the prominent areas occurred, even in those regions with extensive, histologically confirmed, myxomatous substitution of the native collagen tissue. Increment of the degree of mitral bulging occurring during ventricular systole can not be ascertained to cusp elasticity but probably to papilar muscle traction.

  12. Isolation of Bartonella washoensis from a Dog with Mitral Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Chomel, Bruno B.; Wey, Aaron C.; Kasten, Rickie W.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first documented case of Bartonella washoensis bacteremia in a dog with mitral valve endocarditis. B. washoensis was isolated in 1995 from a human patient with cardiac disease. The main reservoir species appears to be ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) in the western United States. Based on echocardiographic findings, a diagnosis of infective vegetative valvular mitral endocarditis was made in a spayed 12-year-old female Doberman pinscher. A year prior to presentation, the referring veterinarian had detected a heart murmur, which led to progressive dyspnea and a diagnosis of congestive heart failure the week before examination. One month after initial presentation, symptoms worsened. An emergency therapy for congestive heart failure was unsuccessfully implemented, and necropsy evaluation of the dog was not permitted. Indirect immunofluorescence tests showed that the dog was strongly seropositive (titer of 1:4,096) for several Bartonella antigens (B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, B. clarridgeiae, and B. henselae), highly suggestive of Bartonella endocarditis. Standard aerobic and aerobic-anaerobic cultures were negative. However, a specific blood culture for Bartonella isolation grew a fastidious, gram-negative organism 7 days after being plated. Phenotypic and genotypic characterizations of the isolate, including partial sequencing of the citrate synthase (gltA), groEL, and 16S rRNA genes, indicated that this organism was identical to B. washoensis. The dog was seronegative for all tick-borne pathogens tested (Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia canis, and Rickettsia rickettsii), but the sample was highly positive for B. washoensis (titer of 1:8,192) and, according to indirect immunofluorescent-antibody assay, weakly positive for phase II Coxiella burnetii infection. PMID:14605197

  13. Management of mitral regurgitation in Marfan syndrome: Outcomes of valve repair versus replacement and comparison with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Helder, Meghana R K; Schaff, Hartzell V; Dearani, Joseph A; Li, Zhuo; Stulak, John M; Suri, Rakesh M; Connolly, Heidi M

    2014-09-01

    The study objective was to evaluate patients with Marfan syndrome and mitral valve regurgitation undergoing valve repair or replacement and to compare them with patients undergoing repair for myxomatous mitral valve disease. We reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients with Marfan syndrome treated surgically between March 17, 1960, and September 12, 2011, for mitral regurgitation and performed a subanalysis of those with repairs compared with case-matched patients with myxomatous mitral valve disease who had repairs (March 14, 1995, to July 5, 2013). Of 61 consecutive patients, 40 underwent mitral repair and 21 underwent mitral replacement (mean [standard deviation] age, 40 [18] vs 31 [19] years; P = .09). Concomitant aortic surgery was performed to a similar extent (repair, 45% [18/40] vs replacement, 43% [9/21]; P = .87). Ten-year survival was significantly better in patients with Marfan syndrome with mitral repair than in those with replacement (80% vs 41%; P = .01). Mitral reintervention did not differ between mitral repair and replacement (cumulative risk of reoperation, 27% vs 15%; P = .64). In the matched cohort, 10-year survival after repair was similar for patients with Marfan syndrome and myxomatous mitral disease (84% vs 78%; P = .63), as was cumulative risk of reoperation (17% vs 12%; P = .61). Patients with Marfan syndrome and mitral regurgitation have better survival with repair than with replacement. Survival and risk of reoperation for patients with Marfan syndrome were similar to those for patients with myxomatous mitral disease. These results support the use of mitral valve repair in patients with Marfan syndrome and moderate or more mitral regurgitation, including those having composite replacement of the aortic root. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Late ventricular potentials and mitral valve prolapse].

    PubMed

    Babuty, D; Charniot, J C; Delhomme, C; Fauchier, L; Fauchier, J P; Cosnay, P

    1994-03-01

    In order to determine the predictive value for ventricular arrhythmias of ventricular late potentials (LP) in mitral valve prolapse (MVP) the authors performed high amplification signal-averaging ECG (SA) and 24 hours ambulatory ECG (Holter) monitoring in 68 consecutive patients (34 men, 34 women, average age 48 +/- 17.7 years) with echocardiographically diagnosed MVP. Patients with bundle branch block or associated cardiac disease were excluded. Echocardiography showed 26 patients to have floppy mitral valves (38.2%), 50 patients to have posterior deplacement > or = 5 mm of the mitral valves in systole (73.5%) and 35 patients to have mitral regurgitation (51.4%). Holter monitoring showed 17 patients without ventricular extrasystoles (VES), 15 had Lown Grade I, 6 had Lown Grade II, 3 had Lown Grade III, 15 had Lown Grade IV A and 12 had Lown Grade IV B ventricular arrhythmias. Therefore, 30 patients had complex ventricular arrhythmias (> or = Lown Grade III) and 13 patients had spontaneous non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) (one patient had NSVT on resting ECG but not on Holter monitoring). Eighteen patients had LP (26.5%). The incidence of complex ventricular arrhythmias was higher in patients with mitral regurgitation (62.8% versus 27.7%; p < 0.005) whereas the incidence of NSVT was not significantly different (25.7% versus 17.1%; p = 0.15). On the other hand, the frequency of complex ventricular arrhythmias was not significantly different in the presence or absence of LP (61.1% versus 40%: NS) whereas the incidence of NSVT was higher in patients with LP (44.4% versus 10%; p < 0.005).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Correlation between plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels and changes in New York Heart Association functional class, left atrial size, left ventricular size and function after mitral and/or aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Elasfar, Abdelfatah

    2012-01-01

    Elevated plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels have been demonstrated in patients with chronic valvular disease. We designed the present study to assess whether changes in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels after mitral, aortic and double mitral and aortic valve replacement reflect changes in heart failure (HF) symptoms including New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and changes in left atrium (LA) size, left ventricle (LV) size and LV function. A prospective observational nonrandomized study among consecutive patients undergoing mitral and/or aortic valve replacement in our center. The study population consisted of 24 patients (mean [SD] age of 55.3 [16.2] years, 58% were males) who underwent surgical mitral valve replacement (12 patients), aortic valve replacement (8 patients) and combined mitral and aortic valve replacement (4 patients). NT-proBNP measurements, transthoracic echocardiography and NYHA class assessments were performed before and 6 months after surgery. The decrease in NT-proBNP was associated with decrease in left atrial dimension (r = 0.73, P < .002), LV end-diastolic dimension (r=0.65, P=.001), LV end-systolic dimension (r=0.53, P=.036), and increase in ejection fraction (r=-0.65, P=.001) after 6 months postoperatively. Furthermore, a decreasing NT-proBNP was associated with improvement in NYHA class. NT-proBNP levels after mitral, aortic and double valve replacement correlates with changes in HF manifestations as well as changes in LA size and LV dimension and function. Thus, we hypothesize that interval measurement of the NT-proBNP level at clinic visits can allow early detection of any clinical deterioration as well as the possibility of assessment of the long-term outcome of those patients.

  16. Echocardiography of congenital mitral valve disorders: echocardiographic-morphological comparisons.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Norman H

    2014-12-01

    I surveyed our echocardiographic database of the years between 1998 and 2012 for congenital abnormalities of the mitral valve in patients over 14 years. A total of 249 patients with mitral valve abnormalities were identified. Abnormalities included clefts in the mitral valve in 58 patients, double orifice of the mitral valve in 19, mitral stenosis with two papillary muscles in 72, and mitral stenosis with one papillary muscle in 51 patients. Supravalvar rings were found in 35 patients with a single papillary muscle, and mitral stenoses with two papillary muscles were found in 22 patients. Mitral prolapse occurred in 44 patients and mitral valvar straddle in five patients. The patients were evaluated by all modalities of ultrasound available over the course of time. Although some lesions were isolated, there were many lesions in which more than one mitral deformity presented in the same patient. The patients are presented showing anatomical correlation with autopsy specimens, some of which came from the patients in this series, and others matched to show correlative anatomy. These lesions remain rare as a group and continue to have high morbidity and mortality.

  17. Isolated Mitral Cleft in Trisomy 21: An Initially 'Silent' Lesion.

    PubMed

    Thankavel, Poonam P; Ramaciotti, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cardiac anomalies are common in trisomy 21, and transthoracic echocardiogram within the first month of life is recommended. While a cleft mitral valve associated with atrioventricular septal defect has been well defined in this population, the prevalence of isolated mitral valve cleft has not been previously reported. The aim of our study was to define the occurrence of isolated mitral cleft in the first echocardiogram of patients with trisomy 21. This retrospective chart review examined echocardiographic data on all Trisomy 21 patients <1 year of age obtained during January 1, 2010, to May 1, 2014, at our institution. Images were reviewed by one of the authors with no knowledge of the official diagnosis. In addition to evaluation for isolated mitral valve cleft, data obtained included presence of additional congenital heart defects and need for surgical intervention. A total of 184 patients (median age 5 days) were identified. Isolated mitral cleft was identified in 12 patients (6.5 %). Four were diagnosed retrospectively (33 %). Only one had mitral regurgitation on initial echocardiogram. Seven required surgery for closure of ventricular septal defects. Isolated mitral cleft is present in an important number of neonates with Trisomy 21. Mitral regurgitation is often absent in the neonatal period and should not be used as a reliable indicator of absence of valve abnormality. Careful attention should be directed toward the mitral valve during the first echocardiogram to exclude an isolated cleft, which can lead to progressive mitral regurgitation.

  18. Possible relationship between degenerative cardiac valvular pathology and lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Canver, C C; Chanda, J; DeBellis, D M; Kelley, J M

    2000-07-01

    We report an unusual clinical presentation of Lyme carditis in a previously healthy 20-year-old black woman without any epidemiologic history of Lyme disease, fulminant in nature, involving a heart valve necessitating emergent mitral valve replacement, and requiring further surgical intervention because of the development of pericardial effusion and tamponade. A dilated right ventricle with normal contractility and severe tricuspid regurgitation with increase in the right atrial size diagnosed later remains under close surveillance.

  19. Mitral valve repair versus replacement in simultaneous aortic and mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Marian; Pirk, Jan; Szarszoi, Ondrej; Skalsky, Ivo; Maly, Jiri; Netuka, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Double valve replacement for concomitant aortic and mitral valve disease is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Excellent results with valve repair in isolated mitral valve lesions have been reported; therefore, whether its potential benefits would translate into better outcomes in patients with combined mitral-aortic disease was investigated. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed involving 341 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with either mitral valve repair (n=42) or double valve replacement (n=299). Data were analyzed for early mortality, late valve-related complications and survival. RESULTS: The early mortality rate was 11.9% for valve repair and 11.0% for replacement (P=0.797). Survival (± SD) was 67±11% in mitral valve repair with aortic valve replacement and 81±3% in double valve replacement at five years of follow-up (P=0.187). The percentage of patients who did not experience major adverse valve-related events at five years of follow-up was 83±9% in those who underwent mitral valve repair with aortic valve replacement and 89±2% in patients who underwent double valve replacement (P=0.412). Age >70 years (HR 2.4 [95% CI 1.1 to 4.9]; P=0.023) and renal dysfunction (HR 1.9 [95% CI 1.2 to 3.7]; P=0.01) were independent predictors of decreased survival. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with double valve disease, both mitral valve repair and replacement provided comparable early outcomes. There were no significant differences in valve-related reoperations, anticoagulation-related complications or prosthetic valve endocarditis. Patient-related factors appear to be the major determinant of late survival, irrespective of the type of operation. PMID:24294032

  20. Echocardiographic anatomy of the mitral valve in healthy dogs and dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Wesselowski, S; Borgarelli, M; Menciotti, G; Abbott, J

    2015-06-01

    To further characterize the echocardiographic anatomy of the canine mitral valve apparatus in normal dogs and in dogs affected by myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). Twenty-two normal dogs and 60 dogs with MMVD were prospectively studied. The length (AMVL), width (AMVW) and area (AMVA) of the anterior mitral valve leaflet were measured in the control group and the affected group, as were the diameters of the mitral valve annulus in diastole (MVAd) and systole (MVAs). The dogs with MMVD were staged based on American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) guidelines and separated into groups B1 and B2/C. All measurements were indexed to body weight based on empirically defined allometric relationships. There was a statistically significant relationship between all log10 transformed mitral valve dimensions and body weight. The AMVL, AMVW, AMVA, MVAd and MVAs were all significantly greater in the B2/C group compared to the B1 and control groups. The AMVW was also significantly greater in the B1 group compared to the control group. Interobserver % coefficient of variation (% CV) was <10% for AMVL, AMVA, MVAd and MVAs, but was 29.6% for AMVW. Intraobserver % CV was <10.4% for all measurements. Measurements of the anterior mitral valve leaflet and the mitral valve annulus in the dog can be indexed to body weight based on allometric relationships. Preliminary reference intervals have been proposed over a range of body sizes. Relative to normal dogs, AMVL, AMVW, AMVA, MVAd and MVAs are greater in patients with advanced MMVD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitral annulus morphologic and functional analysis using real time tridimensional echocardiography in patients submitted to unsupported mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Marco Antônio Vieira; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Tarasoutchi, Flávio; Spinola, Pablo da Cunha; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mitral valve repair is the treatment of choice to correct mitral insufficiency, although the literature related to mitral valve annulus behavior after mitral repair without use of prosthetic rings is scarce. Objective To analyze mitral annulus morphology and function using real time tridimensional echocardiography in individuals submitted to mitral valve repair with Double Teflon technique. Methods Fourteen patients with mitral valve insufficiency secondary to mixomatous degeneration that were submitted to mitral valve repair with the Double Teflon technique were included. Thirteen patients were in FC III/IV. Patients were evaluated in preoperative period, immediate postoperative period, 6 months and 1 year after mitral repair. Statistical analysis was made by repeated measures ANOVA test and was considered statistically significant P<0.05. Results There were no deaths, reoperation due to valve dysfunction, thromboembolism or endocarditis during the study. Posterior mitral annulus demonstrated a significant reduction in immediate postoperative period (P<0.001), remaining stable during the study, and presents a mean of reduction of 25.8% comparing with preoperative period. There was a significant reduction in anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters in the immediate postoperative period (P<0.001), although there was a significant increase in mediolateral diameter between immediate postoperative period and 1 year. There was no difference in mitral internal area variation over the cardiac cycle during the study. Conclusion Segmentar annuloplasty reduced the posterior component of mitral annulus, which remained stable in a 1-year-period. The variation in mitral annulus area during cardiac cycle remained stable during the study. PMID:26313723

  2. Cabergoline use for pituitary tumors and valvular disorders.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, Renata S; Pivonello, Rosario; Ferreri, Lucia; Priscitelli, Prisco; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-03-01

    Cabergoline (CAB) is widely used for the medical treatment of pituitary tumors, particularly those associated with hormone hypersecretion. Whether treatment with CAB is associated with an increased risk of clinically relevant cardiac valve disease in patients with pituitary tumors is still debated. In most studies, CAB has been found not associated with an increased risk of significant valvulopathy, and no correlation has been shown between valvular abnormalities and CAB duration or cumulative dose. This review provides an overview of the studies reporting on the outcome of CAB in terms of cardiac valve disease in patients with pituitary tumors.

  3. Effect of Valvular Surgery in Carcinoid Heart Disease: An Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N C; Yuan, M; Nolan, O; Pawade, T A; Oelofse, T; Singh, H; Mehrzad, H; Zia, Z; Geh, J I; Palmer, D H; May, C J H; Ayuk, J; Shah, T; Rooney, S J; Steeds, R P

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease (NET-CHD) is associated with the development of symptom-limited exercise capacity and high rates of morbidity and mortality. This study sought to determine the survival, cardiac function, and functional class following surgery. This was a retrospective observational cohort study between 2005 and 2015 at a European Centre of Excellence for Neuroendocrine Tumours, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham. England consisting of 62 consecutive patients referred to the NET-Cardiology Service. Subjects were assessed at referral using transthoracic echocardiography (with saline contrast) and transesophageal echocardiography, and 77% with confirmed NET-CHD underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Symptomatic patients with concomitant severe valvular dysfunction were referred for surgery with stable NET disease. Survival of patients with proven NET-CHD following medical and surgical treatments was measure. In total, 47/62 patients were diagnosed with NET-CHD. Thirty-two patients (68%) underwent surgery with bioprosthetic valve replacements in all subjects; tricuspid, n = 31; pulmonary, n = 30; mitral, n = 3; and aortic, n = 3. Four patients underwent concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting. There were 4 (13%) early post-operative deaths. One- and 2-y survival rates after surgery were 75 and 69% compared with 45 and 15% in un-operated patients. Post-operatively, functional class was improved (pre-New York Heart Association Classification [NYHA], 2.6 [0.5] vs post-NYHA, 1.7 [1.1]), P < .05, right-ventricular (RV) size was reduced (136 ml/m(2) [25] vs 71 ml/m(2) [7]; P < .01) with preserved RV ejection fraction (61% ± 9 vs 55% ± 10; P = .26). Valve surgery improved functional class and resulted in RV reverse remodelling with improved survival rates at 2 y compared with those not proceeding to operation. These data highlight the importance of close collaboration between NET clinicians, cardiology, and cardiothoracic surgery teams. Early

  4. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Acute Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Marak, Creticus P.; Joy, Parijat S.; Gupta, Pragya; Guddati, Achuta K.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) can be caused by several etiologies including vasculitis, drug exposure, anticoagulants, infections, mitral valve stenosis, and regurgitation. Chronic mitral valve regurgitation (MR) has been well documented as an etiological factor for DAH, but there have been only a few cases which have reported acute mitral valve regurgitation as an etiology of DAH. Acute mitral valve regurgitation can be a life-threatening condition and often requires urgent intervention. In rare cases, acute mitral regurgitation may result in a regurgitant jet which is directed towards the right upper pulmonary vein and may specifically cause right-sided pulmonary edema and right-sided DAH. Surgical repair of the mitral valve results in rapid resolution of DAH. Acute MR should be considered as a possible etiology in patients presenting with unilateral pulmonary edema, hemoptysis, and DAH. PMID:24383034

  5. Mitral valve repair for ischemic mitral regurgitation: lessons from the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network randomized study.

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Santana, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30% to 50% of patients will develop ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) after a myocardial infarction, which is a result of progressive left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction of the subvalvular apparatus, and portends a poor long-term prognosis. Surgical treatment is centered on mitral valve repair utilizing a restrictive annuloplasty, or valve replacement with preservation of the subvalvular apparatus. In the recent Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network (CSTN) study, patients with severe ischemic MR were randomized to mitral valve repair with a restrictive annuloplasty versus chordal-sparing valve replacement, and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, if indicated. At 2-year follow-up, mitral valve repair was associated with a significantly higher incidence of moderate or greater recurrent MR and heart failure, with no difference in the indices of left ventricular reverse remodeling, as compared with valve replacement. The current appraisal aims to provide insight into the CSTN trial results, and discusses the evidence supporting a pathophysiologic-guided repair strategy incorporating combined annuloplasty and subvalvular repair techniques to optimize the outcomes of mitral valve repair in ischemic MR.

  6. Ultrasound based mitral valve annulus tracking for off-pump beating heart mitral valve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng P.; Rajchl, Martin; Moore, John; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) occurs when the mitral valve cannot close properly during systole. The NeoChordtool aims to repair MR by implanting artificial chordae tendineae on flail leaflets inside the beating heart, without a cardiopulmonary bypass. Image guidance is crucial for such a procedure due to the lack of direct vision of the targets or instruments. While this procedure is currently guided solely by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), our previous work has demonstrated that guidance safety and efficiency can be significantly improved by employing augmented virtuality to provide virtual presentation of mitral valve annulus (MVA) and tools integrated with real time ultrasound image data. However, real-time mitral annulus tracking remains a challenge. In this paper, we describe an image-based approach to rapidly track MVA points on 2D/biplane TEE images. This approach is composed of two components: an image-based phasing component identifying images at optimal cardiac phases for tracking, and a registration component updating the coordinates of MVA points. Preliminary validation has been performed on porcine data with an average difference between manually and automatically identified MVA points of 2.5mm. Using a parallelized implementation, this approach is able to track the mitral valve at up to 10 images per second.

  7. A coupled mitral valve-left ventricle model with fluid-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Feng, Liuyang; Qi, Nan; Berry, Colin; Griffith, Boyce E; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the interaction between the valves and walls of the heart is important in assessing and subsequently treating heart dysfunction. This study presents an integrated model of the mitral valve (MV) coupled to the left ventricle (LV), with the geometry derived from in vivo clinical magnetic resonance images. Numerical simulations using this coupled MV-LV model are developed using an immersed boundary/finite element method. The model incorporates detailed valvular features, left ventricular contraction, nonlinear soft tissue mechanics, and fluid-mediated interactions between the MV and LV wall. We use the model to simulate cardiac function from diastole to systole. Numerically predicted LV pump function agrees well with in vivo data of the imaged healthy volunteer, including the peak aortic flow rate, the systolic ejection duration, and the LV ejection fraction. In vivo MV dynamics are qualitatively captured. We further demonstrate that the diastolic filling pressure increases significantly with impaired myocardial active relaxation to maintain a normal cardiac output. This is consistent with clinical observations. The coupled model has the potential to advance our fundamental knowledge of mechanisms underlying MV-LV interaction, and help in risk stratification and optimisation of therapies for heart diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitral valve prolapse associated with celiac artery stenosis: a new ultrasonographic syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Arcari, Luciano

    2004-01-01

    Background Celiac artery stenosis (CAS) may be caused by atherosclerotic degeneration or compression exerted by the arched ligament of the diaphragm. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most common valvular disorder. There are no reports on an association between CAS and MVP. Methods 1560 (41%) out of 3780 consecutive patients undergoing echocardiographic assessment of MVP, had Doppler sonography of the celiac tract to detect CAS. Results CAS was found in 57 (3.7%) subjects (23 males and 34 females) none of whom complained of symptoms related to visceral ischemia. MVP was observed in 47 (82.4%) subjects with and 118 (7.9%) without CAS (p < 0.001). The agreement between MVP and CAS was 39% (95% CI 32–49%). PSV (Peak Systolic Velocity) was the only predictor of CAS in MPV patients (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.08–0.69) as selected in a multivariate logistic model. Conclusion CAS and MVP seem to be significantly associated in patients undergoing consecutive ultrasonographic screening. PMID:15588321

  9. Clinical characteristics and 12-month outcomes of patients with valvular and non-valvular atrial fibrillation in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Temu, Tecla M; Lane, Kathleen A; Shen, Changyu; Ng'ang'a, Loise; Akwanalo, Constantine O; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Emonyi, Wilfred; Heckbert, Susan R; Koech, Myra M; Manji, Imran; Vatta, Matteo; Velazquez, Eric J; Wessel, Jennifer; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Inui, Thomas S; Bloomfield, Gerald S

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major contributor to the global cardiovascular disease burden. The clinical profile and outcomes of AF patients with valvular heart diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) have not been adequately described. We assessed clinical features and 12-month outcomes of patients with valvular AF (vAF) in comparison to AF patients without valvular heart disease (nvAF) in western Kenya. We performed a cohort study with retrospective data gathering to characterize risk factors and prospective data collection to characterize their hospitalization, stroke and mortality rates. The AF patients included 77 with vAF and 69 with nvAF. The mean (SD) age of vAF and nvAF patients were 37.9(14.5) and 69.4(12.3) years, respectively. There were significant differences (p<0.001) between vAF and nvAF patients with respect to female sex (78% vs. 55%), rates of hypertension (29% vs. 73%) and heart failure (10% vs. 49%). vAF patients were more likely to be taking anticoagulation therapy compared to those with nvAF (97% vs. 76%; p<0.01). After 12-months of follow-up, the overall mortality, hospitalization and stroke rates for vAF patients were high, at 10%, 34% and 5% respectively, and were similar to the rates in the nvAF patients (15%, 36%, and 5%, respectively). Despite younger age and few comorbid conditions, patients with vAF in this developing country setting are at high risk for nonfatal and fatal outcomes, and are in need of interventions to improve short and long-term outcomes.

  10. Acute pericarditis as a complication of percutaneous mitral balloon valvulotomy.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Hasan; Basar, Nurcan; Yasar, Ayse Saatci; Erbay, Ali Riza; Atak, Ramazan

    2006-01-01

    During the past two decades, percutaneous mitral balloon valvulotomy (PMBV) has been frequently used, with high success and low complication rates, in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe rheumatic mitral stenosis. The case is reported of a patient with severe rheumatic mitral stenosis who developed acute pericarditis two days after successful PMBV. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported.

  11. En face view of the mitral valve: definition and acquisition.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Feroze; Warraich, Haider Javed; Shahul, Sajid; Qazi, Aisha; Swaminathan, Madhav; Mackensen, G Burkhard; Panzica, Peter; Maslow, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    A 3-dimensional echocardiographic view of the mitral valve, called the "en face" or "surgical view," presents a view of the mitral valve similar to that seen by the surgeon from a left atrial perspective. Although the anatomical landmarks of this view are well defined, no comprehensive echocardiographic definition has been presented. After reviewing the literature, we provide a definition of the left atrial and left ventricular en face views of the mitral valve. Techniques used to acquire this view are also discussed.

  12. Finite element analysis to model complex mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Labrosse, Michel; Mesana, Thierry; Baxter, Ian; Chan, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Although finite element analysis has been used to model simple mitral repair, it has not been used to model complex repair. A virtual mitral valve model was successful in simulating normal and abnormal valve function. Models were then developed to simulate an edge-to-edge repair and repair employing quadrangular resection. Stress contour plots demonstrated increased stresses along the mitral annulus, corresponding to the annuloplasty. The role of finite element analysis in guiding clinical practice remains undetermined.

  13. Mitral Valve Prolapse or, What to Ignore in Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Fallen, Ernest L.

    1981-01-01

    The presence of an isolated midsystolic click and/or late systolic murmur in an otherwise healthy young individual is a totally benign entity and represents a normal variation of mitral valve motion and function. There exists a very small subset of patients with mitral prolapse easily identified by certain clinical characteristics, who have distinct pathologic changes in their mitral valve leaflets and supporting structures. (Can Fam Physician 1981; 27:631-634). PMID:21289711

  14. Evolution of the concept and practice of mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Rajab, Taufiek K.

    2015-01-01

    The first successful mitral valve repair was performed by Elliot Cutler at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1923. Subsequent evolution in the surgical techniques as well as multi-disciplinary cooperation between cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and cardiac anesthesiologists has resulted in excellent outcomes. In spite of this, the etiology of mitral valve pathology ultimately determines the outcome of mitral valve repair. PMID:26309840

  15. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  16. Mitral and tricuspid valve surgery for Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Ohashi, Takeki; Furui, Masato; Kageyama, Souichirou; Kodani, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Hirai, Yasutaka; Sakakura, Reo

    2015-05-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities, mental retardation, short stature, and hypotonia. An 18-year-old man with morphologic features characteristic of Coffin-Lowry syndrome was referred to our institution for valve disease surgery for worsening cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe mitral valve regurgitation associated with tricuspid valve regurgitation. Mitral valve implantation with a biological valve and tricuspid annular plication with a ring was performed. The ascending aorta was hypoplastic. Both the mitral papillary muscle originating near the mitral annulus and the chordae were shortened. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and his cardiac failure improved.

  17. Chimney technique for mitral valve replacement in children.

    PubMed

    González Rocafort, Álvaro; Aroca, Ángel; Polo, Luz; Rey, Juvenal; Villagrá, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Severe mitral stenosis is unusual in children, but it represents an important challenge for surgeons because of the scarcity of solutions. Several mitral percutaneous and surgical valvuloplasties are performed repetitively to delay mitral valve replacement. Most of the time these procedures show discouraging results. When mitral valve replacement is performed, the annulus may not be large enough to fit a substitute. We present, to our best knowledge, a new technique to implant a large prosthesis in a small annulus without negatively affecting the opening of the leaflets.

  18. Robotic-assisted mitral valve repair: surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Algarni, Khaled D; Suri, Rakesh M; Daly, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Robotic-assisted mitral valve repair represents the least invasive surgical approach currently available for anatomical mitral valve repair in patients with myxomatous mitral valve disease. Standard mitral valve repair techniques utilized during conventional sternotomy/right thoracotomy are exactly replicated with the robotic instrumentation through 1-2 cm port-like incisions with superior 3D visualization. This is performed on cardiopulmonary bypass by peripheral cannulation of the femoral vessels/right internal jugular vein. The ascending aorta is occluded with a transthoracic aortic cross-clamp. Antegrade cardioplegia is delivered centrally into the aortic root through a cardioplegia vent catheter. By replicating conventional mitral valve repair done via an open sternotomy approach, the quality of mitral valve repair is ensured while providing the patients with advantages of less invasive surgery including shorter hospital stay, rapid recovery and return to normal activities, less blood transfusion, superior cosmesis and complete elimination of sternotomy-related morbidities such as deep sternal wound infection and sternal dehiscence. We reviewed the first consecutive 200 patients undergoing robotic mitral valve repair at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 24 January 2008 and 28 January 2011. Successful mitral valve repair was completed in all patients. There were no early (30-day) deaths. One patient suffered a stroke (0.5%). One patient required reoperation for bleeding (0.5%). Two patients (1%) required reoperation for recurrent mitral regurgitation. Twelve patients (6%) required transfusion of allogeneic blood products. We have noted a significant reduction in operative times and resource utilization over time.

  19. Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Therapies: Evolution, Status and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Daniella; Onohara, Daisuke; Kalra, Kanika; Sarin, Eric L; Padala, Muralidhar

    2017-02-01

    Mitral regurgitation is a common cardiac valve lesion, developing from primary lesions of the mitral valve or secondary to cardiomyopathies. Moderate or higher severity of mitral regurgitation imposes significant volume overload on the left ventricle, causing permanent structural and functional deterioration of the myocardium and heart failure. Timely correction of regurgitation is essential to preserve cardiac function, but surgical mitral valve repair is often delayed due to the risks of open heart surgery. Since correction of mitral regurgitation can provide symptomatic relief and halt progressive cardiac dysfunction, transcatheter mitral valve repair technologies are emerging as alternative therapies. In this approach, the mitral valve is repaired either with sutures or implants that are delivered to the native valve on catheters introduced into the cardiovascular system under image guidance, through small vascular or ventricular ports. Several transcatheter mitral valve technologies are in development, but limited clinical success has been achieved. In this review, we present a historical perspective of mitral valve repair, review the transcatheter technologies emerging from surgical concepts, the challenges they face in achieving successful clinical application, and the increasing rigor of safety and durability standards for new transcatheter valve technologies.

  20. [Totally robotic mitral valve surgery in 60 cases].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Gao, Chang-qing; Wang, Gang; Wang, Jia-li; Xiao, Cang-song; Wu, Yang

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of robotic mitral valve surgery using da Vinci S system. We conducted a retrospective review of 60 robotic mitral surgeries from March 2007 to December 2010. Of the 60 patients, 44 underwent mitral valve repair and 16 received mitral valve replacement. The surgical approach was through 4 right chest ports with femoral and internal jugular vein cannulations. Transesophageal echocardiography was used intraoperatively to estimate the surgical results. None of the cases required a conversion to a median sternotomy. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass and cardiac arrest time was 132.2∓29.6 min and 88.1∓22.3 min for robotic mitral valve repair, and was 137.1∓21.9 min and 99.3∓17.4 min for robotic mitral valve replacement. Echocardiographic follow-up of all the patients revealed 3 cases of slight regurgitation in mitral valve repair group. In selected patients with mitral valve disease, robotic mitral surgery can be performed safely.

  1. Peri-procedural imaging for transcatheter mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Navin; Patel, Parag; Bartel, Thomas; Kapadia, Samir; Navia, Jose; Stewart, William; Tuzcu, E. Murat

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) has a high prevalence in older patient populations of industrialized nations. Common etiologies are structural, degenerative MR and functional MR secondary to myocardial remodeling. Because of co-morbidities and associated high surgical risk, open surgical mitral repair/replacement is deferred in a significant percentage of patients. For these patients transcatheter repair/replacement are emerging as treatment options. Because of the lack of direct visualization, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for these procedures. In this review, we summarize mitral valve anatomy, trans-catheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) options, and imaging in the context of TMVR. PMID:27054104

  2. Effect of the mitral valve on diastolic flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Dawoud, Fady; Luo, Hongchang; Lardo, Albert C.

    2014-12-15

    The leaflets of the mitral valve interact with the mitral jet and significantly impact diastolic flow patterns, but the effect of mitral valve morphology and kinematics on diastolic flow and its implications for left ventricular function have not been clearly delineated. In the present study, we employ computational hemodynamic simulations to understand the effect of mitral valve leaflets on diastolic flow. A computational model of the left ventricle is constructed based on a high-resolution contrast computed-tomography scan, and a physiological inspired model of the mitral valve leaflets is synthesized from morphological and echocardiographic data. Simulations are performed with a diode type valve model as well as the physiological mitral valve model in order to delineate the effect of mitral-valve leaflets on the intraventricular flow. The study suggests that a normal physiological mitral valve promotes the formation of a circulatory (or “looped”) flow pattern in the ventricle. The mitral valve leaflets also increase the strength of the apical flow, thereby enhancing apical washout and mixing of ventricular blood. The implications of these findings on ventricular function as well as ventricular flow models are discussed.

  3. Mitral Regurgitation after Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvotomy in Patients with Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Aslanabadi, Naser; Toufan, Mehrnoush; Salehi, Rezvaneyeh; Alizadehasl, Azin; Ghaffari, Samad; Sohrabi, Bahram; Separham, Ahmad; Manafi, Ataolaah; Mehdizadeh, Mohammad Bagher; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) is the gold standard treatment for rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS) in that it causes significant changes in mitral valve area (MVA) and improves leaflet mobility. Development of or increase in mitral regurgitation (MR) is common after BMV. This study evaluated MR severity and its changes after BMV in Iranian patients. Methods: We prospectively evaluated consecutive patients with severe rheumatic MS undergoing BMV using the Inoue balloon technique between February 2010 and January 2013 in Madani Heart Center, Tabriz, Iran. New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class and echocardiographic and catheterization data, including MVA, mitral valve mean and peak gradient (MVPG and MVMG), left atrial (LA) pressure, pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PAPs), and MR severity before and after BMV, were evaluated. Results: Totally, 105 patients (80% female) at a mean age of 45.81 ± 13.37 years were enrolled. NYHA class was significantly improved after BMV: 55.2% of the patients were in NYHA functional class III before BMV compared to 36.2% after the procedure (p value < 0.001). MVA significantly increased (mean area = 0.64 ± 0.29 cm2 before BMV vs. 1.90 ± 0.22 cm2 after BMV; p value < 0.001) and PAPs, LA pressure, MVPG, and MVMG significantly decreased. MR severity did not change in 82 (78.1%) patients, but it increased in 18 (17.1%) and decreased in 5 (4.8%) patients. Patients with increased MR had a significantly higher calcification score (2.03 ± 0.53 vs.1.50 ± 0.51; p value < 0.001) and lower MVA before BMV (0.81 ± 0.23 vs.0.94 ± 0.18; p value = 0.010). There were no major complications. Conclusion: In our study, BMV had excellent immediate hemodynamic and clinical results inasmuch as MR severity increased only in some patients and, interestingly, decreased in a few. Our results, underscore BMV efficacy in severe MS. The echocardiographic calcification score was useful for identifying patients

  4. Mitral regurgitation after percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis: a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Aslanabadi, Naser; Toufan, Mehrnoush; Salehi, Rezvaneyeh; Alizadehasl, Azin; Ghaffari, Samad; Sohrabi, Bahram; Separham, Ahmad; Manafi, Ataolaah; Mehdizadeh, Mohammad Bagher; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) is the gold standard treatment for rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS) in that it causes significant changes in mitral valve area (MVA) and improves leaflet mobility. Development of or increase in mitral regurgitation (MR) is common after BMV. This study evaluated MR severity and its changes after BMV in Iranian patients. We prospectively evaluated consecutive patients with severe rheumatic MS undergoing BMV using the Inoue balloon technique between February 2010 and January 2013 in Madani Heart Center, Tabriz, Iran. New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class and echocardiographic and catheterization data, including MVA, mitral valve mean and peak gradient (MVPG and MVMG), left atrial (LA) pressure, pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PAPs), and MR severity before and after BMV, were evaluated. Totally, 105 patients (80% female) at a mean age of 45.81 ± 13.37 years were enrolled. NYHA class was significantly improved after BMV: 55.2% of the patients were in NYHA functional class III before BMV compared to 36.2% after the procedure (p value < 0.001). MVA significantly increased (mean area = 0.64 ± 0.29 cm(2) before BMV vs. 1.90 ± 0.22 cm(2) after BMV; p value < 0.001) and PAPs, LA pressure, MVPG, and MVMG significantly decreased. MR severity did not change in 82 (78.1%) patients, but it increased in 18 (17.1%) and decreased in 5 (4.8%) patients. Patients with increased MR had a significantly higher calcification score (2.03 ± 0.53 vs.1.50 ± 0.51; p value < 0.001) and lower MVA before BMV (0.81 ± 0.23 vs.0.94 ± 0.18; p value = 0.010). There were no major complications. In our study, BMV had excellent immediate hemodynamic and clinical results inasmuch as MR severity increased only in some patients and, interestingly, decreased in a few. Our results, underscore BMV efficacy in severe MS. The echocardiographic calcification score was useful for identifying patients likely to have MR development or MR increase after

  5. Aortic calcified particles modulate valvular endothelial and interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    van Engeland, Nicole C A; Bertazzo, Sergio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; McCormack, Ann; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Yacoub, Magdi H; Chester, Adrian H; Latif, Najma

    Normal and calcified human valve cusps, coronary arteries, and aortae harbor spherical calcium phosphate microparticles of identical composition and crystallinity, and their role remains unknown. The objective was to examine the direct effects of isolated calcified particles on human valvular cells. Calcified particles were isolated from healthy and diseased aortae, characterized, quantitated, and applied to valvular endothelial cells (VECs) and interstitial cells (VICs). Cell differentiation, viability, and proliferation were analyzed. Particles were heterogeneous, differing in size and shape, and were crystallized as calcium phosphate. Diseased donors had significantly more calcified particles compared to healthy donors (P<.05), but there were no differences between the composition of the particles from healthy and diseased donors. VECs treated with calcified particles showed a significant decrease in CD31 and VE-cadherin and an increase in von Willebrand factor expression, P<.05. There were significantly increased α-SMA and osteopontin in treated VICs (P<.05), significantly decreased VEC and VIC viability (P<.05), and significantly increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive VECs (P<.05) indicating apoptosis when treated with the calcified particles. Isolated calcified particles from human aortae are not innocent bystanders but induce a phenotypical and pathological change of VECs and VICs characteristic of activated and pathological cells. Therapy tailored to reduce these calcified particles should be investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease. PMID:27347228

  7. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease.

  8. Etiology of valvular heart disease-genetic and developmental origins.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Joy; Garg, Vidu

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease occurs as either a congenital or acquired condition and advances in medical care have resulted in valve disease becoming increasingly prevalent. Unfortunately, treatments remain inadequate because of our limited understanding of the genetic and molecular etiology of diseases affecting the heart valves. Therefore, surgical repair or replacement remains the most effective option, which comes with additional complications and no guarantee of life-long success. Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of cardiac valve development and, not surprisingly, mutations in these developmental genes have been identified in humans with congenital valve malformations. Concurrently, there has been a greater realization that acquired valve disease is not simply a degenerative process. Molecular investigation of acquired valve disease has identified that numerous signaling pathways critical for normal valve development are re-expressed in diseased valves. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the development of the heart valves, as well as the implications of these findings on the genetics of congenital and acquired valvular heart disease.

  9. Staphylococcus caprae native mitral valve infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Poyner, Jennifer; Olson, Ewan; Henriksen, Peter; Koch, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus caprae is a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Here, we report a case involving the native mitral valve in the absence of an implantable cardiac electronic device. Case presentation: A 76-year-old man presented with a 2 week history of confusion and pyrexia. His past medical history included an open reduction and internal fixation of a humeral fracture 17 years previously, which remained non-united despite further revision 4 years later. There was no history of immunocompromise or farm-animal contact. Two sets of blood culture bottles, more than 12 h apart, were positive for S. caprae. Trans-thoracic echocardiography revealed a 1×1.2 cm vegetation on the mitral valve, with moderate mitral regurgitation. Due to ongoing confusion, he had a magnetic resonance imaging brain scan, which showed a subacute small vessel infarct consistent with a thromboembolic source. A humeral SPECT-CT (single-photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography) scan showed no clear evidence of acute osteomyelitis. Surgical vegetectomy and mitral-valve repair were considered to reduce the risk of further systemic embolism and progressive valve infection. However, the potential risks of surgery to this patient led to a decision to pursue a cure with antibiotic therapy alone. He remained well 3 months after discharge, with repeat echocardiography demonstrating a reduction in the size of the vegetation (0.9 cm). Conclusion: Management of this infection was challenging due to its rarity and its unclear progression, complicated by the dilemma surrounding surgical intervention in a patient with a complex medical background. PMID:28348787

  10. Preservation versus non-preservation of mitral valve apparatus during mitral valve replacement: a meta-analysis of 3835 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; Ferraz, Paulo Ernando; Escobar, Rodrigo Renda; Martins, Wendell Santos; de Araújo e Sá, Frederico Browne Correia; Lustosa, Pablo César; Vasconcelos, Frederico Pires; Lima, Ricardo Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Resection of the chordopapillary apparatus during mitral valve replacement has been associated with a negative impact on survival. Mitral valve replacement with the preservation of the mitral valve apparatus has been associated with better outcomes, but surgeons remain refractory to its use. To determine if there is any real difference in preservation vs non-preservation of mitral valve apparatus during mitral valve replacement in terms of outcomes, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL/CCTR, SciELO, LILACS, Google Scholar and reference lists of relevant articles to search for clinical studies that compared outcomes (30-day mortality, postoperative low cardiac output syndrome or 5-year mortality) between preservation vs non-preservation during mitral valve replacement from 1966 to 2011. The principal summary measures were odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval and P-values (that will be considered statistically significant when <0.05). The ORs were combined across studies using a weighted DerSimonian–Laird random-effects model. The meta-analysis was completed using the software Comprehensive Meta-Analysis version 2 (Biostat Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). Twenty studies (3 randomized and 17 non-randomized) were identified and included a total of 3835 patients (1918 for mitral valve replacement preservation and 1917 for mitral valve replacement non-preservation). There was significant difference between mitral valve replacement preservation and mitral valve replacement non-preservation groups in the risk of 30-day mortality (OR 0.418, P <0.001), postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (OR 0.299, P <0.001) or 5-year mortality (OR 0.380, P <0.001). No publication bias or important heterogeneity of effects on any outcome was observed. In conclusion, we found evidence that argues in favour of the preservation of mitral valve apparatus during mitral valve replacement. PMID:23027596

  11. Nonresectional Single-Suture Leaflet Remodeling for Degenerative Mitral Regurgitation Facilitates Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, John W.; Cohen, Jeffrey E.; Goldstone, Andrew B.; Fairman, Alexander S.; Edwards, Bryan B.; Hornick, Matthew A.; Atluri, Pavan; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Both leaflet resection and neochordal construction are effective mitral repair techniques, but they may become incrementally time-consuming when using minimally invasive approaches. We have used a single-suture leaflet-remodeling technique of inverting the prolapsed or flail segment tissue into the left ventricle. This repair is straightforward, expeditious, and facilitates a minimally invasive approach. Methods Ninety-nine patients with degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) underwent a minimally invasive single-suture repair of the mitral valve from May 2007 through December 2012. Preoperative and perioperative echocardiograms as well as patient outcomes were analyzed and compared with those obtained from patients undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve repair using quadrangular resection at the same institution during the same period. Results All 99 patients had a successful mitral repair through a sternal-sparing minimally invasive approach. Ninety-one of the 99 patients had zero MR on postoperative echocardiogram, and 8 of 99 had trace to mild MR. Patients in the nonresectional group had significantly shorter cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp times compared with the quadrangular resection group (115.8 ± 41.7 minutes versus 144.9 ± 38.2 minutes; p < 0.001; 76.2 ± 28.1 minutes versus 112.6 ± 33.5 minutes; p < 0.001, respectively). The mean length of stay was 7.5 ± 3 days. All patients were discharged alive and free from clinical symptoms of MR. There have been no reoperations for recurrent MR on subsequent average follow-up of 1 year. Conclusions An effective, highly efficient, and thus far durable single-suture mitral leaflet-remodeling technique facilitates minimally invasive repair of degenerative MR. PMID:23932318

  12. Robotic Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement Using the Sapien XT in the Setting of Severe Mitral Annular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Koeckert, Michael S; Loulmet, Didier F; Williams, Mathew R; Neuburger, Peter J; Grossi, Eugene A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the use of the Sapien XT, placed in the mitral position using a totally endoscopic robotic approach in a 76-year-old man with extensive circumferential mitral calcifications and severe stenosis. The patient was at high risk for traditional open surgery and a large mitral valve annulus prevented safe transcatheter deployment due to size mismatch. Our novel approach offered a minimally invasive technique for native mitral valve replacement in a high-risk patient with anatomical constraints prohibitive to conventional approaches. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12737 (J Card Surg 2016;31:303-305). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [A case of death due to mitral regurgitation caused by traumatic mitral valve injury].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Y; Kojima, T; Yasui, W; Nagasawa, N; Yashiki, M

    1996-06-01

    A 51-year-old male, who had been driving a motor bicycle, was involved in a traffic accident with a trailer, and he died immediately after the accident. According to the external examination of the victim, no fatal injuries were found. The medico-legal autopsy revealed a rupture of the left side of the pericardium, and a tear of the posterior leaflet of the mitral valve. There were no injuries of the papillary muscles and chordae. The cause of death was due to traumatic mitral regurgitation.

  14. Impact of mitral valve geometry on hemodynamic efficacy of surgical repair in secondary mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Padala, Muralidhar; Gyoneva, Lazarina I; Thourani, Vinod H; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve geometry is significantly altered secondary to left ventricular remodeling in non-ischemic and ischemic dilated cardiomyopathies. Since the extent of remodeling and asymmetry of dilatation of the ventricle differ significantly between individual patients, the valve geometry and tethering also differ. The study aim was to determine if mitral valve geometry has an impact on the efficacy of surgical repairs to eliminate regurgitation and restore valve closure in a validated experimental model. Porcine mitral valves (n = 8) were studied in a pulsatile heart simulator, in which the mitral valve geometry can be precisely altered and controlled throughout the experiment. Baseline hemodynamics for each valve were measured (Control), and the valves were tethered in two distinct ways: annular dilatation with 7 mm apical papillary muscle (PM) displacement (Tether 1, symmetric), and annular dilatation with 7 mm apical, 7 mm posterior and 7 mm lateral PM displacement (Tether 2, asymmetric). Mitral annuloplasty was performed on each valve (Annular Repair), succeeded by anterior leaflet secondary chordal cutting (Sub-annular Repair). The efficacy of each repair in the setting of a given valve geometry was quantified by measuring the changes in mitral regurgitation (MR), leaflet coaptation length, tethering height and area. At baseline, none of the valves was regurgitant. Significant leaflet tethering was measured in Tether 2 over Tether 1, but both groups were significantly higher compared to baseline (60.9 +/- 31 mm2 for Control versus 129.7 +/- 28.4 mm2 for Tether 1 versus 186.4 +/- 36.3 mm2 for Tether 2). Consequently, the MR fraction was higher in Tether 2 group (23.0 +/- 5.7%) than in Tether 1 (10.5 +/- 5.5%). Mitral annuloplasty reduced MR in both groups, but remnant regurgitation after the repair was higher in Tether 2. After chordal cutting a similar trend was observed with trace regurgitation in Tether 1 group at 3.6 +/- 2.8%, in comparison to 18.6 +/- 4

  15. ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease Position Paper: assessing the risk of interventions in patients with valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenhek, Raphael; Iung, Bernard; Tornos, Pilar; Antunes, Manuel J.; Prendergast, Bernard D.; Otto, Catherine M.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Stepinska, Janina; Kaden, Jens J.; Naber, Christoph K.; Acartürk, Esmeray; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    Aims Risk scores provide an important contribution to clinical decision-making, but their validity has been questioned in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), since current scores have been mainly derived and validated in adults undergoing coronary bypass surgery. The Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology reviewed the performance of currently available scores when applied to VHD, in order to guide clinical practice and future development of new scores. Methods and results The most widely used risk scores (EuroSCORE, STS, and Ambler score) were reviewed, analysing variables included and their predictive ability when applied to patients with VHD. These scores provide relatively good discrimination, i.e. a gross estimation of risk category, but cannot be used to estimate the exact operative mortality in an individual patient because of unsatisfactory calibration. Conclusion Current risk scores do not provide a reliable estimate of exact operative mortality in an individual patient with VHD. They should therefore be interpreted with caution and only used as part of an integrated approach, which incorporates other patient characteristics, the clinical context, and local outcome data. Future risk scores should include additional variables, such as cognitive and functional capacity and be prospectively validated in high-risk patients. Specific risk models should also be developed for newer interventions, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:21406443

  16. Echocardiographic evaluation of mitral stenosis using diastolic posterior left ventricular wall motion.

    PubMed

    Wise, J R

    1980-05-01

    The slope of the posterior left ventricular wall motion in diastole (LVDS) was determined by echocardiography in 25 normal subjects and 21 patients with mitral stenosis. Patients with mitral stenosis had reduced LVDS that was related to the degree of mitral stenosis determined by calculated mitral valve area (r = 0.92). The mitral valve area correlated more closely with the LVDS than with the left atrial emptying index derived from the posterior aortic wall motion. Three patients with mitral stenosis had an increased LVDS after mitral valvotomy or mitral valve replacement. One patient with a stenotic mitral valve prosthesis had reduced LVDS. The results of this study suggest that analysis of the LVDS would be useful in predicting the severity of mitral stenosis and may be beneficial in evaluating patients with suspected prosthetic mitral valve malfunction.

  17. [Long-term results of mitral percutaneous valvuloplasty with Inoue technique. Seven-years experience at the Cardiology Hospital of the National Medical Center "Siglo XXI", IMSS].

    PubMed

    Flores Flores, Jesús; Ledesma Velasco, Mariano; Palomo Villada, José Antonio; Montoya Guerrero, Silvestre; Estrada Gallegos, Joel; Astudillo Sandoval, Raúl; Abundes Velasco, Arturo; González Díaz, Belinda; Argüero Sánchez, Rubén; Farell Campa, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Since the last decade, percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty with Inoue catheter is considered the treatment of choice for selected patients (mobile valve, no calcification and minimal subvalvular disease) with rheumatic mitral stenosis. We present the seven-year follow-up experience of 456 patients treated with this technique in the catheter laboratory of the Cardiology Hospital in National Medical Center SXXI. It is a retrospective, transversal and observational study performed with data obtained from January 1994 and December 2000, with a follow-up of 58.5 +/- 26.6 months (range 12-96 mean 22). We achieve an initial success of 82.8%, improvement of initial mitral valve area from 0.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.8 +/- 0.3 cm2, with a gain area from 88 to 106% (p < or = 0.001). At the end of the follow-up, the mean valvular area was maintained in 1.7 +/- 0.3 cm2 in 69.8% of the cases. We found a significant reduction of transmitral gradient and of the pulmonary artery systolic pressure immediately after the procedure; 93.1% of patients were in NYHA functional class II at the end of the follow-up, 11.6% presented complications (mitral regurgitation as the most important), in 15.9% of them, due to leaflet rupture, but only 9.1% corresponded to severe grade Ill-IV. Only one patient died due to septal perforation; 93.8% of the patients remained free of major cardiac events at the end of the study. Only 6.1% of the patients required surgery at the end of the follow-up; 5.5% were in functional class NYHA Ill-IV and restenosis occurred in 14.6%. Percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty with Inoue balloon catheter is a safe and effective technique for treating rheumatic mitral stenosis with Wilkins score < 10, with minimal risk and complications and offers good life expectancy with absence of major cardiac events in > 90%. From these patients, 93.1% remained in NYHA-II or -I functional class and the incidence of restenosis decreased.

  18. Close association of vascular and valvular calcification and prognosis of patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Gen, Shikou; Inoue, Tsutomu; Nodaira, Yuka; Ikeda, Naofumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Nakamoto, Hidetomo; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the association between vascular and valvular calcification and the prognosis of patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Data were collected from the records of patients introduced onto CAPD therapy during 1999 - 2006 at the Department of Nephrology, Saitama Medical University. At the start of CAPD, cardiac and vascular echography were used to examine 162 patients (average age: 56 +/- 5 years; 58 men, 104 women; 43 with and 119 without diabetes) for evaluation of vascular and valvular calcification. Both vascular and valvular calcification were found in 32 patients. Vascular calcification was found in 16, and valvular calcification in 11. Over 5 years, 11 patients suffered from cardiovascular disease (7 with stroke, 4 with myocardial infarction). All of these patients had vascular or valvular calcification at the start of CAPD therapy. We also used Cox hazard analysis to examine values for Ca, P, Ca x P, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and lipids. None of these values were independent contributory factors for incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients on CAPD. These data suggest the importance of vascular and valvular echography to evaluate patients on CAPD, especially at the start of CAPD therapy. Vascular and valvular calcification are important factors for determining the prognosis of patients on CAPD.

  19. Assessment of Valvular Disorders in Survivors of Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated by Mediastinal Radiotherapy ± Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bijl, Jesse M; Roos, Marleen M; van Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M; Vos, Josephine M; Bos, Willem-Jan W; Biesma, Douwe H; Post, Marco C

    2016-02-15

    As the number of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) survivors grows, understanding long-term complications becomes more important. Mediastinal radiotherapy (MRT) seems to cause valvular disease, and the prevalence might increase during follow-up. In this cross-sectional study 82 HL survivors participated (52% men, mean age 47.8 years, 50 treated with MRT). Valvular disease was diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and compared between HL survivors treated with and without MRT. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors for valvular disease. During a median follow-up of 13.4 years (range 2 to 39 years), ≥ mild valvular disease was present in 61.2% of HL survivors with MRT (n = 30), compared with 31.0% of HL survivors without MRT (n = 9; odds ratio [OR] 3.51, 95% CI 1.32 to 9.30, p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, only current age remained predictive for ≥ mild valvular disease (OR 1.08 per year, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.14, p = 0.023). Aortic regurgitation (AR) was most prevalent and irradiated patients had significantly more ≥ mild AR (38.2% vs 6.8%, p = 0.007). Within the MRT subgroup, time after radiation of >15 years was associated with AR (OR 4.70, 95% CI 1.05 to 21.03, p = 0.043), after adjusting for current age and hypertension. Severe valvular disease was present in 24.5% of HL survivors with MRT compared with 3.4% without MRT (p = 0.016). Valvular surgery was performed in 9 HL survivors (18.0%) with MRT and in none without MRT. In conclusion, the prevalence of valvular disease in HL survivors treated with MRT is high and increases with time after irradiation. Long-time screening for valvular disease by transthoracic echocardiography might be worthwhile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional Mitral Regurgitation: Appraising the Evidence Behind Recommended Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Samad, Zainab; Velazquez, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most common type of MR encountered in clinical practice. Because the disease arises from the ventricular aspect of the mitral valve apparatus, treatment therapies are less defined and outcomes are poor. In this review, the state of evidence for medical and surgical therapy in functional MR is appraised. Future directions for research in this area are also defined.

  1. Single-Suture Neochorda-Folding Plasty for Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Myung; Je, Hyung Gon; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    The single-suture neochorda-folding plasty technique is a modification of existing mitral valve repair techniques. In the authors’ experience, its simplicity, reliability, and versatility make it a useful technique for mitral valve repair, especially when a minimally invasive approach is used. PMID:26889453

  2. Echocardiography in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Mitral Valve Clip

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huai

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and transcatheter mitral valve repair (MitraClip) procedures have been performed worldwide. In this paper, we review the use of two-dimensional and three-dimensional transesophageal echo for guiding transcatheter aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair. PMID:23019387

  3. Clinical Applications of Natriuretic Peptides in Assessment of Valvular Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhishek; Ahmed, Vaseem; Garg, Aakash; Aggarwal, Chirag

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers such as natriuretic peptides (NPs) have evolving clinical utility beyond the scope of heart failure. The role of NPs in the management of valvular heart disease is a growing area of investigation. NPs have much potential in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with hemodynamically significant valvular lesions who have traditionally been excluded from consideration of surgical intervention. NPs also have a role in the risk stratification of these patients as well as in routine surveillance and monitoring. Together with echocardiographic data and functional status, NPs are being incorporated into the management of valvular heart disease. In this review we examine the evidence for the role of natriuretic peptides in assessment of VHD.

  4. Aortic Valvular Replacement: Clinical Experience With 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Pierre; Lepage, Gilles; Castonguay, Yves

    1964-01-01

    Acquired aortic disease is now currently corrected by total prosthetic replacement of the aortic valve. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 13 cases at the Montreal Heart Institute in 1963. In the first four cases, Bahnson aortic leaflets were used; in the remaining nine, the Starr-Edwards semirigid aortic valve prosthesis. The surgical technique employed is described. There were two operative deaths and two late deaths. The results have been excellent in all of the survivors but one. They have returned to full-time activities and four of them to strenuous physical work. It is the contention of the authors that aortic valve replacement is a surgical procedure with acceptable risks, offering hope for a near-normal life to patients crippled by severe aortic valvular lesions. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:14179061

  5. Mitral-valve repair versus replacement for severe ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Acker, Michael A; Parides, Michael K; Perrault, Louis P; Moskowitz, Alan J; Gelijns, Annetine C; Voisine, Pierre; Smith, Peter K; Hung, Judy W; Blackstone, Eugene H; Puskas, John D; Argenziano, Michael; Gammie, James S; Mack, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G; Ferguson, T Bruce; Horvath, Keith A; Geller, Nancy L; Miller, Marissa A; Woo, Y Joseph; D'Alessandro, David A; Ailawadi, Gorav; Dagenais, Francois; Gardner, Timothy J; O'Gara, Patrick T; Michler, Robert E; Kron, Irving L

    2014-01-02

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation is associated with a substantial risk of death. Practice guidelines recommend surgery for patients with a severe form of this condition but acknowledge that the supporting evidence for repair or replacement is limited. We randomly assigned 251 patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation to undergo either mitral-valve repair or chordal-sparing replacement in order to evaluate efficacy and safety. The primary end point was the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) at 12 months, as assessed with the use of a Wilcoxon rank-sum test in which deaths were categorized below the lowest LVESVI rank. At 12 months, the mean LVESVI among surviving patients was 54.6±25.0 ml per square meter of body-surface area in the repair group and 60.7±31.5 ml per square meter in the replacement group (mean change from baseline, -6.6 and -6.8 ml per square meter, respectively). The rate of death was 14.3% in the repair group and 17.6% in the replacement group (hazard ratio with repair, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 1.47; P=0.45 by the log-rank test). There was no significant between-group difference in LVESVI after adjustment for death (z score, 1.33; P=0.18). The rate of moderate or severe recurrence of mitral regurgitation at 12 months was higher in the repair group than in the replacement group (32.6% vs. 2.3%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in the rate of a composite of major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events, in functional status, or in quality of life at 12 months. We observed no significant difference in left ventricular reverse remodeling or survival at 12 months between patients who underwent mitral-valve repair and those who underwent mitral-valve replacement. Replacement provided a more durable correction of mitral regurgitation, but there was no significant between-group difference in clinical outcomes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Canadian Institutes of

  6. A Rare Case of Mitral Valve Prolapse in Endomyocardial Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Joseph; Haranal, Maruti Yamanappa; Reddy, Shashidhar Ranga; Suryaprakash, Sharadaprasad

    2016-09-01

    Mitral valve prolapse in endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) is an unusual entity. Literature search reveals only 1 report of mitral valve prolapse assosiated with EMF. A 32-year-old woman, of African origin, who presented with features of right heart failure, was diagnosed to have mitral valve prolapse of rheumatic origin with severe mitral regurgitation and severe pulmonary hypertension (PAH). Intraoperative findings lead to the diagnosis of EMF. We report this rare case of mitral valve prolapse in EMF, in a geographical area where rheumatic heart disease is endemic, to showcase how a rare manifestation of EMF can be misdiagnosed as that of rheumatic heart disease. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple purpose simulator using a natural porcine mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Arita, Makoto; Tono, Sumihiro; Kasegawa, Hitoshi; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2004-12-01

    An in vitro pulsatile simulator with a porcine mitral valve was developed in order to simulate physiologic and diseased mitral valve conditions. Evaluation of these conditions was conducted from a hydrodynamic and annulus behavior point of view. We found it possible to simulate mild "mitral valve prolapse" and to obtain quantitative data related to the condition. The diseased condition produced a 40% greater regurgitant volume than that observed under the normal condition (p < 0.0001). Regarding the leakage volume, the diseased condition exhibited about 2.6 times more leakage than the normal condition. The mitral valve simulator proposed in this study is considered fairly stable with respect to both hemodynamics and the behavior of the annulus, and it is an adequate simulator for modeling various types of normal and diseased mitral valve conditions.

  8. Percutaneous mitral valve repair with MitraClip.

    PubMed

    Cilingiroğlu, Mehmet; Salinger, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Over the last decade, several technologies have been developed for percutaneous repair of the mitral valve for patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) and at high-risk for the traditional open-heart mitral valve repair or replacement. Among them, MitraClip has emerged as the only clinically safe and effective method for percutaneous mitral valve repair. It is adapted from the surgical technique that was initially described by Dr. Alfieri and his group by placement of a suture approximating the edges of the mitral leaflets at the origin of the MR jet, leading to creation of so-called bow-tie or double orifice with significant reduction in the MR jet. Here, we review the details of the technology, its procedural perspective as well as currently available data for its safety and effectiveness on a case-based report.

  9. Congenital mitral valve lesions : Correlation between morphology and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Remenyi, Bo; Gentles, Tom L

    2012-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the mitral valve are often complex and affect multiple segments of the valve apparatus. They may occur in isolation or in association with other congenital heart defects. The majority of mitral valve malformations are not simply classified, and descriptive terms with historical significance (parachute, mitral, or arcade) often lack the specificity that cardiac surgeons demand as part of preoperative echocardiographic morphological assessment. This paper examines the strengths and limitations of commonly used descriptions and classification systems of congenitally malformed mitral valves. It correlates pathological, surgical, and echocardiographic findings. Finally, it makes recommendations for the systematic evaluation of the congenitally malformed mitral valve using segmental echocardiographic analysis to assist precise communication and optimal surgical management. PMID:22529594

  10. Substrate Properties Influence Calcification in Valvular Interstitial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Julie A.; Kern, Hanna B.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aim of the study Valvular calcification is an active, cell-mediated process and results in significant morbidity and mortality. In standard culture, valvular interstitial cells (VICs) elicit significant calcification as a result of myofibroblast activation, and this limits the utility of these models to characterize VICs. In the work presented herein, we sought to investigate culturing substrates that suppress atypical VIC calcification and investigate culture substrates that represent a more physiological system. Methods Several culture platforms were selected to compare and contrast the influence of biochemical and mechanical properties on VIC calcification. Substrates investigated include: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), TCPS coated with either fibronectin or fibrin, and an elastic poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel with the same proteins coupled to the surface. Experiments were repeated with pro-fibrotic growth factor transforming growth factor- beta 1 (TGF-β1). VIC calcification was characterized by calcific nodule formation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and calcium accumulation. Gene and protein expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and core binding factor-1 (CBFa-1) were analyzed with qRT-PCR and immunostaining. Results Unmodified TCPS substrates had an innate ability to promote the markers of calcification studied. The addition of TGF-β1 enhanced all the levels of all osteoblastic markers studied. When TCPS surfaces were modified with fibronectin, all markers for calcification were repressed. However αSMA, a marker for myofibroblastic activity, was unchanged. Meanwhile fibrin modified TCPS surfaces enhanced calcification over unmodified TCPS substrates. On the soft PEG hydrogels, all markers for calcification were repressed regardless of the surface chemistry, while αSMA expression remained unaffected. Conclusions Collectively, VIC properties are highly linked to the culture microenvironment. Both the biochemical and

  11. Substrate properties influence calcification in valvular interstitial cell culture.

    PubMed

    Benton, Julie A; Kern, Hanna B; Anseth, Kristi S

    2008-11-01

    Valvular calcification is an active, cell-mediated process that results in significant morbidity and mortality. In standard culture, valvular interstitial cells (VICs) elicit significant calcification as a result of myofibroblast activation, and this limits their use in characterization studies. The study aim was to identify culturing substrates that would suppress atypical VIC calcification, and to investigate culture substrates representing a more physiological system. Several culture platforms were selected to compare and contrast the influence of biochemical and mechanical properties on VIC calcification. Substrates investigated included: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), TCPS coated with either fibronectin or fibrin, and an elastic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel, also with fibronectin or fibrin coupled to the surface. Experiments were repeated with profibrotic growth factor transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). VIC calcification was characterized by calcific nodule formation, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium accumulation. Gene and protein expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (aSMA) and core binding factor-1 (CBFa-1) were analyzed with qRT-PCR and immunostaining. Unmodified TCPS substrates had an innate ability to promote the markers of calcification studied. The addition of TGF-beta1 enhanced levels of all osteoblastic markers studied. When TCPS surfaces were modified with fibronectin, all markers for calcification were repressed, but alphaSMA - a marker for myofibroblastic activity was unchanged. Meanwhile, fibrin-modified TCPS surfaces enhanced calcification over unmodified TCPS substrates. On soft PEG hydrogels, all markers for calcification were repressed, regardless of the surface chemistry, while alphaSMA expression remained unaffected. Collectively, VIC properties are highly linked to the culture microenvironment. Both, the biochemical and mechanical environment of tissue culture has an effect on the spontaneous calcification

  12. Surface Chemistry Regulates Valvular Interstitial Cell Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Matthew N.; Coombs, Kent E.; Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    The primary driver for valvular calcification is the differentiation of valvular interstitial cells (VICs) into a diseased phenotype. However, the factors leading to the onset of osteoblastic-like VICs (obVICs) and resulting calcification are not fully understood. This study isolates the effect of substrate surface chemistry on in vitro VIC differentiation and calcified tissue formation. Using ω-functionalized alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold [CH3 (hydrophobic), OH (hydrophilic), COOH (COO−, negative at physiological pH), and NH2 (NH3+, positive at physiological pH)], we have demonstrated that surface chemistry modulates VIC phenotype and calcified tissue deposition independent of osteoblastic-inducing media additives. Over seven days VICs exhibited surface-dependent differences in cell proliferation (COO− = NH3+> OH > CH3), morphology, and osteoblastic potential. Both NH3+and CH3-terminated SAMs promoted calcified tissue formation while COO−-terminated SAMs showed no calcification. VICs on NH3+-SAMs exhibited the most osteoblastic phenotypic markers through robust nodule formation, up-regulated osteocalcin and α-smooth muscle actin expression, and adoption of a round/rhomboid morphology indicative of osteoblastic differentiation. With the slowest proliferation, VICs on CH3-SAMs promoted calcified aggregate formation through cell detachment and increased cell death indicative of dystrophic calcification. Furthermore, induction of calcified tissue deposition on NH3+ and CH3-SAMs was distinctly different than that of media induced osteoblastic VICs. These results demonstrate that substrate surface chemistry alters VIC behavior and plays an important role in calcified tissue formation. In addition, we have identified two novel methods of calcified VIC induction in vitro. Further study of these environments may yield new models for in vitro testing of therapeutics for calcified valve stenosis, although additional studies need to be conducted

  13. [Impact of mitral annuloplasty combined with surgical revascularization in ischemic mitral regurgitation].

    PubMed

    Tribak, M; Konaté, M; Ould Hbib, B; Konan, P; Mahfoudi, L; Hassani, A El; Daouda, A; Lachhab, F; Bendagha, N; Soufiani, A; Fila, J; Maghraoui, S; Bensouda, A; Marmade, L; Moughil, S

    2017-08-08

    Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation (IMR) is a serious complication of coronary artery disease and is associated with a poor prognosis. The optimal surgical treatment of IMR involves controversies in its indications and modalities. To determine whether mitral annuloplasty associated with surgical revascularization improved short and mid terms outcomes compared with revascularization alone in patients with IMR. Between January 2007 and January 2011, 81 patients operated on Department of Cardiovascular Surgery "B" were included in this study divided into 3 groups. Group 1: 28 patients with IMR had mitral valve surgery associated with surgical revascularization. Group 2: 26 patients with IMR had surgical revascularization without mitral valve surgery. Group 3: 27 patients without IMR had isolated revascularization. Clinical end-points were operative mortality, late mortality, postoperative functional status (NYHA), and the Effective Regurgitant Orifice (ERO) at last follow-up. The mean follow-up was 5 years for groups 1 and 2 and 4 years for group 3. There was no difference between the 3 groups regarding age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and extension of coronary artery disease. The Left Ventricle End Diastolic Diameter (LVEDD) and the Left Ventricle Ejection Fraction (LVEF) were slightly different. Late and operative mortality were higher in group 2 compared to groups 1 and 3. Postoperative functional status (NYHA) improved both in groups 1 and 2. In group 1, there was a decrease in ERO. Mitral annuloplasty combined to revascularization improves symptoms, postoperative ERO and short- and mid-term survival compared with revascularization alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Parachute mitral valve: morphologic descriptors, associated lesions, and outcomes after biventricular repair.

    PubMed

    Marino, Bradley S; Kruge, Lydia E; Cho, Catherine J; Tomlinson, Ryan S; Shera, David; Weinberg, Paul M; Gaynor, J William; Rychik, Jack

    2009-02-01

    In "true" parachute mitral valve, mitral valve chordae insert into one papillary muscle. In parachute-like asymmetric mitral valve, most or all chordal attachments are to one papillary muscle. This study compared morphologic features, associated lesions, and palliation strategies of the two parachute mitral valve and dominant papillary muscle types and examined interventions and midterm outcomes in patients with biventricular circulation. Echocardiography and autopsy databases were reviewed to identify patients with "true" parachute mitral valve or parachute-like asymmetric mitral valve from January 1987 to January 2006. Predictors of palliation strategy in the entire cohort, mitral stenosis on initial echocardiogram, and mortality in the biventricular cohort were determined with logistic regression. Eighty-six patients with "true" parachute mitral valve (n = 49) or parachute-like asymmetric mitral valve (n = 37) were identified. Chordal attachments to the posteromedial papillary muscle were more common (73%). The presence "true" parachute mitral valve (P = .008), hypoplastic left ventricle (P < .001), and two or more left-sided obstructive lesions (P = .002) predicted univentricular palliation. Among 49 patients maintaining biventricular circulation at follow-up, 8 died median follow-up 6.4 years (7 days-17.8 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that "true" parachute mitral valve was associated with mitral stenosis on initial echocardiogram (P = .03), and "true" parachute mitral valve (P = .04) and conotruncal anomalies (P = .0003) were associated with mortality. Progressive mitral stenosis was found in 11 patients; 2 underwent mitral valve interventions, and 1 died. Nearly two thirds of this parachute mitral valve cohort underwent biventricular palliation. Some progression of mitral stenosis occurred, although mitral valve intervention was rare. "True" parachute mitral valve was associated with mitral stenosis on initial echocardiogram. "True" parachute mitral

  15. Abnormal Mitral Valve Dimensions in Pediatric Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Daryl; Benson, Lee; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Dragulescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark; Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) show structural abnormalities other than isolated wall thickening. Recently, adult HCM patients have been found to have longer mitral valve leaflets than control subjects. The aim of the current study was to assess whether children and adolescents with HCM have similar measureable differences in mitral valve leaflet dimensions when compared to a healthy control group. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 46 children with myocardial hypertrophy and a phenotype and/or genotype consistent with sarcomeric HCM were reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were evaluated. The anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet lengths and myocardial structure were compared to 20 healthy controls. The anterior mitral valve was longer in the HCM group than in the control group (28.4 ± 4.9 vs. 25.2 ± 3.6 mm in control patients, p = 0.013) as was the posterior mitral valve leaflet (16.3 ± 3.0 vs. 13.1 ± 2.3 mm for controls <0.0001). There was no correlation between the resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient and anterior mitral valve leaflet length, nor was the anterior mitral valve leaflet longer in those with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve compared to those without (28.9 ± 6.1 vs. 28.1 ± 4.5 mm, p = 0.61). Children and adolescents with HCM have abnormally long mitral valve leaflets when compared with healthy control subjects. These abnormalities do not appear to result in, or be due to, obstruction to left ventricular outflow. The mechanism of this mitral valve elongation is not clear but appears to be independent of hemodynamic disturbances.

  16. Porcine mitral valve interstitial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lester, W; Rosenthal, A; Granton, B; Gotlieb, A I

    1988-11-01

    There are connective tissue cells present within the interstitium of the heart valves. This study was designed to isolate and characterize mitral valve interstitial cells from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. Explants obtained from the distal part of the leaflet, having been scraped free of surface endocardial cells, were incubated in medium 199 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells grew out of the explant after 3 to 5 days and by 3 weeks these cells were harvested and passaged. Passages 1 to 22 were characterized in several explant sets. The cells showed a growth pattern reminiscent of fibroblasts. Growth was dependent on serum concentration. Cytoskeletal localization of actin and myosin showed prominent stress fibers. Ultrastructural studies showed many elongated cells with prominent stress fibers and some gap junctions and few adherens junctions. There were as well cells with fewer stress fibers containing prominent Golgi complex and dilated endoplasmic reticulum. In the multilayered superconfluent cultures, the former cells tended to be on the substratum of the dish or surface of the multilayered culture, whereas the latter was generally located within the layer of cells. Extracellular matrix was prominent in superconfluent cultures, often within the layers as well. Labeling of the cells with antibody HHF 35 (Tsukada T, Tippens D, Gordon D, Ross R, Gown AM: Am J Pathol 126:51, 1987), which recognizes smooth muscle cell actin, showed prominent staining of the elongated stress fiber-containing cells and much less in the secretory type cells. These studies show that interstitial mitral valve cells can be grown in culture and that either two different cell types or one cell type with two phenotypic expressions is present in culture.

  17. Beating-heart Mitral Valve Chordal Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Genevieve; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2011-01-01

    Replacing open-heart surgical procedures with beating-heart interventions substantially decreases the trauma and risk of a procedure. One of the most challenging procedures to perform on the beating heart is valve repair. To address this need, this paper proposes a tool for replacing mitral valve chordae to correct regurgitation. The chordae is secured to the papillary muscle and leaflet using NiTi tissue anchors that also incorporate an internal adjustment mechanism to enable initial adjustment as well as subsequent readjustment of chordae length. Efficacy of the proposed tool for chordae replacement and reduction of regurgitation was demonstrated in an ex-vivo heart simulator. PMID:22254843

  18. Mitral valve prolapse, panic disorder, and chest pain.

    PubMed

    Alpert, M A; Mukerji, V; Sabeti, M; Russell, J L; Beitman, B D

    1991-09-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is a common cardiac disorder that can readily be diagnosed by characteristic auscultatory and echocardiographic criteria. Although many diseases have been associated with mitral valve prolapse, most affected individuals have the primary form of the disorder. Mitral valve prolapse is an inherited condition commonly associated with myxomatous degeneration of the mitral valve and its support structures. Complications of mitral valve prolapse, including cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, infective endocarditis, severe mitral regurgitation (with or without chordae tendineae rupture), and cerebral ischemic events, occur infrequently considering the wide prevalence of the disorder. Panic disorder is a specific type of anxiety disorder characterized by at least three panic attacks within a 3-week period or one panic attack followed by fear of subsequent panic attacks for at least 1 month. It too is a common condition with a prevalence and age and gender distribution similar to that of mitral valve prolapse. Panic disorder and mitral valve prolapse share many nonspecific symptoms, including chest pain or discomfort, palpitations, dyspnea, effort intolerance, and pre-syncope. Chest pain is the symptom in both conditions that most commonly brings the patient to medical attention. The clinical description of chest pain in patients with mitral valve prolapse is highly variable, possibly reflecting multiple etiologies. Chest pain in panic disorder is usually characterized as atypical angina pectoris and as such bears resemblance to the chest pain commonly described by patients with mitral valve prolapse. Multiple investigative attempts to elucidate the mechanism of chest pain in both conditions have failed to identify a unifying cause. Review of the literature leaves little doubt that mitral valve prolapse and panic disorder frequently co-occur. Given the similarities in their symptomatology, a high rate of co-occurrence is, in fact, entirely predictable

  19. Plaque Vulnerability as Assessed by Radiofrequency Intravascular Ultrasound in Patients with Valvular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Senguttuvan, Nagendra Boopathy; Kumar, Sharath; Mishra, Sundeep; Cho, Jun Hwan; Kwon, Jee Eun; Hyeon, Seong Hyeop; Jeong, Yun Sang; Won, Hoyoun; Shin, Seung Yong; Lee, Kwang Je; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Chee Jeong; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac valvular calcification is associated with the overall coronary plaque burden and considered an independent cardiovascular risk and prognostic factor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the presence of valvular calcification and plaque morphology and/or vulnerability. Methods Transthoracic echocardiography was used to assess valvular calcification in 280 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent radiofrequency intravascular ultrasound (Virtual Histology IVUS, VH-IVUS). A propensity score–matched cohort of 192 patients (n = 96 in each group) was analyzed. Thin-capped fibroatheroma (TCFA) was defined as a necrotic core (NC) >10% of the plaque area with a plaque burden >40% and NC in contact with the lumen for ≥3 image slices. A remodeling index (lesion/reference vessel area) >1.05 was considered to be positive. Results Patients were divided into two groups: any calcification in at least one valve (152 patients) vs. no detectable valvular calcification (128 patients). Groups were similar in terms of age, risk factors, clinical diagnosis, and angiographic analysis after propensity score-matched analysis. Gray-scale IVUS analysis showed that the vessel size, plaque burden, minimal lumen area, and remodeling index were similar. By VH-IVUS, % NC and % dense calcium (DC) were greater in patients with valvular calcification (p = 0.024, and p = 0.016, respectively). However, only % DC was higher at the maximal NC site by propensity score-matched analysis (p = 0.029). The frequency of VH-TCFA occurrence was higher depending on the complexity (p = 0.0064) and severity (p = 0.013) of valvular calcification. Conclusions There is a significant relationship between valvular calcifications and VH-IVUS assessment of TCFAs. Valvular calcification indicates a greater atherosclerosis disease complexity (increased calcification of the coronary plaque) and vulnerable coronary plaques (higher incidence of VH-TCFA). PMID

  20. Is minimally invasive thoracoscopic surgery the new benchmark for treating mitral valve disease?

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of mitral valve disease remains dynamic; surgeons and patients must now choose between many different surgical options when addressing mitral regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Notably, advances in imaging and surgical instrumentation allow surgeons to perform less invasive mitral valve surgery that spares the sternum. With favorable long-term data now emerging, we compare the benefits and risks of thoracoscopic mitral valve surgery with that through conventional sternotomy or surgery that is robot-assisted. PMID:27942489

  1. Echocardiography in evaluation of mitral valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Watts, E; Nomeir, A M; Barnes, R

    1975-06-01

    Thirty-three patients with mitral valve prostheses were studied with echocardiography in an effort to determine if this technique could be useful in detecting significant abnormalities. Recordings were obtained in the supine position with the transducer directed to record maximum excursion of the prosthesis. Echoes from the struts, poppet and sewing ring were readily recorded. Amplitude of excursion and opening and closing velocities of the poppet were measured. Fifty echocardiographic recordings were obtained from the 33 patients. Of the 33 patients studied, 22 were thought to have "normal" echo tracings while in 11, the tracings were considered "abnormal." Apparent abnormalities consisted of: 1) abnormal diastolic separation between the poppet and strut, 2) increased echoes near the poppet, strut or sewing ring and 3) a combination of both. There was only one instance of suspected "sticking" of the prosthesis. All patients who had "abnormal" studies except one developed complications associated with their prosthesis (90%) compared to only 36% in patients with "normal" tracings. Five patients in each group died. Autopsy studies are described and correlations with the echocardiographic findings are made. In low profile valves reduction in excursion of the disc may be an indication of malfunction. Echocardiography appears to be of value in the assessment of function of mitral valve prostheses.

  2. Repeat mitral valve replacement: 30-years' experience.

    PubMed

    Expósito, Víctor; García-Camarero, Tamara; Bernal, José M; Arnáiz, Elena; Sarralde, Aurelio; García, Iván; Berrazueta, José R; Revuelta, José M

    2009-08-01

    Prosthetic heart valve dysfunction is an acquired condition that carries a significant risk of emergency surgery. However, the long-term natural history of the condition is not well understood. Between 1974 and 2006, 1535 isolated mitral valve replacements were performed at our hospital (in-hospital mortality 5%). In total, 369 patients needed a second operation (in-hospital mortality 8.1%), while 80 (age 59.8+/-11.4 years) needed a third. The reasons for the third intervention were structural deterioration (67.5%), paravalvular leak (20%) and endocarditis (6.3%). Some 15 patients died in hospital (18.8%). After a mean follow-up period of 17.8 years, 21 patients needed another intervention (i.e., a fourth intervention). The actuarial reoperation-free rate at 20 years was 40.1+/-13.8%. The late mortality rate was 58.5% (18-year survival rate 15.4+/-5.4%). Indications for repeat mitral valve replacement must be judged on an individual basis given the high risk associated with surgery.

  3. Mitral Apparatus Assessment by Delayed Enhancement CMR – Relative Impact of Infarct Distribution on Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chinitz, Jason S.; Chen, Debbie; Goyal, Parag; Wilson, Sean; Islam, Fahmida; Nguyen, Thanh; Wang, Yi; Hurtado-Rua, Sandra; Simprini, Lauren; Cham, Matthew; Levine, Robert A.; Devereux, Richard B.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess patterns and functional consequences of mitral apparatus infarction after acute MI (AMI). Background The mitral apparatus contains two myocardial components – papillary muscles and the adjacent LV wall. Delayed-enhancement CMR (DE-CMR) enables in-vivo study of inter-relationships and potential contributions of LV wall and papillary muscle infarction (PMI) to mitral regurgitation (MR). Methods Multimodality imaging was performed: CMR was used to assess mitral geometry and infarct pattern, including 3D DE-CMR for PMI. Echocardiography (echo) was used to measure MR. Imaging occurred 27±8 days post-AMI (CMR, echo within 1 day). Results 153 patients with first AMI were studied. PMI was present in 30% (n=46; 72% posteromedial, 39% anterolateral). When stratified by angiographic culprit vessel, PMI occurred in 65% of patients with left circumflex, 48% with right coronary, and only 14% of patients with left anterior descending infarctions (p<0.001). Patients with PMI had more advanced remodeling as measured by LV size and mitral annular diameter (p<0.05). Increased extent of PMI was accompanied by a stepwise increase in mean infarct transmurality within regional LV segments underlying each papillary muscle (p<0.001). Prevalence of lateral wall infarction was 3.0 fold higher among patients with, compared to those without, PMI (65% vs. 22%, p<0.001). Infarct distribution also impacted MR, with greater MR among patients with lateral wall infarction (p=0.002). Conversely, MR severity did not differ based on presence (p=0.19) or extent (p=0.12) of PMI, or by angiographic culprit vessel. In multivariable analysis, lateral wall infarct size (OR=1.20[CI=1.05–1.39], p=0.01) was independently associated with substantial (≥moderate) MR even after controlling for mitral annular (OR=1.22[1.04–1.43], p=0.01) and LV end-diastolic diameter (OR=1.11 [0.99–1.23], p=0.056). Conclusions PMI is common post-AMI, affecting nearly one-third of patients. PMI extent

  4. Mitral Valve Surgery: Current Minimally Invasive and Transcatheter Options.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Gammie, James S

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure, the competency and function of which relies on the harmonious action of its component parts. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) for mitral valve repair or replacement (MVR/r) has been performed successfully with incremental improvements in techniques over the past decade. These minimally invasive procedures, while attractive to patients and referring physicians, should meet the same high bar for optimal clinical outcomes and long-term durability of valve repair as traditional sternotomy procedures. The majority of MICS MVR/r procedures are performed via a right minithoracotomy approach with direct or camera-assisted visualization, with a minority of centers performing robotic MVR/r. Outcomes with MICS MVR/r have been shown to have similar morbidity and mortality rates as traditional sternotomy MV procedures but with the advantage of reduced transfusions, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and time to recovery. More recently, transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement (TMVR/r) has become a reality. Percutaneous MV repair technology is currently FDA approved for patients with nonsurgical high-risk degenerative mitral regurgitation. Other TMVR/r technology is at various levels of preclinical and clinical investigation, although these devices are proving to be more challenging compared to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) due to the significantly more complex mitral anatomy and the greater heterogeneity of mitral disease requiring treatment. In this article, we review current techniques for MICS MVR/r and upcoming catheter-based therapies for the mitral valve.

  5. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Ruptured Mitral Chordae Tendineae.

    PubMed

    Toma, Milan; Bloodworth, Charles H; Pierce, Eric L; Einstein, Daniel R; Cochran, Richard P; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2017-03-01

    The chordal structure is a part of mitral valve geometry that has been commonly neglected or simplified in computational modeling due to its complexity. However, these simplifications cannot be used when investigating the roles of individual chordae tendineae in mitral valve closure. For the first time, advancements in imaging, computational techniques, and hardware technology make it possible to create models of the mitral valve without simplifications to its complex geometry, and to quickly run validated computer simulations that more realistically capture its function. Such simulations can then be used for a detailed analysis of chordae-related diseases. In this work, a comprehensive model of a subject-specific mitral valve with detailed chordal structure is used to analyze the distinct role played by individual chordae in closure of the mitral valve leaflets. Mitral closure was simulated for 51 possible chordal rupture points. Resultant regurgitant orifice area and strain change in the chordae at the papillary muscle tips were then calculated to examine the role of each ruptured chorda in the mitral valve closure. For certain subclassifications of chordae, regurgitant orifice area was found to trend positively with ruptured chordal diameter, and strain changes correlated negatively with regurgitant orifice area. Further advancements in clinical imaging modalities, coupled with the next generation of computational techniques will enable more physiologically realistic simulations.

  6. Mitral Valve Surgery: Current Minimally Invasive and Transcatheter Options

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Gammie, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure, the competency and function of which relies on the harmonious action of its component parts. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) for mitral valve repair or replacement (MVR/r) has been performed successfully with incremental improvements in techniques over the past decade. These minimally invasive procedures, while attractive to patients and referring physicians, should meet the same high bar for optimal clinical outcomes and long-term durability of valve repair as traditional sternotomy procedures. The majority of MICS MVR/r procedures are performed via a right minithoracotomy approach with direct or camera-assisted visualization, with a minority of centers performing robotic MVR/r. Outcomes with MICS MVR/r have been shown to have similar morbidity and mortality rates as traditional sternotomy MV procedures but with the advantage of reduced transfusions, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and time to recovery. More recently, transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement (TMVR/r) has become a reality. Percutaneous MV repair technology is currently FDA approved for patients with nonsurgical high-risk degenerative mitral regurgitation. Other TMVR/r technology is at various levels of preclinical and clinical investigation, although these devices are proving to be more challenging compared to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) due to the significantly more complex mitral anatomy and the greater heterogeneity of mitral disease requiring treatment. In this article, we review current techniques for MICS MVR/r and upcoming catheter-based therapies for the mitral valve. PMID:27127558

  7. Prolonged Tp-e Interval and Tp-e/QT Ratio in Children with Mitral Valve Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Demirol, Mustafa; Karadeniz, Cem; Ozdemir, Rahmi; Çoban, Şenay; Katipoğlu, Nagehan; Yozgat, Yılmaz; Meşe, Timur; Unal, Nurettin

    2016-08-01

    Although it is considered to be a benign condition, previous studies have shown that a subset of patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) may be at risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Previous studies have suggested that the interval between the peak and the end of the T wave (Tp-e) can be used as a marker for the transmural dispersion of repolarization. Increased Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio are associated with ventricular arrhythmias and SCD. The aim of this study was to assess alterations in ventricular repolarization by using the Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in children with MVP and to investigate their relationships with the degree of valvular regurgitation. This study prospectively investigated 110 children with MVP and 107 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT ratio, and QT and QTc dispersions were measured from a 12-lead electrocardiogram and compared between groups. QT and QTc dispersions, Tp-e interval, and Tp-e/QTc ratio were found to be significantly higher in patients with MVP. A positive correlation was found between Tp-e/QTc ratio and increase in the degree of mitral regurgitation (MR) (p < 0.05; r = 0.2). However, the degree of MR was not associated with QT, QTc, or Tp-e intervals; QT, QTc, or Tp-e dispersions; or Tp-e/QT ratio (all p values >0.05). Individuals with MVP may be more prone to ventricular arrhythmias due to prolonged QTd, QTcd, and Tp-e interval and increased Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios. Therefore, due to their longer life expectancy, children with MVP should be followed up on regarding life-threatening arrhythmias.

  8. Echocardiographic analysis of a malfunctioning Davila-Sierra mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Tri, Terry B.; Gregoratos, Gabriel

    1981-03-01

    Although the Davila-Sierra mitral valve prosthesis was removed from the market nearly a decade ago, a number of patients still have this valve in place. We recently studied the echocardiographic features of a malfunctioning Davila-Sierra mitral valve prosthesis. Abnormalities that suggested improper functioning of the prosthesis included a markedly delayed poppet opening and an early diastolic hump believed to represent motion of the mitral annulus. Previously described echocardiographic indications of dys-function were not observed in our patient. We report the first known echocardiographic evaluation of a Davila-Sierra prosthesis.

  9. Echocardiographic analysis of a malfunctioning Davila-Sierra mitral valve

    PubMed Central

    Tri, Terry B.; Gregoratos, Gabriel

    1981-01-01

    Although the Davila-Sierra mitral valve prosthesis was removed from the market nearly a decade ago, a number of patients still have this valve in place. We recently studied the echocardiographic features of a malfunctioning Davila-Sierra mitral valve prosthesis. Abnormalities that suggested improper functioning of the prosthesis included a markedly delayed poppet opening and an early diastolic hump believed to represent motion of the mitral annulus. Previously described echocardiographic indications of dys-function were not observed in our patient. We report the first known echocardiographic evaluation of a Davila-Sierra prosthesis. Images PMID:15216230

  10. Resolution of massive left atrial appendage thrombi with rivaroxaban before balloon mitral commissurotomy in severe mitral stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuechun; Lin, Jiafeng; Peng, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Data on nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant being used for the treatment of LAA thrombi are limited only in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. There are no data on the antithrombotic efficacy and safety of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant in the resolution of left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombi in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis. Patient concerns: A 49-year-old woman with known rheumatic mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation was referred for percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy because of progressive dyspnea on exertion over a period of 3 months. Diagnoses: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated a large LAA thrombus protruding into left atria cavity before the procedure. Interventions: Direct factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor rivaroxaban (20 mg/d) was started for the patient. After 3 weeks of rivaroxaban treatment TEE showed a relevantly decreased thrombus size, and a complete thrombus resolution was achieved after 5 weeks of anticoagulant therapy with the FXa inhibitor. Outcomes: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented case of large LAA thrombus resolution with nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant in severe mitral stenosis, and in which percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy was performed subsequently. Lessons: The report indicated that rivaroxaban could be a therapeutic option for mitral stenosis patients with LAA thrombus. Further study is required before the routine use of rivaroxaban in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation. PMID:27930571

  11. Percutaneous mitral valve repair with MitraClip for severe functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Khung Keong; Ding, Zee Pin; Chua, Yeow Leng; Lim, Soo Teik; Sin, Kenny Yoong Kong; Tan, Jack Wei Chieh; Chiam, Paul Toon Lim; Hwang, Nian Chih; Koh, Tian Hai

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old Chinese woman with comorbidities of chronic obstructive lung disease, hypertension and prior coronary artery bypass surgery presented with severe functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and severely depressed left ventricular function. She was in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II-III. Due to high surgical risk, she was referred for percutaneous treatment with the MitraClip valve repair system. This procedure is typically performed via the femoral venous system and involves a transseptal puncture. A clip is delivered to grasp the regurgitant mitral valve leaflets and reduce MR. This was performed uneventfully in our patient, with reduction of MR from 4+ to 1+. She was discharged on post-procedure Day 2 and her NYHA class improved to Class I. This was the first successful MitraClip procedure performed in Asia and represents a valuable treatment option in patients with severe MR, especially those with functional MR or those at high surgical risk.

  12. Progression to moderate or severe mitral regurgitation after percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy using stepwise inflation technique.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, T; Yamazoe, M; Tamura, Y; Tanabe, Y; Hori, T; Konno, T; Higuchi, K; Ida, T; Takemoto, M; Aizawa, Y

    1998-05-01

    Progression to moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (MR) was studied after Inoue balloon percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy (PTMC) using the stepwise inflation technique, performed at increments of 1 mm of balloon diameter, in 49 consecutive patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis (aged from 32-73 years; 8 males, 41 females). The patients were classified on the basis of the degree of MR after PTMC, compared with that before PTMC, into either Group A, development of moderate or more severe (> or = grade 2) MR (n = 8) or Group B, no increase in MR or development of mild (grade 1) MR (n = 41). Progression to moderate or severe MR was significantly associated only with advanced age (60 +/- 8 vs 52 +/- 10 years, p < 0.05) and narrower mitral valve area (0.87 +/- 0.35 vs 1.11 +/- 0.29 cm2, p < 0.05), but other characteristics before PTMC were similar in both groups. There was no difference between the two groups in the total number and degree of balloon inflation. Immediately before the final inflation, the left atrial mean pressure and v wave pressure were decreased in smaller degrees in Group A compared with Group B (-2 +/- 2 vs -5 +/- 4 mmHg, p < 0.05; -2 +/- 2 vs -6 +/- 6 mmHg, p < 0.05, respectively). Thus, the stepwise inflations require careful monitoring of changes in the left atrial pressure and waveform to recognize the aggravation of MR, especially in older patients with severe stenosis. Patients who do not have a significant drop in left atrial mean pressure and v wave pressure during stepwise inflations of the balloon might be at risk of development of moderate or severe MR after further dilations.

  13. Single-centre experience with mitral valve repair in asymptomatic patients with severe mitral valve regurgitation†

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Wouter J.; Head, Stuart J.; de Groot-de Laat, Lotte E.; Geleijnse, Marcel L.; Bogers, Ad J.J.C.; Van Herwerden, Lex A.; Kappetein, A. Pieter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Guidelines recommend surgical mitral valve repair in selected patients with asymptomatic severe mitral valve regurgitation (MR), but the role of repair remains a matter of debate. Survival analyses of operated asymptomatic patients have been reported, but long-term haemodynamics and quality of life are not well defined. The aim of this study was to report the long-term follow-up focusing on these aspects. METHODS Our database identified patients who underwent primary isolated mitral valve repair for severe MR and were asymptomatic by New York Heart Association Class I and in sinus rhythm. To obtain sufficient length of follow-up, only patients operated on before 2006 returned for an echocardiogram and quality-of-life assessment (SF-36). RESULTS Between May 1991 and December 2005, 46 asymptomatic patients with severe MR and a normal left ventricular function (ejection fraction >60%) were operated on. Mean age was 50.2 ± 13.2 years and 89% of patients were male. There were no operative deaths. Mean follow-up was 8.4 ± 3.9 years with 386 patient-years, survival was 93.3% at 12 years and comparable with the general age-matched Dutch population. Follow-up echocardiography showed that 92% had no to mild MR, and 3 patients had moderate MR. Left ventricular function was good/impaired/moderate in 66/29/5% of patients. Quality-of-life SF-36 assessment showed that mean physical and mental health components were 83 ± 17 and 79 ± 17, which was comparable with that of the general age- and gender-matched Dutch population. CONCLUSIONS Our experience shows that mitral valve repair for severe MR in asymptomatic patients is safe, and has satisfactory long-term survival with a low recurrence rate of MR, good left ventricular function, and excellent quality of life that is comparable with the general Dutch population. PMID:23442941

  14. Fully automated software for mitral annulus evaluation in chronic mitral regurgitation by 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Iolanda; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Rincon, Luis Miguel; González, Ariana; García Martín, Ana; Hinojar, Rocio; Jimenez Nacher, Jose Julio; Indolfi, Ciro; Zamorano, Jose Luis

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for mitral valve (MV) anatomic and functional evaluation. Currently, dedicated MV analysis software has limitations for its use in clinical practice. Thus, we tested here a complete and reproducible evaluation of a new fully automatic software to characterize MV anatomy in different forms of mitral regurgitation (MR) by 3D TEE.Sixty patients were included: 45 with more than moderate MR (28 organic MR [OMR] and 17 functional MR [FMR]) and 15 controls. All patients underwent TEE. 3D MV images obtained using 3D zoom were imported into the new software for automatic analysis. Different MV parameters were obtained and compared. Anatomic and dynamic differences between FMR and OMR were detected. A significant increase in systolic (859.75 vs 801.83 vs 607.78 mm; P = 0.002) and diastolic (1040.60 vs. 1217.83 and 859.74 mm; P < 0.001) annular sizes was observed in both OMR and FMR compared to that in controls. FMR had a reduced mitral annular contraction compared to degenerative cases of OMR and to controls (17.14% vs 32.78% and 29.89%; P = 0.007). Good reproducibility was demonstrated along with a short analysis time (mean 4.30 minutes).Annular characteristics and dynamics are abnormal in both FMR and OMR. Full 3D software analysis automatically calculates several significant parameters that provide a correct and complete assessment of anatomy and dynamic mitral annulus geometry and displacement in the 3D space. This analysis allows a better characterization of MR pathophysiology and could be useful in designing new devices for MR repair or replacement.

  15. Fully automated software for mitral annulus evaluation in chronic mitral regurgitation by 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, Iolanda; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Rincon, Luis Miguel; González, Ariana; García Martín, Ana; Hinojar, Rocio; Jimenez Nacher, Jose Julio; Indolfi, Ciro; Zamorano, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for mitral valve (MV) anatomic and functional evaluation. Currently, dedicated MV analysis software has limitations for its use in clinical practice. Thus, we tested here a complete and reproducible evaluation of a new fully automatic software to characterize MV anatomy in different forms of mitral regurgitation (MR) by 3D TEE. Sixty patients were included: 45 with more than moderate MR (28 organic MR [OMR] and 17 functional MR [FMR]) and 15 controls. All patients underwent TEE. 3D MV images obtained using 3D zoom were imported into the new software for automatic analysis. Different MV parameters were obtained and compared. Anatomic and dynamic differences between FMR and OMR were detected. A significant increase in systolic (859.75 vs 801.83 vs 607.78 mm2; P = 0.002) and diastolic (1040.60 vs. 1217.83 and 859.74 mm2; P < 0.001) annular sizes was observed in both OMR and FMR compared to that in controls. FMR had a reduced mitral annular contraction compared to degenerative cases of OMR and to controls (17.14% vs 32.78% and 29.89%; P = 0.007). Good reproducibility was demonstrated along with a short analysis time (mean 4.30 minutes). Annular characteristics and dynamics are abnormal in both FMR and OMR. Full 3D software analysis automatically calculates several significant parameters that provide a correct and complete assessment of anatomy and dynamic mitral annulus geometry and displacement in the 3D space. This analysis allows a better characterization of MR pathophysiology and could be useful in designing new devices for MR repair or replacement. PMID:27930514

  16. Intentional Laceration of the Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet to Prevent Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction During Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Jaffar M.; Rogers, Toby; Schenke, William H.; Mazal, Jonathan R.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Greenbaum, Adam B.; Babaliaros, Vasilis C.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The authors propose a novel transcatheter transection of the anterior mitral leaflet to prevent iatrogenic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction during transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR). BACKGROUND LVOT obstruction is a life-threatening complication of TMVR caused by septal displacement of the anterior mitral leaflet. METHODS In vivo procedures in swine were guided by biplane x-ray fluoroscopy and intracardiac echocardiography. Retrograde transaortic 6-F guiding catheters straddled the anterior mitral leaflet. A stiff 0.014-inch guidewire with polymer jacket insulation was electrified and advanced from the LVOT, through the A2 leaflet base, into the left atrium. The wire was snared and externalized, forming a loop that was energized and withdrawn to lacerate the anterior mitral leaflet. RESULTS The anterior mitral leaflet was successfully lacerated in 7 live and 1 post-mortem swine under heparinization. Lacerations extended to 89 ± 19% of leaflet length and were located within 0.5 ± 0.4 mm of leaflet centerline. The chordae were preserved and retracted the leaflet halves away from the LVOT. LVOT narrowing after benchtop TMVR was significantly reduced with intentional laceration of the anterior mitral leaflet to prevent LVOT obstruction than without (65 ± 10% vs. 31 ± 18% of pre-implantation diameter, p < 0.01). The technique caused mean blood pressure to fall (from 54 ± 6 mm Hg to 30 ± 4 mm Hg, p < 0.01), but blood pressure remained steady until planned euthanasia. No collateral tissue injury was identified on necropsy. CONCLUSIONS Using simple catheter techniques, the anterior mitral valve leaflet was transected. Cautiously applied in patients, this strategy can prevent anterior mitral leaflet displacement and LVOT obstruction caused by TMVR. PMID:27609260

  17. Novel oral Anticoagulants in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose M.F.L.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia in clinical practice, reaching 2% of the people in the world and is associated with systemic embolism. Thus, the use of anticoagulants is indicated if CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 or in patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke. For decades, warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, was the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced, offering similar (or better) effectiveness, safety, and convenience to the vitamin K antagonists. Dabigatran was the first NOAC approved and is a direct thrombin inhibitor. Rivaroxaban and apixaban are factor Xa inhibitors. They display rapid onset of action, more predictable of pharmacological profile, less interactions with other drugs, lack of significant effects in the diet, and less risk of intracranial hemorrhage than warfarin. Despite that dose adjustment is necessary for patients with chronic kidney disease or according to body weight, these new drugs do not require regular monitoring. There are recommendations for the start and follow-up therapy with NOACs, planning for cardioversion, ablation and surgical interventions and the management of bleeding. This article is a review of the major studies of the NOACs. The clinical use of these drugs in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation is presented. PMID:25470147

  18. Palliative care in end-stage valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Jill M; Cooper, Stephanie; Kirkpatrick, James N

    2017-08-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD), particularly aortic valve disease, is prevalent with increasing incidence. When surgery is not possible, or when risks outweigh benefits, percutaneous treatment options may offer effective alternatives. However, procedures may not always go as planned, and frail patients or those whose symptoms are caused by other comorbidities may not benefit from valve intervention at all. Significant effort should be made to assess frailty, comorbidities and patient goals prior to intervention. Palliative care (PC) should play a critical role in the care of patients with severe valve disease. PC is specialised medical care that aims to optimise health-related quality of life by managing symptoms and clarifying patient values and goals of care. It should be implemented at the time of diagnosis and continue throughout the disease course. Because of the paucity of studies dedicated to the provision of PC to patients with advanced VHD, further research is needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. A meso-scale layer-specific structural constitutive model of the mitral heart valve leaflets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Will; Ayoub, Salma; Liao, Jun; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-03-01

    Fundamental to developing a deeper understanding of pathophysiological remodeling in mitral valve (MV) disease is the development of an accurate tissue-level constitutive model. In the present work, we developed a novel meso-scale (i.e. at the level of the fiber, 10-100 μm in length scale) structural constitutive model (MSSCM) for MV leaflet tissues. Due to its four-layer structure, we focused on the contributions from the distinct collagen and elastin fiber networks within each tissue layer. Requisite collagen and elastin fibrous structural information for each layer were quantified using second harmonic generation microscopy and conventional histology. A comprehensive mechanical dataset was also used to guide model formulation and parameter estimation. Furthermore, novel to tissue-level structural constitutive modeling approaches, we allowed the collagen fiber recruitment function to vary with orientation. Results indicated that the MSSCM predicted a surprisingly consistent mean effective collagen fiber modulus of 162.72 MPa, and demonstrated excellent predictive capability for extra-physiological loading regimes. There were also anterior-posterior leaflet-specific differences, such as tighter collagen and elastin fiber orientation distributions (ODF) in the anterior leaflet, and a thicker and stiffer atrialis in the posterior leaflet. While a degree of angular variance was observed, the tight valvular tissue ODF also left little room for any physically meaningful angular variance in fiber mechanical responses. Finally, a novel fibril-level (0.1-1 μm) validation approach was used to compare the predicted collagen fiber/fibril mechanical behavior with extant MV small angle X-ray scattering data. Results demonstrated excellent agreement, indicating that the MSSCM fully captures the tissue-level function. Future utilization of the MSSCM in computational models of the MV will aid in producing highly accurate simulations in non-physiological loading states that can

  20. Dissection of the atrial wall after mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Lukács, L; Kassai, I; Lengyel, M

    1996-01-01

    We describe an unusual sequela of mitral valve replacement in a 50-year-old woman who had undergone a closed mitral commissurotomy in 1975. She was admitted to our hospital because of mitral restenosis in November 1993, at which time her mitral valve was replaced with a mechanical prosthesis. On the 8th postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed dissection and rupture of the left atrial wall. At prompt reoperation, we found an interlayer dissection and rupture of the atrial wall into the left atrium. We repaired the ruptured atrial wall with a prosthetic patch. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative transesophageal echocardiography showed normal prosthetic valve function and no dissection. Images PMID:8680278

  1. Minimally Invasive, Nonsurgical Approach to Repairing Mitral Valve Leaks

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally Invasive, Nonsurgical Approach to Repairing Mitral Valve Leaks - David X. Zhao, MD Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights ...

  2. [Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in patients undergoing robotic mitral valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Gao, Changqing; Xiao, Cangsong; Yang, Ming; Wang, Gang; Wang, Jiali; Shen, Yansong

    2012-12-01

    To retrospectively assess the value of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during robotic mitral valve (MV) replacement. Intraoperative TEE was performed in 21 patients undergoing robotic MV replacement for severe rheumatic mitral stenosis between November 2008 and December 2010. During the procedure, TEE was performed to document the mechanism of rheumatic mitral stenosis (leaflet thickening and calcification, commissural fusion or chordal fusion) before cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). During the establishment of peripheral CPB, TEE was used to guide the placement of the cannulae in the inferior vena cava (IVC), superior vena cava (SVC), and ascending aorta (AAO). After weaning from CPB, TEE was performed to evaluate the effect of the procedure. Accuracy of TEE was 100% for rheumatic mitral stenosis. All the cannuli in the SVC, IVC and AAO were located in the correct position. In all patients, TEE confirmed successful procedure. TEE is useful in the assessment of robotic MV replacement.

  3. Mitral valve aneurysm associated with aortic valve endocarditis and regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Raval, Amish N; Menkis, Alan H; Boughner, Derek R

    2002-01-01

    Mitral valve aneurysms are rare complications occurring most commonly in association with aortic valve infective endocarditis. [Decroly 1989, Chua 1990, Northridge 1991, Karalis 1992, Roguin 1996, Mollod 1997, Vilacosta 1997, Cai 1999, Vilacosta 1999, Teskey 1999, Chan 2000, Goh 2000, Marcos- Alberca 2000] While the mechanism of the development of this lesion is unclear, complications such as perforation can occur and lead to significant mitral regurgitation. [Decroly 1989, Karalis 1992, Teskey 1999, Vilacosta 1999]; The case of a 69-year-old male with Streptococcus Sanguis aortic valve endocarditis and associated anterior mitral leaflet aneurysm is presented. Following surgery, tissue pathology of the excised lesion revealed myxomatous degeneration and no active endocarditis or inflammatory cells. This may add support to the hypothesis that physical stress due to severe aortic insufficiency and structural weakening, without infection of the anterior mitral leaflet, can lead to the development of this lesion.

  4. Robotic mitral valve surgery: current limitations and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Rakesh; Mick, Stephanie; Mihaljevic, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Use of the surgical robot facilitates less invasive mitral valve surgery. Although multiple single center studies confirmed excellent results with robotically-assisted mitral valve surgery, both real and perceived limitations have slowed adoption of this technology. Some still question the safety and efficacy of robotically-assisted mitral valve surgery. However, present data suggests that robotic operations can be performed by specialized surgeons in appropriately selected patients without compromising results. That said, the robot does introduce additional procedural complexity related to management of cardiopulmonary bypass and myocardial protection. A direct approach to these challenges combined with careful patient selection enables the surgeon to obtain excellent results with robotically-assisted mitral valve surgery. PMID:27942490

  5. Mitral valve aneurysm: A serious complication of aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria João; Alves, Vasco; Cabral, Sofia; Antunes, Nuno; Pereira, Luís Sousa; Oliveira, Filomena; Silveira, João; Torres, Severo

    2016-11-01

    Mitral valve aneurysms are rare and occur most commonly in association with aortic valve endocarditis. Transesophageal echocardiography is the most sensitive imaging modality for the diagnosis of this entity and its potential complications, such as leaflet rupture and mitral regurgitation, which mandate prompt surgical intervention. We present the case of a 70-year-old male patient with aortic valve endocarditis complicated with a ruptured aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet and associated severe mitral regurgitation, diagnosed by transesophageal echocardiography, with impressive images. We hypothesized that the aneurysm developed through direct extension of infection from the aortic valve or from a prolapsing aortic vegetation, with abscess formation and subsequent rupture and drainage. This case highlights the importance of appropriate imaging for early detection and timely surgical intervention (repair or replacement) to prevent fatal outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Early Stabilization of Traumatic Aortic Transection and Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, David L.; Wellens, Francis; Vercoutere, Rik A.; De Geest, Raf

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of life-threatening aortic transection with concomitant mitral papillary muscle rupture and severe lung contusion caused by a failed parachute jump. This blunt thoracic injury was treated by early stabilization with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation followed by successful delayed graft repair of the descending aorta and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:65–7) PMID:12638675

  7. Severe rheumatic mitral stenosis: a 21st century medusa.

    PubMed

    Carrilho-Ferreira, Pedro; Pedro, Monica Mendes; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, Antonio Nunes

    2011-09-12

    Although the prevalence of rheumatic fever has greatly decreased in developed countries, rheumatic mitral stenosis still causes significant morbidity and mortality. Symptomatic patients have a poor prognosis, with a 0 to 15% 10-year survival rate, particularly if percutaneous or surgical intervention are contraindicated or considered high risk. We present a case of severe rheumatic mitral stenosis with an evolution over 4 decades, in which exceptional venous distention has established.

  8. Isolated true parachute mitral valve in an asymptomatic elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Onishi, Tetsuari; Omar, Alaa Marbrouk Salem; Norisada, Kazuko; Tatsumi, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Kensuke; Hayashi, Nobuhide; Kinoshita, Shouhiro; Kawano, Seiji; Kawai, Hiroya; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2010-12-01

    We report the extremely rare case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic patient who has an isolated true parachute mitral valve (PMV). In the echocardiographic examination, the parasternal long-axis view showed a single papillary muscle. The short-axis view revealed the presence of a symmetric mitral valve orifice with all chordae attaching to a large anterolateral papillary muscle. Because detailed examination did not reveal the presence of other complications, this patient was diagnosed as an isolated true PMV.

  9. Reexamining contraindications for minimally invasive mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Reade, Clifton C; Bower, Curtis E; Kypson, Alan P; Nifong, L Wiley; Wooden, William A; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2005-01-01

    Historically, contraindications to minimally invasive or robotic mitral valve surgery have included prior mastectomy, thoracic reconstruction, or chest radiation. However, we believe that by granting flexibility in the choice of skin incision site while performing careful dissection, surgeons can provide these patients the outstanding results afforded by a minithoracotomy. We present a patient who had undergone a prior mastectomy and radiation treatment in whom we performed a minimally invasive mitral valve repair through a right-sided minithoracotomy using the previous mastectomy incision.

  10. Anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery with mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinalendu; Mahindrakar, Pallavi; Das, Debasis; Behera, Sukanta Kumar; Chowdhury, Saibal Roy; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit

    2011-08-01

    The usual presentation of anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery is severe left-sided heart failure and mitral valve insufficiency presenting during the first months of life. The manifestations of left heart failure may be masked if pulmonary artery pressure remains high. We believe this is a rarest of rare case of anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery with severe mitral stenosis and pulmonary hypertension in which pulmonary hypertension, along with good collateral circulation helped to preserve left ventricular function.

  11. Robotic mitral valve surgery: overview, methodology, results, and perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Robotic mitral valve repair began in 1998 and has advanced remarkably. It arose from an interest in reducing patient trauma by operating through smaller incisions with videoscopic assistance. In the United States, following two clinical trials, the FDA approved the daVinci Surgical System in 2002 for intra-cardiac surgery. This device has undergone three iterations, eventuating in the current daVinci XI. At present it is the only robotic device approved for mitral valve surgery. Many larger centers have adopted its use as part of their routine mitral valve repair armamentarium. Although these operations have longer perfusion and arrest times, complications have been either similar or less than other traditional methods. Preoperative screening is paramount and leads to optimal patient selection and outcomes. There are clear contraindications, both relative and absolute, that must be considered. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic studies optimally guide surgeons in operative planning. Herein, we describe the selection criteria as well as our operative management during a robotic mitral valve repair. Major complications are detailed with tips to avoid their occurrence. Operative outcomes from the author’s series as well as those from the largest experiences in the United States are described. They show that robotic mitral valve repair is safe and effective, as well as economically reasonable due to lower costs of hospitalization. Thus, the future of this operative technique is bright for centers adopting the “heart team” approach, adequate clinical volume and a dedicated and experienced mitral repair surgeon. PMID:27942486

  12. [Atrial functional mitral regurgitation. Three-dimensional echocardiographic study].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ramírez, José Miguel; Ortega-Trujillo, José Ramón

    2017-07-24

    Atrial fibrillation can lead to a left atrium remodeling and induce functional mitral regurgitation. The aim of this study is to establish what features of the mitral annulus are related to atrial functional mitral regurgitation. Retrospectively 29 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation and 36 controls in sinus rhythm were enrolled. The characteristics of the mitral annulus were analyzed by three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in both groups. 2D and 3D echocardiographic parameters were correlated with the effective regurgitant orifice. Patients with atrial fibrillation had larger left atrium volume, anteroposterior diameter at end-diastole and lower percentage of change in this diameter (P: 0.015, 0.019 and <0.001, respectively). In the multiple regression analysis the ellipticity index (β: -0.756, P: 0.004) and height-anterolateral-posteriomedial diameter ratio (β: -0704, P: 0.003) were independent parameters correlated with the effective regurgitant orifice (R(2): 0.699, P: 0.019) in patients with atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation leads to atrial dilatation and alterations in the size and dynamic of the anteroposterior diameter, producing a circular mitral annulus. The independents determinants of atrial functional mitral regurgitation in the atrial fibrillation group were the ellipticity index and height-anterolateral-posteromedial diameter ratio. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional mitral regurgitation in patients with aortic stenosis: prevalence, clinical correlates and pathophysiological determinants: a quantitative prospective study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Dandale, Rajesh; Nistri, Stefano; Faggiano, Pompilio; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Benfari, Giovanni; Onorati, Francesco; Santini, Francesco; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2014-06-01

    In patients with aortic stenosis (AS) functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is frequent and is attributed to left ventricular (LV) remodelling and to aortic gradient. However, the association of these variables with mitral effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) is still unknown. We prospectively enrolled patients with aortic valve thickness and aortic velocities >2.5 m/s. We measured the LV diastolic (LVD) and systolic volumes (Simpson's method) and ejection fraction (EF) and longitudinal shortening (S-DTI), early, and late (A-DTI) lengthening velocities. The aortic valve area (AVA) and mean gradient (MG) were measured. FMR was considered in the absence of any alteration of mitral leaflet. ERO and regurgitant volume were measured by means of a proximal velocity surface area method method. One hundred and seventy-two patients formed the study population (mean age 76 ± 8 years; 50% female, EF 57 ± 14%, AVA 1.00 ± 0.4 cm(2)). Sixty-three per cent of patients had FMR (ERO range: 0.02 0.32 cm(2)). ERO was significantly associated with LVD (rho = 0.34; P = 0.0001), EF (r(s) = -0.35: P = 0.0001), and S-DTI (r = -0.57; P = 0.0001), A-DTI (rho = -0.47; P = 0.0001). In the subgroup of patients with a preserved EF (LVD <75 mL/m(2) and EF >55%), S-DTI, and A-DTI were the variables with the more powerful association with ERO (r(s) = -0.49 P = 0.0001 and r(s) = -0.40 P = 0.0001, respectively). In the overall population there was a non-significant negative association between the degree of AS and ERO (MG: r(s) = -0.08 P = 0.2 and AVA: r(s) = -0.08 P = 0.2). In AS patients, the LV function is a main determinant of FMR even if EF is preserved. The association between ERO and valvular gradient is complex but tended to be negative. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2013. For permissions please email: journals. permissions@ oup. com.

  14. Pivotal role of bedside Doppler echocardiography in the assessment of patients with acute heart failure and mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Ennezat, Pierre Vladimir; Bellouin, Annaïk; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Juthier, Francis; Fayad, Georges; Vincentelli, André; Berrébi, Alain; Auffray, Jean Luc; Bauchart, Jean Jacques; Mouquet, Frédéric; Montaigne, David; Asseman, Philippe; Le Jemtel, Thierry H; Pibarot, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Patients presenting with mitral regurgitation and acute heart failure remain a challenge for the clinicians. Bedside echocardiography ascertains the functional or primary nature of mitral regurgitation, thereby allowing to focus therapy on the left ventricle and mitral valve apparatus in patients with functional mitral regurgitation and to hasten mitral valve repair or replacement when acute heart failure results from primary mitral regurgitation. This short article reviews the evaluation by bedside echocardiography to guide management of these patients. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Morphological and Chemical Study of Pathological Deposits in Human Aortic and Mitral Valve Stenosis: A Biomineralogical Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Cottignoli, Valentina; Salvador, Loris; Valfré, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate heart valve calcification process by different biomineralogical techniques to provide morphological and chemical features of the ectopic deposit extracted from patients with severe mitral and aortic valve stenosis, to better evaluate this pathological process. Polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses brought to light the presence of nodular and massive mineralization forms characterized by different levels of calcification, as well as the presence of submicrometric calcified globular cluster, micrometric cavities containing disorganized tissue structures, and submillimeter pockets formed by organic fibers very similar to amyloid formations. Electron microprobe analyses showed variable concentrations of Ca and P within each deposit and the highest content of Ca and P within calcified tricuspid aortic valves, while powder X-ray diffraction analyses indicated in the nanometer range the dimension of the pathological bioapatite crystals. These findings indicated the presence of highly heterogeneous deposits within heart valve tissues and suggested a progressive maturation process with continuous changes in the composition of the valvular tissue, similar to the multistep formation process of bone tissue. Moreover the micrometric cavities represent structural stages of the valve tissue that immediately precedes the formation of heavily mineralized deposits such as bone-like nodules. PMID:25685595

  16. Strain magnitude-dependent calcific marker expression in valvular and vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Ferdous, Zannatul; Jo, Hanjoong; Nerem, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve disease and atherosclerosis tend to coexist in most patients with cardiovascular disease; however, the causes and mechanisms of disease development in heart valves are still not clearly understood. To understand the contributions of the magnitude of cyclic strain (5% hypotension, 10% physiological, and 15% hypertension) in calcification, we used a model system of tissue-engineered collagen gels containing human aortic smooth muscle cells and human aortic valvular interstitial cells, both isolated from noncalcific heart transplant tissue. The compacted collagen gels were cultured in osteogenic media for 3 weeks in a custom-designed bioreactor and all assessments were performed at the end of the culture period. The major finding of this study is that bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-4 and transforming growth factor-β1 mRNA expression significantly changed in response to the magnitude of applied strain in valvular cells, while the lowest expression was observed for the representative physiological strain. On the other hand, mRNA expression in vascular cells did not vary in response to the magnitude of strain. Regarding BMP-2 and BMP-4 protein expression determined by immunostaining, trends were similar to mRNA expression in vascular and valvular cells, where only valvular cells showed a varied protein expression depending on the magnitude of the strain applied. Our results suggest that cellular differences exist between vascular and valvular cells in their response to altered levels of cyclic strain during calcification. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Growth of mitral annulus in the pediatric patient after suture annuloplasty of the entire posterior mitral annulus.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Takeshi; Huebler, Michael; Berger, Felix; Hetzer, Roland

    2009-08-01

    When mitral annuloplasty is performed in small children, room for annular growth should be allowed. However, it has not been reported how the valve develops after mitral annuloplasty of the entire posterior annulus. We report a case showing traces of annular growth at redo surgery. A female patient suffering from mitral valve insufficiency due to annular dilatation underwent modified Paneth plasty with Kay-Wooler commissural plication annuloplasty at the age of two years one month. In redo surgery 8.4 years after initial repair, enlargement of the commissural portion of the posterior annulus in addition to enlargement of the anterior leaflet and anterior annulus was observed. Modified Paneth plasty reinforced with a pericardial strip and Kay-Wooler annuloplasty of the posteromedial commissure were performed. Mitral orifice size measured with the Hegar dilator was 18 mm after the re-repair, increasing from 16 mm after the initial repair. Taking into account the normal mitral annulus diameter related to body surface area (BSA) of 16 mm at initial operation and 20 mm at redo surgery, the increase in mitral orifice size from 16 mm to 18 mm in this patient may be regarded as the annular growth in 8.4 years.

  18. Ileal neuroendocrine tumors and heart: not only valvular consequences.

    PubMed

    Calissendorff, Jan; Maret, Eva; Sundin, Anders; Falhammar, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Ileal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) often progress slowly, but because of their generally nonspecific symptoms, they have often metastasized to local lymph nodes and to the liver by the time the patient presents. Biochemically, most of these patients have increased levels of whole blood serotonin, urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and chromogranin A. Imaging work-up generally comprises computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, or in recent years positron emission tomography with 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs, allowing for detection of even sub-cm lesions. Carcinoid heart disease with affected leaflets, mainly to the right side of the heart, is a well-known complication and patients routinely undergo echocardiography to diagnose and monitor this. Multitasking surgery is currently recognized as first-line treatment for ileal NETs with metastases and carcinoid heart disease. Open heart surgery and valve replacement are advocated in patients with valvular disease and progressive heart failure. When valvulopathy in the tricuspid valve results in right-sided heart failure, a sequential approach, performing valve replacement first before intra-abdominal tumor-reductive procedures are conducted, reduces the risk of bleeding. Metastases to the myocardium from ileal NETs are seen in <1-4.3% of patients, depending partly on the imaging technique used, and are generally discovered in those affected with widespread disease. Systemic treatment with somatostatin analogs, and sometimes alpha interferon, is first-line medical therapy in metastatic disease to relieve hormonal symptoms and stabilize the tumor. This treatment is also indicated when heart metastases are detected, with the addition of diuretics and fluid restriction in cases of heart failure. Myocardial metastases are rarely treated by surgical resection.

  19. Normal rate of ventricular emptying in valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, S M; Gash, A K; Bove, A A; Spann, J F

    1981-01-01

    The delayed upstroke of the arterial pulse in valvular aortic stenosis has been attributed, in part, to prolonged left ventricular emptying. Left ventricular emptying rate, however, has not been measured in aortic stenosis. We assessed the rate of left ventricular emptying by computer analysis of biplane cineangiograms in seven normal subjects, six patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, and 12 patients with severe aortic stenosis. As an indicator of delayed arterial pulse rise, T time index (time to half maximum aortic pressure corrected for heart rate) was measured in each group. T time index averaged 0.07 +/- 0.01 units in normal subjects, 0.14 +/- 0.04 units in the patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, and 0.13 +/- 0.05 units in those with severe aortic stenosis. Patients with mild to moderate and severe aortic stenosis differed significantly from normal subjects. Relative emptying rates were defined as the percentage of initial systolic volume ejected divided by the percentage of systole elapsed. These relative emptying rates were determined during the first, second, and third thirds of systole in all three groups. No significant decrease in the relative rate of left ventricular emptying was noted when each group of patients with aortic stenosis was compared with the normal subjects. Neither was there slowing in the actual rate of ejection of blood in ml per second throughout systole. We conclude that the rate of ventricular emptying is normal in aortic stenosis and does not explain the arterial pulse delay in this disease. PMID:7295438

  20. Valvular calcification, inflammation, and mortality in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Bonita A; Yang, Wei; Litt, Harold; Rosas, Sylvia E

    2013-07-01

    The study aim was to determine the correlates of valvular calcification (VC), including clinical and physiologic parameters, in individuals new to dialysis. In addition, the association of VC with coronary artery calcification (CAC) progression and mortality was investigated. A total of 101 incident dialysis individuals underwent electrocardiogram-triggered multislice computed tomography (CT) to monitor the presence and quantification of calcification. The average follow up was 2.85 +/- 0.72 years. Twenty-six (25.7%) patients had only one valve calcified, while 10 (9.9%) had calcifications in both valves. Patients with VC were older, more likely to have a history of diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease (CVD), more likely to have CAC, and to be Caucasian; fibrinogen and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were also higher in these patients. Multivariable Poisson regression analysis revealed older age, history of CVD, increasing fibrinogen, and presence of CAC were independently associated with the presence of VC. Patients with VC also had a higher median annualized CAC progression compared to those without VC (2.90 versus 105.2, p = 0.004). The mortality rate per 100 years was 2.57 in patients without VC, compared to 4.20 and 13.76, respectively, for those with one or two calcified valves. An increasing number of calcified valves was associated with a higher mortality after adjustment for gender and race [HR 2.2 (1.03-4.69), p = 0.04], but was not statistically significant after adjustment for inflammatory markers such as IL-6 or fibrinogen. Traditional and novel risk factors are associated with the presence of VC, which is a risk marker for CAC progression and mortality in incident dialysis patients.

  1. Evaluation of cardiac valvular disease with MR imaging: qualitative and quantitative techniques.

    PubMed

    Glockner, James F; Johnston, Donald L; McGee, Kiaran P

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is almost never performed as the initial imaging test in cardiac valvular disease; that role is dominated by echocardiography. Nevertheless, MR imaging has much to offer in selected patients. Quantitative information regarding the severity of regurgitant or stenotic lesions can be obtained by using a combination of cine gradient-echo or steady-state free precession and cine phase-contrast sequences. In addition to providing measurements of peak velocity and flow, MR imaging is the standard of reference for evaluation of ventricular function, which can be a critical factor in determining when surgical intervention is indicated. Improvements in cardiac MR imaging technology have been particularly striking in the past few years, and these developments can easily be applied to the examination of cardiac valves. The authors briefly describe the pathophysiology of valvular disease, discuss standard MR techniques for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of valvular lesions, and illustrate these concepts with several case studies.

  2. What can we learn about valvular heart disease from PET/CT?

    PubMed

    Jenkins, William S A; Chin, Calvin; Rudd, James H F; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2013-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and with an aging population, its prevalence is increasing. Here, we review the evolving use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in valvular heart disease, with particular focus on calcific aortic stenosis and infective endocarditis. In principle, the activity of any pathological process can be studied, as long as an appropriate radiotracer can be developed. We will review some of the early data using established tracers in the above and other conditions, providing discussion as to the future research and clinical roles of these techniques. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential impact of novel tracers that are currently under development or testing in preclinical models. It is hoped that such advanced imaging might improve the diagnosis, treatment and outlook for patients with valvular heart disease.

  3. [Management of aortic valvular heart disease according to the 2012 guidelines].

    PubMed

    Dayal, N B; Müller, H

    2014-05-28

    In 2012, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published an updated version of its guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. Novelties include the use of advanced techniques for risk stratification and prognostic evaluation, such as stress and 3D echocardiography as well as measurement of left ventricular strain by speckle tracking. Equally important is the inclusion of percutaneous valve replacement or repair procedures, reflecting their ever-increasing use in clinical practice. Finally, the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to valvular heart disease, with collaboration of multiple specialities in a heart team has been put forward. We discuss practical aspects of the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to aortic valvular disease, including an outline of the surgical indications according to the ESC guidelines.

  4. RT 3D TEE: Characteristics of Mitral Valve in Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation Evaluated by MVQ Program

    PubMed Central

    Kovalova, Sylva; Necas, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess the changes of mitral valve (MV) in ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) using Mitral Valve Quantification (MVQ) program. Methods We examined 46 patients (18 women) with IMR aged 45-86 and a control group of 33 healthy individuals (14 women) aged 18-88. Following parameters were assessed: Area of minimal surface spanning annulus (A3), annulus height (h), tenting height (Th), exposed area of anterior (AL), posterior (PL) and both leaflets (BL), ejection fraction of the left ventricle (LV EF), regurgitation volume (RV) and BL/A3, AL/A3, PL/A3 ratios. The normal range of BL/A3 ratio was defined as the average ± 2SD of control group. The study group was separated into subgroup 1 with BL/A3 ratio within normal values and subgroup 2 with pathological BL/A3 ratio. Corresponding parameters of IMR group were compared to the controls and both subgroups were compared to each other using Student t-test. Results In IMR group, as compared to the controls, A3, AL, PL, BL as well as BL/A3, AL/A3, PL/A3 ratios and Th were significantly increased, conversely, h and LV EF was significantly decreased. In the subgroup 2 as compared to the subgroup 1 there was significant increase of Th, BL, AL and PL, while EF LV was significantly decreased. There was no significant difference between these subgroups in A3, h and RV. Conclusion In ischemic MV remodeling two stages were identified without relation to the severity of IMR. The first stage was mainly influenced by the LV dilatation while LV remodeling was more important in the second stage.

  5. Mutations in DCHS1 Cause Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Durst, Ronen; Sauls, Kimberly; Peal, David S; deVlaming, Annemarieke; Toomer, Katelynn; Leyne, Maire; Salani, Monica; Talkowski, Michael E.; Brand, Harrison; Perrocheau, Maëlle; Simpson, Charles; Jett, Christopher; Stone, Matthew R.; Charles, Florie; Chiang, Colby; Lynch, Stacey N.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Delling, Francesca N.; Freed, Lisa A.; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Le Tourneau, Thierry; LeMarec, Hervé; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Trujillano, Daniel; Ossowski, Stephan; Estivill, Xavier; Dina, Christian; Bruneval, Patrick; Chester, Adrian; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Irvine, Kenneth D.; Mao, Yaopan; Wessels, Andy; Motiwala, Tahirali; Puceat, Michel; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Menick, Donald R.; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Nie, Xingju; Broome, Ann-Marie; Williams, Katherine; Johnson, Amanda; Markwald, Roger R.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Hagege, Albert; Levine, Robert A.; Milan, David J.; Norris, Russell A.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common cardiac valve disease that affects nearly 1 in 40 individuals1–3. It can manifest as mitral regurgitation and is the leading indication for mitral valve surgery4,5. Despite a clear heritable component, the genetic etiology leading to non-syndromic MVP has remained elusive. Four affected individuals from a large multigenerational family segregating non-syndromic MVP underwent capture sequencing of the linked interval on chromosome 11. We report a missense mutation in the DCHS1 gene, the human homologue of the Drosophila cell polarity gene dachsous (ds) that segregates with MVP in the family. Morpholino knockdown of the zebrafish homolog dachsous1b resulted in a cardiac atrioventricular canal defect that could be rescued by wild-type human DCHS1, but not by DCHS1 mRNA with the familial mutation. Further genetic studies identified two additional families in which a second deleterious DCHS1 mutation segregates with MVP. Both DCHS1 mutations reduce protein stability as demonstrated in zebrafish, cultured cells, and, notably, in mitral valve interstitial cells (MVICs) obtained during mitral valve repair surgery of a proband. Dchs1+/− mice had prolapse of thickened mitral leaflets, which could be traced back to developmental errors in valve morphogenesis. DCHS1 deficiency in MVP patient MVICs as well as in Dchs1+/− mouse MVICs result in altered migration and cellular patterning, supporting these processes as etiological underpinnings for the disease. Understanding the role of DCHS1 in mitral valve development and MVP pathogenesis holds potential for therapeutic insights for this very common disease. PMID:26258302

  6. Correction of anterior mitral prolapse: the parachute technique.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Konstantinos; Mitchell-Heggs, Laurens; Di Nitto, Valentina; Kirsch, Matthias E W; Noghin, Milena; Ghorayeb, Gabriel; Lessana, Arrigo

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate a new surgical technique for the correction of anterior mitral leaflet prolapse. From October 2006 to November 2011, 44 consecutive patients (28 males, mean age 55 ± 13 years) underwent mitral valve repair because of anterior mitral leaflet prolapse. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate the distance from the tip of each papillary muscle to the annular plane. A specially designed caliper was used to manufacture a parachute-like device, by looping a 4-0 polytetrafluoroethylene suture between a Dacron strip and Teflon felt pledget, according to the preoperative echocardiographic measurements. This parachute was then used to resuspend the anterior mitral leaflet to the corresponding papillary muscle. Of the 44 patients, 35 (80%) required concomitant posterior leaflet repair. Additional procedures were required in 16 patients (36%). The preoperative logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation was 4.3 ± 6.9. The clinical and echocardiographic follow-up were complete. The total follow-up was 1031 patient-months and averaged 23.4 ± 17.2 months per patient. The overall mortality rate was 4.5% (n = 2). Also, 2 patients (4.5%) with recurrent mitral regurgitation required mitral valve replacement, 1 on the first postoperative day and 1 after 13 months. In the latter patient, histologic analysis showed complete endothelialization of the Dacron strip. At follow-up, all non-reoperated survivors (n = 40) were in New York Heart Association class I, with no regurgitation in 40 patients (93%) and grade 2+ mitral regurgitation in 3 (7%). This technique offers a simple and reproducible solution for correction of anterior leaflet prolapse. Echocardiography can reliably evaluate the length of the chordae. However, the long-term results must be evaluated and compared with other surgical strategies. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular filling after mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed Central

    St John Sutton, M G; Traill, T A; Ghafour, A S; Brown, D J; Gibson, D G

    1977-01-01

    In order to investigate the functional effects of mitral valve surgery, echocardiograms showing left ventricular dimension were recorded and digitised in 14 normal subjects and 129 patients after mitral valve surgery. Measurements were made of peak rate of increase of dimension (dD/dt) and duration of rapid filling, studies on left ventriculograms in 36 patients having shown close correlation between these values and changes in cavity volume. In 14 patients with mitral stenosis, peak dD/dt was reduced to 7-2 +/ 1-5 cm/s, and filling period prolonged to 330 +/- 65 ms, compared with normal (16-0 +/- 3-2 cm/s, and 160 +/- 50 ms, respectively), and after mitral valvotomy, these values improved significantly (10-4 +/- 2-7 cm/s and 245 +/- 55 ms). Characteristic abnormalities were found in 67 patients with mitral prostheses. Values for the Björk-Shiley (10-5 +/- 4-2 cm/s and 180 +/- 80 ms) and Hancock (10-3 +/- 3-7 cm/s, 245 +/- 80 ms) values were similar, and both superior to the Starr-Edwards (7-4 +/- 3-0 cm/s, 295 +/- 105 ms). Results after mitral valve repair in 30 cases were not significantly different from normal (14-4 +/- 5-0 cm/s, 170 +/- 50 ms). Values outside the 95 per cent confidence limits for the valve in question allowed diagnosis of value malfunction in 18 cases. The method is value in comparing different operative procedures and in following up patients after mitral valve surgery. PMID:603728

  8. Mutations in DCHS1 cause mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Durst, Ronen; Sauls, Kimberly; Peal, David S; deVlaming, Annemarieke; Toomer, Katelynn; Leyne, Maire; Salani, Monica; Talkowski, Michael E; Brand, Harrison; Perrocheau, Maëlle; Simpson, Charles; Jett, Christopher; Stone, Matthew R; Charles, Florie; Chiang, Colby; Lynch, Stacey N; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Delling, Francesca N; Freed, Lisa A; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Le Tourneau, Thierry; LeMarec, Hervé; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Trujillano, Daniel; Ossowski, Stephan; Estivill, Xavier; Dina, Christian; Bruneval, Patrick; Chester, Adrian; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Irvine, Kenneth D; Mao, Yaopan; Wessels, Andy; Motiwala, Tahirali; Puceat, Michel; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Menick, Donald R; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Nie, Xingju; Broome, Ann-Marie; Williams, Katherine; Johnson, Amanda; Markwald, Roger R; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Hagege, Albert; Levine, Robert A; Milan, David J; Norris, Russell A; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2015-09-03

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common cardiac valve disease that affects nearly 1 in 40 individuals. It can manifest as mitral regurgitation and is the leading indication for mitral valve surgery. Despite a clear heritable component, the genetic aetiology leading to non-syndromic MVP has remained elusive. Four affected individuals from a large multigenerational family segregating non-syndromic MVP underwent capture sequencing of the linked interval on chromosome 11. We report a missense mutation in the DCHS1 gene, the human homologue of the Drosophila cell polarity gene dachsous (ds), that segregates with MVP in the family. Morpholino knockdown of the zebrafish homologue dachsous1b resulted in a cardiac atrioventricular canal defect that could be rescued by wild-type human DCHS1, but not by DCHS1 messenger RNA with the familial mutation. Further genetic studies identified two additional families in which a second deleterious DCHS1 mutation segregates with MVP. Both DCHS1 mutations reduce protein stability as demonstrated in zebrafish, cultured cells and, notably, in mitral valve interstitial cells (MVICs) obtained during mitral valve repair surgery of a proband. Dchs1(+/-) mice had prolapse of thickened mitral leaflets, which could be traced back to developmental errors in valve morphogenesis. DCHS1 deficiency in MVP patient MVICs, as well as in Dchs1(+/-) mouse MVICs, result in altered migration and cellular patterning, supporting these processes as aetiological underpinnings for the disease. Understanding the role of DCHS1 in mitral valve development and MVP pathogenesis holds potential for therapeutic insights for this very common disease.

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of Mitral Regurgitation Secondary to Mitral Valve Prolapse by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Le Goffic, Caroline; Toledano, Manuel; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Binda, Camille; Castel, Anne-Laure; Delelis, François; Graux, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Maréchaux, Sylvestre

    2015-11-01

    The present prospective study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of quantitative assessment of mitral regurgitant fraction (MRF) by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in the modern era using as reference method the blinded multiparametric integrative assessment of mitral regurgitation (MR) severity. 2-Dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) MRF by echocardiography (2D echo MRF and 3D echo MRF) were obtained by measuring the difference in left ventricular (LV) total stroke volume (obtained from either 2D or 3D acquisition) and aortic forward stroke volume normalized to LV total stroke volume. MRF was calculated by cMRI using either (1) (LV stroke volume - systolic aortic outflow volume by phase contrast)/LV stroke volume (cMRI MRF [volumetric]) or (2) (mitral inflow volume - systolic aortic outflow volume)/mitral inflow volume (cMRI MRF [phase contrast]). Six patients had 1 + MR, 6 patients had 2 + MR, 12 patients had 3 + MR, and 10 had 4 + MR. A significant correlation was observed between MR grading and 2D echo MRF (r = 0.60, p <0.0001) and 3D echo MRF (r = 0.79, p <0.0001), cMRI MRF (volumetric) (r = 0.87, p <0.0001), and cMRI MRF (phase contrast r = 0.72, p <0.001). The accuracy of MRF for the diagnosis of MR ≥3+ or 4+ was the highest with cMRI MRF (volumetric) (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.98), followed by 3D echo MRF (AUC = 0.96), 2D echo MRF (AUC = 0.90), and cMRI MRF (phase contrast; AUC = 0.83). In conclusion, MRF by cMRI (volumetric method) and 3D echo MRF had the highest diagnostic value to detect significant MR, whereas the diagnostic value of 2D echo MRF and cMRI MRF (phase contrast) was lower. Hence, the present study suggests that both cMRI (volumetric method) and 3D echo represent best approaches for calculating MRF.

  10. ANP and BNP plasma levels in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis after percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rużyłło, Witold; Chmielak, Zbigniew; Opalińska-Ciszek, Ewa; Janas, Jadwiga; Hoffman, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Grzybowski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Atrial (ANP) and B-type (BNP) natriuretic peptides are hormones secreted by the heart as a response to volume expansion and pressure overload. Aim To assess the changes of ANP and BNP after percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (PBMV) and to investigate factors associated with endpoints. Material and methods The study included 96 patients (90.7% females, age 51.6 ±12.2 years) with rheumatic mitral valve stenosis (mitral valve area (MVA) 1.18 (1.01–1.33) cm2, mean mitral gradient (MMG) 8.2 (7.1–9.2) mm Hg, NYHA 2.09 (1.9–2.5)). Patients were followed up for 29.1 months for the search of endpoints. Results The PBMV was successful in all cases. After the procedure MVA increased (1.18–1.78 cm2, p < 0.01) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) decreased (29.8–21.8 mm Hg, p < 0.01). Concentration of ANP significantly rose 30 min after the PBMV (79.2 vs. 134.2 pg/ml, p = 0.012) and dropped significantly after 24 h (134.2 vs. 70.4 pg/ml, p = 0.01). Furthermore, after 36 months concentration of ANP did not differ from the baseline value (p = NS). BNP concentration at day 1 was lower than at baseline (94.5 vs. 80.2 pg/ml, p = 0.032). Moreover, during the follow-up period BNP continued to fall at all time points. In univariate analysis parameters associated with endpoint occurrence were baseline PAP (p = 0.023), baseline PCWP (p = 0.022), baseline NYHA (p = 0.041) and increase in 6-minute walk test (6MWT) (p = 0.043). In multivariate analysis the only factor associated with endpoint occurrence was baseline NYHA (HR = 1.52, 95% CI: –1.3–1.91, p = 0.022). Conclusions Patients with MS had increased levels of both BNP and ANP. Baseline NYHA class was found to be associated with outcomes after the procedure. PMID:28344613

  11. Impact of mitral geometry and global afterload on improvement of mitral regurgitation after trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Dworakowski, R; Kogoj, P; Reiken, J; Kenny, C; MacCarthy, P; Wendler, O; Monaghan, M J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of mitral geometry, left ventricular (LV) remodelling and global LV afterload on mitral regurgitation (MR) after trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods In this study, 60 patients who underwent TAVI were evaluated by 3D echocardiography at baseline, 1 month and 6 months after procedure. The proportional change in MR following TAVI was determined by examining the percentage change in vena contracta (VC) at 6 months. Patients having a significant reduction of at least 30% in VC were defined as good responders (GR) and the remaining patients were defined as poor responders (PR). Results After 6 months of TAVI, 27 (45%) patients were GR and 33 (55%) were PR. There was a significant decrease in 3DE-derived mitral annular diameter and area (P = 0.001), mitral valve tenting area (TA) (P = 0.05), and mitral papillary muscle dyssynchrony index (DSI) (P = 0.05) in the GR group. 3DE-derived LVESV (P = 0.016), LV mass (P = 0.001) and LV DSI, (P = 0.001) were also improved 6 months after TAVI. In addition, valvulo-arterial impedance (ZVA) was significantly higher at baseline in patients with PR (P = 0.028). 3DE-derived mitral annular area (β: 0.47, P = 0.04), mitral papillary DSI (β: −0.65, P = 0.012) and ZVA (β: 0.45, P = 0.028) were the strongest independent parameters that could predict the reduction of functional MR after TAVI. Conclusion GR patients demonstrate more regression in mitral annulus area and diameter after significant decrease in high LVEDP and trans-aortic gradients with TAVI. PR patients appear to have increased baseline ZVA, mitral valve tenting and restriction in mitral valve coaptation. These factors are important for predicting the impact of TAVI on pre-existing MR. PMID:27457965

  12. Diastolic murmurs in the presence of Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, R A; McAnulty, J H; Starr, A; Rahimtoola, S H

    1975-03-01

    Diastolic murmurs associated with the Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis have not been described previously. In this report, five patients with mitral prostheses are described in whom apical mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs resulted from two different causes. Three patients had clots obstructing the prosthetic orifice. The other two had normally functioning protheses and moderately severe aortic insufficiency. The occurrence of mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs in the presence of a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve demonstrates that 1) the mid-diastolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete mitral valve opening, premature mitral valve closure, vibrating mitral leaflets, or relative mitral stenosis and 2) the presystolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete valve opening or presystolic mitral regurgitation. However, the presystolic murmur was associated with early closure movement of the presthetic poppet.

  13. Association between the N-terminal plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels or elevated left ventricular filling pressure and thromboembolic risk in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ga-In; Cho, Kyoung-Im; Kim, Hyun-Su; Heo, Jung-Ho; Cha, Tae-Joon

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and left ventricular (LV) filling pressures in thromboembolic risk in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Among 327 patients with non-valvular AF, the ratio of peak early filling velocity to mitral annulus velocity (E/Ea) and N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) was compared according to the presence of left atrial appendage (LAA) dysfunction [presence of spontaneous echo contrast (SEC)≥grade 3 and/or reduced LAA emptying flow velocity <20cm/s]. Compared to patients without LAA dysfunction, patients with LAA dysfunction presented with significantly higher CHADS2 scores (1.24±1.14 vs. 1.68±1.31, p=0.005), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (0.36±1.18mg/dl vs. 0.66±1.32mg/dl, p=0.043), and NT-proBNP (765.3±2534.8pg/ml vs. 2266.9±6117.4pg/ml, p=0.002). Furthermore, patients with LAA dysfunction showed significantly higher left atrial volume index (LAVI, 25.1±10.9 vs. 43.1±22.1, p<0.001) and E/Ea (10.8±7.27 vs. 7.97±2.50mg/dl, p<0.001). Plasma logNT-proBNP levels were significantly correlated with the presence of SEC (r=0.276, p<0.001), LAA emptying flow velocity (r=-0.492, p<0.001), LAVI (r=0.405, p<0.001), and E/Ea (r=0.353, p<0.001). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that high NT-proBNP level >249.7pg/ml (odds ratio, OR 6.79, 95% confidence interval, CI 3.16-15.55, p<0.001) and E/Ea >10 (OR 4.41, 95% CI 2.39-8.15, p<0.001) were independent predictors of LAA dysfunction after adjustment of known thromboembolic risk factors. Elevated plasma NT-proBNP concentrations and LV filling pressures represented by LAA dysfunction may be reliable surrogate markers for predicting thromboembolic risk in patients with AF. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Relief of mitral incompetence by selective intracoronary thrombolysis in hyperacute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Keltai, M; Palik, I; Rozsa, Z; Szente, A

    1985-01-01

    Left ventriculography and coronary arteriography were performed in 47 patients with hyperacute myocardial infarction prior to recanalization of the infarct-related vessel. Mitral regurgitation was found in ten patients. After successful recanalization, left ventriculography was repeated in eight of the ten patients with mitral incompetence, and the mitral regurgitation had disappeared in seven. Selective intracoronary thrombolysis resulted in improved left ventricular function and disappearance of mitral incompetence.

  15. Tricuspid regurgitation after successful mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Raftopoulos, Leonidas; Aggeli, Constantina; Vlasseros, Ioannis; Felekos, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    The tricuspid valve (TV) is inseparably connected with the mitral valve (MV) in terms of function. Any pathophysiological condition concerning the MV is potentially a threat for the normal function of the TV as well. One of the most challenging cases is functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) after surgical MV correction. In the past, TR was considered to progressively revert with time after left-sided valve restoration. Nevertheless, more recent studies showed that TR could develop and evolve postoperatively over time, as well as being closely associated with a poorer prognosis in terms of morbidity and mortality. Pressure and volume overload are usually the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms; structural alterations, like tricuspid annulus dilatation, increased leaflet tethering and right ventricular remodelling are almost always present when regurgitation develops. The most important risk factors associated with a higher probability of late TR development involve the elderly, female gender, larger left atrial size, atrial fibrillation, right chamber dilatation, higher pulmonary artery systolic pressures, longer times from the onset of MV disease to surgery, history of rheumatic heart disease, ischaemic heart disease and prosthetic valve malfunction. The time of TR manifestation can be up to 10 years or more after an MV surgery. Echocardiography, including the novel 3D Echo techniques, is crucial in the early diagnosis and prognosis of future TV disease development. Appropriate surgical technique and timing still need to be clarified. PMID:22457188

  16. Artificial intelligence in mitral valve analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeganathan, Jelliffe; Knio, Ziyad; Amador, Yannis; Hai, Ting; Khamooshian, Arash; Matyal, Robina; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Mahmood, Feroze

    2017-01-01

    Echocardiographic analysis of mitral valve (MV) has become essential for diagnosis and management of patients with MV disease. Currently, the various software used for MV analysis require manual input and are prone to interobserver variability in the measurements. The aim of this study is to determine the interobserver variability in an automated software that uses artificial intelligence for MV analysis. Retrospective analysis of intraoperative three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography data acquired from four patients with normal MV undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery in a tertiary hospital. Echocardiographic data were analyzed using the eSie Valve Software (Siemens Healthcare, Mountain View, CA, USA). Three examiners analyzed three end-systolic (ES) frames from each of the four patients. A total of 36 ES frames were analyzed and included in the study. A multiple mixed-effects ANOVA model was constructed to determine if the examiner, the patient, and the loop had a significant effect on the average value of each parameter. A Bonferroni correction was used to correct for multiple comparisons, and P = 0.0083 was considered to be significant. Examiners did not have an effect on any of the six parameters tested. Patient and loop had an effect on the average parameter value for each of the six parameters as expected (P < 0.0083 for both). We were able to conclude that using automated analysis, it is possible to obtain results with good reproducibility, which only requires minimal user intervention.

  17. Tricuspid regurgitation after successful mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Raftopoulos, Leonidas; Aggeli, Constantina; Vlasseros, Ioannis; Felekos, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2012-07-01

    The tricuspid valve (TV) is inseparably connected with the mitral valve (MV) in terms of function. Any pathophysiological condition concerning the MV is potentially a threat for the normal function of the TV as well. One of the most challenging cases is functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) after surgical MV correction. In the past, TR was considered to progressively revert with time after left-sided valve restoration. Nevertheless, more recent studies showed that TR could develop and evolve postoperatively over time, as well as being closely associated with a poorer prognosis in terms of morbidity and mortality. Pressure and volume overload are usually the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms; structural alterations, like tricuspid annulus dilatation, increased leaflet tethering and right ventricular remodelling are almost always present when regurgitation develops. The most important risk factors associated with a higher probability of late TR development involve the elderly, female gender, larger left atrial size, atrial fibrillation, right chamber dilatation, higher pulmonary artery systolic pressures, longer times from the onset of MV disease to surgery, history of rheumatic heart disease, ischaemic heart disease and prosthetic valve malfunction. The time of TR manifestation can be up to 10 years or more after an MV surgery. Echocardiography, including the novel 3D Echo techniques, is crucial in the early diagnosis and prognosis of future TV disease development. Appropriate surgical technique and timing still need to be clarified.

  18. Cost effectiveness of robotic mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Significant technological advances have led to an impressive evolution in mitral valve surgery over the last two decades, allowing surgeons to safely perform less invasive operations through the right chest. Most new technology comes with an increased upfront cost that must be measured against postoperative savings and other advantages such as decreased perioperative complications, faster recovery, and earlier return to preoperative level of functioning. The Da Vinci robot is an example of such a technology, combining the significant benefits of minimally invasive surgery with a “gold standard” valve repair. Although some have reported that robotic surgery is associated with increased overall costs, there is literature suggesting that efficient perioperative care and shorter lengths of stay can offset the increased capital and intraoperative expenses. While data on current cost is important to consider, one must also take into account future potential value resulting from technological advancement when evaluating cost-effectiveness. Future refinements that will facilitate more effective surgery, coupled with declining cost of technology will further increase the value of robotic surgery compared to traditional approaches. PMID:28203539

  19. Patient-specific mitral leaflet segmentation from 4D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Robert J; Tenenholtz, Neil A; Perrin, Douglas P; Marx, Gerald R; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Segmenting the mitral valve during closure and throughout a cardiac cycle from four dimensional ultrasound (4DUS) is important for creation and validation of mechanical models and for improved visualization and understanding of mitral valve behavior. Current methods of segmenting the valve from 4DUS either require extensive user interaction and initialization, do not maintain the valve geometry across a cardiac cycle, or are incapable of producing a detailed coaptation line and surface. We present a method of segmenting the mitral valve annulus and leaflets from 4DUS such that a detailed, patient-specific annulus and leaflets are tracked throughout mitral valve closure, resulting in a detailed coaptation region. The method requires only the selection of two frames from a sequence indicating the start and end of valve closure and a single point near a closed valve. The annulus and leaflets are first found through direct segmentation in the appropriate frames and then by tracking the known geometry to the remaining frames. We compared the automatically segmented meshes to expert manual tracings for both a normal and diseased mitral valve, and found an average difference of 0.59 +/- 0.49 mm, which is on the order of the spatial resolution of the ultrasound volumes (0.5-1.0 mm/voxel).

  20. Usefulness of radionuclide angiocardiography in predicting stenotic mitral orifice area

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.J.; Armitage, D.L.; Fountas, P.N.; Tremblay, P.C.; Druck, M.N.

    1986-12-01

    Fifteen patients with pure mitral stenosis (MS) underwent high-temporal-resolution radionuclide angiocardiography for calculation of the ratio of peak left ventricular (LV) filling rate divided by mean LV filling rate (filling ratio). Whereas LV filling normally occurs in 3 phases, in MS it is more uniform. Thus, in 13 patients the filling ratio was below the normal range of 2.21 to 2.88 (p less than 0.001). In 11 patients in atrial fibrillation, filling ratio divided by mean cardiac cycle length and by LV ejection fraction provided good correlation (r = 0.85) with modified Gorlin formula derived mitral area and excellent correlation with echocardiographic mitral area (r = 0.95). Significant MS can be detected using radionuclide angiocardiography to calculate filling ratio. In the absence of the confounding influence of atrial systole calculation of 0.14 (filling ratio divided by cardiac cycle length divided by LV ejection fraction) + 0.40 cm2 enables accurate prediction of mitral area (+/- 4%). Our data support the contention that the modified Gorlin formula, based on steady-state hemodynamics, provides less certain estimates of mitral area for patients with MS and atrial fibrillation, in whom echocardiography and radionuclide angiocardiography may be more accurate.

  1. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N.; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Su Hao, LO; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Bruneval, Patrick; Norris, Russell A.; Milan, David J.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Levine, Robert A.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown aetiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death1. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance2–5. We performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies in 1,442 cases and 2,439 controls. We identified and replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls six loci and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 encoding a transcription factor6, for which morpholino knockdown in zebrafish results in atrioventricular (AV) valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained for tensin1 (TNS1), a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also show the expression of tensin1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1−/− mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair7. PMID:26301497

  2. Mitral valve repair: an echocardiographic review: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Echocardiographic imaging of the mitral valve before and immediately after repair is crucial to the immediate and long-term outcome. Prior to mitral valve repair, echocardiographic imaging helps determine the feasibility and method of repair. After the repair, echocardiographic imaging displays the new baseline anatomy, assesses function, and determines whether or not further management is necessary. Three-dimensional imaging has improved the assessment of the mitral valve and facilitates communication with the surgeon by providing the surgeon with an image that he/she might see upon opening up the atrium. Further advancements in imaging will continue to improve the understanding of the function and dysfunction of the mitral valve both before and after repair. This information will improve treatment options, timing of invasive therapies, and advancements of repair techniques to yield better short- and long-term patient outcomes. The purpose of this review was to connect the echocardiographic evaluation with the surgical procedure. Bridging the pre- and post-CPB imaging with the surgical procedure allows a greater understanding of mitral valve repair.

  3. Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery via right minithoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Glauber, Mattia; Karimov, Jamshid H; Farneti, Pier Andrea; Cerillo, Alfredo Giuseppe; Santarelli, Filippo; Ferrarini, Matteo; Del Sarto, Paolo; Murzi, Michele; Solinas, Marco

    2009-01-01

    From early experience in cardiac surgery on the mitral valve, access was gained in different ways: through left and right antero-lateral extended thoracotomy for closed and correspondingly for open mitral commissurotomy, from right parasternal access with rib resection, and via median sternotomy. Median sternotomy remains the most common approach for mitral valve procedures, such as replacement or repair, allowing good visualisation, exposure and working field. Applying the largely spread access as median sternotomy, surgeons always wanted to overcome the necessity of large incisions, get a better surgical view, to dissect with better respect to structural integrity and have better aesthetic results. Enhanced understanding of surgical bases and technological development sourced a breakthrough in minimally-invasive approach for mitral valve surgery, offering several advantages such as less postoperative pain, lower morbidity and mortality, faster recovery and shorter hospital stay. In an effort to share the institutional experience in less invasive surgery, this article demonstrates our approach in mitral valve repair through a right minithoracotomy in the 3rd or 4th intercostal space.

  4. Percutaneous transluminal balloon dilatation of the mitral valve in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R; Brender, D; McCredie, M

    1989-01-01

    Pregnancy can cause life threatening complications in women with mitral stenosis, and there is a substantial risk of fetal death if valvotomy under cardiopulmonary bypass is required. A patient is described in whom pulmonary oedema developed after delivery of her first child by caesarean section 13 months previously. Subsequent cardiac catheterisation showed severe mitral stenosis (valve area 0.96 cm2, valve gradient 12 mm Hg, pulmonary artery pressure 30/16 mm Hg). Before valvotomy could be performed the patient again became pregnant and presented in pulmonary oedema at twenty two weeks' gestation. Medical treatment was unsuccessful and she underwent percutaneous transluminal balloon dilatation of the mitral valve. This increased the valve area to 1.78 cm2 and reduced the transmitral gradient to 6 mm Hg. The procedure was uncomplicated, and she remained symptom free on no medication. She delivered vaginally at 37 weeks' gestation. Percutaneous transluminal balloon dilatation of the mitral valve is a safe and effective alternative to mitral valvotomy in pregnancy. PMID:2757867

  5. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lo, Su Hao; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Bruneval, Patrick; Markwald, Roger R; Norris, Russell A; Milan, David J; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Levine, Robert A; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Nonsyndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown etiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance. We performed a meta-analysis of 2 genome-wide association studies in 1,412 MVP cases and 2,439 controls. We identified 6 loci, which we replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls, and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 (LIM and cysteine-rich domains 1), which encodes a transcription factor and for which morpholino knockdown of the ortholog in zebrafish resulted in atrioventricular valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained with knockdown of the ortholog of TNS1, which encodes tensin 1, a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also showed expression of tensin 1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1(-/-) mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair.

  6. Three-dimensional echocardiography for assessment of mitral valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, Jose; de Agustín, Jose Alberto

    2009-09-01

    Since the last few years, three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) has become an accurate tool for mitral stenosis assessment. We will review the latest developments of 3DE in this matter. Accuracy of 3DE planimetry is superior to the accuracy of the invasive Gorlin's method for mitral valve area (MVA) measurements when a median value obtained from two-dimensional planimetry, pressure half-time, and proximal isovelocity surface area method is used as the gold standard. 3DE improves MVA measurement particularly in less experienced operators compared with experienced operators. 3DE also improves the measurement of MVA in patients with calcific mitral stenosis by means of colour planimetry of the flow stream. Comparison of mitral valve volumes measured by 3DE in patients with critical and without critical stenosis has shown significantly larger volumes in patients with critical stenosis. Currently, there is sufficient evidence that 3DE is superior to two-dimensional echocardiography and may be routinely used in the quantification of the MVA in mitral stenosis. In the coming years, 3DE might replace Gorlin's method as the gold standard for MVA quantification and may eventually make cardiac catheterization unnecessary.

  7. Microwave Ablation in Mitral Valve Surgery for Atrial Fibrillation (MAMA).

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Anders; Lehto, Mika; Ahn, Henrik; Hermansson, Ulf; Linde, Peter; Ahlsson, Anders; Koistinen, Juhani; Savola, Jukka; Raatikainen, Pekka; Lepojärvi, Martti; Sahlman, Antero; Werkkala, Kalervo; Toivonen, Lauri; Walfridsson, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Microwave ablation in conjunction with open heart surgery is effective in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In patients assigned for isolated mitral valve surgery no prospective randomized trial has reported its efficacy. Methods: 70 patients with longlasting AF where included from 5 different centres. They were randomly assigned to mitral valve surgery and atrial microwave ablation or mitral valve surgery alone. Results: Out of 70 randomized, 66 and 64 patients were available for evaluation at 6 and 12 months. At 12 months SR was restored and preserved in 71.0 % in the ablation group vs 36.4 % in the control group (P=0.006), corresponding figures at 6 months was 62.5 % vs 26.5 % (P=0.003). The 30-day mortality rate was 1.4 %, with one death in the ablation group vs zero deaths in the control group. At 12 months the mortality rate was 7,1 % (Ablation n=3 vs Control n=2). No significant differences existed between the groups with regard to the overall rate of serious adverse events (SAE) during the perioperative period or at the end of the study. 16 % of patients randomized to ablation were on antiarrhytmic drugs compared to 6 % in the control group after 1 year (p=0.22). Conclusion: Microwave ablation of left and right atrium in conjunction with mitral valve surgery is safe and effectively restores sinus rhythm in patients with longlasting AF as compared to mitral valve surgery alone.

  8. Intraoperative assessment of mitral valve area after mitral valve repair: comparison of different methods.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Andrew; Gemignani, Anthony; Singh, Arun; Mahmood, Feroze; Poppas, Athena

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, 3 different methods to measure the mitral valve area (MVA) after mitral valve repair (MVRep) were studied. Data obtained immediately after repair were compared with postoperative data. The objective was to determine the feasibility and correlation between intraoperative and postoperative MVA data. A prospective study. A tertiary care medical center. Twenty-five elective adult surgical patients scheduled for MVRep. Echocardiographic data included MVAs obtained using the pressure half-time (PHT), 2-dimensional planimetry (2D-PLAN), and the continuity equation (CE). These data were obtained immediately after cardiopulmonary bypass and were compared with data obtained before hospital discharge (transthoracic echocardiogram 1) and 6 to 12 months after surgery (transthoracic echocardiogram 2). Intraoperative care was guided by hemodynamic goals designed to optimize cardiac function. The data show good agreement and correlation between MVA obtained with PHT and 2D-PLAN within and between each time period. MVA data obtained with the CE in the postoperative period were lower than and did not correlate or agree as well with other MVA data. The MVA recorded immediately after valve repair, using PHT, correlated and agreed with MVA data obtained in the postoperative period. These results contrast with previously published data and could highlight the impact of hemodynamic function during the assessment of MVA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anatomical features of acute mitral valve repair dysfunction: Additional value of three-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Derkx, Salomé; Nguyen, Virginia; Cimadevilla, Claire; Verdonk, Constance; Lepage, Laurent; Raffoul, Richard; Nataf, Patrick; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2017-03-01

    Recurrence of mitral regurgitation after mitral valve repair is correlated with unfavourable left ventricular remodelling and poor outcome. This pictorial review describes the echocardiographic features of three types of acute mitral valve repair dysfunction, and the additional value of three-dimensional echocardiography.

  10. Caseous Calcification of Mitral Annulus: A Rare Monster Leading to Cerebrovascular Accident.

    PubMed

    Memon, Sarfaraz; Chhabra, Lovely; Krainski, Felix; Parker, Matthew W; Swales, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Caseous calcification of the mitral annulus (CCMA) is a rare variant of mitral annular calcification that maybe easily misdiagnosed or confused with an abscess, a tumor, or infective vegetation. The main pathophysiological mechanism leading to CCMA involves degeneration and calcium deposition on the mitral valve. We present a case of CCMA to help understand this clinical entity.

  11. Opening snap and isovolumic relaxation period in relation to mitral valve flow in patients with mitral stenosis. Significance of A2--OS interval.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmanson, D; Veyrat, C; Bernier, A; Witchitz, S; Chiche, P

    1976-01-01

    In 15 patients with pure or predominant mitral stenosis and in a control group of 11 patients without mitral stenosis the blood flow velocity through the mitral valve orifice was recorded by means of a directional Doppler ultrasound velocity catheter introduced transeptally and positioned in the orifice of the mitral valve. A simultaneous surface phonocardiogram was obtained. The timing of the mitral opening snap in relation to the blood velocity record of the flow through the valve supported the hypothesis that the opening snap is due to a sudden tensing of the valve leaflets by the chordae tendineae. Determination of the exact time of mitral valve opening, made possible by the blood velocity record, led to the division of the classical A2-0S interval (aortic valve closure to opening snap) into two components representing respectively the diastolic isovolumic relaxation period and the time of excursion of the mitral valve cusps. The durations of the isovolumic relaxation period were compared with those in the control patients and were found to correlate with the severity of the mitral stenosis, whereas those of the excursion time of the mitral cusps were influenced by the presence or absence of mitral valve calcification. PMID:1259828

  12. Percutaneous Mitral Valvotomy in a Case of Situs Inversus Totalis and Juvenile Rheumatic Critical Mitral Stenosis: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Thakur, Ramesh; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Sayal, Karandeep Singh; Sachan, Mohit; Krishna, Vinay; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mishra, Vikas; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis is a rare congenital disorder where the heart being a mirror image is situated on the right side of the body. Distorted cardiac anatomy makes fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous mitral valvotomy (PMV) technically challenging and there are only few reports of PMV in situs inversus totalis. Here we report a case where PMV was successfully done for situs inversus totalis with rare coincidence of juvenile rheumatic severe mitral stenosis in a 12-year-old boy with a few modifications of standard Inoue technique. He had exertional dyspnea of NYHA class III with initial mitral valve area (MVA) of 0.6 cm2 and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension with features suitable for PMV. Femoral vein was accessed from the left side to align the septal puncture needle and balloon to facilitate left ventricular entry. Septal descent and puncture by Brockenbrough needle was performed in the right anterior oblique view with the needle facing 5 o’clock position. Accura balloon was negotiated across mitral valve in left anterior oblique and procedure was successfully executed. Echocardiography showed a well-divided anterior commissure with an MVA of 2.0 cm2 and mild mitral regurgitation. In summary, PMV is safe and feasible in the rare patient with situs inversus totalis with few modifications of the Inoue technique. PMID:26985259

  13. The role of papillary muscle approximation in mitral valve repair for the treatment of secondary mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Yucel, Evin; Santana, Orlando

    2016-12-30

    SummarySecondary mitral regurgitation (MR) is present in up to half of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and is associated with a poor prognosis. It primarily results from progressive left ventricular remodelling, papillary muscle displacement and tethering of the mitral valve leaflets. Mitral valve repair with an undersized ring annuloplasty is the reparative procedure of choice in the treatment of secondary MR. However, this technique is associated with a 30-60% incidence of recurrent moderate or greater MR at mid-term follow-up, which results in progressive deterioration of left ventricular function and increased morbidity. Combined mitral valve repair and papillary muscle approximation has been applied in order to address both the annular and subvalvular dysfunction that coexist in secondary MR, which include graft and suture-based techniques. Herein, we provide a systematic review of the published literature regarding the technical aspects, clinical application, and outcomes of mitral valve repair with combined ring annuloplasty and papillary muscle approximation for the treatment of secondary MR.

  14. [Does mitral valve annuloplasty improve long-term survival in patients having moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation undergoing CABG?].

    PubMed

    Silberman, Shuli; Merin, Ofer; Fink, Daniel; Alshousha, Atia; Shachar, Sigal; Tauber, Rachel; Butnaro, Adi; Bitran, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The best surgical approach for patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is still undetermined. We examined long term outcomes in patients with moderate IMR undergoing coronary bypass (CABG), and compared outcomes between those undergoing isolated CABG to those undergoing concomitant restrictive annuloplasty. Between the years 1993-2011, 231 patients with moderate IMR underwent CABG: group 1 (n = 186) underwent isolated CABG, group 2 (n = 15) underwent CABG with concomitant mitral valve annuloplasty. Univariate analysis was used to compare baseline parameters. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to compare survival. Cox multivariate regression was used to determine predictors for late survival. Survival data up to 20 years is 97% complete. The groups were similar with respect to age, prior MI, LV function, and incidence of atrial fibrillation. Patients undergoing mitral repair had a higher incidence of congestive heart failure (CHF) (p < 0.0001). After surgery more repair patients required use of inotropes (p = 0.0005). Overall operative mortality was 7% and similar between groups. Ten year survival was 55% and 52% for groups 1 and 2 respectively (p = 0.2). Predictors of late mortality included age, CHF, LV dimensions and LV dysfunction. Neither the addition of a mitral procedure and type of ring implanted nor residual MR after surgery, emerged as predictors of survival. In patients with moderate ischemic MR, neither operative mortality nor long term survival are affected by the performance of a restrictive annuloplasty. For patients with CHF, mitral repair may be beneficial in terms of survival.

  15. The Ross II procedure: pulmonary autograft in the mitral position.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Thanos; Cherian, Ashok; Ross, Donald

    2004-10-01

    The surgical management of mitral valve disease in women of childbearing age, young patients, and children with congenital mitral valve defects is made difficult by the prospect of lifelong anticoagulation. We suggest the use of a pulmonary autograft in the mitral position (Ross II procedure) as an alternative surgical technique. We present a review of the literature, historical perspectives, indications, selection criteria, and surgical technique for the Ross II procedure. Our literature search identified 14 studies that reported results from the Ross II operation. Performed in 103 patients, the overall in-hospital mortality was 7 (6.7%), with a late mortality of 10 (9%). Although further research is needed, current evidence suggests the Ross II operation is a valuable alternative in low-risk young patients where valve durability and the complication rate from other procedures is unsatisfactory and anticoagulation not ideal.

  16. [Longterm results of mitral valve replacement (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Erhard, W; Reichmann, M; Delius, W; Sebening, H; Herrmann, G

    1977-04-22

    210 patients were followed up by the actuary method for over 5 years after isolated mitral valve replacement or a double valve replacement. After isolated valve replacement the one month survival including the operative mortality was 92+/-2%. The survival after one year was 83+/-3% and after 5 years 66+/-7%. The five year survival of patients in preoperative class III (according to the NYHA) was 73+/-8% and of class IV 57+/-8% (P less than or equal to 0.1). A comparison of valve replacements for pure mitral stenosis or mitral insufficiency showed no statistically significant differences. In the 37 patients who had a double valve replacement the survival risk was not increased in comparison with those patients who had had a single valve replacement. Age above 45 years and a preoperative markedly raised pulmonary arteriolar resistance reduced the chances of survival.

  17. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction with mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yan; Zeng, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ying; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Current evidences suggest that revascularization of the culprit vessels with percutaneous coronary artery intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting can be beneficial for relieving IMR. A 2.5-year follow-up data of a 61-year-old male patient with ST-segment elevation AMI complicated with IMR showed that mitral regurgitation area increased five days after PCI, and decreased to lower steady level three months after PCI. This finding suggest that three months after PCI might be a suitable time point for evaluating the possibility of IMR recovery and the necessity of surgical intervention of the mitral valve for AMI patient. PMID:27582769

  18. Surgical phantom for off-pump mitral valve replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Doug L.; Campbell, Gordon; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    Off-pump, intracardiac, beating heart surgery has the potential to improve patient outcomes by eliminating the need for cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross clamping but it requires extensive image guidance as well as the development of specialized instrumentation. Previously, developments in image guidance and instrumentation were validated on either a static phantom or in vivo through porcine models. This paper describes the design and development of a surgical phantom for simulating off-pump mitral valve replacement inside the closed beating heart. The phantom allows surgical access to the mitral annulus while mimicking the pressure inside the beating heart. An image guidance system using tracked ultrasound, magnetic instrument tracking and preoperative models previously developed for off-pump mitral valve replacement is applied to the phantom. Pressure measurements and ultrasound images confirm the phantom closely mimics conditions inside the beating heart.

  19. Lack of progress in valvular heart disease in the pre-transcatheter aortic valve replacement era: increasing deaths and minimal change in mortality rate over the past three decades.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Sean; Cox, Brian; Williams, Michael J A

    2014-04-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is an increasingly common problem in clinical practice. With the development of new but expensive therapeutic options, health care systems require timely epidemiological information on VHD. We sought to determine the mortality burden of VHD and how it has changed over time. Population level data from the United States (US) from 1979 to 2009 were used to examine trends in VHD mortality rates over time. Our outcome measure was death, where the primary cause of death was valvular heart disease. The annual number of VHD deaths increased from 15,054 in 1979 to 26,663 in 2009, an increase of on average 2.8% in the US each year (R(2) = 0.97, P < .001). The total VHD mortality rate increased with older age and male sex. There was little overall change in age- and sex-adjusted total VHD mortality rate over time (mortality rate ratio per year 0.999, 95% confidence interval 0.999 to 0.999, P < .001). Non-rheumatic aortic valve disease accounted for 45.2% of all VHD deaths. Adjusted mortality rates for aortic valve disease, mitral valve disease and endocarditis increased (P < .001), while that for rheumatic heart disease decreased (P < .001). If VHD mortality rates remain stable, deaths due to VHD are projected to double over the next 25 years. Despite improvements in mortality rates for other major conditions and in surgical outcomes for VHD, adjusted VHD mortality rates showed minimal change over the 31 years examined. The ageing population is driving a marked increase in the number of deaths due to VHD. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling the Myxomatous Mitral Valve With Three-Dimensional Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Pouch, Alison M; Jackson, Benjamin M; Lai, Eric; Takebe, Manabu; Tian, Sijie; Cheung, Albert T; Woo, Y Joseph; Patel, Prakash A; Wang, Hongzhi; Yushkevich, Paul A; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H

    2016-09-01

    Degenerative mitral valve disease is associated with variable and complex defects in valve morphology. Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) has shown promise in aiding preoperative planning for patients with this disease but to date has not been as transformative as initially predicted. The clinical usefulness of 3DE has been limited by the laborious methods currently required to extract quantitative data from the images. To maximize the utility of 3DE for preoperative valve evaluation, this work describes an automated 3DE image analysis method for generating models of the mitral valve that are well suited for both qualitative and quantitative assessment. The method is unique in that it captures detailed alterations in mitral leaflet and annular morphology and produces image-derived models with locally varying leaflet thickness. The method is evaluated on midsystolic transesophageal 3DE images acquired from 22 subjects with myxomatous degeneration and from 22 subjects with normal mitral valve morphology. Relative to manual image analysis, the automated method accurately represents both normal and complex leaflet geometries with a mean boundary displacement error on the order of one image voxel. A detailed quantitative analysis of the valves is presented and reveals statistically significant differences between normal and myxomatous valves with respect to numerous aspects of annular and leaflet geometry. This work demonstrates a successful methodology for the relatively rapid quantitative description of the complex mitral valve distortions associated with myxomatous degeneration. The methodology has the potential to significantly improve surgical planning for patients with complex mitral valve disease. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling the Myxomatous Mitral Valve With Three-Dimensional Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Pouch, Alison M.; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Lai, Eric; Takebe, Manabu; Tian, Sijie; Cheung, Albert T.; Woo, Y. Joseph; Patel, Prakash A.; Wang, Hongzhi; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Degenerative mitral valve disease is associated with variable and complex defects in valve morphology. Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) has shown promise in aiding preoperative planning for patients with this disease but to date has not been as transformative as initially predicted. The clinical usefulness of 3DE has been limited by the laborious methods currently required to extract quantitative data from the images. Methods To maximize the utility of 3DE for preoperative valve evaluation, this work describes an automated 3DE image analysis method for generating models of the mitral valve that are well suited for both qualitative and quantitative assessment. The method is unique in that it captures detailed alterations in mitral leaflet and annular morphology and produces image-derived models with locally varying leaflet thickness. The method is evaluated on midsystolic transesophageal 3DE images acquired from 22 subjects with myxomatous degeneration and from 22 subjects with normal mitral valve morphology. Results Relative to manual image analysis, the automated method accurately represents both normal and complex leaflet geometries with a mean boundary displacement error on the order of one image voxel. A detailed quantitative analysis of the valves is presented and reveals statistically significant differences between normal and myxomatous valves with respect to numerous aspects of annular and leaflet geometry. Conclusions This work demonstrates a successful methodology for the relatively rapid quantitative description of the complex mitral valve distortions associated with myxomatous degeneration. The methodology has the potential to significantly improve surgical planning for patients with complex mitral valve disease. PMID:27492671

  2. Mitral valve prolapse in Marfan syndrome: an old topic revisited.

    PubMed

    Taub, Cynthia C; Stoler, Joan M; Perez-Sanz, Teresa; Chu, John; Isselbacher, Eric M; Picard, Michael H; Weyman, Arthur E

    2009-04-01

    The echocardiographic features of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) in Marfan syndrome have been well described, and the incidence of MVP in Marfan syndrome is reported to be 40-80%. However, most of the original research was performed in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when the diagnostic criteria for MVP were less specific. Our goal was to investigate the characteristics of MVP associated with Marfan syndrome using currently accepted diagnostic criteria for MVP. Between January 1990 and March 2004, 90 patients with definitive diagnosis of Marfan syndrome (based on standardized criteria with or without genetic testing) were referred to Massachusetts General Hospital for transthoracic echocardiography. Patients' gender, age, weight, height, and body surface area at initial examination were recorded. Mitral valve thickness and motion, the degree of mitral regurgitation and aortic regurgitation, and aortic dimensions were quantified blinded to patients' clinical information. There were 25 patients (28%) with MVP, among whom 80% had symmetrical bileaflet MVP. Patients with MVP had thicker mitral leaflets (5.0 +/- 1.0 mm vs. 1.8 +/- 0.5 mm, P < 0.001), more mitral regurgitation (using a scale of 1-4, 2.2 +/- 1.0 vs. 0.90 +/- 0.60, P < 0.0001), larger LVEDD, and larger dimensions of sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, aortic arch, and descending aorta indexed to square root body surface area, when compared with those without MVP. When echocardiographic features of patients younger than 18 years of age and those of patients older than 18 were compared, adult Marfan patients had larger LA dimension (indexed to square root body surface area), larger sinotubular junction (indexed to square root body surface area), and more mitral regurgitation and aortic regurgitation. The prevalence of MVP in Marfan syndrome is lower than previously reported. The large majority of patients with MVP have bileaflet involvement, and those with MVP have significantly larger aortic root

  3. Energy dynamics of the intraventricular vortex after mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kouki; Itatani, Keiichi; Kitamura, Tadashi; Oka, Norihiko; Horai, Tetsuya; Miyazaki, Shohei; Nie, Masaki; Miyaji, Kagami

    2017-04-07

    Mitral valve morphology after mitral valve surgery affects postoperative intraventricular flow patterns and long-term cardiac performance. We visualized ventricular flow by echocardiography vector flow mapping (VFM) to reveal the impact of different mitral valve procedures. Eleven cases of mechanical mitral valve replacement (nine in the anti-anatomical and two in the anatomical position), three bioprosthetic mitral valve replacements, and four mitral valve repairs were evaluated. The mean age at the procedure was 57.4 ± 17.8 year, and the echocardiography VFM in the apical long-axis view was performed 119.9 ± 126.7 months later. Flow energy loss (EL), kinetic pressure (KP), and the flow energy efficiency ratio (EL/KP) were measured. The cases with MVR in the anatomical position and with valve repair had normal vortex directionality ("Clockwise"; N = 6), whereas those with MVR in the anti-anatomical position and with a bioprosthetic mitral valve had the vortex in the opposite direction ("Counterclockwise"; N = 12). During diastole, vortex direction had no effect on EL ("Clockwise": 0.080 ± 0.025 W/m; "Counterclockwise": 0.083 ± 0.048 W/m; P = 0.31) or KP ("Clockwise": 0.117 ± 0.021 N; "Counterclockwise": 0.099 ± 0.057 N; P = 0.023). However, during systole, the EL/KP ratio was significantly higher in the "Counterclockwise" vortex than that in the "Clockwise" vortex (1.056 ± 0.463 vs. 0.617 ± 0.158; P = 0.009). MVP and MVR with a mechanical valve in the anatomical position preserve the physiological vortex, whereas MVR with a mechanical valve in the anti-anatomical position and a bioprosthetic mitral valve generate inefficient vortex flow patterns, resulting in a potential increase in excessive cardiac workload.

  4. Septic Cerebral Embolisation in Fulminant Mitral Valve Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Doolub, Gemina

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old male with known intravenous drug use was admitted with an acute onset of worsening confusion and speech impairment. His vitals and biochemical profile demonstrated severe sepsis, with a brain CT showing several lesions suspicious for cerebral emboli. He then went on to have a bedside transthoracic echocardiogram that was positive for vegetation on the mitral valve, with associated severe mitral regurgitation. Unfortunately, before he was stable enough to be transferred for valve surgery, he suffered an episode of acute pulmonary oedema requiring intubation and ventilation on intensive care unit. PMID:26120312

  5. Artificial Intelligence in Mitral Valve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jeganathan, Jelliffe; Knio, Ziyad; Amador, Yannis; Hai, Ting; Khamooshian, Arash; Matyal, Robina; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Mahmood, Feroze

    2017-01-01

    Background: Echocardiographic analysis of mitral valve (MV) has become essential for diagnosis and management of patients with MV disease. Currently, the various software used for MV analysis require manual input and are prone to interobserver variability in the measurements. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the interobserver variability in an automated software that uses artificial intelligence for MV analysis. Settings and Design: Retrospective analysis of intraoperative three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography data acquired from four patients with normal MV undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery in a tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods: Echocardiographic data were analyzed using the eSie Valve Software (Siemens Healthcare, Mountain View, CA, USA). Three examiners analyzed three end-systolic (ES) frames from each of the four patients. A total of 36 ES frames were analyzed and included in the study. Statistical Analysis: A multiple mixed-effects ANOVA model was constructed to determine if the examiner, the patient, and the loop had a significant effect on the average value of each parameter. A Bonferroni correction was used to correct for multiple comparisons, and P = 0.0083 was considered to be significant. Results: Examiners did not have an effect on any of the six parameters tested. Patient and loop had an effect on the average parameter value for each of the six parameters as expected (P < 0.0083 for both). Conclusion: We were able to conclude that using automated analysis, it is possible to obtain results with good reproducibility, which only requires minimal user intervention. PMID:28393769

  6. Diagnostic approach to assessment of valvular heart disease using magnetic resonance imaging, part II: a practical approach for native and prosthetic heart valve stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaothawee, Lertlak

    2012-01-01

    MRI is already an established diagnostic modality for assessing valvular stenosis although it is not usually used as the initial non-invasive test. The preferred diagnostic modality for valvular stenosis is currently echocardiography. However, MRI has been offered as a good alternative test in the event of inconclusive echocardiography results. During the course of valvular stenosis, the valve orifice area decreases and the pressure gradient across the diseased valve increases. Valvular orifice area is the major core indicator for valvular stenosis severity grading. Compared with valvular regurgitation, assessment with MRI for valvular stenosis is less complicated. The aim of this article is to detail the MRI techniques in assessing native and prosthetic heart valve stenosis. PMID:27326061

  7. The use of three-dimensional echocardiography for the evaluation of and treatment of mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose A; Nanda, Navin C; Gill, Edward A; de Isla, Leopoldo Pérez; Zamorano, Jose L

    2007-05-01

    To date, mitral stenosis has been evaluated by both hemodynamic data derived from catheterization as well as 2D and Doppler echocardiography. However, the advent of real-time 3D echocardiography has allowed more precise measurement of the mitral valve orifice by planimetry. In addition, evaluation of the mitral commissures prior to and after percutaneous mitral valvuloplasty is greatly aided by 3D echocardiography. Here we discuss these subjects as well as provide specific clinical trials that support the use of real-time 3D echocardiography for the evaluation and treatment of mitral stenosis.

  8. [Restoration of valvular function of deep veins in lower-limb varicose disease].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Gradusov, E G; Ignat'ev, I M; Akhmetzianov, R V

    2014-01-01

    The present work was based on analysing the results of a complex examination and surgical treatment of 16-to-78-year-old patients presenting with varicose disease during the period from 2006 to 2010. A total of 1,095 limbs were examined and operated on in 1,070 patients. Of these, 298 (29.6 %) were men, and 709 (70.4 %) women. The distribution of the patients according to the CEAP clinical classification was as follows: C1 - 3 patients, C2 - 215, C3 - 566, C4 - 203, C5 - 29, and C6 - 79 subjects. All patients underwent ultrasonic duplex scanning, with retrograde phlebography performed in 21 cases. 51.2% of patients were diagnosed as having pathological deep venous reflux. In the group of patients with valvular insufficiency of deep veins, a total of 93 operations aimed at correcting deep reflux were performed, including 12 interventions for congenital avalvulation of veins. The indications for restorative operations on the valvular apparatus of deep veins were determined in severe forms of chronic venous insufficiency combined with axial reflux along deep veins in cases of inefficiency of conventional methods of surgical and conservative treatment. The long-term outcomes of surgery were assessed after 18-48 months. The results were evaluated by means of clinical and instrumental methods of examination: the disease severity scale, patients quality of life questionnaire, ultrasonographic and roentgen contrast methods of examination, and legometry. The operations aimed at restoring the valvular function of the femoral veins turned out to be effective methods of correcting venous reflux and made it possible to restore the valvular function in 84% of cases. In the remote postoperative period valvular competence was observed in 74.6% of patients. Carrying out such operations significantly improve the course of the disease due to decreasing the malleolar volume (p<0.001), manifestations of symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency (p<0.001), and improving quality of life

  9. Activated Human Valvular Interstitial Cells Sustain Interleukin-17 Production To Recruit Neutrophils in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4+ CD45RA− CD25− CCR6+ Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4+ T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify the

  10. Valvular operations in patients with congenital heart disease: increasing rates from 1988 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Ionescu-Ittu, Raluca; Mackie, Andrew S; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Pilote, Louise; Tchervenkov, Christo; Martucci, Giuseppe; Marelli, Ariane J

    2010-11-01

    The congenital heart disease population is aging. We hypothesized that changes in rates of congenital, valvular, and noncongenital surgical operations in congenital heart patients varied with age and disease severity over the last two decades. We performed time trend analysis using a Quebec congenital heart disease database constructed from administrative data. We included congenital heart patients of all ages having cardiac surgical operations. Heart lesions were classified as "severe" and "other." Cardiac surgical operations were grouped as congenital, valvular (including aortic), and noncongenital (arrhythmia surgery, coronary artery bypass grafting, and cardiac transplants). An adapted Aristotle score was developed to classify procedures based on surgical risk. Yearly surgical rates were measured as surgical operations per 1,000 person-years and analyzed over time using Poisson regression models stratified by age, lesion severity, and cardiac surgery category. From 1988 to 2005 we followed 71,979 patients for 1,009,430 person-years. We identified 17,444 cardiac surgical operations. There was a 31% increase in volumes and a 5% increase in surgical rates over time. In children, congenital surgical operations remained constant, accounting for 80% of all surgical operations. In adults, valvular operations were the most common type of surgical operations, increasing from 42% to 63% of all procedures over time. Rates of valvular operations increased significantly in all adult subgroups and in children with severe lesions. The need for valvular interventions has increased in the last two decades in congenital heart disease patients. These findings should be taken into account when allocating resources that will optimize outcomes for this growing population. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The challenges of managing rheumatic disease of the mitral valve in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Little, Sherard G

    2014-12-01

    Between January, 2009 and December, 2013, 84 patients were identified who underwent isolated mitral valve surgery in Jamaica at The University Hospital of the West Indies and The Bustamante Hospital for Children. The most common pathology requiring surgery was rheumatic heart disease, accounting for 84% of the procedures performed. The majority of patients had regurgitation of the mitral valve (67%), stenosis of the mitral valve (22%), and mixed mitral valve disease (11%). The most common procedure performed was replacement of the mitral valve (69%), followed by mitral valve repair (29%). Among the patients, one underwent closed mitral commissurotomy. The choice of procedure differed between age groups. In the paediatric population (<18 years of age), the majority of patients underwent repair of the mitral valve (89%). In the adult population (18 years and above), the majority of patients underwent mitral valve replacement (93%). Overall, of all the patients undergoing replacement of the mitral valve, 89% received a mechanical valve prosthesis, whereas 11% received a bioprosthetic valve prosthesis. Of the group of patients who underwent mitral valve repair for rheumatic heart disease, 19% required re-operation. The average time between initial surgery and re-operation was 1.2 years. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain significant public health challenges in Jamaica and other developing countries. Focus must remain on primary and secondary prevention strategies in order to limit the burden of rheumatic valvulopathies. Attention should also be directed towards improving access to surgical treatment for young adults.

  12. A retrospective analysis of mitral valve pathology in the setting of bicuspid aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    van Rensburg, Annari; Doubell, Anton

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic implications of bicuspid aortic valve associations have come under scrutiny in the transcatheter aortic valve implantation era. We evaluate the spectrum of mitral valve disease in patients with bicuspid aortic valves to determine the need for closer echocardiographic scrutiny/follow-up of the mitral valve. A retrospective analysis of echocardiograms done at a referral hospital over five years was conducted in patients with bicuspid aortic valves with special attention to congenital abnormalities of the mitral valve. One hundred and forty patients with a bicuspid aortic valve were included. A congenital mitral valve abnormality was present in eight (5.7%, P = 0.01) with a parachute mitral valve in four (2.8%), an accessory mitral valve leaflet in one (0.7%), mitral valve prolapse in one, a cleft in one and the novel finding of a trileaflet mitral valve in one. Minor abnormalities included an elongated anterior mitral valve leaflet (P < 0.001), the increased incidence of physiological mitral regurgitation (P < 0.001), abnormal papillary muscles (P = 0.002) and an additional chord or tendon in the left ventricle cavity (P = 0.007). Mitral valve abnormalities occur more commonly in patients with bicuspid aortic valves than matched healthy individuals. The study confirms that abnormalities in these patients extend beyond the aorta. These abnormalities did not have a significant functional effect. PMID:28515127

  13. How safe is it to train residents to perform mitral valve surgery?

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Joseph; Göbölös, László; Miskolczi, Szabolcs; Barlow, Clifford

    2016-11-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The enquiry: In [patients undergoing mitral valve surgery] are [postoperative morbidity and mortality outcomes] acceptable when patients are operated on by [residents]? Four hundred and twenty-three were identified from the search strategy. Six articles selected as best evidence were tabulated. All current published evidence, encompassing open and minimally invasive mitral valve repair in addition to mitral valve replacement, supports the involvement of trainees in mitral procedures. Although trainees may experience longer aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times than specialist surgeons, they are not associated with significantly worse perioperative or postoperative outcomes in comparable mitral procedures. Important factors in the viability of mitral valve training and its quality include the volume of cases per institution and the expertise of the supervising surgeon, and these remain largely unexplored. Overall, mitral valve surgery remains a valuable potential training opportunity, one which is perhaps underexploited.

  14. [Functional mitral regurgitation. Physiopathology and impact of medical therapy and surgical techniques for left ventricle reduction].

    PubMed

    Comín, J; Manito, N; Roca, J; Castells, E; Esplugas, E

    1999-07-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation is frequently observed in the setting of left ventricular dyfunction. This finding is a marker of poor outcome in patients with either ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy. The mechanism accounting for this phenomenon is an altered balance of tethering versus coapting forces acting on the mitral valves in the failing heart. Tethering forces represent an anomalous tension on the mitral valves due to displacement of mitral valve attachments secondary to increased left ventricular chamber sphericity associated with systolic ventricular dysfunction. On the other hand, coapting forces are weak and unable to counteract the abnormal tension acting on the mitral valve, which restricts closure and leads to regurgitation. Vasodilators and inotropic drugs are effective in the management of functional mitral regurgitation. Although partial left ventriculectomy or Batista's procedure is still investigational, this new technique seems to provide an optimal control of functional mitral regurgitation and improve functional capacity and survival of some patients with heart failure.

  15. New inflammatory predictors for non-valvular atrial fibrillation: echocardiographic epicardial fat thickness and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio.

    PubMed

    Acet, Halit; Ertaş, Faruk; Akıl, Mehmet Ata; Oylumlu, Mustafa; Polat, Nihat; Yıldız, Abdulkadir; Bilik, Mehmet Zihni; Yüksel, Murat; Kaya, Zeynettin; Ulgen, Mehmet Sıddık

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of echocardiographic epicardial fat thickness (EFT) and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) with different types of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) in a clinical setting. A total of 197 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study. Seventy-one patients had paroxysmal non-valvular AF, 63 patients had persistent/permanent non-valvular AF, and 63 patients had sinus rhythm (control group). EFT was measured with echocardiography, while NLR was measured by dividing neutrophil count by lymphocyte count. EFT was significantly higher in patients with paroxysmal non-valvular AF compared with those in the sinus rhythm group (6.6 ± 0.7 vs. 5.0 ± 0.9 mm, p < 0.001). Persistent/permanent non-valvular AF patients had a significantly