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Sample records for reference flow injection

  1. Determination of organomercury in biological reference materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchemin, D.; Siu, K.W.; Berman, S.S.

    1988-12-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used for the determination of organomercury in two marine biological standard reference materials for trace metals (dogfish muscle tissue DORM-1 and lobster hepatopancreas TORT-1). In most parts of this study, the organomercury was extracted as the chloride from the material with toluene and back extracted into an aqueous medium of cysteine acetate. Since the final extracts contained more than 4% sodium, isotope dilution and flow injection analysis were used to respectively counter the effect of concomitant elements and avoid clogging the interface. Comparison of results with gas chromatography shows that the only significant organomercury is methyl-mercury. At least 93% of mercury in DORM-1 and 39% of mercury in TORT-1 exist as methylmercury.

  2. Online Determination of Trace Amounts of Tannic Acid in Colored Tannery Wastewaters by Automatic Reference Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liang

    2010-01-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive method was proposed for online determination of tannic acid in colored tannery wastewater by automatic reference flow injection analysis. Based on the tannic acid reduction phosphotungstic acid to form blue compound in pH 12.38 alkaline solutions, the shade of blue compound is in a linear relation to the content of tannic acid at the point of the maximum absorption peak of 760 nm. The optimal experimental conditions had been obtained. The linear range of the proposed method was between 200 μg L−1 to 80 mg L−1 and the detection limit was 0.58 μg L−1. The relative standard deviation was 3.08% and 2.43% for 500 μg L−1 and 40 mg L−1 of tannic acid standard solution, respectively, (n = 10). The method had been successfully applied to determination of tannic acid in colored tannery wastewaters and the analytical results were satisfactory. PMID:20508812

  3. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  4. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  5. Residual ozone determination by flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Straka, M.R.; Pacey, G.E.; Gordon, G.

    1984-09-01

    It has been proposed that ozone be used to replace free chlorine for the disinfection of drinking water and waste water. For the use of ozone in this capacity, it would be necessary to have a fast accurate and precise method to analyze for the presence of residuals. An automated method for ozone determination based on the indigo reagent method is presented. This method is based on the advantages of flow injection analysis (FIA) techniques. 19 references, 3 tables, 2 figures.

  6. Microsphere reference flow samples during systemic flow adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Geffin, G.A.; O'Keefe, D.; Denenberg, A.G.; Daggett, W.M.

    1987-04-01

    Regional myocardial blood flow measurements in the right heart bypass preparation can be particularly valuable, since this preparation provides control of the main hemodynamic determinants of coronary blood flow. The authors examined the validity of aortic reference flow samples in relation to coronary samples during continuous systemic flow adjustment for aortic pressure control in six dogs on right heart bypass, anesthetized with chloralose and urethan. Radioactively-labelled microsphere concentrations were compared in paired reference flow samples drawn from the aortic arch and from a coronary artery for 119 left atrial microsphere injections. During left subclavian artery infusion and during femoral artery infusion at rates above 2000 ml/min, there were high percentage errors in microsphere concentration between paired samples, consistent with aortic sample dilution by systemically infused blood. In 52 injections during withdrawal or femoral infusion below 2000 ml/min, at cardiac outputs of 390-4800 ml/min. Linear regression related these coronary to aortic microsphere concentrations by the equation Y = 1.005X - 1.64, r = 0.997, S/sub y-x/ = 13.2 (5.9%). These data indicate that valid aortic reference flow samples can be obtained within specific hemodynamic conditions during systemic flow adjustment in the right heart bypass preparation.

  7. A volumetric flow sensor for automotive injection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, U.; Krötz, G.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2008-04-01

    For further optimization of the automotive power train of diesel engines, advanced combustion processes require a highly flexible injection system, provided e.g. by the common rail (CR) injection technique. In the past, the feasibility to implement injection nozzle volumetric flow sensors based on the thermo-resistive measurement principle has been demonstrated up to injection pressures of 135 MPa (1350 bar). To evaluate the transient behaviour of the system-integrated flow sensors as well as an injection amount indicator used as a reference method, hydraulic simulations on the system level are performed for a CR injection system. Experimentally determined injection timings were found to be in good agreement with calculated values, especially for the novel sensing element which is directly implemented into the hydraulic system. For the first time pressure oscillations occurring after termination of the injection pulse, predicted theoretically, could be verified directly in the nozzle. In addition, the injected amount of fuel is monitored with the highest resolution ever reported in the literature.

  8. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Berteau, Cecile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Wang, Tao; Rojas, Humberto E; Granger, Corinne; Schwarzenbach, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Aim The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC) injection pain tolerance. Methods The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8–10, and 15–20 cP) combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s). All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain). The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Results Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003). Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm) than medium (VAS =16.6 mm) or low (VAS =22.1 mm) viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002). Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89). Slow (0.02 mL/s) or fast (0.30 mL/s) injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79). In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15–20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High viscosity injections were shown to be the most tolerated, whereas injection volume and flow rates did not impact perceived pain. PMID:26635489

  9. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance.

    PubMed

    Berteau, Cecile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Wang, Tao; Rojas, Humberto E; Granger, Corinne; Schwarzenbach, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC) injection pain tolerance. The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8-10, and 15-20 cP) combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s). All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain). The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003). Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm) than medium (VAS =16.6 mm) or low (VAS =22.1 mm) viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002). Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89). Slow (0.02 mL/s) or fast (0.30 mL/s) injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79). In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15-20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High viscosity injections were shown to be the most tolerated, whereas injection volume and flow rates did not impact perceived pain.

  10. Solenoid pumps for flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Weeks, D A; Johnson, K S

    1996-08-01

    Methods employing flow injection analysis (FIA), particularly for in situ seawater techniques, would benefit from reduction in pump size and power requirement, longer maintenance intervals, and the ability to incorporate microprocessor control of each reagent and sample flow stream. In this work, the peristaltic pump of a conventional FIA system was replaced by three solenoid-driven diaphragm pumps with integral Viton check valves, and the system was tested by performing the simple nitrite analysis, which has well-defined FIA performance characteristics. Sixty injections per hour were possible with flow rates of 0.5 mL/min for reagents and sample. The coefficient of variation was 1% for 10 μM NO(2)(-) concentrations, and the detection limit was less than 0.1 μM NO(2)(-). These values match the reported performance for this method using peristaltic pumps.

  11. Reversed flow injection spectrophotometric determination of chlorate.

    PubMed

    Chuesaard, Thanyarat; Wonganan, Tharinee; Wongchanapiboon, Teerapol; Liawruangrath, Saisunee

    2009-09-15

    An interfacing has been developed to connect a spectrophotometer with a personal computer and used as a readout system for development of a simple, rapid and sensitive reversed flow injection (rFI) procedure for chlorate determination. The method is based on the oxidation of indigo carmine by chlorate ions in an acidic solution (dil. HCl) leading to the decrease in absorbance at 610 nm. The decrease in absorbance is directly related to the chlorate concentration present in the sample solutions. Optimum conditions for chlorate were examined. A linear calibration graph over the range of 0.1-0.5 mg L(-1) chlorate was established with the regression equation of Y=104.5X+1.0, r(2)=0.9961 (n=6). The detection limit (3 sigma) of 0.03 mg L(-1), the limit of quantitation (10 sigma) of 0.10 mg L(-1) and the RSD of 3.2% for 0.3 mg L(-1) chlorate (n=11) together with a sample throughput of 92 h(-1) were obtained. The recovery of the added chlorate in spiked water samples was 98.5+/-3.1%. Major interferences for chlorate determination were found to be BrO(3)(-), ClO(2)(-), ClO(-) and IO(3)(-) which were overcome by using SO(3)(2-) (as Na(2)SO(3)) as masking agent. The method has been successfully applied for the determination of chlorate in spiked water samples with the minimum reagent consumption of 14.0 mL h(-1). Good agreement between the proposed rFIA and the reference methods was found verified by Student's t-test at 95% confidence level.

  12. Automated Protein Assay Using Flow Injection Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Carrie A. C.; Oates, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    1998-08-01

    The technique of flow injection analysis (FIA) is a common instrumental method used in detecting a variety of chemical and biological agents. This paper describes an undergraduate laboratory that uses FIA to perform a bicinchoninic acid (BCA) colorimetric assay for quantitating protein samples. The method requires less than 2 min per sample injection and gives a response over a broad range of protein concentrations. This method can be used in instrumental analysis labs to illustrate the principles and use of FIA, or as a means for introducing students to common methods employed in the analysis of biological agents.

  13. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  14. Operator-free flow injection analyser

    PubMed Central

    de Faria, Lourival C.

    1991-01-01

    A flow injection analyser has been constructed to allow an operator-free determination of up to 40 samples. Besides the usual FIA apparatus, the analyser includes a home-made sample introduction device made with three electromechanical three-way valves and an auto-sampler from Technicon which has been adapted to be commanded by an external digital signal. The analyser is controlled by a single board SDK-8085 microcomputer. The necessary interface to couple the analyser components to the microcomputer is also described. The analyser was evaluated for a Cr(VI)-FIA determination showing a very good performance with a relative standard deviation for 15 signals from the injection of 100 μl of a 1.0 mg.ml-1 standard Cr(VI) solution being equal to 0.5%. PMID:18924899

  15. Immobilized Bioluminescent Reagents in Flow Injection Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Abdul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Bioluminescent reactions exhibits two important characteristics from an analytical viewpoint; they are selective and highly sensitive. Furthermore, bioluminescent emissions are easily measured with a simple flow-through detector based on a photomultiplier tube and the rapid and reproducible mixing of sample and expensive reagent is best achieved by a flow injection manifold. The two most important bioluminescent systems are the enzyme (luciferase)/substrate (luciferin) combinations extracted from fireflies (Photinus pyralis) and marine bacteria (Virio harveyi) which requires ATP and NAD(P)H respectively as cofactors. Reactions that generate or consume these cofactors can also be coupled to the bioluminescent reaction to provide assays for a wide range of clinically important species. A flow injection manifold for the study of bioluminescent reactions is described, as are procedures for the extraction, purification and immobilization of firefly and bacterial luciferase and oxidoreductase. Results are presented for the determination of ATP using firefly system and the determination of other enzymes and substrates participating in ATP-converting reactions e.g. creatine kinase, ATP-sulphurylase, pyruvate kinase, creatine phosphate, pyrophosphate and phophoenolypyruvate. Similarly results are presented for the determination of NAD(P)H, FMN, FMNH_2 and several dehydrogenases which produce NAD(P)H and their substrates, e.g. alcohol, L-lactate, L-malate, L-glutamate, Glucose-6-phosphate and primary bile acid.

  16. Recent advances in flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Trojanowicz, Marek; Kołacińska, Kamila

    2016-04-07

    A dynamic development of methodologies of analytical flow injection measurements during four decades since their invention has reinforced the solid position of flow analysis in the arsenal of techniques and instrumentation of contemporary chemical analysis. With the number of published scientific papers exceeding 20,000, and advanced instrumentation available for environmental, food, and pharmaceutical analysis, flow analysis is well established as an extremely vital field of modern flow chemistry, which is developed simultaneously with methods of chemical synthesis carried out under flow conditions. This review work is based on almost 300 original papers published mostly in the last decade, with special emphasis put on presenting novel achievements from the most recent 2-3 years in order to indicate current development trends of this methodology. Besides the evolution of the design of whole measuring systems, and including especially new applications of various detections methods, several aspects of implications of progress in nanotechnology, and miniaturization of measuring systems for application in different field of modern chemical analysis are also discussed.

  17. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of boron in ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ramos, S; Medina-Hernández, M J; Sagrado, S

    1998-03-01

    A flow injection spectrophotometric method for the determination of boron in ceramic materials is described. The method is based on spectrophotometric measurement of the decrease in the pH produced by the reaction between boric acid and mannitol in the presence of an acid-base indicator. A bichannel FI (flow injection) manifold in which the sample solutions were injected into deionized water (at pH 5.4) and the stream was later merged with the reagent stream (a mannitol solution containing 1x10(-4) mol l(-1) bromocresol green at pH 5.4), was used. Transient signals were monitored at 616 nm. A theoretical model which describes the dependence between the absorbance values and boric acid concentration is presented. The model predicts a non linear dependence between the absorbance or increment in absorbance and the boric acid concentration. In contrast, the model predicts a linear dependence between the inverse of the absorbance values and the boric acid concentration. The calibration graphs (1/A vs mug ml(-1) B(2)O(3)) were linear over the range 1-30 mug ml(-1) of B(2)O(3). The relative standard deviations were 0.7 and 0.4% for 4 and 8 mug ml(-1) of B(2)O(3), respectively. The limit of detection was 0.02 mug ml(-1) of B(2)O(3) (3sigma criterium). The method was used to determine boron in nine ceramic materials with very different nominal boron compositions. The results were compared with those obtained using a potentiometric titration method as reference method. No significant differences (at 95% probability level) were found between the proposed and reference methods. The method is rapid, reliable, precise and free of interferences.

  18. Taylor-Couette flow with radial fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Nikolas; Dutcher, Cari S.

    2017-08-01

    Taylor-Couette cells have been shown to improve a number of industrial processes due to the wide variety of hydrodynamic flow states accessible. Traditional designs, however, limit the ability to introduce new fluids into the annulus during device operation due to geometric confinement and complexity. In this paper, a co- and counter-rotating Taylor-Couette cell with radial fluid injection has been constructed. The incorporation of 16 ports in the inner cylinder enables radial fluid injection during rotation of both cylinders. The design is also capable of continuous axial flow, enabling large injection volumes. The new inner cylinder design does not modify the critical Re for flow instabilities and can precisely inject a desired mass at a desired flow rate. A range of injection rates and masses were explored to quantify the effect of radial injection on the stability of the turbulent Taylor vortex structure. Only the highest injection rate and total mass studied (5.9 g/s, 100 g) modified the turbulent Taylor vortex structure after injection for a sustained period. The post-injection vortices remained larger than the pre-injection vortices, whereas at lower injection rates or masses, the vortex structure quickly returned to the pre-injection structure. This new system allows for in situ study of hydrodynamic effects on fluid-fluid (gas and liquid) mixing and multiphase complexation, growth, and structure. We demonstrated this new design's potential for studying the flocculation of bentonite using cationic polyacrylamide for enhancing water treatment operations.

  19. Flow injection titration basing on the merging-zone technique.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Marzena; Kozak, Joanna; Danielewska, Karolina; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2009-09-15

    The proposed approach relies on titration of a sample that is gradually diluted in strictly controlled way in the flow injection system developed. On each step of sample dilution equal volumes of the sample and titrant solutions are simultaneously injected into two carrier streams and the zones are merged with each other. Then, they are mixed completely in the mixing chamber, merged with a stream of indicator and directed to a detector. It has been revealed that the method provides the results with accuracy better than +/-3.3% (RE) and with mean repeatability lower than 1.0% (RSD). When the analyte concentration in a sample is too low to be determined directly, the procedure of titration with standard addition is exploited. The proposed approach has been successfully applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegar and magnesium and calcium in pharmaceutical products. The results obtained were comparable with those provided by the reference methods. The proposed procedure is characterized by low consumption of sample (usually less than 2 mL), titrant (about 3 mL) and indicator (about 0.6 mL). Average time of a single analysis is similar to time of traditional batch analysis.

  20. Parametric Studies of Flow Separation using Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Boundary Layer separation causes the airfoil to stall and therefore imposes dramatic performance degradation on the airfoil. In recent years, flow separation control has been one of the active research areas in the field of aerodynamics due to its promising performance improvements on the lifting device. These active flow separation control techniques include steady and unsteady air injection as well as suction on the airfoil surface etc. This paper will be focusing on the steady and unsteady air injection on the airfoil. Although wind tunnel experiments revealed that the performance improvements on the airfoil using injection techniques, the details of how the key variables such as air injection slot geometry and air injection angle etc impact the effectiveness of flow separation control via air injection has not been studied. A parametric study of both steady and unsteady air injection active flow control will be the main objective for this summer. For steady injection, the key variables include the slot geometry, orientation, spacing, air injection velocity as well as the injection angle. For unsteady injection, the injection frequency will also be investigated. Key metrics such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient, total pressure loss and total injection mass will be used to measure the effectiveness of the control technique. A design of experiments using the Box-Behnken Design is set up in order to determine how each of the variables affects each of the key metrics. Design of experiment is used so that the number of experimental runs will be at minimum and still be able to predict which variables are the key contributors to the responses. The experiments will then be conducted in the 1ft by 1ft wind tunnel according to the design of experiment settings. The data obtained from the experiments will be imported into JMP, statistical software, to generate sets of response surface equations which represent the statistical empirical model for each of the metrics as

  1. Parametric Studies of Flow Separation using Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Boundary Layer separation causes the airfoil to stall and therefore imposes dramatic performance degradation on the airfoil. In recent years, flow separation control has been one of the active research areas in the field of aerodynamics due to its promising performance improvements on the lifting device. These active flow separation control techniques include steady and unsteady air injection as well as suction on the airfoil surface etc. This paper will be focusing on the steady and unsteady air injection on the airfoil. Although wind tunnel experiments revealed that the performance improvements on the airfoil using injection techniques, the details of how the key variables such as air injection slot geometry and air injection angle etc impact the effectiveness of flow separation control via air injection has not been studied. A parametric study of both steady and unsteady air injection active flow control will be the main objective for this summer. For steady injection, the key variables include the slot geometry, orientation, spacing, air injection velocity as well as the injection angle. For unsteady injection, the injection frequency will also be investigated. Key metrics such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient, total pressure loss and total injection mass will be used to measure the effectiveness of the control technique. A design of experiments using the Box-Behnken Design is set up in order to determine how each of the variables affects each of the key metrics. Design of experiment is used so that the number of experimental runs will be at minimum and still be able to predict which variables are the key contributors to the responses. The experiments will then be conducted in the 1ft by 1ft wind tunnel according to the design of experiment settings. The data obtained from the experiments will be imported into JMP, statistical software, to generate sets of response surface equations which represent the statistical empirical model for each of the metrics as

  2. Numerical simulation of flow separation control by oscillatory fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resendiz Rosas, Celerino

    2005-07-01

    In this work, numerical simulations of flow separation control are performed. The separation control technique studied is called "synthetic jet actuation". The developed code employs a cell centered finite volume scheme which handles viscous, steady and unsteady compressible turbulent flows. The pulsating zero mass jet flow is simulated by imposing a harmonically varying transpiration boundary condition on the airfoil's surface. Turbulence is modeled with the algebraic model of Baldwin and Lomax. The application of synthetic jet actuators is based in their ability to energize the boundary layer, thereby providing significant increase in the lift coefficient. This has been corroborated experimentally and it is corroborated numerically in this research. The performed numerical simulation investigates the flow over a NACA0015 airfoil. For this flow Re = 9 x 105 and the reduced frequency and momentum coefficient are F + = 1.1 and Cmu = 0.04 respectively. The oscillatory injection takes place at 12.27% chord from the leading edge. A maximum increase in the mean lift coefficient of 93% is predicted by the code. A discrepancy of approximately 10% is observed with corresponding experimental data from the literature. The general trend is, however, well captured. The discrepancy is attributed to the modeling of the injection boundary condition and to the turbulence model. A sensitivity analysis of the lift coefficient to different values of the oscillation parameters is performed. It is concluded that tangential injection, F+ ≈ O(1) and the utilized grid resolution around the site of injection are optimal. Streamline fields obtained for different angles of injection are analyzed. Flow separation and attachment as functions of the injection angle and of the velocity of injection can be observed. It is finally concluded that a reliable numerical tool has been developed which can be utilized as a support tool in the optimization of the synthetic jet operation and in the

  3. Liquid injection in confined co-flow: Application to portal vein embolization by glue injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandulache, M.-C.; Paullier, P.; Bouzerar, R.; Yzet, T.; Balédent, O.; Salsac, A.-V.

    2012-08-01

    Drop formation in liquid-liquid systems has received considerable attention over the last century owing to its many industrial applications. More recent applications may be found in the field of endovascular/percutaneous treatments. The present study focuses on portal vein embolization (PVE), which consists in the blockage of part of the portal trunk though the injection of surgical glue. The short-time injection is dominated by fluid dynamic effects: the influence of polymerization is secondary owing to the presence of ethiodized oil in the injected mixture. If the mechanism of liquid injection is well understood for injections in unconfined fluids at rest, fewer studies have so far considered the case of outer liquids flowing in confined environments. The objective is therefore to conduct a large range parametric study of liquid injections in confined co-flows. An experimental setup has been designed to simulate in vitro the injection in an immiscible liquid flowing in a cylindrical tube. The transition from the dripping to the jetting regimes is found to be independent of confinement, but to depend on the ratio of the inertial forces of the injected liquid to the surface tension, i.e., the Weber number of the inner flow Wei. The confinement, however, has an influence on the drop size in the dripping regime. Its influence diminishes in the first phase of the jetting regime, as the drop size largely decreases. In the fully established jetting regime, the drop size is finally only a function of the ejection tube diameter. To predict the size of the drops in the dripping regime, we have developed a semiempirical model that takes into account the effects of both the tube confinement and outer flow. It will help the interventional radiologists predict the drop size depending on the geometrical and velocimetric conditions at the site of embolization. All these results can then serve as a base to optimize the PVE technique during clinical practice.

  4. Simultaneous spectrophotometric flow injection determination of phosphate and silicate.

    PubMed

    Kozak, J; Latocha, K; Kochana, J; Wieczorek, M; Kościelniak, P

    2015-02-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of phosphate and silicate based on spectrophotometric measurement at 385 nm of a single peak using a flow injection system with two component calibration is described. In the system, a stream of sample containing both analytes is merged with a stream of ammonium molybdate to form (at 1injected into a carrier stream (H2SO4) and then merged with the stream of sample containing the mixture of heteropolyacids. A characteristic peak is registered as a result of selective decomposition of molybdophosphoric acid by oxalic acid. The area (or the absorbance measured at the constant signal) and the absorbance measured at the minimum of the peak can be used as measures corresponding to the phosphate and silicate concentrations, respectively. The time of the peak registration is about 3 min. Two-component calibration with the use of four standard solutions of the phosphate/silicate concentrations established in accordance with 2(2) factorial design was applied. Phosphate and silicate can be determined within the concentration ranges of 0.20-15.00 and 0.20-20.00 mg L(-1), with precision less than 2.7 and 0.9% (RSD), respectively and accuracy better than 6.2% (RE). The detection limit is 0.054 and 0.092 mg L(-1) for phosphate and silicate, respectively. The method was applied to determination of the analytes in certified reference materials of groundwater, wastewater, and river water giving results consistent with the certified values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C.

    1993-01-01

    A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

  6. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.

    1993-02-16

    A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

  7. Downstream influence of swept slot injection in hypersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of an experimental and numerical investigation of tangential swept slot injection into a thick turbulent boundary layer at Mach 6 are presented. Film cooling effectiveness, skin friction, and flow structure downstream of the swept slot injection were investigated. The data were compared with that for unswept slots, and it was found that cooling effectiveness and skin friction reductions are not significantly affected by sweeping the slot.

  8. Injected power and entropy flow in a heated granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, P.; Puglisi, A.; Barrat, A.; Trizac, E.; van Wijland, F.

    2005-10-01

    Our interest goes to the power injected in a heated granular gas and to the possibility to interpret it in terms of entropy flow. We numerically determine the distribution of the injected power by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Then, we provide a kinetic-theory approach to the computation of such a distribution function. Finally, after showing why the injected power does not satisfy a fluctuation relation à la Gallavotti-Cohen, we put forward a new quantity which does fulfill such a relation, and is not only applicable in a variety of frameworks outside the granular world, but also experimentally accessible.

  9. Investigation of flow structures in supersonic flow with mass injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, A.; Das, P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, three-dimensional simulations are performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methodology, while the dynamic sub-grid scale eddy viscosity model is invoked to numerically investigate the evolution of flow structures in supersonic base flow with mass bleed. Mean flow field properties obtained from numerical simulations, such as axial velocity, pressure on the base surface, have been compared with the experimental measurements in order to show that LES is able to predict the mean flow properties with acceptable accuracy. The data obtained from LES has been further analyzed to understand the evolution of coherent structures in the flow field. Periodical shedding of vortical structures from the outer shear layer has been observed and it has also been found that this vortex shedding is associated with the flapping of the outer shear layer.

  10. Material flow data for numerical simulation of powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretek, I.; Holzer, C.

    2017-01-01

    The powder injection molding (PIM) process is a cost efficient and important net-shape manufacturing process that is not completely understood. For the application of simulation programs for the powder injection molding process, apart from suitable physical models, exact material data and in particular knowledge of the flow behavior are essential in order to get precise numerical results. The flow processes of highly filled polymers are complex. Occurring effects are very hard to separate, like shear flow with yield stress, wall slip, elastic effects, etc. Furthermore, the occurrence of phase separation due to the multi-phase composition of compounds is quite probable. In this work, the flow behavior of a 316L stainless steel feedstock for powder injection molding was investigated. Additionally, the influence of pre-shearing on the flow behavior of PIM-feedstocks under practical conditions was examined and evaluated by a special PIM injection molding machine rheometer. In order to have a better understanding of key factors of PIM during the injection step, 3D non-isothermal numerical simulations were conducted with a commercial injection molding simulation software using experimental feedstock properties. The simulation results were compared with the experimental results. The mold filling studies amply illustrate the effect of mold temperature on the filling behavior during the mold filling stage. Moreover, the rheological measurements showed that at low shear rates no zero shear viscosity was observed, but instead the viscosity further increased strongly. This flow behavior could be described with the Cross-WLF approach with Herschel-Bulkley extension very well.

  11. Axisymmetric flows from fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Zheng, Zhong; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-02-01

    We study the axisymmetric flows generated from fluid injection into a horizontal confined porous medium that is originally saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. Neglecting the effects of surface tension and fluid mixing, we use the lubrication approximation to obtain a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the time evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ, which measures the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. For this axisymmetric geometry, the similarity solution involving R2/T (where R is the dimensionless radial coordinate and T is the dimensionless time) is an exact solution to the nonlinear governing equation for all times. Four analytical expressions are identified as asymptotic approximations (two of which are new solutions): (i) injection-driven flow with the injected fluid being more viscous than the displaced fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M < 1) where we identify a self-similar solution that indicates a parabolic interface shape; (ii) injection-driven flow with injected and displaced fluids of equal viscosity (Γ ≪ 1 and M = 1), where we find a self-similar solution that predicts a distinct parabolic interface shape; (iii) injection-driven flow with a less viscous injected fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M > 1) for which there is a rarefaction wave solution, assuming that the Saffman-Taylor instability does not occur at the reservoir scale; and (iv) buoyancy-driven flow (Γ ≫ 1) for which there is a well-known self-similar solution corresponding to gravity currents in an unconfined porous medium [S. Lyle et al. "Axisymmetric gravity currents in a porous medium," J. Fluid Mech. 543, 293-302 (2005)]. The various axisymmetric flows are summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime

  12. Flow in a porous nozzle with massive wall injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of massive wall injection on the flow characteristics in a nozzle. The experiments were performed on a water table with a porous-nozzle test section. This had 45 deg and 15 deg half angles of convergence and divergence, respectively, throat radius of 2.5 inches, and throat width of 3 inches. The hydraulic analogy was employed to qualitatively extend the results to a compressible gas flow through the nozzle. An analysis of the water table flow was made using a one-dimensional flow assumption in the continuity and momentum equations. An analysis of a compressible flow in a nozzle was made in a manner analogous to that for the water flow. It is shown that the effect of blowing is to move the sonic position downstream of the geometric throat. Similar results were determined for the incompressible water table flow. Limited photographic results are presented for an injection of air, CO2, and Freon-12 into a main-stream air flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle. Schlieren photographs were used to visualize the flow.

  13. Injection induced flows in porous-walled ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddini, R. A.

    1985-07-01

    A theoretical analysis of the flow in porous-walled tubes and channels with appreciable injection through the duct wall is presented. Emphasis is placed on flows induced solely from injection by closure of a duct end. Effects of compressibility, nonideal boundary conditions and turbulent transition on flow development are considered. The analysis employs a full Reynolds stress model of turbulence, with an implicit finite-difference procedure used to solve the resulting parabolic equation system. Theoretical results together with existing experimental data indicate that the flows in porous tubes at large injection Reynolds number can undergo at least three regimes of flow development, proceeding from the closed head end. In the first regime the velocity field develops in accordance with laminar similarity theory. In the second, high levels of turbulence are developed while the mean velocity field continues to correspond with laminar theory. The third regime commences with transition of the mean axial velocity distribution, a process occurring at extremely large axial-flow Reynolds numbers.

  14. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governing equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.

  15. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; ...

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governingmore » equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.« less

  16. Enhancing resolution of free-flow zone electrophoresis via a simple sheath-flow sample injection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Liu, Ji; Li, Jun-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ju-Fang; Xiao, Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Li, Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a simple and novel sheath-flow sample injection method (SFSIM) is introduced to reduce the band broadening of free-flow zone electrophoresis separation in newly developed self-balance free-flow electrophoresis instrument. A needle injector was placed in the center of the separation inlet, into which the BGE and sample solution were pumped simultaneously. BGE formed sheath flow outside the sample stream, resulting in less band broadening related to hydrodynamics and electrodynamics. Hemoglobin and C-phycocyanin were successfully separated by the proposed method in contrast to the poor separation of free-flow electrophoresis with the traditional injection method without sheath flow. About 3.75 times resolution enhancement could be achieved by sheath-flow sample injection method.

  17. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for monitoring and controlling the rate of fluid flow from an injection well used for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  18. Determination of Acidity Constants by Gradient Flow-Injection Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Antonio C. L.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2006-01-01

    A three-hour laboratory experiment, designed for an advanced undergraduate course in instrumental analysis that illustrates the application of the gradient chamber flow-injection titration (GCFIT) method with spectrophotometric detection to determine acidity constants is presented. The procedure involves the use of an acid-base indicator to obtain…

  19. Determination of Acidity Constants by Gradient Flow-Injection Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Antonio C. L.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2006-01-01

    A three-hour laboratory experiment, designed for an advanced undergraduate course in instrumental analysis that illustrates the application of the gradient chamber flow-injection titration (GCFIT) method with spectrophotometric detection to determine acidity constants is presented. The procedure involves the use of an acid-base indicator to obtain…

  20. Immobilized enzymes in flow-injection analysis: present and trends.

    PubMed

    Ruz, J; Lázaro, F; de Castro, M D

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the use of immobilized enzymes in flow-injection analysis (FIA) is presented. The joint use of FIA and immobilized enzymes means that analytical procedures are easily automated, analytical costs are reduced and methods are faster. The future possibilities for this combination are discussed.

  1. Immobilized enzymes in flow-injection analysis: present and trends

    PubMed Central

    Ruz, J.; Lázaro, F.; de Castro, M. D. Luque

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the use of immobilized enzymes in flow-injection analysis (FIA) is presented. The joint use of FIA and immobilized enzymes means that analytical procedures are easily automated, analytical costs are reduced and methods are faster. The future possibilities for this combination are discussed. PMID:18925183

  2. Determination of Reaction Stoichiometries by Flow Injection Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Angel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a method of flow injection analysis intended for calculation of complex-formation and redox reaction stoichiometries based on a closed-loop configuration. The technique is suitable for use in undergraduate laboratories. Information is provided for equipment, materials, procedures, and sample results. (JM)

  3. Flow injection photometric determination of NaCl, KCl and glucose in injectable drugs exploiting Schlieren signals.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Paulo Henrique Gonçalves Dias; de Melo, Karla Danielle Tavares; Fagundes, Yebá Ngoamãn Martins; de Araujo Gomes, Adriano; do Nascimento, Elaine Cristina Lima; dos Santos, Sérgio Ricardo Bezerra; de Almeida, Luciano Farias; de Araújo, Mário César Ugulino

    2012-03-25

    A flow injection photometric system that exploits Schlieren signals for analytical measurement is described. The system was designed to be used as a new strategy for determining the contents of sodium chloride, potassium chloride and glucose, each respectively in injectable drugs. The proposed methodology was based on the difference between the refractive indices of the sample zone and of the carrier stream. With this perspective, a lab-made photometer based on LED-phototransistor technology was employed as a detection system to investigate the different analytical profiles related to the Schlieren effect in low flow rate conditions. The parameters of the flow system, such as flow-rate, optical path length, and sampling loop, were adjusted in order to obtain suitable Schlieren profiles for the measurements. Data evaluation was performed with the application of partial least squares regression (PLS-1). The obtained results demonstrated the predictive ability of the constructed PLS models, and the predicted concentration values were in agreement with the reference values, with a 95% confidence level.

  4. A gravity-induced flow injection system for surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao; Mu, Ying; Yang, Mengchao; Song, Qi; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Zhongyu; Xiang, Liancheng; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan

    2013-08-15

    A number of portable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices have been developed for point-of-care (POC) testing. Meanwhile, micropumps have been fabricated to be integrated into these devices for flow injection analysis (FIA). However, the (micro) pumps, the tubes and their external control units were space-consuming. Here we developed a power-free flow injection analysis (FIA) method for SPR detection based on a gravity-induced flow injection (gFI) system. The gFI system was tubeless and did not need to be controlled. The fluid was driven into the detection areas by its own gravitational force. A transition channel was used to increase the liquid-level difference between the inlet reservoir and the outlet reservoir. After a liquid sample was placed in the inlet reservoir, the flow rate of the liquid sample was increased in the transition channel. Before it arrived at the sensing surface, the flow rate of the sample was steady (with an error of less than 10%). The fluctuation of the flow rate had an influence on the SPR response signal, which was successfully denoised using an internal reference. With the gFI system, the SPR imaging biosensor was able to perform real-time detection manually. The SPR responses of DNA hybridization and protein immobilization were successfully obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tangential injection to a supersonic flow on a blunted nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvakhov, P. V.; Egorov, I. V.; Ezhov, I. V.; Ezhov, I. V.; Novikov, I. V.; Vasilevskiy, E. B.

    2017-06-01

    The flow pattern and the heat §ux to a body surface at a tangential gas injecting have been investigated. The cooling air was injected to a §ow through the tangential axisymmetric slot on the spherically blunted cylinder. The experiments were conducted at M∞ = 6, Re∞,Rw = 0.76 · 106, angle of attack α = 0°-30°, and the slot width hk/Rw = 0-0.021. The mass rate of the injecting gas was G∗ = gj/(πρ∞ u2∞w) = 0- 0.16. It has been shown that maximum of the heat §ux toward the sphere surface can be sufficiently decreased. Numerical investigations have been carried out using the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for axisymmetric two-dimensional (2D) viscous compressible unsteady §ows at α = 0.

  6. Theory of Gas Injection: Interaction of Phase Behavior and Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindoruk, B.

    2015-12-01

    The theory of gas injection processes is a central element required to understand how components move and partition in the reservoir as one fluid is displacing another (i.e., gas is displacing oil). There is significant amount of work done in the area of interaction of phase-behavior and flow in multiphase flow conditions. We would like to present how the theory of gas injection is used in the industry to understand/design reservoir processes in various ways. The tools that are developed for the theory of gas injection originates from the fractional flow theory, as the first solution proposed by Buckley-Leveret in 1940's, for water displacing oil in porous media. After 1960's more and more complex/coupled equations were solved using the initial concept(s) developed by Buckley-Leverett, and then Welge et al. and others. However, the systematic use of the fractional flow theory for coupled set of equations that involves phase relationships (EOS) and phase appearance and disappearance was mainly due to the theory developed by Helfferich in early 80's (in petroleum literature) using method of characteristics primarily for gas injection process and later on by the systematic work done by Orr and his co-researchers during the last two decades. In this talk, we will present various cases that use and extend the theory developed by Helfferich and others (Orr et al., Lake et al. etc.). The review of various injection systems reveals that displacement in porous media has commonalities that can be represented with a unified theory for a class of problems originating from the theory of gas injection (which is in a way generalized Buckley-Leverett problem). The outcome of these solutions can be used for (and are not limited to): 1) Benchmark solutions for reservoir simulators (to quantify numerical dispersion, test numerical algorithms) 2) Streamline simulators 3) Design of laboratory experiments and their use (to invert the results) 4) Conceptual learning and to investigate

  7. Bone cement flow analysis by stepwise injection through medical cannulas.

    PubMed

    Zderic, Ivan; Steinmetz, Philipp; Windolf, Markus; Richards, R Geoff; Boger, Andreas; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2016-12-01

    Cement leakage is a serious adverse event potentially occurring during vertebroplasty. Pre-operative in-silico planning of the cement filling process can help reducing complication rates related to leakage. This requires a better understanding of the cement flow along the whole injection path. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyze bone cement flow behavior by stepwise injections through medical cannulas. Sixteen cannulas were assigned to four groups for stepwise injection of differently colored cement portions of 1ml volume. Each group differed in the amount of injected cement portions with a range of 1-4ml. After cement curing longitudinal cross-sections of the cannulas were performed and high-resolution pictures taken. Based on these pictures, quadratic polynomial interpolation was applied to the marked intersections between the last two injected cement portions to calculate the leading coefficients. Leading coefficients in the groups with three cement portions (0.287 ± 0.078), four portions (0.243 ± 0.041) and two portions (0.232 ± 0.050) were comparable and significantly higher than the group with one cement portion (0.0032 ± 0.0004), p ≤ 0.016. Based on these findings, cement flow through medical cannulas can be considered as predictable and can therefore be excluded as a source of risk for possible cement leakage complications during vertebroplasty procedures. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Injection Induced Mixing in Flows Separating From Smooth Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J. (Technical Monitor); Wundrow, David W.

    2004-01-01

    An analytic model for predicting the effect of unsteady local surface injection on the flow separating from a streamlined body at angle of attack is proposed. The model uses the premise that separation control results from enhanced mixing along the shear layer that develops between the main stream and the fluid in the underlying recirculation zone. High-Reynolds-number asymptotic methods are used to connect the unsteady surface injection to an instability wave propagating on the separating shear layer and then to the large-scale coherent structures that produce the increased mixing. The results is a tool that can guide the choice of fluid-actuator parameters to maximize flow-control effectiveness and may also facilitate computer-based numerical experiments.

  9. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  10. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  11. Method and apparatus for continuous flow injection extraction analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Siemer, Darryl D.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for a continuous flow injection batch extraction aysis system is disclosed employing extraction of a component of a first liquid into a second liquid which is a solvent for a component of the first liquid, and is immiscible with the first liquid, and for separating the first liquid from the second liquid subsequent to extraction of the component of the first liquid.

  12. Angled Injection: Turbulent Flow Hybrid Bearings Comparison to Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis; Childs, Dara

    1997-01-01

    Hydrostatic/hydrodynamic (hybrid) journal bearings handling process liquids have limited dynamic stability characteristics and their application as support elements to high speed flexible rotating systems is severely restricted. Measurements on water hybrid bearings with angled orifice injection have demonstrated improved rotordynamic performance with virtual elimination of cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and null or negative whirl frequency ratios. A bulk-flow model for prediction of the static performance and force coefficients of hybrid bearings with angled orifice injection is advanced. The analysis reveals that the fluid momentum exchange at the orifice discharge produces a pressure rise in the hydrostatic recess retards the shear flow induced by journal rotation, and thus, reduces cross-coupling forces. The predictions from the model are compared with experimental measurements for a 45 deg. angled orifice injection, 5 recess water hybrid bearing operating at 10.2, 17.4, and 24.6 krpm and with supply pressures of 4, 5.5, and 7 MPa. The correlations include recess pressures, flow rates, and rotordynamic force coefficients at the journal centered position.

  13. Transverse jet injection into a supersonic turbulent cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Z. A.; Thornber, B.; Drikakis, D.

    2011-04-01

    Jet injection into a supersonic cross-flow is a challenging fluid dynamics problem in the field of aerospace engineering which has applications as part of a rocket thrust vector control system for noise control in cavities and fuel injection in scramjet combustion chambers. Several experimental and theoretical/numerical works have been conducted to explore this flow; however, there is a dearth of literature detailing the instantaneous flow which is vital to improve the efficiency of the mixing of fluids. In this paper, a sonic jet in a Mach 1.6 free-stream is studied using a finite volume Godunov type implicit large eddy simulations technique, which employs fifth-order accurate MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) scheme with modified variable extrapolation and a three-stage second-order strong-stability-preserving Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal advancement. A digital filter based turbulent inflow data generation method is implemented in order to capture the physics of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer. This paper details the averaged and instantaneous flow features including vortex structures downstream of the jet injection, along with the jet penetration, jet mixing, pressure distributions, turbulent kinetic energy, and Reynolds stresses in the downstream flow. It demonstrates that Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities in the upper jet shear layer are primarily responsible for mixing of the two fluids. The results are compared to experimental data and recently performed classical large eddy simulations (LES) with the same initial conditions in order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical methods and utility of the inflow generation method. Results here show equivalent accuracy for 1/45th of the computational resources used in the classical LES study.

  14. Mixing layer control for tangential slot injection in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcinville, R. M.; Goodman, W. L.; Hassan, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Tangential injection into turbulent flows is one of the most promising methods of minimizing skin friction and providing thermal protection. The technique also has application to laser hardening. The effectiveness of the injected material can be increased if the spreading rate of the resulting mixing region can be reduced. Various techniques which have been shown to be effective in manipulating the rate of growth of mixing layers under certain conditions have been applied to a slot configuration having a thick external turbulent boundary layer. These include geometry modifications to the slot lip trailing edge and acoustic excitation of the slot exit plane over a wide range of frequencies. Neither of these approaches produced any noticeable effect on the downstream evolution of the mixing layer. This lack of effectiveness is attributed to the dominating influence of the well-developed incoming turbulent boundary layer. The placement of large-eddy breakup devices in this boundary layer upstream of the injection point did produce significantly lower velocities in the near-wall region of the flow downstream of the slot exit.

  15. Sonic injection through diamond orifices into a hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Huaiguo

    The objective for the present study was to experimentally characterize the performance of diamond shaped injectors for hypersonic flow applications. First, an extensive literature review was performed. Second, a small scale Mach 5.0 wind tunnel facility was installed. Third, a detailed experimental parametric investigation of sonic injection through a diamond orifice (five incidence angles and three momentum ratios) and a circular injector (three momentum ratios) into the Mach 5.0 freestream was performed. Also, the use of downstream plume vorticity control ramps was investigated. Fourth, a detailed analysis of the experimental data to characterize and model the flow for the present range of conditions was achieved. The experimental techniques include surface oil flow visualization, Mie-Scattering flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), shadowgraph photograph, and a five-hole mean flow probe. The results show that the diamond injectors have the potential to produce attached shock depending on the incidence angle and jet momentum ratio. For example, the incidence angles less than or equal to 45° at J = 0.43 generated attached interaction shocks. The attached shock produced reduced total pressure loss (drag for scramjet) and eliminated potential hot spots, associated with the upstream flow separation. The jet interaction shock angle increased with jet incidence angle and momentum ratio due to increased penetration and flow disturbances. The plume penetration and cross-sectional area increased with incidence angle and momentum ratio. The increased jet interaction shock angle and strength produced increased total pressure loss, jet interaction force and total normal force. The characteristic kidney bean shaped plume was not discernable from the diamond injectors indicating increased effectiveness for film cooling applications. A vorticity generation ramp increased the penetration of the plume and the plume shape was indicative of higher levels of

  16. Recent Development in Optical Chemical Sensors Coupling with Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Catalina Bosch; Rojas, Fuensanta Sánchez

    2006-01-01

    Optical techniques for chemical analysis are well established and sensors based on these techniques are now attracting considerable attention because of their importance in applications such as environmental monitoring, biomedical sensing, and industrial process control. On the other hand, flow injection analysis (FIA) is advisable for the rapid analysis of microliter volume samples and can be interfaced directly to the chemical process. The FIA has become a widespread automatic analytical method for more reasons; mainly due to the simplicity and low cost of the setups, their versatility, and ease of assembling. In this paper, an overview of flow injection determinations by using optical chemical sensors is provided, and instrumentation, sensor design, and applications are discussed. This work summarizes the most relevant manuscripts from 1980 to date referred to analysis using optical chemical sensors in FIA.

  17. Enhanced sensitivity in flow injection analysis using a long pathlength liquid waveguide capillary flow cell for spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Incorporation of a liquid waveguide capillary flow cell into a flow injection instrument enhances the sensitivity of flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection by two orders of magnitude. Nitrite determination at nM levels has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of this novel technique for trace analysis. Combining the long pathlength spectrophotometry with flow injection analysis, this technique has advantages of low detection limit, good precision and high sample throughput.

  18. Determination of carbofuran by flow-injection with chemiluminescent detection.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zenghong; Ouyang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Liangqia; Lin, Xucong; Chen, Guonan

    2005-01-01

    It was found that carbofuran enhances the chemiluminescence reaction between sodium sulphite and Ce(4+) in sulphuric acid, and this formed the basis of a flow-injection system with chemiluminescence detection for determination of carbofuran. Under optimum conditions, the enhanced chemiluminescence intensity was linear, with the concentration of carbofuran in the range 8 x 10(-8)-1.0 x 10(-5) g[sol ]mL, with a detection limit of 2.84 x 10(-8) g[sol ]mL (3 s[sol ]k). The proposed method was applied to the analysis of carbofuran in cabbage, with satisfactory results.

  19. A factorial design for optimizing a flow injection analysis system.

    PubMed

    Luna, J R; Ovalles, J F; León, A; Buchheister, M

    2000-05-01

    The use of a factorial design for the response exploration of a flow injection (FI) system is described and illustrated by FI spectrophotometric determination of paraquat. Variable response (absorbance) is explored as a function of the factors flow rate and length of the reaction coil. The present study was found to be useful to detect and estimate any interaction among the factors that may affect the optimal conditions for the maximal response in the optimization of the FI system, which is not possible with a univariate design. In addition, this study showed that factorial experiments enable economy of experimentation and yield results of high precision due to the use of the whole data for calculating the effects.

  20. [Determination of lead with GFAAS using online flow injection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Lan

    2007-06-01

    A cheap, rapid and sensitive method for the determination of trace amount of lead in water samples by graphite furnace absorption spectrometry coupled with online flow injection preconcentration with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarboxylate chelating cellulose (CC-APDC) was developed. There were six steps in the preconcentration of flow injection: first, 0.15 mL nitric acid was used for a complete elution, which exceeded the volume of the graphite tube, so the 40 mL solution was removed before eluting. Secondly, 40 mL maximum concentration elution solution was added to GFAAS by fixed volume sampling to improve the accuracy. In addition, traditional stopping gas measurement was substituted with small flow gas atomization (30 mL x min(-1), preconcention for 1 min) during the removal of high memory effect for ashing stage in graphite furnace, which develops tail-out phenomenon and makes blank value low and steady. Various parameters affecting the adsorption and elution, such as pH of the solution, eluent concentration, sample flow rate etc, were optimized. If miniflow in atomization step was used, the memory effect in the determination of lead by GFAAS could be removed. The CC-APDC was used for preparation and preconcentration. A good precision (RSD = 1.4%, n = 10), high enrichment factor (15) and sample throughput (50 h) with detection limit 0.12 microg x L(-1) were obtained. This method has been successfully applied to the water sample for lead determination with a recovery of 95%-105%.

  1. Reference Solutions for Benchmark Turbulent Flows in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Pandya, Mohagna J.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    A grid convergence study is performed to establish benchmark solutions for turbulent flows in three dimensions (3D) in support of turbulence-model verification campaign at the Turbulence Modeling Resource (TMR) website. The three benchmark cases are subsonic flows around a 3D bump and a hemisphere-cylinder configuration and a supersonic internal flow through a square duct. Reference solutions are computed for Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model using a linear eddy-viscosity model for the external flows and a nonlinear eddy-viscosity model based on a quadratic constitutive relation for the internal flow. The study involves three widely-used practical computational fluid dynamics codes developed and supported at NASA Langley Research Center: FUN3D, USM3D, and CFL3D. Reference steady-state solutions computed with these three codes on families of consistently refined grids are presented. Grid-to-grid and code-to-code variations are described in detail.

  2. Flow injection analysis of MWC fly ash leaching characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Willemin, J.A.; Nesbitt, C.C.; Dewey, G.R.; Sandall, J.F.; Sutter, L.L.

    1995-11-01

    A completely mixed batch reactor leaching method utilizing flow injection analysis (the CMBR-FIA method) was developed to study the lead leaching characteristics of municipal waste combustor fly ash. Flow injection analysis (FIA) coupled with atomic absorption spectrophotometry enabled the determination of lead concentrations at one minute intervals. The pH and oxidation-reduction potential of the solution were continuously monitored to characterize the leaching conditions. Automatic titration was used to alter the solution pH to defined endpoints. The CMBR-FIA method offers the ability to immediately observe alterations to the leaching solution, and grants the freedom to study a number of parameters concurrently. The CMBR-FIA method is a rapid and reliable means to investigate leaching characteristics. This paper describes the method and demonstrates its use to monitor the leaching of lead from municipal solid waste combustor fly ash as a function of pH. Soluble lead concentrations are shown to increase quickly with decreasing pH. A maximum of 50% of the total lead concentration was available in solution at pH 2. This value gradually decreased with time to over 35% of the total. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Sensitive flow-injection spectrophotometric analysis of bromopride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Liliane Spazzapam; Weinert, Patrícia Los; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena Redigolo

    2014-12-01

    A flow injection spectrophotometric procedure employing merging zones is proposed for direct bromopride determination in pharmaceutical formulations and biological fluids. The proposed method is based on the reaction between bromopride and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (p-DAC) in acid medium, in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), resulting in formation of a violet product (λmax = 565 nm). Experimental design methodologies were used to optimize the experimental conditions. The Beer-Lambert law was obeyed in a bromopride concentration range of 3.63 × 10-7 to 2.90 × 10-5 mol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9999. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.07 × 10-7 and 3.57 × 10-7 mol L-1, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of bromopride in pharmaceuticals and human urine, and recoveries of the drug from these media were in the ranges 99.6-101.2% and 98.6-102.1%, respectively. This new flow injection procedure does not require any sample pretreatment steps.

  4. Simple and clean determination of tetracyclines by flow injection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Michael Pérez; Pezza, Helena Redigolo; Pezza, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    An environmentally reliable analytical methodology was developed for direct quantification of tetracycline (TC) and oxytetracycline (OTC) using continuous flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection. The method is based on the diazo coupling reaction between the tetracyclines and diazotized sulfanilic acid in a basic medium, resulting in the formation of an intense orange azo compound that presents maximum absorption at 434 nm. Experimental design was used to optimize the analytical conditions. The proposed technique was validated over the concentration range of 1 to 40 μg mL- 1, and was successfully applied to samples of commercial veterinary pharmaceuticals. The detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) limits were 0.40 and 1.35 μg mL- 1, respectively. The samples were also analyzed by an HPLC method, and the results showed agreement with the proposed technique. The new flow injection method can be immediately used for quality control purposes in the pharmaceutical industry, facilitating monitoring in real time during the production processes of tetracycline formulations for veterinary use.

  5. Effect of injection wells with partially perforated completion on CO2/brine flow distribution and injectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyant, E.; Han, W. S.; Kim, K. Y.; Jung, N. H.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Sequestration is a viable technology to reduce the concentration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere. The success of an injection project requires large amounts of dry supercritical CO2 to be injected into brine saturated aquifers within the subsurface. However, solid salt precipitation causes a reduction of permeability, having adverse effects on well injectivity as well as pressure build-up. This study evaluated the accumulation of precipitated salt, brine flux patterns, and pressure build-up for two well constructions, 1) partially completed with 4 injection intervals and 2) fully completed throughout the thickness of the target formation. This study found that when a partially completed well is implemented, precipitation of solid salt experiences a greater radial extent then a fully completed well. Both well designs showed non-localized salt precipitation in low permeability formations (5 and 50 mD) and localized salt precipitation at high permeability (250 and 500 mD). It was also found that two different brine flux patterns occurred; under low-k conditions the brine flux was primarily outward and parallel to the direction of the CO2 migration and salt precipitation became limited. While under high-k conditions there developed back-flow of the brine to the tail of the plume as the plume experienced greater vertical movement, and the counter-flowing brine sustained the precipitation process amplifying salt precipitation. When this process occurred the permeability reduction factor became orders of magnitude less then when non-localized salt precipitation occurred, and formed an impermeable barrier around the injection well. The formation of this barrier was found to have the effect of increasing the pressure build-up near the well in regions of the reservoir in which it occurred. A sensitivity analysis on the anisotropic/isotropic nature of the reservoir and the value of the critical porosity was also conducted. The

  6. Numerical investigation of supersonic base flow with parallel injection. [in scramjet combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, G. A.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Drummond, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation represents the first detailed numerical calculations of base flow with gas injection using a geometry and primary flow condition germane to a scramjet combustor. The investigation is concerned with the numerical solution of the complete two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for the flowfield in the vicinity of the base with parallel gas injection, taking into account the fluid dynamic aspects of this flowfield. The flow is dominated by separation, and by mixed regions of locally subsonic and supersonic flow. A comparison is conducted of flows with and without injection, and the effect of base injection on the wave patterns and shear layers of such flows is clearly established.

  7. Flow-injection enzymatic analysis for glycerol and triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Chen; Cheng, Chien-Ming

    2005-11-15

    A flow-injection enzymatic analytical system was developed for determination of glycerol and triacylglycerol based on enzymatic reactions in capillary followed by electrochemical detection. The hydrogen peroxide produced from the enzyme reaction was monitored by a platinum-based electrochemical probe. Different immobilization strategies on silica support were studied. The best and most effective configuration found for the measurement of glycerol and triacylglycerols in this system was the tandem connection of a lipase column and a silica-fused capillary column coimmobilized with glycerokinase (GK) and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO). Lipase helps the breakdown of triacylglycerol to yield free fatty acids and glycerol, while glycerokinase catalyzes the adenosine-5-triphosphate-dependent phosphorylation of glycerol to yield alpha-glycerol phosphate, which can subsequently be oxidized by 3-glycerol phosphate oxidase to produce hydrogen peroxide. Response-surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the proposed system for glycerol. Experiment settings were designed by central composite design to investigate the combined effects of pH, flow rate, reaction temperature, and ATP concentration on collected signals. The fitted model, per RSM, showed that the optimum conditions of the system are 2 mM ATP in 0.1 M carbonate buffer (pH 11.0), flow rate of 0.18 mL/min, temperature of 35 degrees C, 20 microL of sample injection, and applied voltage of 0.650 V. The proposed biosensing system using lipase, GK, and GPO exhibited a flow-injection analysis peak response of 2.5 min and a detection limit of 5 x 10(-5) M glycerol (S/N = 3) with acceptable reproducibility (CV < 4.30%). It also had linear working ranges from 10(-4) to 10(-2) M for glycerol and from 10(-3) to 10(-2) M for triacylglycerol. The capillary enzyme reactor was stable up to 2 months in continuous operation, and it was possible to analyze up to 15 samples per hour. The present biosensing system holds

  8. Three-dimensional computations of cross-flow injection and combustion in a supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    A low-storage version of the SPARK3D code which is based on the temporally second-order accurate MacCormack (1969) explicit scheme is used to solve the governing equations for three-dimensional chemically reacting flows with finite-rate chemistry. The code includes a fourth-order compact spatial scheme capable of providing higher order spatial accuracy, and it is used to study two-dimensional linear advection, two-dimensional Euler flow, and three-dimensional viscous flow. Also considered are the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen in a supersonic cross stream.

  9. Holographic interferometry with an injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and two reference beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of twin injection seeded Nd:YAG lasers is compared with the performance of an argon-ion laser for recording dual-reference-beam holograms in AGFA 8E56 emulsion. Optical heterodyning is used to measure interference, and the results are expressed in terms of heterodyning signal level and intensity signal-to-noise. The Nd:YAG laser system is to be used for optical inspections of structures for cracks, defects, gas leaks, and structural changes.

  10. Holographic interferometry with an injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and two reference beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of twin injection seeded Nd:YAG lasers is compared with the performance of an argon-ion laser for recording dual-reference-beam holograms in AGFA 8E56 emulsion. Optical heterodyning is used to measure interference, and the results are expressed in terms of heterodyning signal level and intensity signal-to-noise. The Nd:YAG laser system is to be used for optical inspections of structures for cracks, defects, gas leaks, and structural changes.

  11. From continuous flow analysis to programmable Flow Injection techniques. A history and tutorial of emerging methodologies.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Jaromir Jarda

    2016-09-01

    Automation of reagent based assays, also known as Flow Analysis, is based on sample processing, in which a sample flows towards and through a detector for monitoring of its components. The Achilles heel of this methodology is that the majority of FA techniques use constant continuous forward flow to transport the sample - an approach which continually consumes reagents and generates chemical waste. Therefore the purpose of this report is to highlight recent developments of flow programming that not only save reagents, but also lead by means of advanced sample processing to selective and sensitive assays based on stop flow measurement. Flow programming combined with a novel approach to data harvesting yields a novel approach to single standard calibration, and avoids interference caused by refractive index. Finally, flow programming is useful for sample preparation, such as rapid, extensive sample dilution. The principles are illustrated by selected references to an available online tutorial http://www.flowinjectiontutorial,com/.

  12. Novel approaches to analysis by flow injection gradient titration.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Marzena; Kozak, Joanna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2007-09-26

    Two novel procedures for flow injection gradient titration with the use of a single stock standard solution are proposed. In the multi-point single-line (MP-SL) method the calibration graph is constructed on the basis of a set of standard solutions, which are generated in a standard reservoir and subsequently injected into the titrant. According to the single-point multi-line (SP-ML) procedure the standard solution and a sample are injected into the titrant stream from four loops of different capacities, hence four calibration graphs are able to be constructed and the analytical result is calculated on the basis of a generalized slope of these graphs. Both approaches have been tested on the example of spectrophotometric acid-base titration of hydrochloric and acetic acids with using bromothymol blue and phenolphthalein as indicators, respectively, and sodium hydroxide as a titrant. Under optimized experimental conditions the analytical results of precision less than 1.8 and 2.5% (RSD) and of accuracy less than 3.0 and 5.4% (relative error (RE)) were obtained for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively, in ranges of 0.0031-0.0631 mol L(-1) for samples of hydrochloric acid and of 0.1680-1.7600 mol L(-1) for samples of acetic acid. The feasibility of both methods was illustrated by applying them to the total acidity determination in vinegar samples with precision lower than 0.5 and 2.9% (RSD) for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively.

  13. Determination of diquat by flow injection-chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    López-Paz, J L; Catalá-Icardo, M; Antón-Garrido, B

    2009-06-01

    A simple, economic, sensitive and rapid method for the determination of the pesticide diquat was described. This new method was based on the coupling of flow injection analysis methodology and direct chemiluminescent detection; to the authors' knowledge, this approach had not been used up to now with this pesticide. It was based on its oxidation with ferricyanide in alkaline medium; significant improvements in the analytical signal were achieved by using high temperatures and quinine as sensitiser. Its high throughput (144 h(-1)), together with its low limit of detection (2 ng mL(-1)), achieved without need of preconcentration steps, permitted the reliable quantification of diquat over the linear range of (0.01-0.6) microg mL(-1) in samples from different origins (river, tap, mineral and ground waters), even in the presence of a 40-fold concentration of paraquat, a pesticide commonly present in the commercial formulations of diquat.

  14. Online assay of bone specific alkaline phosphatase with a flow injection-bead injection system.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Supaporn Kradtap; Somprayoon, Duangporn; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Ongchai, Siriwan; Arppornchayanon, Olarn; Ganranoo, Lucksagoon; Lapanantnoppakhun, Somchai; Grudpan, Kate

    2007-09-26

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) has been used as one of the biomarkers for bone resorption and liver diseases. Normally, total alkaline phosphatase is quantified along with other symptoms to determine the releasing source of the alkaline phosphatase. A semi-automated flow injection-bead injection system was proposed to conveniently and selectively assay bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) based on its specific binding to wheat germ coated beads. Amount of BALP in serum was determined from the intensity of the yellow product produced from bound BALP on the retained beads and its substrate pNPP. The used beads were discarded and the fresh ones were introduced for the next analysis. The reaction cell was designed to be opened and closed using a computer controlled solenoid valve for a precise incubation time. The performance of the proposed system was evaluated by using it to assay BALP in human serum. The results were compared to those obtained by using a commercial ELISA kit. The system is proposed to be an easy and cost effective system for quantification of BALP as an alternative to batch wise wheat germ specific binding technique.

  15. Flow injection chemiluminescence determination of naphazoline hydrochloride in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Iranifam, Mortaza; Sorouraddin, Mohammad H

    2014-02-01

    A simple and sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method was developed for the determination of naphazoline hydrochloride (NPZ). The method is based on the enhancing effect of NPZ on the weak CL signal from the reaction of KIO4 with H2 O2 . Experimental parameters that affected the CL signal, including the pH of the KIO4 solution, concentrations of KIO4 , H2 O2 and disodium-EDTA and flow rate were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the increment of CL intensity was linearly proportional to the concentration of NPZ in the range 5.0 × 10(-6) to 70 × 10(-6) mol/L. The detection limit was 1.0 × 10(-6) mol/L and the relative standard deviation for 50 × 10(-6) mol/L NPZ solution was 2.8% (n = 11). In addition, a high throughput of 120 samples/h was achieved. The utility of this method was demonstrated by determining NPZ in pharmaceuticals.

  16. Fuel-Air Injection Effects on Combustion in Cavity-Based Flameholders in a Supersonic Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    FUEL-AIR INJECTION EFFECTS ON COMBUSTION IN CAVITY-BASED FLAMEHOLDERS IN A SUPERSONIC FLOW THESIS...Government. AFIT/GAE/ENY/05-M02 FUEL-AIR INJECTION EFFECTS ON COMBUSTION IN CAVITY-BASED FLAMEHOLDERS IN A SUPERSONIC FLOW THESIS Presented to...AIR INJECTION EFFECTS ON COMBUSTION IN CAVITY-BASED FLAMEHOLDERS IN A SUPERSONIC FLOW William H. Allen Jr., BSME Captain, USAF

  17. Resin Flow Analysis in the Injection Cycle of a Resin Transfer Molded Radome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanian, Hossein; Poursina, Mehrdad

    2007-04-01

    Resin flow analysis in the injection cycle of an RTM process was investigated. Fiberglass and carbon fiber mats were used as reinforcements with EPON 826 epoxy resin. Numerical models were developed in ANSYS finite element software to simulate resin flow behavior into a mold of conical shape. Resin flow into the woven fiber mats is modeled as flow through porous media. The injection time for fiberglass/epoxy composite is found to be 4407 seconds. Required injection time for the carbon/epoxy composite is 27022 seconds. Higher injection time for carbon/epoxy part is due to lower permeability value of the carbon fibers compared to glass fiber mat.

  18. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaddes, David E.; Demirel, Melik C.; Reeves, W. Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (~20 μm) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1–200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0–50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton® fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time. PMID:26479269

  19. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, David E; Demirel, Melik C; Reeves, W Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-12-07

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (∼20 μm) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1-200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0-50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton® fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time.

  20. Holographic interferometry with an injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and two reference beams

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.J. )

    1990-06-20

    The performance of twin injection seeded Nd:YAG lasers is compared with the performance of an argon-ion laser for recording dual-reference-beam holograms in AGFA 8E56 emulsion. Optical heterodyning is used to measure interference and the results are expressed in terms of heterodyning signal level and intensity signal to noise. The Nd:YAG laser system is to be used for optical inspections of structures for cracks, defects, gas leaks, and structural changes. Key words: holography, lasers, neodymium, heterodyning, Interferometry.

  1. Highly sensitive flow-injection chemiluminescence determination of pyrogallol compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanwal, Shamsa; Fu, Xiaohong; Su, Xingguang

    2009-12-01

    A highly sensitive flow-injection chemiluminescent method for the direct determination of pyrogallol compounds has been developed. Proposed method is based on the enhanced effect of pyrogallol compounds on the chemiluminescence signals of KMnO 4-H 2O 2 system in slightly alkaline medium. Three important pyrogallol compounds, pyrogallic acid, gallic acid and tannic acid, have been detected by this method, and the possible mechanism of the CL reaction is also discussed. The proposed method is simple, convenient, rapid (60 samples h -1), and sensitive, has a linear range of 8 × 10 -10 mol L -1 to 1 × 10 -5 mol L -1, for pyrogallic acid, with a detection limit of 6 × 10 -11 mol L -1, 4 × 10 -8 mol L -1 to 5 × 10 -3 mol L -1 for gallic acid with a detection limit of 9 × 10 -10 mol L -1, and 8 × 10 -8 mol L -1 to 5 × 10 -2 mol L -1 for tannic acid, with a detection limit of 2 × 10 -9 mol L -1, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 15) was 0.8, 1.1 and 1.3% for 5 × 10 -6 mol L -1 pyrogallic acid, gallic acid and tannic acid, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of pyrogallol compounds in tea and coffee samples.

  2. Exploratory study of the effects of injection configurations and inlet flow conditions on the characteristics of flow in spherical chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.

    1972-01-01

    Flow visualization studies were conducted to evaluate techniques for injecting simulated-fuel and simulated-propellant gases into a spherical cavity for application to open-cycle gaseous-core nuclear rockets. Preliminary studies were conducted with six simulated-fuel injectors and eight simulated-propellant injection configurations. Additional tests were conducted with the best configuration to determine the effect of weight-flow ratio, gas density ratio, injector location, and flow distribution on the simulated-fuel containment characteristics.

  3. Investigation of the three-dimensional turbulent flow downstream of swept slot injection in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an experimental and numerical investigation of tangential swept slot injection (sweep angles of 22.5 and 45 deg) into a thick turbulent boundary layer at Mach 6 are presented. Film cooling effectiveness, skin friction, and flow structure downstream of the swept slot injection are investigated. The data are compared to that for unswept slots, and it is found that cooling effectiveness and skin-friction reductions are not significantly affected by sweeping the slot. Predictions of cooling effectiveness and skin friction obtained by a numerical finite-difference technique agree reasonably well with experimental surface variables. As in previous supersonic two-dimensional slot research, reduced mixing was found downstream of the slot lip in the present three-dimensional case.

  4. Application of flow-injection potentiometric system for determination of total concentration of aliphatic carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Mroczkiewicz, Monika; Górski, Łukasz; Zamojska-Jaroszewicz, Anna; Szewczyk, Krzysztof W; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2011-09-30

    In this work, flow-injection system with potentiometric detection was tested for determination of total carboxylic acid concentration. Detection part of the examined system consists of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) with polymer membranes of different compositions. First electrode is based on Zr(IV)-tetraphenylporphyrin as ionophore selective towards carboxylic acid anions, the membrane of second one contains only liphophilic anion exchanger - tridodecylmethylammonium chloride. Final response of the system is a result of combination of EMF signals from both electrodes. Combination of two detectors enables significant decrease of differences between potentiometric signals induced by mixtures of studied anions of various concentrations as compared to results obtained only with metalloporphyrin-based ISE. The use of anion-exchanger based detector allows for elimination of the influence of aliphatic carboxylic acids lipophilicity. Proposed potentiometric flow-injection system was employed for determination of short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids (so-called VFA - volatile fatty acids) in samples originating from an anaerobic digester. Results obtained for these relatively complicated samples are in good agreement with results obtained with the use of reference colorimetric method. Linear response towards carboxylic acids was observed in the concentration range of 10(-4) to 10(-2)mold m(-3), with the slopes in the range of -110 to -150 mV dec(-1) (for acetate(-) and butyrate(-), respectively). System enables for determination of about 6 samples per hour. Life time of ISEs average about 2 months. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  6. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  7. Understanding the Fundamental Roles of Momentum and Vorticity Injections in Flow Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-02

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0311 Understanding the fundamental roles of momentum and vorticity injections in flow control Kunihiko Taira FLORIDA STATE...08-2016 Final Report 15 May 2013 - 14 May 2016 Understanding the fundamental roles of momentum and vorticity injections in flow control FA9550-13-1...been developed and validated, which can serve as a basis for physics -based active flow control guided by the knowledge of hydrodynamic instabilities

  8. Selective determination of chlorine dioxide using gas diffusion flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, D.A.; Pacey, G.E.; Gordon, G.

    1985-12-01

    An automated absorbance technique for the determination of aqueous chlorine dioxide has been developed by utilizing gas diffusion flow injection analysis. A gas diffusion membrane is used to separate the donor (sampling) stream from the acceptor (detecting) stream. The absorbance of chlorine dioxide is monitored at 359 nm. The first method uses distilled water as the acceptor stream and gives a detection limit of 0.25 mg/L chlorine dioxide. This system is over 550 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than chlorine. To further minimize chlorine interference, oxalic acid is used in the acceptor stream. The detection limit for this system is 0.45 mg/L chlorine dioxide. This second system is over 5400 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than chlorine. Both methods show excellent selectivity for chlorine dioxide over iron and manganese compounds, as well as other oxychlorinated compounds such as chlorite and perchlorate ions. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Two-parameter determination in vinegar by a flow injection-pervaporation system.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, J; Pérez-Juan, P; Luque de Castro, M D

    2001-07-01

    A flow injection method (FI) for the sequential determination of ethanol and acetic acid in vinegar is reported. The determination of ethanol is based on the oxidation of the pervaporated ethanol by K2Cr2O7. The acetic acid is determined by an acid-base reaction with Thymol Blue as the indicator. Both reactions are monitored photometrically at 600 nm using a single detector. Optimisation studies and assessment of the sequential Fl method are also reported. The linear determination range is 0-12% v/v for ethanol and 0-10% (grams of acetic acid in 100 ml) for acetic acid. The sample throughput of the sequential manifold is seven per hour. The new method was applied to vinegar samples and the results obtained were in excellent agreement with those from reference methods used in Spain.

  10. DETECTING WATER FLOW BEHIND PIPE IN INJECTION WELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency require that an injection well exhibit both internal and external mechanical integrity. The external mechanical integrity consideration is that there is no significant fluid movement into an underground source of drinking water ...

  11. Injectable Solid Peptide Hydrogel as Cell Carrier: Effects of Shear Flow on Hydrogel and Cell Payload

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Congqi; Mackay, Michael E.; Czymmek, Kirk; Nagarkar, Radhika P.; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.

    2012-01-01

    β-hairpin peptide-based hydrogels are a class of injectable solid hydrogels that can deliver encapsulated cells or molecular therapies to a target site via syringe or catheter injection as a carrier material. These physical hydrogels can shear-thin and consequently flow as a low-viscosity material under a sufficient shear stress but immediately recover back into a solid upon removal of the stress, allowing them to be injected as preformed gel solids. Hydrogel behavior during flow was studied in a cylindrical capillary geometry that mimicked the actual situation of injection through a syringe needle in order to quantify effects of shear-thin injection delivery on hydrogel flow behavior and encapsulated cell payloads. It was observed that all β-hairpin peptide hydrogels investigated displayed a promising flow profile for injectable cell delivery: a central wide plug flow region where gel material and cell payloads experienced little or no shear rate and a narrow shear zone close to the capillary wall where gel and cells were subject to shear deformation. The width of the plug flow region was found to be weakly dependent on hydrogel rigidity and flow rate. Live-dead assays were performed on encapsulated MG63 cells three hours after injection flow and revealed that shear-thin delivery through the capillary had little impact on cell viability and the spatial distribution of encapsulated cell payloads. These observations help us to fundamentally understand how the gels flow during injection through a thin catheter and how they immediately restore mechanically and morphologically relative to pre-flow, static gels. PMID:22390812

  12. Paper-based analytical device for electrochemical flow-injection analysis of glucose in urine.

    PubMed

    Lankelma, Jan; Nie, Zhihong; Carrilho, Emanuel; Whitesides, George M

    2012-05-01

    This article describes a new design for a paper-based electrochemical system for flow-injection analysis. Capillary wicking facilitates a gravity-driven flow of buffer solution continuously through paper and nitrocellulose, from a buffer reservoir at one end of the device to a sink at the other. A difference in height between the reservoir and the sink leads to a continuous and constant flow. The nitrocellulose lies horizontally on a working electrode, which consists of a thin platinum layer deposited on a solid support. The counter and reference electrodes are strategically positioned upstream in the buffer reservoir. A simple pipetting device was developed for reliable application of (sub)microliter volumes of sample without the need of commercial micropipets; this device did not damage the nitrocellulose membrane. Demonstration of the system for the determination of the concentration of glucose in urine resulted in a noninvasive, quantitative assay that could be used for diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. This method does not require disposable test strips, with enzyme and electrodes, that are thrown away after each measurement. Because of its low cost, this system could be used in medical environments that are resource-limited.

  13. Transonic injection in interaction with transverse compressible flow.

    PubMed

    Dizene, R; Charbonnier, J M; Dorignac, E; Lablanc, R

    2002-10-01

    An extensive study devoted to modelling blade cooling was undertaken at CEAT a few years ago in collaboration with SNECMA. For the turbomachinery applications, an experimental configuration of a turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer was studied for compressible and incompressible flows. The research presented here is a part of that study and this paper reports on the experimental results of an investigation concerned with a row of transonic jets interacting with a transverse flow. In many applications, the cooling layer does not emerge onto the surface from a tangential slot but comes from a slot normal to or inclined to what is otherwise a flush surface. In this case the freestream interacts with the coolant flow. The secondary (jet) flow is introduced at an angle of 45 degrees to the mainstream flow direction. Visualization studies using the surface flow patterns and surface temperature flow patterns are reported and discussed.

  14. Transport phenomena in subsonic and supersonic flows in a duct with mass injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Shyang-Lin

    1994-01-01

    Film cooling effects have always been crucial for the engine/rocket/ramjet propulsion systems. Knowing the pressure and temperature distribution of the flow is very important for both system and structural analyses to find optimal design. An efficient time dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes solver using higher order accuracy algorithms employing the finite-volume method is developed. The physics inside the flow field with a cooler secondary mass stream injected into the channel is studied. The results showed that for subsonic main flow, the injected mass stream will bend and accelerate in the downstream direction, creating a region of lower temperature near the downstream walls. This lower temperature region also exists even if there is a heat flux added to the flow system. Therefore, film cooling effect exists for the subsonic flow. For supersonic flow, however, the injected mass flow, instead of bending toward the downstream wall in order to have a cooling effect, is bent toward upstream direction and retards the main flow, resulting in a stagnant flow region. The temperature in the entire flow field is found to increase an appreciable amount even though the temperature in the stagnant region is found to be relatively lower than other areas. Therefore, there is no film cooling effect observed for supersonic flow. These phenomena have been verified by the experimental work. For subsonic flow, the acoustical wave is found to travel forwards and backwards in the field system while the pressure gradient is favorable for the whole flow field. For supersonic flow, there is always an adverse pressure gradient region formed near the walls upstream of the mass-injection location. Inside this adverse pressure gradient region, an air bubble is usually found to exist. The flow interactions between the main stream and secondary stream increase the flow vorticity. This vorticity is found to travel in the downstream direction for subsonic flow. However, for supersonic flow

  15. Numerical investigation of thrust vectoring by injection of secondary air into nozzle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berens, T.

    1993-11-01

    Injection of secondary air into nozzle flows is an efficient method to control the thrust vector angle of an aircraft. A numerical investigation of thrust vectoring has been carried out for hypersonic aircraft in the transonic flight regime. In this speed range, single duct asymmetrical single expansion ramp nozzles operate far off design due to large nozzle exit areas required for optimal thrust coefficients at hypersonic cruise Mach numbers, thus producing large thrust components in the downward direction. Injecting secondary air into the nozzle flow in the critical transonic flight Mach number regime can lead to favorable gross thrust vector angles and thus improved thrust efficiency in flight direction. For a hypersonic aircraft's rectangular convergent-divergent nozzle configuration with a single expansion ramp, two dimensional Euler calculations of the complete afterbody flow field were carried out in the transonic flight regime, investigating subsonic as well as supersonic injection of the aircraft's forebody boundary layer air into the nozzle flow. Subsonic flow of the injected air along the expansion ramp produces a favorable pressure distribution on the ramp and results in advantageous thrust vectors with small force components normal to the flight direction and in best thrust efficiency. The interaction between the external flow, the jet plume flow, and the secondary air flow, as well as the behavior of the thrust vector, due to pressure and temperature variations of the injected forebody boundary layer air, are discussed. Also investigated was the impact of the aircraft's angle of attack on the complete nozzle flow field.

  16. Determination of arsenic in a nickel alloy by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. P.; Tyson, J. F.; Offley, S. G.

    1992-08-01

    The development of a method for the direct determination of trace arsenic quantities in nickel alloy digests, by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, is described. An optimization study of the manifold and chemical parameters produced system performance, in terms of tolerance of the nickel matrix and sensitivity, such that matrix removal and pre-reduction of As(V) to As (III) prior to arsine generation were eliminated. Full recovery of the As(V) signal from a solution containing 5 ng ml -1 in the presence of 60 μg ml -1 nickel was obtained. Validation of the method was achieved by analyzing a British Chemical Standard (BCS) Certified Reference Material (CRM) #346 IN nickel alloy containing arsenic at a concentration of 50 μg g -1. Following dissolution in nitric and hydrofluoric acids by a microwave assisted procedure, the only subsequent preparation required was dilution by the appropriate factor. Up to 60 injections h -1 may be made, with a detection limit of 0.5 ng ml -1 arsenic (250 pg absolute) as As(V) in a 500 μl sample. The peak height characteristic concentration is 0.46 ng ml -1, with a relative standard deviation of 3.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 As(V) standard ( n = 6).

  17. High-throughput chemical residue analysis by fast extraction and dilution flow injection mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C

    2011-01-21

    Fast extraction and dilution flow injection mass spectrometry (FED-FI-MS) is presented as a technique to increase throughput in quantitative multiresidue screening in complex matrices, while meeting current analytical method quality requirements.

  18. Differentiating organic and conventional sage by chromatographic and mass spectrometry flow-injection fingerprints

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and flow injection electrospray ionization with ion trap mass spectrometry (FIMS) fingerprints combined with the principal component analysis (PCA) were examined for their potential in differentiating commercial organic and conventional sage samples. The...

  19. Laboratory behavior of a plasma plume injected into the magnetized plasma flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minami, Shigeyuki; Baum, Peter J.; Kamin, George; Takeya, Yoshio; White, R. Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Plasma plumes are injected into the tail of the simulated earth's magnetosphere produced by an interaction between the simulated solar wind and a magnetic dipole. The behavior of laboratory artificial plasma plumes injected into the magnetized plasma flow is discussed in conjunction with the AMPTE artificial comet experiments (Minami et al., 1986) and other active chemical release experiments in space.

  20. Flow-injection analysis with multidetection as a useful technique for metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Ruz, J; Rios, A; de Castro, M D; Valcarcel, M

    1986-03-01

    The analytical potential of a closed flow-injection system with multidetection by a single detector (for calculation of rate constants, reaction rate, dilution and amplification methods, etc.) is extended to simultaneous determinations for chromium speciation, with injection of the reagent(s) into the sample solution (which acts as the carrier).

  1. Micropolar boundary layer flow at a stagnation point on a moving wall with suction and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanien, I. A.; Hady, F. M.

    1988-10-01

    The flow of a micropolar fluid at a two-dimensional stagnation point on a moving wall with suction and injection is studied. Numerical computations were carried out on a VME-2955 computer. The effects of the suction/injection parameter and dimensionless material parameters are discussed.

  2. Bubble formation during horizontal gas injection into downward-flowing liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hua; Thomas, Brian G.

    2001-12-01

    Bubble formation during gas injection into turbulent downward-flowing water is studied using high-speed videos and mathematical models. The bubble size is determined during the initial stages of injection and is very important to turbulent multiphase flow in molten-metal processes. The effects of liquid velocity, gas-injection flow rate, injection hole diameter, and gas composition on the initial bubble-formation behavior have been investigated. Specifically, the bubble-shape evolution, contact angles, size, size range, and formation mode are measured. The bubble size is found to increase with increasing gas-injection flow rate and decreasing liquid velocity and is relatively independent of the gas injection hole size and gas composition. Bubble formation occurs in one of four different modes, depending on the liquid velocity and gas flow rate. Uniform-sized spherical bubbles form and detach from the gas injection hole in mode I for a low liquid speed and small gas flow rate. Modes III and IV occur for high-velocity liquid flows, where the injected gas elongates down along the wall and breaks up into uneven-sized bubbles. An analytical two-stage model is developed to predict the average bubble size, based on realistic force balances, and shows good agreement with measurements. Preliminary results of numerical simulations of bubble formation using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model qualitatively match experimental observations, but more work is needed to reach a quantitative match. The analytical model is then used to estimate the size of the argon bubbles expected in liquid steel in tundish nozzles for conditions typical of continuous casting with a slide gate. The average argon bubble sizes generated in liquid steel are predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the same flow conditions. However, the differences lessen with increasing liquid velocity.

  3. Improved optical techniques for studying sonic and supersonic injection into Mach 3 flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buggele, Alvin E.; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1997-11-01

    Filtered Rayleigh Scattering and shadowgraph flow visualization were used to characterize the penetration of helium or moist air injected transversely at several pressures to a Mach 3 flow in the NASA Lewis 3.81 inch by 10 inch continuous flow supersonic wind tunnel. This work is in support of the LOX augmented nuclear thermal rocket program. The present study used an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser to illuminate a transverse section of the injectant plume. Rayleigh scattered light was passed through an iodine absorption cell to suppress stray laser light and was imaged onto a cooled CCD camera. The scattering was based on condensation of water vapor in the injectant flow. Results are presented for various configurations of sonic and supersonic injector designs mounted primarily in the floor of the tunnel. Injectors studied include a single 0.25 inch diameter hole, five 0.112 inch diameter holes on 0.177 inch spacing, and a 7 degree half angle wedge. High speed shadowgraph flow visualization images were obtained with several video camera systems. Roof and floor static pressure data are presented several ways for the three configurations of injection designs with and without helium and/or air injection into Mach 3 flow.

  4. Gold nanorods for surface Plasmon resonance detection of mercury (II) in flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Khang; Heider, Emily C; Brooks, Scott C; Barbosa, Fernando; Campiglia, Andres D

    2014-10-01

    This article investigates the flow injection analysis of mercury (II) ions in tap water samples via surface Plasmon resonance detection. Quantitative analysis of mercury (II) is based on the chemical interaction of metallic mercury with gold nanorods immobilized on a glass substrate. A new flow cell design is presented with the ability to accommodate the detecting substrate in the sample compartment of commercial spectrometers. Two alternatives are here considered for mercury (II) detection, namely stop-flow and continuous flow injection analysis modes. The best limit of detection (2.4 ng mL(-1)) was obtained with the continuous flow injection analysis approach. The accurate determination of mercury (II) ions in samples of unknown composition is demonstrated with a fortified tap water sample.

  5. A 3-D nonisothermal flow simulation and pulling force model for injection pultrusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Ibrahim

    1998-12-01

    Injected Pultrusion (IP) is an efficient way of producing high quality, low cost, high volume and constant cross-section polymeric composites. This process has been developed recently, and the efforts to optimize it are still underway. This work is related to the development of a 3-D non-isothermal flow model for the IP processes. The governing equations for transport of mass, momentum and, energy are formulated by using a local volume averaging approach, and the Finite Element/Control Volume method is used to solve the system of equations numerically. The chemical species balance equation is solved in the Lagrangian frame of reference whereas the energy equation is solved using Galerkin, SU (Streamline Upwind), and SUPG (Streamline Upwind Petrov Galerkin) approaches. By varying degrees of freedom and the flow rates of the resin, it is shown that at high Peclet numbers the SUPG formulation performs better than the SU and the Galerkin methods in all cases. The 3-D model predictions for degree of cure and temperature are compared with a one dimensional analytical solution and the results are found satisfactory. Moreover, by varying the Brinkman Number, it is shown that the effect of viscous dissipation is insignificant. The 3-D flow simulations have been carried out for both thin and thick parts and the results are compared with the 2-D model. It is shown that for thick parts 2-D simulations render erroneous results. The effect of changing permeability on the flow fronts is also addressed. The effect of increasing taper angle on the model prediction is also investigated. A parametric study is conducted to isolate optimum conditions for both isothermal and non-isothermal cases using a straight rectangular die and a die with a tapered inlet. Finally, a simple pulling force model is developed and the pulling force required to pull the carbon-epoxy fiber resin system is estimated for dies of varying tapered inlet.

  6. ASSESSING THE GEOCHEMICAL FATE OF DEEP-WELL-INJECTED HAZARDOUS WASTE: A REFERENCE GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The geochemical fate of deep-well-injected wastes must be thoroughly understood to avoid problems when incompatibility between the injected wastes and the injection-zone formation is a possibility. An understanding of geochemical fate will be useful when a geochemical no-migratio...

  7. ASSESSING THE GEOCHEMICAL FATE OF DEEP-WELL-INJECTED HAZARDOUS WASTE: A REFERENCE GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The geochemical fate of deep-well-injected wastes must be thoroughly understood to avoid problems when incompatibility between the injected wastes and the injection-zone formation is a possibility. An understanding of geochemical fate will be useful when a geochemical no-migratio...

  8. Determination of Nitrite and Nitrate in Freshwaters using Flow Injection Luminol Chemiluminescence Detection.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Attiq-Ur; Yaqoob, Mohammad; Waseem, Amir; Nabi, Abdul

    2011-09-01

    A flow injection method for determination of nitrite and nitrate in freshwaters is described based on luminol-hypochlorite chemiluminescence (CL) system. Nitrate is reduced on-line with a cadmium reduction column to nitrite and its inhibition effect on luminol CL emission was measured. The effects of chemical and physical parameters such as buffer pH and concentration, luminol, sodium hypochlorite and sulfuric acid concentrations, flow rate, and sample volume were investigated. The calibration graphs were linear over the range 0.1-50 µM (R2 = 0.9989 and 0.9984) for nitrite and nitrate respectively with a limit of detection (S/N = 3) of 4.0 × 10-8 M and a sample throughput of 120 samples per hour. The effect of foreign ions was studied and the method was successfully applied to the determination of nitrite and nitrate in water samples. The results obtained were in good agreement with those achieved by a spectrophotometric reference method at the 95% confidence level. Standard addition method was also applied to the freshwater samples and the recovery values were found in the range of 92-109% and 94-105% for nitrite and nitrate respectively.

  9. Completely automated system for determining halogenated organic compounds by multisyringe flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Maya, Fernando; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2008-08-01

    A new, multisyringe flow injection setup was designed to develop the first completely automated flow methodology for the expeditious, accurate in-line determination of halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) in water. The target compounds are preconcentrated and isolated by solid-phase extraction. Following elution, previously organically bound halogens are released as free hydrogen halides by the combined action of UV light and a chemical oxidant for their subsequent spectrophotometric determination by reaction with Hg(SCN) 2 and Fe(3+). Optimizing the major hydrodynamic and chemical variables resulted in improved performance. Recovery of various HOCs was assessed, and potential interferents were examined. Under the selected operating conditions, the proposed method exhibits variable analytical performance depending on the particular sample volume used (e.g., a sample volume of 5 mL provides a linear working range of 140-2000 microg L(-1), a LOD of 100 microg L(-1), and a throughput of 9 samples h(-1)). The method was successfully used to determine total adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in well water and leachates, and the results validated against an AOX reference method. The role of the proposed system in the environmental analytical field is critically discussed.

  10. Application of quantum dots in clinical and alimentary fields using multicommutated flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Llorent-Martínez, E J; Molina-García, L; Kwiatkowski, R; Ruiz-Medina, A

    2013-05-15

    In recent years, the number of scientific papers regarding the use of quantum dots (QDs) has increased almost exponentially, especially emphasizing their use for new applications and describing new approaches. One of the future trends in the development of new methods of analysis is the use of automated methodologies. Among them, Multicommutated Flow Injection Analysis has been here selected in order to show its potentiality in pharmaceutical and food analysis. Using water-soluble CdTe QDs modified by mercaptopropionic acid, a flow system was developed for the determination of ascorbic acid. The system was based on the quenching effect produced by ascorbic acid on the fluorescence of QDs. Under the optimized conditions, the relationship between the fluorescence intensity of the QDs and ascorbic acid concentration was linear in the range of 12-250 μg mL(-1), obtaining a sample throughput of 68 determinations per hour. The proposed method was applied to the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceutical formulations, goji capsules and fruit juices. The results obtained were in good agreement with those showed by a reference method, so indicating the utility of the proposed method in the clinical and alimentary fields.

  11. Flow visualization of lateral jet injection into swirling crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, G. B.; Aoki, K.; Lilley, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Flow visualization experiments have been conducted to characterize the time-mean flowfield of a deflected turbulent jet in a confining cylindrical crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of 2, 4, and 6 were investigated, under crossflow inlet swirler vane angles of 0 (swirler removed), 45 and 70 degrees. Smoke, neutrally-buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles, and multi-spark flow visualization were employed to highlight interesting features of the deflected jet, as well as the trajectory and spread pattern of the jet. Gross flowfield characterization was obtained for a range of lateral jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios and a range of inlet swirl strengths in the main flow. The flow visualization results agree well with the measurements obtained elsewhere with the six-orientation single hot-wire method.

  12. Flow visualization of lateral jet injection into swirling crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, G. B.; Aoki, K.; Lilley, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Flow visualization experiments have been conducted to characterize the time-mean flowfield of a deflected turbulent jet in a confining cylindrical crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of 2, 4, and 6 were investigated, under crossflow inlet swirler vane angles of 0 (swirler removed), 45 and 70 degrees. Smoke, neutrally-buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles, and multi-spark flow visualization were employed to highlight interesting features of the deflected jet, as well as the trajectory and spread pattern of the jet. Gross flowfield characterization was obtained for a range of lateral jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios and a range of inlet swirl strengths in the main flow. The flow visualization results agree well with the measurements obtained elsewhere with the six-orientation single hot-wire method.

  13. Modeling of three-dimensional mixing and reacting ducted flows. [for scramjet injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelazny, S. W.; Rushmore, W. L.; Baker, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    A computer code based on a finite-element solution algorithm is developed to perform an analytical investigation on the turbulent mixing and reaction of hydrogen jets injected from multiple orifices transverse and parallel to a supersonic airstream. A laser optical cavity flow field was also analyzed to demonstrate the generality of the proposed model. Computational results provide a three-dimensional description of velocity, temperature, and species-concentration fields downstream of injection. Major conclusions are that the analysis has immediate utility in evaluating the mixing effectiveness of transverse H2 injection data since it has been tested in its ability to model this type of data and that turbulent mixing length theory, constant effective Prandtl number, and a Lewis number of unity provide reasonable agreement with transverse H2 injection data downstream of the near-injection region. Efforts are presently being directed toward using the code in modeling laser and scramjet data for a wide range of flow conditions.

  14. Insights into Cold Water Injection Stimulation Effects through Analytical Solutions to Flow and Heat Transport

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Plummer

    2013-09-01

    Wells in traditional hydrothermal reservoirs are used to extract heat and to dispose of cooled water. In the first case, high productivity (the ratio of production flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) to is preferred in order to maximize power generation, while minimizing the parasitic energy loss of pumping. In the second case, high injectivity (the ratio of injection flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) is preferred, in order to reduce pumping costs. In order to improve productivity or injectivity, cold water is sometimes injected into the reservoir in an attempt to cool and contract the surrounding rock matrix and thereby induce dilation and/or extension of existing fractures or to generate new fractures. Though the increases in permeability associated with these changes are likely localized, by improving connectivity to more extensive high-permeability fractures they can at least temporarily provide substantially improved productivity or injectivity.

  15. Liquid sprays and flow studies in the direct-injection diesel engine under motored conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung Lee; Carpenter, Mark H.; Ramos, Juan I.; Schock, Harold J.; Stegeman, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A two dimensional, implicit finite difference method of the control volume variety, a two equation model of turbulence, and a discrete droplet model were used to study the flow field, turbulence levels, fuel penetration, vaporization, and mixing in diesel engine environments. The model was also used to study the effects of engine speed, injection angle, spray cone angle, droplet distribution, and intake swirl angle on the flow field, spray penetration and vaporization, and turbulence in motored two-stroke diesel engines. It is shown that there are optimum conditions for injection, which depend on droplet distribution, swirl, spray cone angle, and injection angle. The optimum conditions result in good spray penetration and vaporization and in good fuel mixing. The calculation presented clearly indicates that internal combustion engine models can be used to assess, at least qualitatively, the effects of injection characteristics and engine operating conditions on the flow field and on the spray penetration and vaporization in diesel engines.

  16. Effect of combustor geometry and fuel injection scheme on the combustion process in a supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zun; Wang, Zhenguo; Sun, Mingbo; Bai, Xue-Song

    2016-12-01

    The combustion process in a hydrogen fueled scramjet combustor with a rearwall-expansion cavity was investigated numerically under inflow conditions of Ma=2.52 with stagnation pressure P0=1.6 Mpa and stagnation temperature T0=1486 K. The numerical solver was first evaluated for supersonic reactive flows in a similar combustor configuration where experimental data is available. Wall-pressure distribution was compared with the experiments, and grid independency analysis and chemical mechanism comparison were conducted. The numerical results showed fairly good agreements with the available experimental data under supersonic combustion conditions. Then the numerical solver was used to study the effects of combustor geometry, fuel injection scheme and injection equivalence ratio on the combustion process. It was found that under the same fuel injection condition, the combustor configuration with a rearwall-expansion cavity is in favor of the supersonic combustion mode and present better ability of thermal choking prevention than the other combustor configurations. For the rearwall-expansion cavity combustor, the supersonic flow field was found to be sensitive to the injector position and injection scheme, but not highly sensitive to the injection pressure. Besides, rearwall-expansion cavity with the combined fuel injection scheme (with an injection upstream the cavity and a direct injection on the rear wall) is an optimized injection scheme during the flame stabilization process.

  17. Flow regime analysis for fluid injection into a confined aquifer: implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Zheng, Z.; Celia, M. A.; Stone, H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide injection into a confined saline aquifer may be modeled as an axisymmetric two-phase flow problem. Assuming the two fluids segregate in the vertical direction due to strong buoyancy, and neglecting capillary pressure and miscibility, the lubrication approximation leads to a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors in the system are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of the displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ , the gravity number, which represents the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. Four different analytical solutions can be derived as the asymptotic approximations, representing specific values of the parameter pairs. The four solutions correspond to: (1) Γ << 1, M <1; (2) Γ << 1, M =1; (3) Γ << 1, M >1; and (4) Γ >> 1, any M values. The first two of these solutions are new, while the third corresponds to the solution of Nordbotten and Celia (2006) for confined injections and the fourth corresponds to the solution of (Lyle et al., 2005) for gravity currents in an unconfined aquifer. Overall, the various axisymmetric flows can be summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime (Fig. 1). Data from a number of CO2 injection sites around the world can be used to compute the two dimensionless groups Γ and M associated with each injection. When plotted on the regime diagram, these values show the flow behavior for each injection and how the values vary from site to site. For all the CO2 injections, M is always larger than 1, while Γ can range from 0.01 up to 100. The pairs of (Γ, M) with lower Γ values correspond to solution (3), while the ones with higher Γ values can move up to the intermediate regime and the flow regime for solution (4). The higher values of Γ correspond to pilot-scale injections with low

  18. Automated enzymatic assays in a renewable fashion using the multisyringe flow injection scheme with soluble enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pizà, Nicolau; Miró, Manuel; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, a novel flowing stream scheme based upon the multisyringe flow injection (MSFI) technique is presented as a powerful tool to perform automated enzymatic assays. The exploitation of enzymes in homogeneous phase circumvents typical drawbacks associated with the commonly used packed-bead or open tubular permanent columns, namely, malfunctions of the reactor, carryover effects, flow resistance, loss of binding sites, large reagent consumption, and use of harmful organic solvents during immobilization procedures. The proposed MSFI system is able to handle minute volumes of soluble enzymes and accommodate reactions with divergent kinetic and pH demands, as demonstrated via the indirect chemiluminescence determination of trace levels of glucose. The procedure is based on the on-line glucose oxidase-catalyzed oxidation of beta-glucose in homogeneous phase to beta-glucono-delta-lactone and hydrogen peroxide. Subsequently, the generated oxidant merges downstream with an alkaline slug of 3-aminopthalhydrazide and a metal-catalyst zone (viz., Co(II)) at a total flow rate as high as 72 mL/min aiming to warrant maximum light collection from the fast CL reaction. Under optimum conditions for both sequentially occurring reactions, a glucose concentration as low as 90 microg/L may be easily detected at a 1000-fold photomultiplier gain. A second-order polynomial regression equation of light emission versus substrate concentration is found over the range 90 microg/L-2.7 mg/L glucose, although a maximum concentration of 180 mg/L may be determined by suitable gain selection without requiring manifold reconfiguration. An injection throughput of 20 h(-1), a repeatability better than 2.5% at the 1 mg/L level, and a 3sigma detection limit of 72 microg/L are the analytical features of the designed analyzer. The proposed approach was applied to the analysis of ultralow glucose content soft drinks as well as fruit juices suitable for diabetic consumers. The accuracy was

  19. An Ion-Selective Electrode/Flow-Injection Analysis Experiment: Determination of Potassium in Serum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Kovach, Paul M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a low-cost, senior-level, instrumental analysis experiment in which a home-made potassium tubular flow-through electrode is constructed and incorporated into a flow injection analysis system (FIA). Also describes experiments for evaluating the electrode's response properties, examining basic FIA concepts, and determining potassium in…

  20. An Ion-Selective Electrode/Flow-Injection Analysis Experiment: Determination of Potassium in Serum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Kovach, Paul M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a low-cost, senior-level, instrumental analysis experiment in which a home-made potassium tubular flow-through electrode is constructed and incorporated into a flow injection analysis system (FIA). Also describes experiments for evaluating the electrode's response properties, examining basic FIA concepts, and determining potassium in…

  1. Micromachined pre-focused M×N flow switches for continuous multi-sample injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwo-Bin; Hwei, Bao-Herng; Huang, Guan-Ruey

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we present a novel microfluidic chip capable of continuous multi-sample switching and injection for bio-analytical applications. The innovative device integrates two important microfluidic phenomena, including hydrodynamic focusing and valveless flow switching inside multi-ported microchannels. The multiple samples can be pre-focused to narrow streams and can then be continuously injected into desired outlet ports. In this study, a theoretical model based on the `flow-rate-ratio' method is first proposed to predict the performance of the microfluidic device. Then, a simple but reliable one-mask micromachining process is developed to fabricate the pre-focused M×N flow switch on a quartz substrate. The multi-sample switching and injection is then verified experimentally with the use of microscopic visualization of water sheath flows and dye-containing sample flows. The experimental data indicate that the multi-sample flows can be hydrodynamically pre-focused and then guided into the desired outlet ports precisely based on relative sheath and sample flow rates. The data predicted by the proposed theoretical model are highly consistent with the experimental results. It is also noted that the `pre-focusing' function added prior to multi-sample flow switching is crucial for precise sample injection. The novel microfluidic chip has great potential for high-throughput chemical analysis, cell fusion, fraction collection, fast sample mixing and many other applications in the field of micro-total-analysis systems.

  2. Investigation on the achievable flow length in injection moulding of polymeric materials with dynamic mould tempering.

    PubMed

    Meister, Steve; Drummer, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    A variety of parts in microsystems technology are manufactured by injection moulding of polymeric materials. In Particular the high cooling velocity affects negatively the process and the resulting part properties. The scope of this paper is to investigate the influence on the reachable flow length in injection moulding of different polymeric materials. The results indicate that the mould temperature has less impact on the achievable flow length of the polymer melt as the injection pressure. A higher mould temperature leads only to a slight increase in flow length. In addition, a transcending of the glass or the crystallization temperature of polymeric materials with the mould temperature shows no effect on the achievable flow length of the material.

  3. Flow in a discrete slotted nozzle with massive injection. [water table tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of massive wall injection on the flow characteristics in a slotted nozzle. Some of the experiments were performed on a water table with a slotted-nozzle test section. This has 45 deg and 15 deg half angles of convergence and divergence, respectively, throat radius of 2.5 inches, and throat width of 3 inches. The hydraulic analogy was employed to qualitatively extend the results to a compressible gas flow through the nozzle. Experimental results from the water table include contours of constant Froude and Mach number with and without injection. Photographic results are also presented for the injection through slots of CO2 and Freon-12 into a main-stream air flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle in a wind tunnel. Schlieren photographs were used to visualize the flow, and qualititative agreement between the results from the gas tunnel and water table is good.

  4. Investigation on the Achievable Flow Length in Injection Moulding of Polymeric Materials with Dynamic Mould Tempering

    PubMed Central

    Drummer, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    A variety of parts in microsystems technology are manufactured by injection moulding of polymeric materials. In Particular the high cooling velocity affects negatively the process and the resulting part properties. The scope of this paper is to investigate the influence on the reachable flow length in injection moulding of different polymeric materials. The results indicate that the mould temperature has less impact on the achievable flow length of the polymer melt as the injection pressure. A higher mould temperature leads only to a slight increase in flow length. In addition, a transcending of the glass or the crystallization temperature of polymeric materials with the mould temperature shows no effect on the achievable flow length of the material. PMID:23970840

  5. Flow visualization of film cooling with spanwise injection from a small array of holes and compound-angle injection from a large array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a smooth, flat plate was studied for two configurations: (1) spanwise injection through a four hole staggered array; and (2) compound angle injection through a 49 hole staggered array. The ratio of boundary layer thicknesses to hole diameter and the Reynolds number were typical of gas turbine film cooling applications. Streaklines showing the motion of the injected air were obtained by photographing small, neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles that followed the flow field.

  6. Numerical analysis for the multi-phase flow of pulverized coal injection inside blast furnace tuyere

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.

    2005-09-01

    The pulverized coal injection (PCI) system was modified from single lance injection into double lance injection at No. 3 Blast Furnace of CSC. It is beneficial to reduce the cost of coke. However, the injected coal was found very close to the inner wall of the tuyere during the operation, such as to cause the possibility of erosion for the tuyere. In this study a three-dimensional mathematical model has been developed based on a computational fluid dynamics software PHOENICS to simulate the fluid flow phenomena inside blast furnace tuyere. The model was capable of handling steady-state, three-dimensional multi-phase flow of pulverized coal injection. The model was applied to simulate the flow patterns of the injection coal inside the tuyere with two kinds of lance design for the PCI system. The distribution of injection coal was simulated such as to estimate the possibility of erosion for the tuyere. The calculated results agreed with the operating experience of CSC plant and the optimum design of double lance was suggested. The model was also applied to simulate the oxygen concentration distribution with these different oxygen enrichments for the coal/oxygen lance system. The calculated results agreed with the experimental measurement. These test results demonstrate that the model is both reasonably reliable and efficient.

  7. Study of argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V.; Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2013-10-28

    In this work, the reaction kinetics in argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure argon was created in quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 60 W. The nitrogen was added into the afterglow at the distance of 9 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. The argon spectral lines and after nitrogen addition also nitrogen second positive system (SPS) were identified in the spectra. The measurement of spatial dependence of SPS intensity showed a very slow decay of the intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the nitrogen concentration. In order to explain this behavior a kinetic model for reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that C {sup 3}Π{sub u} state of molecular nitrogen, which is the upper state of SPS emission, is produced by excitation transfer from argon metastables to nitrogen molecules. However, the argon metastables are also produced at Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ion recombination with electrons and this limits the decay of argon metastable concentration and it results in very slow decay of SPS intensity.

  8. Numerical Simulation of the Flow Behavior and Breakthrough Phenomenon in Co-Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilinca, Florin; Hétu, Jean-François

    2007-05-01

    A study of the flow behavior during sequential co-injection molding is shown using a three-dimensional finite element flow analysis code. Solutions of the non-Newtonian, non-isothermal melt flow are obtained by solving the momentum, continuity and energy equations. Two additional transport equations are solved for tracking polymer/air and skin/core polymers interfaces. The co-injection model is integrated into the NRC's 3D injection molding software. Solutions are shown for the filling of a spiral-flow mould for which experimental measurements are available. The numerical approach predicts the core advance stage during which the core flow front catches up on the skin flow front and the core expansion phase when the flow fronts of core and skin materials advance together without breakthrough. The breakthrough phenomenon is also predicted. The predicted flow front behavior is compared to the experimental observations for various skin/core melt temperature and skin/core viscosity ratio. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data and indicate correctly the trends in solution change when processing parameters are changing.

  9. Optimization of Tangential Mass Injection for Minimizing Flow Separation in a Scramjet Inlet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    thank John Brohas of the AFIT Model Shop for crafting such a complex model, John Leugers of the Wright Laboratory for his advice on structural design...separation. The wind tunnel model was also limited to 2-D. Sidewalls ,.ould only have increased the tunnel blockage and added complexity to the flow analysis...model centerline downstream. The tangential mass injection piece (see Figure 17) was the most complex part of the model. An injection Mach number of 3

  10. Phase Change Effects on Immiscible Flow Displacements in Radial Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report a systematic simulation of immiscible fluid-fluid displacements in radial injection in the presence of phase change. Due to the presence of two fluid-fluid interfaces in the system, a special treatment has been adopted. To track the leading interface position, two highly accurate methods including Level Set and Immersed Interface Method were used, while for locating the trailing interface an energy equation was adopted assuming the existence of a constant thin condensate layer. Dimensional analysis led to three important dimensionless groups including capillary number (Ca), Jacob number (Ja) and viscosity ratios (M) of the three fluids. Simulation results indicate significant influences of these parameters on the development of the instability and the interfacial morphology of fingers. Increasing Ca or M tends to amplify the interfacial instability, fingertip splitting, and results in longer fingers. In contrast, increasing Ja has stabilizing effects due to an increase of the thickness of the condensate layer. On the other hand at lower viscosity ratios as well as lower Ca, because of compensation effects of the phase change, both leading and trailing interfaces are found to be less unstable. Moreover accumulated condensate and oil saturation depletion curves show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively, when the Ca increases. Although viscosity ratio and Ja have similar effects on the accumulated condensate, they do not show any effect on the oil depletion saturation.

  11. Pre- and post-injection flow characterization in a heavy-duty diesel engine using high-speed PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, R. P. C.; Luijten, C. C. M.; Dam, N. J.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    2012-09-01

    High-speed particle image velocimetry (HS-PIV) using hollow microspheres has been applied to characterize the flow in a heavy-duty diesel engine during and after fuel injection. The injection timings were varied in the range representing those used in premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) regimes, and multiple injections have been applied to investigate their influence on the flow inside the combustion chamber. By injecting into pure nitrogen, combustion is avoided and the flow can be studied long after injection. The results show a sudden change of air motion at the start of injection as a result of the air entrainment at the core of the spray. Furthermore, as expected, spray injection causes a considerable increase in the cycle-to-cycle fluctuations of the flow pattern, the more so for longer injection durations.

  12. Inhibition of Information Flow to the Default Mode Network During Self-Reference Versus Reference to Others.

    PubMed

    Soch, Joram; Deserno, Lorenz; Assmann, Anne; Barman, Adriana; Walter, Henrik; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan; Schott, Björn H

    2016-07-11

    The default mode network (DMN), a network centered around the cortical midline, shows deactivation during most cognitive tasks and pronounced resting-state connectivity, but is actively engaged in self-reference and social cognition. It is, however, yet unclear how information reaches the DMN during social cognitive processing. Here, we addressed this question using dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during self-reference (SR) and reference to others (OR). Both conditions engaged the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG), most likely reflecting semantic processing. Within the DMN, self-reference preferentially elicited rostral anterior cingulate and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (rACC/vmPFC) activity, whereas OR engaged posterior cingulate and precuneus (PCC/PreCun). DCM revealed that the regulation of information flow to the DMN was primarily inhibitory. Most prominently, SR elicited inhibited information flow from the LIFG to the PCC/PreCun, while OR was associated with suppression of the connectivity from the LIFG to the rACC/vmPFC. These results suggest that task-related DMN activation is enabled by inhibitory down-regulation of task-irrelevant information flow when switching from rest to stimulus-specific processing.

  13. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  14. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes.

  15. High-throughput pesticide residue quantitative analysis achieved by tandem mass spectrometry with automated flow injection.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Pentz, Anne M; Bramble, Frederick Q

    2009-04-15

    The use of automated flow injection with MS/MS detection for fast quantitation of agrochemicals in food and water samples was demonstrated in this study. Active ingredients from the sulfonylurea herbicide and carbamate insecticide classes were selected as model systems. Samples were prepared using typical procedures from residue methods, placed in an autosampler, and injected directly into a triple quadrupole instrument without chromatographic separation. The technique allows data acquisition in 15 s per injection, with samples being injected every 65 s, representing a significant improvement from the 15-30 min needed in typical HPLC/MS/MS methods. The availability of HPLC systems is an advantage since they can be used in flow-injection mode (bypassing the column compartment). Adequate accuracy, linearity, and precision (R(2) > 0.99 and RSD < 20%) were obtained using external standards prepared in each control matrix. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) achieved for all analytes was 0.01 mg/kg in food samples and 0.1 ng/mL in water; while limits of detection (LOD) were estimated to be about 0.003 mg/kg and 0.03 ng/mL in food and water, respectively. The advantages and limitations of flow injection MS/MS for ultratrace-level quantitative analysis in complex matrixes are discussed.

  16. Recovery of injected freshwater to differentiate fracture flow in a low-permeability brackish aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotliński, Konrad; Dillon, Peter J.; Pavelic, Paul; Cook, Peter G.; Page, Declan W.; Levett, Kerry

    2011-10-01

    SummaryA low-permeability weathered siltstone-sandstone aquifer containing brackish water was investigated to measure recoverability of injected freshwater with the aim of determining the significance of secondary porosity in contributing to groundwater flow and transport. Examination of the core, borehole geophysics, Radon-222, electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) profiles and step-drawdown pumping tests did not identify whether fractures contribute to groundwater flow. A number of injection and recovery tests lasting from 3 days to 3 months using potable water showed a large degree of mixing with native groundwater. Withdrawal greater than 12-17% of the injected volume resulted in recovered water containing more native groundwater than injected water. A finite element solute transport model was set up to reproduce the observed salinity in recovered water. Without the inclusion of discrete fractures in the model it was not possible to get a fit between the observed and modelled salinity of recovered water within a realistic range of dispersivity values. The model was subsequently verified by using data from long-term injection and recovery trials. This evaluation of mixing conclusively demonstrated that the aquifer behaved as a fractured rock aquifer and not as an aquifer with primary porosity alone. Therefore, aquifer storage and recovery can be a very useful hydrogeological method to identify the occurrence of fracture flow in aquifers where there is a measurable concentration difference between the injected water and ambient groundwater.

  17. Characteristics of heat exchange in the region of injection into a supersonic high-temperature flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakirov, F. G.; Shaykhutdinov, Z. G.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the local heat transfer coefficient distribution during gas injection into the supersonic-flow portion of a Laval nozzle is discussed. The controlling dimensionless parameters of the investigated process are presented in terms of a generalized relation for the maximum value of the heat transfer coefficient in the nozzle cross section behind the injection hole. Data on the heat transfer coefficient variation along the nozzle length as a function of gas injection rate are also presented, along with the heat transfer coefficient distribution over a cross section of the nozzle.

  18. Characteristics of heat exchange in the region of injection into a supersonic high-temperature flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakirov, F. G.; Shaykhutdinov, Z. G.

    1985-04-01

    An experimental investigation of the local heat transfer coefficient distribution during gas injection into the supersonic-flow portion of a Laval nozzle is discussed. The controlling dimensionless parameters of the investigated process are presented in terms of a generalized relation for the maximum value of the heat transfer coefficient in the nozzle cross section behind the injection hole. Data on the heat transfer coefficient variation along the nozzle length as a function of gas injection rate are also presented, along with the heat transfer coefficient distribution over a cross section of the nozzle.

  19. Study of nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V. Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2014-10-21

    The reaction kinetics in nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure nitrogen was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 130 W. The mercury vapors were added into the afterglow at the distance of 30 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. Three nitrogen spectral systems – the first positive, the second positive, and the first negative, and after the mercury vapor addition also the mercury resonance line at 254 nm in the spectrum of the second order were identified. The measurement of the spatial dependence of mercury line intensity showed very slow decay of its intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the mercury concentration. In order to explain this behavior, a kinetic model for the reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that the state Hg(6 {sup 3}P{sub 1}), which is the upper state of mercury UV resonance line at 254 nm, is produced by the excitation transfer from nitrogen N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastables to mercury atoms. However, the N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastables are also produced by the reactions following the N atom recombination, and this limits the decay of N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastable concentration and results in very slow decay of mercury resonance line intensity. It was found that N atoms are the most important particles in this late nitrogen afterglow, their volume recombination starts a chain of reactions which produce excited states of molecular nitrogen. In order to explain the decrease of N atom concentration, it was also necessary to include the surface recombination of N atoms to the model. The surface recombination was considered as a first order reaction and wall recombination probability γ = (1.35 ± 0.04) × 10{sup −6} was determined from the experimental data. Also

  20. The determination of trace lead in Chinese medicinal herbs by flow injection analysis in polyethyleneglycol medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Aiqin; Zhu, Xiashi; Huang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yaqin

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a new flow injection analysis (FIA) for the determination of Pb 2+ in Chinese medicinal herbs was developed. In the buffer solution of borax-NaOH (pH 10.5), Pb 2+ reacted with 2-[(5-bromo-2-pyridyl)-azo]-5-(diethyl-amino)phenol (5-Br-PADAP) to form a complex. The experimental results showed that the sensitivity was enhanced in the presence of polyethyleneglycol-800 (PG-800). The main factors affecting the determination were investigated in detail. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range and detection limit is 0.0-0.3 μg/mL and 1.5 ng/mL (correlation coefficient r = 0.9996), respectively. The linear regression equation is A = -0.005 + 0.60 c (μg/mL). The sample throughout is 10 h -1. Foreign substrates effects were also investigated. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of lead in reference material, goldthread and lepidium seed.

  1. Novel PVC-membrane electrode for flow injection potentiometric determination of Biperiden in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Elmorsy; El-Sabbagh, Inas A; El-Kholy, N G; Ghahni, E Y Abdel

    2011-12-15

    The construction and performance characteristics of Biperiden (BP) polyvinyl chloride (PVC) electrodes are described. Different methods for electrode fabrication are tested including; incorporation of BP-ion pairs (BP-IPs), incorporation of ion pairing agents, or soaking the plain electrode in BP-ion pairs suspension solution. Electrode matrices were optimized referring to the effect of modifier content and nature, plasticizer and the method of modification. The proposed electrodes work satisfactorily in the BP concentration range from 10(-5) to 10(-2)mol L(-1), with fast response time (7s) and adequate operational lifetime (28 days). The electrode potential is pH independent within the range 2.0-7.0, with good selectivity towards BP in presence of various interfering species. The developed electrodes have been applied for potentiometric determination of BP in pharmaceutical formulation under batch and flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions. FIA offers the advantages of accuracy and automation feasibility with high sampling frequency. The dissolution profile for Akineton tablets (2mg BP/tablet) was studied using the proposed electrode in comparison with the official methods.

  2. Single-channel flow injection spectrophotometric determination of nickel using furildioxime in micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Memon, Najma; Memon, Saima; Solangi, Amber R; Soomro, Rubina; Soomro, Rabel

    2012-01-01

    A very simple, selective, and fast flow injection spectrophotometeric method is developed for determination of nickel using furildioxime as complexing agent. Micellar solution of brij-35 is employed to solubilize the sparingly soluble complex of Ni-furildioxime in buffered aqueous system (pH-9.00). Under optimized conditions, absorbance is linear from 0.02 to 10 μg mL(-1) using 500 μL sample volume and from 10 to 30 μg mL(-1) using 50 μL sample volume of nickel at 480 nm, with R(2) = 0.9971 and 0.9916, respectively. The molar absorption coefficient and Sandell's sensitivity were 6.0 × 10(3) L mol(-1) cm(-1) and 0.01 ng cm(-2), respectively. The sample throughput of the method is 120 samples per hour with RSD of 0.01-0.2% for 0.02 to 10 μg mL(-1) nickel (n = 5), indicating that the method is highly precise and reproducible. Interference from cobalt is removed by Nitroso R-salt-modified XAD-16. The developed method is validated by analysing certified reference materials and is applied to assess nickel content of commercially available cigarettes.

  3. Determination of cadmium by flow injection-chemical vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Razo, C; Tyson, J F

    2000-01-01

    A method was developed for the generation of a "cold vapor" of cadmium by means of flow injection-chemical vapor generation from aqueous samples, the determination being conducted with an atomic absorption spectrometer (Pyrex glass T-cell). Several gas-liquid separator designs, atomizer designs, and the effect of several reagents previously reported as sensitivity enhancers (including cobalt, nickel, thiourea and didodecyl-dimethylammonium bromide) were investigated. The limit of detection, calculated as the concentration giving a signal equal to three times the standard deviation of the blank, was 16 ng L(-1), and the relative standard deviation was 1.4% for a concentration of 2 microg L(-1) and 3.8% for 0.1 microg L(-1). The addition of nickel and thiourea to the samples provided improved tolerance to the interference of coexisting ions. Two NIST certified reference materials, Montana Soil and Apple Leaves (respectively containing 41.7+/-0.25 mg kg(-1) Cd and 0.013+/-0.002 mg kg(-1) Cd) were accurately analyzed. The interference of lead was overcome by coprecipitation with barium sulfate, and the experimental values obtained were 41+/-1 mg kg(-1) Cd and 0.013+/-0.002 mg kg(-1) Cd, respectively.

  4. Active Flow Separation Control of a Stator Vane Using Surface Injection in a Multistage Compressor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Micro-flow control actuation embedded in a stator vane was used to successfully control separation and improve near stall performance in a multistage compressor rig at NASA Glenn. Using specially designed stator vanes configured with internal actuation to deliver pulsating air through slots along the suction surface, a research study was performed to identify performance benefits using this microflow control approach. Pressure profiles and unsteady pressure measurements along the blade surface and at the shroud provided a dynamic look at the compressor during microflow air injection. These pressure measurements lead to a tracking algorithm to identify the onset of separation. The testing included steady air injection at various slot locations along the vane. The research also examined the benefit of pulsed injection and actively controlled air injection along the stator vane. Two types of actuation schemes were studied, including an embedded actuator for on-blade control. Successful application of an online detection and flow control scheme will be discussed. Testing showed dramatic performance benefit for flow reattachment and subsequent improvement in diffusion through the use of pulsed controlled injection. The paper will discuss the experimental setup, the blade configurations, and preliminary CFD results which guided the slot location along the blade. The paper will also show the pressure profiles and unsteady pressure measurements used to track flow control enhancement, and will conclude with the tracking algorithm for adjusting the control.

  5. Adaptation of a load-inject valve for a flow injection chemiluminescence system enabling dual-reagent injection enhances understanding of environmental Fenton chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew R; Nightingale, Philp D; Turner, Suzanne M; Liss, Peter S

    2013-09-24

    Environmental Fenton chemistry has been poorly constrained within the marine environment at a multi-component level. A simple, unique, reconfiguration of a flow-injection analytical system combined with luminol chemiluminescence allows quasi-simultaneously the measurement, using a single load-inject valve and a single photon multiplier tube, of reduced iron, Fe(II), and hydrogen peroxide. The system enables rapid, every 22s, measurements with good accuracy at environmentally relevant concentrations, less than 5% relative standard deviations on both a 5 nM Fe(II) standard and a 60 nM hydrogen peroxide standard. Limits of detection were as low as 40 pM Fe(II) and 100 pM hydrogen peroxide. The system showed excellent capability by measuring from within an organic rich seawater the photochemically induced production of Fe(II) and hydrogen peroxide and their subsequent cycling and Fenton like interactions.

  6. Use of inherently conducting polymers and pulsed amperometry in flow injection analysis to detect oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanzhe; Moulton, Simon E; Too, Chee O; Wallace, Gordon G; Zhou, Dezhi

    2004-07-01

    Pulsed amperometry has been used to detect and discriminate between different base-pair oligonucleotides using flow injection analysis with polypyrrole modified electrodes. Oligonucleotides with 20-repeat units were immobilized as the sole counter anion during polymerisation of pyrrole onto a glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The modified electrode was then used in a flow injection analysis (FIA) set-up to selectively detect complementary oligonucleotides. Results showed that complementary oligo(dG)(20) and non-complementary oligonucleotides can be distinguished by using the oligo(dC)(20) modified electrode.

  7. Fluorimetric determination of phenothiazine derivatives by photooxidation in a flow-injection system.

    PubMed

    Laassis, B; Aaron, J J; Mahedero, M C

    1994-11-01

    Flow-injection analysis (FIA) was combined with photochemically induced fluorescence (PF) detection for the determination of four phenothiazine derivatives, including unsubstituted phenothiazine, thionine, Azure A and Methylene Blue. The working analytical parameters (flow-rate, injected volume, photoreactor length) were optimized. Linear calibration graphs were obtained over about two orders of magnitude, with relative standard deviation within the range 1-2.3%. Limits of detection were between 13 and 35 ng/ml, according to the compound. The FIA-PF method was applied to the determination of phenothiazines in urine samples. Mean recoveries ranged from 94 to 117%.

  8. Flow-injection and sequential-injection determinations of paracetamol in pharmaceutical preparations using nitrosation reaction.

    PubMed

    Burakham, Rodjana; Duangthong, Supunnee; Patimapornlert, Lop; Lenghor, Narong; Kasiwad, Suphaphorn; Srivichai, Lalida; Lapanantnoppakhun, Somchai; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Grudpan, Kate

    2004-05-01

    A simple FI and two different SI systems have been investigated for the determination of paracetamol by employing a simple reagent for a nitrosation reaction. It is based on the on-line nitrosation of paracetamol with sodium nitrite in an acidic medium. The formed nitroso derivative species reacts further with sodium hydroxide to convert it to a more stable compound. The yellow product is continuously monitored at 430 nm. The FI system is very simple and cost effective for fast manual operation (60 injections/h; y = 0.268x + 44.314, r2 = 0.9910 for 400 - 1000 mg/l and y = 0.1687x + 145.72, r2 = 0.9970 for 1000 - 2500 mg/l). The two SI systems with different components and configurations are automated and optimized for the conditions for which no extra dilution is to be required for sample handling: one with a syringe pump and two selection valves (60 samples/h; y = 0.1488x - 4.7297, r2 = 0.9946 for 400 - 1000 mg/l and y = 0.0858x + 63.933, r2 = 0.9849 for 1000 - 2500 mg/l); the other is simpler and more cost-effective, with an autoburette and only one selection valve (15 samples/h; y = 0.0072x + 1.1467, r2 = 0.9977 for 200 - 1000 mg/l and y = 0.0028x + 5.4699, r2 = 0.9879 for 1000 - 2500 mg/l). They have all been applied to assay paracetamol in pharmaceutical preparations. The obtained results agree with those by the US Pharmacopeia method.

  9. An automatic, vigorous-injection assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique for stopped-flow spectrophotometric detection of boron.

    PubMed

    Alexovič, Michal; Wieczorek, Marcin; Kozak, Joanna; Kościelniak, Paweł; Balogh, Ioseph S; Andruch, Vasil

    2015-02-01

    A novel automatic vigorous-injection assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure based on the use of a modified single-valve sequential injection manifold (SV-SIA) was developed and applied for determination of boron in water samples. The major novelties in the procedure are the achieving of efficient dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction by means of single vigorous-injection (250 µL, 900 µL s(-1)) of the extraction solvent (n-amylacetate) into aqueous phase resulting in the effective dispersive mixing without using dispersive solvent and after self-separation of the phases, as well as forwarding of the extraction phase directly to a Z-flow cell (10 mm) without the use of a holding coil for stopped-flow spectrophotometric detection. The calibration working range was linear up to 2.43 mg L(-1) of boron at 426nm wavelength. The limit of detection, calculated as 3s of a blank test (n=10), was found to be 0.003 mg L(-1), and the relative standard deviation, measured as ten replicable concentrations at 0.41 mg L(-1) of boron was determined to be 5.6%. The validation of the method was tested using certified reference material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of the injection of a heated turbulent jet into a cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Schetz, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a theoretical model is investigated of the incompressible jet injection process. The discharge of a turbulent jet into a cross flow was mathematically modeled by using an integral method which accounts for natural fluid mechanisms such as turbulence, entrainment, buoyancy, and heat transfer. The analytical results are supported by experimental data and demonstrate the usefulness of the theory for estimating the trajectory and flow properties of the jet for a variety of injection conditions. The capability of predicting jet flow properties, as well as two- and three-dimensional jet paths, was enhanced by obtaining the jet cross-sectional area during the solution of the conservation equations. Realistic estimates of temperature in the jet fluid were acquired by accounting for heat losses in the jet flow due to forced convection and to entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet.

  11. Modeling and flow analysis of pure nylon polymer for injection molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Kusaseh, N.; Basri, S.; Oumer, A. N.; Hamedon, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In the production of complex plastic parts, injection molding is one of the most popular industrial processes. This paper addresses the modeling and analysis of the flow process of the nylon (polyamide) polymer for injection molding process. To determine the best molding conditions, a series of simulations are carried out using Autodesk Moldflow Insight software and the processing parameters are adjusted. This mold filling commercial software simulates the cavity filling pattern along with temperature and pressure distributions in the mold cavity. In the modeling, during the plastics flow inside the mold cavity, different flow parameters such as fill time, pressure, temperature, shear rate and warp at different locations in the cavity are analyzed. Overall, this Moldflow is able to perform a relatively sophisticated analysis of the flow process of pure nylon. Thus the prediction of the filling of a mold cavity is very important and it becomes useful before a nylon plastic part to be manufactured.

  12. Supersonic flow past axisymmetric body with strong local two-phase surface injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, V. A.; Gol'Din, V. D.; Grishin, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    It is known [1 3] that in order to provide heat shield or to improve the aerodynamics of the body strong injection of cooling gas into the supersonic stream is utilized. Analysis of flow characteristics in the neighborhood of the solid body in the presence of strong single-phase injection and the effect of injection on the aerodynamic characteristics of some axisymmetric bodies are given, e.g., in [2 4]. Supersonic flow past a blunt-nosed axisymmetric body with blowing of a mixture of gas and solid particles through a porous segment in the leading edge region is considered in the present paper. Such a situation could occur in modeling the breakdown of the heat shield of a flight vehicle during its reentry into the thick layers of atmosphere and also in the case of forced introduction of particles in the flow of the injected gas in order to break up the leading edge shock and accordingly the variation in the drag of the body [5]. A description of the trajectory of the particles has been obtained as a result of numerical and analytical solution of the problem and their analysis is used to arrive at conclusions on their intersection and, consequently, also on the multiple-valued nature of the flow parameters in the neighborhood of the line dividing the external flow and the injected two-phase mixture. Sufficient conditions for multiple-valuedness have been analytically found which agree with numerical results. It has been established that with a change in composition of sufficiently small particles within the limits 0.1 to 0.6 by weight of the injected mixture the drag coefficient of the body does not change by more than 10%.

  13. Micromachined pre-focused 1×N flow switches for continuous sample injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwo-Bin; Hung, Chen-I.; Ke, Bin-Jo; Huang, Guan-Ruey; Hwei, Bao-Herng

    2001-09-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation of a microfluidic chip capable of continuous sample switching and injection for bio-analytical applications. The novel device integrates two important microfluidic phenomena, including hydrodynamic focusing and valveless flow switching inside multi-ported microchannels. In this study, a simple theoretical model based on the `flow-rate-ratio' method is first proposed to predict the performance of the device. Based on these data, a pre-focused 1×N flow switch is designed and fabricated using micromachining techniques. A novel micromachining technique is demonstrated which combines quartz template fabrication and replication of microstructures on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates for mass production of microfluidic devices. Three-dimensional templates with an inverse image of microfluidic channels are fabricated on quartz substrates and then used to imprint microstructures onto PMMA substrates using hot embossing methods. Finally, the flow switching is verified experimentally with the use of microscopic visualization of water sheath flows and a dye-containing sample flow. The experimental data indicate that the sample flow could be hydrodynamically pre-focused to a narrow stream and then guided into a desired outlet port based on relative sheath and sample flow rates. It also shows that the added `pre-focusing' function prior to the flow switching is crucial for precise sample injection. The microfluidic chip could be applied in the fields of bio/chemical analysis.

  14. Injection of densely loaded flows into entrained-flow gasifiers. First quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, M.A.; Edelman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop improved understanding of the injection and mixing of densely loaded gas/solid mixtures into gas streams. The ultimate application of the results will be the development of improved injection and mixing configurations for entrained-flow coal gasifiers. In entrained-flow gasification, the injection and dispersion of heavily loaded mixtures of coal and gases is an important factor for overall reactor performance and the uniformity of coal processing. Poor disperison in a reactor has several adverse consequences. These include depressed particle heating rates, which affect critical devolatilization phenomena. Limited mixing also leads to increased reactor residence time requirements and nonuniformity of coal treatment. Information is needed to provide guidance for establishing reactor inlet configurations which will accelerate mixing and to facilitate modeling of such reactors. Data are available for systems which are more dilute than those used for entrained gasifiers, but special considerations lead to the desirability of using a minimum amount of injection flow in a gasifier. 54 refs.

  15. Injection of densely loaded flows into entrained-flow gasifiers. Second quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, M.A.; Edelman, R.B.

    1986-04-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop improved understanding of the injection and mixing of densely loaded gas/solid mixtures into gas streams. The ultimate application of the results will be the development of improved injection and mixing configurations for entrained-flow gasifiers. In entrained-flow gasification, the injection and dispersion of heavily loaded mixtures of coal and gases is an important factor for overall reactor performance and the uniformity of coal processing. Poor dispersion in a reactor has several adverse consequences. These include depressed particle heating rates, which affect critical devolatilization phenomena. Limited mixing also leads to increased reactor residence time requirements and nonuniformity of coal treatment. Information is needed to provide guidance for establishing reactor inlet configurations which will accelerate mixing and to facilitate modeling of such reactors. Data are available for systems which are more dilute than those used for entrained gasifiers, but special considerations lead to the desirability of using a minimum amount of injection flow in a gasifier. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) test plan; (2) literature search; (3) theoretical investigation; and (4) experimental investigation. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  16. An oil flow study of the reference Shuttle-C configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pokora, Darlene C.; Springer, Anthony M.

    1994-01-01

    An oil flow study of the reference Shuttle-C configuration is presented. The Shuttle-C vehicle was a proposed shuttle derived vehicle where the orbiter was to be replaced by an unmanned cargo carrier element. Oil flows are shown for the range of Mach numbers from Mach 1.10 to 3.48 at various angles-of-attack and roll angles. The major flow field phenomena over the Shuttle-C reference configuration are shown in these oil flows. Using the oil flows, a qualitative understanding of the flow around the vehicle can be determined, aiding the quantitative definition of aerodynamic data from theoretical analyses and test results. The oil flows presented in this study were obtained from configurations tested in the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel from October 1988 through February 1989.

  17. THE EFFECTS OF INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS OF DICHLOROETHYLSULFIDE IN RABBITS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ITS LEUCOTOXIC ACTION

    PubMed Central

    Pappenheimer, Alwin M.; Vance, Morgan

    1920-01-01

    1. The lethal dose of dichloroethylsulfide (distilled from a German yellow cross shell), when injected intravenously into rabbits is from 0.005 to 0.01 gm. per kilo. 2. Rabbits dying within 24 hours showed extensive hemorrhages, and edema of the lungs. 3. Severe lesions of the intestinal tract were present in about one-third of the rabbits. 4. Dichloroethylsulfide injected intravenously is specifically poisonous for the hematopoietic tissues. Severe lesions are caused in the bone marrow, and the number of circulating leucocytes is markedly deminished. In animals surviving the injection regeneration occurs. The granular cells of the bone marrow seem to be more sensitive than the lymphoid cells and the erythrocytes. 5. The effect upon the blood and hematopoietic tissues is not due to the admixture of nitrobenzene or chlorobenzene in the shell filling. Injection of these substances in animals in amounts many times greater than the total dose of dichloroethylsulfide used produced no changes in the blood picture, and the subsequent injection of dichloroethylsulfide free from these solvents produced a typical reaction. PMID:19868389

  18. An experimental study on the effect of air bubble injection on the flow induced rotational hub

    SciTech Connect

    Nouri, N.M.; Sarreshtehdari, A.

    2009-01-15

    Modification of shear stress due to air bubbles injection in a rotary device was investigated experimentally. Air bubbles inject to the water flow crosses the neighbor of the hub which can rotate just by water flow shear stresses, in this device. Increasing air void fraction leads to decrease of shear stresses exerted on the hub surface until in high void fractions, the hub motion stopped as observed. Amount of skin friction decrease has been estimated by counting central hub rotations. Wall shear stress was decreased by bubble injection in all range of tested Reynolds number, changing from 50,378 to 71,238, and also by increasing air void fraction from zero to 3.06%. Skin friction reduction more than 85% was achieved in this study as maximum measured volume of air fraction injected to fluid flow while bubbles are distinct and they do not make a gas layer. Significant skin friction reduction obtained in this special case indicate that using small amount of bubble injection causes large amount of skin friction reduction in some rotary parts in the liquid phases like as water. (author)

  19. Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels in a high pressure flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Callahan, C.V.; Dryer, F.L.

    1998-01-01

    Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines the premixed urn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, we must understand the chemical kinetic processes which lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane and isooctane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine-like conditions in a high pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and at 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments and comparisons of experimentally measures and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690- 1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed method.

  20. Benchmark initiative on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisch, K.; Annewandter, R.; Olden, P.; Mackay, E.; Bauer, S.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers involves multiple strongly interacting processes such as multiphase flow and geomechanical deformation, which threat to the seal integrity of CO2 repositories. Coupled simulation codes are required to establish realistic prognoses of the coupled process during CO2 injection operations. International benchmark initiatives help to evaluate, to compare and to validate coupled simulation results. However, there is no published code comparison study so far focusing on the impact of coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics on the long-term integrity of repositories, which is required to obtain confidence in the predictive capabilities of reservoir simulators. We address this gap by proposing a benchmark study. A wide participation from academic and industrial institutions is sought, as the aim of building confidence in coupled simulators become more plausible with many participants. Most published benchmark studies on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes have been performed within the field of nuclear waste disposal (e.g. the DECOVALEX project), using single-phase formulation only. As regards CO2 injection scenarios, international benchmark studies have been published comparing isothermal and non-isothermal multiphase flow processes such as the code intercomparison by LBNL, the Stuttgart Benchmark study, the CLEAN benchmark approach and other initiatives. Recently, several codes have been developed or extended to simulate the coupling of hydraulic and geomechanical processes (OpenGeoSys, ELIPSE-Visage, GEM, DuMuX and others), which now enables a comprehensive code comparison. We propose four benchmark tests of increasing complexity, addressing the coupling between multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection. In the first case, a horizontal non-faulted 2D model consisting of one reservoir and one cap rock is considered, focusing on stress and strain regime changes in the storage formation and the

  1. Enhanced mixing via alternating injection in radial Hele-Shaw flows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Miranda, José A

    2015-10-01

    Mixing at low Reynolds numbers, especially in the framework of confined flows occurring in Hele-Shaw cells, porous media, and microfluidic devices, has attracted considerable attention lately. Under such circumstances, enhanced mixing is limited due to the lack of turbulence, and absence of sizable inertial effects. Recent studies, performed in rectangular Hele-Shaw cells, have demonstrated that the combined action of viscous fluid fingering and alternating injection can dramatically improve mixing efficiency. In this work, we revisit this important fluid mechanical problem, and analyze it in the context of radial Hele-Shaw flows. The development of radial fingering instabilities under alternating injection conditions is investigated by intensive numerical simulations. We focus on the impact of the relevant physical parameters of the problem (Péclet number Pe, viscosity contrast A, and injection time interval Δt) on fluid mixing performance.

  2. Detection of Catechol by Potentiometric-Flow Injection Analysis in the Presence of Interferents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Suzanne K.; Widera, Justyna; Zhang, Hong

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate analytical chemistry experiment developed to teach instrumental lab skills while incorporating common interferents encountered in the real-world analysis of catechol. The lab technique incorporates potentiometric-flow injection analysis on a dibenzo-18-crown-6 dual platinum electrode to detect catechol in…

  3. Determination of Nitrogen by Flow Injection Analysis in Environmental and Wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Straw, K.A.

    1999-03-01

    In summary, three generations of Lachat FIA systems have been used in the laboratory over a period of 13 yrs, running, in addition to the 4 N methods, Cr{sup +6}, SiO{sub 2}, Fluoride by ISE. Overall flow injection systems have been versatile and reliable and a good choice in the lab for analyzing a wide variety of samples quickly.

  4. Detection of Catechol by Potentiometric-Flow Injection Analysis in the Presence of Interferents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Suzanne K.; Widera, Justyna; Zhang, Hong

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate analytical chemistry experiment developed to teach instrumental lab skills while incorporating common interferents encountered in the real-world analysis of catechol. The lab technique incorporates potentiometric-flow injection analysis on a dibenzo-18-crown-6 dual platinum electrode to detect catechol in…

  5. Experimental Study of Dual Injections with a Cavity in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, T.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Lo, K. H.; Kontis, K.; Obayashi, S.

    The design of supersonic injection systems is a key issue for the development of a supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) [1]. Since supersonic flow is present in the combustion chamber of the scramjet, it is difficult to satisfy features which indicate fuel-air mixing and flame stabilisation.

  6. Differentiating organic from conventional peppermints using chromatographic and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting techniques were tested for their potential in differentiating organic and conventional peppermint samples. Ten organic and ten conventional peppermint samples were examined using HPLC-UV and FI...

  7. A Microconduit Flow Injection Analysis Demonstration Using a 35-mm Slide Projector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvie, Ian D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is a 35mm projector demonstration which combines the advantages a highly magnified view of the sample zone as it undergoes dispersion and the ability to show more than a single-line flow injection analysis manifold. Manufacture and use of the slide for demonstration are discussed. (CW)

  8. Assessing cement injection behaviour in cancellous bone: an in vitro study using flow models.

    PubMed

    Bou-Francis, Antony; López, Alejandro; Persson, Cecilia; Hall, Richard M; Kapur, Nikil

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the cement injection behaviour during vertebroplasty and accurately predicting the cement placement within the vertebral body is extremely challenging. As there is no standardized methodology, we propose a novel method using reproducible and pathologically representative flow models to study the influence of cement properties on injection behaviour. The models, confined between an upper glass window and a lower aluminium plate, were filled with bone marrow substitute and then injected (4, 6 and 8 min after cement mixing) with commercially available bone cements (SimplexP, Opacity+, OsteopalV and Parallax) at a constant flow rate (3 mL/min). A load cell was used to measure the force applied on the syringe plunger and calculate the peak pressure. A camera was used to monitor the cement flow during injection and calculate the following parameters when the cement had reached the boundary of the models: the time to reach the boundary, the filled area and the roundness. The peak pressure was comparable to that reported during clinical vertebroplasty and showed a similar increase with injection time. The study highlighted the influence of cement formulations and model structure on the injection behaviour and showed that cements with similar composition/particle size had similar flow behaviour, while the introduction of defects reduced the time to reach the boundary, the filled area and the roundness. The proposed method provides a novel tool for quick, robust differentiation between various cement formulations through the visualization and quantitative analysis of the cement spreading at various time intervals. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. New once-a-month injectable contraceptives, with particular reference to Cyclofem/Cyclo-Provera.

    PubMed

    Hall, P E

    1998-08-01

    Once-a-month injectable contraceptives containing a progestogen and an estrogen have been developed that disrupt vaginal bleeding patterns less than the widely used progestogen-only preparations. Pharmacokinetic studies were undertaken of dosages and ratios of the progestogens and the respective estrogens. In Phase III clinical trials, annual pregnancy rates were below 0.4% for Mesigyna (norethisterone enanthate/estradiol valerate, Schering AG, Berlin, Germany) and below 0.2% for Cyclofem (MPA/E2C) (medroxyprogesterone acetate/estradiol cypionate, Aplicaciones Farmaceuticas, SA, Mexico and PT Tunggal, Indonesia). More than two-thirds of women had predictable, regular cycles, and discontinuation due to bleeding-related problems occurred less than half as often as with progestogen-only injectables. With MPA/E2C, return to fertility is similar to that observed with other hormonal or intrauterine methods, and both products have little effect on lipids or hemostasis. Introductory trials of MPA/E2C in 12000 women with 100000 woman-months of experience confirmed the high efficacy of the product in routine use. The use of MPA/E2C in a non-reusable injection device, Uniject (Becton Dickinson, Franklin Lakes, NJ) is discussed. Once-a-month hormonal contraceptives have been shown to provide a safe contraceptive option for all women and an alternative for women who wish to use injectable formulations that cause less disruption in vaginal bleeding and minimal side effects.

  10. Flow injection analysis system based on amperometric thin-film transducers for free chlorine detection in swimming pool waters.

    PubMed

    Olivé-Monllau, Rosa; Orozco, Jahir; Fernández-Sánchez, César; Baeza, Mireia; Bartrolí, Jordi; Jimenez-Jorquera, Cecilia; Céspedes, Francisco

    2009-03-15

    This work reports on the performance of a user-friendly flow injection analysis (FIA) system for the monitoring of free chlorine. A methacrylate flow cell integrating a gold thin-film microelectrode, together with an on-chip gold counter electrode, both fabricated by microfabrication technology, provided robustness, low output impedance, rapid response and low cost to the proposed flow system. An external Ag/AgCl reference electrode placed downstream the chip completes the electrochemical cell. Amperometric detection of chlorine was carried out at a set potential of +350 mV, without oxygen interference. The proposed flow system responded linearly to chlorine concentrations in a range from 0.2 to 5 mgl(-1), with a sensitivity of 0.23 microAlmg(-1), the estimated limit of detection being 0.02 mgl(-1). In addition, the system response was kept stable for at least 10 days (+/-3sigma criterion), by keeping the flow system in an inert atmosphere when not in use. Fifteen samples of swimming pool waters were analyzed and no matrix effects were detected. Also, results were in good agreement with those obtained by a standard method. The excellent analytical performance of the system together with its good working stability would also enable its application for the detection of chlorine in other matrices such as tap water or chlorine stock solutions.

  11. Laminar flow at a three-dimensional stagnation point with large rates of injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libby, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Exact calculations of the titled flow are presented and compared to the predictions of an asymptotic analysis for large rates of injection. The inner layer of the boundary layer is found to involve outflow in both orthogonal directions whether the external flow along the y axis is inward or outward. As a result, the flow at a nearly two-dimensional stagnation point involves drastic changes as a weak outflow changes to a weak inflow. It is also found that the velocity profiles in the two directions in the inner layer are quite different.

  12. Screen-printed sensor for batch and flow injection potentiometric chromium(VI) monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Raúl A; Gismera, M Jesús; Sevilla, M Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2010-05-01

    A disposable screen-printed electrode was designed and evaluated for direct detection of chromium(VI) in batch and flow analysis. The carbon screen-printed electrode was modified with a graphite-epoxy composite. The optimal graphite-epoxy matrix contains 37.5% graphite powder, 12.5% diphenylcarbohydrazide, a selective compound for chromium(VI), and 50% epoxy resin. The principal analytical parameters of the potentiometric response in batch and flow analysis were optimized and calculated. The screen-printed sensor exhibits a response time of 20 +/- 1 s. In flow analysis, the analytical frequency of sampling is 70 injections per hour using 0.1 M NaNO(3) solution at pH 3 as the carrier, a flow rate of 2.5 mL.min(-1), and an injection sample volume of 0.50 mL. The sensor shows potentiometric responses that are very selective for chromium(VI) ions and optimal detection limits in both static mode (2.1 x 10(-7) M) and online analysis (9.4 x 10(-7) M). The disposable potentiometric sensor was employed to determine toxicity levels of chromium(VI) in mineral, tap, and river waters by flow-injection potentiometry and batch potentiometry. Chromium(VI) determination was also carried out with successful results in leachates from municipal solid waste landfills.

  13. Optimized and validated flow-injection spectrophotometric analysis of topiramate, piracetam and levetiracetam in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Ghada M; Abdel-Salam, Randa A; Emara, Samy

    2011-12-01

    Application of a sensitive and rapid flow injection analysis (FIA) method for determination of topiramate, piracetam, and levetiracetam in pharmaceutical formulations has been investigated. The method is based on the reaction with ortho-phtalaldehyde and 2-mercaptoethanol in a basic buffer and measurement of absorbance at 295 nm under flow conditions. Variables affecting the determination such as sample injection volume, pH, ionic strength, reagent concentrations, flow rate of reagent and other FIA parameters were optimized to produce the most sensitive and reproducible results using a quarter-fraction factorial design, for five factors at two levels. Also, the method has been optimized and fully validated in terms of linearity and range, limit of detection and quantitation, precision, selectivity and accuracy. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical preparations.

  14. Decompositions of injection patterns for nodal flow allocation in renewable electricity networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Mirko; Tranberg, Bo; Hempel, Sabrina; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The large-scale integration of fluctuating renewable power generation represents a challenge to the technical and economical design of a sustainable future electricity system. In this context, the increasing significance of long-range power transmission calls for innovative methods to understand the emerging complex flow patterns and to integrate price signals about the respective infrastructure needs into the energy market design. We introduce a decomposition method of injection patterns. Contrary to standard flow tracing approaches, it provides nodal allocations of link flows and costs in electricity networks by decomposing the network injection pattern into market-inspired elementary import/export building blocks. We apply the new approach to a simplified data-driven model of a European electricity grid with a high share of renewable wind and solar power generation.

  15. Laminar flow across an unbounded square cylinder with suction or injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantokratoras, Asterios

    2017-02-01

    The flow around a horizontal square cylinder with uniform suction or injection at the front and rear sides is considered in the present paper. The problem is investigated numerically with a finite volume method using the SIMPLE algorithm. This flow has been investigated in the past for Reynolds numbers greater than 70. In the present work, the investigation is extended to very low Reynolds numbers (up to 0.001, Stokes flow) including eight different cases concerning suction-injection at the two sides. It is found that the drag coefficient takes negative and zero values in many cases and varies linearly at low Re numbers. In all eight cases, the vortices around the cylinder have been calculated. It is found that at low Re numbers, some vortices are symmetrical both about the horizontal and vertical cylinder axes.

  16. Flow-Injection Coulometric Detection Based on Ion Transfer and Its Application to the Determination of Chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Ortuño, Joaquín A.; Gil, Antonio; Sánchez-Pedreño, Concepción

    2008-01-01

    A flow-injection coulometric method for the determination of chlorpromazine based on ion transfer into a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane, was developed. The detector used consists of a flow-through cell that incorporates a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane which contains tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate as electrolyte. The membrane is located between the flowing solution and an inner aqueous electrolyte solution. Two pairs of electrodes, each pair formed by a reference electrode and a working electrode, are used, one pair in each solution. The potential between the reference electrodes was controlled by a four-electrode potentiostat with ohmic drop compensation. A potential step capable of producing the transfer of the chlorpromazine ion into the membrane was applied during the passage of a wide portion of sample plug through the cell and the corresponding quantity of the electricity was measured. In the selected conditions, a linear relationship was observed between the quantity of electricity and chlorpromazine concentrations over a range of 1×10-6 −1×10-4 M. The detection limit was 2 × 10-7 M. Good repeatability and between-day reproducibility was obtained. No interference was observed on the part of some common ions and pharmaceutical excipients. The method proposed was applied satisfactorily to the determination of chlorpromazine in pharmaceuticals and human urine. PMID:27879901

  17. Flow rate dependent extra-column variance from injection in capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pankaj; Liu, Kun; Sharma, Sonika; Lawson, John S; Dennis Tolley, H; Lee, Milton L

    2015-02-06

    Efficiency and resolution in capillary liquid chromatography (LC) can be significantly affected by extra-column band broadening, especially for isocratic separations. This is particularly a concern in evaluating column bed structure using non-retained test compounds. The band broadening due to an injector supplied with a commercially available capillary LC system was characterized from experimental measurements. The extra-column variance from the injection valve was found to have an extra-column contribution independent of the injection volume, showing an exponential dependence on flow rate. The overall extra-column variance from the injection valve was found to vary from 34 to 23 nL. A new mathematical model was derived that explains this exponential contribution of extra-column variance on chromatographic performance. The chromatographic efficiency was compromised by ∼130% for a non-retained analyte because of injection valve dead volume. The measured chromatographic efficiency was greatly improved when a new nano-flow pumping system with integrated injection valve was used.

  18. Diesel fuel injection pump with signal rotor giving reference position and rotation position signals

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Y.; Kobayashi, F.; Miyagi, H.

    1986-03-11

    This patent describes a distribution type fuel injection system for an internal combustion engine having a crankshaft and cylinders. The fuel injection system consists of: an input shaft mounted for rotation in a predetermined phase relationship with the crankshaft; a housing; a plunger; a combination of a cam plate and a cam follower incorporated between the input shaft and the plunger to drive the plunger in a first axial direction to reduce the size of the high pressure chamber in a first group of certain spaced rotational phases of the input shaft. A spring biases the plunger in a second axial direction opposite to the first axial direction to increase the size of the high pressure chamber in a second group of certain spaced rotational phases. Each rotational phase of the second group is located between corresponding two adjacent ones of the first group of rotational phases; means for communicating the high pressure chamber with a source of fuel when the plunger is moving in the second axial direction and for communicating the high pressure chamber with successive ones of the plurality of cylinders when the plunger is moving in the first axial direction; a solenoid valve which selectively vents the high pressure chamber according to selective energization and deenergization thereof to control the amount of fuel supplied to respective ones of the cylinders; a signal rotor having signal generating means circumferentially spaced around a circular portion thereof; a signal pickup means for detecting each of the signal generating means as it passes a predetermined location adjacent to the circular portion of the signal rotor; an electronic calculating means for calculating an amount of fuel to be injected for each fuel injection according to engine rotational speed and accelerator pedal opening amount. The calculating means determines a rotational angle of the crankshaft.

  19. The Co-axial Flow of Injectable Solid Hydrogels with Encapsulated Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brandon; Pochan, Darrin; Sathaye, Sameer

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogels are quickly becoming an important biomaterial that can be used for the safe, localized injection of cancer drugs, the injection of stem cells into areas of interest or other biological applications. Our peptides can be self-assembled in a syringe where they form a gel, sheared by injection and, once in the body, immediately reform a localized pocket of stiff gel. My project has been designed around looking at the possibility of having a co-axial strand, in which one gel can surround another. This co-axial flow can be used to change the physical properties of our gel during injection, such as stiffening our gel using hyaluronic acid or encapsulating cells in the gel and surrounding the gel with growth medium or other biological factors. Rheology on hyaluron stiffened gels and cells encapsulated in gels was performed for comparison to the results from co-axial flow. Confocal microscopy was used to examine the coaxial gels after flow and to determine how the co-axial nature of the gels is affected by the concentration of peptide.

  20. Flow-induced birefringence: the hidden PSF killer in high performance injection-molded plastic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidley, Matthew D.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz; Kester, Robert; Descour, Michael R.

    2006-02-01

    A 7-mm OD, NA = 1 water immersion injection-molded plastic endoscope objective has been fabricated for a laser scanning fiber confocal reflectance microscope (FCRM) system specifically designed for in vivo detection of cervical and oral pre-cancers. Injection-molded optics was selected for the ability to incorporate aspheric surfaces into the optical design and its high volume capabilities. Our goal is high performance disposable endoscope probes. This objective has been built and tested as a stand-alone optical system, a Strehl ratio greater than 0.6 has been obtained. One of the limiting factors of optical performance is believed to be flow-induced birefringence. We have investigated different configurations for birefringence visualization and believe the circular polariscope is most useful for inspection of injection-molded plastic optics. In an effort to decrease birefringence effects, two experiments were conducted. They included: (1) annealing of the optics after fabrication and (2) modifying the injection molding prameters (packing pressures, injection rates, and hold time). While the second technique showed improvement, the annealing process could not improve quality without physically warping the lenses. Therefore, to effectively reduce flow-induced birefringence, molding conditions have to be carefully selected. These parameters are strongly connected to the physical part geometry. Both optical design and fabrication technology have to be considered together to deliver low birefringence while maintaining the required manufacturing tolerances. In this paper we present some of our current results that illustrate how flow-induced birefringence can degrade high performance injection-molded plastic optical systems.

  1. Analysis of a laminar boundary layer flow over a flat plate with injection or suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, S.; Babaelahi, M.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis is performed to study a laminar boundary layer flow over a porous flat plate with injection or suction imposed at the wall. The basic equations of this problem are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by means of appropriate transformations. These equations are solved analytically by the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), and the solutions are compared with the numerical solution (NS). The effect of uniform suction/injection on the heat transfer and velocity profile is discussed. A constant surface temperature in thermal boundary conditions is used for the horizontal flat plate.

  2. Streakline flow visualization of discrete-hole film cooling with normal, slanted, and compound angle injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Russell, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a three-row, staggered array with five-diameter spacing was studied for three hole angles: (1) normal, (2) slanted 30 deg to the surface in the direction of the main stream, and (3) slanted 30 deg to the surface and 45 deg laterally to the main stream. The ratio of the boundary layer thickness-to-hole diameter and Reynolds number were typical of gas-turbine film-cooling applications. Detailed streaklines showing the turbulent motion of the injected air were obtained by photographing very small neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles which follow the flow field.

  3. Using regional flow classes as references to analyse flow regime anomalies across a set of regulated Canadian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Fraser; Lapointe, Michel; Bourque, Guillaume; Boisclair, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that a river's natural flow regime is a key determinant of ecological integrity and that dam regulated-flow releases can be detrimental to biotic communities and even affect river ecosystem structure (e.g. Poff and Zimmerman, 2010). Regional flow classes, groups of rivers that share similar natural flow regimes (called ‘river types' by Poff and Zimmerman (2010)) and to which regional fish communities are ‘adapted', have been proposed as units of analysis to identify significant damming related flow alteration (e.g. Poff, 1996; Poff and Zimmerman, 2010; McManamay et al., 2012a). Specifically, the natural range of flow behaviour within regional classes can be used to identify clearly anomalous flow features in rivers regulated by dams. Through ordination analysis on 70 ecologically important flow indices, we isolated five distinctive regional groupings of natural flow regimes among the 96 unregulated rivers located in study regions of South Eastern and South Western Canada, selected based on watershed characteristics as possible references for the 13 hydro-regulated, NSERC-HydroNet study rivers in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. The distinguishing characteristics of natural flow regimes within each flow class are explored through visualization in principal component space. The 16 regulated HydroNet sites were assigned to appropriate regional flow classes through discriminant function analysis based on shared geographic location and watershed characteristics. Anomalous flow features in the regulated rivers are then characterized by type and strength, based on identification of flow indices that are significantly different from observed natural variability in the relevant regional class. The magnitude distributions and the main axes of variability in index anomalies are analysed, across regions and regulation types (storage, peaking and run-of-the-river (RoR)). We also discuss the potential biological

  4. Spike-Nosed Bodies and Forward Injected Jets in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, M.; Washington, C.; Blankson, I. M.; Shvets, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The paper contains new numerical simulation and experimental test results of blunt body drag reduction using thin spikes mounted in front of a body and one- or two-phase jets injected against a supersonic flow. Numerical simulations utilizing the NASA CFL3D code were conducted at the Hampton University Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) and experimental tests were conducted using the facilities of the IM/MSU Aeromechanics and Gas Dynamics Laboratory. Previous results were presented at the 37th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference. Those results were based on some experimental and numerical simulation tests for supersonic flow around spike-nosed or shell-nosed bodies, and numerical simulations were conducted only for a single spike-nosed or shell-nosed body at zero attack angle, alpha=0. In this paper, experimental test results of gas, liquid and solid particle jet injection against a supersonic flow are presented. In addition, numerical simulation results for supersonic flow around a multiple spike-nosed body with non-zero attack angles and with a gas and solid particle forward jet injection are included. Aerodynamic coefficients: drag, C(sub D), lift, C(sub L), and longitudinal momentum, M(sub z), obtained by numerical simulation and experimental tests are compared and show good agreement.

  5. Development of mediated BOD biosensor system of flow injection mode for shochu distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Oota, Shinichi; Hatae, Yuta; Amada, Kei; Koya, Hidekazu; Kawakami, Mitsuyasu

    2010-09-15

    Although microbial biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensors utilizing redox mediators have attracted much attention as a rapid BOD measurement method, little attempts have been made to apply the mediated BOD biosensors to the flow injection analysis system. In this work, a mediated BOD sensor system of flow injection mode, constructed by combining an immobilized microbial reactor with an electrochemical flow cell of three electrodes configuration, has been developed to estimate BOD of shochu distillery wastewater (SDW). It was demonstrated consequently that the mediated sensing was realized by employing phosphate buffer containing potassium hexacyanoferrate as the carrier. The output current was found to yield a peak with a sample injection, and to result from reoxidation of reduced mediator at the electrode. By employing the peak area as the sensor response, the effects of flow rate and pH of the carrier on the sensitivity were investigated. The sensor system using a microorganism of high SDW-assimilation capacity showed good performance and proved to be available for estimation of BOD of SDW.

  6. Flow injection catalase activity measurement based on gold nanoparticles/carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    El Nashar, Rasha Mohamed

    2012-07-15

    Amperometric flow injection method of hydrogen peroxide analysis was developed based on catalase enzyme (CAT) immobilization on a glassy carbon electrode (GC) modified with electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticles on a multiwalled carbon nanotubes/chitosan film. The resulting biosensor was applied to detect hydrogen peroxide with a linear response range 1.0×10(-7)-2.5×10(-3)M with a correlation coefficient 0.998 and response time less than 10s. The optimum conditions of film deposition such as potential applied, deposition time and pH were tested and the flow injection conditions were optimized to be: flow rate of 3ml/min, sample volume 75μl and saline phosphate buffer of pH 6.89. Catalase enzyme activity was successfully determined in liver homogenate samples of rats, raised under controlled dietary plan, using a flow injection analysis system involving the developed biosensor simultaneously with spectrophotometric detection, which is the common method of enzymatic assay. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  8. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Ciancone, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configutations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  9. Numerical prediction of flow induced fibers orientation in injection molded polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumer, A. N.; Hamidi, N. M.; Mat Sahat, I.

    2015-12-01

    Since the filling stage of injection molding process has important effect on the determination of the orientation state of the fibers, accurate analysis of the flow field for the mold filling stage becomes a necessity. The aim of the paper is to characterize the flow induced orientation state of short fibers in injection molding cavities. A dog-bone shaped model is considered for the simulation and experiment. The numerical model for determination of the fibers orientation during mold-filling stage of injection molding process was solved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software called MoldFlow. Both the simulation and experimental results showed that two different regions (or three layers of orientation structures) across the thickness of the specimen could be found: a shell region which is near to the mold cavity wall, and a core region at the middle of the cross section. The simulation results support the experimental observations that for thin plates the probability of fiber alignment to the flow direction near the mold cavity walls is high but low at the core region. It is apparent that the results of this study could assist in decisions regarding short fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  10. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  11. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  12. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, F. F.; Ciancone, M. L.

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configutations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  13. Spike-Nosed Bodies and Forward Injected Jets in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, M.; Washington, C.; Blankson, I. M.; Shvets, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The paper contains new numerical simulation and experimental test results of blunt body drag reduction using thin spikes mounted in front of a body and one- or two-phase jets injected against a supersonic flow. Numerical simulations utilizing the NASA CFL3D code were conducted at the Hampton University Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL) and experimental tests were conducted using the facilities of the IM/MSU Aeromechanics and Gas Dynamics Laboratory. Previous results were presented at the 37th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference. Those results were based on some experimental and numerical simulation tests for supersonic flow around spike-nosed or shell-nosed bodies, and numerical simulations were conducted only for a single spike-nosed or shell-nosed body at zero attack angle, alpha = 0 degrees. In this paper, experimental test results of gas, liquid and solid particle jet injection against a supersonic flow are presented. In addition, numerical simulation results for supersonic flow around a multiple spike-nosed body with non-zero attack angles and with a gas and solid particle forward jet injection are included. Aerodynamic coefficients: drag, C (sub D), lift, C(sub L), and longitudinal momentum, M(sub z), obtained by numerical simulation and experimental tests are compared and show good agreement.

  14. Computer controlled-flow injection potentiometric system based on virtual instrumentation for the monitoring of metal-biosorption processes.

    PubMed

    Florido, A; Valderrama, C; Nualart, S; Velazco-Molina, L; Arias de Fuentes, O; del Valle, M

    2010-05-23

    A completely automated flow-injection system was developed for the monitoring of biosorption studies of Cu(II) ion on vegetable waste by-products. The system employed flow-through Cu(II)-selective electrodes, of epoxy-resin-CuS/Ag(2)S heterogeneous crystalline type, and computer controlled pumps and valves for the flow operation. Computer automation was done through a specially devised virtual instrument, which commanded and periodically calibrated the system, allowing for the monitoring of Cu(II) ions between 0.6 and 6530 mg L(-1) at a typical frequency of 15 h(-1). Grape stalk wastes were used as biosorbent to remove Cu(II) ions in a fixed-bed column with a sorption capacity of 5.46 mg g(-1), obtained by the developed flow system, while the reference determination performed by FAAS technique supplied a comparable value of 5.41 mg g(-1). Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of reference conditions on flow rate, modifier fraction and retention in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Shoykhet Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2016-08-12

    When using compressible mobile phases such as fluidic CO2, the density, the volumetric flow rates and volumetric fractions are pressure dependent. The pressure and temperature definition of these volumetric parameters (referred to as the reference conditions) may alter between systems, manufacturers and operating conditions. A supercritical fluid chromatography system was modified to operate in two modes with different definition of the eluent delivery parameters, referred to as fixed and variable mode. For the variable mode, the volumetric parameters are defined with reference to the pump operating pressure and actual pump head temperature. These conditions may vary when, e.g. changing the column length, permeability, flow rate, etc. and are thus variable reference conditions. For the fixed mode, the reference conditions were set at 150bar and 30°C, resulting in a mass flow rate and mass fraction of modifier definition which is independent of the operation conditions. For the variable mode, the mass flow rate of carbon dioxide increases with system pump operating pressure, decreasing the fraction of modifier. Comparing the void times and retention factor shows that the deviation between the two modes is almost independent of modifier percentage, but depends on the operating pressure. Recalculating the set volumetric fraction of modifier to the mass fraction results in the same retention behaviour for both modes. This shows that retention in SFC can be best modelled using the mass fraction of modifier. The fixed mode also simplifies method scaling as it only requires matching average column pressure.

  16. Flow visualization of discrete-hole film cooling with spanwise injection over a cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Insight into the fluid mechanics encountered when film air from a single row of holes is injected over a cylinder in a mainstream at conditions simulating a film cooled, turbulent-vane leading edge was investigated. Smoke was added to the cooling air to visualize its flow path. Film was injected in the spanwise direction at angles of 30 deg and 45 deg to the surface; at angular locations of 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg from the stagnation line; and at various blowing ratios. The observations were related to the measured heat transfer data of others. The results indicate that, in addition to the expected growth in film thickness and the greater penetration of the boundary layer with increasing blowing ration, there was an absence of spanwise spreading and only a small spanwise deflection of the injected film.

  17. Simulations of Injection, Mixing, and Combustion in Supersonic Flow Using a Hybrid RANS/LES Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David Michael

    There is a great need for accurate and reliable numerical simulation of injection, mixing, and combustion in supersonic combustion ramjet engines. This study seeks to improve the accuracy and reliability which these flow can be simulated with by investigating the use of recent improvements in turbulence modeling and numerical methods. The present numerical simulations use implicit time integration and low-dissipation flux evaluation schemes in an unstructured grid framework. A hybrid Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation approach is used to model turbulence. The large-scale turbulent structure of the flow is resolved, while the near-wall structure is fully modeled. The effects of numerics, grid resolution, and boundary conditions are investigated. The simulation approach is thoroughly validated against available experimental data at a variety of flow conditions. The simulations focus on the injection of fuel through circular injector ports that are oriented either normal to the supersonic crossflow, or at a low angle with respect to the crossflow. The instantaneous flow structure resolved by the simulations is qualitatively compared to experimental flowfield visualization. Quantitative comparisons are made to mean wall pressure, mean velocity, turbulence quantities, and mean mixing data. The simulations are found to do very well at predicting the mean flowfield as well as fluctuations in velocity and injectant concentration. The simulation approach is then used to simulate the flow within a model supersonic combustor. The focus is on the non-reacting case. The simulation results are found to agree well with experimental measurements of temperature and species concentrations. The flow is examined to improve understanding of the mixing within the model combustor. Preliminary results for a simulation including hydrogen combustion are also presented.

  18. Reagents regeneration flow injection analysis (RRFIA) for spectrophotometric determination of methamphetamine coupled with solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Norio; Fukui, Nobukazu; Sakai, Tadao

    2005-12-15

    Methamphetamine (MPA), being a stimulant drug, reacts with tetrabromophenolphthalein ethyl ester (TBPEH) to form a red-violet ion associate, TBPEHMPA, in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) at pH 9. The maximum absorption wavelength was at 570nm. After measuring, yellow TBPEH with DCE could be regenerated by mixing with the buffer solution at pH 3. The regenerated TBPEH/DCE could be reused as an ion association reagent and extracting solvent. In addition, the reagent regeneration could be performed by the on-line flow injection system and the cyclic flow injection analysis system was demonstrated for the determination of MPA without consumption of ion association reagent and organic solvent. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.5-3.5x10(-5)M with good repeatability. The sample throughput was 20h(-1).

  19. "Reagentless" flow injection determination of ammonia and urea using membrane separation and solid phase basification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, J. R.; Thompson, J. O.; Sauer, R. L.; Atwater, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    Flow injection analysis instrumentation and methodology for the determination of ammonia and ammonium ions in an aqueous solution are described. Using in-line solid phase basification beds containing crystalline media. the speciation of ammoniacal nitrogen is shifted toward the un-ionized form. which diffuses in the gas phase across a hydrophobic microporous hollow fiber membrane into a pure-water-containing analytical stream. The two streams flow in a countercurrent configuration on opposite sides of the membrane. The neutral pH of the analytical stream promotes the formation of ammonium cations, which are detected using specific conductance. The methodology provides a lower limit of detection of 10 microgram/L and a dynamic concentration range spanning three orders of magnitude using a 315-microliters sample injection volume. Using immobilized urease to enzymatically promote the hydrolysis of urea to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide, the technique has been extended to the determination of urea.

  20. "Reagentless" flow injection determination of ammonia and urea using membrane separation and solid phase basification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, J. R.; Thompson, J. O.; Sauer, R. L.; Atwater, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    Flow injection analysis instrumentation and methodology for the determination of ammonia and ammonium ions in an aqueous solution are described. Using in-line solid phase basification beds containing crystalline media. the speciation of ammoniacal nitrogen is shifted toward the un-ionized form. which diffuses in the gas phase across a hydrophobic microporous hollow fiber membrane into a pure-water-containing analytical stream. The two streams flow in a countercurrent configuration on opposite sides of the membrane. The neutral pH of the analytical stream promotes the formation of ammonium cations, which are detected using specific conductance. The methodology provides a lower limit of detection of 10 microgram/L and a dynamic concentration range spanning three orders of magnitude using a 315-microliters sample injection volume. Using immobilized urease to enzymatically promote the hydrolysis of urea to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide, the technique has been extended to the determination of urea.

  1. "Reagentless" flow injection determination of ammonia and urea using membrane separation and solid phase basification.

    PubMed

    Akse, J R; Thompson, J O; Sauer, R L; Atwater, J E

    1998-07-01

    Flow injection analysis instrumentation and methodology for the determination of ammonia and ammonium ions in an aqueous solution are described. Using in-line solid phase basification beds containing crystalline media. the speciation of ammoniacal nitrogen is shifted toward the un-ionized form. which diffuses in the gas phase across a hydrophobic microporous hollow fiber membrane into a pure-water-containing analytical stream. The two streams flow in a countercurrent configuration on opposite sides of the membrane. The neutral pH of the analytical stream promotes the formation of ammonium cations, which are detected using specific conductance. The methodology provides a lower limit of detection of 10 microgram/L and a dynamic concentration range spanning three orders of magnitude using a 315-microliters sample injection volume. Using immobilized urease to enzymatically promote the hydrolysis of urea to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide, the technique has been extended to the determination of urea.

  2. Testing and comparison of four ionic tracers to measure stream flow loss by multiple tracer injection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zellweger, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    An injectate containing lithium, sodium, chloride and bromide was added continuously at five sites along a 507 m study reach of St Kevin Gulch, Lake County, Colorado to determine which sections of the stream were losing water to the stream bed and to ascertain how well the four tracers performed. The acidity of the stream (pH 3.6) made it possible for lithium and sodium, which are normally absorbed by ion exchange with stream bed sediment, to be used as conservative tracers. Net flow losses as low as 0.81 s-1, or 8% of flow, were calculated between measuring sites. By comparing the results of simultaneous injection it was determined whether subsections of the study reach were influent or effluent. Evaluation of tracer concentrations along 116 m of stream indicated that all four tracers behaved conservatively. Discharges measured by Parshall flumes were 4-18% greater than discharges measured by tracer dilution. -from Author

  3. Single standard calibration and data processing in flow injection titration based on concentration gradients

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, M. C. U.; Santos, A. V.; Honorato, R. S.; Pasquini, C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes use of gradients of concentration generated in flow injection (FI) systems to perform determinations based on points where the concentration of titrant and analyte are at stoichiometric ratio. Two procedures were developed. In one procedure the titrant is injected in a FI manifold and merges with the sample which is continuously pumped towards the detector. In the other procedure the sample is injected and merged with the titrant which is continuously pumped. Both techniques make use of concentration gradients of the sample or titrant generated in FI manifolds that contain a mixing chamber. This gradient is calibrated employing only one standard solution (usually the titrant) in order to convert any detector signal, obtained in the elapsed time after injection, to instantaneous concentration values. The flow system is microcomputer controlled and data are treated to locate points where the concentration of titrant and analyte are at the stoichiometric ratio. These points are found in abrupt changes of the signal × concentration curves obtained in the presence of the reaction. The method has been evaluated for determination of Fe(II) and acetic acid by spectrophotometric and conductimetric detection, respectively. Results show a mean relative standard deviation lower than 1%, an average accuracy of 1% and a high sampling processing capability (40 to 60 samples per hour). PMID:18924802

  4. Simultaneous determination of nanomolar nitrite and nitrate in seawater using reverse flow injection analysis coupled with a long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sichao; Zhang, Min; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing; Zhu, Yong

    2013-12-15

    A reverse flow injection analysis (rFIA) method coupled with 1m liquid waveguide capillary cell and spectrophotometric detection for simultaneous determination of nanomolar nitrite and nitrate in seawater was developed. The design of two analytical channels sharing the same detection system in the proposed method allowed the analysis of both nitrite and nitrate with single sample injection. Different strategies of reagent injection were investigated to obtain a higher sensitivity and a better peak shape. A dual-wavelength detection mode was chosen to eliminate the light source shifting and sample matrix interference. Experimental parameters were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and the matrix effect from seawater was preliminarily investigated. The proposed method had high sensitivity with detection limit of 0.6 nmol L(-1) for both nitrite and nitrate. The linearity was 2-500 nmol L(-1) for both analytes, and the upper limit could be extended by choosing a lower sensitivity detection wavelength. The analytical results of 26 surface seawater samples obtained with the proposed method showed good agreement with those using a reference method operated using an automated segmented flow analyzer. The proposed method could greatly minimize the trouble introduced by bubbles in the segmented flow analyzer. It also had the advantages of high precision and high sample throughput (nitrite and nitrate detected in triplicate; 5 h(-1)). Compared to normal flow injection analysis, the rFIA method is superior due to its lower reagent consumption, less dispersion of sample, as well as higher sensitivity.

  5. Implementation of air injection into the turbulent boundary layer of aircraft wing using external pressurized flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V. I.

    2017-03-01

    The possibility of using the injection of air into the incompressible turbulent boundary layer of an axisymmetric wing through a finely perforated area provided on the wing surface was studied. The air blowing was implemented via the supply of external pressurized flow through a permeable leading edge of the wing. It is shown that, with the blowing section located on the "flat" side of the wing, only an insignificant reduction in airfoil drag could be achieved. Simultaneously, the data obtained show that there exists a possibility of raising the lift-drag ratio due to a more appropriate choice of blowing-section location in the rarefaction region of the flow.

  6. Determination of diphenhydramine hydrochloride by flow injection with bromophenol blue and turbidimetric measurement.

    PubMed

    Martinez Calatayud, J; Sanchez Sampedro, A; Navasquillo Sarrion, S

    1990-06-01

    The study of a number of diphenhydramine-dye systems was carried out in order to determine the most suitable precipitate for the turbidimetric determination of diphenhydramine using flow injection (FI). The reagent selected was Bromophenol Blue. The chemical and FI variables were optimised. The calibration graph was linear over the concentration range 50-230 p.p.m. of diphenhydramine hydrochloride. A number of interfering substances were also investigated.

  7. Modulating flow and aerodynamic characteristics of a square cylinder in crossflow using a rear jet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Hsu, Ching M.; Chen, Yu T.

    2017-01-01

    The temporally evolved flow behaviors around a square cylinder subject to modulation of a planar jet issued from the cylinder's downstream surface into the wake were studied using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization method and synchronized hot-wire anemometers. The drag force asserted on the square cylinder was obtained by measuring the surface pressures. Four characteristic flow modes (wake-dominated, transitional, critical, and jet-dominated) were observed in different regimes of freestream Reynolds number and jet injection ratio. In the wake-dominated mode, the jet swung periodically back and forth on the downstream surface due to the wake vortex shedding. In the transitional mode, the vortex shedding in the wake vanished so that the flow around the cylinder presented no periodic oscillations. In the critical mode, the wake width became smaller and therefore made the vortex shedding frequency larger than that observed in the wake dominated mode. In the jet-dominated mode, the jet had a large momentum that entrained wake fluids and therefore stabilized the instabilities of the wake, separated boundary layers on lateral surfaces, and stagnation point on the upstream surface. Two standing vortices appeared in the near wake beside the high-momentum jet. The width of the wake was decreased substantially by jet entrainment. The drag coefficient decreased with an increase in the jet injection ratio. The downstream surface jet injection caused the pressure coefficients to decrease at the upstream surface and to increase at the downstream surface. Therefore, the drag coefficients were decreased significantly by 26%, 33%, and 38% at the injection ratios of 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5, respectively.

  8. Stability Analysis of High-Speed Boundary-Layer Flow with Gas Injection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    the boundary layer [1,2]. Non-equilibrium effects such as molecular vibration and dissociation can damp acoustic disturbances [3,4]. Carbon dioxide ...potential beneficial application of adding carbon dioxide into boundary-layer flows in order to delay transition onset. Experimentally, this is...will occur immediately following the injection of cold carbon dioxide . The test cases with air and nitrogen as the test gas suggested the momentum

  9. Determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples by flow injection cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James; Jones, Phil; Hill, Steve J.

    1996-12-01

    A simple and accurate method has been developed for the determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples. The method utilises an off-line microwave digestion stage followed by analysis using a flow injection system with detection by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The method has been validated using two certified reference materials (DORM-1 dogfish and MESS-2 estuarine sediment) and the results agreed well with the certified values. A detection limit of 0.2 ng g -1 Hg was obtained and no significant interference was observed. The method was finally applied to the determination of mercury in river sediments and canned tuna fish, and gave results in the range 0.1-3.0 mg kg -1.

  10. Pervaporation-flow injection with chemiluminescence detection for determination of iodide in multivitamin tablets.

    PubMed

    Nacapricha, D; Sangkarn, P; Karuwan, C; Mantim, T; Waiyawat, W; Wilairat, P; Cardwell, T; McKelvie, I D; Ratanawimarnwong, N

    2007-04-30

    This paper describes the use of a pervaporation (PV) technique in a flow injection (FI) system for selective improvement in iodide analysis. Iodide in the sample zone is oxidized to iodine, which permeates through a hydrophobic membrane. Detection of the diffused iodine is achieved using the chemiluminescent (CL) emission at 425nm that results from the reaction between iodine and luminol. The method was applied for the analysis of some pharmaceutical products, such as nuclear emergency tablets and multivitamin tablets. Ascorbic acid present in multivitamin samples interfered seriously with the analysis, and off-line sample treatment using anion exchange resin was employed to successfully remove ascorbic acid before the analysis. Ascorbic acid was flushed from the column using 0.4M sodium nitrate followed by elution of iodide with 2M sodium nitrate. The detection limit (3S.D.) of the system was 0.5mgl(-1), with reproducibility of 5.2% R.S.D. at 5mgl(-1). Sample throughput was determined as 30injectionsh(-1). There was good agreement between iodide concentrations from extracted samples determined using four different methods, i.e., PV-FI, gas diffusion-flow injection, potentiometry and ICP-MS. A comparison of the analytical features of the developed pervaporation system with these of the previously reported chemiluminescence gas diffusion-flow injection previously reported is also described.

  11. Free flow isotachophoresis in an injection moulded miniaturised separation chamber with integrated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Stone, Victoria N; Baldock, Sara J; Croasdell, Laura A; Dillon, Leonard A; Fielden, Peter R; Goddard, Nick J; Thomas, C L Paul; Treves Brown, Bernard J

    2007-07-06

    An injection moulded free flow isotachophoresis (FFITP) microdevice with integrated carbon fibre loaded electrodes with a separation chamber of 36.4mm wide, 28.7 mm long and 100 microm deep is presented. The microdevice was completely fabricated by injection moulding in carbon fibre loaded polystyrene for the electrodes and crystal polystyrene for the remainder of the chip and was bonded together using ultrasonic welding. Two injection moulded electrode designs were compared, one with the electrode surface level with the separation chamber and one with a recessed electrode. Separations of two anionic dyes, 0.2mM each of amaranth and acid green and separations of 0.2mM each of amaranth, bromophenol blue and glutamate were performed on the microdevice. Flow rates of 1.25 ml min(-1) for the leading and terminating electrolytes were used and a flow rate of 0.63 ml min(-1) for the sample. Electric fields of up to 370 V cm(-1) were applied across the separation chamber. Joule heating was not found to be significant although out-gassing was observed at drive currents greater than 3 mA.

  12. Potentiometric electronic tongue-flow injection analysis system for the monitoring of heavy metal biosorption processes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; del Valle, M; Alegret, S; Valderrama, C; Florido, A

    2012-05-15

    An automated flow injection potentiometric (FIP) system with electronic tongue detection (ET) is used for the monitoring of biosorption processes of heavy metals on vegetable wastes. Grape stalk wastes are used as biosorbent to remove Cu(2+) ions in a fixed-bed column configuration. The ET is formed by a 5-sensor array with Cu(2+) and Ca(2+)-selective electrodes and electrodes with generic response to heavy-metals, plus an artificial neural network response model of the sensor's cross-response. The real-time monitoring of both the Cu(2+) and the cation exchanged and released (Ca(2+)) in the effluent solution is performed by using flow-injection potentiometric electronic tongue system. The coupling of the electronic tongue with automation features of the flow-injection system allows us to accurately characterize the Cu(2+) ion-biosorption process, through obtaining its breakthrough curves, and the profile of the Ca(2+) ion release. In parallel, fractions of the extract solution are analysed by spectroscopic techniques in order to validate the results obtained with the reported methodology. The sorption performance of grape stalks is also evaluated by means of well-established sorption models.

  13. Reverse flow injection spectrophotometric determination of iodate and iodide in table salt.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihai; Zhao, Jingchan

    2004-05-28

    A very simple and sensitive reverse flow injection method is described for the determination of iodate and iodide. The iodate reacts with excess iodide in acidic medium to form tri-iodide, which can be spectrophotometrically monitored at 351nm, and the absorbance is directly related to the concentration of iodate in the sample. The determination of iodide is based on oxidizing iodide to iodate. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 0.02-3.0mugml(-1) I with r(2)=0.9998, and the limit of detection is 0.008mugml(-1) I. The chemical and flow injection variables were studied and optimized to make the procedure suitable for quantitating iodate and iodide in table salts. It is shown that the reverse flow injection analysis could greatly improve the sensitivity and precision for determination of iodate with a relative standard deviation of 0.9%. A complete analysis, including sampling and washing, could be performed in 35s. The procedure was applied successfully to the determination of iodate and iodide in table salts, and the results were statistically compared with results determined by standard iodometry method.

  14. Hydrodynamic sample injection into short electrophoretic capillary in systems with a flow-gating interface.

    PubMed

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr

    2017-01-13

    An electrophoretic apparatus with a flow-gating interface has been developed, enabling hydrodynamic sequence injection of the sample into the separation capillary from the liquid flow by underpressure generated in the outlet electrophoretic vessel. The properties of the apparatus were tested on an artificial sample of an equimolar mixture of 100μM potassium and sodium ions and arginine. The repeatability of the injection of the tested ions expressed as RSD (in%) for the peak area, peak height and migration time was in the range 0.76-2.08, 0.18-0.68 and 0.28-0.48, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the apparatus was used for sequence monitoring of the reaction between the antidiabetic drug phenyl biguanide and the glycation agent methyl glyoxal. The reaction solution was continuously sampled by a microdialysis probe from a thermostated external vessel using a syringe pump at a flow rate of 3μLmin(-1) and was injected into a separation capillary at certain time intervals. The electrophoretic separation progressed in a capillary with an internal diameter of 50μm with a length of 11.5cm and was monitored using a contactless conductivity detector.

  15. SAG injection in a North Sea stratified reservoir: Flow experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanssen, J.E.; Surguchev, L.M.; Svorstoel, I.

    1994-12-31

    This paper is a study of a novel recovery process for stratified reservoirs with large permeability contrasts. A slug of foaming surfactant is injected alternately with gas, thus by analogy with WAG making this a SAG injection process. A combined experimental and numerical evaluation demonstrating effective diversion by foam and significant recovery potential over WAG of the method is reported. An experiment with the new process was performed in a visual 2-D porous medium flow model approximately scaled to the conditions of a North Sea reservoir that is characterized by high permeability contrast and limited interlayer communication. The experiment showed poor performance of conventional WAG, which swept mainly the high-permeable layer. Placement of a surfactant slug and later foam generation in the swept layer was successfully demonstrated and gave efficient injectant diversion into the other layers, resulting in complete sweep of the reservoir model by continued WAG. In summary the results of this paper show experimentally and by simulation on the same system that SAG injection as implemented here is superior to WAG injection and that the rich observations made in the experimental ca be matched with reasonable accuracy using a commercial simulator with only empirical parameters.

  16. Fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks: analysis of epidural flow of the injectate with respect to needle tip position.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Kyle; Riew, K Daniel; Gilula, Louis A

    2014-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of consecutively performed fluoroscopically guided cervical nerve root blocks. Objective To describe the incidence of injectate central epidural flow with respect to needle tip position during fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks (ECNRBs). Methods Between February 19, 2003 and June 11, 2003, 132 consecutive fluoroscopically guided ECNRBs performed with contrast media in the final injected material (injectate) were reviewed on 95 patients with average of 1.3 injections per patient. Fluoroscopic spot images documenting the procedure were obtained as part of standard quality assurance. An independent observer not directly involved in the procedures retrospectively reviewed the images, and the data were placed into a database. Image review was performed to determine optimal needle tip positioning for injectate epidural flow. Results Central epidural injectate flow was obtained in only 28.9% of injections with the needle tip lateral to midline of the lateral mass (zone 2). 83.8% of injectate went into epidural space when the needle tip was medial to midline of the lateral mass (zone 3). 100% of injectate flowed epidurally when the needle tip was medial to or at the medial cortex of the lateral mass (zone 4). There was no statistically significant difference with regards to central epidural flow and the needle tip position on lateral view. Conclusion To ensure central epidural flow with ECNRBs one must be prepared to pass the needle tip medial to midplane of the lateral mass or to medial cortex of the lateral mass. Approximately 16% of ECNRBs with needle tip medial to midline of the lateral mass did not flow into epidural space. One cannot claim a nerve block is an epidural block unless epidural flow of injectate is observed.

  17. MICROSCALE FLOW INJECTION AND MICROBORE HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATORGRAPHY COUPLED WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY VIA A HIGH-EFFICIENCY NEBULIZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high-effeciency nebulizer has been used for coupling microscale flow injection and microbore high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The microscale flow injection system was configured to minimize band broadening between...

  18. Automated multiple flow-injection analysis in clinical chemistry: determination of total protein with Biuret reagent.

    PubMed

    Shideler, C E; Stewart, K K; Crump, J; Wills, M R; Savory, J; Renoe, B W

    1980-09-01

    We have examined the feasibility of the automated multiple flow-injection technique for application to clinical chemistry by adapting to this system the biuret method for the determination of total protein. Samples were discretely and rapidly introduced into a continuously flowing, nonsegmented reagent stream by means of an automatic sampler and high-pressure injection valve. Pumps operating at 1380-2070 kPa (200-300 psi) were utilized to introduce the biuret reagent and saline diluent into the system separately at flow rates of 72 and 47 microL/s, respectively. Use of 20-microL sample and a 3.0-s reaction-delay coil was adequately sensitive for analysis for total protein by this method. Samples were analyzed at a rate of 150/h with no detectable between-sample carryover. Within-run precision studies yielded relative standard deviations of 2.5% and less. Total protein values obtained by this method correlated well with those obtained by centrifugal analyzer and bubble-segmented continuous-flow biuret methods.

  19. Hybrid LES/RANS Simulation of Transverse Sonic Injection into a Mach 2 Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boles, John A.; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    A computational study of transverse sonic injection of air and helium into a Mach 1.98 cross-flow is presented. A hybrid large-eddy simulation / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) turbulence model is used, with the two-equation Menter baseline (Menter-BSL) closure for the RANS part of the flow and a Smagorinsky-type model for the LES part of the flow. A time-dependent blending function, dependent on modeled turbulence variables, is used to shift the closure from RANS to LES. Turbulent structures are initiated and sustained through the use of a recycling / rescaling technique. Two higher-order discretizations, the Piecewise Parabolic Method (PPM) of Colella and Woodward, and the SONIC-A ENO scheme of Suresh and Huyhn are used in the study. The results using the hybrid model show reasonably good agreement with time-averaged Mie scattering data and with experimental surface pressure distributions, even though the penetration of the jet into the cross-flow is slightly over-predicted. The LES/RANS results are used to examine the validity of commonly-used assumptions of constant Schmidt and Prandtl numbers in the intense mixing zone downstream of the injection location.

  20. Characterization and optimization of low cost microfluidic thread based electroanalytical device for micro flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Agustini, Deonir; Bergamini, Márcio F; Marcolino-Junior, Luiz Humberto

    2017-01-25

    The micro flow injection analysis (μFIA) is a powerful technique that uses the principles of traditional flow analysis in a microfluidic device and brings a number of improvements related to the consumption of reagents and samples, speed of analysis and portability. However, the complexity and cost of manufacturing processes, difficulty in integrating micropumps and the limited performance of systems employing passive pumps are challenges that must be overcome. Here, we present the characterization and optimization of a low cost device based on cotton threads as microfluidic channel to perform μFIA based on passive pumps with good analytical performance in a simple, easy and inexpensive way. The transport of solutions is made through cotton threads by capillary force facilitated by gravity. After studying and optimizing several features related to the device, were obtained a flow rate of 2.2 ± 0.1 μL s(-1), an analytical frequency of 208 injections per hour, a sample injection volume of 2.0 μL and a waste volume of approximately 40 μL per analysis. For chronoamperometric determination of naproxen, a detection limit of 0.29 μmol L(-1) was reached, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.69% between injections and a RSD of 3.79% with five different devices. Thus, based on the performance presented by proposed microfluidic device, it is possible to overcome some limitations of the μFIA systems based on passive pumps and allow expansion in the use of this technique.

  1. Sensitive competitive flow injection chemiluminescence immunoassay for IgG using gold nanoparticle as label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Honglan; Shangguan, Li; Liang, Lin; Ling, Chen; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2011-11-01

    A sensitive competitive flow injection chemiluminescence (CL-FIA) immunoassay for immunoglobulin G (IgG) was developed using gold nanoparticle as CL label. In the configuration, anti-IgG antibody was immobilized on a glass capillary column surface by 3-(aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane and glutaraldehyde to form immunoaffinity column. Analyte IgG and gold nanoparticle labeled IgG were passed through the immunoaffinity column mounted in a flow system and competed for the surface-confined anti-IgG antibody. CL emission was generated from the reaction between luminol and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Au (III), generated from chemically oxidative dissolution of gold nanoparticle by an injection of 0.10 mol L -1 HCl-0.10 mol L -1 NaCl solution containing 0.10 mmol L -1 Br 2. The concentration of analyte IgG was inversely related to the amount of bound gold nanoparticle labeled IgG and the CL intensity was linear with the concentration of analyte IgG from 1.0 ng mL -1 to 40 ng mL -1 with a detection limit of 5.2 × 10 -10 g mL -1. The whole assay time including the injections and washing steps was only 30 min for one sample, which was competitive with CL immunoassays based on a gold nanoparticle label and magnetic separation. This work demonstrates that the CL immunoassay incorporation of nanoparticle label and flow injection is promising for clinical assay with sensitivity and high-speed.

  2. Automated determination of nitrate plus nitrite in aqueous samples with flow injection analysis using vanadium (III) chloride as reductant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Lin, Kunning; Chen, Nengwang; Yuan, Dongxing; Ma, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Determination of nitrate in aqueous samples is an important analytical objective for environmental monitoring and assessment. Here we report the first automatic flow injection analysis (FIA) of nitrate (plus nitrite) using VCl3 as reductant instead of the well-known but toxic cadmium column for reducing nitrate to nitrite. The reduced nitrate plus the nitrite originally present in the sample react with the Griess reagent (sulfanilamide and N-1-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride) under acidic condition. The resulting pink azo dye can be detected at 540 nm. The Griess reagent and VCl3 are used as a single mixed reagent solution to simplify the system. The various parameters of the FIA procedure including reagent composition, temperature, volume of the injection loop, and flow rate were carefully investigated and optimized via univariate experimental design. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range and detection limit of this method are 0-100 µM (R(2)=0.9995) and 0.1 µM, respectively. The targeted analytical range can be easily extended to higher concentrations by selecting alternative detection wavelengths or increasing flow rate. The FIA system provides a sample throughput of 20 h(-1), which is much higher than that of previously reported manual methods based on the same chemistry. National reference solutions and different kinds of aqueous samples were analyzed with our method as well as the cadmium column reduction method. The results from our method agree well with both the certified value and the results from the cadmium column reduction method (no significant difference with P=0.95). The spiked recovery varies from 89% to 108% for samples with different matrices, showing insignificant matrix interference in this method.

  3. Effect of Transpiration Injection on Skin Friction in an Internal Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castiglone, L. A.; Northam, G. B.; Baker, N. R.; Roe, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center that included development and evaluation of an operational facility for wall drag measurement of potential scramjet fuel injection or wall cooling configurations. The facility consisted of a supersonic tunnel, with one wall composed of a series of interchangeable aluminum plates attached to an air bearing suspension system. The system was equipped with load cells that measured drag forces of 115 psia (793 kPa). This flow field contained a train of weak, unsteady, reflecting shock waves that were produced in the Mach 2 nozzle flows, the effect of reflecting shocks (which are to be expected in scramjet combustors) in internal flows has not previously been documented.

  4. Modeling of the flow continuum and optimal design of control-oriented injection systems in liquid composite molding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokce, Ali

    Several methodologies are presented in this dissertation that aim to ensure successful filling of the mold cavity consistently, during the mold filling stage of Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes such as Resin Transfer Molding (RTM), Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) and Seemann Composites Resin Infusion Molding (SCRIMP). Key parameters that affect the resin flow in the mold cavity can be divided into two main groups as continuum-related parameters and injection-related parameters. Flow continuum, which consists of all the spaces resin can reach in the mold cavity, has two major components: the porous medium, which is made up of the fiber reinforcements, and the flow channels that are introduced into the flow continuum unintentionally and offer an easy flow path to the resin. The properties that characterize the porous medium and the unintentional flow channels are continuum-related parameters. The injection-related parameters include resin injection locations (gates), resin injection conditions and air drainage locations (vents). Modeling the flow continuum is crucial in predicting the resin flow in the mold cavity. In this study, permeability, the key property of the porous medium, is predicted using the Method of Cells, a proven method to predict macroscopic properties of heterogeneous materials. Unintentional flow channels, which are also called racetracking channels, are modeled using a probabilistic approach. Injection-related parameters are the key tools to influence the resin flow in the mold cavity. In this study, Branch and Bound Search is modified for single gate optimization. Due to its pertinence to injection system design, the parameters that govern gate effectiveness in steering the resin advance are studied. A combinatorial search algorithm is proposed for vent optimization. Vent optimization and gate optimization algorithms are integrated for simultaneous gate and vent optimization. Overall, these methodologies reduce the cycle

  5. Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry hyphenated system for organic mercury determination: A step forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Valeria; Biagi, Simona; Ghimenti, Silvia; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2011-11-01

    Monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were determined on line using flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry without neither requiring a pre-treatment with chemical oxidants, nor UV/MW additional post column interface, nor organic solvents, nor complexing agents, such as cysteine. Inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were detected by atomic fluorescence spectrometry in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride reduction to Hg 0, monomethylmercury hydride and ethylmercury hydride, respectively. The effect of mercury complexing agent such as cysteine, ethylendiaminotetracetic acid and HCl with respect to water and Ar/H 2 microflame was investigated. The behavior of inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury and their cysteine-complexes was also studied by continuous flow-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in order to characterize the reduction reaction with tetrahydroborate. When complexed with cysteine, inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separately quantified varying tetrahydroborate concentration due to a lack of selectivity, and their speciation requires a pre-separation stage (e.g. a chromatographic separation). If not complexed with cysteine, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separated, as well, but their sum can be quantified separately with respect to inorganic mercury choosing a suitable concentration of tetrahydroborate (e.g. 10 - 5 mol L - 1 ), thus allowing the organic/inorganic mercury speciation. The detection limits of the flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method were about 45 nmol L - 1 (as mercury) for all the species considered, a relative standard deviation ranging between 1.8 and 2.9% and a linear dynamic range between 0.1 and 5 μmol L - 1 were obtained. Recoveries of monomethylmercury and ethylmercury with respect to inorganic mercury were never less than 91%. Flow injection

  6. Dispersion-convolution model for simulating peaks in a flow injection system.

    PubMed

    Pai, Su-Cheng; Lai, Yee-Hwong; Chiao, Ling-Yun; Yu, Tiing

    2007-01-12

    A dispersion-convolution model is proposed for simulating peak shapes in a single-line flow injection system. It is based on the assumption that an injected sample plug is expanded due to a "bulk" dispersion mechanism along the length coordinate, and that after traveling over a distance or a period of time, the sample zone will develop into a Gaussian-like distribution. This spatial pattern is further transformed to a temporal coordinate by a convolution process, and finally a temporal peak image is generated. The feasibility of the proposed model has been examined by experiments with various coil lengths, sample sizes and pumping rates. An empirical dispersion coefficient (D*) can be estimated by using the observed peak position, height and area (tp*, h* and At*) from a recorder. An empirical temporal shift (Phi*) can be further approximated by Phi*=D*/u2, which becomes an important parameter in the restoration of experimental peaks. Also, the dispersion coefficient can be expressed as a second-order polynomial function of the pumping rate Q, for which D*(Q)=delta0+delta1Q+delta2Q2. The optimal dispersion occurs at a pumping rate of Qopt=sqrt[delta0/delta2]. This explains the interesting "Nike-swoosh" relationship between the peak height and pumping rate. The excellent coherence of theoretical and experimental peak shapes confirms that the temporal distortion effect is the dominating reason to explain the peak asymmetry in flow injection analysis.

  7. Determination of trace amounts of phosphate by flow-injection photometry.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Sathrugnan; Hashigaya, Seigo; Kajiya, Tasuku; Hirata, Shizuko

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a simple and rapid procedure for determination of traces of phosphate by means of molybdenum blue chemistry. The use of a cost-effective home-made flow cell with a long path length in combination with a light emitting diode (LED) and a photodiode (PD) is demonstrated as a simple absorbance detector for flow-injection analysis. In this method, a sample is injected into the carrier stream through an injection valve and mixed online with mixed reagent (a mixture of molybdate, bismuth, and ascorbic acid in sulfuric acid). The color intensity of the resulting association complex, molybdenum blue, is measured photometrically ( lambda(max) 875 nm). The proposed method can be used to detect phosphate in the range 0.02-4.0 mg x L(-1) and the precision of the proposed procedure is less than 5% at 0.1 mg x L(-1) phosphorus as phosphate. The method has been successfully applied to a variety of natural water samples.

  8. Flow injection colorimetric method using acidic ceric nitrate as reagent for determination of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Youngvises, Napaporn; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2011-05-15

    Ceric ammonium nitrate has been used for qualitative analysis of ethanol. It forms an intensely colored unstable complex with alcohol. In this work, a simple flow injection (FI) colorimetric method was developed for the determination of ethanol, based on the reaction of ethanol with ceric ion in acidic medium to produce a red colored product having maximum absorption at 415 nm. Absorbance of this complex could be precisely measured in the FI system. A standard or sample solution was injected into a deionized water donor stream and flowed to a gas diffusion unit, where the ethanol diffused through a gas permeable membrane made of plumbing PTFE tape into an acceptor stream to react with ceric ammonium nitrate in nitric acid. Color intensity of the reddish product was monitored by a laboratory made LED based colorimeter and the signal was recorded on a computer as a peak. Peak height obtained was linearly proportional to the concentration of ethanol originally presented in the injected solution in the range of 0.1-10.0% (v/v) (r(2)=0.9993), with detection limit of 0.03% (v/v). With the use of gas diffusion membrane, most of the interferences could be eliminated. The proposed method was successfully applied for determination of ethanol in some alcoholic beverages, validating by gas chromatographic method. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of Spray Injection to Turbulent Flows from a Slit Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Jun; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Oshima, Marie; Ito, Hisashi; Kubota, Masato

    Slit nozzles are used in some gasoline direct injection engines and makes fan shaped spray. Spray injecting flows to turbulent flows from a slit nozzle have been analyzed numerically using combination of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and lagrangian Discrete Droplet Method (DDM). As a result, LES can resolve the internal structure of the spray and irregular droplet distribution made by small eddies that momentum of spray itself induced. In conventional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) combined DDM calculation such eddies cannot be resolved, and also the internal spray structure or irregularity doesn't appear since all effects of turbulence are averaged. But such structure or irregularity is important for stable combustion in gasoline direct injection engines. Therefore the combination of LES and DDM method will play essential role for developing more robust and high efficient engines under wide operating conditions. We also proposed the way of constructing pseudo particle image in order to compare calculation results with sliced spray pictures obtained by experiments. We show time changes of the shape of brightness Probability Density Function (PDF) can be used to evaluate variance of spray droplets.

  10. Flow injection determination of bromide ion in a developer using bromide ion-selective electrode detector.

    PubMed

    Masadome, T; Asano, Y; Nakamura, T

    1999-10-01

    A potentiometric flow injection determination method for bromide ion in a developer was proposed, by utilizing a flow-through type bromide ion-selective electrode detector. The sensing membrane of the electrode was Ag(2)S-AgBr membrane. The response of the electrode detector as a peak-shape signal was obtained for injected bromide ion in a developer. A linear relationship was found to exist between peak height and the concentration of the bromide ion in a developer in a concentration range from 1.0x10(-3) to 1.0x10(-2) mol l(-1). The relative standard deviation for 10 injections of a 6x10(-3) mol l(-1) bromide ion in a developer was 1.3% and the sampling rate was ca 17-20 samples h(-1). The present method was free from the interference of an organic reducing reagent, an organic substance in a developer sample solution for the determination of bromide ion in a developer.

  11. Approximate solutions for Forchheimer flow during water injection and water production in an unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Moutsopoulos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the hydraulics around injection and production wells in unconfined aquifers associated with rainwater and reclaimed water aquifer storage schemes is an issue of increasing importance. Much work has been done previously to understand the mathematics associated with Darcy's law in this context. However, groundwater flow velocities around injection and production wells are likely to be sufficiently large such as to induce significant non-Darcy effects. This article presents a mathematical analysis to look at Forchheimer's equation in the context of water injection and water production in unconfined aquifers. Three different approximate solutions are derived using quasi-steady-state assumptions and the method of matched asymptotic expansion. The resulting approximate solutions are shown to be accurate for a wide range of practical scenarios by comparison with a finite difference solution to the full problem of concern. The approximate solutions have led to an improved understanding of the flow dynamics. They can also be used as verification tools for future numerical models in this context.

  12. Choroidal thickness and choroidal blood flow after intravitreal bevacizumab injection in eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masahiro; Matsuura, Toyoaki; Ogata, Nahoko

    2015-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate choroidal thickness (CT) and choroidal blood flow in the subfoveal region after intravitreal bevacizumab injection (IVB) for the treatment of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Prospective, comparative study of 20 eyes with chronic CSC and and 20 fellow eyes treated with 1.25 mg/0.05 mL IVB. Subfoveal CT and serous retinal detachment height were measured using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. Subfoveal choroidal blood flow was assessed by the mean blur rate of laser speckle flowgraphy. IOP, blood pressure, and pulse rate, and ocular perfusion pressure were also measured. All measurements were made before and after IVB. Subfoveal fluid was not present after IVB in the affected eyes. The mean subfoveal CT decreased from 335 µm at baseline to 304 and 291 µm at 1 and 3 months, respectively, after IVB. Average mean blur rate ratio decreased from baseline to 92.9% and 88.0% at 1 and 3 months, respectively. In the fellow eyes, subfoveal CT and choroidal blood flow decreased slightly from baseline. There was a significant correlation between the decrease in subfoveal CT and choroidal blood flow after IVB in affected eyes. IOP, mean arterial pressure, pulse rate, and ocular perfusion pressure did not change significantly after IVB. IVB significantly reduced subfoveal CT, choroidal blood flow, and subretinal fluid absorption in eyes with chronic CSC. The reduction of subfoveal CT after IVB was likely caused by the reduction of subfoveal choroidal blood flow. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Visualization analysis of tiger-striped flow mark generation phenomena in injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owada, Shigeru; Yokoi, Hidetoshi

    2016-03-01

    The generation mechanism of tiger-striped flow marks of polypropylene (PP)/rubber/talc blends in injection molding was investigated by dynamic visualization analysis in a glass-inserted mold. The analysis revealed that the behavior of the melt flow front correlates with the flow mark generation. The cloudy part in the tiger-striped flow marks corresponded to the low transcription rate area of the melt diverging near the cavity wall, while the glossy part corresponded to the high transcription rate area of the melt converging toward the cavity wall side. The melt temperature at the high transcription rate area was slightly lower than that at the low transcription rate area. These phenomena resulted due to the difference in the temperature of the melt front that was caused by the asymmetric fountain flow. These results suggest the followings; At the moment when the melt is broken near the one side of cavity wall due to piling the extensional strains up to a certain level, the melt spurts out near the broken side. It results in generating asymmetric fountain flow temporarily to relax the extensional front surface, which moves toward the opposite side to form the high transcription area.

  14. National Combustion Code Validated Against Lean Direct Injection Flow Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.

    2003-01-01

    Most combustion processes have, in some way or another, a recirculating flow field. This recirculation stabilizes the reaction zone, or flame, but an unnecessarily large recirculation zone can result in high nitrogen oxide (NOx) values for combustion systems. The size of this recirculation zone is crucial to the performance of state-of-the-art, low-emissions hardware. If this is a large-scale combustion process, the flow field will probably be turbulent and, therefore, three-dimensional. This research dealt primarily with flow fields resulting from lean direct injection (LDI) concepts, as described in Research & Technology 2001. LDI is a concept that depends heavily on the design of the swirler. The LDI concept has the potential to reduce NOx values from 50 to 70 percent of current values, with good flame stability characteristics. It is cost effective and (hopefully) beneficial to do most of the design work for an LDI swirler using computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are CAE tools that can calculate three-dimensional flows in complex geometries. However, CFD codes are only beginning to correctly calculate the flow fields for complex devices, and the related combustion models usually remove a large portion of the flow physics.

  15. Visualization of regional cerebrospinal fluid flow with a dye injection technique in focal arachnoid pathologies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Takeda, Masaaki; Mitsuhara, Takafumi; Morishige, Mizuki; Yamada, Naoto; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-05-01

    Surgical lysis of the thickened arachnoid membrane is the first choice of treatment in spinal arachnoid pathologies that cause flow disturbances or blockage of CSF. However, it is important to consider that while extensive lysis of the arachnoid may temporarily provide a wide pathway for CSF, an extensive lytic procedure may later cause secondary adhesion. Thus, it is ideal for the proper extent of the arachnoid lysis to be determined after careful analysis of regional CSF flow. The authors report their limited experience with intraoperative visualization of CSF flow in spinal arachnoid pathologies. Two patients with a dorsal arachnoid web (DAW) with cervical syringomyelia and 1 patient with focal adhesive arachnoiditis causing edema of the spinal cord were surgically treated at the authors' institution between 2007 and 2013. In all cases, the presence of a DAW or focal adhesive arachnoiditis was suspected from the findings on MRI, namely 1) an indentation on the upper thoracic spinal cord and 2) syringomyelia and/or edema of the spinal cord above the indentation. Exploratory surgery disclosed a transversely thickened arachnoid septum on the dorsal side of the indented cord. To prove blockage of the CSF by the septum and to decide on the extent of arachnoid lysis, regional CSF flow around the arachnoid septum was visualized by subarachnoid injection of gentian violet solution close to the web. Injected dye stagnated just close to the arachnoid septum in all cases, and these findings documented CSF blockage by the septum. In 2 cases, a 2-minute observation showed that the injected dye stayed close to the web without diffusion. The authors performed not only resection of the web itself but also lysis of the thickened arachnoid on both sides of the spinal cord to make a CSF pathway on the ventral side. In the third case, the dye stagnated close to the web at first but then diffused through the nerve root to the ventral CSF space. The lysis procedure was completed

  16. Bio-bar-code functionalized magnetic nanoparticle label for ultrasensitive flow injection chemiluminescence detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Shusheng

    2009-10-07

    A signal amplification strategy based on bio-bar-code functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as labels holds promise to improve the sensitivity and detection limit of the detection of DNA hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphisms by flow injection chemiluminescence assays.

  17. A finite difference method for predicting supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows with tangential slot injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. W.; Lewis, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    An implicit finite difference method has been applied to tangential slot injection into supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows. In addition, the effects induced by the interaction between the boundary layer displacement thickness and the external pressure field are considered. In the present method, three different eddy viscosity models have been used to specify the turbulent momentum exchange. One model depends on the species concentration profile and the species conservation equation has been included in the system of governing partial differential equations. Results are compared with experimental data at stream Mach numbers of 2.4 and 6.0 and with results of another finite difference method. Good agreement was generally obtained for the reduction of wall skin friction with slot injection and with experimental Mach number and pitot pressure profiles. Calculations with the effects of pressure interaction included showed these effects to be smaller than effects of changing eddy viscosity models.

  18. Determination of Hypochlorite in Bleaching Products with Flower Extracts to Demonstrate the Principles of Flow Injection Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Luiz Antonio; Prieto, Katia Roberta; Carvalheiro, Eder Tadeu Gomes; Carvalheiro, Carla Cristina Schmitt

    2005-01-01

    The use of crude flower extracts to the principle of analytical chemistry automation, with the flow injection analysis (FIA) procedure developed to determine hypochlorite in household bleaching products was performed. The FIA comprises a group of techniques based on injection of a liquid sample into a moving, nonsegmented carrier stream of a…

  19. Determination of Hypochlorite in Bleaching Products with Flower Extracts to Demonstrate the Principles of Flow Injection Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Luiz Antonio; Prieto, Katia Roberta; Carvalheiro, Eder Tadeu Gomes; Carvalheiro, Carla Cristina Schmitt

    2005-01-01

    The use of crude flower extracts to the principle of analytical chemistry automation, with the flow injection analysis (FIA) procedure developed to determine hypochlorite in household bleaching products was performed. The FIA comprises a group of techniques based on injection of a liquid sample into a moving, nonsegmented carrier stream of a…

  20. Droplet-based microfluidic flow injection system with large-scale concentration gradient by a single nanoliter-scale injection for enzyme inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Cai, Long-Fei; Zhu, Ying; Du, Guan-Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2012-01-03

    We described a microfluidic chip-based system capable of generating droplet array with a large scale concentration gradient by coupling flow injection gradient technique with droplet-based microfluidics. Multiple modules including sample injection, sample dispersion, gradient generation, droplet formation, mixing of sample and reagents, and online reaction within the droplets were integrated into the microchip. In the system, nanoliter-scale sample solution was automatically injected into the chip under valveless flow injection analysis mode. The sample zone was first dispersed in the microchannel to form a concentration gradient along the axial direction of the microchannel and then segmented into a linear array of droplets by immiscible oil phase. With the segmentation and protection of the oil phase, the concentration gradient profile of the sample was preserved in the droplet array with high fidelity. With a single injection of 16 nL of sample solution, an array of droplets with concentration gradient spanning 3-4 orders of magnitude could be generated. The present system was applied in the enzyme inhibition assay of β-galactosidase to preliminarily demonstrate its potential in high throughput drug screening. With a single injection of 16 nL of inhibitor solution, more than 240 in-droplet enzyme inhibition reactions with different inhibitor concentrations could be performed with an analysis time of 2.5 min. Compared with multiwell plate-based screening systems, the inhibitor consumption was reduced 1000-fold.

  1. Flow, spray and combustion analysis by laser techniques in the combustion chamber of a direct-injection diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, W.; Schindler, K.-P.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the analysis of in -cylinder flow, fuel injection, and combustion by means of state-of-the-art optical techniques, as laser light-sheet, laser doppler anemometry and laser shadowgraphy, can help to support the understanding of the interaction of swirl flow development, spray formation, auto-ignition and combustion in near production-line direct-injection diesel engines and thus advances the development of engines with lower fuel consumption and emissions.

  2. A biological tool to assess flow connectivity in reference temporary streams from the Mediterranean Basin.

    PubMed

    Cid, N; Verkaik, I; García-Roger, E M; Rieradevall, M; Bonada, N; Sánchez-Montoya, M M; Gómez, R; Suárez, M L; Vidal-Abarca, M R; Demartini, D; Buffagni, A; Erba, S; Karaouzas, I; Skoulikidis, N; Prat, N

    2016-01-01

    Many streams in the Mediterranean Basin have temporary flow regimes. While timing for seasonal drought is predictable, they undergo strong inter-annual variability in flow intensity. This high hydrological variability and associated ecological responses challenge the ecological status assessment of temporary streams, particularly when setting reference conditions. This study examined the effects of flow connectivity in aquatic macroinvertebrates from seven reference temporary streams across the Mediterranean Basin where hydrological variability and flow conditions are well studied. We tested for the effect of flow cessation on two streamflow indices and on community composition, and, by performing random forest and classification tree analyses we identified important biological predictors for classifying the aquatic state either as flowing or disconnected pools. Flow cessation was critical for one of the streamflow indices studied and for community composition. Macroinvertebrate families found to be important for classifying the aquatic state were Hydrophilidae, Simuliidae, Hydropsychidae, Planorbiidae, Heptageniidae and Gerridae. For biological traits, trait categories associated to feeding habits, food, locomotion and substrate relation were the most important and provided more accurate predictions compared to taxonomy. A combination of selected metrics and associated thresholds based on the most important biological predictors (i.e. Bio-AS Tool) were proposed in order to assess the aquatic state in reference temporary streams, especially in the absence of hydrological data. Although further development is needed, the tool can be of particular interest for monitoring, restoration, and conservation purposes, representing an important step towards an adequate management of temporary rivers not only in the Mediterranean Basin but also in other regions vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Simple flow injection colorimetric system for determination of paraquat in natural water.

    PubMed

    Chuntib, Prakit; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2015-11-01

    A simple and low cost flow injection colorimetric system has been developed for determination of paraquat in natural water. The developed method is based on the reduction of paraquat by using sodium dithionite as a reducing agent in an alkaline medium to produce a blue free radical ion that can be detected by a simple light emitting diode-light dependent resistor (LED-LDR) colorimeter. The standard or sample solution was injected via a set of 3-way solenoid valves into a water carrier stream and flowed to merge with reagent to generate a colored product which is proportional to the concentration of paraquat ion in the solution. Under the optimum condition of the system, i.e., mixing coil length 30 cm, flow rate 2.0 mL min(-1), sample volume 100 μL, concentrations of dithionite 0.1% (w/v) and sodium hydroxide 0.06 mol L(-1), a linear calibration graph in the range of 0.2-10.0 mg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996, and a limit of detection of 0.15 mg L(-1) were achieved. Relative standard deviation for 9 replicate injections of 1 mg L(-1) paraquat is 3.7%. A sample throughput of 40 injections h(-1) was achieved. The limit of detection can be improved by off-line preconcentration of paraquat employing a column packed with Dowex 50WX8-100 (H) cation exchange resin and eluted with 10% (w/v) ammonium chloride in ammonium buffer solution pH 10. The eluting solution was then injected into the FI system for paraquat determination. The proposed system did not suffer from interferences of some possible ions in natural water and other herbicides. Recoveries obtained by spiking 0.5 and 5.0 mg L(-1) paraquat standard into water samples were in the range of 104-110% and 101-105%, respectively. The developed system can be conveniently applied for screening of paraquat contaminated in natural water.

  4. Generation of electromagnetic emission during the injection of dense supersonic plasma flows into arched magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, Dmitry; Golubev, Sergey; Viktorov, Mikhail; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Yushkov, George

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of dense supersonic plasma flows with an inhomogeneous arched magnetic field is one of the key problems in near-Earth and space plasma physics. In this work a new experimental approach is suggested to study interaction of supersonic (ion Mach number up to 2.7) dense (up to 1015cm-3) plasma flows with inhomogeneous magnetic field (an arched magnetic trap with a field strength up to 3.3 T) which opens wide opportunities to model space plasma processes in laboratory conditions. Fully ionized plasma flows with density from 1013cm-3 to 1015cm-3 are created by plasma generator on the basis of pulsed vacuum arc discharge and injected into open magnetic trap across magnetic field lines. The filling of the arched magnetic trap with plasma and further magnetic field lines break by dense plasma flow was accompanied by pulsed electromagnetic emission at electron cyclotron frequency range, which can generated by electrons in the place of intensive deceleration of plasma flow in magnetic field. Grant of Ministry of Education 14.Z50.31.0007.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of a Cavitating Multiphase Flow for Liquid Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailloux, M.; Helie, J.; Reveillon, J.; Demoulin, F. X.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical method for modelling a compressible multiphase flow that involves phase transition between liquid and vapour in the context of gasoline injection. A discontinuous compressible two fluid mixture based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) implementation is employed to represent the phases of liquid, vapour and air. The mass transfer between phases is modelled by standard models such as Kunz or Schnerr-Sauer but including the presence of air in the gas phase. Turbulence is modelled using a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach to catch instationnarities and coherent structures. Eventually the modelling approach matches favourably experimental data concerning the effect of cavitation on atomisation process.

  6. The effect of wall suction/injection on MHD Marangoni convection boundary layer flow in nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Rohana Abdul; Arifin, Norihan Md.

    2014-07-01

    The problem of Marangoni-driven boundary layer flow over a permeable flat surface in an electrically conducting nanofluid is considered in the present paper. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are obtained using the shooting method. Three types of nanoparticles, namely copper (Cu), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) are considered by using a water-based fluid to investigate the effect of nanoparticle volume fraction parameter φ of the nanofluid. It is found that the wall suction or injection has the significant effect on the velocity and temperature profiles.

  7. Investigation of a chemiluminescent system for the determination of ammonia by flow-injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, P.R.; Crouch, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    A novel system for the determination of ammonia based on the chemiluminescent reaction between hypochlorite and luminol is presented. The technique of flow injection analysis was employed to automate the system. Ammonia reacts with hypochlorite to form monochloramine in basic solution which decreases the observed chemiluminescence intensity. Several interferents are identified, and the reasons why they interfere are discussed. The effects of interferents are minimized through the use of a double-tube dialyzer where the ammonia is diffused across the dialyzer membrane into a recipient stream of hydrochloric acid.

  8. Observation of plasma microwave emission during the injection of supersonic plasma flows into magnetic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, M. E.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Kiryuhin, N. D.; Golubev, S. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    The process of plasma deceleration during the injection of supersonic plasma flow across the magnetic field of an arched configuration is experimentally demonstrated. Pulsed plasma microwave emission in the electron cyclotron frequency range is observed. It is shown that the frequency spectrum of plasma emission is determined by the position of the deceleration region in the magnetic field of the magnetic arc, and its bandwidth is defined by the magnetic field inhomogeneity in the deceleration region. The observed emission can be related to the cyclotron mechanism of wave generation by non-equilibrium energetic electrons in the dense plasma.

  9. Flow injection analysis of mercury(II) in pharmaceuticals based on enzyme inhibition and biosensor detection.

    PubMed

    Bertocchi, P; Ciranni, E; Compagnone, D; Magearu, V; Palleschi, G; Pirvutoiu, S; Valvo, L

    1999-06-01

    An enzymatic amperometric procedure for measurement of mercury(II) in pharmaceuticals, based on the inhibition of invertase and on a glucose electrode was studied. Analytical parameters for measurements in batch and flow injection analysis (FIA) have been optimised. Mercury(II) was detected in the 10-60 ppb range with RSD < or =2%. A sample throughput of 6 h(-1) for batch and 15 h(-1) for FIA was obtained. The total mercury(II) from thimerosal (thiomersal, sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate) in eye-drop samples was measured with the amperometric procedure after oxidative cleavage treatment. Results for both batch and FIA procedures correlated well with atomic absorbtion spectroscopy (AAS) data.

  10. Trace determination of aqueous sulfite, sulfide, and methanethiol by fluorometric flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, P.K.; Yang, H.C.

    1986-11-01

    Preservation of sulfite, sulfide, and methanethiol in buffered formaldehyde and oxaldihydroxamic acid stabilizers has been studied. Flow injection analysis procedures that involve T mixing or membrane-based reagent introduction have been developed for the fast (24 samples/h) analysis of these anions based upon the reaction with N-acridinylmaleimide in a water-N,N-dimethylformamide medium to form a fluorescent product. Detection limits are 0.04, 0.60, and 0.80 ..mu..M, respectively, for the three sulfur species; differential analysis is possible.

  11. Determination of thallium in soils by flow-injection-differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Lukaszewski, Z; Zembrzuski, W

    1992-03-01

    A relatively simple and quick method for the determination of thallium in soils is described. The method does not require any separation prior to determination. Total decomposition of the sample was performed in a teflon bomb. The interferences of iron, aluminum and manganese were removed by media exchange performed in a flow-injection measuring system, and the other interferences were removed by the use of the base electrolyte consisting of 0.15M EDTA and 0.1M ascorbic acid. The contents of thallium in the examined samples of soil were between 100 and 350 ppb.

  12. Flow Control in a Transonic Diffuser through Mass and Vorticity Injection to Mitigate Massive Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, Jeremy

    generators, sweeping jets array, pulsed jets array, segmented jet, and 2-D steady and unsteady jets, which were placed at different streamwise locations relative to the separation point, and different throat widths in order to compare the effect of the momentum coefficient over the effect of the mass flow ratio. Note that the segmented jet and the 2-D jets were investigated under steady and unsteady injection with two different RMS values (low and high RMS). The highest pressure recovery achieved by the presence of the vortex generators was when they were erected into the flow at the height corresponding to the local boundary layer thickness (h/delta=1). The sweeping jets array achieved similar performance as the pulsed jets arrays. Moreover, they outperformed the 2-D jets, located at the same streamwise location, both in pressure recovery and in symmetry of the flow. The 2-D jet and the segmented jet located closer to the separation point (at x/L=0.25) resulted in a more efficient flow reattachment, resulting in a higher pressure recovery than for the 2-D jets located at the beginning of the ramp. Also, the effect of mass flow ratio and momentum coefficient was investigated, leading to the conclusion that both parameters are necessary to compare the effectiveness of flow control actuators. Furthermore, the 2-D jets and the segmented jet were investigated under two unsteady conditions--with a low RMS unsteady injection and a high RMS unsteady injection. Independently to the actuator, the steady jet consistently resulted in a slightly asymmetric flow field. Also, the low RMS unsteady jet performed slightly better than the steady jet, whereas the high RMS outperformed significantly the steady jet and the low RMS unsteady jet, independently to its actuation frequency. Moreover, the performances of the high RMS unsteady jet were consistently higher at an actuation frequency of 200 Hz, which corresponds to the shedding frequency of the separated flow. In addition, it was found

  13. Flow injection analysis of trace chromium (VI) in drinking water with a liquid waveguide capillary cell and spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Yuan, Dongxing; Byrne, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is an acknowledged hazardous material in drinking waters. As such, effective monitoring and assessment of the risks posed by Cr(VI) are important analytical objectives for both human health and environmental science. However, because of the lack of highly sensitive, rapid, and simple procedures, a relatively limited number of studies have been carried out in this field. Here we report a simple and sensitive analytical procedure of flow injection analysis (FIA) for sub-nanomolar Cr(VI) in drinking water samples with a liquid core waveguide capillary cell (LWCC). The procedure is based on a highly selective reaction between 1, 5-diphenylcarbazide and Cr(VI) under acidic conditions. The optimized experimental parameters included reagent concentrations, injection volume, length of mixing coil, and flow rate. Measurements at 540 nm, and a 650-nm reference wavelength, produced a 0.12-nM detection limit. Relative standard deviations for 1, 2, and 10 nM samples were 5.6, 3.6, and 0.72 % (n = 9), and the analysis time was <2 min sample(-1). The effects of salinity and interfering ions, especially Fe(III), were evaluated. Using the FIA-LWCC method, different sources of bottled waters and tap waters were examined. The Cr(VI) concentrations of the bottled waters ranged from the detection limit to ∼20 nM, and tap waters collected from the same community supply had Cr(VI) concentration around 14 nM.

  14. Direct μ-flow injection isotope dilution ICP-MS for the determination of heavy metals in oil samples.

    PubMed

    Bettmer, Jörg; Heilmann, Jens; Kutscher, Daniel J; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Heumann, Klaus G

    2012-01-01

    The determination of trace elements in oil samples and their products is of high interest as their presence significantly affects refinery processes and the environment by possible impact of their combustion products. In this context, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) plays an important role due to its outstanding analytical properties in the quantification of trace elements. In this work, we present the accurate and precise determination of selected heavy metals in oil samples by making use of the combination of μ-flow direct injection and isotope dilution ICP-MS (ICP-IDMS). Spike solutions of (62)Ni, (97)Mo, (117)Sn and (206)Pb were prepared in an organic solvent, mixed directly with the diluted oil samples and tested to be fit for purpose for the intended ID approach. The analysis of real samples revealed strong matrix effects affecting the ICP-MS sensitivity, but not the isotope ratio measurements, so that accurate results are obtained by ICP-IDMS. Typical relative standard deviations were about 15% for peak area and peak height measurements, whereas the isotope ratios were not significantly affected (RSD < 2%). The developed method was validated by the analysis of a metallo-organic multi-element standard (SCP-21, typically applied as a calibration standard) and the standard reference material SRM1084a (wear metals in lubricating oil). The obtained results were in excellent agreement with the certified values (recoveries between 98% and 102%), so the proposed methodology of combining μ-flow direct injection and ICP-IDMS can be regarded as a new tool for the matrix-independent, multi-element and reliable determination of trace elements in oil and related organic liquids.

  15. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles.

    PubMed

    Reges, José E O; Salazar, A O; Maitelli, Carla W S P; Carvalho, Lucas G; Britto, Ursula J B

    2016-07-13

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved.

  16. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Reges, José E. O.; Salazar, A. O.; Maitelli, Carla W. S. P.; Carvalho, Lucas G.; Britto, Ursula J. B.

    2016-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved. PMID:27420068

  17. Flow-injection determination of amine contaminants in cyclamate samples based on temperature for controlling selectivity.

    PubMed

    Saurina, Javier; Hlabangana, Leah; Garcia-Milla, Daniel; Hernandez-Cassou, Santiago

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a flow-injection (FI) method for the simultaneous determination of aniline and cyclohexylamine impurities in cyclamate products. The method consists of the derivatization of amines with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonate under selective and non-selective conditions. Here, the selectivity is achieved by working at 20 degree C, at which only aniline reacts, whilst higher temperatures (80 degree C) lead to a non-selective reaction of the two analytes. The FI manifold is composed of two flow cells for the spectrophotometric detection of derivatives at 480 nm. Experimental conditions have been optimized by factorial design and multicriteria making approach. Quantification is accomplished by differential analysis of the analyte contributions in the double peaks generated when the sample reaches cell 1 and cell 2. Results obtained with the proposed method are in satisfactory agreement with those provided by the standard method for the analysis of cyclamate samples.

  18. Selective chlorine dioxide determination using gas-diffusion flow injection analysis with chemiluminescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, D.A.; Gord, J.R.; Gordon, G.; Pacey, G.E.

    1986-06-01

    An automated chemiluminescent technique has been developed utilizing the advantages of gas-diffusion flow injection analysis. A gas-diffusion membrane separates the donor (sampling) stream from the acceptor (detecting) stream and removes ionic interferences. A novel chemiluminescence flow-through detector cell is used to measure the concentration of chlorine dioxide as a function of the intensity of the chemiluminescence produced from its reaction with luminol. The chemiluminescent reagent merges with the analyte directly in front of the photomultiplier tube in order to maximize the sensitivity of the system. The detection limit for chlorine dioxide is approximately 5 ppb. The method is over 1500 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than for chlorine on a mole basis. This method eliminates interference from iron and manganese compounds, as well as other oxychlorinated compounds such as chlorite ion and chlorate ion.

  19. Flow injection analysis of iron in rain water with thiocyanate and surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, A. N.; ehikhalikar, S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper explains a new procedure for flow injection analysis (FIA) determination of iron in rain water based on the colour reaction of Fe3+ with thiocyanate ions in the presence of the cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). The value of apparent molar absorptivity of the complex in terms of iron is (2.00) x 104 l mole-1 cm-1 at an absorption maximum of 490 nm. The detection limit of the method is 8 ppb Fe. The sample throughput is 90 samples/h at a flow rate of 4.0 ml/min. The reaction mechanism, optimization of FIA variables, and effect of various types of surfactant are described. None of the tested anions and cations interfered with the determination of iron. The method was used for the quantification and flux determination of iron in rain water. PMID:18924794

  20. Miniaturised free flow isotachophoresis of bacteria using an injection moulded separation device.

    PubMed

    Prest, Jeff E; Baldock, Sara J; Fielden, Peter R; Goddard, Nicholas J; Goodacre, Royston; O'Connor, Richard; Treves Brown, Bernard J

    2012-08-15

    A new design of miniaturised free flow electrophoresis device has been produced. The design contains a separation chamber that is 45 mm long by 31.7 mm wide with a depth of 50 μm and has nine inlet and nine outlet holes to allow for fraction collection. The devices were formed of polystyrene with carbon fibre loaded polystyrene drive electrodes and produced using injection moulding. This means that the devices are low cost and can potentially be mass produced. The devices were used for free flow isotachophoresis (FFITP), a technique that can be used for focussing and concentrating analytes contained within complex sample matrices. The operation of the devices was demonstrated by performing separations of dyes and bacterial samples. Analysis of the output from FFITP separations of samples containing the bacterium Erwinia herbicola, a biological pathogen, by cell culturing and counting showed that fractionation of the output was achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of cyanide by a flow injection analysis-atomic absorption spectrometric method.

    PubMed

    López Gómez, A V; Martínez Calatayud, J

    1998-10-01

    A new flow injection analysis (FIA) procedure is proposed for the indirect atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cyanide. The FIA manifold is based on the insertion of the sample into a distilled water carrier, then the sample flows through a solid-phase reactor filled with silver iodide entrapped in polymeric resin beads. The calibration graph is linear over the range 0.2-6.0 mg l-1 of cyanide (correlation coefficient 0.9974), the detection limit is 0.1 mg l-1, the sample throughput is 193 h-1 and the RSD is 0.8%. The method is simple, quick and more selective than other published FIA procedures. The reproducibility obtained by using different solid-phase reactors and solutions is in the range 2.2-3.1% (RSD). The method was applied to the determination of cyanide in commercial samples such as pharmaceutical formulations and industrial electrolytic baths.

  2. [Determination of phenobarbital in human urine and serum using flow injection chemiluminescence].

    PubMed

    Li, X; Niu, L C; He, X L; Song, Z H

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive chemiluminescence method, based on the enhancive effect of phenobarbital on the chemiluminescence reaction between luminol and dissolved oxygen in a flow injection system, was proposed for the determination of phenobarbital. The chemiluminescence intensity responded to the concentration of phenobarbital linearly ranging from 0.05 to 10 ng x ml(-1) with the detection limit of 0.02 ng x ml(-1) (3 sigma). At a flow rate of 2.0 ml x min(-1), a complete determination of phenobarbital, including sampling and washing, could be accomplished in 0.5 min, offering the sampling efficiency of 120 h(-1) accordingly. The method was applied successfully in an assay of PB for pharmaceutical preparations, human urine and serum without any pretreatment with recovery from 95.7 to 106.7% and RSDs of less than 3.0%.

  3. The influence of boundary layers on supersonic inlet flow unstart induced by mass injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Hyungrok; Im, Seong-Kyun; Mungal, M. Godfrey; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2011-09-01

    A transverse jet is injected into a supersonic model inlet flow to induce unstart. Planar laser Rayleigh scattering from condensed CO2 particles is used to visualize flow dynamics during the unstart process, while in some cases, wall pressure traces are simultaneously recorded. Studies conducted over a range of inlet configurations reveal that the presence of turbulent wall boundary layers strongly affect the unstart dynamics. It is found that relatively thick turbulent boundary layers in asymmetric wall boundary layer conditions prompt the formation of unstart shocks; in symmetric boundary conditions lead to the propagation of pseudo-shocks; and in both cases facilitate fast inlet unstart, when compared with thin, laminar boundary layers. Incident shockwaves and associated reflections are found to affect the speed of pressure disturbances. These disturbances, which induce boundary layer separation, are found to precede the formation of unstart shocks. The results confirm the importance of and need to better understand shock-boundary layer interactions in inlet unstart dynamics.

  4. Plasma heating, electric fields and plasma flow by electron beam ionospheric injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.

    1990-01-01

    The electric fields and the floating potentials of a Plasma Diagnostics Payload (PDP) located near a powerful electron beam injected from a large sounding rocket into the auroral zone ionosphere have been studied. As the PDP drifted away from the beam laterally, it surveyed a region of hot plasma extending nearly to 60 m radius. Large polarization electric fields transverse to B were imbedded in this hot plasma, which displayed large ELF wave variations and also an average pattern which has led to a model of the plasma flow about the negative line potential of the beam resembling a hydrodynamic vortex in a uniform flow field. Most of the present results are derived from the ECHO 6 sounding rocket mission.

  5. LDA measurements in a Mach 2 flow over a rearward facing step with staged transverse injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.-A.; Dancey, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the mean velocity field and selected turbulence statistics have been obtained via 2D LDA in a Mach 2 flow over a rearward facing step with downstream transverse injection. Axial mean velocity profiles, profiles of the axial and normal RMS levels, and the correlation coefficient between the axial and normal fluctuating components are presented for locations upstream of the step. These data, through comparison with other reported measurements in zero pressure gradient compressible boundary layers indicate that the boundary layers upstream of the step are consistent with 'quasi-equilibrium' turbulent boundary layers with the adiabatic wall boundary condition. Mean velocity field measurements on the symmetry plane of the tunnel are compared to laser induced iodine fluorescence measurements reported in the literature and obtained in the same facility. This comparison demonstrates the quality of the present LDA data set and shows that particle lag is not significant in the LDA measurements despite the complex nature of the downstream flow.

  6. Reference values for ductus venosus Doppler flow measurements at 10-14 weeks of gestation.

    PubMed

    Prefumo, F; Risso, D; Venturini, P L; De Biasio, P

    2002-07-01

    To calculate reference ranges for ductus venosus Doppler measurements obtained transabdominally at 10-14 weeks of gestation. Two hundred and one normal fetuses with a crown-rump length (CRL) ranging from 38 to 88 mm were examined in a cross-sectional study. The pulsatility index for veins (PIV), peak velocity during ventricular systole (S-wave), lowest forward velocity during atrial contraction (A-wave) and time-averaged maximum velocity (TAMXV) were recorded from the ductus venosus. Flow velocity waveforms were also classified as normal or abnormal according to the presence (normal) or absence or reversal (abnormal) of frequencies during atrial contraction. Three of 201 fetuses showed an abnormal flow pattern (1.5%; 95% exact confidence interval, 0.3-4.3%). In the 198 fetuses with a normal flow pattern, the mean PIV ranged from 1.07 at a CRL of 38 mm to 1.00 at a CRL of 88 mm (r = -0.093; P = 0.19). A significant increase in mean blood flow velocity with increasing CRL was noted for the S-wave (27.0 cm/s to 33.6 cm/s; r = 0.17; P = 0.02), the A-wave (5.9 cm/s to 7.8 cm/s; r = 0.14; P = 0.04) and the TAMXV (19.4 cm/s to 25.3 cm/s; r = 0.19; P < 0.01). Crown-rump length-specific reference ranges for each parameter were calculated using the method of scaled absolute residuals. Abnormal ductus venosus flow patterns could be observed in normal fetuses, even if they ocurred with a low prevalence. Reference values for Doppler measurements were established in fetuses with normal patterns of flow.

  7. Effect of Trailing Edge Flow Injection on Fan Noise and Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation using trailing edge blowing for reducing fan rotor/guide vane wake interaction noise was completed in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Data were acquired to measure noise, aerodynamic performance, and flow features for a 22" tip diameter fan representative of modern turbofan technology. The fan was designed to use trailing edge blowing to reduce the fan blade wake momentum deficit. The test objective was to quantify noise reductions, measure impacts on fan aerodynamic performance, and document the flow field using hot-film anemometry. Measurements concentrated on approach, cutback, and takeoff rotational speeds as those are the primary conditions of acoustic interest. Data are presented for a 2% (relative to overall fan flow) trailing edge injection rate and show a 2 dB reduction in Overall Sound Power Level (OAPWL) at all fan test speeds. The reduction in broadband noise is nearly constant and is approximately 1.5 dB up to 20 kHz at all fan speeds. Measurements of tone noise show significant variation, as evidenced by reductions of up to 6 dB in the 2 BPF tone at 6700 rpm.: and increases of nearly 2 dB for the 4 BPF tone at approach speed. Aerodynamic performance measurements show the fan with 2 % injection has an overall efficiency that is comparable to the baseline fan and operates, as intended, with nearly the same pressure ratio and mass flow parameters. Hot-film measurements obtained at the approach operating condition indicate that mean blade wake filling in the tip region was not as significant as expected. This suggests that additional acoustic benefits could be realized if the trailing edge blowing could be modified to provide better filling of the wake momentum deficit. Nevertheless, the hot-film measurements indicate that the trailing edge blowing provided significant reductions in blade wake turbulence. Overall, these results indicate that further work may be required to fully understand the proper

  8. Flow injection potentiometric system for the simultaneous determination of inositol phosphates and phosphate: phosphorus nutritional evaluation on seeds and grains.

    PubMed

    Parra, Aleix; Ramon, Meritxell; Alonso, Julián; Lemos, Sherlan G; Vieira, Edivan C; Nogueira, Ana R A

    2005-10-05

    A simple flow injection potentiometric (FIP) system, which uses a tubular cobalt electrode, has been developed for phosphorus nutritional evaluation of seeds and grains. Inorganic phosphorus, P(i), is determined using a 1 x 10(-2) mol.L(-1) potassium phthalate buffer solution adjusted at pH 4. A sensitivity of 47 mV/decade and an operating range from 10 to 1000 mg.L(-1) (1 x 10(-4)-1 x 10(-2) M) of dihydrogen phosphate are obtained. The inositol phosphates amount, which is referred to the organic phosphorus, P(org), is directly determined from extracts using a 1 x 10(-2) mol.L(-1) Tris-HCl buffer solution adjusted at pH 8. A sensitivity of 127 mV/decade and an operating range of 10-1000 mg.L(-1) (2.5 x 10(-4)-5 x 10(-3) M) of P(org) (expressed as inositol hexakisphosphoric acid monocalcium) are achieved. Some samples of seed and grain are analyzed by an ICP-OES and a spectrophotometric method to compare results to the developed flow system; no significant differences at the 95% confidence level are observed using a paired t test. Other samples such as animal nursing feed, soybean meal, and corn are also analyzed with the proposed FIP system, showing a good correlation to the ICP-OES values.

  9. Flow injection on-line solid phase extraction for ultra-trace lead screening with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhuo; Xu, Zhangrun; Wang, Jianhua

    2006-01-01

    A flow injection (FI) on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure for ultra-trace lead separation and preconcentration was developed, followed by hydride generation and atomic fluorescence spectrometric (AFS) detection. Lead is retained on an iminodiacetate chelating resin packed microcolumn, and is afterward eluted with 2.5% (v/v) hydrochloric acid to facilitate the hydride generation by reaction with alkaline tetrahydroborate solution with 1% (m/v) potassium ferricyanide as an oxidizing (or sensitizing) reagent. The hydride was separated from the reaction medium in the gas-liquid separator and swept into the atomizer for quantification. The chemical variables and the FI flow parameters were carefully optimized. With a sample loading volume of 4.8 ml, quantitative retention of lead was obtained, along with an enrichment factor of 11.3 and a sampling frequency of 50 h(-1). A detection limit of 4 ng l(-1), defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 sigma), was achieved along with a RSD value of 1.6% at the 0.4 microg l(-1) level. The procedure was validated by determining lead contents in two certified reference materials, and its practical applicability was further demonstrated by analysing a variety of biological and environmental samples.

  10. Effects of GC temperature and carrier gas flow rate on on-line oxygen isotope measurement as studied by on-column CO injection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Yin, Xi-Jie; Zhou, Youping

    2015-08-01

    Although deemed important to δ(18) O measurement by on-line high-temperature conversion techniques, how the GC conditions affect δ(18) O measurement is rarely examined adequately. We therefore directly injected different volumes of CO or CO-N2 mix onto the GC column by a six-port valve and examined the CO yield, CO peak shape, CO-N2 separation, and δ(18) O value under different GC temperatures and carrier gas flow rates. The results show the CO peak area decreases when the carrier gas flow rate increases. The GC temperature has no effect on peak area. The peak width increases with the increase of CO injection volume but decreases with the increase of GC temperature and carrier gas flow rate. The peak intensity increases with the increase of GC temperature and CO injection volume but decreases with the increase of carrier gas flow rate. The peak separation time between N2 and CO decreases with an increase of GC temperature and carrier gas flow rate. δ(18) O value decreases with the increase of CO injection volume (when half m/z 28 intensity is <3 V) and GC temperature but is insensitive to carrier gas flow rate. On average, the δ(18) O value of the injected CO is about 1‰ higher than that of identical reference CO. The δ(18) O distribution pattern of the injected CO is probably a combined result of ion source nonlinearity and preferential loss of C(16) O or oxygen isotopic exchange between zeolite and CO. For practical application, a lower carrier gas flow rate is therefore recommended as it has the combined advantages of higher CO yield, better N2 -CO separation, lower He consumption, and insignificant effect on δ(18) O value, while a higher-than-60 °C GC temperature and a larger-than-100 µl CO volume is also recommended. When no N2 peak is expected, a higher GC temperature is recommended, and vice versa. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Lung function in North American Indian children: reference standards for spirometry, maximal expiratory flow volume curves, and peak expiratory flow.

    PubMed

    Wall, M A; Olson, D; Bonn, B A; Creelman, T; Buist, A S

    1982-02-01

    Reference standards of lung function was determined in 176 healthy North American Indian children (94 girls, 82 boys) 7 to 18 yr of age. Spirometry, maximal expiratory flow volume curves, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured using techniques and equipment recommended by the American Thoracic Society. Standing height was found to be an accurate predictor of lung function, and prediction equations for each lung function variable are presented using standing height as the independent variable. Lung volumes and expiratory flow rates in North American Indian children were similar to those previously reported for white and Mexican-American children but were greater than those in black children. In both boys and girls, lung function increased in a curvilinear fashion. Volume-adjusted maximal expiratory flow rates after expiring 50 or 75% of FVC tended to decrease in both sexes as age and height increased. Our maximal expiratory flow volume curve data suggest that as North American Indian children grow, lung volume increases at a slightly faster rate than airway size does.

  12. Generation of electromagnetic emission during the injection of dense supersonic plasma flows into arched magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Mansfeld, Dmitry; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Interaction of dense supersonic plasma flows with an inhomogeneous arched magnetic field is one of the key problems in near-Earth and space plasma physics. It can influence on the energetic electron population formation in magnetosphere of the Earth, movement of plasma flows in magnetospheres of planets, energy release during magnetic reconnection, generation of electromagnetic radiation and particle precipitation during solar flares eruption. Laboratory study of this interaction is of big interest to determine the physical mechanisms of processes in space plasmas and their detailed investigation under reproducible conditions. In this work a new experimental approach is suggested to study interaction of supersonic (ion Mach number up to 2.7) dense (up to 1015 cm-3) plasma flows with inhomogeneous magnetic field (an arched magnetic trap with a field strength up to 3.3 T) which opens wide opportunities to model space plasma processes in laboratory conditions. Fully ionized plasma flows with density from 1013 cm-3 to 1015 cm-3 are created by plasma generator on the basis of pulsed vacuum arc discharge. Then plasma is injected in an arched open magnetic trap along or across magnetic field lines. The filling of the arched magnetic trap with dense plasma and further magnetic field lines break by dense plasma flow were experimentally demonstrated. The process of plasma deceleration during the injection of plasma flow across the magnetic field lines was experimentally demonstrated. Pulsed plasma microwave emission at the electron cyclotron frequency range was observed. It was shown that frequency spectrum of plasma emission is determined by position of deceleration region in the magnetic field of the magnetic arc, and is affected by plasma density. Frequency spectrum shifts to higher frequencies with increasing of arc current (plasma density) because the deceleration region of plasma flow moves into higher magnetic field. The observed emission can be related to the

  13. Flow injection analysis of ketoprofen based on the order transform second chemiluminescence reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yafeng; Cao, Guiping; Ge, Chuanqin

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores an order-transform-second-chemiluminescence (OTSCL) method combining the flow injection technique for the determination of ketoprofen. When ketoprofen solution was injected into the mixture after the end of the reaction of alkaline luminol and sodium periodate or sodium periodate solution was injected into the reaction mixture of ketoprofen and alkaline luminol, a new chemiluminescence (CL) reaction was initiated and strong CL signal was detected. A mechanism for the OTSCL has been proposed on the basis of the chemiluminescence kinetic characteristic, UV-visible absorption and chemiluminescent spectra. Under optimal experimental conditions, the CL response is proportional to the concentration of ketoprofen over the range of 2.0 × 10 -7 to 1.0 × 10 -5 mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9950 and a detection limit of 8.0 × 10 -9 mol/L (3 σ). The relative standard deviation for 11 repetitive determinations of 1.0 × 10 -6 mol/L ketoprofen is 2.9%. The utility of this method was demonstrated by determining ketoprofen in pharmaceutical formulations without interference from its potential impurities.

  14. Implementation and Characterization of Flow Injection in Dissolution DNP-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) offers a substantial signal increase for liquid state NMR. A challenge in realizing the possible gain lies in the transfer of the hyperpolarized sample to the NMR detector without loss of hyperpolarization. Here, we demonstrate that a flow injection method using high pressure liquid leads to improved performance compared to the more common gas driven injection, by suppressing residual fluid motions during the NMR experiment while still achieving short injection time. Apparent diffusion coefficients were determined from pulsed field gradient echo measurements, and were shown to fall below 1.5x the value of a static sample within 0.8 s. Due to the single-scan nature of D-DNP, pulsed field gradients are often the only choice for coherence selection or encoding, but their application requires stationary fluid. Sample delivery driven by a high-pressure liquid will improve the applicability of these types of advanced experiments in D-DNP. PMID:26139513

  15. A diffuse interface approach to injection-driven flow of different miscibility in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Yan, Pei-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Miscible and immiscible injection flows in heterogeneous porous media, for which the permeability is characterized by a log Gaussian distribution, are simulated by a robust diffuse-interface formulation. The robust numerical method enables direct qualitative and quantitative comparisons regarding pattern formations in various fluid miscibility conditions. For miscible injections, the typical size of fingering structures depends strongly on the correlation length and forms tapered fingers with sharper tips. On the other hand, the typical size of immiscible fingers is affected less significantly by the permeability heterogeneity, and wide spreading tips are retained in the fingering patterns. Prominence of fingering instability is quantitatively evaluated by the channeling width and the interfacial length. The channeling width shows strong and monotonic dependences on the heterogeneous variance. On the contrary, maximum channeling width occurs at intermediate correlation length due to local resonant effect between the faster penetrating fingers and permeability heterogeneity. On the other hand, effects of the correlation length and the permeability variance on the interfacial lengths are generally consistent. Longer interfacial length is perturbed by smaller correlation length or higher variance. Interesting invariant evolutions of interfacial lengths are revealed regardless of the permeability variance in sufficiently large correlation length under all miscibility conditions. In addition, the regime of slower growth of interfacial length at later times experimentally observed in homogeneous miscible injection is verified in heterogeneous porous media as well.

  16. Re-evaluation of a subsurface injection experiment for testing flow and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Engelman, R.E.; Pearson, A.L.; Murray, C.J.; Smoot, J.L. Lu, A.H.; Randall, P.R.; Wegener, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    The current preferred method for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site is to vitrify the wastes so they can be stored in a near-surface, shallow-land burial facility (Shord 1995). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) managed the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a disposal facility for the vitrified LLW. Vadose zone flow and transport models are recognized as necessary tools for baseline risk assessments of stored waste forms. The objective of the Controlled Field Testing task of the PVTD Project is to perform and analyze field experiments to demonstrate the appropriateness of conceptual models for the performance assessment. The most convincing way to demonstrate appropriateness is to show that the model can reproduce the movement of water and contaminants in the field. Before expensive new experiments are initiated, an injection experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in 1980 (designated the ``Sisson and the Lu experiment``) should be completely analyzed and understood. Briefly, in that test, a solution containing multiple tracers was injected at a single point into the subsurface sediments. The resulting spread of the water and tracers was monitored in wells surrounding the injection point. Given the advances in knowledge, computational capabilities, and models over the last 15 years, it is important to re-analyze the data before proceeding to other experiments and history-matching exercises.

  17. Flow injection analysis of picric acid explosive using a copper electrode as electrochemical detector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, João R C; de Araujo, William R; Salles, Maiara O; Paixão, Thiago R L C

    2013-01-30

    A simple and fast electrochemical method for quantitative analysis of picric acid explosive (nitro-explosive) based on its electrochemical reduction at copper surfaces is reported. To achieve a higher sample throughput, the electrochemical sensor was adapted in a flow injection system. Under optimal experimental conditions, the peak current response increases linearly with picric acid concentration over the range of 20-300 μmol L(-1). The repeatability of the electrode response in the flow injection analysis (FIA) configuration was evaluated as 3% (n=10), and the detection limit of the method was estimated to be 6.0 μmol L(-1) (S/N=3). The sample throughput under optimised conditions was estimated to be 550 samples h(-1). Peroxide explosives like triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) were tested as potential interfering substances for the proposed method, and no significant interference by these explosives was noticed. The proposed method has interesting analytical parameters, environmental applications, and low cost compared with other electroanalytical methods that have been reported for the quantification of picric acid. Additionally, the possibility to develop an in situ device for the detection of picric acid using a disposable sensor was evaluated. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of chloride in waters using a multisyringe flow injection system.

    PubMed

    Maya, Fernando; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2008-02-15

    A multisyringe flow injection system (MSFIA) with spectrophotometric detection is proposed as a fast, robust and low-reagent consumption system for the determination of chloride (Cl(-)) in waters. The system is based in the classic reaction of Cl(-) with Fe(3+) and Hg(SCN)(2), but due to the hazardous properties of this last reagent, the proposed methodology has been developed with the aim to minimize the consumption of this one, consuming less than 0.05 mg of Hg for a Cl(-) determination, being the system of this type with the lowest Hg consumption. The linear working range was between 1 and 40 mg L(-1) Cl(-) and the detection limit was 0.2 mg L(-1) Cl(-). The repeatability (RSD) was 0.8% for a 10 mg L(-1) Cl(-) solution, and the injection throughput was 130 h(-1). The proposed system is compared with other chloride monitoring flow systems, this comparison is realized with a point of view of the equilibrium between the obtained analytical features and produced residues toxicity. The proposed system was applied to the determination of Cl(-) in mineral, tap and well water.

  19. Direct-injection chemiluminescence detector. Properties and potential applications in flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Koronkiewicz, Stanislawa; Kalinowski, Slawomir

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel chemiluminescence detector, with a cone-shaped detection chamber where the analytical reaction takes place. The sample and appropriate reagents are injected directly into the chamber in countercurrent using solenoid-operated pulse micro-pumps. The proposed detector allows for fast measurement of the chemiluminescence signal in stop-flow conditions from the moment of reagents mixing. To evaluate potential applications of the detector the Fenton-like reaction with a luminol-H2O2 system and several transition metal ions (Co(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+)) as a catalyst were investigated. The results demonstrate suitability of the proposed detector for quantitative analysis and for investigations of reaction kinetics, particularly rapid reactions. A multi-pumping flow system was designed and optimized. The developed methodology demonstrated that the shape of the analytical signals strongly depends on the type and concentration of the metal ions. The application of the detector in quantitative analysis was assessed for determination of Fe(III). The direct-injection chemiluminescence detector allows for a sensitive and repeatable (R.S.D. 2%) determination. The intensity of chemiluminescence increased linearly in the range from about 0.5 to 10 mg L(-1) Fe(III) with the detection limit of 0.025 mg L(-1). The time of analysis depended mainly on reaction kinetics. It is possible to achieve the high sampling rate of 144 samples per hour.

  20. Coupling microdialysis with flow-injection chemiluminescence detection for a protein-drug interaction study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Gong, Zhengjun; Zhang, Zhujun

    2006-06-16

    The interaction of metronidazole (MTZ) and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied using the coupling system of on-line microdialysis sampling with flow-injection chemiluminescence detection (FI-MD-CL). The interested drug and HSA were mixed in different molar ratios in 0.067 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and incubated at 37 degrees C in a water-bath. Then the microdialysis probe was put into the MTZ-HSA mixed solution and sampled at a perfusion rate of 5 microL min(-1). The microdialysates was determined using flow-injection chemiluminescence. In vitro recovery (R) of MTZ under experimental conditions was approximately 25.2% with a R.S.D. of about 3.2%. The values estimated for the binding constant (K) and the number of the binding sites (n) were found to be 1.50 x 10(3)L mol(-1) and 1.89, respectively. The values of nK obtained using Scatchard analysis and Klotz plot were found to be quite similar. The method provided a reliable and simple technique for the study of drug-protein interaction.

  1. Flow injection fluorescence immunoassay for gentamicin using sol-gel-derived mesoporous biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huang-Hao; Zhu, Qing-Zhi; Qu, Hui-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Lan; Ding, Ma-Tai; Xu, Jin-Gou

    2002-09-01

    Sol-gel-derived mesoporous biomaterials were used for the first time in the flow-injection fluorescence immunoassay system. Anti-gentamicin antibody was immobilized in a mesoporous sol-gel material using tetramethoxysilane as a precursor and poly(ethylene glycol) as a template. The sol-gel glass was used to develop an immunoaffinity column for the flow-injection immunoassay of gentamicin. Little unspecific adsorption of gentamicin on the sol-gel and no antibody leaching under harsh elution conditions were found. The immunoassay is based on the competition between gentamicin and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled gentamicin for a limited number of encapsulated antibody binding sites. NaOH solution of 5 x 10(-3)mol/L is used for the regeneration of encapsulated antibody binding sites after each measurement, which allows the immunoreactor to be used for up to 20 times without any loss of reactivity. Sample preconcentration is not needed and a single assay can be performed within 10 min. The calibration for gentamicin has a working range of 250-5000 ng/mL with a detection limit of 200 ng/mL, which is close to that of the fluorescence immunoassay and fluorescence polarization immunoassay using the same reactants. Comparison of the results from this method with that obtained from HPLC showed an excellent correlation.

  2. Non-extraction flow injection determination of cationic surfactants using eriochrome black-T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Hemmateenejad, B.; Barzegar, S.

    2009-09-01

    A new, rapid, sensitive, non-extraction batch, and flow injection spectrophotometric method for the determination of cationic surfactants (CSs) such as cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride (TBAC) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) is proposed. The method is based on the interaction of cationic surfactants with eriochrome black-T to form an ion-association complex. This complex has strong absorbance at 708 nm. The effects of chemical parameters and FIA variables on the determination of cationic surfactants were studied in detail, especially for CTAB. Under optimum conditions, the two linear calibration ranges of the method are 3.0 × 10 -6 to 5.0 × 10 -3 mol L -1 CTAB, CPB and DTAB for the batch spectrophotometric method and 2.0 × 10 -6 to 2.0 × 10 -4 mol L -1 CTAB, CPB and TBC for the flow injection spectrophotometric method. The sample throughput was 35 ± 5 samples h -1 at room temperature. The relative standard deviations for 10 replicates of analysis of (2.0, 0.6 and 0.2) × 10 -4 mol L -1 CTAB were 1.2, 1.3, and 0.8%, respectively. In addition, the influence of potential interfering substances on the determination of cationic surfactants was studied. The proposed method is simple and rapid, using no toxic organic solvents. It was applied to the determination of trace CS in industrial wastewater with satisfactory results.

  3. Flow injection method for the determination of silver concentration in drinking water for spacecrafts.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; Kobylinska, Dorota Korte; Franko, Mladen; Sarzanini, Corrado

    2010-04-14

    A flow injection method has been developed for determination of silver. The method is based on a reduction reaction with sodium borohydride which leads to the formation of a colloidal species which is monitored at a wavelength of 390 nm. The reaction variables flow rate, sodium borohydride concentration and pH, which affect sensitivity, were investigated and their effects were established using a two-levels, three-factor experimental design. Further optimization of manifold variables (reaction coil and injection volume) allowed us to determine silver in the range 0.050-5.0 mg L(-1) with a minimum detectable concentration of 0.050 mg L(-1). Silver is added, as biocide, to drinking water for spacecrafts. The chemical species of silver, present in this kind of sample, were characterized by a procedure based on the selective retention of Ag(+) onto a 2.2.2. cryptand based substrate followed by determination of the non-bound and bound (after elution) Ag(+) by the FIA method. The method optimized was applied to a drinking water sample provided for the launch with the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) module Jule Verne to the International Space Station (March 9, 2008).

  4. Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

    1988-10-04

    The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Influence of Mold Surface Treatments on Flow of Polymer in Injection Moulding. Application to Weldlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chailly, M.; Charmeau, J.-Y.; Bereaux, Y.; Monasse, B.

    2007-04-01

    Due to increasing expectations from the market, the aspect of molded parts has to be improved constantly. Some of the defects observed on these parts such as weldlines are related to the filling stage. To limit this, we investigated the influence on weldlines using various surface deposits on the mold surface, mainly PVD and PACVD deposits : Chromium nitride (CrN), Titanium nitride (TiN), Diamond like Carbon (DLC), Chromium and polished steel (PG) on an instrumented plate mold. Injection campaign was led on three polymers which differ in terms of nature (amorphous, semi-crystalline, copolymers). We studied the evolution of the dimensions of weldlines appearing on the plate using the same injection parameters for a given polymer, but with various deposits and thicknesses. Another aspect that had been investigated is the morphology of the weldline through the thickness of the part, depending on polymer nature. Adhesion of polymer at the flow front with the mold surface proved to change. The modification of the initial contact in the filling stage and thus the thermal resistance at the mold implied a change in the process, increasing or reducing the pressure loss in the flow and differential shrinkage in the final part. The induced impact on dimensions of the weldlines allowed to distinguish which surface treatments were able to reduce the defect. A complementary study was led on both polymers in molten state and deposits in terms of wetting using a sessile drop method to confirm the adhesion at the polymer/mold interface. This study proved the influence of the use of surface treatments has clearly an impact on the filling stage of the injection molding process, and it is necessary to get a better knowledge of the interactions between physical adhesion, tribology of polymer/mold contact, and thermal properties of the coatings and their impact on solidification of the polymer.

  6. High-throughput nanoliter sample introduction microfluidic chip-based flow injection analysis system with gravity-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Bin; Fang, Qun; He, Qiao-Hong; Fang, Zhao-Lun

    2005-03-01

    In this work, a simple, robust, and automated microfluidic chip-based FIA system with gravity-driven flows and liquid-core waveguide (LCW) spectrometric detection was developed. The high-throughput sample introduction system was composed of a capillary sampling probe and an array of horizontally positioned microsample vials with a slot fabricated on the bottom of each vial. FI sample loading and injection were performed by linearly moving the array of vials filled alternately with 50-microL samples and carrier, allowing the probe inlet to enter the solutions in the vials through the slots sequentially and the sample and carrier solution to be introduced into the chip driven by gravity. The performance of the system was demonstrated using the complexation of o-phenanthroline with Fe(II) as a model reaction. A 20-mm-long Teflon AF 2400 capillary (50-microm i.d., 375-microm o.d.) was connected to the chip to function as a LCW detection flow cell with a cell volume of 40 nL and effective path length of 1.7 cm. Linear absorbance response was obtained in the range of 1.0-100 microM Fe(II) (r2=0.9967), and a good reproducibility of 0.6% RSD (n=18) was achieved. The sensitivity was comparable with that obtained using conventional FIA systems, which typically consume 10,000-fold more sample. The highest sampling throughput of 1000 h-1 was obtained by using injection times of 0.08 and 3.4 s for sample and carrier solution, respectively, with a sample consumption of only 0.6 nL for each cycle.

  7. Flow injection potentiometric determination of bismuth(III) in anti-acid formulations.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M F; Fatibello-Filho, O

    2001-06-19

    A flow injection potentiometric procedure is proposed for determining bismuth(III) in anti-acid formulations. In this work, a tubular electrode coated with an ion-pair formed between [Bi(EDTA)](-) and tricaprylylmethylammonium cation (Aliquat 336) in a poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) was constructed and used in a single channel flow injection system. The effect of membrane composition, pH and flow injection parameter over the Bi(III) tubular electrode response (slope (mV/decade)) was initially evaluated in quintuplicate in 0.5 mol l(-1) EDTA solution as carrier. The best response (-59.6+/-0.9 mV/decade) was attained with the 5% m/m ion-pair; 65% m/m o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (o-NPOE) and 30% m/m PVC in pH 6-9. The electrode showed a linear response to E (mV) versus log [Bi(EDTA)](-) in the bismuth(III) concentration range from 2.0x10(-5) to 1.0x10(-2) mol l(-1) and a useful lifetime of at least 5 months (more than 1000 determinations for each polymeric membrane). The detection limit was 1.2x10(-5) mol l(-1) and the R.S.D. was less than 2.0% for a solution containing 5.0x10(-4) mol l(-1) bismuth(III) (n=10). Several species such as Cd(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Cr(III) and Al(III) at 1.0x10(-3) mol l(-1) concentration in 0.5 mol l(-1) EDTA solution did not cause any interference. The frequency rate was 90 determinations per hour and the results obtained for bismuth(III) in anti-acid formulations using this flow procedure and those obtained using a spectrophotometric procedure are in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  8. Smooth reference equations for slow vital capacity and flow-volume curve indexes.

    PubMed

    Pistelli, F; Bottai, M; Viegi, G; Di Pede, F; Carrozzi, L; Baldacci, S; Pedreschi, M; Giuntini, C

    2000-03-01

    We derived reference values for slow vital capacity (VC) and flow-volume curve indexes (FVC, FEV(1), and flows) from the 1,185 tracings provided by 1,039 "normal" subjects who participated in one or both cross-sectional surveys of the Po River Delta study in 1980-1982 and in 1988-1991. Definition of "normal" was based on negative answers to questions on respiratory symptoms/diseases or recent infections, current/past tobacco smoking, and work exposure to noxious agents. Reference equations were derived separately by sex as linear regressions of body mass index (BMI = weight/height(2)), BMI-squared, height, height-squared, and age. Age entered all the models by natural cubic splines using two break points, except for the ratios FEV(1)/VC and FEV(1)/FVC. Random effects models were applied to adjust for the potential intrasubject correlation. BMI, along with height and age, appeared to be an important predictor, which was significantly associated with VC, FEV(1), FVC, FEV(1)/FVC, and PEF in both sexes, and with FEV(1)/VC and FEF(25-75) in females. Natural cubic splines provided smooth reference equation curves (no "jumps" or "angled points") over the entire age span, differently from the conventional reference equations. Thus, we recommend the use of smooth continuous equations for predicting lung function indexes, along with the inclusion of BMI in the equations.

  9. Pungency evaluation of onion cultivars from the Venezuelan West-Center region by flow injection analysis-UV-visible spectroscopy pyruvate determination.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Pineda; Lué-Merú, Marcó P; Ricardo, Rivas; Máximo, Gallignani; Maribel, Valero; Luis, Burguera José; Marcela, Burguera

    2004-12-15

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) method was developed for the determination of pyruvate in onion cultivars (Allium cepa L.) from the West-Center region of Venezuela. The reference Schwimmer and Weston (1961) (J. Agric. Food Chem. 9 (1961) 301) Batch method was modified and adapted to FIA conditions. The formation kinetic of the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-pyruvate complex was evaluated at room temperature and at 37 degrees C. It was demonstrated the suitability of the chromopher formation at room temperature. The optimal values for the FIA parameters were: sample injection volume 3mL, flow rate 6mLmin(-1), reactor length 1.5m, sodium hydroxide concentration 1.0molL(-1) and hydrochloric acid concentration 0.5molL(-1). The working calibration range was extended from 80mgL(-1) (Batch method) to 700mgL(-1) with the FIA set up. The sample dilution step is thus avoided, simplifying the whole analysis process. The pungency in representative samples of the cultivars Yellow granex 438, Ultra Hybrid and Red onion "Sangre de Toro" was evaluated by the flow injection analysis (FIA)-pyruvate method and the results were compared to the reference Batch pyruvate method and to the taste panel test. Non-significant differences were found at the 95% of confidence level between the FIA method and the Batch reference method. Correlation coefficient when comparing the FIA results to the taste panel test was r(2) = 0.8353. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found in the pungency of the cultivars, the Ultra Hybrid having the highest pungency. The pungency order from minor to major was: Red onion, Texas Grano 438 and Ultra Hybrid.

  10. Transverse injection into Mach 2 flow behind a rearward-facing step - A 3-D, compressible flow test case for hypersonic combustor CFD validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, James C.; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Hartfield, Roy J.; Hollo, Steven D.

    1991-01-01

    A spatially-complete data set of the important primitive flow variables is presented for the complex, nonreacting, 3D unit combustor flow field employing transverse injection into a Mach 2 flow behind a rearward-facing step. A unique wind tunnel facility providing the capability for iodine seeding was built specifically for these measurements. Two optical techniques based on laser-induced-iodine fluorescence were developed and utilized for nonintrusive, in situ flow field measurements. LDA provided both mean and fluctuating velocity component measurements. A thermographic phosphor wall temperature measurement technique was developed and employed. Data from the 2D flow over a rearward-facing step and the complex 3D mixing flow with injection are reported.

  11. Evaluation of Flow-Injection Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Rapid and High-Throughput Quantitative Determination of B-Vitamins in Nutritional Supplements

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, Deepak; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    The use of flow-injection electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for rapid and high-throughput mass spectral analysis of selected B-vitamins, viz. B1, B2, B3, B5, and B6, in nutritional formulations was demonstrated. A simple and rapid (~5 min) in-tube sample preparation was performed by adding extraction solvent to a powdered sample aliquot followed by agitation, centrifugation, and filtration to recover an extract for analysis. Automated flow injection introduced 1 L of the extracts directly into the mass spectrometer ion source without chromatographic separation. Sample-to-sample analysis time was 60 s representing significant improvement over conventional liquid chromatography approaches which typically require 25-45 min, and often require more significant sample preparation procedures. Quantitative capabilities of the flow-injection analysis were tested using the method of standard additions and NIST standard reference material (SRM 3280) multivitamin/multielement tablets. The quantity determined for each B-vitamin in SRM 3280 was within the statistical range provided for the respective certified values. The same sample preparation and analysis approach was also applied to two different commercial vitamin supplement tablets and proved to be successful in the quantification of the selected B-vitamins as evidenced by an agreement with the labels values and the results obtained using isotope dilution liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  12. Influence of injection gate definition on the flow-front approximation in numerical simulations of mold-filling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Dhiren; Imáek, Pavel; Advani, Suresh

    2003-08-01

    Flow through porous media has been used to model resin impregnation in composites manufacturing processes such as resin transfer molding. Many numerical schemes have been used to explore the efficiency and accuracy in description of the movement of the liquid front when it is introduced through injection gates into a mold containing stationary and compacted fibrous porous media. In all numerical schemes, injection gates are modelled with a single node. Mathematically, a single node definition for a finite radius injection gate imparts a singularity. In this paper, an approach to avoid this singularity by modelling the injection gate with more than one node is presented. An analytical solution relating the fill time to the injection gate radius is developed for a constant pressure injection from a spherical injection gate into an isotropic media. A new parameter mesh density level, defined as the ratio of the injection radius to the element size, is used to investigate the accuracy and the convergence of the numerical results. It is shown that the numerical results converge when the mesh density level is increased. The accuracy of the results depends on the ratio of the flow-front radius to the injection gate radius as well as on the mesh density level. In many situations, a spherical injection gate may not represent the correct physics and model simplification may be necessary.The impact of such simplifications is also quantified. The systematic analysis presented in this paper should prove useful to the modeller in taking the decision whether to select the proper, geometric definition for the injection gate to obtain accurate results or to define the injection gate using a single node and be aware of the errors introduced due to the singularity.

  13. Flow injection analysis of nanomolar silicate using long pathlength absorbance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Byrne, Robert H

    2012-01-15

    Determination of silicate at low concentrations (i.e., nanomolar levels) is an important analytical objective for both marine science and the semiconductor industry. Here we report the use of flow injection analysis (FIA) in combination with long pathlength liquid core waveguide (LCW) spectrometry to achieve detection limits for dissolved silica on the order of 10nM. Sample throughput for the simple, automated analytical apparatus used in this work is 12h(-1) at low levels of dissolved silica; this rate can be increased by a factor of three for higher (micromolar) levels of dissolved silica. The analytical protocol is based on the reaction of silicate with ammonium molybdate to form a yellow silicomolybdate complex, which is subsequently reduced to silicomolybdenum blue by ascorbic acid. Optimization of the FIA procedure included consideration of the compositions and concentrations of reagents, volume of the injection loop, flow rate conditions, and lengths of mixing coils. The interference by phosphate was examined and eliminated through addition of oxalic acid. The dissolved silica detection limit of 7.2nM in pure water is consistent with the strictest standard for the semiconductor industry, and the 9.0nM detection limit for seawater shows that this analytical method is also suitable for oligotrophic ocean waters. The targeted analytical range of 10nM to 5μM can be easily extended to higher concentrations without altering the experimental hardware-i.e., by simply changing flow rates or selecting alternative analytical wavelengths. Compared to previously published LCW-based spectrophotometric methods, this analytical system exhibits improved sensitivity, reduced sample consumption, and higher sample throughput.

  14. Effects of fuel injection on mixing and upstream interactions in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qiuya

    Scramjet engine performance has been studied experimentally and computationally almost under steady-state conditions. Transients of the airflow and fueling in the scramjet's isolator or combustor create important fluid-dynamic/ combustion interactions. Spark schlieren photography was employed to study the effects of pressure rise in the combustion chamber on the isolator flow at three conditions with isolator entrance Mach number of 1.6, 1.9 and 2.5, covering the range of dual-mode combustion and transition to full scramjet operation. Heat release through combustion in the model scramjet was simulated by incrementally blocking the flow exit until upstream-interaction was induced and a shock train formed in the isolator. Theoretical predictions of the pressure rise in the isolator under separated flow conditions were calculated, which agreed well with the experimental data. The prediction is sensitive to the accurate modeling of the isolator inlet conditions and the correct selection of wall friction coefficient. Gaseous helium and argon have been transversely injected into a Mach 1.6 airflow simulating a light and a heavy fuel injection behind a thin triangular pylon placed upstream, in the isolator, which has a negligible impact on pressure losses. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to observe the penetration and mixing in the test section at three cross-sections including the recirculation region and beyond. Results were compared to the no-pylon cases, which showed the presence of the pylon resulted in improving both penetration and spreading of the jet. Simulation for shock wave/ boundary-layer interaction was conducted in Fluent for case of M=1.9 at 60% blockage by using k-ε RNG model with two different near wall treatments. In both cases, the shock ran out of isolator before the computation converged, this is different from experimental results. Proper actual wall friction force may have a very important effect on the computation, which needs

  15. Rapid Quantitation of Ascorbic and Folic Acids in SRM 3280 Multivitamin/Multielement Tablets using Flow-Injection Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, Deepak; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Ascorbic acid (AA) and folic acid (FA) are water-soluble vitamins and are usually fortified in food and dietary supplements. For the safety of human health, proper intake of these vitamins is recommended. Improvement in the analysis time required for the quantitative determination of these vitamins in food and nutritional formulations is desired. METHODS: A simple and fast (~5 min) in-tube sample preparation was performed, independently for FA and AA, by mixing extraction solvent with a powdered sample aliquot followed by agitation, centrifugation, and filtration to recover an extract for analysis. Quantitative detection was achieved by flow-injection (1 L injection volume) electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) in negative ion mode using the method of standard addition. RESULTS: Method of standard addition was employed for the quantitative estimation of each vitamin in a sample extract. At least 2 spiked and 1 non-spiked sample extract were injected in triplicate for each quantitative analysis. Given an injection-to-injection interval of approximately 2 min, about 18 min was required to complete the quantitative estimation of each vitamin. The concentration values obtained for the respective vitamins in the standard reference material (SRM) 3280 using this approach were within the statistical range of the certified values provided in the NIST Certificate of Analysis. The estimated limit of detections of FA and AA were 13 and 5.9 ng/g, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Flow-injection ESI-MS/MS was successfully applied for the rapid quantitation of FA and AA in SRM 3280 multivitamin/multielement tablets.

  16. State of the art in on-line techniques coupled to flow injection analysis FIA/on-line- a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Puchades, R.; Maquieira, A.; Atienza, J.; Herrero, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    Flow injection analysis (FIA) has emerged as an increasingly used laboratory tool in chemical analysis. Employment of the technique for on-line sample treatment and on-line measurement in chemical process control is a growing trend. This article reviews the recent applications of FlA. Most papers refer to on-line sample treatment. Although FIA is very well suited to continuous on-line process monitoring, few examples have been found in this areamost of them have been applied to water treatment or fermentation processes. PMID:18925271

  17. Direct liquid sample introduction for flow injection analysis and liquid chromatography with inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, K.E.; Rice, G.W.; Fassel, V.A.

    1984-02-01

    The coupling of flow injection analysis (FIA) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) offers new and attractive approaches for the determination of elemental concentrations in a wide variety of sample matrices. One of the most attractive features that FIA offers is a rapid and precise means of automating sample introduction into an ICP for simultaneous, multielement analysis at the trace, minor, and major constituent level with minimal sample consumption. The utilization of the ICP as a detector for HPLC retains most of the advantages of FIA-ICP, while providing the analyst with a powerful and versatile means of compound separation. This added dimension becomes particularly important when metal speciation is of primary interest, rather than total metal content. To date, the coupling of FIA and HPLC to the ICP has only been accomplished using conventional cross-flow, concentric, or Babington-type pneumatic nebulizers. Limits of detection under these conditions have generally been observed to be poorer when compared to conventional continuous sample flow conditions. These limitations have been attributed to the large dead-volume and the sample losses associated with conventional nebulizers and band broadening of eluents from FIA transfer tubing or HPLC columns prior to entering the nebulizer unit. In an effort to resolve these difficulties, a microconcentric nebulizer has been developed which is inserted directly into the tip of a conventional sample introduction tube of an ICP torch. Preliminary data on the potential utility of direct liquid sample introduction into the ICP are presented. 12 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  18. The measurement of skin lymph flow by isotope clearance--reliability, reproducibility, injection dynamics, and the effect of massage

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, P.S.; Simmonds, R.; Rezvani, M.; Robbins, M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Ryan, T.J. )

    1990-12-01

    The measurement of skin lymph flow was investigated using an isotope clearance technique (ICT). Multiple lymph flow determinations were undertaken in the skin of anaesthetized large white pigs to test for reproducibility, ascertain the most suitable tracer, study the influence of injection dynamics, and observe the effect of massage as a stimulus to lymph flow. Blood clearance of tracer was also investigated. Results demonstrated that lymphatic clearance is a monoexponential function with good reproducibility under controlled laboratory conditions. 99mTc-colloid (TCK17 Cis) compared favorably with 131I-human serum albumin as a tracer and both performed better than colloid gold (198Au). Lymph flow was significantly faster in one pig than in the other. No difference existed between left and right sides or between caudal and rostral sites on each flank, but clearance was significantly slower in thigh than flank skin. Sub-epidermal injections cleared faster and more consistently than either deep or subcutaneous injections. Neither injection volume nor needle tract backflow of tracer influenced results, but local massage significantly enhanced clearance. Escape of 99mTc-colloid by the blood was negligible. These results indicate that skin lymph flow can be reliably measured when conditions are controlled. Extrinsic factors such as massage strongly influence lymph flow. Greater sensitivity in detecting degrees of lymphatic insufficiency may be achieved if a standardized stimulus to lymph flow is administered during isotope clearance measurement.

  19. Scale-up from batch to flow-through wet milling process for injectable depot formulation.

    PubMed

    Lehocký, Róbert; Pěček, Daniel; Štěpánek, František

    2016-12-01

    Injectable depot formulations are aimed at providing long-term sustained release of a drug into systemic circulation, thus reducing plasma level fluctuations and improving patient compliance. The particle size distribution of the formulation in the form of suspension is a key parameter that controls the release rate. In this work, the process of wet stirred media milling (ball milling) of a poorly water-soluble substance has been investigated with two main aims: (i) to determine the parametric sensitivity of milling kinetics; and (ii) to develop scale-up methodology for process transfer from batch to flow-through arrangement. Ball milling experiments were performed in two types of ball mills, a batch mill with a 30ml maximum working volume, and a flow-through mill with a 250ml maximum working volume. Milling parameters were investigated in detail by methodologies of QbD to map the parametric space. Specifically, the effects of ball size, ball fill level, and rpm on the particle breakage kinetics were systematically investigated at both mills, with an additional parameter (flow-rate) in the case of the flow-through mill. The breakage rate was found to follow power-law kinetics with respect to dimensionless time, with an asymptotic d50 particle size in the range of 200-300nm. In the case of the flow-through mill, the number of theoretical passes through the mill was found to be an important scale-up parameter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple versus single injections of fluorescent microspheres for the determination of regional organ blood flow in septic sheep.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Hamahata, Atsumori; Traber, Daniel L; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2013-07-01

    Determination of regional blood flow by the injection of microspheres in sepsis models is crucial for the experimental evaluation of the influence of experimental treatment strategies on organ perfusion. However, multiple injections may critically increase the total quantity of microspheres, thereby restricting regional microcirculation and altering the results of blood flow measurements. This study was designed to compare the results of multiple versus single injections of microspheres in an established ovine sepsis model. Injury was induced by smoke inhalation and instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into the lungs. Twenty sheep were studied for 4, 8, 12, 18, or 24 h, respectively. Microspheres were injected at the end of the study period and the animals were euthanized and organ tissues were harvested. Another four sheep were studied for 24 h and multiple microsphere injections were performed at the above indicated time points in the same animals. Tracheal blood flow significantly increased and blood flow to the pancreas and ileum significantly decreased versus baseline in both groups (P < 0.05 each). Blood flow to the ileum, renal cortex and skin did not significantly change versus baseline in both groups (P > 0.05). Blood flow was higher to the trachea in the multiple injection group at 18 h (P = 0.048) and to the ileum at 12 h (P = 0.049), and lower to the skin at 18 h (P = 0.015). In conclusion, the results indicate that multiple versus single microsphere injections induced no or negligible alterations during ovine sepsis. This finding may help reduce the quantity of animals needed in future experiments.

  1. A luminol-based micro-flow-injection electrochemiluminescent system to determine reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wei, Xiuhua; Tu, Yifeng

    2011-09-15

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) system with electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection has been established. Based on a specially designed flow-through ECL cell with a very simple structure, the system possesses rapid response and high sensitivity. With luminol as the ECL reagent, the response of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was investigated on the developed FIA-ECL system. After optimizing the experimental conditions, such as the electric parameters, the buffer condition and the flow rate, it was demonstrated that the developed FIA-ECL system works well for quantified assays. Compared with reported works, the present results indicate that the developed FIA-ECL system has the lowest limit of detection (S/N=3) of 3.0×10(-9) mol/L for H(2)O(2), which is equal to the level of chemiluminescence (CL). The developed system was successfully used to monitor the yield of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) in water vapour during the work of an ultrasonic humidifier with H(2)O(2) as index. And the amount of ROSs in some other real samples, including tap water, drinking water and river water was detected with recoveries from 92.0% to 106%.

  2. Coronary CT angiography using low concentrated contrast media injected with high flow rates: Feasible in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mihl, Casper; Kok, Madeleine; Wildberger, Joachim E; Altintas, Sibel; Labus, David; Nijssen, Estelle C; Hendriks, Babs M F; Kietselaer, Bas L J H; Das, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that peak injection pressures and image quality using low concentrated contrast media (CM) (240 mg/mL) injected with high flow rates will be comparable to a standard injection protocol (CM: 300 mg/mL) in coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). One hundred consecutive patients were scanned on a 2nd generation dual-source CT scanner. Group 1 (n=50) received prewarmed Iopromide 240 mg/mL at an injection rate of 9 mL/s, followed by a saline chaser. Group 2 (n=50) received the standard injection protocol: prewarmed Iopromide 300 mg/mL; flow rate: 7.2 mL/s. For both protocols, the iodine delivery rate (IDR, 2.16 gI/s) and the total iodine load (22.5 gI) were kept identical. Injection pressure (psi) was continuously monitored by a data acquisition program. Contrast enhancement was measured in the thoracic aorta and all proximal and distal coronary segments. Subjective and objective image quality was evaluated between both groups. No significant differences in peak injection pressures were found between both CM groups (121 ± 5.6 psi vs. 120 ± 5.3 psi, p=0.54). Flow rates of 9 mL/s were safely injected without any complications. No significant differences in contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and subjective image quality were found (all p>0.05). No significant differences in attenuation levels were found in the thoracic aorta and all segments of the coronary arteries (all p>0.05). Usage of low iodine concentration CM and injection with high flow rates is feasible. High flow rates (9 mL/s) of Iopromide 240 were safely injected without complications and should not be considered a drawback in clinical practice. No significant differences in peak pressure and image quality were found. This creates a doorway towards applicability of a broad variety in flow rates and IDRs and subsequently more individually tailored injection protocols. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of trace metals in seawater by an automated flow injection ion chromatograph pretreatment system with ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tung-Yuan; Chien, Chia-Te; Wang, Bing-Nan; Siriraks, Archava

    2010-09-15

    A novel flow injection ion chromatograph (FI-IC) system has been developed to fully automate pretreatment procedures for multi-elemental analysis of trace metals in seawater by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS). By combining 10-port, 2 position and 3-way valves in the FI-IC manifold, the system effectively increase sample throughput by simultaneously processing three seawater samples online for: sample loading, injection, buffering, preconcentration, matrix removal, metal elution, and sample collection. Forty-two seawater samples can be continuously processed without any manual handing. Each sample pretreatment takes about 10 min by consuming 25 mL of seawater and producing 5 mL of processed concentrated samples for multi-elemental offline analysis by ICPMS. The offline analysis improve analytical precision and significantly increase total numbers of isotopes determined by ICPMS, which include the metals Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, and Zn. The blank value and detection limits of trace metals using the system with ICPMS analysis all range from 0.1 to 10 parts per trillion (ppt), except Al, Fe, and Zn. The accuracy of the pretreatment system was validated by measuring open-ocean and coastal reference seawater, NASS-5 and CASS-4. Using the system with ICPMS analysis, we have obtained reliable trace metal concentrations in the water columns of the South China Sea. Possessing the features of full automation, high throughput, low blank, and low reagent volume used, the system automates and simplifies rigorous and complicated pretreatment procedures for multi-elemental analysis of trace metals in seawater and effectively enhances analytical capacity for trace metal analysis in environmental and seawater samples. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Flow injection methods for the determination of retinol and α-tocopherol using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Asgher, Mohammad; Yaqoob, Mohammad; Waseem, Amir; Nabi, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Flow injection (FI) methods are reported to determine retinol and α-tocopherol based on its enhancement affect of lucigenin chemiluminescence (CL) in alkaline medium. Surfactants including Brij-35, Triton X-100, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate have been reported for the first time to enhance lucigenin CL intensity in the presence of retinol and α-tocopherol. With Brij-35, the CL intensity was enhanced by 67% for retinol and 58% for α-tocopherol. CTAB was found to enhance the CL intensity by 16% for retinol whereas for α-tocopherol, the CL intensity was quenched up to 95%. Retinol could be determined specifically in the presence of α-tocopherol using CTAB. The calibration graphs were found to be linear up to 1.43 mg/L (R(2) = 0.9985, n = 8) with a detection limit (3s) of 1.43 × 10(-3) mg/L for retinol and 2.15 mg/L (R(2) = 0.9989; n = 8) with a detection limit (3s) of 4.31 × 10(-4) mg/L for α-tocopherol. An injection throughput of 120/h, and relative standard deviations of 0.9-2.8% (n = 4) were achieved in the concentration range studied. The influence of common ions, excipients in pharmaceutical formulations and related organic compounds on the determination of retinol and α-tocopherol individually was studied. The proposed methods were applied to determine retinol and α-tocopherol in pharmaceutical formulations and human blood serum. The results did not differ significantly from the CL method and HPLC reference method at 95% confidence level.

  5. Determination of arsenic in industrial samples by pervaporation flow injection with amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Cardwell, Terence J; Cattrall, Robert W; Kolev, Spas D

    2009-10-12

    This paper describes a simple and inexpensive pervaporation flow injection (PFI) system for the on-line determination of arsenic in industrial samples based on amperometric detection. The PFI system uses on-line hydride generation for the separation of As(III) from the sample matrix thus substantially reducing matrix interferences associated with "dirty" industrial samples. A method for the speciation of As(III) and As(V) is also described. The PFI system is validated using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. There was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between the results for the two methods. The proposed PFI method is characterised by a wide analytical concentration range (0.05-60mgL(-1)), a detection limit for As(III) of 1.0microgL(-1) and a sample throughput of 12h(-1).

  6. Flow Injection Analysis of 5-(Hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde in Honey by a Modified Winkler Method.

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Karine; Milani, Maria Izabel; Rossini, Eduardo L; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena R

    2016-01-01

    One of the quality indicators for honey is 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF), which is formed during the heating or aging of honey. The International Honey Commission recommends three methods for the determination of HMF in honey: the Winkler method, the White method, and determination by HPLC. The Winkler method uses the carcinogenic substance p-toluidine, which is not in accordance with the principles of Green Chemistry. The present work describes the determination of HMF in honey by flow injection analysis (FIA) using a modified Winkler method, replacing p-toluidine with p-aminobenzoic acid. The linear range was 1.00 to 40.0 mg L(-1), the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.43 mg L(-1), and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 1.32 mg L(-1). The method is an efficient and environmentally friendly technique for the analysis of HMF in honey.

  7. Fast screening of stabilizers in polymeric materials by flow injection-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beißmann, Susanne; Reisinger, Michael; Toelgyesi, Laszlo; Klampfl, Christian; Buchberger, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, the applicability of rapid flow injection-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for simultaneous qualitative screening of different classes of stabilizers in polymeric materials is demonstrated. Electrospray ionization and atmospherical pressure chemical ionization were compared, whereby the latter yielded generally poorer detection limits and only single charged ions that were for some analytes beyond the mass range of the quadrupole mass spectrometry. Positive electrospray ionization allowed the interference-free monitoring of multiple reaction monitoring transitions selective for 36 commonly used stabilizers without chromatographic separation. Real polymer samples were extracted by toluene and the method allowed the detection of analytes down to 0.00001-0.025 wt% depending on the stabilizer.

  8. Photodegradation and flow-injection determination of simetryn herbicide by luminol chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Amir; Yaqoob, Mohammad; Nabi, Abdul

    2008-08-01

    A novel and simple flow injection chemiluminescence method is reported for the determination of simetryn, a common herbicide. The method is based on the direct oxidation of luminol by the photoproducts of the simetryn in alkaline medium in the absence of catalyst/oxidant. The linear concentration range was 0.01 - 2 microg mL(-1) simetryn with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9997 and relative standard deviations (RSD; n = 4) in the range of 0.9 - 2.3%. The limit of detection (S/N = 3) was 7.5 ng mL(-1) with a sample throughput of 100 h(-1). The proposed method has been applied to determine simetryn in natural waters using Sep-Pak C(18) cartridges for solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure. The recoveries were in the range of 97 +/- 1 to 104 +/- 2%. The mechanism of chemiluminescence reaction has also been discussed briefly.

  9. Flow-injection determination of acetone with diazotized anthranilic acid through a fluorescent reaction intermediate.

    PubMed

    García de María, C; Hueso Domínguez, K B; Martín Garrido, N

    2007-09-26

    Acetone and diazotized anthranilic acid react in alkaline solution, giving a fluorescent intermediate that can be measured at excitation and emission wavelengths of 305 and 395 nm, respectively. Based on this, a fluorimetric flow-injection method is proposed for the determination of acetone in aqueous solution. Under the proposed conditions, acetone can be detected at concentrations higher than 8 x 10(-7)M, with a linear application range from 1 x 10(-6) to 2 x 10(-4)M and an R.S.D. of 2.7% (1.0 x 10(-5)M, n=10). A sampling frequency of 24h(-1) is achieved. Some potentially interfering species are investigated.

  10. A simple microfluidic integrated with an optical sensor for micro flow injection colorimetric determination of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Supharoek, Sam-ang; Youngvises, Napaporn; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2012-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for fabricating a microfluidic platform was developed. A printed circuit board (PCB) was used to make a master mold for replicating a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel. The master mold was fabricated by a simple photolithographic method, employing a photoresist dry film. The process did not use hazardous chemicals, a clean room or any expensive instrument. The PDMS microchannel was clamped with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plates, where a light emitting diode (LED) as a light source and a light dependent resistor (LDR) as a light sensor were attached to form a simple optical sensor. The system was successfully employed as a micro flow injection analysis for the determination of glutathione in dietary supplement samples. A linear calibration graph in the range of 5.0 - 60.0 mg L(-1) glutathione was obtained with a detection limit of 0.01 mg L(-1). The system provided a sample throughput of 48 h(-1), with microliter consumption of the reagent.

  11. Flow injection amperometric detection of insulin at cobalt hydroxide nanoparticles modified carbon ceramic electrode.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Esmaeil; Omidinia, Eskandar; Heidari, Hassan; Fazli, Maryam

    2016-02-15

    Cobalt hydroxide nanoparticles were prepared onto a carbon ceramic electrode (CHN|CCE) using the cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. The modified electrode was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that CHN with a single-layer structure was uniformly electrodeposited on the surface of CCE. The electrocatalytic activity of the modified electrode toward the oxidation of insulin was studied by CV. CHN|CCE was also used in a homemade flow injection analysis system for insulin determination. The limit of detection (signal/noise [S/N] = 3) and sensitivity were found to be 0.11 nM and 11.8 nA/nM, respectively. Moreover, the sensor was used for detection of insulin in human serum samples. This sensor showed attractive properties such as high stability, reproducibility, and high selectivity.

  12. Determination of tsumacide residues in vegetable samples using a flow-injection chemiluminescence method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Hao, Yuhong; Ren, Juanjuan; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive, simple and rapid flow-injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method is described to determine tsumacide pesticide residue based on the CL reaction of the alkaline degradation product of tsumacide with acidic KMnO(4) when rhodamine 6G was present. Under the optimum conditions, the relative CL intensity is linear with the concentration of tsumacide in the range of 2.0 x 10(-3)-0.20 mg/L. The detection limit is 6.6 x 10(-4) mg/L (3sigma) and the relative standard deviation for 2.0 x 10(-2) mg/L tsumacide solution was 2.28% (intra-day) and 4.85% (inter-day). The proposed method has been applied to determine the residue of tsumacide in vegetable samples and the recovery test is very satisfactory.

  13. Free-convection flow past a horizontal surface in a nanofluid with suction/injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Nurul Shahirah Mohd; Arifin, Norihan Md; Bachok, Norfifah; Nazar, Roslinda

    2017-08-01

    The present work deals with the steady free-convection boundary-layer flow past a horizontal permeable surface embedded in a porous medium filled with a nanofluid. The similarity transformation was applied to the governing equations to transform into a system of ordinary differential equations, which are then solved numerically using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order (RKF45) method. Three types of nanoparticles which are titania (TiO2), alumina (Al2O3), and copper (Cu) in the based fluid of water are considered to investigate the effect of the nanoparticle volume fraction parameter, υ. Results are presented and discussed for the local Nusselt number, the surface velocity, the temperature profiles, and the velocity profile. It is found that the imposition of suction/injection has an impact on the velocity profiles and temperature profiles.

  14. Preprocessing, classification modeling and feature selection using flow injection electrospray mass spectrometry metabolite fingerprint data.

    PubMed

    Enot, David P; Lin, Wanchang; Beckmann, Manfred; Parker, David; Overy, David P; Draper, John

    2008-01-01

    Metabolome analysis by flow injection electrospray mass spectrometry (FIE-MS) fingerprinting generates measurements relating to large numbers of m/z signals. Such data sets often exhibit high variance with a paucity of replicates, thus providing a challenge for data mining. We describe data preprocessing and modeling methods that have proved reliable in projects involving samples from a range of organisms. The protocols interact with software resources specifically for metabolomics provided in a Web-accessible data analysis package FIEmspro (http://users.aber.ac.uk/jhd) written in the R environment and requiring a moderate knowledge of R command-line usage. Specific emphasis is placed on describing the outcome of modeling experiments using FIE-MS data that require further preprocessing to improve quality. The salient features of both poor and robust (i.e., highly generalizable) multivariate models are outlined together with advice on validating classifiers and avoiding false discovery when seeking explanatory variables.

  15. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of ultra trace amounts of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, A A; Kazemzadeh, A

    2000-07-01

    A new simple, sensitive and rapid catalytic-spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid has been described based on its catalytic effect on the redox reaction between dichromate and Brilliant cresyl blue in acidic media by means of a flow injection analysis method. The color change of Brilliant cresyl blue due to its oxidation was monitored spectrophotometrically at 625 nm. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.020-4.70 microg/mL oxalic acid with a limit of detection 0.005 microg/mL of oxalic acid. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 0.020 microg/mL and 0.900 microg/mL was 2.2% and 1.7%, respectively. No serious interference was identified. Oxalic acid was determined in wastewater and in spinach by the proposed method with satisfactory results.

  16. Fast simultaneous determination of niobium and tantalum by Kalman Filter analysis with flow injection chemiluminescence method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Li, Junfeng; Chen, Zhengxia; Liu, Mingyang; Wang, Hongyan

    2005-09-01

    A fast and highly efficient Kalman Filter analysis-flow injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method was developed to simultaneously determine trace amounts of niobium and tantalum in geological samples. The method, without the boring process of separation and dear instruments, is suitable for field scene analysis. The mixed chemiluminescence kinetic curve was analyzed by a Kalman Filter (KF) in this method to realize the simultaneous determination of niobium and tantalum. Possible interference elements in the determination were investigated. Under the selected conditions, the detection limits (3sigma, n = 11) of niobium(V) and tantalum(V) were 2.1 x 10(-3) microg g(-1) and 4.0 x 10(-3) microg g(-1), respectively, and the relative standard deviations were 4.9% and 3.3% (n = 9). The method was applied to the determination of niobium and tantalum in geological samples with satisfactory results.

  17. Marangoni boundary layer flow in micropolar fluid with suction/injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Norfarahanim Mohd; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Bachok, Norfifah

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of Marangoni boundary layer flow in micropolar fluid is studied with suction/injection effect. The assumption of interface temperature to be a quadratic function of the distance x along the interface is taking into account. The technique of similarity transformations is used to transform the general governing partial differential equations into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations are obtained by using shooting method for each profiles and presented in the form of tables and figures along with the results of surface heat transfer. The problem is considered for two different values of microrotation n, which is n = 0 and n = 0.5 where it is represented the strong and the weak concentration of microelements, respectively.

  18. Chemiluminescence determination of potassium bromate in flour based on flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhengyu; Zhang, Zhengwei; Yu, Yan; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Jianqiu

    2016-01-01

    A novel and highly sensitive flow-injection chemiluminescence method for the determination of potassium bromate (KBrO3) has been developed. This method is based on the luminescence properties of the KBrO3-Na2SO3-quinine sulfate system in acid medium. Optimized experimental conditions and a possible mechanism were investigated. The relative chemiluminescence intensity responded linearly to the concentration of KBrO3 in the range of 7.054 × 10(-6)-1.008 × 10(-4) mol/L with a detection limit of 2.116 × 10(-6) mol/L. The relative standard deviation (RSD) at 5.0 × 10(-5) mol/L KBrO3 (n = 12) was 2.3%. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of KBrO3 in flour.

  19. Flow-injection chemiluminescence determination of melamine in urine and plasma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoshuang; Shi, Xiyan; Tang, Yuhai; Yue, Zhongjin; He, Qiqi

    2012-01-01

    A novel flow-injection chemiluminescence method for the determination of melamine in urine and plasma was developed. It was found that melamine can remarkably enhance chemiluminescence emission from the luminol-K(3) Fe(CN)(6) system in an alkaline medium. Under the optimum conditions, chemiluminescence intensity had a good linear relationship with the concentration of melamine in the range 9.0 × 10(-9) -7.0 × 10(-6) g/mL, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992. The detection limit (3σ) was 3.5 ng/mL. The method has been applied to determine the concentration of melamine in samples using liquid-liquid extraction. Average recoveries of melamine were 102.6% in urine samples and 95.1% in plasma samples. The method provided a reproducible and stable approach for the sensitive detection of melamine in urine and plasma samples.

  20. Bienzymatic Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Aspartame by Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Maria-Cristina; Bucur, Bogdan; Bucur, Madalina-Petruta; Radu, Gabriel Lucian

    2014-01-01

    A rapid, simple and stable biosensor for aspartame detection was developed. Alcohol oxidase (AOX), carboxyl esterase (CaE) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were immobilised with glutaraldehyde (GA) onto screen-printed electrodes modified with cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPC). The biosensor response was fast. The sample throughput using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system was 40 h−1 with an RSD of 2.7%. The detection limits for both batch and FIA measurements were 0.1 μM for methanol and 0.2 μM for aspartame, respectively. The enzymatic biosensor was successfully applied for aspartame determination in different sample matrices/commercial products (liquid and solid samples) without any pre-treatment step prior to measurement. PMID:24412899

  1. Bienzymatic biosensor for rapid detection of aspartame by flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Maria-Cristina; Bucur, Bogdan; Bucur, Madalina-Petruta; Radu, Gabriel Lucian

    2014-01-09

    A rapid, simple and stable biosensor for aspartame detection was developed. Alcohol oxidase (AOX), carboxyl esterase (CaE) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were immobilised with glutaraldehyde (GA) onto screen-printed electrodes modified with cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPC). The biosensor response was fast. The sample throughput using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system was 40 h⁻¹ with an RSD of 2.7%. The detection limits for both batch and FIA measurements were 0.1 µM for methanol and 0.2 µM for aspartame, respectively. The enzymatic biosensor was successfully applied for aspartame determination in different sample matrices/commercial products (liquid and solid samples) without any pre-treatment step prior to measurement.

  2. Effect of orifice-area reduction on flow characteristics during injection through spinal needles.

    PubMed

    Myers, M R; Malinauskas, R A

    1998-02-01

    A reduction in hole size for certain side-port spinal needles has been advocated in recent reports. While the influence of orifice-area reduction on the aspiration capability of the needle has been studied, the influence on the anaesthetic delivery properties is relatively unknown. As a first step in understanding the effects of hole-size reduction on anaesthetic distribution within the subarachnoid space, we studied flows emanating from isolated needles using computer simulations. Following validation of the numerical model using experimental particle visualisation, trajectories of anaesthetic particles injected through 25 G Whitacre needles of various orifice areas were computed and used to determine the orientation and rate of spread of the anaesthetic jet exiting the needle. Two factors impacting the concentration distribution were observed: the rate of spread of the anaesthetic jet increases markedly with decreasing orifice area and the jet alignment shifts toward perpendicular to the needle axis.

  3. Flow Injection Mass Spectroscopic Fingerprinting and Multivariate Analysis for Differentiation of Three Panax Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei; Harnly, James M.; Harrington, Peter de B.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the use of spectral fingerprints acquired by flow injection(FI)-MS and multivariate analysis to differentiate three Panax species: P. ginseng, P. quinquefolius, and P. notoginseng. Data were acquired using both high resolution and unit resolution MS, and were processed using principal component analysis (PCA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and a fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES). Both high and unit resolution MS allowed discrimination among the three Panax species. PLS-DA and FuRES provided classification with 100% accuracy while SIMCA provided classification accuracies of 77 and 88% by high- and low-resolution MS, respectively. The method does not quantify any of the sample components. With FI-MS, the analysis time was less than 2 min. PMID:21391484

  4. Flow injection spectrophotometry using natural reagent from Morinda citrifolia root for determination of aluminium in tea.

    PubMed

    Tontrong, Sopa; Khonyoung, Supada; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2012-05-01

    A flow injection (FI) spectrophotometric method with using natural reagent extracted from Morinda citrifolia root has been developed for determination of aluminium. The extract contained anthraquinone compounds which could react with Al(3+) to form reddish complexes which had maximum absorption wavelength at 499.0nm. The extract could be used as a reagent in FI system without further purification to obtain pure compound. A sensitive method for determination of aluminium in concentration range of 0.1-1.0mgL(-1), with detection limit of 0.05mgL(-1) was achieved. Relative standard deviations of 1.2% and 1.7% were obtained for the determination of 0.1 and 0.6mgL(-1) Al(3+) (n=11). Sample throughput of 35h(-1) was achieved with the consumption of 3mL each of carrier and reagent solutions per injection. The developed method was successfully applied to tea samples, validated by the FAAS standard method. The method is simple, fast, economical and could be classified as a greener analytical method.

  5. Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal Experiments for Ground Flow Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbecher, E.; Maier, F.

    2012-04-01

    We present a closer look on the Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal Experiment (SWIW) also known as Push-Pull Experiments and its ability to determine the groundwater velocity, as one of the major parameters concerning reservoir management. SWIW are tripartite. One starts with the tracer injection, followed by a quiescence period, where the tracer transport is dominated by the ambient flow field in the reservoir. The last phase is the withdrawal where the tracer break trough curve (BTC) is recorded. From the shape of the BTC, we are able to determine the groundwater velocity. The problem is numerically modeled using COMSOL Multiphysics. We compare with an advanced inversion scheme, based on analytical solutions and implemented in MATLAB. The results show that the BTC of a SWIW experiment is highly dependent on interaction between the parameters for groundwater velocity, pumping rates and the duration of the quiescence phase as well as the reservoir geometry. For the specific tracer applied in the model a minor influence is given by diffusion, dispersion and sorption processes. In dependence of the quiescence time and the groundwater velocity one can distinguish between three characteristic BTC types for the single tracer SWIW. These are given for tracers around the well, tracer between well and stagnation point and tracer beyond the stagnation point. The transition between these different cases is also discussed. The COMSOL Multiphysics model is used to investigate observations from a SWIW experiment performed recently in Japan. The latter is performed in cooperation with Technical University Berlin. Acknowledgements: Gebo, Logro

  6. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of anionic surfactants using methyl orange as chromogenic reagent.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Chen, H

    2000-06-01

    A flow injection(FI) spectrophotometric method for the determination of anionic surfactants was developed on the basis of the competition for the cationic surfactant cetyl pyridine (CP+) chloride between the acidic dye methyl orange (MO) and anionic surfactants. In a pH 5.0 medium the cation of cetyl pyridine (CP+) reacts with dissociated methyl orange (MO-) to form an ion-associate complex, causing a blue shift of lambda(max) from 465 nm for MO- to 358 nm for the CP+ x MO- associate. The MO- in the ion-associate complex can be quantitatively substituted by such anionic surfactants as sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DBS) or sodium lauryl sulfate (LS), leading to an increase in the absorbance measured at 465 nm. This increased absorbance value is proportional to the concentration of anionic surfactants. Various chemical and physical parameters for the FI spectrophotometric method were optimized, and interference-free levels were examined. At the optimized conditions, Beer's law was obeyed in the range 1.4 approximately 25 mg/L sodium DBS for an injected sample volume of 180 microL, and a detection limit of 0.22 mg/L for sodium DBS was achieved at a sampling rate of 90 h(-1). Eleven determinations of a 16 mg/L sodium DBS solution gave a RSD of 0.4%. The proposed method has successfully been applied to the determination of anionic surfactant concentration in waste water and in detergents.

  7. Sensitive determination of 2-methoxyestradiol in pharmaceutical preparations and serum samples using flow injection chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hanchun; Zhang, Min; Zeng, Wenyuan; Zeng, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-05-01

    A rapid and sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method is described for the determination of 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) based on enhancement of the CL intensity from a potassium ferricyanide-calcein system in sodium hydroxide medium. The optimum conditions for the CL emission were investigated. Under optimized conditions, a linear calibration graph was obtained over the range 1.0 × 10(-8) to 1.0 × 10(-6) mol/L (r = 0.998) 2ME with a detection limit (3σ) of 5.4 × 10(-9) mol/L. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 5.0 × 10(-7) mol/L 2ME was 1.7%. As a preliminary application, the proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of 2ME in injection solutions and serum samples. The possible CL mechanism was also proposed.

  8. Validated flow-injection method for rapid aluminium determination in anti-perspirants.

    PubMed

    López-Gonzálvez, A; Ruiz, M A; Barbas, C

    2008-09-29

    A flow-injection (FI) method for the rapid determination of aluminium in anti-perspirants has been developed. The method is based on the spectrophotometric detection at 535nm of the complex formed between Al ions and the chromogenic reagent eriochrome cyanine R. Both the batch and FI methods were validated by checking the parameters included in the ISO-3543-1 regulation. Variables involved in the FI method were optimized by using appropriate statistical tools. The method does not exhibit interference from other substances present in anti-perspirants and it shows a high precision with a R.S.D. value (n=6) of 0.9%. Moreover, the accuracy of the method was evaluated by comparison with a back complexometric titration method, which is currently used for routine analysis in pharmaceutical laboratories. The Student's t-test showed that the results obtained by both methods were not significantly different for a significance level of 95%. A response time of 12s and a sample analysis time, by performing triplicate injections, of 60s were achieved. The analytical figures of merit make the method highly appropriate to substitute the time-consuming complexometric method for this kind of analysis.

  9. Extinction Dynamics of a Co-flow Diffusion Flame by Very Small Water Droplets Injected into the Air Stream

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-28

    flame extinction with UFM are available in the literature. Ndubizu et al. [18-20] conducted experiments on the effects of UFM on a forced convection ...injected air Reynolds number of 4 x 105 (Re=650). This suggests that the bulk of the air is affected by the natural convection and deviates...significantly from the streamlines of the injected air at the bottom of the burner. Therefore, the fluid flow set up by the natural convection is

  10. Numerical investigation of scale effect of various injection diameters on interaction in cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Qi, Yin-Yin; Liu, Wei-Lai; Xu, Bao-Jian; Ge, Jia-Ru; Xuan, Xiang-Chun; Jen, Tien-Chien

    2016-12-01

    The incident shock wave generally has a strong effect on the transversal injection field in cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flow, possibly due to its affecting the interaction between incoming flow and fuel through various operation conditions. This study is to address scale effect of various injection diameters on the interaction between incident shock wave and transversal cavity injection in a cold kerosene-fueled scramjet combustor. The injection diameters are separately specified as from 0.5 to 1.5 mm in 0.5 mm increments when other performance parameters, including the injection angle, velocity and pressure drop are all constant. A combined three dimensional Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids (CLSVOF) approach with an improved K-H & R-T model is used to characterize penetration height, span expansion area, angle of shock wave and sauter mean diameter (SMD) distribution of the kerosene droplets with/without considering evaporation. Our results show that the injection orifice surely has a great scale effect on the transversal injection field in cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flows. Our findings show that the penetration depth, span angle and span expansion area of the transverse cavity jet are increased with the injection diameter, and that the kerosene droplets are more prone to breakup and atomization at the outlet of the combustor for the orifice diameter of 1.5 mm. The calculation predictions are compared against the reported experimental measurements and literatures with good qualitative agreement. The simulation results obtained in this study can provide the evidences for better understanding the underlying mechanism of kerosene atomization in cold supersonic flow and scramjet design improvement.

  11. Flow injection chemiluminescence analysis of phenolic compounds using the NCS-luminol system.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Behzad; Dadashvand, Reza

    2006-03-01

    A flow injection system coupled with two simple and sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) methods is described for the determination of some phenolic compounds. The methods are based on the inhibition effects of the investigated phenols on the CL signal intensities of N-chlorosuccinimide-KI-luminol (NCS-KI-luminol) and NCS-luminol systems. The influences of the chemical and hydrodynamic parameters on the decrease in CL signal intensities of NCS-KI-luminol and NCS-luminol systems for hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol, serving as the model compounds of analyte, were studied in the flow injection mode of analysis. Under the selected conditions, the proposed CL systems were used for the determination of some phenolic compound and analytical characteristics of the systems including calibration equation, correlation coefficient, linear dynamic range, limit of detection, and sample throughput. The limits of detection for hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol were 0.002, 0.01, and 0.3 microM using the NCS-KI-luminol system; for the NCS-luminol system these were 0.01, 0.17, and 1.6 microM, respectively. The relative standard deviation for 10 repeated measurements of 0.04, 0.06, and 1 microM of hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol were 1.9, 1.4, and 2.0%, respectively, with the NCS-KI-luminol system; for 0.2, 0.5, and 4 microM of hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol these were 2.6, 2.2, and 3.7%, respectively, using the NCS-luminol system. The method was applied to the determination of catechol in known environmental water samples with a relative error of less than 6%. A possible reaction mechanism of the proposed CL system is discussed briefly.

  12. Phosphite determination in fertilizers after online sequential sample preparation in a flow injection system.

    PubMed

    Dametto, Patrícia Roberta; Franzini, Vanessa Pezza; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta

    2007-07-25

    A flow injection spectrophotometric system is proposed for phosphite determination in fertilizers by the molybdenum blue method after the processing of each sample two times on-line without and with an oxidizing step. The flow system was designed to add sulfuric acid or permanganate solutions alternately into the system by simply displacing the injector-commutator from one resting position to another, allowing the determination of phosphate and total phosphate, respectively. The concentration of phosphite is obtained then by difference between the two measurents. The influence of flow rates, sample volume, and dimension of flow line connecting the injector-commutator to the main analytical channel was evaluated. The proposed method was applied to phosphite determination in commercial liquid fertilizers. Results obtained with the proposed FIA system were not statistically different from those obtained by titrimetry at the 95% confidence level. In addition, recoveries within 94 and 100% of spiked fertilizers were found. The relative standard deviation (n = 12) related to the phosphite-converted-phosphate peak alone was

  13. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser metal deposition by powder injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiqiang

    Laser metal deposition is an additive manufacturing technique which allows quick fabrication of fully-dense metallic components directly from Computer Aided Design (CAD) solid models. A self-consistent three-dimensional model was developed for the laser metal deposition process by powder injection, which simulates heat transfer, phase changes, and fluid flow in the melt pool. The governing equations for solid, liquid and gas phases in the calculation domain have been formulated using the continuum model. The free surface in the melt pool has been tracked by the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, while the VOF transport equation was solved using the Piecewise Linear Interface Calculation (PLIC) method. Surface tension was modeled by taking the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model combined with a force-balance flow algorithm. Laser-powder interaction was modeled to account for the effects of laser power attenuation and powder temperature rise during the laser metal deposition process. The governing equations were discretized in the physical space using the finite volume method. The advection terms were approximated using the MUSCL flux limiter scheme. The fluid flow and energy equations were solved in a coupled manner. The incompressible flow equations were solved using a two-step projection method, which requires a solution of a Poisson equation for the pressure field. The discretized pressure Poisson equation was solved using the ICCG (Incomplete Cholesky Conjugate Gradient) solution technique. The energy equation was solved by an enthalpy-based method. Temperature-dependent thermal-physical material properties were considered in the numerical implementation. The numerical model was validated by comparing simulations with experimental measurements.

  14. On the existence of solutions of an equation arising in the theory of laminar flow in a uniformly porous channel with injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, K. G.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of concave solutions of Berman's equation which describes the laminar flow in channels with injection through porous walls is established. It was found that the (unique) concave solutions exist for all injection Reynolds number R < 0.

  15. On the existence of solutions of an equation arising in the theory of laminar flow in a uniformly porous channel with injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Ke-Gang

    1987-01-01

    The existence of concave solutions of Berman's equation which describes the laminar flow in channels with injection through porous walls is established. It was found that the (unique) concave solutions exist for all injection Reynolds numbers R less than 0.

  16. Development and validation of a flow-injection assay for dissolution studies of the anti-depressant drug venlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D; Verdoukas, Aspasia; Themelis, Demetrius G

    2005-12-01

    The first flow-injection method has been developed, optimized and validated for the determination of venlafaxine, an antidepressant drug. The method is based on a direct measurement of the absorbance of the analyte in an acidic medium, at 274 nm. Flow-injection parameters, such as sample injection volume and flow rate, were studied and optimized. The proposed method was validated in terms of linearity, repeatability, detection limit, accuracy and selectivity. Linearity was obeyed in the range 30 - 150 mg L(-1) of venlafaxine, while the detection limit (1.5 mg L(-1)) and repeatability (sr < 1.0%, n = 12) were satisfactory. The sampling rate was 30 h(-1). The results of dissolution studies of venlafaxine tablets obtained by the proposed method were in good agreement with those by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  17. Bio-convection on the nonlinear radiative flow of a Carreau fluid over a moving wedge with suction or injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, C. S. K.; Ibrahim, S. M.; Anuradha, S.; Priyadharshini, P.

    2016-11-01

    In modern days, the mass transfer rate is challenging to the scientists due to its noticeable significance for industrial as well as engineering applications; owing to this we attempt to study the cross-diffusion effects on the magnetohydrodynamic nonlinear radiative Carreau fluid over a wedge filled with gyro tactic microorganisms. Numerical results are presented graphically as well as in tabular form with the aid of the Runge-Kutta and Newton methods. The effects of pertinent parameters on velocity, temperature, concentration and density of motile organism distributions are presented and discussed for two cases (suction and injection flows). For real-life application we also calculated the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. It is observed that thermal and concentration profiles are not uniform in the suction and injection flow cases. It is found that the heat and mass transport phenomenon is high in the injection case, while heat and mass transfer rates are high in the suction flow case.

  18. Determination of tannin in green tea infusion by flow-injection analysis based on quenching the fluorescence of 3-aminophthalate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Richie L C; Lin, Chun-Hsun; Chung, Chien-Yu; Cheng, Tzong-Jih

    2005-11-02

    A flow-injection analytical system was developed to determine tannin content in green tea infusions. The flow-injection system is based on measuring the quenching effect of tannin on the fluorescence of 3-aminophthalate. Fluorophore was obtained by auto-oxidation of luminol during solution preparation. System performance was satisfactory for routine analysis (sample throughput >20 h(-1); linear dynamic range for tannic acid, 0.005-0.3 mg/mL; linear dynamic range for green tea tannin, 0.02-1.0 mg/mL; CV < 3%). The flow-injection method is immune from interference by coexisting ascorbate in green tea infusion. Analytical results were verified by the ferrous tartrate method, the Japanese official analytical method.

  19. Sequential determination of multi-nutrient elements in natural water samples with a reverse flow injection system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kunning; Ma, Jian; Yuan, Dongxing; Feng, Sichao; Su, Haitao; Huang, Yongming; Shangguan, Qipei

    2017-05-15

    An integrated system was developed for automatic and sequential determination of NO2(-), NO3(-), PO4(3-), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+) in natural waters based on reverse flow injection analysis combined with spectrophotometric detection. The system operation was controlled by a single chip microcomputer and laboratory-programmed software written in LabVIEW. The experimental parameters for each nutrient element analysis were optimized based on a univariate experimental design, and interferences from common ions were evaluated. The upper limits of the linear range (along with detection limit, µmolL(-1)) of the proposed method was 20 (0.03), 200 (0.7), 12 (0.3), 5 (0.03), 5 (0.03), 9 (0.2) µmolL(-1), for NO2(-), NO3(-), PO4(3-), Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Mn(2+), respectively. The relative standard deviations were below 5% (n=9-13) and the recoveries varied from 88.0±1.0% to 104.5±1.0% for spiked water samples. The sample throughput was about 20h(-1). This system has been successfully applied for the determination of multi-nutrient elements in different kinds of water samples and showed good agreement with reference methods (slope 1.0260±0.0043, R(2)=0.9991, n=50).

  20. Reverse flow injection spectrophotometric determination of ciprofloxacin in pharmaceuticals using iron from soil as a green reagent.

    PubMed

    Palamy, Sysay; Ruengsitagoon, Wirat

    2017-09-13

    A novel reverse flow injection spectrophotometric method for the determination of ciprofloxacin was successfully combined with the on-line introduction of an iron solution extracted from soil as green reagent. The assay was optimized by a univariate method to select the optimum conditions for the highest absorbance and highest stability of the complex. Beer-Lambert's law (λmax=440nm) is obeyed in the range 0.5-50μgmL(-1) with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9976 and 0.9996 using soil as green reagent from Khon Kaen, Thailand and Vientiane, Laos, respectively. The average percentage recoveries were in the range of 98.55-102.14% and the precision was in the range of 0.80-1.73%. The limit of detection and the limit of quantitation were 0.20 and 0.69μgmL(-1), respectively, with a sampling rate of over 46samplesh(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of ciprofloxacin in commercial pharmaceutical formulations. The results were in good agreement with those obtained by the reference HPLC method using a t-test at 95% of confidence level for comparison. This method is suitable for laboratories looking for alternative analytical methods using green reagents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel flow injection spectrophotometric method using plant extracts as green reagent for the determination of doxycycline.

    PubMed

    Palamy, Sysay; Ruengsitagoon, Wirat

    2017-01-15

    A novel flow injection spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of doxycycline in pharmaceutical preparations using iron(III) contained in extracts from plants. The assay was based on the complex formed between doxycycline and iron(III) characterized by an absorption maximum at 435nm. The calibration graphs obtained over the doxycycline concentration range 5-250μgmL(-1) gave correlation coefficients of 0.9979, 0.9987 and 0.9987 with the three green reagents prepared from Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (S. alata), Polygonum hydropiper L. (P. hydropiper) or Diplazium esculentum (Retz.) Sw. (D. esculentum), respectively. The relative standard deviations of the repeatability was <2.00%. The percentage recoveries were in the range of 98.27-101.03%. Doxycycline contents obtained by this new method and by the reference methods reported in literature were in agreement at 95% confidence level with the paired t-test. The sample throughput was 36h(-1) for each green reagent.

  2. A novel flow injection spectrophotometric method using plant extracts as green reagent for the determination of doxycycline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamy, Sysay; Ruengsitagoon, Wirat

    2017-01-01

    A novel flow injection spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of doxycycline in pharmaceutical preparations using iron(III) contained in extracts from plants. The assay was based on the complex formed between doxycycline and iron(III) characterized by an absorption maximum at 435 nm. The calibration graphs obtained over the doxycycline concentration range 5-250 μg mL- 1 gave correlation coefficients of 0.9979, 0.9987 and 0.9987 with the three green reagents prepared from Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (S. alata), Polygonum hydropiper L. (P. hydropiper) or Diplazium esculentum (Retz.) Sw. (D. esculentum), respectively. The relative standard deviations of the repeatability was < 2.00%. The percentage recoveries were in the range of 98.27-101.03%. Doxycycline contents obtained by this new method and by the reference methods reported in literature were in agreement at 95% confidence level with the paired t-test. The sample throughput was 36 h- 1 for each green reagent.

  3. Determination of subnanomolar concentrations of vanadium in environmental water samples using flow injection with luminol chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Attiq-ur-Rehman; Yaqoob, Mohammad; Waseem, Amir; Nabi, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    A flow injection chemiluminescence method is described for the determination of subnanomolar concentrations of vanadium in environmental water samples. The procedure is based on the oxidation of luminol in the presence of dissolved oxygen catalyzed by vanadium(IV). Vanadium(V) reduction and preconcentration of vanadium(IV) was carried out using in-line silver reductor and 8-hydroxyquinoline chelating columns at pH 3.15, respectively. The calibration graph for vanadium(IV) was linear in the concentration range of 0.025-10 µg/L with relative standard deviation in the range of 0.4-5.58%. The detection limit (3s blank) was 3.8 × 10(-3) µg/L without preconcentration; when the vanadium(IV) was preconcentrated with an 8-HQ column for 1 min (2.0 mL of sample loaded), the detection limit of 5.1 × 10(-4) µg/L was achieved. One analytical cycle can be completed in 2.0 min. The analysis of certified reference materials (CASS-4, NASS-5 and SLRS-4) by the proposed method showed good agreement with the certified values. The method was successfully applied to the determination of total dissolved vanadium in environmental water samples.

  4. [Determination of trace mercury in wastewater by a flow injection analysis composed of immobilized ionic liquid enrichment and colorimetric detection].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Mao, Li-li; Yang, Gui-peng; Gao, Xian-chi; Tang, Xu-li

    2010-07-01

    Amberlite XAD-7 resin was modified by room temperature ionic liquid (1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [C6 mim]PF6) coating through a maceration method, gaining a new sort of hydrophobic adsorbent for the solid phase extraction mini-column. Trace inorganic mercury in wastewater samples was preconcentrated and determined by flow injection online mini-column sampling coupled with spectrophotometric determination. In acid medium, dithizone was employed as chelator with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) to form a red neutral mercury-dithizone complex, which could be extracted quantificationally by solid phase extraction technique on the mini-column. Under the optimized conditions, the linearity and the detection limit of the proposed method were found to be 0.35 to 50.0 microg x L(-1) Hg2+ and 0.067 microg x L(-1) Hg2+, respectively. The enrichment factor of 25 times could be achieved with a 50 mL sampling volume and the developed procedure was successfully applied for the determination of mercury in the certified reference material (GSBZ50016-90) and the spiked dock wastewater samples with the recovery of 99%-103%.

  5. CFD Validation of Gas Injection in Flowing Mercury over Vertical Smooth and Grooved Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, Ashraf A; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Riemer, Bernie

    2009-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The nuclear spallation reaction occurs when a proton beam hits liquid mercury. This interaction causes thermal expansion of the liquid mercury which produces high pressure waves. When these pressure waves hit the target vessel wall, cavitation can occur and erode the wall. Research and development efforts at SNS include creation of a vertical protective gas layer between the flowing liquid mercury and target vessel wall to mitigate the cavitation damage erosion and extend the life time of the target. Since mercury is opaque, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used as a diagnostic tool to see inside the liquid mercury and guide the experimental efforts. In this study, CFD simulations of three dimensional, unsteady, turbulent, two-phase flow of helium gas injection in flowing liquid mercury over smooth, vertically grooved and horizontally grooved walls are carried out with the commercially available CFD code Fluent-12 from ANSYS. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) model is used to track the helium-mercury interface. V-shaped vertical and horizontal grooves with 0.5 mm pitch and about 0.7 mm depth were machined in the transparent wall of acrylic test sections. Flow visualization data of helium gas coverage through transparent test sections is obtained with a high-speed camera at the ORNL target test facility (TTF). The helium gas mass flow rate is 8 mg/min and introduced through a 0.5 mm diameter port. The local mercury velocity is 0.9 m/s. In this paper, the helium gas flow rate and the local mercury velocity are kept constant for the three cases. Time integration of predicted helium gas volume fraction over time is done to evaluate the gas coverage and calculate the average thickness of the helium gas layer. The predicted time-integrated gas coverage over vertically grooved and horizontally grooved test sections is better than over a smooth wall. The

  6. Performance of 4600-pound-thrust centrifugal-flow-type turbojet engine with water-alcohol injection at inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, Philip W

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of injecting a water-alcohol mixture of 2:1 at the compressor inlet of a centrifugal-flow type turbojet engine was conducted in an altitude test chamber at static sea-level conditions and at an altitude of 20,000 feet with a flight Mach number of 0.78 with an engine operating at rated speed. The net thrust was augmented by 0.16 for both flight conditions with a ratio of injected liquid to air flow of 0.05. Further increases in the liquid-air ratio did not give comparable increases in thrust.

  7. Flow injection sample pretreatment in the determination of trace elements in waters by atomic spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Flow injection (FI) techniques are a way of automating sampling pretreatment procedures with direct coupling to the instrument. For a variety of reasons, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) would be the method of choice for the determination of trace elements in water samples were it not for some of the inherent limitations of this technique. These limitations are concerned with the various interferences that arise from matrix components and with the atom number density in the source. This together with the various noise sources sets detection limits which are not low enough for many applications. Thus many FI procedures are devised with the aim of overcoming these limitations and thus solid phase extraction (SPE) as a means of preconcentration features largely in recently published work. Results will be presented for the determination of trace elements in water samples (both fresh and saline) in which SPE procedures were used to (a) remove the potentially interfering sea-water matrix for determinations using ICP-MS and (b) preconcentrate cadmium from surface waters prior to determination by FAAS. Hydride generation methods have been applied for the determination of selenium and arsenic. In highly saline media the elevated recoveries of Se have been investigated and for the determination of As, an evaluation of the claim that the use of surfactants improves the performance of a flow based hydride generation system has critically evaluated.

  8. Indirect flow-injection spectrophotometric determination of meloxicam, tenoxicam and piroxicam in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Al-Momani, Idrees F

    2006-12-01

    A simple and sensitive indirect spectrophotometric method for the assay of meloxicam (MX), tenoxicam (TX) and piroxicam (PX) in pure and in pharmaceutical formulations by flow injection analysis (FIA) has been proposed. The method is based on the oxidation of these drugs by a known excess of N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) in an acidic medium, followed by a reaction of excess oxidant with chloranilic acid (CAA) to bleach its purple color. The absorbance values increased linearly with increasing concentrations of the drugs. Variables, such as the acidity, reagent concentrations, flow rate of reagents and other FI parameters were optimized to produce the most sensitive and reproducible results. The system obeyed Beer's low over concentration ranges of 10 - 160, 20 - 200 and 10 - 160 microg/ml for MX, TX and PX, respectively. The common excipients and additives did not interfere with their determinations. The method was successfully applied to the determinations of MX, TX and PX in various pharmaceutical preparations. The results obtained by the proposed method were found to be in good agreement with those found by the official HPLC methods.

  9. Total polyphenols content in white wines on a microfluidic flow injection analyzer with embedded optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Oscar, Sandoval-Ventura; Fernando, Olguín-Contreras Luis; Del Pilar, Cañizares-Macías María

    2017-04-15

    Absorbance detection in food microdevices has not been thoroughly used due to low levels of sensitivity in measurements. Thus, it is necessary to develop microfluidic methods for improving photometric detection. For this purpose, a simple coupled-optical-fiber-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microdevice was developed, to quantify polyphenols content in white wine employing the Folin-Ciocalteu reaction method. A 6V and 10W halogen lamp with an optical path length of 7mm between optical fibers, which were placed into the microchip, using guides at the outlet of the flow, increased the level of sensitivity during detection. The linear range was from 0.03mmol/L to 0.18mmol/L. Thus, the corresponding equation was: Abs=4.00(±0.16) [tannic acid]+0.17(±0.017). Intra-laboratory repeatability and reproducibility percentages were 2.95% and 6.84%, respectively. Such results were compared to those obtained from applying the conventional flow-injection analysis method, based on the same type of reaction. The relative error between methods was less than 13%.

  10. Numerical simulation of internal and near-nozzle flow of a gasoline direct injection fuel injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kaushik; Som, Sibendu; Battistoni, Michele; Li, Yanheng; Quan, Shaoping; Senecal, Peter Kelly

    2015-12-01

    A numerical study of two-phase flow inside the nozzle holes and the issuing spray jets for a multi-hole direct injection gasoline injector has been presented in this work. The injector geometry is representative of the Spray G nozzle, an eight-hole counterbore injector, from, the Engine Combustion Network (ECN). Simulations have been carried out for the fixed needle lift. Effects of turbulence, compressibility and, non-condensable gases have been considered in this work. Standard k—ɛ turbulence model has been used to model the turbulence. Homogeneous Relaxation Model (HRM) coupled with Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach has been utilized to capture the phase change phenomena inside and outside the injector nozzle. Three different boundary conditions for the outlet domain have been imposed to examine non-flashing and evaporative, non-flashing and non-evaporative, and flashing conditions. Inside the nozzle holes mild cavitation-like and in the near-nozzle region flash boiling phenomena have been predicted in this study when liquid fuel is subjected to superheated ambiance. Noticeable hole to hole variation has been also observed in terms of mass flow rates for all the holes under both flashing and non-flashing conditions.

  11. [Research on optimization of mathematical model of flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Ya-Bing; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Dai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was a widely used method in the industries of health, environmental, geological and metallurgical fields for the merit of high sensitivity, wide measurement range and fast analytical speed. However, optimization of this method was too difficult as there exist so many parameters affecting the sensitivity and broadening. Generally, the optimal conditions were sought through several experiments. The present paper proposed a mathematical model between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients using the law of conservation of mass according to the characteristics of hydride chemical reaction and the composition of the system, which was proved to be accurate as comparing the theoretical simulation and experimental results through the test of arsanilic acid standard solution. Finally, this paper has put a relation map between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients, and summarized that GLS volume, carrier solution flow rate and sample loop volume were the most factors affecting sensitivity and broadening coefficients. Optimizing these three factors with this relation map, the relative sensitivity was advanced by 2.9 times and relative broadening was reduced by 0.76 times. This model can provide a theoretical guidance for the optimization of the experimental conditions.

  12. The role of flow injection analysis within the framework of an automated laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) was invented at roughly the same time by two quite dissimilar research groups [1,2]. FIA was patented by both groups in 1974; a year also marked by the publication of the first book on automatic chemical analysis [3]. This book was a major undertaking for its authors and it is hoped that it has added to the knowledge of those analysts attempting to automate their work or to increase the level of computerization/automation and thus reduce staffing commitments. This review discusses the role of FIA in laboratory automation, the advantages and disadvantages of the FIA approach, and the part it could play in future developments. It is important to stress at the outset that the FIA approach is all too often closely paralleled with convention al continuous flow analysis (CFA). This is a mistake for many reasons, none the least of which because of the considerable success of the CFA approach in contrast to the present lack of penetration in the commercial market-place of FIA instrumentation. PMID:18925262

  13. Ultra-sensitive Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) determination of calcium in ice cores at ppt level.

    PubMed

    Traversi, R; Becagli, S; Castellano, E; Maggi, V; Morganti, A; Severi, M; Udisti, R

    2007-07-02

    A Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) spectrofluorimetric method for calcium determination in ice cores was optimised in order to achieve better analytical performances which would make it suitable for reliable calcium measurements at ppt level. The method here optimised is based on the formation of a fluorescent compound between Ca and Quin-2 in buffered environment. A careful evaluation of operative parameters (reagent concentration, buffer composition and concentration, pH), influence of interfering species possibly present in real samples and potential favourable effect of surfactant addition was carried out. The obtained detection limit is around 15 ppt, which is one order of magnitude lower than the most sensitive Flow Analysis method for Ca determination currently available in literature and reproducibility is better than 4% for Ca concentrations of 0.2 ppb. The method was validated through measurements performed in parallel with Ion Chromatography on 200 samples from an alpine ice core (Lys Glacier) revealing an excellent fit between the two chemical series. Calcium stratigraphy in Lys ice core was discussed in terms of seasonal pattern and occurrence of Saharan dust events.

  14. Facile and sensitive determination of selenium (IV) in pharmaceutical formulations by flow injection spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kailasa Suresh; Suvardhan, Kanchi; Kang, Seong Ho

    2008-05-01

    An automated flow injection spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid, simple, selective, and sensitive determination of selenium (IV) from various pharmaceutical multivitamin and mineral formulations. The method was based on the oxidation of 4-aminoantipyrine (4-amino-l,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazole-3-one; 4-AAP) by selenium in presence of acidic medium and the coupling with N-(naphthalen-l-yl)ethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride (NEDA) to give a violet color derivative. Gilson P2 mini pulse peristaltic pump has been used for introducing the selenium (IV), dilute HCl, 4-AAP and NEDA solutions into reaction coil by an automatic system. The absorbance of the 4-AAP-NEDA color derivative was measured at 563 nm after a reaction time of 3 min in stop flow of 4-AAP-NEDA. Beer's law was obeyed for selenium in the concentration range 0.05-5.0 microg mL(-1) and Sandell's sensitivity was found to be 0.00286 microg cm2. The performance of the present method was compared with the official method in terms of Student's F- and t-tests, and no significant difference was observed. This method was found to be suitable for estimating the selenium (IV) concentration in various pharmaceutical multivitamin and mineral formulations such as tablets and capsules.

  15. Successive determination of urinary bilirubin and creatinine employing simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Ponhong, Kraingkrai; Teshima, Norio; Grudpan, Kate; Vichapong, Jitlada; Motomizu, Shoji; Sakai, Tadao

    2015-02-01

    A novel four-channel simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis (SIEMA) system has been assembled for successive determination of bilirubin and creatinine in urinary samples. The chemical variables and physical parameters in the flow system were optimized for the enhancement of successive analytical performances. The interferences from urine matrices on the determination of bilirubin and creatinine were eliminated to dilute urine samples. The calibration graphs with the optimum conditions were achieved to be in 0.024-5.0 mg L(-1) for bilirubin and 2-100 mg L(-1) for creatinine. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) at 3 mg L(-1) of bilirubin and at 50 mg L(-1) of creatinine for 11 runs were 1.5 and 1.0%, respectively. The limits of detections (3σ of blank) for bilirubin and creatinine were 7 µg L(-1) and 0.6 mg L(-1), respectively. The sample throughput for stepwise detection was 22 h(-1). The proposed method was applied to the successive determination of bilirubin and creatinine in urine samples.

  16. Determination of potassium, sodium, and total alkalies in portland cement, fly ash, admixtures, and water of concrete by a simple flow injection flame photometric system.

    PubMed

    Junsomboon, Jaroon; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2011-01-01

    A simple flow injection with flame photometric detection has been developed for determination of sodium, potassium, and total alkalies in portland cement, fly ash, admixtures, and water of concrete. A liquid sample or a digest of solid sample was injected into a water carrier stream which flowed to a flame photometer. A change in emission intensity at a selected wavelength was recorded as a peak. An amplifier circuit was fabricated, which helped improve sensitivity of the flame photometer. Calibration graphs in the range of 0.05-1.0 mg L(-1) and 1.0-20.0 mg L(-1) were obtained with a detection limit of 0.02 mg L(-1), for both potassium and sodium determination. Relative standard deviations for 11 replicates of injecting of 10 mg L(-1) potassium and sodium solutions were 1.69 and 1.79%, respectively. Sample throughput of 120 h(-1) was achieved. The proposed method was successfully applied to portland cement, fly ash, admixtures, and water samples validated by the ASTM standard method and certified reference materials of portland cement.

  17. Determination of Potassium, Sodium, and Total Alkalies in Portland Cement, Fly Ash, Admixtures, and Water of Concrete by a Simple Flow Injection Flame Photometric System

    PubMed Central

    Junsomboon, Jaroon; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2011-01-01

    A simple flow injection with flame photometric detection has been developed for determination of sodium, potassium, and total alkalies in portland cement, fly ash, admixtures, and water of concrete. A liquid sample or a digest of solid sample was injected into a water carrier stream which flowed to a flame photometer. A change in emission intensity at a selected wavelength was recorded as a peak. An amplifier circuit was fabricated, which helped improve sensitivity of the flame photometer. Calibration graphs in the range of 0.05–1.0 mg L−1 and 1.0–20.0 mg L−1 were obtained with a detection limit of 0.02 mg L−1, for both potassium and sodium determination. Relative standard deviations for 11 replicates of injecting of 10 mg L−1 potassium and sodium solutions were 1.69 and 1.79%, respectively. Sample throughput of 120 h−1 was achieved. The proposed method was successfully applied to portland cement, fly ash, admixtures, and water samples validated by the ASTM standard method and certified reference materials of portland cement. PMID:21747733

  18. Multicommuted flow injection method for fast photometric determination of phenolic compounds in commercial virgin olive oil samples.

    PubMed

    Lara-Ortega, Felipe J; Sainz-Gonzalo, Francisco J; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    A multicommuted flow injection method has been developed for the determination of phenolic species in virgin olive oil samples. The method is based on the inhibitory effect of antioxidants on a stable and colored radical cation formation from the colorless compound N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPD(•+)) in acidic medium in the presence of Fe(III) as oxidant. The signal inhibition by phenolic species and other antioxidants is proportional to their concentration in the olive oil sample. Absorbance was recorded at 515nm by means of a modular fiber optic spectrometer. Oleuropein was used as the standard for phenols determination and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (trolox) was the reference standard used for total antioxidant content calculation. Linear response was observed within the range of 250-1000mg/kg oleuropein, which was in accordance with phenolic contents observed in commercial extra virgin olive oil in the present study. Fast and low-volume liquid-liquid extraction of the samples using 60% MeOH was made previous to their insertion in the flow multicommuted system. The five three-way solenoid valves used for multicommuted liquid handling were controlled by a homemade electronic interface and Java-written software. The proposed approach was applied to different commercial extra virgin olive oil samples and the results were consistent with those obtained by the Folin Ciocalteu (FC) method. Total time for the sample preparation and the analysis required in the present approach can be drastically reduced: the throughput of the present analysis is 8 samples/h in contrast to 1sample/h of the conventional FC method. The present method is easy to implement in routine analysis and can be regarded as a feasible alternative to FC method.

  19. Effect of betaxolol on impaired choroidal blood flow after intravitreal injection of endothelin-1 in albino rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Dong Myung; Park, Won Chan

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the effect of topical betaxolol on impaired choroidal blood flow (CBF) induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1) injection into the vitreous of albino rabbits. Betaxolol (n = 7) or balanced salt solution (BSS) (n = 6) was instilled in the right eyes before and 12 hrs after the intravitreal injection of ET-1 (10(-6) M, 10 microl), and BSS was instilled in the right eyes before and 12 hrs after the intravitreal injection of BSS (n = 6). Blood pressure, intraocular pressure and CBF were measured prior to the instillation of betaxolol or BSS, and just before and 2 hrs, 12 hrs and 24 hrs after ET-1 or BSS injection. CBF was measured by scanning laser Doppler flowmetry. Intravitreal injection of ET-1 decreased CBF. Compared with topical BSS, topical betaxolol significantly inhibited the decrease in CBF at 2 hrs (p = .022), 12 hrs (p = .046) and 24 hrs (p = .015) after the intravitreal injection of ET-1. There was no significant change of blood pressure or intraocular pressure after the topical administration of betaxolol or the intravitreal injection of ET-1. The decrease in CBF after the intravitreal injection of ET-1 was partially inhibited by topical betaxolol.

  20. Flow-injection chemiluminescence method to detect a β2 adrenergic agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangbin; Tang, Yuhai; Shang, Jian; Wang, Zhongcheng; Yu, Hua; Du, Wei; Fu, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    A new method for the detection of β2 adrenergic agonists was developed based on the chemiluminescence (CL) reaction of β2 adrenergic agonist with potassium ferricyanide-luminol CL. The effect of β2 adrenergic agonists including isoprenaline hydrochloride, salbutamol sulfate, terbutaline sulfate and ractopamine on the CL intensity of potassium ferricyanide-luminol was discovered. Detection of the β2 adrenergic agonist was carried out in a flow system. Using uniform design experimentation, the influence factors of CL were optimized. The optimal experimental conditions were 1 mmol/L of potassium ferricyanide, 10 µmol/L of luminol, 1.2 mmol/L of sodium hydroxide, a flow speed of 2.6 mL/min and a distance of 1.2 cm from 'Y2 ' to the flow cell. The linear ranges and limit of detection were 10-100 and 5 ng/mL for isoprenaline hydrochloride, 20-100 and 5 ng/mL for salbutamol sulfate, 8-200 and 1 ng/mL for terbutaline sulfate, 20-100 and 4 ng/mL for ractopamine, respectively. The proposed method allowed 200 injections/h with excellent repeatability and precision. It was successfully applied to the determination of three β2 adrenergic agonists in commercial pharmaceutical formulations with recoveries in the range of 96.8-98.5%. The possible CL reaction mechanism of potassium ferricyanide-luminol-β2 adrenergic agonist was discussed from the UV/vis spectra. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Kinetic control of reagent dissolution for the flow injection determination of iron at trace levels.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Hernán A; Andrade, Francisco J; Luna, Pablo C; Tudino, Mabel B

    2002-07-01

    A novel methodology for the determination of iron at the ppb level by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis is described. The method is based on the control of the flow dissolution of the colorimetric reagent 1,10-phenanthroline. This is achieved by means of the minimization of the area of contact between the carrier and the solid reagent, thus allowing the use of the fairly soluble organic compound without affecting the reactor lifetime. The reagent is melted inside an acrylic column (3.0 x 0.5 cm id) in such a way that a hollow space is left in the center after cooling. This new design improves some aspects of the performance of the classical solid-phase reactors as no problems related to the increase in the backpressure of the system are evidenced. Furthermore, the total reagent loading of the column is increased as no inert support is needed. A comparison between the performance of this novel methodology and that of the conventional packed reactor was performed and several advantages were observed: the use of higher flow rates, an increase in the reactor lifetime and a decrease in reagent consumption. A mathematical model to fit the concentration profiles of the dissolved reagent as a function of the residence time of the sample within the column is presented. The application of this strategy to the determination of Fe(II) improves the figures of merit in comparison to those obtained with a single-line homogeneous system: the limit of detection is 2 microg Fe L(-1) (3s) and the sensitivity is similar to that of the batch procedure. Results obtained for the determination of iron in natural waters are also presented.

  2. Mercury speciation in sea food by flow injection cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry using selective solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Vereda Alonso, E; Siles Cordero, M T; García de Torres, A; Cañada Rudner, P; Cano Pavón, J M

    2008-10-19

    An on-line inorganic and organomercury species separation, preconcentration and determination system consisting of cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS or CV-ETAAS) coupled to a flow injection (FI) method was studied. The inorganic mercury species was retained on a column (i.d., 3 mm; length 3 cm) packed to a height of 0.7 cm with a chelating resin aminopropyl-controlled pore glass (550 A) functionalized with [1,5-bis (2 pyridyl)-3-sulphophenyl methylene thiocarbonohydrazyde] placed in the injection valve of a simple flow manifold. Methylmercury is not directly determined. Previous oxidation of the organomercurial species permitted the determination of total mercury. The separation of mercury species was obtained by the selective retention of inorganic mercury on the chelating resin. The difference between total and inorganic mercury determined the organomercury content in the sample. The inorganic mercury was removed on-line from the microcolumn with 6% (m/v) thiourea. The mercury cold vapor generation was performed on-line with 0.2% (m/v) sodium tethrahydroborate and 0.05% (m/v) sodium hydroxide as reducing solution. The determination was performed using CV-AAS and CV-ETAAS, both approaches have been used and compared for the speciation of mercury in sea food. A detection limit of 10 and 6 ng l(-1) was achieved for CV-AAS and CV-ETAAS, respectively. The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 1 microg l(-1) Hg level was 3.5% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), calculated from the peak heights obtained. Both approaches were validated with the use of two certified reference materials and by spiking experiments. By analyzing the two biological certified materials, it was evident that the difference between the total mercury and inorganic mercury corresponds to methylmercury. The concentrations obtained by both techniques were in agreement with the certified values or with differences of the certified values for total Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg

  3. Reference values of fetal erythrocytes in maternal blood during pregnancy established using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Harry; Nabbe, Karin C A M; Kooren, Jurgen A; Adriaansen, Henk J; Roelandse-Koop, Elianne A; Schuitemaker, Joost H N; Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2011-10-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the fetal RBC count in maternal blood during uncomplicated pregnancies from 26 weeks onward. We used a flow cytometric method specifically designed for use in a routine hematology analyzer. Pregnant women were recruited through midwives. The participating laboratories used the FMH QuikQuant method (Trillium Diagnostics, Brewer, ME) in a CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA). The method is based on a monoclonal antibody to hemoglobin F. Flow cytometric data were analyzed by 2 independent observers. The 95th percentile reference range was estimated according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. A total of 236 samples were statistically analyzed. Gestational ages ranged from 21.6 to 41 weeks (mean, 32.0 weeks), and the fetal RBC count in maternal blood ranged from 0.00% to 0.50% (median, 0.025%). The fetal RBC count in maternal blood shows no correlation with gestational age. The established reference range during normal pregnancy is less than 0.125%.

  4. Feedback-amplified electrochemical dual-plate boron-doped diamond microtrench detector for flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Grace E M; Gross, Andrew J; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara; Lubben, Anneke T; Marken, Frank

    2015-08-01

    An electrochemical flow cell with a boron-doped diamond dual-plate microtrench electrode has been developed and demonstrated for hydroquinone flow injection electroanalysis in phosphate buffer pH 7. Using the electrochemical generator-collector feedback detector improves the sensitivity by one order of magnitude (when compared to a single working electrode detector). The diffusion process is switched from an analyte consuming "external" process to an analyte regenerating "internal" process with benefits in selectivity and sensitivity.

  5. Determination of acetaldehyde in saliva by gas-diffusion flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramdzan, Adlin N; Mornane, Patrick J; McCullough, Michael J; Mazurek, Waldemar; Kolev, Spas D

    2013-07-05

    The consumption of ethanol is known to increase the likelihood of oral cancer. In addition, there has been a growing concern about possible association between long term use of ethanol-containing mouthwashes and oral cancer. Acetaldehyde, known to be a carcinogen, is the first metabolite of ethanol and it can be produced in the oral cavity after consumption or exposure to ethanol. This paper reports on the development of a gas-diffusion flow injection method for the online determination of salivary acetaldehyde by its colour reaction with 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH) and ferric chloride. Acetaldehyde samples and standards (80 μL) were injected into the donor stream containing NaCl from which acetaldehyde diffused through the hydrophobic Teflon membrane of the gas-diffusion cell into the acceptor stream containing the two reagents mentioned above. The resultant intense green coloured dye was monitored spectrophotometrically at 600 nm. Under the optimum working conditions the method is characterized by a sampling rate of 9h(-1), a linear calibration range of 0.5-15 mg L(-1) (absorbance=5.40×10(-2) [acetaldehyde, mg L(-1)], R(2)=0.998), a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.90% (n=10, acetaldehyde concentration of 2.5 mg L(-1)), and a limit of detection (LOD) of 12.3 μg L(-1). The LOD and sampling rate of the proposed method are superior to those of the conventional gas chromatographic (GC) method (LOD=93.0 μg L(-1) and sampling rate=4 h(-1)). The reliability of the proposed method was illustrated by the fact that spiked with acetaldehyde saliva samples yielded excellent recoveries (96.6-101.9%), comparable to those obtained by GC (96.4-102.3%) and there was no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level between the two methods when non-spiked saliva samples were analysed.

  6. Simple flow injection method for simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Kozak, J; Jodłowska, N; Kozak, M; Kościelniak, P

    2011-09-30

    The method is based on spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) at a single wavelength (530 nm) with the use of a dedicated reversed-flow injection system. In the system, EDTA solution is injected into a carrier stream (HNO(3)) and then merged with a sample stream containing a mixture of sulfosalicylic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline as indicators. In an acid environment (pH≅3) the indicators form complexes with both Fe(III) and Fe(II), but EDTA replaces sulfosalicylic acid, forming a more stable colourless complex with Fe(III), whereas Fe(II) remains in a complex with 1,10-phenenthroline. As a result, the area and minimum of the characteristic peak can be exploited as measures corresponding to the Fe(III) and Fe(II) concentrations, respectively. The analytes were not found to affect each other's signals, hence two analytical curves were constructed with the use of a set of standard solutions, each containing Fe(II) and Fe(III). Both analytes were determined in synthetic samples within the concentration ranges of 0.05-4.0 and 0.09-6.0 mg L(-1), respectively, with precision less than 1.5 and 2.6% (RSD) and with accuracy less than 4.3 and 5.6% (RE). The method was applied to determination of the analytes in water samples collected from artesian wells and the results of the determination were consistent with those obtained using the ICP-OES technique.

  7. Spectrophotometric detection of arsenic using flow-injection hydride generation following sorbent extraction preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Neto, J A; Montes, R; Cardoso, A A

    1999-12-06

    An automated system with a C(18) bonded silica gel packed minicolumn is proposed for spectrophotometric detection of arsenic using flow-injection hydride generation following sorbent extraction preconcentration. Complexes formed between arsenic(III) and ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate (ADDP) are retained on a C(18) sorbent. The eluted As-DDP complexes are merged with a 1.5% (w/v) NaBH(4) and the resulting solution is thereafter injected into the hydride generator/gas-liquid separator. The arsine generated is carried out by a stream of N(2) and trapped in an alkaline iodine solution in which the analyte is determined by the arsenomolybdenum blue method. With preconcentration time of 120 s, calibration in the 5.00-50.0 mug As l(-1) range and sampling rate of about 20 samples h(-1) are achieved, corresponding to 36 mg ADDP plus 36 mg ammonium heptamolybdate plus 7 mg hydrazine sulfate plus 0.7 mg stannous chloride and about 7 ml sample consumed per determination. The detection limit is 0.06 mug l(-1) and the relative standard deviation (n=12) for a typical 17.0 mug As l(-1) sample is ca. 6%. The accuracy was checked for arsenic determination in plant materials from the NIST (1572 citrus leaves; 1573 tomato leaves) and the results were in agreement with the certified values at 95% confidence level. Good recoveries (94-104%) of spiked tap waters, sugars and synthetic mixtures of trivalent and pentavalent arsenic were also found.

  8. Numerical Solution for the Effect of Suction or Injection on Flow of Nanofluids Past a Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Elazem, Nader Y.

    2016-06-01

    The flow of nanofluids past a stretching sheet has attracted much attention owing to its wide applications in industry and engineering. Numerical solution has been discussed in this article for studying the effect of suction (or injection) on flow of nanofluids past a stretching sheet. The numerical results carried out using Chebyshev collocation method (ChCM). Useful results for temperature profile, concentration profile, reduced Nusselt number, and reduced Sherwood number are discussed in tabular and graphical forms. It was also demonstrated that both temperature and concentration profiles decrease by an increase from injection to suction. Moreover, the numerical results show that the temperature profiles decrease at high values of Prandtl number Pr. Finally, the present results showed that the reduced Nusselt number is a decreasing function, whereas the reduced Sherwood number is an increasing function at fixed values of Prandtl number Pr, Lewis number Le and suction (or injection) parameter s for variation of Brownian motion parameter Nb, and thermophoresis parameter Nt.

  9. Comparison of Flow Injection MS, NMR, and DNA Sequencing: Methods for Identification and Authentication of Black Cohosh (Actaea racemosa)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (1H-NMR), two metabolic fingerprinting methods, and DNA sequencing were used to identify and authenticate Actaea species. Initially, samples of Actaea racemosa L. from a single source were distinguished from ...

  10. The influence of fuel injection and heat release on bulk flow structures in a direct-injection, swirl-supported diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterl, Andreas; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; Hazeleger, Wilco; Burgers, Gerrit

    2007-08-01

    Particle image velocimetry is applied to measure the vertical (r z) plane flow structures in a light-duty direct-injection diesel engine with a realistic piston geometry. The measurements are corrected for optical distortions due to the curved piston bowl walls and the cylindrical liner. Mean flow fields are presented and contrasted for operation both with and without fuel injection and combustion. For operation with combustion, the two-dimensional divergence of the measured mean velocity fields is employed as a qualitative indicator of the locations of mean heat release. In agreement with numerical simulations, dual-vortex, vertical plane mean flow structures that may enhance mixing rates are formed approximately mid-way through the combustion event. Late in the cycle a toroidal vortex forms outside the bowl mouth. Imaging studies suggest that soot and partially oxidized fuel trapped within this vortex are slow to mix with surrounding fluid; moreover, the vortex impedes mixing of fluid exiting the bowl with air within the squish volume.

  11. On-line dynamic fractionation and automatic determination of inorganic phosphorus in environmental solid substrates exploiting sequential injection microcolumn extraction and flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Buanuam, Janya; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald; Shiowatana, Juwadee

    2006-06-16

    Sequential injection microcolumn extraction (SI-MCE) based on the implementation of a soil-containing microcartridge as external reactor in a sequential injection network is, for the first time, proposed for dynamic fractionation of macronutrients in environmental solids, as exemplified by the partitioning of inorganic phosphorus in agricultural soils. The on-line fractionation method capitalises on the accurate metering and sequential exposure of the various extractants to the solid sample by application of programmable flow as precisely coordinated by a syringe pump. Three different soil phase associations for phosphorus, that is, exchangeable, Al- and Fe-bound, and Ca-bound fractions, were elucidated by accommodation in the flow manifold of the three steps of the Hieltjes-Lijklema (HL) scheme involving the use of 1.0M NH4Cl, 0.1M NaOH and 0.5M HCl, respectively, as sequential leaching reagents. The precise timing and versatility of SI for tailoring various operational extraction modes were utilized for investigating the extractability and the extent of phosphorus re-distribution for variable partitioning times. Automatic spectrophotometric determination of soluble reactive phosphorus in soil extracts was performed by a flow injection (FI) analyser based on the Molybdenum Blue (MB) chemistry. The 3sigma detection limit was 0.02 mg P L(-1) while the linear dynamic range extended up to 20 mg P L(-1) regardless of the extracting media. Despite the variable chemical composition of the HL extracts, a single FI set-up was assembled with no need for either manifold re-configuration or modification of chemical composition of reagents. The mobilization of trace elements, such as Cd, often present in grazed pastures as a result of the application of phosphate fertilizers, was also explored in the HL fractions by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

  12. Multiphase contrast-saline mixture injection with dual-flow in 64-row MDCT coronary CTA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lizhen; Du, Xiangying; Li, Pengyu; Liu, Yaou; Li, Kuncheng

    2009-03-01

    To explore the feasibility of multiphase contrast-saline mixture with dual-flow injection technique for visualization of right ventricular (RV) cavity and interventricular septum (IVS) in 64-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. Twenty-four patients underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA) imaging with 64-row MDCT. In twelve patients (group A), 60 ml contrast medium (CM) bolus was followed by 40 ml saline, and in the other twelve patients (group B), 50 ml CM bolus was followed by 50 ml contrast-saline mixture at 60:40 ratio. The CM, saline and contrast-saline mixture flow rate were all 5.0 ml/s. Two experienced radiologists measured the CT values of ascending aorta, descending aorta, pulmonary artery and RV, rated the uniformity of RV cavity, the visualization of coronary arteries and IVS independently. By Kappa test, agreement between the two radiologists was 0.93 and 0.86 concerning the CT value measurements and the grades of the three indexes, respectively. By t-test, the mean CT values of ascending aorta and descending aorta of the two groups had no statistical difference (t=1.459, P>0.05; t=1.619, P>0.05); while the mean CT values of pulmonary artery and RV cavity had statistical differences (t=8.316, P<0.05; t=10.372, P<0.05). By two-related rank sum test, according to the visualization of coronary arteries and the uniformity of RV cavity, there were no statistical differences (U=66.00, P>0.05; U=54.00, P>0.05); while according to the visualization of IVS, group B was better than group A (U=8.00, P<0.05). In coronary CTA, a contrast-saline mixture after CM bolus can provide clear visualization of RV and IVS and LV without impairing coronary CTA image.

  13. Pharmacokinetic of pseudoephedrine in rat serum with luminol-pepsin chemiluminescence system by flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kai; Li, Yajuan; Zheng, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenghua

    2015-02-01

    Pepsin (Pep) accelerated the electron transferring rate of excited 3-aminophathlate and enhanced luminol-dissolved oxygen chemiluminescence (CL) intensity, and the flow injection (FI) luminol-Pep CL system was first developed. It was found that the CL intensity of luminol-Pep reaction could be remarkably inhibited by pseudoephedrine (PE); the decrement of CL intensity was linear to the logarithm of PE concentration in the range of 0.1∼100.0 nmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.03 nmol mL(-1) (3σ). At a flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1), the complete process including washing and sampling was performed within 40 s, offering a sample throughput of 90 h(-1). This proposed method was successfully applied to determining PE in rat serum for 18 h after intragastric administration with the elimination ratio of 42.34 % and recoveries from 90.3 to 110.6 %. The pharmacokinetic results showed that PE could be rapidly absorbed into serum with peak concentration (C max) of 1.45 ± 0.18 g L(-1) at the time (T max) of 1.49 ± 0.02 h; the absorption half-life (0.35 ± 0.04 h), elimination half-life (1.86 ± 0.24 h), the area under curve (109.81 ± 6.03 mg L(-1) h(-1)), mean residence time (3.82 ± 0.27 h), and elimination rate constant (2.26 ± 0.23 L g(-1) h(-1)) in rats vivo were derived, respectively. The possible CL mechanism of luminol-Pep-PE reaction was discussed by FI-CL, fluorescence, and molecular docking (MD) methods.

  14. High-resolution quantitative metabolome analysis of urine by automated flow injection NMR.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Laeticia; Godejohann, Markus; Martin, François-Pierre J; Collino, Sebastiano; Bürkle, Alexander; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bernhardt, Jürgen; Toussaint, Olivier; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Gonos, Efstathios S; Sikora, Ewa; Grune, Tilman; Breusing, Nicolle; Franceschi, Claudio; Hervonen, Antti; Spraul, Manfred; Moco, Sofia

    2013-06-18

    Metabolism is essential to understand human health. To characterize human metabolism, a high-resolution read-out of the metabolic status under various physiological conditions, either in health or disease, is needed. Metabolomics offers an unprecedented approach for generating system-specific biochemical definitions of a human phenotype through the capture of a variety of metabolites in a single measurement. The emergence of large cohorts in clinical studies increases the demand of technologies able to analyze a large number of measurements, in an automated fashion, in the most robust way. NMR is an established metabolomics tool for obtaining metabolic phenotypes. Here, we describe the analysis of NMR-based urinary profiles for metabolic studies, challenged to a large human study (3007 samples). This method includes the acquisition of nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy one-dimensional and J-resolved two-dimensional (J-Res-2D) (1)H NMR spectra obtained on a 600 MHz spectrometer, equipped with a 120 μL flow probe, coupled to a flow-injection analysis system, in full automation under the control of a sampler manager. Samples were acquired at a throughput of ~20 (or 40 when J-Res-2D is included) min/sample. The associated technical analysis error over the full series of analysis is 12%, which demonstrates the robustness of the method. With the aim to describe an overall metabolomics workflow, the quantification of 36 metabolites, mainly related to central carbon metabolism and gut microbial host cometabolism, was obtained, as well as multivariate data analysis of the full spectral profiles. The metabolic read-outs generated using our analytical workflow can therefore be considered for further pathway modeling and/or biological interpretation.

  15. High-Resolution Quantitative Metabolome Analysis of Urine by Automated Flow Injection NMR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism is essential to understand human health. To characterize human metabolism, a high-resolution read-out of the metabolic status under various physiological conditions, either in health or disease, is needed. Metabolomics offers an unprecedented approach for generating system-specific biochemical definitions of a human phenotype through the capture of a variety of metabolites in a single measurement. The emergence of large cohorts in clinical studies increases the demand of technologies able to analyze a large number of measurements, in an automated fashion, in the most robust way. NMR is an established metabolomics tool for obtaining metabolic phenotypes. Here, we describe the analysis of NMR-based urinary profiles for metabolic studies, challenged to a large human study (3007 samples). This method includes the acquisition of nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy one-dimensional and J-resolved two-dimensional (J-Res-2D) 1H NMR spectra obtained on a 600 MHz spectrometer, equipped with a 120 μL flow probe, coupled to a flow-injection analysis system, in full automation under the control of a sampler manager. Samples were acquired at a throughput of ∼20 (or 40 when J-Res-2D is included) min/sample. The associated technical analysis error over the full series of analysis is 12%, which demonstrates the robustness of the method. With the aim to describe an overall metabolomics workflow, the quantification of 36 metabolites, mainly related to central carbon metabolism and gut microbial host cometabolism, was obtained, as well as multivariate data analysis of the full spectral profiles. The metabolic read-outs generated using our analytical workflow can therefore be considered for further pathway modeling and/or biological interpretation. PMID:23718684

  16. Chromium(III) determination without sample treatment by batch and flow injection potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Raúl A; Gismera, M A Jesús; Sevilla, M A Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2009-02-16

    A new and easy device for direct detection of chromium(III) in batch and flow analysis without previous oxidation/reduction or preconcentration steps of samples is designed and evaluated. For this purpose a potentiometric sensor with solid state membrane based on carbon paste matrix is developed. The sensor is modified with di(2-hydroxyphenylimino)ethane and the principal analytical parameters of the potentiometric response in batch and flow analysis are optimized and calculated. Optimal detection limits (1.4 x 10(-7)M in static mode and 5.4 x 10(-7)M in on-line analysis) and selectivity to trivalent chromium are obtained in both analysis modes. The use of this device to direct detection of chromium(III) in real samples is tested using a sediment Certified Reference Material. Chromium(III) determination is also carried out with successful results in environmental samples such as extracts from soils used as barriers in landfills and industrial samples such as waste waters from electroplating industries.

  17. A Detailed Investigation of Staged Normal Injection into a Mach 2 Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Dean R.; Northam, G. Burton; Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the staged injection of two jets of air behind a rearward facing step into a Mach 2 flow was performed using the SPARK 3-D Navier-Stokes code. Calculated mole fraction distributions were compared with an extensive set of planar mole fraction measurements made with a laser induced iodine fluorescence technique. A statistical measure, the standard deviation, was used to help assess agreement between calculation and experiment. Overall, good agreement was found between calculated and measured values. Generally, agreement was better in the far field of the injectors. The effect of grid resolution was investigated by calculating solutions on grids of 60,000, 200,000, and 450,000 points. Differences in the solutions on the two finer grids were small. However, the mole fraction distributions were distinguishable. The effect of turbulence modeling was investigated by employing three different algebraic models for the jet turbulence: the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Prandtl mixing length model, and the Eggers mixing length model. Overall, the Eggers mixing length model was found to be superior for this case. Finally, the effect of the jet exit conditions was examined. A recently proposed Mach number distribution at the jet exit was found to slightly improve agreement between measurement and calculation.

  18. A spectrophotometric flow injection system for streptomycin determination in veterinary samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frugeri, Pedro Marcos; Lago, Ayla Campos do; Wisniewski, Célio; Luccas, Pedro Orival

    2014-01-01

    In this work a spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system for streptomycin determination in veterinary samples, is being proposed. The method is based on streptomycin alkaline hydrolysis that forms guanidine, followed by the reaction with Fe(II). The colored product has absorption peak at 520 nm. To evaluate and optimize the system parameters, chemometrics tools, such as factorial design, Pareto chart and Doelhert design, were used. The veterinary samples are diluted in water and introduced in the FIA system, therefore no sample preparation is required. The optimized system presented: linear range of 60 up to 1000 mg L-1, limit of detection of 18 mg L-1 and sampling rate of 36 readings per hour. The precision was checked and the CV for veterinary sample readings were always less than 6.5%. The accuracy was studied by comparison with chromatographic method, thus, five samples of pharmaceutical veterinary were determined by HPLC and by the proposed method, and the results are in agreement (t-test, p = 0.05).

  19. Flow injection analysis as a tool for enhancing oceanographic nutrient measurements--a review.

    PubMed

    Worsfold, Paul J; Clough, Robert; Lohan, Maeve C; Monbet, Philippe; Ellis, Peter S; Quétel, Christophe R; Floor, Geerke H; McKelvie, Ian D

    2013-11-25

    Macronutrient elements (C, N and P) and micronutrient elements (Fe, Co, Cu, Zn and Mn) are widely measured in their various physico-chemical forms in open ocean, shelf sea, coastal and estuarine waters. These measurements help to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of these elements in marine waters and highlight the ecological and socio-economic importance of the oceans. Due to the dynamic nature of marine waters in terms of chemical, biological and physical processes, it is advantageous to make these measurements in situ and in this regard flow injection analysis (FIA) provides a suitable shipboard platform. This review, therefore, discusses the role of FIA in the determination of macro- and micro-nutrient elements, with an emphasis on manifold design and detection strategies for the reliable shipboard determination of specific nutrient species. The application of various FIA manifolds to oceanographic nutrient determinations is discussed, with an emphasis on sensitivity, selectivity, high throughput analysis and suitability for underway analysis and depth profiles. Strategies for enhancing sensitivity and minimizing matrix effects, e.g. refractive index (schlieren) effects and the important role of uncertainty budgets in underpinning method validation and data quality are discussed in some detail. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Two-Dimensional supersonic flow and mixing with a perpendicular injection in a Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohammad; Ahmed, S.; Sadrul Islam, A. K. M.

    2003-11-01

    A numerical investigation has been performed on supersonic mixing of hydrogen with air in a Scramjet (Supersonic Combustion Ramjet) combustor and its flame holding capability by solving Two-Dimensional full Navier-Stokes equations. The main flow is air entering through a finite width of inlet and gaseous hydrogen is injected perpendicularly from the side wall. An explicit Harten-Yee Non-MUSCL Modified-flux-type TVD scheme has been used to solve the system of equations, and a zero-equation algebraic turbulence model to calculate the eddy viscosity coefficient. In this study the enhancement of mixing and good flame holding capability of a supersonic combustor have been investigated by varying the distance of injector position from left boundary keeping constant the backward-facing step height and other calculation parameters. The results show that the configuration for small distance of injector position has high mixing efficiency but the upstream recirculation can not evolved properly which is an important factor for flame holding capability. On the other hand, the configuration for very long distance has lower mixing efficiency due to lower gradient of hydrogen mass concentration on the top of injector caused by the expansion of side jet in both upstream and downstream of injector. For moderate distance of injector position, large and elongated upstream recirculation can evolve which might be activated as a good flame holder.

  1. High-throughput quantification of stabilizers in polymeric materials by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beißmann, Susanne; Reisinger, Michael; Reimann, Andreas; Klampfl, Christian W; Buchberger, Wolfgang

    2014-04-30

    High-throughput methods for identification and quantification of stabilizers in plastic materials are of significant importance in order to evaluate the suitability of materials of unknown origin for specific application areas, to clarify reasons for failure of materials, or for comparison of materials from different sources. In the present study, a highly sensitive and rapid flow injection method coupled to selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MS) for comprehensive analysis of 21 polymer stabilizers in polyolefins is demonstrated. A critical factor for this approach is the choice of ionization mode, as no separation was performed prior to MS detection. Differences between several ionization techniques regarding matrix effects are reported. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was found to be the most suitable ionization technique, with no significant matrix effects observed. The developed method has a linear dynamic range over two to three orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients better than 0.99 for all studied analytes. Following a multistep sample preparation protocol, the method allowed quantification down to minimum values of between 0.0001 and 0.04 wt% depending on the type of stabilizer. Results were compared to an established chromatographic approach and showed very good correlation (bias below 7.5%). The applicability of the optimized method could be demonstrated for both the qualitative and quantitative determination of polymer stabilizers in polyolefins. Furthermore, the described approach yields a complete analysis in a much shorter time than can be achieved with commonly applied chromatographic methods. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Geochemical consequences of flow differentiation in a multiple injection dike (Trinity ophiolite, N. California)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brouxel, M.

    1991-01-01

    A clinopyroxene-rich dike of the Trinity ophiolite sheeted-dike complex shows three different magmatic pulses, probably injected in a short period of time (no well developed chilled margin) and important variations of the clinopyroxene and plagioclase percentages between its core (highly porphyritic) and margins (aphyric). This variation, interpreted as related to a flow differentiation phenomenon (mechanical phenocryst redistribution), has important geochemical consequences. It produces increases in the FeO, MgO, CaO, Cr and Ni contents from the margin to the core, together with increases in the clinopyroxene percentage, and decreases in the SiO2, Zr, Y, Nb and REE contents together with a decrease in the percentage of the fine-grained groundmass toward the core of the dike. This mineralogical redistribution, which also affects the incompatible trace element ratios because of the difference in plagioclase and clinopyroxene mineral/liquid partition coefficients, illustrate the importance of fractionation processes outside of a magma chamber. ?? 1991.

  3. Creatinine biosensor based on ammonium ion selective electrode and its application in flow-injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Radomska, Anna; Bodenszac, Ewa; Gła B, Stanisław; Koncki, Robert

    2004-10-20

    A new, highly sensitive, fast responding and stable potentiometric biosensor for creatinine determination is developed. The biosensor is based on an ammonium ion-selective electrode. Creatinine deiminase (EC 3.5.4.21) is chemically immobilized on the surface of the polymeric ion-sensitive membrane in the form of monomolecular layer using a simple, one-step carbodiimide covalent attachment method. The resulting enzyme electrodes are useful for measurement under flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions. The biosensors exhibit excellent operational and storage stability. The enzyme electrodes retain over 70% of initial sensitivity after ten weeks of work under FIA conditions. The storage stability at 4 degrees C is longer than half a year without loss of sensitivity. Under optimized conditions near 30 samples per hour can be analyzed and the determination range (0.02-20.0mmoll(-1)) fully covers creatinine concentrations important from clinical and biomedical point of view. The simple biosensor/FIA system has been successfully used for determination of creatinine in urine, serum and posthemodialysate samples.

  4. Determination of thyroxine in pharmaceuticals using flow injection with luminol chemiluminescence inhibition detection.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Amir; Yaqoob, Mohammad; Nabi, Abdul

    2006-01-01

    A simple flow injection method is reported for the determination of thyroxine, based on its inhibition effect on luminol-iron(II) chemiluminescence in alkaline medium in the presence of molecular oxygen. The detection limits (2s) for d- and l-thyroxine are 0.08 and 0.1 mg/L, respectively, with a sample throughput of 100/h. The calibration data for d- and l-thyroxine over the range 0.2-1.0 mg/L gives correlation coefficients (r(2)) of 0.9915 and 0.984 with relative standard deviations (RSD; n = 4) in the range 1.2-2.8%. The effects of some organic compounds was studied on luminol-iron(II) CL system for thyroxine determination. The method was applied to pharmaceutical thyroxine tablets and the results obtained (in the range 50.5 +/- 2.0-51.6 +/- 1.2 microg l-thyroxine/tablet) were in reasonable agreement with the value quoted. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Flow-injection chemiluminescence determination of diazepam by oxidation with N-bromosuccinimide.

    PubMed

    Han, Suqin; Jia, Shize; Guo, Liang

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive flow-injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method is described for the determination of diazepam based on its reaction with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) in alkaline medium in the presence of dichlorofluorescein (DCF) as an effective energy-transfer agent. Under optimum conditions, the proposed method allowed the measurement of diazepam over the range of 2.0 × 10(-6) to 2.0 × 10(-4) mol/L with a detection limit of 5.0 × 10(-7) mol/L. The relative standard deviation for 11 parallel measurements of 2.0 × 10(-5) mol/L diazepam was 2.1%. The method was applied satisfactorily for the determination of diazepam in pharmaceutical preparations, and the results agree well with those obtained by spectrophotometry. The use of the proposed system for the determination of diazepam in urine and plasma samples was also tested. The possible mechanism of the chemiluminescence reaction is discussed briefly. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Spectrophotometric cocaine determination in a biphasic medium employing flow-batch sequential injection analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Maria José; dos Anjos, Edijane V; Honorato, Ricardo S; Pimentel, Maria Fernanda; Paim, Ana Paula S

    2008-11-23

    Quantifying cocaine in apprehended samples is important to the Brazilian Federal Police because the concentration can indicate the origin of the drug and consequently the traffic route. In addition to the other risks of using this drug is the variability in cocaine concentration, which makes large doses lethal. Gas Chromatography with a Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) and a Mass Selective Detector (GC-MS) are the techniques usually employed, but these systems are not available in all police laboratories, due to the relatively high cost. In the present work, a flow-system procedure for the spectrophotometric determination of cocaine using cobalt thiocyanate as a complexing reagent was developed. In this reaction, two phases are formed: the superior (pink) contains an excess of cobalt thiocyanate solution and the lower layer (blue) contains the complex cocaine-cobalt thiocyanate. Samples and reagent are inserted through a sequential-injection valve between two air bubbles inside a reaction chamber. An optic fiber sensor connected to the chamber recorded the absorbance at 630 nm signal. The detection and quantification limits were 29.4 mg L(-1) and 98 mg L(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviation was 4.9% for solutions containing 400 mg L(-1) (n=10), with stable baselines. The analytical throughput was 12 determinations per hour.

  7. Flow injection fluorometric determination of ascorbic acid using perylenebisimide-linked nitroxide.

    PubMed

    Maki, Tomoharu; Soh, Nobuaki; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko

    2011-09-30

    A simple and sensitive flow injection fluorometric method for the determination of ascorbic acid is described. Perylenebisimide-linked nitroxide (PBILN) is used as a fluorescent reagent, which permits the selective determination of ascorbic acid. The fluorescence of the perylenebisimide moiety in PBILN is quenched by the nitroxide moiety, which is linked to the perylenebisimide. When a stream of a solution of ascorbic acid is merged with a stream of PBILN, the ascorbic acid reacts with the nitroxide moiety of PBILN to form hydroxylamine, and the fluorescence properties of the perylenebisimide moiety are recovered. As a result, a peak-shaped fluorescence signal is produced, which can be observed by a fluorescence detector located downstream. Under optimized conditions, a good linear relationship between the concentration of ascorbic acid and peak height in the concentration range from 0.5 to 10 μmol L(-1) was found and the detection limit (S/N=3) was 0.28 μmol L(-1). The relative standard deviation for the determination of 4.0 μmol L(-1) ascorbic acid samples was 1.0% (n=5). The proposed method was applied to the determination of ascorbic acid in several soft drink beverages and the analytical results were in good agreement with those obtained using a conventional method.

  8. Trace and ultratrace analysis methods for the determination of phosphorus by flow-injection techniques.

    PubMed

    Motomizu, Shoji; Li, Zhen-Hai

    2005-04-15

    Trace (< or =1 mg/l or 30 microM) and ultratrace (< or =1 microg/l or 30 nM) analysis methods for phosphorus determination by flow-injection analysis are reviewed. Most of the methods cited in this review are fundamentally based on the reaction of orthophosphate with molybdate to form heteropoly acids, such as molybdenum yellow and molybdenum blue, and some of the methods are based on the formation of such secondary reactions as ion associates and their aggregates with bulky cations, such as cationic dyes and quaternary ammonium ions. The heteropoly acids themselves can be measured by spectrophotometry, and the ion associate formed with a cationic dye, Malachite Green (MG), can be measured based on the coloration of MG. Light scattering detection methods can be used for measuring the aggregates of ion associates formed with bulky cations. Highly sensitive detection of phosphorus can be accomplished by fluorophotometry; Rhodamine B (RB) and its analogues react with molybdophosphate to form ion associates, which shows fluorescence quenching of RB: LOD is about 5 nM. The detection method based on the chemiluminescence of luminal oxidized with molybdophosphoric acids is probably the most sensitive of all the detection methods reported so far: LOD of the method is as low as 1nM. The LOD of the molybdenum blue method can be improved by using a liquid core waveguide: LOD is 0.5 nM.

  9. Determination of propafenone hydrochloride by flow-injection analysis coupled with resonance light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoli; Xu, Dongpo; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Sa

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid flow injection analysis (FIA) method with resonance light scattering (RLS) was described for the determination of propafenone (PPF). The method was based on the ion-association reaction of 12-tungstophosphoric acid (TP) with propafenone. In pH 1.0 acidic medium, TP reacted with PPF to form an ion-associate complex, which resulted in a significant enhancement of RLS intensity. The maximum scattering peak was located at 340 nm, the RLS intensity was proportional to the concentration of PPF in the range 0.003-9.0 microg/mL, and the detection limit (3sigma) of 1.0 ng/mL was obtained at a sampling rate of 60 samples/h. The feasible reaction conditions and FIA parameters for the system were optimized. The method proposed in this paper shows satisfactory reproducibility with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.1% for 10 successive determinations of 2.0 microg/mL PPF. The present method had been successfully applied to the determination of PPF in serum samples and pharmaceutical samples. The results obtained were in agreement with the method used in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia.

  10. Flow injection hydride generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of toxicologically relevant arsenic in urine.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Panayot K; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajce; Tsalev, Dimiter L

    2006-07-15

    Analytical procedure for the determination of toxicologically relevant arsenic (the sum of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate) in urine by flow injection hydride generation and collection of generated inorganic and methylated hydrides on an integrated platform of a transverse-heated graphite atomizer for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination (ETAAS) is elaborated. Platforms are pre-treated with 2.7 micromol of zirconium and then with 0.10 micromol of iridium which serve both as an efficient hydride sequestration medium and permanent chemical modifier. Arsine, monomethylarsine and dimethylarsine are generated from diluted urine samples (10-25-fold) in the presence of 50 mmol L(-1) hydrochloric acid and 70 mmol L(-1)l-cysteine. Collection, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures are 450, 500, 2100 and 2150 degrees C, respectively. The characteristic mass, characteristic concentration and limit of detection (3sigma) are 39 pg, 0.078 microg L(-1) and 0.038 microg L(-1) As, respectively. The limits of detection in urine are ca. 0.4 and 1 microg L(-1) with 10- and 25-fold dilutions. The sample throughput rate is 25 h(-1). Applications to several urine CRMs are given.

  11. PVC membrane electrode for the potentiometric determination of Ipratropium bromide using batch and flow injection techniques.

    PubMed

    Hassouna, M E M; Elsuccary, S A A

    2008-06-15

    Ipratropium (IP(+)) ion-selective electrode (ISE) has been constructed from poly(vinyl chloride) matrix membrane containing Ipratropium-tetraphenylborate (IP-TPB) as the electroactive component using 2-nitrophenyloctylether as plasticizer. The electrode exhibits near Nernstian response to Ipratropium bromide (IPBr) over the concentration range 10(-5) to 10(-2) mol L(-1) and detection limit 5.1x10(-6) mol L(-1). The electrode offers significant advantages including long lifetime (>2 months), excellent stability and reproducibility, fast response time (<10 s), wide pH working range (pH 2-9), high thermal stability (isothermal coefficient 0.37 mV/degrees C) and superior selectivity for IPBr over a large number of inorganic and organic substances. The electrode was successfully used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of IPBr versus sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) and in the determination of IPBr in Atrovent vials and spiked urine samples applying batch and flow injection techniques, with satisfactory results.

  12. Flow injection analysis of nitrate and nitrite in commercial baby foods.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Adrian A; Prasad, Surendra

    2016-04-15

    Commercial baby foods are an easy alternative to home-made meals especially for working parents in a nuclear family therefore it is imperative to determine the nitrate and nitrite content in commercially available baby foods varieties marketed in Fiji. A total of 108 baby food samples were analyzed for nitrate and nitrite using our standardized flow injection analysis (FIA) technique with colorimetric detection technique employing sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride as color reagents where the samples throughput was 38 h(-1). The commercial baby food varieties chosen comprised of vegetables, cereals, fruits and milk. The study shows that the nitrate content of the baby foods studied ranges from 2.10 to 220.67 mg kg(-1) whereas the nitrite content ranges from 0.44 to 3.67 mg kg(-1). Typical recoveries of spiked nitrate residues ranged from 92% to 106%. The study shows that the average nitrate content of commercially available baby foods in Fiji descends below the maximum level proposed by the European Union Legislation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The electrochemiluminescence of luminol on titania nanotubes functionalised indium tin oxide glass for flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Xiao, Changbin; Tu, Yifeng

    2015-10-01

    The titania nanotubes (TiNTs) had been immobilised onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass to intensify the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of luminol. The morphology, structure and properties such as specific surface area and transmittance of synthesised TiNTs were characterised. The results indicated that the TiNTs was several hundred nanometres in length with the diameter of 20 nm. In flow injection analysis (FIA) mode, the TiNTs dramatically enhanced the ECL emission of luminol for about 25 multiple, meanwhile decreased the requirement of buffer pH and exciting potential. The ECL emission of luminol on functionalised ITO electrode has sensitive response toward hydrogen peroxide, and extraordinarily responsive toward the antioxidant. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL emission exhibited a linear response within the concentration range from 0.1 mg L(-1) to 30 mg L(-1) and an absolute detection limit of 1.65×10(-10) g of resveratrol. The gross antioxidant activity of blueberry and kiwi were determined with satisfactory recoveries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Microfluidic Flow Injection Analysis with Thermal Lens Microscopic Detection for Determination of NGAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanović, Tatjana; Liu, Mingqiang; Likar, Polona; Klemenc, Matjaž; Franko, Mladen

    2015-06-01

    A combined microfluidic flow injection analysis-thermal lens microscopy (FIA-TLM) system was applied for determination of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)—a biomarker of acute kidney injury. NGAL was determined following a commercial ELISA assay and transfer of the resulting solution into the FIA-TLM system with a 100 m deep microchannel. At an excitation power of 100 mW, the FIA-TLM provided about seven times lower limits of detection (1.5 pg as compared to a conventional ELISA test, and a sample throughput of six samples per minute, which compares favorably with sample throughput of the microtiter plate reader, which reads 96 wells in about 30 min. Comparison of results for NGAL in plasma samples from healthy individuals and for NGAL dynamics in patients undergoing coronary angiography measured with transmission mode spectrometry on a microtiter plate reader and with FIA-TLM showed good agreement. In addition to improved LOD, the high sensitivity of FIA-TLM offers possibilities of a further reduction of the total reaction time of the NGAL ELISA test by sacrificing some of the sensitivity while reducing the duration of individual incubation steps.

  15. The determination of glutamine with flow-injection chemiluminescence detection and mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ming; Liu, Zhuan-Li; Shi, Yan-Mei; Tian, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple, rapid and sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for the determination of glutamine (Gln) using a flow-injection (FI) system. Gln was found to strongly inhibit the CL signal of the luminol-H(2)O(2)-CuSO(4) system in Na(2)B(4)O(7) solution. A new FI-CL method was developed for the determination of Gln. Parameters affecting the reproducibility and CL detection were optimized systematically. Under the optimized conditions, the corresponding linear regression equation was established over the range of 5.0 x 10(-7) to 2.5 x 10(-6) mol/L with the detection limit of 1.8 x 10(-8) mol/L. The relative standard deviation was found to be 1.8% for 11 replicate determinations of 1.5 x 10(-6) mol/L Gln. The proposed method has been satisfactorily applied for the determination of Gln in real samples (Marzulene-s granules) with recoveries in the range of 98.7-108.6%. The minimum sampling rate was about 100 samples/h. The possible mechanism of this inhibitory CL was studied by fluorescence spectrophotometer and UV-vis spectrophotometer.

  16. Determination of Trace Nickel in Natural Water by Flow Injection Analysis with Cetrimonium Bromide as Sensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. X.; Zhang, C. X.; Li, N.; Zhang, X. S.

    2015-11-01

    2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (5-Br-PADAP) is a highly sensitive chromogenic reagent that can react with most of the transition and alkaline earth metals. The Ni(II)-5-Br-PADAP complex is more stable than other metal-5-Br-PADAP complexes. In the presence of seignette salt, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) can decompose most of the 5-Br-PADAP complexes with metals except for iron, cobalt, and nickel. Cetrimonium bromide (CTMAB) as a sensitizer for the color reaction forms a ternary complex with nickel and 5-Br-PADAP with maximum absorption wavelength at 561 nm. CTMAB can significantly improve the sensitivity and selectivity of nickel determination, as well as the stability and solubility of compounds. In this study, the determination of trace nickel in natural water samples was performed by flow injection analysis. The calibration lines were established in the range of 0-200 μg/l of nickel (n ≥ 3), and the limit of detection was 0.093 μg/l. The relative standard deviation was 2.55% for the determination of 25 μg/l nickel (n ≥ 20). The recoveries of this method ranged from 91.0 to 101% for environmental water samples. A large amount of aluminum, calcium, cadmium, copper, bicarbonate, magnesium, zinc, and iron, except for cobalt, did not interfere with the determination of nickel.

  17. Development of a flow injection analysis method for the determination of acrylamide copolymers in oilfield brines

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C.; Burke, R.A.; Schramm, L.L.; Nasr-El-Din, H.A.

    1995-11-01

    An automated method for the determination of acrylamide polymers by flow injection analysis (FIA) has been developed and optimized for routine use. The method has been extensively tested for interferences common in oilfield brines. Potential interferences were examined from Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 3+}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}}, OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, sample coloration, and commonly used surfactants. The analysis is specific for amides, and the sensitivity to concentration of amide groups in the polymer was shown to be constant as the degree of polymer hydrolysis was varied. The range of the method is 0.1 to 100 mg/L. Sample throughput is 30 samples/h with triplicate analysis. Relative standard deviations of 0.2% are readily obtained from standard solutions and 0.5% from complex samples (at 50 mg/L). The method is applicable to the determination of aqueous, acrylamide-based polymers in process streams, surface waters and oilfield brines.

  18. Method for (236)U Determination in Seawater Using Flow Injection Extraction Chromatography and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Steier, Peter; Nielsen, Sven; Golser, Robin

    2015-07-21

    An automated analytical method implemented in a flow injection (FI) system was developed for rapid determination of (236)U in 10 L seawater samples. (238)U was used as a chemical yield tracer for the whole procedure, in which extraction chromatography (UTEVA) was exploited to purify uranium, after an effective iron hydroxide coprecipitation. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied for quantifying the (236)U/(238)U ratio, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was used to determine the absolute concentration of (238)U; thus, the concentration of (236)U can be calculated. The key experimental parameters affecting the analytical effectiveness were investigated and optimized in order to achieve high chemical yields and simple and rapid analysis as well as low procedure background. Besides, the operational conditions for the target preparation prior to the AMS measurement were optimized, on the basis of studying the coprecipitation behavior of uranium with iron hydroxide. The analytical results indicate that the developed method is simple and robust, providing satisfactory chemical yields (80-100%) and high analysis speed (4 h/sample), which could be an appealing alternative to conventional manual methods for (236)U determination in its tracer application.

  19. Ultrasensitive determination of DNA sequences by flow injection chemiluminescence using silver ions as labels.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lichun; Liu, Xiuhui; Zhou, Min; Ma, Yongjun; Wu, Guofan; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2014-10-27

    We presented a new strategy for ultrasensitive detection of DNA sequences based on the novel detection probe which was labeled with Ag(+) using metallothionein (MT) as a bridge. The assay relied on a sandwich-type DNA hybridization in which the DNA targets were first hybridized to the captured oligonucleotide probes immobilized on Fe3O4@Au composite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and then the Ag(+)-modified detection probes were used to monitor the presence of the specific DNA targets. After being anchored on the hybrids, Ag(+) was released down through acidic treatment and sensitively determined by a coupling flow injection-chemiluminescent reaction system (Ag(+)-Mn(2+)-K2S2O8-H3PO4-luminol) (FI-CL). The experiment results showed that the CL intensities increased linearly with the concentrations of DNA targets in the range from 10 to 500 pmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 3.3 pmol L(-1). The high sensitivity in this work may be ascribed to the high molar ratio of Ag(+)-MT, the sensitive determination of Ag(+) by the coupling FI-CL reaction system and the perfect magnetic separation based on Fe3O4@Au composite MNPs. Moreover, the proposed strategy exhibited excellent selectivity against the mismatched DNA sequences and could be applied to real samples analysis.

  20. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid in soft drinks and beer.

    PubMed

    Luque-Pérez, E; Ríos, A; Valcárcel, M

    2000-04-01

    Two spectrophotometric methods, a photochemical and a non-photochemical, for the determination of ascorbic acid in soft drinks and beer using a flow-injection system are proposed. The non-photochemical method is based on the redox reaction that takes place between ascorbic acid and Fe(III), yielding dehydroascorbic acid and Fe(II). Fe(II) reacts with 1,10-phenantroline, originating the reddish orange Fe(phen)3(2+) complex (ferroin). This complex is spectrophotometrically monitored at 512 nm, and the signal is directly related to the concentration of ascorbic acid in the sample. The photochemical method has the same basis, nevertheless, uses the irradiation with visible light to enhance the redox reaction and so achieve higher sensitivities in the analysis. The non-photochemical method shows a linear range between 5 and 80 microg mL(-1), with a relative standard deviation of 1.6% (n = 11), a detection limit of 2.7 microg mL(-1) and a sample throughput of 60 samples h(-1). The photochemical method shows a linear range between 1 and 80 microg mL(-1), with a relative standard deviation of 1.0% (n = 11 ), a detection limit of 0.5 microg mL(-1) and a sample throughput of 40 samples h(-1).

  1. Study on the interaction of catalase with pesticides by flow injection chemiluminescence and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xijuan; Wang, Zhuming; Chen, Donghua; Luo, Kai; Xiong, Xunyu; Song, Zhenghua

    2014-08-01

    The interaction mechanisms of catalase (CAT) with pesticides (including organophosphates: disulfoton, isofenphos-methyl, malathion, isocarbophos, dimethoate, dipterex, methamidophos and acephate; carbamates: carbaryl and methomyl; pyrethroids: fenvalerate and deltamethrin) were first investigated by flow injection (FI) chemiluminescence (CL) analysis and molecular docking. By homemade FI-CL model of lg[(I0-I)/I]=lgK+nlg[D], it was found that the binding processes of pesticides to CAT were spontaneous with the apparent binding constants K of 10(3)-10(5) L mol(-1) and the numbers of binding sites about 1.0. The binding abilities of pesticides to CAT followed the order: fenvalerate>deltamethrin>disulfoton>isofenphos-methyl>carbaryl>malathion>isocarbophos>dimethoate>dipterex>acephate>methomyl>methamidophos, which was generally similar to the order of determination sensitivity of pesticides. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that CAT bound with hydrophobic pesticides by hydrophobic interaction force, and with hydrophilic pesticides by hydrogen bond and van der Waals force. The pesticides to CAT molecular docking study showed that pesticides could enter into the cavity locating among the four subdomains of CAT, giving the specific amino acid residues and hydrogen bonds involved in CAT-pesticides interaction. It was also found that the lgK values of pesticides to CAT increased regularly with increasing lgP, Mr, MR and MV, suggesting that the hydrophobicity and steric property of pesticide played essential roles in its binding to CAT.

  2. Determination of formaldehyde in Brazilian alcohol fuels by flow-injection solid phase spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonardo S G; Leão, Elsimar S; Dantas, Alaílson F; Pinheiro, Heloísa L C; Costa, Antonio C S; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2004-10-20

    In this work, a solid phase spectrophotometric method in association with flow injection analysis for formaldehyde determination has been developed with direct measurement of light-absorption in C(18) material. The 3,5-diacetyl-1,4-dihydrolutidine produced from the reaction between formaldehyde and fluoral P was quantitatively retained on C(18) support and the spectrophotometric detection was performed simultaneously at 412nm. The retained complex was quickly eluted from C(18) material with the eluent stream consisting of a 50% (v/v) ethanol solution. The results showed that the proposed method is simple, rapid and the analytical response is linear in the concentration range of 0.050-1.5mgL(-1). The limit of detection was estimated as 30mugL(-1) and the R.S.D. 2.2% using a sample volume of 625muL. The system presented an analytical throughput of 20 determinations per hour. The method was successfully applied in the determination of formaldehyde in ethanol fuel.

  3. Colorimetric determination of free and total cholesterol by flow injection analysis with a fiber optic detector.

    PubMed

    Krug, A; Suleiman, A A; Guilbault, G G; Kellner, R

    1992-04-01

    A flow injection method for the determination of total and free cholesterol is presented. Cholesterol esterase and cholesterol oxidase are immobilized on aminoalkyl glass beads. The beads are packed into a tubular glass reactor. The cholesterol esters traversing through the esterase reactor are cleaved to cholesterol and fatty acids. The oxidase reactor converts cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one and hydrogen peroxide is generated. The sample stream is merged with reagent streams consisting of a peroxidase solution and a solution of 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethyl-benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt, and a hydrogen peroxide-dependent color reaction takes place in a short coiled reactor. The signal is monitored by means of fiber optic instrumentation. Cholesterol concentration can be related to the absorption of the oxidized dye form at a wavelength of 425 nm. The working range is 0.5-0.8 mmol l-1, and the sample throughputs are 60 and 30 h-1 for free and total cholesterol, respectively.

  4. Determination of iodide using flow injection with acidic potassium permanganate chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Mohammad; Atiq-ur-Rehman; Waseem, Amir; Nabi, Abdul

    2006-01-01

    A simple and rapid flow-injection method is described for the determination of iodide, based on potassium permanganate chemiluminescence detection via oxidation of formaldehyde in aqueous hydrochloric acid. The calibration graph was linear over the range 1.0-12 x 10(-6) mol/L (r2 = 0.9955) with relative standard deviations (n = 4) in the range 1.0-3.5%. The detection limit (3sigma) was 1.0 x 10(-7) mol/L, with sample throughput of 120/h. The effect of interfering cations [Ca(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), Fe(III) and Pb(II)] and anions (Cl-, SO4(2-), PO4(3-), NO3-, NO2-, F- and SO3(2-)) were studied. The method was applied to iodized salt samples and the results obtained in the range 0.03 +/- 0.005 - 0.10 +/- 0.006 mg I/g were in reasonable agreement with the amount labelled. The method was statistically compared with the results obtained by titration; no significant disagreement at 95% confidence was observed.

  5. Application of hot platinum microelectrodes for determination of flavonoids in flow injection analysis and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Magnuszewska, Jolanta; Krogulec, Tadeusz

    2013-07-05

    The determination of quercetin and rutin by flow injection analysis (FIA) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) using electrochemical detection was described. These flavonoids were determined at normal (unheated) and hot platinum microelectrodes using cyclic voltammetry. When quercetin or rutin is reaching the platinum electrode, a change of the current in the region of the platinum oxide formation is observed. Integration of the current changes in this in this region creates analytical signals in the form of peaks. An increase of temperature to about 76°C in a small zone adjacent to the microelectrode causes an increase of the analytical signal by more than 6 times under FIA conditions. This method enables the use of hot microelectrodes as detectors in HPLC or CE. In CE the improvement of the analytical signal at hot microelectrodes is smaller than in FIA and increase only 1.3-3.4 times. Heated microelectrodes were used for analysis of the flavonoids in natural samples of the plant (extract of sea buckthorn) and a pharmaceutical preparation (Cerutin). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Flow injection amperometric sensor with a carbon nanotube modified screen printed electrode for determination of hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Upan, Jantima; Reanpang, Preeyaporn; Chailapakul, Orawon; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2016-01-01

    Flow injection amperometric (FI-Amp) sensor was developed for sensitive and selective determination of hydroquinone. A simple screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) was modified with various nanomaterials for improvement of sensitivity on the determination of quinone. As a result, the appropriate sensitivity is obtained from the SPCE modified with carbon nanotube (CNT) which indicated that CNT contributed to the transfer of electron to quinone. The reproducibility (n=9) and repeatability (n=111) of SPCE-CNT were obtained at 4.4% and 3.6%RSD, respectively. The SPCE-CNT electrode and enzymatic column were incorporated to the FI-Amp system to determine hydroquinone. Laccase was immobilized on silica gel using a cross-linking method by glutaraldehyde modification and then packed in the column. The laccase column has high efficiency for catalytic oxidation of hydroquinone to quinone, which further detects by amperometric detection. Parameters affecting response of the proposed sensor, i.e., pH, ionic strength, and temperature have been optimized. The proposed system provided a wide linear range between 1 and 50 µM with detection limit of 0.1 µM. Satisfactory recoveries in the range of 91.2-103.8% were obtained for the analysis of water sample.

  7. Determination of nabumetone in pharmaceutical formulation by flow injection analysis (FIA) with UV-detection.

    PubMed

    Can, N O; Tuncel, M; Aboul-Enein, H Y

    2003-01-01

    A precise and accurate FIA method for the quantification of nabumetone (NAB) in pharmaceuticals is described. The best suitable carrier solvent system consisted of ethanol: water (30:70 v/v). Sample solution (4.7 x 10(-6) M NAB) was prepared in this solvent and injected to the instrumental system at a flow rate of 1.2 ml x min(-1). The signals were detected by a UV detector at 228.8 nm. The calibration curves of NAB was linear in the concentration range of 1.4 x 10(-6) M-2.8 x 10(-5) M. The intra- and inter-assay precision were less than 2.6%. The method exhibited a good linearity with the correlation coefficients. The LOD and LOQ values were found to be 4.4 x 10(-7) and 1.3 x 10(-6) M, respectively. The effects of the tablet excipients were insignificant at the 95% probability level. The calculated tablet content was 99% which is agreement with the ranges stated by pharmacopoeias.

  8. MHD Modelling of Coronal Loops: Injection of High-Speed Chromospheric Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Observations reveal a correspondence between chromospheric type II spicules and bright upward-moving fronts in the corona observed in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) band. However, theoretical considerations suggest that these flows are probably not the main source of heating in coronal magnetic loops. Aims. We investigate the propagation of high-speed chromospheric flows into coronal magnetic flux tubes and the possible production of emission in the EUV band. Methods. We simulated the propagation of a dense 104 K chromospheric jet upward along a coronal loop by means of a 2D cylindrical MHD model that includes gravity, radiative losses, thermal conduction, and magnetic induction. The jet propagates in a complete atmosphere including the chromosphere and a tenuous cool (approximately 0.8 MK) corona, linked through a steep transition region. In our reference model, the jet initial speed is 70 km per second, its initial density is 10(exp 11) per cubic centimeter, and the ambient uniform magnetic field is 10 G. We also explored other values of jet speed and density in 1D and different magnetic field values in 2D, as well as the jet propagation in a hotter (approximately 1.5 MK) background loop. Results. While the initial speed of the jet does not allow it to reach the loop apex, a hot shock-front develops ahead of it and travels to the other extreme of the loop. The shock front compresses the coronal plasma and heats it to about 10(exp 6) K. As a result, a bright moving front becomes visible in the 171 Angstrom channel of the SDO/AIA mission. This result generally applies to all the other explored cases, except for the propagation in the hotter loop. Conclusions. For a cool, low-density initial coronal loop, the post-shock plasma ahead of upward chromospheric flows might explain at least part of the observed correspondence between type II spicules and EUV emission excess.

  9. Three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liping; Lu, Gang; Chen, Dachuan; Li, Wenjun; Lu, Chunsheng

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the three-dimensional (3D) injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method. The polymer melt was modeled as a power law fluid and the fibers were considered as rigid cylindrical bodies. The filling details and fiber orientation in the injection-molding process were studied. The results indicated that the SPH method could effectively predict the order of filling, fiber accumulation, and heterogeneous distribution of fibers. The SPH simulation also showed that fibers were mainly aligned to the flow direction in the skin layer and inclined to the flow direction in the core layer. Additionally, the fiber-orientation state in the simulation was quantitatively analyzed and found to be consistent with the results calculated by conventional tensor methods.

  10. Evaluation of lumbar transforaminal epidural injections with needle placement and contrast flow patterns: a prospective, descriptive report.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kim A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Damron, Kim S; McManus, Carla D

    2004-04-01

    Transforaminal epidural steroid injection is one of the commonly employed modalities of treatment in managing nerve root pain. However, there have been no controlled prospective evaluations of epidural and nerve root contrast distribution patterns and other aspects of fluoroscopically directed lumbosacral transforaminal epidural steroid injections. To evaluate contrast flow patterns and intravascular needle placement of fluoroscopically guided lumbosacral transforaminal epidural injections. A prospective, observational study. A total of 100 consecutive patients undergoing fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections were evaluated. The contrast flow patterns, ventral or dorsal epidural filling, nerve root filling, C-arm time, and intravascular needle placement were evaluated. Ventral epidural filling was seen in 88% of the procedures, in contrast to dorsal filling noted in 9% of the procedures. Nerve root filling was seen in 97% of the procedures. Total intravenous placement of the needle was noted in 22% of the procedures, whereas negative flashback and aspiration was noted in 5% of the procedures. Lumbosacral transforaminal epidural injections, performed under fluoroscopic visualization, provide excellent nerve root filling and ventral epidural filling patterns. However, unrecognized intravascular needle placement with negative flashback or aspiration was noted in 5% of the procedures.

  11. Investigation of Thrust Augmentation of a 1600-pound Thrust Centrifugal-flow-type Turbojet Engine by Injection of Refrigerants at Compressor Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William L.; Dowman, Harry W.

    1947-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to determine effectiveness of refrigerants in increasing thrust of turbojet engines. Mixtures of water an alcohol were injected for a range of total flows up to 2.2 lb/sec. Kerosene was injected into inlets covering a range of injected flows up to approximately 30% of normal engine fuel flow. Injection of 2.0 lb/sec of water alone produced an increase in thrust of 35.8% of rate engine conditions and kerosene produced a negligible increase in thrust. Carbon dioxide increased thrust 23.5 percent.

  12. Sickle cell anemia: reference values of cerebral blood flow determined by continuous arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Arkuszewski, M; Krejza, J; Chen, R; Melhem, E R

    2013-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a chronic illness associated with progressive deterioration in patients' quality of life. The major complications of SCA are cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) such as asymptomatic cerebral infarct or overt stroke. The risk of CVA may be related to chronic disturbances in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but the thresholds of "normal" steady-state CBF are not well established. The reference tolerance limits of CBF can be useful to estimate the risk of CVA in asymptomatic children with SCA, who are negative for hyperemia or evidence of arterial narrowing. Continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) MR perfusion allows for non-invasive quantification of global and regional CBF. To establish such reference tolerance limits we performed CASL MR examinations on a 3-Tesla MR scanner in a carefully selected cohort of 42 children with SCA (mean age, 8.1±3.3 years; range limits, 2.3-14.4 years; 24 females), who were not on chronic transfusion therapy, had no history of overt stroke or transient ischemic attack, were free of signs and symptoms of focal vascular territory ischemic brain injury, did not have intracranial arterial narrowing on MR angiography and were at low risk for stroke as determined by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography.

  13. Determination of Zinc-Based Additives in Lubricating Oils by Flow-Injection Analysis with Flame-AAS Detection Exploiting Injection with a Computer-Controlled Syringe

    PubMed Central

    Pignalosa, Gustavo; Cabrera, Noel

    2005-01-01

    A flow-injection system is proposed for the determination of metal-based additives in lubricating oils. The system, operating under computer control uses a motorised syringe for measuring and injecting the oil sample (200 μL) in a kerosene stream, where it is dispersed by means of a packed mixing reactor and carried to an atomic absorption spectrometer which is used as detector. Zinc was used as model analyte. Two different systems were evaluated, one for low concentrations (range 0–10 ppm) and the second capable of providing higher dilution rates for high concentrations (range 0.02%–0.2% w/w). The sampling frequency was about 30 samples/h. Calibration curves fitted a second-degree regression model (r 2 = 0.996). Commercial samples with high and low zinc levels were analysed by the proposed method and the results were compared with those obtained with the standard ASTM method. The t test for mean values showed no significant differences at the 95% confidence level. Precision (RSD%) was better than 5% (2% typical) for the high concentrations system. The carryover between successive injections was found to be negligible. PMID:18924720

  14. A Clinical Study on the Effect of Injection Sites on Efficacy of Anesthesia and Pulpal Blood Flow in Carious Teeth.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q H; Hong, Q C; Zhang, L; Ye, L; Huang, D M

    2017-10-04

    This randomized clinical trial evaluated the efficiency of maxillary infiltration anesthesia in carious teeth at two different injection sites and their impact on the laser Doppler recordings of pulpal blood flow (PBF) during a caries excavation procedure. The null hypothesis tested was that there are no differences in the efficiency of anesthesia and PBF reduction between maxillary infiltrations at the two injection sites. One hundred twenty patients were divided into three groups according to the degree of carious lesion of their maxillary left central incisors (moderate caries, deep caries, or no caries). Forty patients in each group randomly received infiltrations over the root apex of maxillary left central incisors (site X) or over the midpoint of the line connecting the root apexes of both maxillary left central and lateral incisors (site Y) using 0.9 mL 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline. Teeth were pulp tested at five-minute intervals after injection except for the period of cavity cutting, which was done 12 minutes after injection. The PBF changes after injection were monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry. The observation period in this study was 60 minutes. Success of anesthesia was defined as no or mild pain on cavity cutting by visual analog scale recordings. Deep caries group showed significantly higher baseline PBF (p<0.05). All groups showed 100% success of anesthesia and similar duration time (p>0.05). Subgroups that had the injection at site Y showed significantly less reduction of PBF (p<0.05). Cavity-cutting procedures increased the amplitude of the PBF around the lowest value after injection. Independent of the cavity depth, carious anterior teeth anesthetized by infiltration further from the apex had significantly less reduction on the pulpal blood flow compared with teeth anesthetized by infiltration at the apex.

  15. A rapid and accurate method for determining protein content in dairy products based on asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qin-Qin; Li, Yong-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid method and a system to determine protein content using asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry based on reaction between coomassie brilliant blue G250 (CBBG) and protein was established. Main merit of our approach is that it can avoid interferences of other nitric-compounds in samples, such as melamine and urea. Optimized conditions are as follows: Concentrations of CBBG, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), NaCl and HCl are 150 mg/l, 30 mg/l, 0.1 mol/l and 1.0% (v/v), respectively; volumes of the sample and reagent are 150 μl and 30 μl, respectively; length of a reaction coil is 200 cm; total flow rate is 2.65 ml/min. The linear range of the method is 0.5-15 mg/l (BSA), its detection limit is 0.05 mg/l, relative standard deviation is less than 1.87% (n=11), and analytical speed is 60 samples per hour.

  16. Determination of As, Hg and Pb in herbs using slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chia-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of herbs for As, Hg and Pb has been carried out using slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with flow injection vapor generation. Slurry containing 0.5% m/v herbal powder, 0.1% m/v citric acid and 2% v/v HCl was injected into the VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Hg and Pb that obviate dissolution and mineralization. Standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for quantifications in selected herbal powders. This method has been validated by the determination of As, Hg and Pb in NIST standard reference materials SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The As, Hg and Pb analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The precision obtained by the reported procedure was better than 7% for all determinations. The detection limit estimated from standard addition curve was 0.008, 0.003, and 0.007 ng mL(-1) for As, Hg and Pb, respectively.

  17. A bulk liquid membrane-flow injection (BLM-FI) coupled system for the preconcentration and determination of vanadium in saline waters.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Juan J; García-Vargas, Manuel; Moreno, Carlos

    2013-01-15

    A bulk liquid membrane-flow injection (BLM-FI) system has been developed for the preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of vanadium in saline waters. The preconcentration step was based on a bulk liquid membrane containing Aliquat 336 (acting as a carrier) dissolved in dodecane/dodecanol. Vanadium species were chemically pumped due to the pH gradient between the sample (pH 3.2) and the receiving solution (pH 9.8). Vanadium transport through the membrane was monitored by a new and sensitive spectrophotometric method based on its reaction with di-2-pyridyl ketone benzoylhydrazone (dPKBH) in an acidic medium. As a consequence of membrane transport, vanadium was recovered in an ammonium solution, where total vanadium concentration was spectrophotometrically determined at 375 nm, as the pentavalent species, by using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system. Under optimal conditions, this FIA system provided a detection limit of 4.7 μg L(-1) (3s(blank)/m) and RSD 2.72%, for vanadium determination in saline samples. Both preconcentration and determination steps were previously optimized by modified simplex methodologies. The proposed coupled method was successfully applied to the determination of vanadium in a certified reference material (TMDA-62) and in two seawater samples.

  18. Modeling of Transient Flow Mixing of Streams Injected into a Mixing Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voytovych, Dmytro M.; Merkle, Charles L.; Lucht, Robert P.; Hulka, James R.; Jones, Gregg W.

    2006-01-01

    Ignition is recognized as one the critical drivers in the reliability of multiple-start rocket engines. Residual combustion products from previous engine operation can condense on valves and related structures thereby creating difficulties for subsequent starting procedures. Alternative ignition methods that require fewer valves can mitigate the valve reliability problem, but require improved understanding of the spatial and temporal propellant distribution in the pre-ignition chamber. Current design tools based mainly on one-dimensional analysis and empirical models cannot predict local details of the injection and ignition processes. The goal of this work is to evaluate the capability of the modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools in predicting the transient flow mixing in pre-ignition environment by comparing the results with the experimental data. This study is a part of a program to improve analytical methods and methodologies to analyze reliability and durability of combustion devices. In the present paper we describe a series of detailed computational simulations of the unsteady mixing events as the cold propellants are first introduced into the chamber as a first step in providing this necessary environmental description. The present computational modeling represents a complement to parallel experimental simulations' and includes comparisons with experimental results from that effort. A large number of rocket engine ignition studies has been previously reported. Here we limit our discussion to the work discussed in Refs. 2, 3 and 4 which is both similar to and different from the present approach. The similarities arise from the fact that both efforts involve detailed experimental/computational simulations of the ignition problem. The differences arise from the underlying philosophy of the two endeavors. The approach in Refs. 2 to 4 is a classical ignition study in which the focus is on the response of a propellant mixture to an ignition source, with

  19. Emerging flow injection mass spectrometry methods for high-throughput quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Kaldon, Laura G

    2016-01-01

    Where does flow injection analysis mass spectrometry (FIA-MS) stand relative to ambient mass spectrometry (MS) and chromatography-MS? Improvements in FIA-MS methods have resulted in fast-expanding uses of this technique. Key advantages of FIA-MS over chromatography-MS are fast analysis (typical run time <60 s) and method simplicity, and FIA-MS offers high-throughput without compromising sensitivity, precision and accuracy as much as ambient MS techniques. Consequently, FIA-MS is increasingly becoming recognized as a suitable technique for applications where quantitative screening of chemicals needs to be performed rapidly and reliably. The FIA-MS methods discussed herein have demonstrated quantitation of diverse analytes, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, environmental contaminants, and endogenous compounds, at levels ranging from parts-per-billion (ppb) to parts-per-million (ppm) in very complex matrices (such as blood, urine, and a variety of foods of plant and animal origin), allowing successful applications of the technique in clinical diagnostics, metabolomics, environmental sciences, toxicology, and detection of adulterated/counterfeited goods. The recent boom in applications of FIA-MS for high-throughput quantitative analysis has been driven in part by (1) the continuous improvements in sensitivity and selectivity of MS instrumentation, (2) the introduction of novel sample preparation procedures compatible with standalone mass spectrometric analysis such as salting out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) with volatile solutes and NH4(+) QuEChERS, and (3) the need to improve efficiency of laboratories to satisfy increasing analytical demand while lowering operational cost. The advantages and drawbacks of quantitative analysis by FIA-MS are discussed in comparison to chromatography-MS and ambient MS (e.g., DESI, LAESI, DART). Generally, FIA-MS sits 'in the middle' between ambient MS and chromatography-MS, offering a balance between analytical

  20. Flow-injection electrogenerated chemiluminescence determination of fluoroquinolones based on its sensitizing effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyan; Zheng, Xingwang; Zhang, Zhujun

    2005-01-01

    A simple and sensitive flow-injection electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) method for the determination of fluoroquinolones was developed. The method is based on the sensitizing effect of fluoroquinolones on the weak ECL signal of electrochemical oxidation of luminol on the surface of the platinum flake electrode in the medium of 0.1 mol/L Na2CO3-NaHCO3. At the optimum experimental conditions, the relative ECL intensity increased linearly with increasing fluoroquinolones concentration, in the ranges 1.0 x 10(-8)-2.0 x 10(-4) g/mL for norfloxacin, 5.0 x 10(-9)-6.0 x 10(-6) g/mL for oxfloxacin, 2.0 x 10(-8)-1.4 x 10(-5) g/mL for ciprofloxacin, 1.0 x 10(-8)-1.4 x 10(-5) g/mL for pefloxacin, and 1.0 x 10(-9)-1.0 x 10(-5) g/mL for enoxacin, with detection limits of 4.0 x 10(-9) g/mL, 2.0 x 10(-9) g/mL, 1.0 x 10(-8) g/mL, 8.0 x 10(-9) g/mL, and 8.0 x 10(-10) g/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviations were all less than 2.5% for the determination of 2.0 x 10(-6) g/mL fluoroquinolones (n = 11). The method was used to determine these medicines in pharmaceutical samples with satisfactory results. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Use of flow injection mass spectrometric fingerprinting and chemometrics for differentiation of three black cohosh species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huilian; Sun, Jianghao; McCoy, Joe-Ann; Zhong, Haiyan; Fletcher, Edward J.; Harnly, James; Chen, Pei

    2015-03-01

    Flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS) was used to provide chemical fingerprints of black cohosh (Actaea racemosa L.) in a manner of minutes by omitting the separation step. This method has proven to be a powerful tool for botanical authentication and in this study it was used to distinguish between three Actaea species prior to a more detailed chemical analysis using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). Black cohosh has become increasingly popular as a dietary supplement in the United States for the treatment of symptoms related to menopause. However, it has been known to be adulterated with the Asian Actaea dahurica (Turcz. ex Fisch. & C.A.Mey.) Franch. species (syn. Cimicifuga dahurica (Turcz.) Maxim). Existing methods for identification of black cohosh and differentiation of Actaea species are usually lengthy, laborious, and lack robustness, often based on the comparison of a few pre-selected components. Chemical fingerprints were obtained for 77 black cohosh samples and their related species using FIMS in the negative ion mode. The analysis time for each sample was less than 2 min. All data were processed using principal component analysis (PCA). FIMS fingerprints could readily differentiate all three species. Representative samples from each of the three species were further examined using UHPLC-MS to provide detailed profiles of the chemical differences between the three species and were compared to the PCA loadings. This study demonstrates a simple, fast, and easy analytical method that can be used to differentiate A. racemosa, Actaea podocarpa, and A. dahurica.

  2. The comparison of flow injection analysis and quartz chemical sensors for the determination of hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Due to the wide variety of its uses, hydrazine is present in many different work environments. Hydrazine is a suspect human carcinogen and poses a potential health risk if a person is exposed to hydrazine. The levels of hydrazine in the work environment must be monitored to avert potential health risks. Two different methods are investigated as possible monitors for hydrazine in a work environment. The primary goal of this research is to compare a flow injection analysis (FIA) method and a quartz chemical sensor for the determination of hydrazine vapor at sub ppm levels. The first study involves a comparison of FIA methods for direct hydrazine determination in the liquid phase. This study demonstrates the optimum conditions for the types of chemistry being investigated. This information is carried forward to a second study involving a comparison of gas diffusion FIA methods for hydrazine analysis. A third study develops and defines important principles in reverse dual phase gas diffusion FIA. A method for determining carbon dioxide is used to demonstrate these principles. A fourth study applies the information about the chemistry of hydrazine from the second study to the reverse dual phase gas diffusion FIA system developed for carbon dioxide. A fifth study demonstrates the applicability of quartz chemical sensors for hydrazine analysis. This study involves both surface acoustic wave devices (SAWs) and quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs). A summary follows these different studies which compares the success of each method. The criteria of evaluation are reviewed. New developments resulting from this research are presented. A final addendum includes work done on the automation of a method for free chlorine determination.

  3. On-line preconcentration and speciation of arsenic by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Narcise, Cristine Ingrid S; Coo, Lilibeth Dlc; Del Mundo, Florian R

    2005-12-15

    A flow injection-column preconcentration-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometric (FI-column-HGAAS) method was developed for determining mug/l levels of As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with simultaneous preconcentration and speciation. The speciation scheme involved determining As(V) at neutral pH and As(III+V) at pH 12, with As(III) obtained by difference. The enrichment factor (EF) increased with increase in sample loading volume from 2.5 to 10ml, and for preconcentration using the chloride-form anion exchange column, EFs ranged from 5 to 48 for As(V) and 4 to 24 for As(III+V), with corresponding detection limits of 0.03-0.3 and 0.07-0.3mug/l. Linear concentration range (LCR) also varied with sample loading volume, and for a 5-ml sample was 0.3-5 and 0.2-8mug/l for As(V) and As(III+V), respectively. Sample throughput, which decreased with increase in sample volume, was 8-17 samples/h. For the hydroxide-form column, the EFS for 2.5-10ml samples were 3-23 for As(V) and 2-15 for As(III+V), with corresponding detection limits of 0.07-0.4 and 0.1-0.5mug/l. The LCR for a 5-ml sample was 0.3-10mug/l for As(V) and 0.2-20mug/l for As(III+V). Sample throughput was 10-20 samples/h. The developed method has been effectively applied to tap water and mineral water samples, with recoveries ranging from 90 to 102% for 5-ml samples passed through the two columns.

  4. Flow-injection chemiluminescence analysis for sensitive determination of atenolol using cadmium sulfide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Khataee, Alireza; Lotfi, Roya; Hasanzadeh, Aliyeh; Iranifam, Mortaza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-03-15

    A sensitive, rapid and simple flow-injection chemiluminescence (CL) system based on the light emitted from KMnO4-cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) reaction in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in acidic medium was developed as a CL probe for the sensitive determination of atenolol. Optical and structural features of CdS QDs capped with l-cysteine, which synthesized via hydrothermal approach, were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL), and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The CL intensity of KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB was remarkably enhanced in the presence of trace level of atenolol. Under optimum experimental conditions, there is a linear relationship between the increase in CL intensity of KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB system and atenolol concentration in a range of 0.001 to 4.0 mg L(-1) and 4.0 to 18.0 mg L(-1), with a detection limit (3σ) of 0.0010 mg L(-1). A possible mechanism for KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB-atenolol CL reaction is proposed. To prove the practical application of the KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB CL method, the method was applied for the determination of atenolol in spiked environmental water samples and commercial pharmaceutical formulation. Furthermore, corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) technique was utilized for determination of atenolol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Flow injection assessment of nitrate contents in fresh and cooked fruits and vegetables grown in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Surendra; Chetty, Adrian A

    2011-10-01

    Nitrates form part of the essential chemistry of soils and plants. Thus, plant roots are able to absorb nitrate directly from the soil. It has been discovered that human nitrate intake is mainly from vegetables. Vegetables play an important role in human nutrition since they are an outstanding source for vitamins, minerals, and biologically active compounds. In risk assessment of nitrate contents, this study reports the nitrate levels of 8 commonly consumed fruits and vegetables grown in Fiji, tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), eggplant (Solanum melongena), capsicum (Capsicum annuum var. grossum), breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), long bean (Vigna sesquipedalis), jackfruit (A. heterophyllus), pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo), and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). The effects of different types of cooking methods, baking, boiling, and frying, have also been studied. The validated flow injection analysis technique has been used to quantify the nitrate-N levels in the chosen products following nitrate extraction using the activated carbon technique. The mean values of nitrate levels in fresh products ranged from 25.83 to 281.02 mg NO(3) (-) kg(-1) . The study shows that boiling reduced nitrate contents by 65.37% to 25.25%. The frying in soy bean oil elevated nitrate contents from 354.79% to 86.69%, but after baking, nitrate contents remained almost constant with slight increasing trend in the case of tomato (19.97%). The nitrate levels published in the literature for the same types of fruits and vegetables studied have also been reviewed and compared. The average nitrate-N values were comparable or lower than overseas data, but did not present unpredictably high values, that is, they were below the risk level. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Establish an automated flow injection ESI-MS method for the screening of fragment based libraries: Application to Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Riccardi Sirtori, Federico; Caronni, Dannica; Colombo, Maristella; Dalvit, Claudio; Paolucci, Mauro; Regazzoni, Luca; Visco, Carlo; Fogliatto, Gianpaolo

    2015-08-30

    ESI-MS is a well established technique for the study of biopolymers (nucleic acids, proteins) and their non covalent adducts, due to its capacity to detect ligand-target complexes in the gas phase and allows inference of ligand-target binding in solution. In this article we used this approach to investigate the interaction of ligands to the Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90). This enzyme is a molecular chaperone involved in the folding and maturation of several proteins which has been subjected in the last years to intensive drug discovery efforts due to its key role in cancer. In particular, reference compounds, with a broad range of dissociation constants from 40pM to 100μM, were tested to assess the reliability of ESI-MS for the study of protein-ligand complexes. A good agreement was found between the values measured with a fluorescence polarization displacement assay and those determined by mass spectrometry. After this validation step we describe the setup of a medium throughput screening method, based on ESI-MS, suitable to explore interactions of therapeutic relevance biopolymers with chemical libraries. Our approach is based on an automated flow injection ESI-MS method (AFI-MS) and has been applied to screen the Nerviano Medical Sciences proprietary fragment library of about 2000 fragments against Hsp90. In order to discard false positive hits and to discriminate those of them interacting with the N-terminal ATP binding site, competition experiments were performed using a reference inhibitor. Gratifyingly, this group of hits matches with the ligands previously identified by NMR FAXS techniques and confirmed by X-ray co-crystallization experiments. These results support the use of AFI-MS for the screening of medium size libraries, including libraries of small molecules with low affinity typically used in fragment based drug discovery. AFI-MS is a valid alternative to other techniques with the additional opportunities to identify compounds interacting with

  7. Estimating maximum sustainable injection pressure duringgeological sequestration of CO2 using coupled fluid flow andgeomechanical fault-slip analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.; Cappa, F.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2006-10-17

    This paper demonstrates the use of coupled fluid flow andgeomechanical fault slip (fault reactivation) analysis to estimate themaximum sustainable injection pressure during geological sequestration ofCO2. Two numerical modeling approaches for analyzing faultslip areapplied, one using continuum stress-strain analysis and the other usingdiscrete fault analysis. The results of these two approaches to numericalfault-slip analyses are compared to the results of a more conventionalanalytical fault-slip analysis that assumes simplified reservoirgeometry. It is shown that the simplified analytical fault-slip analysismay lead to either overestimation or underestimation of the maximumsustainable injection pressure because it cannot resolve importantgeometrical factors associated with the injection induced spatialevolution of fluid pressure and stress. We conclude that a fully couplednumerical analysis can more accurately account for the spatial evolutionof both insitu stresses and fluid pressure, and therefore results in amore accurate estimation of the maximum sustainable CO2 injectionpressure.

  8. Investigation of SF6 injection during cyclic C2H2/SF6 flow for the formation of geometrically controlled carbon coils.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Chul; Park, Bitna; Park, Semi; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Carbon coils could be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases along with SF6 as an incorporated additive gas using a thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. To obtain geometrically controlled carbon coils, a cyclic process, namely the turning on and off of C2H2 or SF6 flow during the initial reaction stage, was carried out. According to the different reaction processes, different interruption/injection times of C2H2 or SF6 flow and different injection sequences of the gas flow were investigated while maintaining the identical overall injection time of C2H2 and/or SF6 flow. The formation of carbon microcoils (CMCs) is favored by the lowest interruption/injection time ratio of SF6 flow within one cycle. In addition, the injection of SF6 flow prior to the injection of C2H2 flow promotes the formation of CMCs. Based on these results we revealed the role of the SF6 flow injection for the enhanced formation of geometrically controlled CMCs. The etching of materials, thereby promoting an increase in the number of nucleation sites for the survived growth species to form CMCs, by the increased fluorine concentration, originating from the dominant SF6 influx, is understood to be the main cause for the exclusive CMCs formation.

  9. Quantitative investigation of compressible mixing: Staged transverse injection into Mach 2 flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.; Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Planar measurements of the injectant mole fraction distribution and the velocity field within a supersonic mixing flowfield have been made using laser-induced iodine fluorescence. The flowfield investigated in this work is staged transverse injection of air into a Mach 2 freestream. A complete three-dimensional survey of the injectant mole fraction distribution has been generated, and a single planar velocity measurement has been completed. The measurements reveal the dramatic effect of streamwise vortices on the mixing in the near field of the injectors, as well as the rapid mixing generated by staging two fuel injectors. Analysis of the downstream decay of the maximum injectant mole fraction in this and other supersonic mixing flowfields indicates that the relative rate of injectant mixing well downstream of the injectors is independent of injection geometry, freestream Mach number, and injectant molecular weight. Mixing within this region of the flowfield is dominated by small-scale turbulence within the injectant plume. The transition of the dominant mixing mechanism, from vortex-driven mixing in the near field to small-scale turbulent mixing in the far field, was found to occur in the region about 10 diameters downstream of the injectors.

  10. Studies on Mixed-Gas Plasmas and Segmented Flow Injection for Use with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Jane Mary

    In this thesis, mixed gas plasmas and flow injection into air bubbles were investigated for use with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), in order to improve the technique's analytical capabilities. The mixed gas plasmas were created in two different ways: (i) by adding another gas, either argon, nitrogen, or hydrogen, to the nebulizer gas flow using a sheathing device or (ii) by adding nitrogen to the plasma gas flow. The introduction of each sheathing gas led to degraded analyte sensitivity but generally improved plasma stability, resulting in improved detection limits for a few elements. Introduction of nitrogen into the plasma gas, under the same operating conditions used for an all-argon plasma, resulted in degraded sensitivity but improved signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios for Cr, Fe, and Se. The tolerance of ICP-MS to effects caused by the concomitant elements Na and K was improved by addition of nitrogen to the plasma gas flow. Flow injection using a segmented air/water carrier resulted in improved precision, sensitivity, and detection limits compared to those obtained using an all-water carrier. The enhancement in sensitivity was found to be mass dependent and was attributable to more than simply a reduction in dispersion. Under optimized operating conditions, using segmented flow injection resulted in similar or improved detection limits for all analytes except Se when compared to those obtained using continuous nebulization. Changing the gas used to segment the carrier stream did not result in appreciable changes in analyte signals or positions of maximum ionization within the plasma, indicating that the fundamental properties of the plasma did not change. The tolerance of ICP-MS to effects caused by the concomitant elements Na and Ca was not improved by using a segmented carrier compared to that experienced using an all-water carrier.

  11. Chemiluminescence determination of ferulic acid by flow-injection analysis using cerium(IV) sensitized by rhodamine 6G.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju Peng; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2008-11-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid flow-injection chemiluminescence method has been developed for the determination of ferulic acid based on the chemiluminescence reaction of ferulic acid with rhodamine 6G and ceric sulfate in sulphuric acid medium. Strong chemiluminescence signal was observed when ferulic acid was injected into the acidic ceric sulfate solution in a flow-cell. The present method allowed the determination of ferulic acid in the concentration range of 8.0 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-4) mol l(-1) and the detection limit for ferulic acid was 8.7 x 10(-9) mol l(-1). The relative standard deviation was 2.4% for 10 replicate analyses of 1.0 x 10(-5) mol l(-1) ferulic acid. The proposed method was applied to the determination of ferulic acid in Taita Beauty Essence samples with satisfactory results.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  13. Electroanalysis of tetracycline using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode applied to flow injection system.

    PubMed

    Treetepvijit, Surudee; Chuanuwatanakul, Suchada; Einaga, Yasuaki; Sato, Rika; Chailapakult, Orawon

    2005-05-01

    The electrochemical analysis of tetracycline was investigated using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry with a flow injection system. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemical oxidation of tetracycline. Comparison experiments were carried out using as-deposited boron-doped diamond thin film electrode (BDD). Nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode (Ni-DIA) provided well-resolved oxidation irreversible cyclic voltammograms. The current signals were higher than those obtained using the as-deposited BDD electrode. Results using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode in flow injection system coupled with amperometric detection are presented. The optimum potential for tetracycline was 1.55 V versus Ag/AgCl. The linear range of 1.0 to 100 microM and the detection limit of 10 nM were obtained. In addition, the application for drug formulation was also investigated.

  14. Flow injection conductometric system with gas diffusion separation for the determination of Kjeldahl nitrogen in milk and chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Junsomboon, Jaroon; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2008-10-10

    A simple flow injection (FI) conductometric system with gas diffusion separation was developed for the determination of Kjeldahl nitrogen (or proteins) in milk and chicken meat. The sample was digested according to the Kjeldahl standard method and the digest was diluted and directly injected into the donor stream consisting of 4M NaOH. In alkaline medium, ammonium was converted to ammonia, which diffused through the PTFE membrane to dissolve in an acceptor stream (water). Dissociation of ammonia caused a change in conductance of the acceptor solution, which was linearly proportional to the concentration of ammonium originally present in the injected solution. A conductometric flow through cell and an amplifier circuit was fabricated, which helped improve sensitivity of the conductometric detection system. With using a plumbing Teflon tape as a gas diffusion membrane and without thermostating control of the system, a linear calibration graph in range of 10-100mgL(-1) N-NH(4) was obtained, with detection limit of 1mgL(-1) and good precision (relative standard deviation of 0.3% for 11 replicate injections of 50mgL(-1) N-NH(4)). The developed method was validated by the standard Kjeldahl distillation/titration method for the analysis of milk and chicken meat samples. The proposed system had sample throughput of 35h(-1) and consumed much smaller amounts of chemical than the standard method (275mg vs 17.5g of NaOH per analysis, respectively).

  15. Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Finely Perforated Surface Under Conditions of Air Injection at the Expense of External Flow Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V. I.; Boiko, A. V.; Kavun, I. N.

    2015-11-01

    The characteristics of an incompressible turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with air blown in though a finely perforated surface from an external confined flow through an input device, located on the "idle" side of the plate, have been investigated experimentally and numerically. A stable decrease in the local values of the coefficient of surface friction along the plate length that attains 85% at the end of the perforated portion is shown. The experimental and calculated data obtained point to the possibility of modeling, under earth conditions, the process of controlling a turbulent boundary layer with air injection by using the resources of an external confined flow.

  16. Feedback-amplified electrochemical dual-plate boron-doped diamond microtrench detector for flow injection analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Grace E M; Gross, Andrew J; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara; Lubben, Anneke T; Marken, Frank

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical flow cell with a boron-doped diamond dual-plate microtrench electrode has been developed and demonstrated for hydroquinone flow injection electroanalysis in phosphate buffer pH 7. Using the electrochemical generator-collector feedback detector improves the sensitivity by one order of magnitude (when compared to a single working electrode detector). The diffusion process is switched from an analyte consuming “external” process to an analyte regenerating “internal” process with benefits in selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:25735831

  17. An apparatus for the determination of volatile analytes by stopped-flow injection analysis using an integrated fiber optic detector.

    PubMed

    Baxter, P J; Růzicka, J; Christian, G D; Olson, D C

    1994-03-01

    A new method for the analysis of volatile analytes using a stopped-flow injection system originating from either a gas or liquid phase has been developed. It uses an integrated fiber optic detector which also serves as a reactor. This system combines the advantages of gas diffusion and stopped-flow, making the overall assay very sensitive. Both gas streams and aqueous solutions containing ammonia were analyzed. The limits of detection are 40 ppb for gas phase analysis and 1.0 ppm for aqueous phase analysis.

  18. Comparison of Flow Injection MS, NMR, and DNA Sequencing: Methods for Identification and Authentication of Black Cohosh (Actaea racemosa)

    PubMed Central

    Harnly, James; Chen, Pei; Sun, Jianghao; Huang, Huilian; Colson, Kimberly L.; Yuk, Jimmy; McCoy, Joe-Ann H.; Harbaugh Reynaud, Danica T.; Harrington, Peter B.; Fletcher, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Flow injection mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, two metabolic fingerprinting methods, and DNA sequencing were used to identify and authenticate Actaea species. Initially, samples of Actaea racemosa from a single source were distinguished from other Actaea species based on principal component analysis and soft independent modeling of class analogies of flow injection mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry metabolic fingerprints. The chemometric results for flow injection mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry agreed well and showed similar agreement throughout the study. DNA sequencing using DNA sequence data from two independent gene regions confirmed the metabolic fingerprinting results. Differences were observed between A. racemosa samples from four different sources, although the variance within species was still significantly less than the variance between species. A model based on the combined A. racemosa samples from the four sources consistently permitted distinction between species. Additionally, the combined A. racemosa samples were distinguishable from commercial root samples and from commercial supplements in tablet, capsule, or liquid form. DNA sequencing verified the lack of authenticity of the commercial roots but was unsuccessful in characterizing many of the supplements due to the lack of available DNA. PMID:26692457

  19. Structure of backward facing step flow in low Reynolds number controlled by synthetic jet array with different injection velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Saneyuki

    2013-11-01

    This study presents detailed structure of separated flow downstream of a backward facing step affected by a non-uniform periodic disturbance along spanwise direction induced by synthetic jet array. The Reynolds number based on the step height ranged from 300 to 900. The frequency of the synthetic jet actuation was selected within the acceptance frequency range of separating shear layer. The periodic disturbance generates periodic transverse vortices whose size and shape change corresponding to the strength of the disturbance. The effect of different injection velocities in the synthetic jet array from those of adjacent jets on the transverse vortex structure and resulting reattachment process is discussed based on the wall shear stress measured by the Micro Flow Sensor (MFS) and flow visualization. Near wall behavior of the transverse vortex above the MFS was related to the sensor output. The results show that non-uniform injection velocity manipulated in the jet array induces difference in the distorted vortex structure and reattachment process in spanwise direction, which strongly depend on the Reynolds number and injection velocities of the synthetic jets.

  20. Comparison of Flow Injection MS, NMR, and DNA Sequencing: Methods for Identification and Authentication of Black Cohosh (Actaea racemosa).

    PubMed

    Harnly, James; Chen, Pei; Sun, Jianghao; Huang, Huilian; Colson, Kimberly L; Yuk, Jimmy; McCoy, Joe-Ann H; Reynaud, Danica T Harbaugh; Harrington, Peter B; Fletcher, Edward J

    2016-02-01

    Flow injection mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, two metabolic fingerprinting methods, and DNA sequencing were used to identify and authenticate Actaea species. Initially, samples of Actaea racemosa from a single source were distinguished from other Actaea species based on principal component analysis and soft independent modeling of class analogies of flow injection mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry metabolic fingerprints. The chemometric results for flow injection mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry agreed well and showed similar agreement throughout the study. DNA sequencing using DNA sequence data from two independent gene regions confirmed the metabolic fingerprinting results. Differences were observed between A. racemosa samples from four different sources, although the variance within species was still significantly less than the variance between species. A model based on the combined A. racemosa samples from the four sources consistently permitted distinction between species. Additionally, the combined A. racemosa samples were distinguishable from commercial root samples and from commercial supplements in tablet, capsule, or liquid form. DNA sequencing verified the lack of authenticity of the commercial roots but was unsuccessful in characterizing many of the supplements due to the lack of available DNA. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Simultaneous determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in tannery wastewater using low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shujuan; Zhang, Xinshen; Yu, Lingyun; Wang, Li; Li, Hui

    2012-03-01

    Trivalent and hexavalent chromium have been successfully separated and determined using low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometric analysis (LPIC-FIA). A column packed with crosslinking starch microspheres was used for on-line separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) in a flow-injection system because of its absorptive effect on Cr(III). To determine the concentration of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in samples, we used 3.0 mmol/L nitric acid to elute adsorbed Cr(III) from the column and then used ceric sulfate-sulfuric acid as oxidant to convert all Cr(III) into Cr(VI). Then, Cr(VI) directly came from the samples and Cr(VI) came from Cr(III) successively formed a amaranthine complex with diphenycarbazide and the complex shows a maximum absorption at 530 nm. Analytical parameters including the concentration of eluent and oxidant solution, oxidizing temperature, length of oxidizing reaction coil, reaction coil and injection coil, interfering effects, etc., were optimized. The limit of detection was 1.25 μg/L for Cr(VI) and 3.76 μg/L for Cr(III). The linear relationship between absorption with the concentration of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was 0.001-1.000 mg/L and 0.030-1.000 mg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.9995 and 0.9994, respectively. The relative standard deviation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was 1.21% and 1.66%, respectively (n=10). Major cations and anions did not show any interference. We validated this method through certified reference materials and through measuring the recovery in tannery wastewater.

  2. Stability Analysis of High-Speed Boundary-Layer Flow with Gas Injection (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    to improve the injector performance • Shaping of injector – Conical shapes – Cylindrical shape • Suction-blowing of zero mass injection • Conclusions...16Distribution A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Injector of conical shape 5-deg half-angle sharp cone with the injector having the slope...pressure for conical injectors (injection rate 13.5 g/s) =1 =3 Baseline (=0) Injection region 18Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

  3. Post-injection Multiphase Flow Modeling and Risk Assessments for Subsurface CO2 Storage in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface storage of carbon dioxide in geological formations is widely regarded as a promising tool for reducing global atmospheric CO2 emissions. Successful geologic storage for sequestrated carbon dioxides must prove to be safe by means of risk assessments including post-injection analysis of injected CO2 plumes. Because fractured reservoirs exhibit a higher degree of heterogeneity, it is imperative to conduct such simulation studies in order to reliably predict the geometric evolution of plumes and risk assessment of post CO2injection. The research has addressed the pressure footprint of CO2 plumes through the development of new techniques which combine discrete fracture network and stochastic continuum modeling of multiphase flow in fractured geologic formations. A subsequent permeability tensor map in 3-D, derived from our preciously developed method, can accurately describe the heterogeneity of fracture reservoirs. A comprehensive workflow integrating the fracture permeability characterization and multiphase flow modeling has been developed to simulate the CO2plume migration and risk assessments. A simulated fractured reservoir model based on high-priority geological carbon sinks in central Alabama has been employed for preliminary study. Discrete fracture networks were generated with an NE-oriented regional fracture set and orthogonal NW-fractures. Fracture permeability characterization revealed high permeability heterogeneity with an order of magnitude of up to three. A multiphase flow model composed of supercritical CO2 and saline water was then applied to predict CO2 plume volume, geometry, pressure footprint, and containment during and post injection. Injection simulation reveals significant permeability anisotropy that favors development of northeast-elongate CO2 plumes, which are aligned with systematic fractures. The diffusive spreading front of the CO2 plume shows strong viscous fingering effects. Post-injection simulation indicates significant

  4. Evaluation of a direct injection nebulizer interface for flow injection analysis and high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, K.E.

    1986-06-01

    A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) was designed, developed, and evaluated to determine its potential utilization as an effective interface for flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection. The analytical figures of merit for the DIN when used as an interface for FIA-ICP-AES were found to be comparable to or better than those obtained with conventional pneumatic nebulization in terms of limits of detection (LODs), reproducibility, linearity, and interelement effects. Stable plasma operation was maintained for the DIN sample introduction of a variety of pure organic solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, methylisobutylketone, and pyridine. The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES facility was specifically applied for the speciation of inorganic and organometallic species contained in synthetic mixtures, vanilla extracts, and a variety of energy-related materials, such as shale oil process water, coal extracts, shale oil, crude oil, and an SRC II. Suggestions for future research are also considered. 227 refs., 44 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. A comparison of continuous pneumatic nebulization and flow injection-direct injection nebulization for sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.

    1995-08-01

    Dilute nitric acid blanks and solutions containing Ni, Cd, Pb, and U (including two laboratory waste samples) were analyzed eighteen times over a two-month period using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two different sample introduction techniques were employed: flow injection-direct injection nebulization (FI-DIN) and continuous pneumatic nebulization (CPN). Using comparable instrumental measurement procedures, FI-DIN analyses were 33% faster and generated 52% less waste than CPN analyses. Instrumental limits of detection obtained with FI-DIN and CPN were comparable but not equivalent (except in the case of Pb) because of nebulizer-related differences in sensitivity (i.e., signal per unit analyte concentration) and background. Substantial and statistically significant differences were found between FI-DIN and CPN Ni determinations, and in the case of the laboratory waste samples, there were also small but statistically significant differences between Cd determinations. These small (2 to 3%) differences were not related to polyatomic ion interference (e.g., {sup 95}Mo{sup 16}O{sup +}), but in light of the time savings and waste reduction to be realized, they should not preclude the use of FI-DIN in place of CPN for determination of Cd, Pb, U and chemically.

  6. A comparison of continuous pneumatic nebulization and flow injection-direction injection nebulization for sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.

    1997-08-01

    Samples containing Ni, Cd, Pb, and U were analyzed eighteen times over a two-month period using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Sample introduction was accomplished by either flow injection-direct injection nebulization (FI-DIN) or continuous pneumatic nebulization (CPN). Using comparable instrumental measurement procedures, FI-DIN analyses were 33% faster and generated 52% less waste than CPN analyses. Instrumental limits of detection obtained with FI-DIN and CPN were comparable but not equivalent (except in the case of Pb) because of nebulizer-related differences in sensitivity (i.e., signal per unit analyte concentration) and background. Substantial and statistically significant differences were found between FI-DIN and CPN Ni determinations, and in the case of laboratory waste samples, there were also small but statistically significant differences between Cd determinations. These small (2 to 3%) differences were not related to polyatomic ion interference (e.g., {sup 95}Mo{sup 16}O{sup +}), but in light of the time and waste savings to be realized, they should not preclude the use of FI-DIN in place of CPN for determination of Cd, Pb, U, and similar elements present at trace concentrations.

  7. Flow injection analysis with on-line nylon powder extraction for room-temperature phosphorescence determination of thiabendazole.

    PubMed

    Piccirilli, G N; Escandar, G M

    2009-07-30

    A fast and very selective flow-through phosphorescence optosensor was designed and characterized for the determination of the fungicide thiabendazole in water samples. For the first time, thiabendazole was determined using a flow-through optosensor based on the phosphorescence signals obtained when it is retained in a solid support. While thiabendazole does not phosphoresce in packing materials commonly used to fill the flow-cell, significant emission signals are observed when it is retained on nylon powder in the presence of iodide and sulfite. The experimental set-up was based on a flow-injection manifold coupled to an on-line phosphorescence detector containing nylon powder packed in a conventional flow-cell. Potassium iodide and sodium sulfite were added to sample aliquots to improve the thiabendazole phosphorescence and injected in the flow manifold using water as carrier. After the phosphorescence emission was registered, the analyte was eluted from the packed nylon with a 65% (v/v) methanol-water mixture. Optimal instrumentation, experimental and flow conditions were evaluated. Using a sample volume of 2000 microL, the analytical signal showed a very good linearity in the range 12.9-110 ng mL(-1), with a detection limit of 4.5 ng mL(-1), and a sample throughput of about 14 samples per hour. The effects of the presence of concomitant species in the thiabendazole phosphorescence signal were studied, and a comparison with the fluorescence nylon-powder optosensor was carried out and discussed. Finally, the applicability of the proposed optosensor was tested in water samples, and satisfactory recoveries ranging between 97% and 105% were obtained.

  8. Analytical model for steady flow through a finite channel with one porous wall with arbitrary variable suction or injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Jason; Darr, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an exact solution of two-dimensional laminar flow through a finite length channel with one porous wall. It improves upon previous solutions by (1) satisfying the no-slip boundary condition at the channel dead end, (2) adding a turbulent term to the porous wall boundary condition, (3) allowing for arbitrary variable suction or injection across the porous wall, and (4) model validation against new cryogenic liquid hydrogen and oxygen experimental data. Of particular interest in the current work is the modeling of cryogenic propellant flow through a porous liquid acquisition device (LAD) screen and channel inside a propellant tank. First, a detailed review of the literature is presented for previously attempted solutions to channel flow with one porous wall. Next, the governing equations, boundary conditions, and model assumptions are used to derive the analytical flow solution and present general model results for pressure and velocity fields within the channel. Then, the model solution is compared with horizontal LAD channel flow data in liquid oxygen as well as vertical LAD channel flow data in an inverted outflow configuration in liquid hydrogen. Model results are used to update the static cryogenic bubble point pressure model with a dynamic bubble point term which factors in enhanced convection and cooling at the screen during propellant outflow. Convective heat transfer at the LAD screen during outflow is also quantified by comparing model and data. The new analytical flow solution with the dynamic bubble point model is shown to compare well with available cryogenic experimental data.

  9. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2009-08-12

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals using flow injection chemical vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 6% m/v flour, 0.7% m/v thiourea, 0.4 microg mL(-1) Co(II), and 2.5% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the elements studied in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, a standard addition method and an isotope dilution method were used for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in selected cereal samples. The influences of vapor generation conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals were reported. The effectiveness of the vapor generation sample introduction technique in alleviating various spectral interferences in ICP-MS analysis has been demonstrated. This method has been applied for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour reference material, NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour reference material, and cereal samples obtained from local market. The As, Cd, and Hg analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 0.10, 0.16, and 0.07 ng g(-1) for As, Cd, and Hg, respectively, in the original cereal samples.

  10. A review of models for the analysis of the injection of densely loaded flows into entrained flow gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, R.; Rizk, M. A.

    1989-11-01

    An analysis of turbulent gas-particle flow has been conducted for which dilute and dense flows were considered. This study showed that, although, there are a variety of models postulated for the analysis of dilute-phase particulate transport, there exists limited information on dense-phase flow. Several derivations of multi-phase flow equations have appeared in the literature. The differences between these equations are in the momentum source terms, the pressure gradient terms and in the convection terms of the dispersed phase momentum equation. In most of the studies on dilute two-phase flow, the effects of the dispersed phase on fluid turbulence have not been considered at all or considered only in an ad hoc fashion. In the few studies where such effects have been incorporated properly, many simplifying assumptions and various empirical constants were introduced. Evaluation of the constants was made via a comparison between model predictions and experimental data. Among these studies the work of Elghobashi and his co-workers, in general, and of Rizk (1985), in particular, provides a foundation for the extension to densely loaded gas/solid flows. Based on this approach, a new mathematical model has been formulated to analyze densely loaded gas/solid flows taking into account particle-particle interactions and gas-particle interactions. 136 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. A review of models for the analysis of the injection of densely loaded flows into entrained flow gasifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, R.; Rizk, M. A.

    1989-11-01

    An analysis of turbulent gas-particle flow has been conducted for which dilute and dense flows were considered. This study showed that, although, there are a variety of models postulated for the analysis of dilute-phase particulate transport, there exists limited information on dense-phase flow. Several derivations of multi-phase flow equations have appeared in the literature. The differences between these equations are in the momentum source terms, the pressure gradient terms and in the convection terms of the dispersed phase momentum equation. In most of the studies on dilute two-phase flow, the effects of the dispersed phase on fluid turbulence have not been considered at all or considered only in an ad hoc fashion. In the few studies where such effects have been incorporated properly, many simplifying assumptions and various empirical constants were introduced. Evaluation of the constants was made via a comparison between model predictions and experimental data. Among these studies the work of Elghobashi and his co-workers, in general, and of Rizk (1985), in particular, provides a foundation for the extension to densely loaded gas/solid flows. Based on this approach, a new mathematical model has been formulated to analyze densely loaded gas/solid flows taking into account particle-particle interactions and gas-particle interactions.

  12. A submersible battery-powered flow injection (FI) sensor for the determination of nitrate in estuarine and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    David, A R; McCormack, T; Worsfold, P J

    1999-01-01

    The design, construction and performance of a remotely deployed submersible flow injection-based nutrient (total oxidized nitrogen) sensor are described. The sensor featured a custom-built microcomputer and a solid-state, flow-through spectrophotometric detector, and the derivatization chemistry was based on in-line copper-cadmium reduction of nitrate to nitrite, and diazotization with N1NED and sulphanilamide. The limit of detection was 0.0014 mg l(-1) NO3-N and the linear range was 0.0014- 0.77 mg l(-1) with a 260 microl sample volume and a 20 mm path length flow cell. Results from submersed deployments in the Tamar estuary and North Sea are also reported.

  13. A submersible battery-powered flow injection (FI) sensor for the determination of nitrate in estuarine and coastal waters

    PubMed Central

    David, Anthony R. J.; McCormack, Trevor; Worsfold, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    The design, construction and performance of a remotely deployed submersible flow injection-based nutrient (total oxidized nitrogen) sensor are described. The sensor featured a custom-built microcomputer and a solid-state, flow-through spectrophotometric detector, and the derivatization chemistry was based on in-line coppercadmium reduction of nitrate to nitrite, and diazotization with N1NED and sulphanilamide. The limit of detection was 0.0014 mg l-1 NO3-N and the linear range was 0.0014- 0.77 mg l-1 with a 260 μl sample volume and a 20 mm path length flow cell. Results from submersed deployments in the Tamar estuary and North Sea are also reported. PMID:18924837

  14. Determination of free and total sulfites in wine using an automatic flow injection analysis system with voltammetric detection.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Luis Moreira; Grosso Pacheco, Joao; Jorge Magalhaes, Paulo; Antonio Rodrigues, Jose; Araujo Barros, Aquiles

    2010-02-01

    An automated flow injection analysis (FIA) system, based on an initial analyte separation by gas-diffusion and subsequent determination by square-wave voltammetry (SWV) in a flow cell, was developed for the determination of total and free sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) in wine. The proposed method was compared with two iodometric methodologies (the Ripper method and a simplified method commonly used by the wine industry). The developed method displayed good repeatability (RSD lower than 6%) and linearity (between 10 and 250 mg l(-1)) as well as a suitable LOD (3 mg l(-1)) and LOQ (9 mg l(-1)). A major advantage of this system is that SO(2) is directly detected by flow SWV.

  15. Laminar and turbulent flow solutions with radiation and ablation injection for Jovian entry. [radiative heating rates for the Galileo probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent flow-field solutions with coupled carbon-phenolic mass injection are presented for the forebody of a probe entering a nominal Jupiter atmosphere. Solutions are obtained for a 35-degree hyperboloid and for a 45-degree spherically blunted cone using a time-dependent, finite-difference method. The radiative heating rates for the coupled laminar flow are significantly reduced as compared to the corresponding no-blowing case; however, for the coupled turbulent flow, it is found that the surface radiative heating rates are substantially increased and often exceed the corresponding no-blowing values. Turbulence is found to have no effect on the surface radiative heating rates for the no-blowing solutions. The present results are compared with the other available solutions, and some additional solutions are presented.

  16. Examination of the temporal effect in a flow injection analysis system using multi-channel absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Chun; Yu, Tiing; Pai, Su-Cheng

    2009-05-22

    In addition to the Poiseuille effect, a so-called temporal effect was proposed recently to elucidate the commonly observed tailing peak signals of flow injection analysis (FIA). A multi-channel absorbance detector was used in this study to obtain the FIA peaks on both the spatial and temporal coordinates. The temporal effect was analyzed by comparison of the profiles between the experimental and the corresponding Gaussian peaks, and by comparison of asymmetry factors between the spatial and the temporal peaks. The temporal effect appeared to be the major factor under flow rates ranging from 0.5 to 8 ml min (-1). This was despite the presence of a spatially frontal peak observed in the FIA tubing, which was found to result in a tailing peak on the temporal coordinate due to this discussed cause. In addition, the temporal effect became greater as the flow rate increased.

  17. Experimental Study of a Reference Model Vertical-Axis Cross-Flow Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Wosnik, Martin; Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical power, total rotor drag, and near-wake velocity of a 1:6 scale model (1.075 m diameter) of the US Department of Energy’s Reference Model vertical-axis cross-flow turbine were measured experimentally in a towing tank, to provide a comprehensive open dataset for validating numerical models. Performance was measured for a range of tip speed ratios and at multiple Reynolds numbers by varying the rotor’s angular velocity and tow carriage speed, respectively. A peak power coefficient CP = 0.37 and rotor drag coefficient CD = 0.84 were observed at a tip speed ratio λ0 = 3.1. A regime of weak linear Re-dependence of the power coefficient was observed above a turbine diameter Reynolds number ReD ≈ 106. The effects of support strut drag on turbine performance were investigated by covering the rotor’s NACA 0021 struts with cylinders. As expected, this modification drastically reduced the rotor power coefficient. Strut drag losses were also measured for the NACA 0021 and cylindrical configurations with the rotor blades removed. For λ = λ0, wake velocity was measured at 1 m (x/D = 0.93) downstream. Mean velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, and mean kinetic energy transport were compared with results from a high solidity turbine acquired with the same test apparatus. Like the high solidity case, mean vertical advection was calculated to be the largest contributor to near-wake recovery. However, overall, lower levels of streamwise wake recovery were calculated for the RM2 case—a consequence of both the relatively low solidity and tapered blades reducing blade tip vortex shedding—responsible for mean vertical advection—and lower levels of turbulence caused by higher operating tip speed ratio and therefore reduced dynamic stall. Datasets, code for processing and visualization, and a CAD model of the turbine have been made publicly available. PMID:27684076

  18. Experimental Study of a Reference Model Vertical-Axis Cross-Flow Turbine.

    PubMed

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin; Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S

    The mechanical power, total rotor drag, and near-wake velocity of a 1:6 scale model (1.075 m diameter) of the US Department of Energy's Reference Model vertical-axis cross-flow turbine were measured experimentally in a towing tank, to provide a comprehensive open dataset for validating numerical models. Performance was measured for a range of tip speed ratios and at multiple Reynolds numbers by varying the rotor's angular velocity and tow carriage speed, respectively. A peak power coefficient CP = 0.37 and rotor drag coefficient CD = 0.84 were observed at a tip speed ratio λ0 = 3.1. A regime of weak linear Re-dependence of the power coefficient was observed above a turbine diameter Reynolds number ReD ≈ 106. The effects of support strut drag on turbine performance were investigated by covering the rotor's NACA 0021 struts with cylinders. As expected, this modification drastically reduced the rotor power coefficient. Strut drag losses were also measured for the NACA 0021 and cylindrical configurations with the rotor blades removed. For λ = λ0, wake velocity was measured at 1 m (x/D = 0.93) downstream. Mean velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, and mean kinetic energy transport were compared with results from a high solidity turbine acquired with the same test apparatus. Like the high solidity case, mean vertical advection was calculated to be the largest contributor to near-wake recovery. However, overall, lower levels of streamwise wake recovery were calculated for the RM2 case-a consequence of both the relatively low solidity and tapered blades reducing blade tip vortex shedding-responsible for mean vertical advection-and lower levels of turbulence caused by higher operating tip speed ratio and therefore reduced dynamic stall. Datasets, code for processing and visualization, and a CAD model of the turbine have been made publicly available.

  19. Determination of menadione sodium bisulfite in pharmaceutical preparations by flow-injection on-line photochemical spectrofluorometry.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Wang, Z; Cao, X; Chen, H; Ke, Y

    2001-10-01

    A flow-injection on-line photochemical spectrofluorometry (FI-PF) was developed for the determination of menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB) using acetone and sodium sulfite as sensitizing reagents. An injected sample band carried by a water stream was on-line merged with a mixed NaOH, Na2SO3 and acetone solution in a "T" connector. It was then driven to pass a knotted PTFE photochemical reactor (0.5 mm i.d. x 200 cm, KR) that was freely coiled around a 6-W low-pressure mercury lamp. While passing the KR, MSB was derived into an intensively fluorescent compound that was on-line delivered into a flow-through cell and detected therein at an emission wavelength of 459 nm and an excitation wavelength of 336 nm. Under optimized conditions a detection limit of 0.38 microg l(-1) was achieved at a sampling rate of 90 h(-1). Eleven determinations of 0.5 mg l(-1) and 0.05 mg l(-1) MSB standard solution gave RSDs of 0.75% and 1.3%, respectively. The calibration curve was linear in the MSB concentration range 0.005-1.5 mg l(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to assay the MSB content in MSB injection.

  20. Design and realization of the high-precision weighing systems as the gravimetric references in PTB's national water flow standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Rainer; Beyer, Karlheinz; Baade, Hans-Joachim

    2012-07-01

    PTB's ‘Hydrodynamic Test Field’, which represents a high-accuracy water flow calibration facility, serves as the national primary standard for liquid flow measurands. As the core reference device of this flow facility, a gravimetric standard has been incorporated, which comprises three special-design weighing systems: 300 kg, 3 tons and 30 tons. These gravimetric references were realized as a combination of a strain-gauge-based and an electromagnetic-force-compensation load-cell-based balance, each. Special emphasis had to be placed upon the dynamics design of the whole weighing system, due to the high measurement resolution and the dynamic behavior of the weighing systems, which are dynamically affected by mechanical vibrations caused by environmental impacts, flow machinery operation, flow noise in the pipework and induced wave motions in the weigh tanks. Taking into account all the above boundary conditions, the design work for the gravimetric reference resulted in a concrete foundation ‘rock’ of some 300 tons that rests on a number of vibration isolators. In addition to these passively operating vibration isolators, the vibration damping effect is enhanced by applying an electronic level regulation device.

  1. [Reference intervals and its verification for leukocyte differential count in peripheral blood by CytoDiff flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Qu, Chenxue; Pu, Chengwei; Shang, Ke; Dong, Ning; Xing, Ying; Li, Xiufeng; Wang, Jianzhong

    2015-07-14

    To establish and verify the reference intervals for leukocyte differential count in peripheral blood by CytoDiff flow cytometry. Leukocyte differentiation count was analyzed by using hematology analyzer, CytoDiff flow cytometry and morphology differential count in 278 healthy controls, 550 flagged and 102 unflagged samples. The reference intervals of leukocyte parameters were established and verified according to the healthy controls. Then the correlations of five leukocytes were analyzed among hematology analyzer, CytoDiff flow cytometry and morphology differential count. Lymphocyte subsets were analyzed and compared between healthy controls and patients with different diseases. The CytoDiff flow cytometric blast counts were explored to analyze the clinical diagnostic efficiency compared to morphology differential count as a reference method. CytoDiff flow cytometry can differentiate the leukocyte into 16 parameters, including percentage and absolute count, therefore 32 parameters in total. Among these parameters, 18 parameters had significant difference between male and female (P < 0. 05), and the others had no difference (P >0. 05). Except the CD16pos monocyte, there were no difference among ages in other parameters. The correlation between hematology analyzer, CytoDiff flow cytometry and morphology differential count were good for neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, basophils and eosinophils in healthy controls and clinical samples. When the cutoff value of the ratio of T + NK and B lymphocyte was set at 1. 0 by ROC, the sensitivity was 90. 9% and specificity was 99. 8% for diagnosing the chronic lymphocyte leukemia (CLL). When the cutoff value of blast count by CytoDiff flow cytometry was set at 1%, the sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 96. 1% and accuracy was 96. 2% by morphology differential blast count for the reference method. Establish and verify the reference interval of leukocyte differential count in peripheral blood by CytoDiff flow cytometry in

  2. Skin friction reduction in supersonic flow by injection through slots, porous sections and combinations of the two

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, J. A.; Vanovereem, J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of skin friction reduction in a Mach 3.0 air steam with gaseous injection through a tangential slot, a porous wall section, and combinations of the two was conducted. The primary data obtained were wall shear values measured directly with a floating element balance and also inferred from Preston Tube measurements. Detailed profiles at several axial stations, wall pressure distributions and schlieren photographs are presented. The data indicate that a slot provides the greatest skin friction reduction in comparison with a reference flat plate experiment. The porous wall section arrangement suffers from an apparent roughness-induced rise in skin friction at low injection rates compared to the flat plate. The combination schemes demonstrated a potential for gain.

  3. Direct automatic determination of bitterness and total phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil using a pH-based flow-injection analysis system.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mesa, José A; Mateos, Raquel

    2007-05-16

    Flavor and taste are sensorial attributes of virgin olive oil (VOO) highly appreciated by consumers. Among the organoleptic properties of VOO, bitterness is related to the natural phenolic compounds present in the oil. Sensorial analysis is the official method to evaluate VOO flavor and bitterness, which requires highly specialized experts. Alternatively, methods based on physicochemical determinations could be useful for the industry. The present work presents a flow-injection analysis system for the direct automatic determination of bitterness and total phenolic compounds in VOO without prior isolation, based on the spectral shift undergone by phenolic compounds upon pH variation. This system enables a complete automation of the process, including dilution of the sample and its sequential injection into buffer solutions of acidic and alkaline pH. The variation of the absorbance at 274 nm showed a high correlation with bitterness and the total phenolic content of VOO, due to the close relationship between these two parameters. Thus, the proposed method determines the bitterness and phenolic compounds, with results similar to those from reference methods (relative errors ranging from 1% to 8% for bitterness and from 2% and 7% for phenolic compounds). The precision evaluated at two levels of both parameters ranged between 0.6% and 1.5% for bitterness and between 0.7% and 2.6% for phenolic compounds.

  4. Flow injection determination of copper in mussels by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after on-line continuous ultrasound-assisted extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Cid, A.; Yebra, M. C.

    2002-05-01

    Copper was extracted on-line from solid mussel samples by a simple and rapid continuous ultrasound-assisted extraction system (CUES). The CUES is connected to a flow injection manifold, which permits the on-line flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper. The manifold is simple and the copper signal was obtained for a volume of 250 μl of acid leachate injected into an ultrapure water carrier stream. An experimental design was used for the optimization of the continuous leaching procedure. Compared to off-line ultrasonic-assisted extraction methods, sonication time is reduced by factors of 6-12, the leaching takes place at room temperature (20 °C), and the analysis time is reduced because centrifugation was not necessary to separate the liquid phase. The method allowed a total sampling frequency of 11 samples h -1, with a relative standard deviation for the complete procedure of 2.7% (for a sample containing 2.0 μg g -1 copper (wet mass, n=11). The limit of detection was 0.06 μg g -1 (wet mass) for 30 mg of sample. The analytical procedure was verified for a reference standard material (TORT-1). The analytical procedure was applied to mussel samples from Galicia (Spain).

  5. Flow-injection chemiluminescence analysis for sensitive determination of atenolol using cadmium sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khataee, Alireza; Lotfi, Roya; Hasanzadeh, Aliyeh; Iranifam, Mortaza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive, rapid and simple flow-injection chemiluminescence (CL) system based on the light emitted from KMnO4-cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) reaction in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in acidic medium was developed as a CL probe for the sensitive determination of atenolol. Optical and structural features of CdS QDs capped with L-cysteine, which synthesized via hydrothermal approach, were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL), and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The CL intensity of KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB was remarkably enhanced in the presence of trace level of atenolol. Under optimum experimental conditions, there is a linear relationship between the increase in CL intensity of KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB system and atenolol concentration in a range of 0.001 to 4.0 mg L- 1 and 4.0 to 18.0 mg L- 1, with a detection limit (3σ) of 0.0010 mg L- 1. A possible mechanism for KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB-atenolol CL reaction is proposed. To prove the practical application of the KMnO4-CdS QDs-CTAB CL method, the method was applied for the determination of atenolol in spiked environmental water samples and commercial pharmaceutical formulation. Furthermore, corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) technique was utilized for determination of atenolol. Figure S2. Optimization of the CL reaction conditions: (a) effect of KMnO4 concentration. Conditions: the concentrations of H2SO4, CdS QDs and atenolol were 1 mol L-1, 0.35 mol L-1, and 4.0 mg L-1, respectively; (b) effect of acidic media. Conditions: the concentrations of KMnO4 was 0.04 mmol L-1, other conditions were as in (a); (c) effect of CdS QDs concentration. Conditions: H2SO4 concentration was 1.0 mol L-1, other conditions were as in (b), and (d) effect of CTAB concentration. Conditions: CdS QDs concentration was 0.35 mmol L-1, other conditions were as in (c). Figure S3. UV-Vis absorption spectra of KMnO4-CdS QDs-atenolol CL system

  6. Intravitreal injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may have this procedure if you have: Macular degeneration : An eye disorder that slowly destroys sharp, central ... injection References American Academy of Ophthalmology. Age-related macular degeneration PPP - updated 2015. Aao.org web site. Updated ...

  7. Automated continuous monitoring of inorganic and total mercury in wastewater and other waters by flow-injection analysis and cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated continuous monitoring system for the determination of inorganic and total mercury by flow-injection analysis followed by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The method uses a typical flow-injection manifold where digestion and reduction of the injected sample takes place. Mercury is removed by aeration from the flowing stream in a specially designed air-liquid separator and swept into a silica cell for absorption measurement at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. A calibration curve up to 10 μg Hg ml-1 using three different path length cells is obtained with a detection limit of 0.02 μg Hg ml-1. The sampling rate of an injection every 3 min produces 20 results per hour from a flowing stream. PMID:18925201

  8. Optically specific detection of D- and L-lactic acids by a flow-injection dual biosensor system with on-line microdialysis sampling.

    PubMed

    Nanjo, Yoko; Yano, Takayuki; Hayashi, Ryuzo; Yao, Toshio

    2006-08-01

    A flow-injection dual biosensor system with microdialysis sampling is proposed for the simultaneous determination of D-lactic and L-lactic acids. The dialysate from the microdialysis tube is delivered to a sample loop of the six-way autoinjector and then automatically injected into the flow-injection line with a dual enzyme electrode arranged in perpendicular to the flow direction. The dual enzyme electrode is constructed by hybridizing a poly(1,2-diaminobenzene) film into two sensing parts which respond selectively to D-lactic and L-lactic acids, respectively, without any cross-reactivity. The proposed flow-injection analysis method can be successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of D,L-lactic acids in alcoholic beverages.

  9. Laminar boundary layer flow of a nanofluid along a wedge in the presence of suction/injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasmani, R. Md.; Muhaimin, I.; Kandasamy, R.

    2013-05-01

    The behavior of an incompressible laminar boundary layer flow over a wedge in a nanofluid with suction or injection has been investigated. The model used for the nanofluid integrates the effects of the Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters. The governing partial differential equations of this problem, subjected to their boundary conditions, are solved by the Runge-Kutta-Gill technique with the shooting method for finding the skin friction and the rate of heat and mass transfer. The result are presented in the form of velocity, temperature, and volume fraction profiles for different values of the suction/injection parameter, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, pressure gradient parameter, Prandtl number, and Lewis number. The conclusion is drawn that these parameters significantly affect the temperature and volume fraction profiles, but their influence on the velocity profile is comparatively smaller.

  10. Simultaneous flow-injection measurement of hydroxide, chloride, hypochlorite and chlorate in Chlor-alkali cell effluents.

    PubMed

    Tian, K; Dasgupta, P K

    2000-07-31

    A flow injection method is reported for the simultaneous determination of hydroxide, chloride, hypochlorite, and chlorate ions that exist in Chlor-alkali cell effluents in concentrations ranging from sub-millimolar to several molar. The hydroxide concentration is determined by the heat of neutralization of the injected sample into an acidic carrier stream and the chloride concentration is calculated from the measured conductance data. For the measurement of hypochlorite and chlorate, colorimetric iodometry is used. Iodide is oxidized to iodine by OCl(-) and ClO(3)(-) in acid solutions. While room temperature is sufficient for the reaction between OCl(-) and I(-), the reaction between ClO(3)(-) and I(-) requires an elevated temperature. The different reaction requirements are utilized to differentiate between NaOCl and NaClO(3), respectively.

  11. Determination of aqueous ozone for potable water treatment applications by chemiluminescence flow-injection analysis. A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Chung, H K; Bellamy, H S; Dasgupta, P K

    1992-06-01

    The feasibility of determining aqueous ozone by chemiluminescence flow-injection analysis (CL-FIA) was studied for applications in potable water treatment. The ozonated water sample is injected into a pure water carrier and mixed with a dye reagent in front of a photodetector. Many reagents undergo fast CL reactions with aqueous ozone. Most of these reactions display considerable selectivity for ozone over other oxidants of importance in water treatment. Even when there is steady-state response to another oxidant, significant discrimination against the interferents is possible by taking advantage of the much faster kinetics of the CL reaction with ozone. A simple design of a Siemens-type ozone generator and preparation of standard ozone solutions are also described.

  12. Discharge flow of granular media from silos with a lateral orifice and injection of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aussillous, Pascale; Zhou, Yixian; Ruyer, Pierre; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Few studies concern the prediction of the mass flow rate of a granular media discharged from a silo with a lateral orifice. However, this situation can have pratical interest considering a tank of granular material with a leak on its side. We studied experimentally the discharge of a vertical silo filled by spherical glass beads. We consider rectangular silos with a rectangular orifice. The impact of size, aspect ratio and position of the orifice and the effect of an additional air flow were studied. The measured parameters are the mass flow rate and the pressure along the silo, whereas the controlled parameters are the size of particles, and the flow rate of air. We identified two regimes of discharge according to the aspect ratio (of width to height) of the rectangular orifice. Increasing the air flow rate induces an increase of the granular media flow rate. Using a simple physical model to describe the grains and gas flow, we put in evidence the role played by the air pressure gradient at the outlet. Then we compared the experimental results with continuum Navier-Stokes simulations with the granular μ(I)-rheology. We showed that the continuum μ(I)-rheology describes well our discharge flow of granular media from silos, taking into account the effect of the position of the orifice as well as the coupling with the gas flow.

  13. Sensitive kinetic-catalytic spectrophotometric method for cobalt determination using a chip coupled to a multisyringe flow injection analysis system.

    PubMed

    Abouhiat, Fatima Zohra; Henríquez, Camelia; El Yousfi, Farida; Cerdà, Víctor

    2017-05-01

    The development of an automated kinetic-catalytic spectrophotometric method for cobalt determination is presented. The method is based on the catalytic effect of Co in the oxidation of hydroxybenzoic acid by H2O2 in basic media. The method has been automated using a multisyringe flow injection system coupled to a monolithic flow conduit called chip (chip-MSFIA). All reagents and sample are simultaneously propelled into the chip to achieve an efficient mixing. The reaction product is monitored at 482nm. The reaction takes place very fast at room temperature, thus the fixed-time method is applied to quantify Co concentration in samples. Variables such as, reagents concentration, pH, flow rate and reaction time have been optimized to improve the selectivity and sensitivity of the proposed system. Under optimal conditions, Co may be determined in the range 0.02-10.00μgL(-1) achieving a limit of detection of 0.02μgL(-1) and an injection throughput of 68h(-1). Relative standard deviations are below 3%. The method has been successfully applied to water samples and a pharmaceutical formulation. The accuracy of the method has been validated by add-recovery tests and satisfactory recoveries from 91% to 97% were obtained.

  14. Potentiometric flow injection sensing system for determination of heparin based on current-controlled release of protamine.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jiahong; Ding, Jiawang; Chen, Yan; Qin, Wei

    2015-02-09

    A flow injection system incorporated with a polycation-sensitive polymeric membrane electrode in the flow cell is proposed for potentiometric determination of heparin. An external current in nano-ampere scale is continuously applied across the polymeric membrane for controlled release of protamine from the inner filling solution to the sample solution, which makes the electrode membrane regenerate quickly after each measurement. The protamine released at membrane-sample interface is consumed by heparin injected into the flow cell via their strong electrostatic interaction, thus decreasing the measured potential, by which heparin can be detected. Under optimized conditions, a linear relationship between the potential peak height and the concentration of heparin in the sample solution can be obtained in the range of 0.1-2.0 U mL(-1), and the detection limit is 0.06 U mL(-1). The proposed potentiometric sensing system has been successfully applied to the determination of heparin in undiluted sheep whole blood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance comparison of supersonic ejectors with different motive gas injection schemes applicable for flowing medium gas laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, G.; Subbarao, P. M. V.; Mainuddin; Tyagi, R. K.; Dawar, A. L.

    2017-05-01

    A class of flowing medium gas lasers with low generator pressures employ supersonic flows with low cavity pressure and are primarily categorized as high throughput systems capable of being scaled up to MW class. These include; Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) and Hydrogen (Deuterium) Fluoride (HF/DF). The practicability of such laser systems for various applications is enhanced by exhausting the effluents directly to ambient atmosphere. Consequently, ejector based pressure recovery forms a potent configuration for open cycle operation. Conventionally these gas laser systems require at least two ejector stages with low pressure stage being more critical, since it directly entrains the laser media, and the ensuing perturbation of cavity flow, if any, may affect laser operation. Hence, the choice of plausible motive gas injection schemes viz., peripheral or central is a fluid dynamic issue of interest, and a parametric experimental performance comparison would be beneficial. Thus, the focus is to experimentally characterize the effect of variation in motive gas supply pressure, entrainment ratio, back pressure conditions, nozzle injection position operated together with a COIL device and discern the reasons for the behavior.

  16. Reference values of ductus venosus blood flow velocities and waveform indices from 10 to 20 weeks of gestation.

    PubMed

    Axt-Fliedner, R; Diler, S; Georg, T; Friedrich, M; Diedrich, K

    2004-03-01

    Our objective was to establish reference values for ductus venosus flow velocities during ventricular systole (S wave) and diastole (D wave), the lowest forward velocity during atrial contraction (A wave) and different calculated indices [(S-A)/D), (S-A)/Vmean, (S-A)/S, S/A, S/D)]. Ductus venosus flow velocity waveforms were obtained from 329 singleton pregnancies at 10-20 weeks of gestation by pulsed-wave color Doppler. Reference values were constructed by means of a quadratic regression model after logarithmic transformation of original data. A significant increase in blood flow velocity during atrial contraction [A-wave, (3.5 cm/s to 9.9 cm/s and 12.9 cm/s to 66.3 cm/s respectively, 5-95% centile)], during ventricular systole [S-wave, (19.2 cm/s to 30.1 cm/s and 45.1 cm/s to 84.9 cm/s respectively, 5-95% centile)] and during early ventricular diastole [D-wave, (15.7 cm/s to 26.1 cm/s and 37.9 cm/s to 77.9 cm/s respectively, 5-95% centile)]. The venous indices values decreased with increasing gestational age. In 3 of 329 fetuses (0.91%) a reversed flow during atrial contraction was seen. Assessment of ductus venosus blood flow velocities during first and second trimester is feasible by means of color Doppler flow. The reference ranges and calculated velocities established in this study may be utilized in studies dealing with the role of ductus venosus blood flow in chromosomal abnormal fetuses, fetuses with congenital heart disease or fetal myocardial insufficiency of hypoxic origin.

  17. Characterizing Mechanical and Flow Properties using Injection Falloff Tests, March 28, 2011

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation asserts that Injection Fall-off Testing is an efficient way to derive in-situ information on most rock types, after-closure analysis can derive rock transmissibility and pore fluid pressure, and this is used to assist in the HF process.

  18. Pulsed Injection Flow Control for Throttling in Supersonic Nozzles - A Computational Fluid Dynamics Design Study (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-14

    other high temperature real gas effects. Although such effects are relevant when numerically 4 assessing rocket engine performance, the fundamental...Study of Rocket Thrust Control by Gas Injection,” Massachusetts Institite of Technolog, Naval Supersonic Laboratory, Technical Report 448...because of its space access mission. However, potential cadidates for this technology include gas turbines and rockets whose application required the

  19. Design of Seismic Networks for CO2 Sequestration Utilizing Pre-injection Fluid Flow, Seismicity and Ground Motion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxall, W.; Layland-Bachmann, C. E.; Doughty, C.; Jeanne, P.; White, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of passive seismic monitoring during and after CO2 injection is twofold. First, analysis of induced seismicity can be used to track the migration of subsurface pressure and the CO2 plume and provide constraints on the reservoir permeability structure using seismic tomography and by mapping earthquake hypocenters through time. Earthquake focal mechanisms can also help characterize the in situ stress state. The second purpose is to assess induced seismicity hazard and risk on an ongoing basis throughout the life of the project. Both objectives are important in optimizing the design of a seismic monitoring network before injection begins, which requires initial characterization of the seismicity that might be expected. We approach this problem together with pre-injection hazard assessment by simulating the potential range of induced seismicity behavior that might result from a given injection scenario. Our approach assumes that comprehensive site characterization, including rock and hydrological properties, in situ stress, larger faults, and dominant fracture systems, has been completed. We use the code RSQSim to simulate seismicity at reservoir scale under constant rate tectonic loading and injection-induced pressure change histories modeled using the flow code TOUGH2. Monitoring network design, including the network configuration and instrument sensitivity, can then be based on the simulated hypocenter distributions and ground motion amplitudes calculated by convolving earthquake source parameters with synthetic Green's functions determined from the velocity structure. We show examples of multiple realizations of hypocenter and frequency-magnitude distributions generated by sampling the uncertainties in model input parameters and by randomizing fault and fracture properties. The multiple realizations - which are required for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment - enable us to introduce a probabilistic element to inform network design optimization.

  20. Numerical simulations of shock-wave interaction with a boundary layer in the plane supersonic flows with jet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beketaeva, A. O.; Moisseyeva, Ye. S.; Naimanova, A. Zh.

    2016-03-01

    A supersonic air flow in a plane channel with a transverse turbulent jet of hydrogen injected through a slot on the bottom wall is simulated. The algorithm for solving the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for the flow of a perfect multispecies gas on the basis of the WENO scheme is proposed. The main attention is paid to the interaction of the shock-wave structure with the boundary layers on the upper and lower duct walls under the conditions of an internal turbulent flow. Namely, a detailed study of the structure of the flow is done, and separation and mixing depending on the jet slot width are investigated. It is found that in addition to well-known shock-wave structures produced by the interaction of the free stream with the transverse jet and the bow shock interaction with the boundary layers near the walls, an additional system of shock waves and the flow separation arise on the bottom wall downstream at some distance from the jet. The comparison with the experimental data is performed.

  1. The history of the microsphere method for measuring blood flows with special reference to myocardial blood flow: a personal memoir.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien I E

    2017-04-01

    We use many types of equipment and technologies to make our measurements but give little thought to how they developed. Evolution was once described as a series of recoils from blind alleys, and this is exemplified by the gradual development of the microsphere method of measuring blood flows. The microsphere method is one of the most frequently used methods for measuring blood flow to organs and portions of organs. The method can measure myocardial blood flow with reasonable accuracy (within 10%) down to samples weighing >50 mg but probably will not do so for samples weighing 1-10 mg. Microspheres with diameters from 10 to 15 μm provide the best compromise between accurate flow measurement and retention in tissue. Radioactive labels have been almst entirely replaced by fluorescent labels, but colored microspheres and neutron-activated labels are also used.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The contributions of the various individuals who developed the microsphere method of measuring regional blood flows and how these advances took place are brought to light in this paper.

  2. CSCM Navier-Stokes thermal/aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic nozzle flows with slot injection and wall cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codding, William H.; Lombard, C. K.; Yang, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Conservative Supra-Characteristic Method (CSCM) Navier-Stokes solver is applied to ascertain the problems inherent in the design of a nominal Mach 14 nozzle for NASA-Ames' 3.5-ft Hypersonic Wind Tunnel; attention is given to the effects of boundary layer cooling systems on the aerodynamic redesign of the nozzle throat region. Complete nozzle flowfields are calculated with and without slot injection of either hot or cold fluid into the boundary layer just upstream of the throat, as well as with alternatively adiabatic and cold walls. The CSCM method is capable of resolving subtle differences in the flows.

  3. Two-dimensional analysis of two-phase reacting flow in a firing direct-injection diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee

    1989-01-01

    The flow field, spray penetration, and combustion in two-stroke diesel engines are described. Fuel injection begins at 345 degrees after top dead center (ATDC) and n-dodecane is used as the liquid fuel. Arrhenius kinetics is used to calculate the reaction rate term in the quasi-global combustion model. When the temperature, fuel, and oxygen mass fraction are within suitable flammability limits, combustion begins spontaneously. No spark is necessary to ignite a localized high temperature region. Compression is sufficient to increase the gaseous phase temperature to a point where spontaneous chemical reactions occur. Results are described for a swirl angle of 22.5 degrees.

  4. Novel flow injection-fluorometric method for the determination of trace silicate and its application to ultrapurified water analysis.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akhmad; Oshima, Mitsuko; Ishii, Naoe; Motomizu, Shoji

    2003-08-29

    A highly sensitive fluorescence quenching method for the determination of silicate based on the formation of an ion associate between molybdosilicate and Rhodamine B (RB) in nitric acid medium was developed. A flow injection system coupled with a fluorescence detector was used for the measurement of fluorescence intensity at 560 and 580 nm as excitation and emission wavelengths, respectively. The calibration graph for Si showed a linear range of 0.1-5 ng cm(-3) with correlation coefficient of 0.9999, and the detection limit of 0.06 ng cm(-3). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of silicate in ultrapurified water with satisfactory results.

  5. A portable battery-powered flow injection monitor for the in situ analysis of nitrate in natural waters

    PubMed Central

    Blundell, N. J.; Hopkins, A.; Worsfold, P. J.; Casey, H.

    1993-01-01

    The design and performance of a portable, automated flow injection (FI)-based photometric monitor are described. The system is controlled by an in-house microcomputer system that enables the monitor (including a solid state detector) to operate from a 12 V battery supply. The monitor uses the cadmium reduction/diazotization method to analyse for nitrate with a linear range of 0 to 12 mg l-1 and a limit of detection of 0.05 mg l-1 (NO3-N). The hardware and software design, monitor performance and results obtained during unattended operation are presented. PMID:18924971

  6. CSCM Navier-Stokes thermal/aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic nozzle flows with slot injection and wall cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codding, William H.; Lombard, C. K.; Yang, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Conservative Supra-Characteristic Method (CSCM) Navier-Stokes solver is applied to ascertain the problems inherent in the design of a nominal Mach 14 nozzle for NASA-Ames' 3.5-ft Hypersonic Wind Tunnel; attention is given to the effects of boundary layer cooling systems on the aerodynamic redesign of the nozzle throat region. Complete nozzle flowfields are calculated with and without slot injection of either hot or cold fluid into the boundary layer just upstream of the throat, as well as with alternatively adiabatic and cold walls. The CSCM method is capable of resolving subtle differences in the flows.

  7. Partial least-squares-discriminant analysis differentiating Chinese wolfberries by UPLC-MS and flow injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiying; Jiang, Qianqian; Shi, Haiming; Niu, Yuge; Gao, Boyan; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2014-09-17

    Lycium barbarum L. fruits (Chinese wolfberries) were differentiated for their cultivation locations and the cultivars by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and flow injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting techniques combined with chemometrics analyses. The partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to the data projection and supervised learning with validation. The samples formed clusters in the projected data. The prediction accuracies by PLS-DA with bootstrapped Latin partition validation were greater than 90% for all models. The chemical profiles of Chinese wolfberries were also obtained. The differentiation techniques might be utilized for Chinese wolfberry authentication.

  8. Fluid flows due to earthquakes with reference to Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    Yucca Mountain geohydrology is dominated by a deep water table in volcanic tuffa beds which are cut by numerous faults. Certain zones in these tuffas and most of the fault apertures are filled with a fine-grained calcitic cement. Earthquakes have occured in this region with the most recent being of magnitude 5.6 and at a distance of about 20 km. Earthquakes in western U.S.A. have been observed to cause fluid flows through and out of the crust of the Earth. These flows are concentrated along the faults with normal faulting producing the largest flows. An earthquake produces rapid pressure changes at and below the ground surface, thereby forcing flows of gas, water, slurries and dissolved salts. In order to examine the properties of flows produced by earthquakes, we simulate the phenomena using computer-based modeling. We investigate the effects of adults and high permeability zones on the pattern of flows induced by the earthquake. We demonstrate that faults act as conduits to the surface and that the higher the permeability of a zone, the more the flows will concentrate there. Numerical estimates of flow rates from these simulations compare favorably with data from observed flows due to earthquakes. Simple volumetric arguments demonstrate the ease with which fluids from the deep water table can reach the surface along fault conduits.

  9. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ni; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling; Sahayam, A C

    2015-02-20

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL(-1) Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g(-1) for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample.

  10. Validation Studies for Numerical Simulations of Flow Phenomena Expected in the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic VHTR Reference Design

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson

    2005-09-01

    The final design of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) of the fourth generation of nuclear power plants (Gen IV) has not yet been established. The VHTR may be either a prismatic (block) or pebble bed type. It may be either gas-cooled or cooled with an as yet unspecified molten salt. However, a conceptual design of a gas-cooled VHTR, based on the General Atomics GT-MHR, does exist and is called the prismatic VHTR reference design, MacDonald et al [2003], General Atomics [1996]. The present validation studies are based on the prismatic VHTR reference design. In the prismatic VHTR reference design, the flow in the lower plenum will be introduced by dozens of turbulent jets issuing into a large crossflow that must negotiate dozens of cylindrical support columns as it flows toward the exit duct of the reactor vessel. The jets will not all be at the same temperature due to the radial variation of power density expected in the core. However, it is important that the coolant be well mixed when it enters the power conversion unit to ensure proper operation and long life of the power conversion machinery. Hence, it is deemed important to be able to accurately model the flow and mixing of the variable temperature coolant in the lower plenum and exit duct. Accurate flow modeling involves determining modeling strategies including the fineness of the grid needed, iterative convergence tolerance, numerical discretization method used, whether the flow is steady or unsteady, and the turbulence model and wall treatment employed. It also involves validation of the computer code and turbulence model against a series of separate and combined flow phenomena and selection of the data used for the validation. The present report describes progress made to date for the task entitled ‘CFD software validation of jets in crossflow’ which was designed to investigate the issues pertaining to the validation process.

  11. Modeling of biomass smoke injection into the lower stratosphere by a large forest fire (Part I): reference simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentmann, J.; Luderer, G.; Winterrath, T.; Fromm, M. D.; Servranckx, R.; Textor, C.; Herzog, M.; Graf, H.-F.; Andreae, M. O.

    2006-11-01

    Wildland fires in boreal regions have the potential to initiate deep convection, so-called pyro-convection, due to their release of sensible heat. Under favorable atmospheric conditions, large fires can result in pyro-convection that transports the emissions into the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Here, we present three-dimensional model simulations of the injection of fire emissions into the lower stratosphere by pyro-convection. These model simulations are constrained and evaluated with observations obtained from the Chisholm fire in Alberta, Canada, in 2001. The active tracer high resolution atmospheric model (ATHAM) is initialized with observations obtained by radiosonde. Information on the fire forcing is obtained from ground-based observations of the mass and moisture of the burned fuel. Based on radar observations, the pyro-convection reached an altitude of about 13 km, well above the tropopause, which was located at about 11.2 km. The model simulation yields a similarly strong convection with an overshoot of the convection above the tropopause. The main outflow from the pyro-convection occurs at about 10.6 km, but a significant fraction (about 8%) of the emitted mass of the smoke aerosol is transported above the tropopause. In contrast to regular convection, the region with maximum updraft velocity in the pyro-convection is located close to the surface above the fire. This results in high updraft velocities >10 m s-1 at cloud base. The temperature anomaly in the plume decreases rapidly with height from values above 50 K at the fire to about 5 K at about 3000 m above the fire. While the sensible heat released from the fire is responsible for the initiation of convection in the model, the release of latent heat from condensation and freezing dominates the overall energy budget. Emissions of water vapor from the fire do not significantly contribute to the energy budget of the convection.

  12. Modeling of biomass smoke injection into the lower stratosphere by a large forest fire (Part I): reference simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentmann, J.; Luderer, G.; Winterrath, T.; Fromm, M. D.; Servranckx, R.; Textor, C.; Herzog, M.; Graf, H.-F.; Andreae, M. O.

    2006-07-01

    Wildland fires in boreal regions have the potential to initiate deep convection, so-called pyro-convection, due to their release of sensible heat. Under favorable atmospheric conditions, large fires can result in pyro-convection that transports the emissions into the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Here, we present three-dimensional model simulations of the injection of fire emissions into the lower stratosphere by pyro-convection. These model simulations are constrained and evaluated with observations obtained from the Chisholm fire in Alberta, Canada, in 2001. The active tracer high resolution atmospheric model (ATHAM) is initialized with observations obtained by radiosonde. Information on the fire forcing is obtained from ground-based observations of the mass and moisture of the burned fuel. Based on radar observations, the pyro-convection reached an altitude of about 13 km, well above the tropopause, which was located at about 11.2 km. The model simulation yields a similarly strong convection with an overshoot of the convection above the tropopause. The main outflow from the pyro-convection occurs at about 10.6 km, but a significant fraction (about 8%) of the emitted mass of the smoke aerosol is transported above the tropopause. In contrast to regular convection, the region with maximum updraft velocity in the pyro-convection is located close to the surface above the fire. This results in high updraft velocities >10 ms-1 at cloud base. The temperature anomaly in the plume decreases rapidly with height from values above 50 K at the fire to about 5 K at about 3000 m above the fire. While the sensible heat released from the fire is responsible for the initiation of convection in the model, the release of latent heat from condensation and freezing dominates the overall energy budget. Emissions of water vapor from the fire do not significantly contribute to the energy budget of the convection.

  13. In-line electrochemical reagent generation coupled to a flow injection biamperometric system for the determination of sulfite in beverage samples.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Nattany T G; Barbosa, Elaine M O; da Silva, Paulo A B; de Souza, Gustavo C S; Nascimento, Valberes B; Lavorante, André F

    2016-07-15

    This work reports an in-line electrochemical reagent generation coupled to a flow injection biamperometric procedure for the determination of SO3(2-). The method was based on a redox reaction between the I3(-) and SO3(2-) ions, after the diffusion of SO2 through a gas diffusion chamber. Under optimum experimental conditions, a linear response ranging from 1.0 to 12.0 mg L(-1) (R=0.9999 and n=7), a detection and quantification limit estimated at 0.26 and 0.86 mg L(-1), respectively, a standard deviation relative of 0.4% (n=10) for a reference solution of 4.0 mg L(-1) SO3(2-) and sampling throughput for 40 determinations per hour were achieved. Addition and recovery tests with juice and wine samples were performed resulting in a range between 92% and 110%. There were no significant differences at a 95% confidence level in the analysis of eight samples when comparing the new method with a reference procedure.

  14. Determination of arsenic in traditional Chinese medicine by microwave digestion with flow injection-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Ong, E S; Yong, Y L; Woo, S O

    1999-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method with high sample throughput was developed for determining arsenic in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the form of uncoated tablets, sugar-coated tablets, black pills, capsules, powders, and syrups. The method involves microwave digestion with flow injection-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-ICP-MS). Method precision was 2.7-10.1% (relative standard deviation, n = 6) for different concentrations of arsenic in different TCM samples analyzed by different analysts on different days. Method accuracy was checked with a certified reference material (sea lettuce, Ulva lactuca, BCR CRM 279) for external calibration and by spiking arsenic standard into different TCMs. Recoveries of 89-92% were obtained for the certified reference material and higher than 95% for spiked TCMs. Matrix interference was insignificant for samples analyzed by the method of standard addition. Hence, no correction equation was used in the analysis of arsenic in the samples studied. Sample preparation using microwave digestion gave results that were very similar to those obtained by conventional wet acid digestion using nitric acid.

  15. The role of pressure drop and flow redistribution on modeling mercury control using sorbent injection in baghouse filters

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph R.V. Flora; Richard A. Hargis; William J. O'Dowd; Andrew Karash; Henry W. Pennline; Radisav D. Vidic

    2006-03-15

    A mathematical model based on simple cake filtration theory was coupled to a previously developed two-stage mathematical model for mercury (Hg) removal from coal combustion using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter. Values of the average permeability of the filter cake and the filter resistance extracted from the model were 4.4 x 10{sup -13}m{sup 2} and 2.5 x 10{sup -4}m{sup -1}, respectively. The flow is redistributed during partial cleaning of the filter, with flows higher across the newly cleaned filter section. The calculated average Hg removal efficiency from the baghouse is lower because of the high mass flux of Hg exiting the filter in the newly cleaned section. The model shows that calculated average Hg removal is affected by permeability, filter resistance, fraction of the baghouse cleaned, and cleaning interval. 17 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. The role of pressure drop and flow redistribution on modeling mercury control using sorbent injection in baghouse filters.

    PubMed

    Flora, Joseph R V; Hargis, Richard A; O'Dowd, William J; Karash, Andrew; Pennline, Henry W; Vidic, Radisav D

    2006-03-01

    A mathematical model based on simple cake filtration theory was coupled to a previously developed two-stage mathematical model for mercury (Hg) removal using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter. Values of the average permeability of the filter cake and the filter resistance extracted from the model were 4.4 x 10(-13) m2 and 2.5 x 10(-4) m(-1), respectively. The flow is redistributed during partial cleaning of the filter, with flows higher across the newly cleaned filter section. The calculated average Hg removal efficiency from the baghouse is lower because of the high mass flux of Hg exiting the filter in the newly cleaned section. The model shows that calculated average Hg removal is affected by permeability, filter resistance, fraction of the baghouse cleaned, and cleaning interval.

  17. Flame AAS determination of lead in water with flow-injection preconcentration and speciation using functionalized cellulose sorbent.

    PubMed

    Naghmush, A M; Pyrzyńska, K; Trojanowicz, M

    1995-06-01

    The on-line solid phase extraction of trace amount of lead in flow-injection system with flame AAS detection was investigated using cellulose sorbents with phosphonic acid and carboxymethyl groups, C(18) sorbent non-modified and modified with Pyrocatechol Violet or 8-quinolinol, commercial chelating sorbents Chelex 100 and Spheron Oxin 1000, non-polar sorbent Amberlite XAD-2 modified with Pyrocatechol Violet and several cation-exchange resins. The best dynamic characteristics of retention were observed for functionalized cellulose sorbents. For Cellex P assumed as optimum sorbent, elution with a separate fractions of nitric acid and ethanol allows the differentiation between tetraalkyllead and sum of inorganic lead and organolead species of smaller number of alkyl groups. The detection limit for the determination of inorganic Pb(II) was estimated as 0.17 microg/l. at preconcentration from 50 ml sample at a flow rate of 7 ml/min.

  18. Injection, flow, and mixing of CO2 in porous media with residual gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Doughty, C.A.

    2010-09-01

    Geologic structures associated with depleted natural gas reservoirs are desirable targets for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as evidenced by numerous pilot and industrial-scale GCS projects in these environments world-wide. One feature of these GCS targets that may affect injection is the presence of residual CH{sub 4}. It is well known that CH{sub 4} drastically alters supercritical CO{sub 2} density and viscosity. Furthermore, residual gas of any kind affects the relative permeability of the liquid and gas phases, with relative permeability of the gas phase strongly dependent on the time-history of imbibition or drainage, i.e., dependent on hysteretic relative permeability. In this study, the effects of residual CH{sub 4} on supercritical CO{sub 2} injection were investigated by numerical simulation in an idealized one-dimensional system under three scenarios: (1) with no residual gas; (2) with residual supercritical CO{sub 2}; and (3) with residual CH{sub 4}. We further compare results of simulations that use non-hysteretic and hysteretic relative permeability functions. The primary effect of residual gas is to decrease injectivity by decreasing liquid-phase relative permeability. Secondary effects arise from injected gas effectively incorporating residual gas and thereby extending the mobile gas plume relative to cases with no residual gas. Third-order effects arise from gas mixing and associated compositional effects on density that effectively create a larger plume per unit mass. Non-hysteretic models of relative permeability can be used to approximate some parts of the behavior of the system, but fully hysteretic formulations are needed to accurately model the entire system.

  19. Continuous ultrasound-assisted extraction coupled to flow injection-pervaporation, derivatization, and spectrophotometric detection for the determination of ammonia in cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Caballo-López, A; Luque de Castro, M D

    2006-04-01

    A dynamic system for the continuous removal of ammonia from cigarettes with ultrasound assistance and iterative change of the flow direction of the extractant through the sample cell has been developed. A 0.1-g sample of cigarette was subjected to 7 min of ultrasound-assisted extraction (application and duration of pulse 0.7 s, output amplitude 85% of the converter nominal amplitude), and 1 M NaOH solution was used both as extractant and as carrier in the dynamic system. The ultrasound-assisted extractor was coupled to a pervaporation unit through a flow injection interface in order to develop a fully automated method. In arriving at the pervaporator, the ammonia is transferred from the donor-carrier stream to an acceptor stream, where the classical Berthelot reaction takes place--thus favoring pervaporation. The blue complex formed is spectrophotometrically monitored at 655 nm. The method was applied to the determination of ammonia in a selection of 10 European cigarette brands and Kentucky Reference 2R4F cigarettes.

  20. 3D-Printed Fluidic Devices for Nanoparticle Preparation and Flow-Injection Amperometry Using Integrated Prussian Blue Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Gregory W.; Satterwhite, Jennifer E.; Bhakta, Snehasis; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Gillette, Kelsey M.; Chen, Eric; Rusling, James F.

    2015-01-01

    A consumer-grade fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer was used to construct fluidic devices for nanoparticle preparation and electrochemical sensing. Devices were printed using poly(ethylene terephthalate) and featured threaded ports to connect polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing via printed fittings prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). These devices included channels designed to have 800 × 800 µm2 square cross sections and were semitransparent to allow visualization of the solution-filled channels. A 3D-printed device with a Y-shaped mixing channel was used to prepare Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) under flow rates of 100 to 2000 µL min−1. PBNPs were then attached to gold electrodes for hydrogen peroxide sensing. 3D-printed devices used for electrochemical measurements featured threaded access ports into which a fitting equipped with reference, counter, and PBNP-modified working electrodes could be inserted. PBNP-modified electrodes enabled amperometric detection of H2O2 in the 3D-printed channel by flow-injection analysis, exhibiting a detection limit of 100 nM and linear response up to 20 µM. These experiments show that a consumer-grade FFF printer can be used to fabricate low-cost fluidic devices for applications similar to those that have been reported with more expensive 3D-printing methods. PMID:25901660