Sample records for reflected gps signals

  1. Terrain-Moisture Classification Using GPS Surface-Reflected Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael S.; Acton, Scott T.; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study we present a novel method of land surface classification using surface-reflected GPS signals in combination with digital imagery. Two GPS-derived classification features are merged with visible image data to create terrain-moisture (TM) classes, defined here as visibly identifiable terrain or landcover classes containing a surface/soil moisture component. As compared to using surface imagery alone, classification accuracy is significantly improved for a number of visible classes when adding the GPS-based signal features. Since the strength of the reflected GPS signal is proportional to the amount of moisture in the surface, use of these GPS features provides information about the surface that is not obtainable using visible wavelengths alone. Application areas include hydrology, precision agriculture, and wetlands mapping.

  2. Method and apparatus for relative navigation using reflected GPS signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ian R. (Inventor); Boegner, Jr., Gregory J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system to passively navigate an orbiting moving body towards an orbiting target using reflected GPS signals. A pair of antennas is employed to receive both direct signals from a plurality of GPS satellites and a second antenna to receive GPS signals reflected off an orbiting target. The direct and reflected signals are processed and compared to determine the relative distance and position of the orbiting moving body relative to the orbiting target.

  3. Soil Moisture Sensing Using Reflected GPS Signals: Description of the GPS Soil Moisture Product.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine; Small, Eric; Chew, Clara

    2015-04-01

    As first demonstrated by the GPS reflections group in 2008, data from GPS networks can be used to monitor multiple parameters of the terrestrial water cycle. The GPS L-band signals take two paths: (1) the "direct" signal travels from the satellite to the antenna, which is typically located 2-3 meters above the ground; (2) the reflected signal interacts with the Earth's surface before traveling to the antenna. The direct signal is used by geophysicists and surveyors to measure the position of the antenna, while the effects of reflected signals are a source of error. If one focuses on the reflected signal rather than the positioning observables, one has a method that is sensitive to surface soil moisture (top 5 cm), vegetation water content, and snow depth. This method - known as GPS Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR) - has a footprint of ~1000 m2 for most GPS sites. This is intermediate in scale to most in situ and satellite observations. A significant advantage of GPS-IR is that data from existing GPS networks can be used without any changes to the instrumentation. This means that there is a new source of cost-effective instrumentation for satellite validation and climate studies. This presentation will provide an overview of the GPS-IR methodology with an emphasis on the soil moisture product. GPS water cycle products are currently produced on a daily basis for a network of ~500 sites in the western United States; results are freely available at http://xenon.colorado.edu/portal. Plans to expand the GPS-IR method to the network of international GPS sites will also be discussed.

  4. Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using Surface Reflected GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Maslanik, James; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Axelrad, Penina; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new research effort to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. Our experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and freshwater ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska indicating correlation between forward-scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered measurements.

  5. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  6. Decadal changes of surface elevation over permafrost area estimated using reflected GPS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Larson, Kristine M.

    2018-02-01

    Conventional benchmark-based survey and Global Positioning System (GPS) have been used to measure surface elevation changes over permafrost areas, usually once or a few times a year. Here we use reflected GPS signals to measure temporal changes of ground surface elevation due to dynamics of the active layer and near-surface permafrost. Applying the GPS interferometric reflectometry technique to the multipath signal-to-noise ratio data collected by a continuously operating GPS receiver mounted deep in permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, we can retrieve the vertical distance between the antenna and reflecting surface. Using this unique kind of observables, we obtain daily changes of surface elevation during July and August from 2004 to 2015. Our results show distinct temporal variations at three timescales: regular thaw settlement within each summer, strong interannual variability that is characterized by a sub-decadal subsidence trend followed by a brief uplift trend, and a secular subsidence trend of 0.26 ± 0.02 cm year-1 during 2004 and 2015. This method provides a new way to fully utilize data from continuously operating GPS sites in cold regions for studying dynamics of the frozen ground consistently and sustainably over a long time.

  7. Utilizing Calibrated GPS Reflected Signals to Estimate Soil Reflectivity and Dielectric Constant: Results from SMEX02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Torres, Omar; Grant, Michael S.; Masters, Dallas

    2006-01-01

    Extensive reflected GPS data was collected using a GPS reflectometer installed on an HC130 aircraft during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02) near Ames, Iowa. At the same time, widespread surface truth data was acquired in the form of point soil moisture profiles, areal sampling of near-surface soil moisture, total green biomass and precipitation history, among others. Previously, there have been no reported efforts to calibrate reflected GPS data sets acquired over land. This paper reports the results of two approaches to calibration of the data that yield consistent results. It is shown that estimating the strength of the reflected signals by either (1) assuming an approximately specular surface reflection or (2) inferring the surface slope probability density and associated normalization constants give essentially the same results for the conditions encountered in SMEX02. The corrected data is converted to surface reflectivity and then to dielectric constant as a test of the calibration approaches. Utilizing the extensive in-situ soil moisture related data this paper also presents the results of comparing the GPS-inferred relative dielectric constant with the Wang-Schmugge model frequently used to relate volume moisture content to dielectric constant. It is shown that the calibrated GPS reflectivity estimates follow the expected dependence of permittivity with volume moisture, but with the following qualification: The soil moisture value governing the reflectivity appears to come from only the top 1-2 centimeters of soil, a result consistent with results found for other microwave techniques operating at L-band. Nevertheless, the experimentally derived dielectric constant is generally lower than predicted. Possible explanations are presented to explain this result.

  8. Using GPS Reflections for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickler, David

    2000-01-01

    GPS signals that have reflected off of the ocean's surface have shown potential for use in oceanographic and atmospheric studies. The research described here investigates the possible deployment of a GPS reflection receiver onboard a remote sensing satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The coverage and resolution characteristics of this receiver are calculated and estimated. This mission analysis examines using reflected GPS signals for several remote sensing missions. These include measurement of the total electron content in the ionosphere, sea surface height, and ocean wind speed and direction. Also discussed is the potential test deployment of such a GPS receiver on the space shuttle. Constellations of satellites are proposed to provide adequate spatial and temporal resolution for the aforementioned remote sensing missions. These results provide a starting point for research into the feasibility of augmenting or replacing existing remote sensing satellites with spaceborne GPS reflection-detecting receivers.

  9. Soil Moisture and Vegetation Effects on GPS Reflectivity From Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Grant, M. S.; Bosch, D.

    2004-12-01

    While originally designed as a navigation system, the GPS signal has been used to achieve a number of useful scientific measurements. One of these measurements utilizes the reflection of the GPS signal from land to determine soil moisture. The study of GPS reflections is based on a bistatic configuration that utilizes forward reflection from the surface. The strength of the GPS signal varies in proportion to surface parameters such as soil moisture, soil type, vegetation cover, and topography. This paper focuses on the effects of soil water content and vegetation cover on the surface based around a reflectivity. A two-part method for calibrating the GPS reflectivity was developed that permits the comparison of the data with surface parameters. The first part of the method relieves the direct signal from any multipath effects, the second part is an over-water calibration that yields a reflectivity independent of the transmitting satellite. The sensitivity of the GPS signal to water in the soil is shown by presenting the increase in reflectivity after rain as compared to before rain. The effect of vegetation on the reflected signal is also presented by the inclusion of leaf area index as a fading parameter in the reflected signal from corn and soy bean fields. The results are compared to extensive surface measurements made as part of the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX 2002) in Iowa and SMEX 2003 in Georgia.

  10. Information content in reflected signals during GPS Radio Occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Josep M.; Cardellach, Estel; Rodríguez, Hilda

    2018-04-01

    The possibility of extracting useful information about the state of the lower troposphere from the surface reflections that are often detected during GPS radio occultations (GPSRO) is explored. The clarity of the reflection is quantified, and can be related to properties of the surface and the low troposphere. The reflected signal is often clear enough to show good phase coherence, and can be tracked and processed as an extension of direct non-reflected GPSRO atmospheric profiles. A profile of bending angle vs. impact parameter can be obtained for these reflected signals, characterized by impact parameters that are below the apparent horizon, and that is a continuation at low altitude of the standard non-reflected bending angle profile. If there were no reflection, these would correspond to tangent altitudes below the local surface, and in particular below the local mean sea level. A forward operator is presented, for the evaluation of the bending angle of reflected GPSRO signals, given atmospheric properties as described by a numerical weather prediction system. The operator is an extension, at lower impact parameters, of standard bending angle operators, and reproduces both the direct and reflected sections of the measured profile. It can be applied to the assimilation of the reflected section of the profile as supplementary data to the direct section. Although the principle is also applicable over land, this paper is focused on ocean cases, where the topographic height of the reflecting surface, the sea level, is better known a priori.

  11. GPS Ocean Reflection Experiment on Spartan 251

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L; Russo, Angela; Mickler, Dave; Armatys, Michael; Ferebee, Melvin J.

    1999-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that the GPS signal which has reflected from the ocean surface contains useful geophysical data from which the sea surface wind speed and other parameters can be extracted. This can be used for remote sensing, similar to present day use of radar altimeters or scatterometers, but with significantly smaller instrumentation because of the utilization of the existing GPS broadcast signal for illumination. Several campaigns of aircraft experimentation have been completed demonstrating this technique and reflected GPS data has been reliably collected from 25 km altitude on a balloon. However, there has not yet been a demonstration that the reflected GPS signal can be detected from orbit with sufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to make useful remote sensing measurements. A technology demonstration experiment was planned for a Space Shuttle flight in the late 2000 using the Spartan 251 recoverable carrier. This experiment would also have been the first flight validation of the PiVoT GPS receiver developed in house at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The "open-architecture" design of this receiver would allow the software modifications to be made which control code-correlator spacing to map out the shape of the reflected signal waveform, which is the most basic data product generated by this instrumentation. A moderate gain left-hand circularly polarized antenna, constructed from an array of off-the-shelf hemispherical antennas was to be used to give approximately 3 to 6 dB of additional gain. Preliminary SNR predictions have been done indicating that this antenna would offer sufficient gain to record waveform measurements. A system level description of the experiment instrumentation, including the receiver, antenna and data storage and retrieval will be given. The visibility of GPS reflections over the mission duration of several hours will be studied, including the effects of the limited beamwidth of the antenna. Spartan 251 has now

  12. Comparison Between Sea Surface Wind Speed Estimates From Reflected GPS Signals and Buoy Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L.; Katzberg, Steven J.; Zavorotny, Valery U.

    2000-01-01

    Reflected signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) have been collected from an aircraft at approximately 3.7 km altitude on 5 different days. Estimation of surface wind speed by matching the shape of the reflected signal correlation function against analytical models was demonstrated. Wind speed obtained from this method agreed with that recorded from buoys to with a bias of less than 0.1 m/s, and with a standard derivation of 1.3 meters per second.

  13. Estimating Effects of Multipath Propagation on GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Sung; Hajj, George; Young, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    Multipath Simulator Taking into Account Reflection and Diffraction (MUSTARD) is a computer program that simulates effects of multipath propagation on received Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. MUSTARD is a very efficient means of estimating multipath-induced position and phase errors as functions of time, given the positions and orientations of GPS satellites, the GPS receiver, and any structures near the receiver as functions of time. MUSTARD traces each signal from a GPS satellite to the receiver, accounting for all possible paths the signal can take, including all paths that include reflection and/or diffraction from surfaces of structures near the receiver and on the satellite. Reflection and diffraction are modeled by use of the geometrical theory of diffraction. The multipath signals are added to the direct signal after accounting for the gain of the receiving antenna. Then, in a simulation of a delay-lock tracking loop in the receiver, the multipath-induced range and phase errors as measured by the receiver are estimated. All of these computations are performed for both right circular polarization and left circular polarization of both the L1 (1.57542-GHz) and L2 (1.2276-GHz) GPS signals.

  14. Towards GPS Surface Reflection Remote Sensing of Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Axelrad, P.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the research to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. The characteristics of the GPS signals and equipment afford the possibility of new measurements not possible with existing radar and passive microwave systems. In particular, the GPS receiving systems are small and light-weight, and as such are particularly well suited to be deployed on small aircraft or satellite platforms with minimal impact. Our preliminary models and experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and fresh-water ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska suggesting correlation between forward scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered signals.

  15. Software for a GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    A special-purpose software Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver designed for remote sensing with reflected GPS signals is described in Delay/Doppler-Mapping GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System (NPO-30385), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The input accepted by this program comprises raw (open-loop) digitized GPS signals sampled at a rate of about 20 MHz. The program processes the data samples to perform the following functions: detection of signals; tracking of phases and delays; mapping of delay, Doppler, and delay/Doppler waveforms; dual-frequency processing; coherent integrations as short as 125 s; decoding of navigation messages; and precise time tagging of observable quantities. The software can perform these functions on all detectable satellite signals without dead time. Open-loop data collected over water, land, or ice and processed by this software can be further processed to extract geophysical information. Possible examples include mean sea height, wind speed and direction, and significant wave height (for observations over the ocean); bistatic-radar terrain images and measures of soil moisture and biomass (for observations over land); and estimates of ice age, thickness, and surface density (for observations over ice).

  16. An Interdisciplinary Approach at Studying the Earth-Sun System with GPS/GNSS and GPS-like Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Hajj, George; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Chao, Yi; Ao, Chi; Zumberge, James

    2005-01-01

    The value of Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) measurements to atmospheric science, space physics, and ocean science, is now emerging or showing a potential to play a major role in the evolving programs of NASA, NSF and NOAA. The objective of this communication is to identify and articulate the key scientific questions that are optimally, or perhaps uniquely, addressed by GPS or GPS-like observations, and discuss their relevance to existing or planned national Earth-science research programs. The GPS-based ocean reflection experiments performed to date have demonstrated the precision and spatial resolution suitable to altimetric applications that require higher spatial resolution and more frequent repeat than the current radar altimeter satellites. GPS radio occultation is promising as a climate monitoring tool because of its benchmark properties: its raw observable is based on extremely accurate timing measurements. GPS-derived temperature profiles can provide meaningful climate trend information over decadal time scales without the need for overlapping missions or mission-to-mission calibrations. By acquiring data as GPS satellites occult behind the Earth's limb, GPS also provides high vertical resolution information on the vertical structure of electron density with global coverage. New experimental techniques will create more comprehensive TEC maps by using signals reflected from the oceans and received in orbit. This communication will discuss a potential future GNSS Earth Observing System project which would deploy a constellation of satellites using GPS and GPS-like measurements, to obtain a) topography measurements based on GPS reflections with an accuracy and horizontal resolution suitable for eddy monitoring, and h) climate-records quality atmospheric temperature profiles. The constellation would also provide for measurements of ionospheric elec tron density. This is a good example of an interdisciplinary mission concept, with broad science objectives

  17. Robust GPS autonomous signal quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndili, Awele Nnaemeka

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), introduced by the U.S. Department of Defense in 1973, provides unprecedented world-wide navigation capabilities through a constellation of 24 satellites in global orbit, each emitting a low-power radio-frequency signal for ranging. GPS receivers track these transmitted signals, computing position to within 30 meters from range measurements made to four satellites. GPS has a wide range of applications, including aircraft, marine and land vehicle navigation. Each application places demands on GPS for various levels of accuracy, integrity, system availability and continuity of service. Radio frequency interference (RFI), which results from natural sources such as TV/FM harmonics, radar or Mobile Satellite Systems (MSS), presents a challenge in the use of GPS, by posing a threat to the accuracy, integrity and availability of the GPS navigation solution. In order to use GPS for integrity-sensitive applications, it is therefore necessary to monitor the quality of the received signal, with the objective of promptly detecting the presence of RFI, and thus provide a timely warning of degradation of system accuracy. This presents a challenge, since the myriad kinds of RFI affect the GPS receiver in different ways. What is required then, is a robust method of detecting GPS accuracy degradation, which is effective regardless of the origin of the threat. This dissertation presents a new method of robust signal quality monitoring for GPS. Algorithms for receiver autonomous interference detection and integrity monitoring are demonstrated. Candidate test statistics are derived from fundamental receiver measurements of in-phase and quadrature correlation outputs, and the gain of the Active Gain Controller (AGC). Performance of selected test statistics are evaluated in the presence of RFI: broadband interference, pulsed and non-pulsed interference, coherent CW at different frequencies; and non-RFI: GPS signal fading due to physical blockage and

  18. Evaluation of Experimental Data from the Gains Balloon GPS Surface Reflection Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganoe, George G.; Johnson, Thomas A.; Somero, John Ryan

    2002-01-01

    The GPS Surface Reflection Instrument was integrated as an experiment on the GAINS (Global Airocean IN-situ System) 48-hour balloon mission flown in June 2002. The data collected by similar instruments in the past has been used to measure sea state from which ocean surface winds can be accurately estimated. The GPS signal has also been shown to be reflected from wetland areas and even from subsurface moisture. The current version of the instrument has been redesigned to be more compact, use less power, and withstand a greater variation in environmental conditions than previous versions. This instrument has also incorporated a new data collection mode to track 5 direct satellites (providing a continuous navigation solution) and multiplex the remaining 7 channels to track the reflected signal of the satellite tracked in channel 0. The new software mode has been shown to increase the signal to noise ratio of the collected data and enhance the science return of the instrument. During the GAINS balloon flight over the Northwest US, the instrument measured surface reflections as they were detected over the balloon's ground track. Since ground surface elevations in this area vary widely from the WGS-84 ellipsoid altitude, the instrument software has been modified to incorporate a surface altitude correction based on USGS 30-minute Digital Elevation Models. Information presented will include facts about instrument design goals, data collection methodologies and algorithms, and will focus on results of the science data analyses for the mission.

  19. Evaluation of Experimental Data from the GAINS Balloon GPS Surface Reflection Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gance, George G.; Johnson, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The GPS Surface Reflection Instrument was integrated as an experiment on the GAINS (Global Airocean IN-situ System) 48-hour balloon mission flown in September 2001. The data collected by similar instruments in the past has been used to measure sea state from which ocean surface winds can be accurately estimated. The GPS signal has also been shown to be reflected from wetland areas and even from subsurface moisture. The current version of the instrument has been redesigned to be more compact, use less power, and withstand a greater variation in environmental conditions than previous versions. This instrument has also incorporated a new data collection mode to track 5 direct satellites (providing a continuous navigation solution) and multiplex the remaining 7 channels to track the reflected signal of the satellite tracked in channel 0. The new software mode has been shown to increase the signal to noise ratio of the collected data and enhance the science return of the instrument. During the 48-hour flight over the Northwest US, the instrument will measure surface reflections that can be detected over the balloon's ground track. Since ground surface elevations in this area vary widely from the WGS-84 ellipsoid altitude, the instrument software has been modified to incorporate a surface altitude correction based on USGS 30-minute Digital Elevation Models. Information presented will include facts about instrument design goals, data collection methodologies and algorithms, and results of the science data analyses for the 48-hour mission.

  20. Wave Measurements Using GPS Velocity Signals

    PubMed Central

    Doong, Dong-Jiing; Lee, Beng-Chun; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the idea of using GPS-output velocity signals to obtain wave measurement data. The application of the transformation from a velocity spectrum to a displacement spectrum in conjunction with the directional wave spectral theory are the core concepts in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the accuracy of the inversed displacement of the surface of the sea. A GPS device was installed on a moored accelerometer buoy to verify the GPS-derived wave parameters. It was determined that loss or drifting of the GPS signal, as well as energy spikes occurring in the low frequency band led to erroneous measurements. Through the application of moving average skill and a process of frequency cut-off to the GPS output velocity, correlations between GPS-derived, and accelerometer buoy-measured significant wave heights and periods were both improved to 0.95. The GPS-derived one-dimensional and directional wave spectra were in agreement with the measurements. Despite the direction verification showing a 10° bias, this exercise still provided useful information with sufficient accuracy for a number of specific purposes. The results presented in this study indicate that using GPS output velocity is a reasonable alternative for the measurement of ocean waves. PMID:22346618

  1. GPS Multipath Fade Measurements to Determine L-Band Ground Reflectivity Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavak, Adnan; Xu, Guang-Han; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1996-01-01

    In personal satellite communications, especially when the line-of-sight is clear, ground specular reflected signals along with direct signals are received by low gain, almost omni-directional subscriber antennas. A six-channel, C/A code processing, GPS receiver with an almost omni-directional patch antenna was used to take measurements over three types of ground to characterize 1.575 GHz specular ground reflections and ground dielectric properties. Fade measurements were taken over grass, asphalt, and lake water surfaces by placing the antenna in a vertical position at a fixed height from the ground. Electrical characteristics (conductivity and dielectric constant) of these surfaces (grass, asphalt, lake water) were obtained by matching computer simulations to the experimental results.

  2. Wind Speed Measurement from Bistatically Scattered GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L.; Komjathy, Attila; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    1999-01-01

    Instrumentation and retrieval algorithms are described which use the forward, or bistatically scattered range-coded signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio navigation system for the measurement of sea surface roughness. This roughness is known to be related directly to the surface wind speed. Experiments were conducted from aircraft along the TOPEX ground track, and over experimental surface truth buoys. These flights used a receiver capable of recording the cross correlation power in the reflected signal. The shape of this power distribution was then compared against analytical models derived from geometric optics. Two techniques for matching these functions were studied. The first recognized the most significant information content in the reflected signal is contained in the trailing edge slope of the waveform. The second attempted to match the complete shape of the waveform by approximating it as a series expansion and obtaining the nonlinear least squares estimate. Discussion is also presented on anomalies in the receiver operation and their identification and correction.

  3. Signal existence verification (SEV) for GPS low received power signal detection using the time-frequency approach.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Sun, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    The detection of low received power of global positioning system (GPS) signals in the signal acquisition process is an important issue for GPS applications. Improving the miss-detection problem of low received power signal is crucial, especially for urban or indoor environments. This paper proposes a signal existence verification (SEV) process to detect and subsequently verify low received power GPS signals. The SEV process is based on the time-frequency representation of GPS signal, and it can capture the characteristic of GPS signal in the time-frequency plane to enhance the GPS signal acquisition performance. Several simulations and experiments are conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed method for low received power signal detection. The contribution of this work is that the SEV process is an additional scheme to assist the GPS signal acquisition process in low received power signal detection, without changing the original signal acquisition or tracking algorithms.

  4. Detection of Seasonal Changes in the Cryosphere Using Reflected GNSS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, C. C.; Zuffada, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Lowe, S.; Oveisgharan, S.; Esterhuizen, S. X.

    2016-12-01

    Using ground-reflected GPS or GNSS signals in a bistatic radar approach is a new way of observing changes in the Earth's surface. Numerous studies using GNSS receivers flown on aircraft or mounted on towers have shown that these forward-scattered signals are sensitive to changes in sea state, soil moisture, vegetation cover, and sea ice. However, until last year, there was a paucity of observations from which to understand potential science applications from the vantage point of space. Two recent advancements have provided the largest amount of spaceborne reflection data ever recorded. The first, TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1), is an experimental platform launched in July 2014 that houses a GPS receiver and antenna capable of recording reflections. Although designed to record reflections over the ocean surface, TDS-1 has also recorded a large amount of reflection data over land, which show sensitivity to both soil moisture and sea ice. The second major advancement is GNSS reflections data recorded by the SMAP radar receiver. JPL retuned the receiver to the GPS frequency soon after July 2015 and began passively recording reflections data. As of August 2016, the receiver is still recording daily reflections. Together, these two new sources of data allow the investigation of seasonal changes in the Earth's surface at moderately high resolution ( 1 km). Here, we present seasonal changes in the cryosphere as observed by TDS-1 and in the SMAP reflections data. Although the sensitivity to sea ice has been previously shown, here we show for the first time a strong change in the reflected signal over land between winter and the spring thaw of up to 15 dB. This could be an indication that reflected GNSS signals are sensitive to freeze/thaw state of the soil. The confounding influence of the snowpack on the signal must be understood before definitive conclusions can be made, and we show the current status of this analysis.

  5. Benefits of Software GPS Receivers for Enhanced Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    1 Published in GPS SOLUTIONS 4(1) Summer, 2000, pages 56-66. Benefits of Software GPS Receivers for Enhanced Signal Processing Alison Brown...Diego, CA 92110-3127 Number of Pages: 24 Number of Figures: 20 ABSTRACT In this paper the architecture of a software GPS receiver is described...and an analysis is included of the performance of a software GPS receiver when tracking the GPS signals in challenging environments. Results are

  6. GPS: A New Tool for Ocean Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Garrison, James L.; Zavorotny, Valery

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we demonstrate wind retrieval (estimate its speed) from reflected signals obtained by a GPS receiver on board an aircraft to illustrate the potential of using GPS for remote-sensing applications. Before showing those results, we provide some background on radar remote sensing and discuss the theoretical model we used to interpret reflection data. This model describes the power and correlation properties of the reflected GPS signals as a function of scattering geometry and environmental parameters related to the reflecting surface.

  7. GPS Multipath Fade Measurements to Determine L-Band Ground Reflectivity Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavak, Adnan; Xu, Guanghan; Vogel, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    In personal satellite communications, especially when the line-of-sight is clear, ground specular reflected signals along with direct signals are received by low gain, almost omni-directional subscriber antennas. A six-channel, C/A code processing, global positioning system (GPS) receiver with an almost omni-directional patch antenna was used to take measurements over three types of ground to characterize 1.575 GHz specular ground reflections and ground dielectric properties. Fade measurements were taken over grass, asphalt, and lake water surfaces by placing the antenna in a vertical position at a fixed height from the ground. Electrical characteristics (conductivity and dielectric constant) of these surfaces (grass, asphalt, lake water) were obtained by matching computer simulations to the experimental results.

  8. The Accidental Tide Gauge: A GPS Reflection Case Study from Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Ray, Richard D.; Nievinski, Felipe G..; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    For the last decade, it has been known that reflected GPS signals observed with specialized instruments could be used to measure sea level. In this letter, data from an existing geodeticquality GPS site near Kachemak Bay, Alaska, are analyzed for a one-year time period. Daily sea-level variations are more than 7 m. Tidal coefficients have been estimated and compared with coefficients estimated from records from a traditional tide gauge at Seldovia Harbor, approximately 30 km away. The GPS and Seldovia estimates of M(sub 2) and S(sub 2) coefficients agree to better than 2%; much of this residual can be attributed to true differences in the tide over 30 km as it propagates up Kachemak Bay. For daily mean sea levels the agreement is 2.3 cm. Because a standard geodetic GPS receiver/antenna is used, this GPS instrument can measure long-term sea-level changes in a stable terrestrial reference frame.

  9. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation Using Above-the-Constellation GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke

    2017-01-01

    GPS-based spacecraft navigation offers many performance and cost benefits, and GPS receivers are now standard GNC components for LEO missions. Recently, more and more high-altitude missions are taking advantage of the benefits of GPS navigation as well. High-altitude applications pose challenges, however, because receivers operating above the GPS constellations are subject to reduced signal strength and availability, and uncertain signal quality. This presentation will present the history and state-of-the-art in high-altitude GPS spacecraft navigation, including early experiments, current missions and receivers, and efforts to characterize and protect signals available to high-altitude users. Recent results from the very-high altitude MMS mission are also provided.

  10. GPS Remote Sensing Measurements Using Aerosonde UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael S.; Katzberg, Stephen J.; Lawrence, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    In February 2004, a NASA-Langley GPS Remote Sensor (GPSRS) unit was flown on an Aerosonde unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) from the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) in Virginia. Using direct and surface-reflected 1.575 GHz coarse acquisition (C/A) coded GPS signals, remote sensing measurements were obtained over land and portions of open water. The strength of the surface-reflected GPS signal is proportional to the amount of moisture in the surface, and is also influenced by surface roughness. Amplitude and other characteristics of the reflected signal allow an estimate of wind speed over open water. In this paper we provide a synopsis of the instrument accommodation requirements, installation procedures, and preliminary results from what is likely the first-ever flight of a GPS remote sensing instrument on a UAV. The correct operation of the GPSRS unit on this flight indicates that Aerosonde-like UAV's can serve as platforms for future GPS remote sensing science missions.

  11. Detection test of wireless network signal strength and GPS positioning signal in underground pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Yunwei; Chen, Ling

    2018-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of selecting positioning technology for inspection robot in underground pipeline environment, the wireless network signal strength and GPS positioning signal testing are carried out in the actual underground pipeline environment. Firstly, the strength variation of the 3G wireless network signal and Wi-Fi wireless signal provided by China Telecom and China Unicom ground base stations are tested, and the attenuation law of these wireless signals along the pipeline is analyzed quantitatively and described. Then, the receiving data of the GPS satellite signal in the pipeline are tested, and the attenuation of GPS satellite signal under underground pipeline is analyzed. The testing results may be reference for other related research which need to consider positioning in pipeline.

  12. Experimental Verification of Ocean Bounced GPS Signals and Analysis of their Application to Ionospheric Corrections for Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelrad, P.; Cox, A. E.; Crumpton, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which uses observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals reflected from the ocean surface and acquired by a GPS receiver onboard an altimetric satellite to compute the ionospheric delay present in the altimeter measurement. This eliminates the requirement for a dual frequency altimeter for many Earth observing missions. A ground-based experiment is described which confirms the presence of these ocean-bounced signals and demonstrates the potential for altimeter ionospheric correction at the centimeter level.

  13. Fast-Acquisition/Weak-Signal-Tracking GPS Receiver for HEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintemitz, Luke; Boegner, Greg; Sirotzky, Steve

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the technical background and design of the Navigator Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver -- . a radiation-hardened receiver intended for use aboard spacecraft. Navigator is capable of weak signal acquisition and tracking as well as much faster acquisition of strong or weak signals with no a priori knowledge or external aiding. Weak-signal acquisition and tracking enables GPS use in high Earth orbits (HEO), and fast acquisition allows for the receiver to remain without power until needed in any orbit. Signal acquisition and signal tracking are, respectively, the processes of finding and demodulating a signal. Acquisition is the more computationally difficult process. Previous GPS receivers employ the method of sequentially searching the two-dimensional signal parameter space (code phase and Doppler). Navigator exploits properties of the Fourier transform in a massively parallel search for the GPS signal. This method results in far faster acquisition times [in the lab, 12 GPS satellites have been acquired with no a priori knowledge in a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) scenario in less than one second]. Modeling has shown that Navigator will be capable of acquiring signals down to 25 dB-Hz, appropriate for HEO missions. Navigator is built using the radiation-hardened ColdFire microprocessor and housing the most computationally intense functions in dedicated field-programmable gate arrays. The high performance of the algorithm and of the receiver as a whole are made possible by optimizing computational efficiency and carefully weighing tradeoffs among the sampling rate, data format, and data-path bit width.

  14. A New Indoor Positioning System Architecture Using GPS Signals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Wu; Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue

    2015-04-29

    The pseudolite system is a good alternative for indoor positioning systems due to its large coverage area and accurate positioning solution. However, for common Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, the pseudolite system requires some modifications of the user terminals. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a new pseudolite-based indoor positioning system architecture. The main idea is to receive real-world GPS signals, repeat each satellite signal and transmit those using indoor transmitting antennas. The transmitted GPS-like signal can be processed (signal acquisition and tracking, navigation data decoding) by the general receiver and thus no hardware-level modification on the receiver is required. In addition, all Tx can be synchronized with each other since one single clock is used in Rx/Tx. The proposed system is simulated using a software GPS receiver. The simulation results show the indoor positioning system is able to provide high accurate horizontal positioning in both static and dynamic situations.

  15. Climatology of GPS signal loss observed by Swarm satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Stolle, Claudia; Park, Jaeheung

    2018-04-01

    By using 3-year global positioning system (GPS) measurements from December 2013 to November 2016, we provide in this study a detailed survey on the climatology of the GPS signal loss of Swarm onboard receivers. Our results show that the GPS signal losses prefer to occur at both low latitudes between ±5 and ±20° magnetic latitude (MLAT) and high latitudes above 60° MLAT in both hemispheres. These events at all latitudes are observed mainly during equinoxes and December solstice months, while totally absent during June solstice months. At low latitudes the GPS signal losses are caused by the equatorial plasma irregularities shortly after sunset, and at high latitude they are also highly related to the large density gradients associated with ionospheric irregularities. Additionally, the high-latitude events are more often observed in the Southern Hemisphere, occurring mainly at the cusp region and along nightside auroral latitudes. The signal losses mainly happen for those GPS rays with elevation angles less than 20°, and more commonly occur when the line of sight between GPS and Swarm satellites is aligned with the shell structure of plasma irregularities. Our results also confirm that the capability of the Swarm receiver has been improved after the bandwidth of the phase-locked loop (PLL) widened, but the updates cannot radically avoid the interruption in tracking GPS satellites caused by the ionospheric plasma irregularities. Additionally, after the PLL bandwidth increased larger than 0.5 Hz, some unexpected signal losses are observed even at middle latitudes, which are not related to the ionospheric plasma irregularities. Our results suggest that rather than 1.0 Hz, a PLL bandwidth of 0.5 Hz is a more suitable value for the Swarm receiver.

  16. P-Code-Enhanced Encryption-Mode Processing of GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence; Meehan, Thomas; Thomas, Jess B.

    2003-01-01

    A method of processing signals in a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver has been invented to enable the receiver to recover some of the information that is otherwise lost when GPS signals are encrypted at the transmitters. The need for this method arises because, at the option of the military, precision GPS code (P-code) is sometimes encrypted by a secret binary code, denoted the A code. Authorized users can recover the full signal with knowledge of the A-code. However, even in the absence of knowledge of the A-code, one can track the encrypted signal by use of an estimate of the A-code. The present invention is a method of making and using such an estimate. In comparison with prior such methods, this method makes it possible to recover more of the lost information and obtain greater accuracy.

  17. Modeling Horizontal GPS Seasonal Signals Caused by Ocean Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, N. M.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2014-12-01

    GPS monuments around the world exhibit seasonal signals in both the horizontal and vertical components with amplitudes on the order of centimeters. For analysis of tectonic signals, researchers typically fit and remove a sine wave with an annual period, and sometimes an additional sine wave with a semiannual period. As interest grows in analyzing smaller, slower signals it becomes more important to correct for these seasonal signals accurately. It is well established that the vertical component of seasonal GPS signals is largely due to continental water storage cycles (e.g. van Dam et al., GRL, 2001). Horizontal seasonal signals however are not well explained by continental water storage. We examine horizontal seasonal signals across western North America and find that the horizontal component is coherent at very large spatial scales and is in general oriented perpendicular to the nearest coastline, indicating an oceanic origin. Additionally, horizontal and vertical annual signals are out of phase by approximately 2 months indicating different physical origins. Studies of GRACE and ocean bottom pressure data indicate an annual variation of non-steric, non-tidal ocean height with an average amplitude of 1 cm globally (e.g. Ponte et al., GRL, 2007). We use Some Programs for Ocean Tide Loading (SPOTL; Agnew, SIO Technical Report, 2012) to model predicted displacements due to these (non-tidal) ocean loads and find general agreement with observed horizontal GPS seasonal signals. In the future, this may lead to a more accurate way to predict and remove the seasonal component of GPS displacement time-series, leading to better discrimination of the true tectonic signal. Modeling this long wavelength signal also provides a potential opportunity to probe the structure of the Earth.

  18. Analysis of Seasonal Signal in GPS Short-Baseline Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaihua; Jiang, Weiping; Chen, Hua; An, Xiangdong; Zhou, Xiaohui; Yuan, Peng; Chen, Qusen

    2018-04-01

    Proper modeling of seasonal signals and their quantitative analysis are of interest in geoscience applications, which are based on position time series of permanent GPS stations. Seasonal signals in GPS short-baseline (< 2 km) time series, if they exist, are mainly related to site-specific effects, such as thermal expansion of the monument (TEM). However, only part of the seasonal signal can be explained by known factors due to the limited data span, the GPS processing strategy and/or the adoption of an imperfect TEM model. In this paper, to better understand the seasonal signal in GPS short-baseline time series, we adopted and processed six different short-baselines with data span that varies from 2 to 14 years and baseline length that varies from 6 to 1100 m. To avoid seasonal signals that are overwhelmed by noise, each of the station pairs is chosen with significant differences in their height (> 5 m) or type of the monument. For comparison, we also processed an approximately zero baseline with a distance of < 1 m and identical monuments. The daily solutions show that there are apparent annual signals with annual amplitude of 1 mm (maximum amplitude of 1.86 ± 0.17 mm) on almost all of the components, which are consistent with the results from previous studies. Semi-annual signal with a maximum amplitude of 0.97 ± 0.25 mm is also present. The analysis of time-correlated noise indicates that instead of flicker (FL) or random walk (RW) noise, band-pass-filtered (BP) noise is valid for approximately 40% of the baseline components, and another 20% of the components can be best modeled by a combination of the first-order Gauss-Markov (FOGM) process plus white noise (WN). The TEM displacements are then modeled by considering the monument height of the building structure beneath the GPS antenna. The median contributions of TEM to the annual amplitude in the vertical direction are 84% and 46% with and without additional parts of the monument, respectively. Obvious

  19. Post-Correlation Semi-Coherent Integration for High-Dynamic and Weak GPS Signal Acquisition (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    provide the coverage. To enable weak GPS signal acquisition , one known technique at the receiver end is to extend the signal integration time...Han, “Block Accumulating Coherent Integration Over Extended Interval (BACIX) for Weak GPS Signal Acquisition ,” Proc. of ION-GNSS’06, Ft. Worth, TX...AFRL-RY-WP-TP-2008-1158 POST-CORRELATION SEMI-COHERENT INTEGRATION FOR HIGH-DYNAMIC AND WEAK GPS SIGNAL ACQUISITION (PREPRINT) Chun Yang

  20. a Method Using Gnss Lh-Reflected Signals for Soil Roughness Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Li, W.; Chen, Y.; Lv, H.; Pei, Y.

    2018-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R) is based on the concept of receiving GPS signals reflected by the ground using a passive receiver. The receiver can be on the ground or installed on a small aircraft or UAV and collects the electromagnetic field scattered from the surface of the Earth. The received signals are then analyzed to determine the characteristics of the surface. Many research has been reported showing the capability of the GNSS-R technique. However, the roughness of the surface impacts the phase and amplitude of the received signals, which is still a worthwhile study. This paper presented a method can be used by GNSS-R to estimate the surface roughness. First, the data was calculated in the specular reflection with the assumption of a flat surface with different permittivity. Since the power reflectivity can be evaluated as the ratio of left-hand (LH) reflected signal to the direct right-hand (RH) signal. Then a semi-empirical roughness model was applied to the data for testing. The results showed the method can distinguish the water and the soil surface. The sensitivity of the parameters was also analyzed. It indicates this method for soil roughness estimation can be used by GNSS-R LH reflected signals. In the next step, several experiments need to be done for improving the model and exploring the way of the estimation.

  1. Using Doppler Shifts of GPS Signals To Measure Angular Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    A method has been proposed for extracting information on the rate of rotation of an aircraft, spacecraft, or other body from differential Doppler shifts of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals received by antennas mounted on the body. In principle, the method should be capable of yielding low-noise estimates of rates of rotation. The method could eliminate the need for gyroscopes to measure rates of rotation. The method is based on the fact that for a given signal of frequency ft transmitted by a given GPS satellite, the differential Doppler shift is attributable to the difference between those components of the instantaneous translational velocities of the antennas that lie along the line of sight from the antennas to the GPS satellite.

  2. Global Positioning System (GPS) civil signal monitoring (CSM) trade study report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-03-07

    This GPS Civil Signal Monitoring (CSM) Trade Study has been performed at the direction of DOT/FAA Navigation Programs as the agency of reference for consolidating civil monitoring requirements on the Global Positioning System (GPS). The objective of ...

  3. GPS Signal Corruption by the Discrete Aurora: Precise Measurements From the Mahali Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, Joshua; Mrak, Sebastijan; Hirsch, Michael; Swoboda, John; Akbari, Hassan; Starr, Gregory; Hampton, Don; Erickson, Philip; Lind, Frank; Coster, Anthea; Pankratius, Victor

    2017-10-01

    Measurements from a dense network of GPS receivers have been used to clarify the relationship between substorm auroras and GPS signal corruption as manifested by loss of lock on the received signal. A network of nine receivers was deployed along roadways near the Poker Flat Research Range in central Alaska, with receiver spacing between 15 and 30 km. Instances of large-amplitude phase fluctuations and signal loss of lock were registered in space and time with auroral forms associated with a sequence of westward traveling surges associated with a substorm onset over central Canada. The following conclusions were obtained: (1) The signal corruption originated in the ionospheric E region, between 100 and 150 km altitude, and (2) the GPS links suffering loss of lock were confined to a narrow band (<20 km wide) along the trailing edge of the moving auroral forms. The results are discussed in the context of mechanisms typically cited to account for GPS phase scintillation by auroral processes.

  4. Navigator GPS Receiver for Fast Acquisition and Weak Signal Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke; Moreau, Michael; Boegner, Gregory J.; Sirotzky, Steve

    2004-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing a new space-borne GPS receiver that can operate effectively in the full range of Earth orbiting missions from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to geostationary and beyond. Navigator is designed to be a fully space flight qualified GPS receiver optimized for fast signal acquisition and weak signal tracking. The fast acquisition capabilities provide exceptional time to first fix performance (TIFF) with no a priori receiver state or GPS almanac information, even in the presence of high Doppler shifts present in LEO (or near perigee in highly eccentric orbits). The fast acquisition capability also makes it feasible to implement extended correlation intervals and therefore significantly reduce Navigator s acquisition threshold. This greatly improves GPS observability when the receiver is above the GPS constellation (and satellites must be tracked from the opposite side of the Earth) by providing at least 10 dB of increased acquisition sensitivity. Fast acquisition and weak signal tracking algorithms have been implemented and validated on a hardware development board. A fully functional version of the receiver, employing most of the flight parts, with integrated navigation software is expected by mid 2005. An ultimate goal of this project is to license the Navigator design to an industry partner who will then market the receiver as a commercial product.

  5. GPS Signal Feature Analysis to Detect Volcanic Plume on Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavo', Flavio; Aranzulla, Massimo; Scollo, Simona; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Imme', Giuseppina

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic ash produced during explosive eruptions can cause disruptions to aviation operations and to population living around active volcanoes. Thus, detection of volcanic plume becomes a crucial issue to reduce troubles connected to its presence. Nowadays, the volcanic plume detection is carried out by using different approaches such as satellites, radars and lidars. Recently, the capability of GPS to retrieve volcanic plumes has been also investigated and some tests applied to explosive activity of Etna have demonstrated that also the GPS may give useful information. In this work, we use the permanent and continuous GPS network of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo (Italy) that consists of 35 stations located all around volcano flanks. Data are processed by the GAMIT package developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Here we investigate the possibility to quantify the volcanic plume through the GPS signal features and to estimate its spatial distribution by means of a tomographic inversion algorithm. The method is tested on volcanic plumes produced during the lava fountain of 4-5 September 2007, already used to confirm if weak explosive activity may or may not affect the GPS signals.

  6. Simulating GPS radio signal to synchronize network--a new technique for redundant timing.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qingxiao; Jun, Yang; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Fan, Yaohui; Ivanov, Eugene N; Tobar, Michael E

    2014-07-01

    Currently, many distributed systems such as 3G mobile communications and power systems are time synchronized with a Global Positioning System (GPS) signal. If there is a GPS failure, it is difficult to realize redundant timing, and thus time-synchronized devices may fail. In this work, we develop time transfer by simulating GPS signals, which promises no extra modification to original GPS-synchronized devices. This is achieved by applying a simplified GPS simulator for synchronization purposes only. Navigation data are calculated based on a pre-assigned time at a fixed position. Pseudo-range data which describes the distance change between the space vehicle (SV) and users are calculated. Because real-time simulation requires heavy-duty computations, we use self-developed software optimized on a PC to generate data, and save the data onto memory disks while the simulator is operating. The radio signal generation is similar to the SV at an initial position, and the frequency synthesis of the simulator is locked to a pre-assigned time. A filtering group technique is used to simulate the signal transmission delay corresponding to the SV displacement. Each SV generates a digital baseband signal, where a unique identifying code is added to the signal and up-converted to generate the output radio signal at the centered frequency of 1575.42 MHz (L1 band). A prototype with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) has been built and experiments have been conducted to prove that we can realize time transfer. The prototype has been applied to the CDMA network for a three-month long experiment. Its precision has been verified and can meet the requirements of most telecommunication systems.

  7. Application of Reflected Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS-R) Signals in the Estimation of Sea Roughness Effects in Microwave Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voo, Justin K.; Garrison, James L.; Yueh, Simon H.; Grant, Michael S.; Fore, Alexander G.; Haase, Jennifer S.; Clauss, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    In February-March 2009 NASA JPL conducted an airborne field campaign using the Passive Active L-band System (PALS) and the Ku-band Polarimetric Scatterometer (PolSCAT) collecting measurements of brightness temperature and near surface wind speeds. Flights were conducted over a region of expected high-speed winds in the Atlantic Ocean, for the purposes of algorithm development for salinity retrievals. Wind speeds encountered were in the range of 5 to 25 m/s during the two weeks deployment. The NASA-Langley GPS delay-mapping receiver (DMR) was also flown to collect GPS signals reflected from the ocean surface and generate post-correlation power vs. delay measurements. This data was used to estimate ocean surface roughness and a strong correlation with brightness temperature was found. Initial results suggest that reflected GPS signals, using small low-power instruments, will provide an additional source of data for correcting brightness temperature measurements for the purpose of sea surface salinity retrievals.

  8. Characterization of the Ionospheric Scintillations at High Latitude using GPS Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezaoui, H.; Hamza, A. M.; Jayachandran, P. T.

    2013-12-01

    Transionospheric radio signals experience both amplitude and phase variations as a result of propagation through a turbulent ionosphere; this phenomenon is known as ionospheric scintillations. As a result of these fluctuations, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers lose track of signals and consequently induce position and navigational errors. Therefore, there is a need to study these scintillations and their causes in order to not only resolve the navigational problem but in addition develop analytical and numerical radio propagation models. In order to quantify and qualify these scintillations, we analyze the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of L1 GPS signals at 50 Hz sampling rate using the Canadian High arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) measurements. The raw GPS signal is detrended using a wavelet-based technique and the detrended amplitude and phase of the signal are used to construct probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the scintillating signal. The resulting PDFs are non-Gaussian. From the PDF functional fits, the moments are estimated. The results reveal a general non-trivial parabolic relationship between the normalized fourth and third moments for both the phase and amplitude of the signal. The calculated higher-order moments of the amplitude and phase distribution functions will help quantify some of the scintillation characteristics and in the process provide a base for forecasting, i.e. develop a scintillation climatology model. This statistical analysis, including power spectra, along with a numerical simulation will constitute the backbone of a high latitude scintillation model.

  9. TOPEX orbit determination using GPS signals plus a sidetone ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, P. L.; Larden, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The GPS orbit determination was studied to see how well the radial coordinate for altimeter satellites such as TOPEX could be found by on board measurements of GPS signals, including the reconstructed carrier phase. The inclusion on altimeter satellites of an additional high accuracy tracking system is recommended. It is suggested that a sidetone ranging system is used in conjunction with TRANET 2 beacons.

  10. Study on common seasonal signals in GPS time series and environmental loadings using Multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszczynska, Marta; Rosat, Severine; Klos, Anna; Bogusz, Janusz

    2017-04-01

    Analysis to determine common seasonal signals in two case studies with adopted a 3-years lag-window as the optimal window size. We also inferred the statistical significance of oscillations through the Monte Carlo MSSA method (Allen and Robertson, 1996). In the first case study, we investigated the common spatio-temporal seasonal signals for all stations. For this purpose, we divided selected stations with respect to the continents. For instance, for stations located in Europe, seasonal oscillations accounts for approximately 45% of the GPS-derived data variance. Much higher variance of seasonal signals is explained by hydrological loadings of about 92%, while the non-tidal oceanic loading accounted for 31% of total variance. In the second case study, we analysed the capability of the MSSA method to establish a causality between several time series. Each of estimated Principal Component represents pattern of the common signal for all analysed data. For ZIMM station (Zimmerwald, Switzerland), the 1st, 2nd and 9th, 10th Principal Components, which accounts for 35% of the variance, corresponds to the annual and semi-annual signals. In this part, we applied the non-parametric MSSA approach to extract the common seasonal signals for GPS time series and environmental loadings for each of the 250 stations with clear statement, that some part of seasonal signal reflects the real geophysical effects. REFERENCES: 1. Allen, M. and Robertson, A.: 1996, Distinguishing modulated oscillations from coloured noise in multivariate datasets. Climate Dynamics, 12, No. 11, 775-784. DOI: 10.1007/s003820050142. 2. Dong, D., Fang, P., Bock, Y., Cheng, M.K. and Miyazaki, S.: 2002, Anatomy of apparent seasonal variations from GPS-derived site position time series. Journal of Geophysical Research, 107, No. B4, 2075. DOI: 10.1029/2001JB000573. 3. Rebischung, P., Altamimi, Z., Ray, J. and Garayt, B.: 2016, The IGS contribution to ITRF2014. Journal of Geodesy, 90, No. 7, 611-630. DOI:10.1007/s00190-016-0897-6.

  11. Estimation of sea level variations with GPS/GLONASS-reflectometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padokhin, A. M.; Kurbatov, G. A.; Andreeva, E. S.; Nesterov, I. A.; Nazarenko, M. O.; Berbeneva, N. A.; Karlysheva, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    In the present paper we study GNSS - reflectometry methods for estimation of sea level variations using a single GNSSreceiver, which are based on the multipath propagation effects caused by the reflection of navigational signals from the sea surface. Such multipath propagation results in the appearance of the interference pattern in the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of GNSS signals at small satellite elevation angles, which parameters are determined by the wavelength of the navigational signal and height of the antenna phase center above the reflecting sea surface. In current work we used GPS and GLONASS signals and measurements at two working frequencies of both systems to study sea level variations which almost doubles the amount of observations compared to GPS-only tide gauge. For UNAVCO sc02 station and collocated Friday Harbor NOAA tide gauge we show good agreement between GNSS-reflectometry and traditional mareograph sea level data.

  12. GPS Ocean Reflection Experiment (GORE) Wind Explorer (WindEx) Instrument Design and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganoe, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the design and development of the WindEx instrument, and the technology implemented by it. The important design trades will be covered along with the justification for the options selected. An evaluation of the operation of the instrument, and plans for continued development and enhancements will also be given. The WindEx instrument consists of a processor that receives data from an included GPS Surface reflection receiver, and computes ocean surface wind speeds in real time utilizing an algorithm developed at LaRC by Dr. Stephen J. Katzberg. The WindEx performs a windspeed server function as well as acting as a repository for the client moving map applications, and providing a web page with instructions on the installation and use of the WindEx system. The server receives the GPS reflection data produced by the receiver, performs wind speed processing, then makes the wind speed data available as a moving map display to requesting client processors on the aircraft network. The client processors are existing systems used by the research personnel onboard. They can be configured to be WINDEX clients by downloading the Java client application from the WINDEX server. The client application provides a graphical display of a moving map that shows the aircraft position along with the position of the reflection point from the surface of the ocean where the wind speed is being estimated, and any coastlines within the field of view. Information associated with the reflection point includes the estimated wind speed, and a confidence factor that gives the researcher an idea about the reliability of the wind speed measurement. The instrument has been installed on one of NOAA's Hurricane Hunters, a Gulfstream IV, whose nickname is "Gonzo". Based at MacDill AFB, Florida, "Gonzo" flies around the periphery of the storm deploying GPS-based dropsondes which measure local winds. The dropsondes are the "gold-standard" for determining surface winds, but can only be

  13. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    The application of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation of spacecraft in High and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEO/GEO) has crossed a threshold and is now being employed in operational missions. Utilizing advanced GPS receivers optimized for these missions, space users have made extensive use of the sidelobe transmissions from the GPS satellites to realize navigation performance that far exceeds that predicted by pre-launch simulations. Unfortunately, the official specification for the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV), developed in 2006, assumes that only signals emanating from the main beam of the GPS transmit antenna are useful for navigation, which greatly under-estimates the number of signals available for navigation purposes. As a result, future high-altitude space users may be vulnerable to any GPS design changes that suppress the sidelobe transmissions, beginning with Block III space vehicles (SVs) 11-32. This paper presents proposed changes to the GPS system SSV requirements, as informed by data from recent experiments in the SSV and new mission applications that are enabled by GPS navigation in HEO/GEO regimes. The NASA/NOAA GOES-R series satellites are highlighted as an example of a mission that relies on this currently-unspecified GPS system performance to meet mission requirements.

  14. Preliminary Results from the GPS-Reflections Mediterranean Balloon Experiment (GPSR-MEBEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L.; Ruffini, Giulio; Rius, Antonio; Cardellach, Estelle; Masters, Dallas; Armatys, Michael; Zavorotny, Valery; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An experiment to collect bistatically scattered GPS signals from a balloon at 37 km altitude has been conducted. This experiment represented the highest altitude to date that such signals were successfully recorded. The flight took place in August 1999 over the Mediterranean sea, between a launch in Sicily and recovery near Nerpio, a town in the Sierra de Segura, Albacete province of Huelva, Spain. Results from this experiment are presented, showing the waveform shape as compared to theoretical calculations. These results will be used to validate analytical models which form the basis of wind vector retrieval algorithms. These algorithms are already being validated from aircraft altitudes, but may be applied to data from future spacebourne GPS receivers. Surface wind data from radiosondes were used for comparison. This experiment was a cooperative project between NASA, the IEEC in Barcelona, and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  15. Preliminary Results from the GPS-Reflections Mediterranean Balloon Experiment (GPSR MEBEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L.; Ruffini, Giulio; Rius, Antonio; Cardellach, Estelle; Masters, Dallas; Armathys, Michael; Zavorotny, Valery

    2000-01-01

    An experiment to collect bistatically scattered GPS signals from a balloon at 37 km altitude has been conducted. This experiment represented the highest altitude to date that such signals were successfully recorded. The flight took place in August 1999 over the Mediterranean sea, between a launch in Sicily and recovery near Nerpio, a town in the Sierra de Segura, Albacete province of Huelva, Spain. Results from this experiment are presented, showing the waveform shape as compared to theoretical calculations. These results will be used to validate analytical models which form the basis of wind vector retrieval algorithms. These algorithms are already being validated from aircraft altitudes, but may be applied to data from future spaceborne GPS receivers. Surface wind data from radiosondes were used for comparison. This experiment was a cooperative project between NASA, the IEEC in Barcelona, and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  16. Azimuth selection for sea level measurements using geodetic GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Shuangcheng

    2018-03-01

    Based on analysis of Global Positioning System (GPS) multipath signals recorded by a geodetic GPS receiver, GPS Reflectometry (GPS-R) has demonstrated unique advantages in relation to sea level monitoring. Founded on multipath reflectometry theory, sea level changes can be measured by GPS-R through spectral analysis of recorded signal-to-noise ratio data. However, prior to estimating multipath parameters, it is necessary to define azimuth and elevation angle mask to ensure the reflecting zones are on water. Here, a method is presented to address azimuth selection, a topic currently under active development in the field of GPS-R. Data from three test sites: the Kachemak Bay GPS site PBAY in Alaska (USA), Friday Harbor GPS site SC02 in the San Juan Islands (USA), and Brest Harbor GPS site BRST in Brest (France) are analyzed. These sites are located in different multipath environments, from a rural coastal area to a busy harbor, and they experience different tidal ranges. Estimates by the GPS tide gauges at azimuths selected by the presented method are compared with measurements from physical tide gauges and acceptable correspondence found for all three sites.

  17. GPS signal loss in the wide area monitoring system: Prevalence, impact, and solution

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Yao, Wenxuan; Zhou, Dao; Zhan, Lingwei

    The phasor measurement unit (PMUs), equipped with Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for precise time synchronization, provides measurements of voltage and current phasors at different nodes of the wide area monitoring system. However, GPS receivers are likely to lose satellite signals due to various unpredictable factors. The prevalence of GPS signal loss (GSL) on PMUs is first investigated using real PMU data. The historical GSL events are extracted from a phasor data concentrator (PDC) and FNET/GridEye server. The correlation between GSL and time, spatial location, solar activity are explored via comprehensive statistical analysis. Furthermore, the impact of GSL on phasormore » measurement accuracy has been studied via experiments. Finally, several potential solutions to mitigate the impact of GSL on PMUs are discussed and compared.« less

  18. GPS signal loss in the wide area monitoring system: Prevalence, impact, and solution

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, Wenxuan; Zhou, Dao; Zhan, Lingwei; ...

    2017-03-19

    The phasor measurement unit (PMUs), equipped with Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for precise time synchronization, provides measurements of voltage and current phasors at different nodes of the wide area monitoring system. However, GPS receivers are likely to lose satellite signals due to various unpredictable factors. The prevalence of GPS signal loss (GSL) on PMUs is first investigated using real PMU data. The historical GSL events are extracted from a phasor data concentrator (PDC) and FNET/GridEye server. The correlation between GSL and time, spatial location, solar activity are explored via comprehensive statistical analysis. Furthermore, the impact of GSL on phasormore » measurement accuracy has been studied via experiments. Finally, several potential solutions to mitigate the impact of GSL on PMUs are discussed and compared.« less

  19. Direct-Y: Fast Acquisition of the GPS PPS Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namoos, Omar M.; DiEsposti, Raymond S.

    1996-01-01

    The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) provides positioning and time information to military users via the Precise Positioning Service (PPS) which typically allows users a significant margin of precision over the commercially available Standard Positioning Service (SPS), Military sets that rely on first acquiring the SPS Coarse Acquisition (C/A) code, read from the data message the handover word (HOW) that provides the time-of-signal transmission needed to acquire and lock onto the PPS Y-code. Under extreme battlefield conditions, the use of GPS would be denied to the warfighter who cannot pick up the un-encrypted C/A code. Studies are underway at the GPS Joint Program Office (JPO) at the Space and Missile Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base that are aimed at developing the capability to directly acquire Y-code without first acquiring C/A code. This paper briefly outlines efforts to develop 'direct-Y' acquisition, and various approaches to solving this problem. The potential ramifications of direct-Y to military users are also discussed.

  20. Using surface displacement derived from GRACE to constrain the water loading signal in cGPS measurements in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, L.; Bennett, R. A.; Harig, C.

    2017-12-01

    Currently, cGPS data is well suited to track vertical changes in the Earth's surface. However, there are annual, semi-annual, and interannual signals within cGPS time series that are not well constrained. We hypothesize that these signals are primarily due to water loading. If this is the case, the conventional method of modeling cGPS data as an annual or semiannual sinusoid falls short, as such models cannot accurately capture all variations in surface displacement, especially those due to extreme hydrologic events. We believe that we can better correct the cGPS time series with another method we are developing wherein we use a time series of surface displacement derived from the GRACE geopotential field instead of a sinusoidal model to correct the data. Currently, our analysis is constrained to the Amazon Basin, where the signal due to water loading is large enough to appear in both the GRACE and cGPS measurements. The vertical signal from cGPS stations across the Amazon Basin show an apparent spatial correlation, which further supports our idea that these signals are due to a regional water loading signal. In our preliminary research, we used tsview for Matlab to find that the WRMS of the corrected cGPS time series can be reduced as much as 30% from the model corrected data to the GRACE corrected data. The Amazon, like many places around the world, has experienced extreme drought, in 2005, 2010, and recently in 2015. In addition to making the cGPS vertical signal more robust, the method we are developing has the potential to help us understand the effects of these weather events and track trends in water loading.

  1. Precise measurement method for ionospheric total electron content using signals from GPS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imae, Michito; Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Akihiro; Hama, Shinichi; Miki, Chihiro

    1990-01-01

    A GPS codeless receiver called GTR-2 was for measuring total electron content (TEC) along the line of sight to the GPS satellite by using the cross correlation amplitude of the received P-code signals carried by L1(1575.42 MHz) and L2(1227.6 MHz). This equipment has the performance of uncertainty in the measurement of TEC of about 2 X 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m when a 10 dBi gain antenna was used. To increase the measurement performance, an upper version of GTR-2 called GTR-3 is planned which uses the phase information of the continuous signals obtained by making a cross correlation or multiplication of the received L1 and L2 P-code signals. By using the difference of these measured phases values, the ionospheric delay with the ambiguities of the periods of L1+L2 and L1-L2 signals can be estimated.

  2. Open-loop GPS signal tracking at low elevation angles from a ground-based observation site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, Georg; Zus, Florian

    2016-04-01

    For more than a decade space-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) observations are used by meteorological services world-wide for their numerical weather prediction models. In addition, climate studies increasingly rely on validated GNSS-RO data sets of atmospheric parameters. GNSS-RO profiles typically cover an altitude range from the boundary layer up to the upper stratosphere; their highest accuracy and precision, however, are attained at the tropopause level. In the lower troposphere, multipath ray propagation tend to induce signal amplitude and frequency fluctuations which lead to the development and implementation of open-loop signal tracking methods in GNSS-RO receiver firmwares. In open-loop mode the feed-back values for the carrier tracking loop are derived not from measured data, but from a Doppler frequency model which usually is extracted from an atmospheric climatology. In order to ensure that this receiver-internal parameter set, does not bias the carrier phase path observables, dual-channel open-loop GNSS-RO signal tracking was suggested. Following this proposal the ground-based "GLESER" (GPS low-elevation setting event recorder) campaign was established. Its objective was to disproof the existence of model-induced frequency biases using ground-based GPS observations at very low elevation angles. Between January and December 2014 about 2600 validated setting events, starting at geometric elevation angles of +2° and extending to -1°… - 1.5°, were recorded by the single frequency "OpenGPS" GPS receiver at a measurement site located close to Potsdam, Germany (52.3808°N, 13.0642°E). The study is based on the assumption that these ground-based observations may be used as proxies for space-based RO measurements, even if the latter occur on a one order of magnitude faster temporal scale. The "GLESER" data analysis shows that the open-loop Doppler model has negligible influence on the derived frequency profile

  3. GPS Space Service Volume: Ensuring Consistent Utility Across GPS Design Builds for Space Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Parker, Joel Jefferson Konkl; Valdez, Jennifer Ellen

    2015-01-01

    GPS availability and signal strength originally specified for users on or near surface of Earth with transmitted power levels specified at edge-of-Earth, 14.3 degrees. Prior to the SSV specification, on-orbit performance of GPS varied from block build to block build (IIA, IIRM, IIF) due to antenna gain and beam width variances. Unstable on-orbit performance results in significant risk to space users. Side-lobe signals, although not specified, were expected to significantly boost GPS signal availability for users above the constellation. During GPS III Phase A, NASA noted significant discrepancies in power levels specified in GPS III specification documents, and measured on-orbit performance. To stabilize the signal for high altitude space users, NASA DoD team in 2003-2005 led the creation of new Space Service Volume (SSV) definition and specifications.

  4. The Performance Analysis of a Real-Time Integrated INS/GPS Vehicle Navigation System with Abnormal GPS Measurement Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai

    2013-01-01

    The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC) and tightly coupled (TC) schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals) affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system. PMID:23955434

  5. Modeling the effects of Multi-path propagation and scintillation on GPS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash Krause, L.; Wilson, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    GPS signals traveling through the earth's ionosphere are affected by charged particles that often disrupt the signal and the information it carries due to "scintillation", which resembles an extra noise source on the signal. These signals are also affected by weather changes, tropospheric scattering, and absorption from objects due to multi-path propagation of the signal. These obstacles cause distortion within information and fading of the signal, which ultimately results in phase locking errors and noise in messages. In this work, we attempted to replicate the distortion that occurs in GPS signals using a signal processing simulation model. We wanted to be able to create and identify scintillated signals so we could better understand the environment that caused it to become scintillated. Then, under controlled conditions, we simulated the receiver's ability to suppress scintillation in a signal. We developed a code in MATLAB that was programmed to: 1. Create a carrier wave and then plant noise (four different frequencies) on the carrier wave, 2. Compute a Fourier transform on the four different frequencies to find the frequency content of a signal, 3. Use a filter and apply it to the Fourier transform of the four frequencies and then compute a Signal-to-noise ratio to evaluate the power (in Decibels) of the filtered signal, and 4.Plot each of these components into graphs. To test the code's validity, we used user input and data from an AM transmitter. We determined that the amplitude modulated signal or AM signal would be the best type of signal to test the accuracy of the MATLAB code due to its simplicity. This code is basic to give students the ability to change and use it to determine the environment and effects of noise on different AM signals and their carrier waves. Overall, we were able to manipulate a scenario of a noisy signal and interpret its behavior and change due to its noisy components: amplitude, frequency, and phase shift.

  6. Surface Temperature and Precipitation Affecting GPS Signals Before the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake (Central Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescentini, L.; Amoruso, A.; Chiaraluce, L.

    2017-12-01

    This work focuses on GPS time series recorded before the Mw 6.1 earthquake which struck Central Italy in April 2009. It shows how environmental noise effects may be subtle and relevant when investigating relatively small strain signals and how the availability of data from weather stations and water level sensors co-located with GPS stations may provide critical information which must be taken into consideration while dealing with deformation signals.The preparatory phase of a large earthquake may include both seismic (foreshocks) and aseismic (slow slip event, SSE) deforming episodes but, unlike afterslip, no slow event has yet been recorded before moderate earthquakes, even when they occurred close to high-sensitivity strain meters. An exception to this seems to be represented by the 2009 earthquake. The main shock was preceded by a foreshock sequence lasting 6 months; it has been claimed that an analysis of continuous GPS data shows that during the foreshock sequence a 5.9 Mw SSE occurred along a decollement located beneath the reactivated normal fault system. This hypothesized SSE, that started in the middle of February 2009 and lasted for almost two weeks, would have eventually loaded the largest foreshock and the main shock.We show that the strain signal that the SSE would have generated at two laser strainmeters operating at about 20 km NE from the SSE source was essentially undetected. On the contrary, a transient signal is present in temperature and precipitation time series recorded close to the GPS station, MTTO, that has largest signal referred to the SSE, implying that these contaminated the GPS record. This interpretation is corroborated by the strong similarity, during the coldest winter months, between the displacement data of MTTO and a linear combination of filtered temperature and precipitation data, mimicking simple heat conduction and snow accumulation/removal processes. Such a correlation between displacement and environmental data is missing

  7. A Forward GPS Multipath Simulator Based on the Vegetation Radiative Transfer Equation Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen; Xia, Junming

    2017-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have been widely used in navigation, positioning and timing. Nowadays, the multipath errors may be re-utilized for the remote sensing of geophysical parameters (soil moisture, vegetation and snow depth), i.e., GPS-Multipath Reflectometry (GPS-MR). However, bistatic scattering properties and the relation between GPS observables and geophysical parameters are not clear, e.g., vegetation. In this paper, a new element on bistatic scattering properties of vegetation is incorporated into the traditional GPS-MR model. This new element is the first-order radiative transfer equation model. The new forward GPS multipath simulator is able to explicitly link the vegetation parameters with GPS multipath observables (signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), code pseudorange and carrier phase observables). The trunk layer and its corresponding scattering mechanisms are ignored since GPS-MR is not suitable for high forest monitoring due to the coherence of direct and reflected signals. Based on this new model, the developed simulator can present how the GPS signals (L1 and L2 carrier frequencies, C/A, P(Y) and L2C modulations) are transmitted (scattered and absorbed) through vegetation medium and received by GPS receivers. Simulation results show that the wheat will decrease the amplitudes of GPS multipath observables (SNR, phase and code), if we increase the vegetation moisture contents or the scatters sizes (stem or leaf). Although the Specular-Ground component dominates the total specular scattering, vegetation covered ground soil moisture has almost no effects on the final multipath signatures. Our simulated results are consistent with previous results for environmental parameter detections by GPS-MR. PMID:28587255

  8. Detection of Heater Generated Super Small Scale Striations Using GPS Signal Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, A. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Chiang, K.; Psiaki, M.; Secan, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J.; Siefring, C. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent theoretical models predict that super small striations (SSS) of the electron density, on the order of ten centimeters, can be excited by HF waves with frequency close to multiples of the electron gyro frequency [Gurevich et al., 2006]. The first experimental verification of SSS was made at HAARP [Milikh et al., 2008]. We present results of HAARP experiments that include simultaneous observations of GPS carrier phase and SEE observations of ionospheric turbulence. These observations show that SSS excited by HF frequencies near the fourth harmonic of the gyro frequency scatter GPS signals, and in three out of six experiments indicate the presence of strong turbulence, similar to that observed in descending artificial ionized layer experiments [Pedersen et al., 2010]. This turbulence is capable of generating suprathermal electrons, and in one of the experiments, the presence of fast electrons was confirmed by the HAARP incoherent scattering radar. Estimates on the SSS shows that they correspond to 3-10% electron density depletions. Such irregularities affect UHF signals including GPS, and thus can be important in applications. Gurevich, A.V. and K.P. Zybin (2006), Phys. Lett. A, 358, 159. Milikh, G., et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Let., 35, L22102, doi:10.1029/2008GL035527. Pedersen, T. et al. (2010), Geophys. Res. Let., 37, L02106, doi:10.1029/2009GL041895.

  9. Functional description of signal processing in the Rogue GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past year, two Rogue GPS prototype receivers have been assembled and successfully subjected to a variety of laboratory and field tests. A functional description is presented of signal processing in the Rogue receiver, tracing the signal from RF input to the output values of group delay, phase, and data bits. The receiver can track up to eight satellites, without time multiplexing among satellites or channels, simultaneously measuring both group delay and phase for each of three channels (L1-C/A, L1-P, L2-P). The Rogue signal processing described requires generation of the code for all three channels. Receiver functional design, which emphasized accuracy, reliability, flexibility, and dynamic capability, is summarized. A detailed functional description of signal processing is presented, including C/A-channel and P-channel processing, carrier-aided averaging of group delays, checks for cycle slips, acquistion, and distinctive features.

  10. Observing crustal deformation and atmospheric signals from COSMO-SKYMED and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Cappello, G.; Errico, M.; Novali, F.

    2012-04-01

    The combined use of InSAR and GPS allows for the full exploitation of the complementary aspects of the two techniques by overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. Additionally, GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may contribute in obtaining better corrections of the wet tropospheric path delay in InSAR signals. This will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. We have compared the InSAR and GPS data at Bologna (urbanized area) and Medicina (agricultural area), in northeastern Italy, where two permanent GPS stations of the University of Bologna are operational since mid 1999 and 1996 respectively. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in the framework of the research contract AO-1140. The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique was applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the two towns mentioned above. The results of this work demonstrate on the one hand the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. On the other, the comparison of the differential height between the two stations derived with the GPS and the InSAR data, using both acquisition geometries, is satisfactory. Elevation, ground deformation and atmospheric artifacts were estimated in correspondence of the identified PS and compared with the GPS measurements carried out at the same acquisition time by the permanent stations at Bologna and Medicina. The comparison of the differential height between the two stations shows the sensitivity of the GPS height solution to the length of the observation interval. The vertical dispersion achieved by GPS is higher than that achieved by PS InSAR, as expected; however, a similar linear trend appears in the results of both techniques. The

  11. TOGA - A GNSS Reflections Instrument for Remote Sensing Using Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterhuizen, S.; Meehan, T. K.; Robison, D.

    2009-01-01

    Remotely sensing the Earth's surface using GNSS signals as bi-static radar sources is one of the most challenging applications for radiometric instrument design. As part of NASA's Instrument Incubator Program, our group at JPL has built a prototype instrument, TOGA (Time-shifted, Orthometric, GNSS Array), to address a variety of GNSS science needs. Observing GNSS reflections is major focus of the design/development effort. The TOGA design features a steerable beam antenna array which can form a high-gain antenna pattern in multiple directions simultaneously. Multiple FPGAs provide flexible digital signal processing logic to process both GPS and Galileo reflections. A Linux OS based science processor serves as experiment scheduler and data post-processor. This paper outlines the TOGA design approach as well as preliminary results of reflection data collected from test flights over the Pacific ocean. This reflections data demonstrates observation of the GPS L1/L2C/L5 signals.

  12. Physical applications of GPS geodesy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Geodesy, the oldest science, has become an important discipline in the geosciences, in large part by enhancing Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities over the last 35 years well beyond the satellite constellation's original design. The ability of GPS geodesy to estimate 3D positions with millimeter-level precision with respect to a global terrestrial reference frame has contributed to significant advances in geophysics, seismology, atmospheric science, hydrology, and natural hazard science. Monitoring the changes in the positions or trajectories of GPS instruments on the Earth's land and water surfaces, in the atmosphere, or in space, is important for both theory and applications, from an improved understanding of tectonic and magmatic processes to developing systems for mitigating the impact of natural hazards on society and the environment. Besides accurate positioning, all disturbances in the propagation of the transmitted GPS radio signals from satellite to receiver are mined for information, from troposphere and ionosphere delays for weather, climate, and natural hazard applications, to disturbances in the signals due to multipath reflections from the solid ground, water, and ice for environmental applications. We review the relevant concepts of geodetic theory, data analysis, and physical modeling for a myriad of processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and discuss the extensive global infrastructure that has been built to support GPS geodesy consisting of thousands of continuously operating stations. We also discuss the integration of heterogeneous and complementary data sets from geodesy, seismology, and geology, focusing on crustal deformation applications and early warning systems for natural hazards.

  13. Characteristics and limitations of GPS L1 observations from submerged antennas - Theoretical investigation in snow, ice, and freshwater and practical observations within a freshwater layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Ladina; Meindl, Michael; Geiger, Alain

    2018-05-01

    Observations from a submerged GNSS antenna underneath a snowpack need to be analyzed to investigate its potential for snowpack characterization. The magnitude of the main interaction processes involved in the GPS L1 signal propagation through different layers of snow, ice, or freshwater is examined theoretically in the present paper. For this purpose, the GPS signal penetration depth, attenuation, reflection, refraction as well as the excess path length are theoretically investigated. Liquid water exerts the largest influence on GPS signal propagation through a snowpack. An experiment is thus set up with a submerged geodetic GPS antenna to investigate the influence of liquid water on the GPS observations. The experimental results correspond well with theory and show that the GPS signal penetrates the liquid water up to three centimeters. The error in the height component due to the signal propagation delay in water can be corrected with a newly derived model. The water level above the submerged antenna could also be estimated.

  14. Statistical inference in comparing DInSAR and GPS data in fault areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzaghi, R.; Borghi, A.; Kunzle, A.

    2012-04-01

    DInSAR and GPS data are nowadays currently used in geophysical investigation, e.g. for estimating slip rate over the fault plane in seismogenic areas. This analysis is usually done by mapping the surface deformation rates as estimated by GPS and DInSAR over the fault plane using suitable geophysical models (e.g. the Okada model). Usually, DInSAR vertical velocities and GPS horizontal velocities are used for getting an integrated slip estimate. However, it is sometimes critical to merge the two kinds of information since they may reflect a common undergoing geophysical signal plus different disturbing signals that are not related to the fault dynamic. In GPS and DInSAR data analysis, these artifacts are mainly connected to signal propagation in the atmosphere and to hydrological phenomena (e.g. variation in the water table). Thus, some coherence test between the two information must be carried out in order to properly merge the GPS and DInSAR velocities in the inversion procedure. To this aim, statistical tests have been studied to check for the compatibility of the two deformation rate estimates coming from GPS and DInSAR data analysis. This has been done according both to standard and Bayesian testing methodology. The effectiveness of the proposed inference methods has been checked with numerical simulations in the case of a normal fault. The fault structure is defined following the Pollino fault model and both GPS and DInSAR data are simulated according to real data acquired in this area.

  15. Attitude determination for small satellites using GPS signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Daniel

    An embedded system for GPS-based attitude determination (AD) using signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements was developed for CubeSat applications. The design serves as an evaluation testbed for conducting ground based experiments using various computational methods and antenna types to determine the optimum AD accuracy. Raw GPS data is also stored to non-volatile memory for downloading and post analysis. Two low-power microcontrollers are used for processing and to display information on a graphic screen for real-time performance evaluations. A new parallel inter-processor communication protocol was developed that is faster and uses less power than existing standard protocols. A shorted annular patch (SAP) antenna was fabricated for the initial ground-based AD experiments with the testbed. Static AD estimations with RMS errors in the range of 2.5° to 4.8° were achieved over a range of off-zenith attitudes.

  16. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    GPS (Global Positioning System) Space Service Volume (SSV) signal environment is from 3,000-36,000 kilometers altitude. Current SSV specifications only capture performance provided by signals transmitted within 23.5(L1) or 26(L2-L5) off-nadir angle. Recent on-orbit data lessons learned show significant PNT (Positioning, Navigation and Timing) performance improvements when the full aggregate signal is used. Numerous military civil operational missions in High Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEOGEO) utilize the full signal to enhance vehicle PNT performance

  17. The GPS Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.; Moreau, M. C.; Dahle-Melsaether, M. E.; Petrofski, W. P.; Stanton, B. J.; Thomason, S.; Harris, G. A.; Sena, R. P.; Temple, L. Parker, III

    2006-01-01

    Prior to the advent of artificial satellites, the concept of navigating in space and the desire to understand and validate the laws of planetary and satellite motion dates back centuries. At the initiation of orbital flight in 1957, space navigation was dominated by inertial and groundbased tracking methods, underpinned by the laws of planetary motion. It was early in the 1980s that GPS was first explored as a system useful for refining the position, velocity, and timing (PVT) of other spacecraft equipped with GPS receivers. As a result, an entirely new GPS utility was developed beyond its original purpose of providing PVT services for land, maritime, and air applications. Spacecraft both above and below the GPS constellation now receive the GPS signals, including the signals that spill over the limb of the Earth. The use of radionavigation satellite services for space navigation in High Earth Orbits is in fact a capability unique to GPS. Support to GPS space applications is being studied and planned as an important improvement to GPS. This paper discusses the formalization of PVT services in space as part of an overall GPS improvement effort. It describes the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV) and compares it to the Terrestrial Service Volume (TSV). It also discusses SSV coverage with the current GPS constellation, coverage characteristics as a function of altitude, expected power levels, and coverage figures of merit.

  18. A 10-Year Comparison of Water Levels Measured with a Geodetic GPS Receiver Versus a Conventional Tide Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Ray, Richard D.; Williams, Simon D. P.

    2017-01-01

    A standard geodetic GPS receiver and a conventional Aquatrak tide gauge, collocated at Friday Harbor, Washington, are used to assess the quality of 10 years of water levels estimated from GPS sea surface reflections.The GPS results are improved by accounting for (tidal) motion of the reflecting sea surface and for signal propagation delay by the troposphere. The RMS error of individual GPS water level estimates is about 12 cm. Lower water levels are measured slightly more accurately than higher water levels. Forming daily mean sea levels reduces the RMS difference with the tide gauge data to approximately 2 cm. For monthly means, the RMS difference is 1.3 cm. The GPS elevations, of course, can be automatically placed into a well-defined terrestrial reference frame. Ocean tide coefficients, determined from both the GPS and tide gauge data, are in good agreement, with absolute differences below 1 cm for all constituents save K1 and S1. The latter constituent is especially anomalous, probably owing to daily temperature-induced errors in the Aquatrak tide gauge

  19. Utilizing GPS to Determine Ionospheric Delay over the Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Garrison, James L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Several spaceborne altimeters have been built and flown, and others are being developed to provide measurements of ocean and ice sheet topography. Until the launch of TOPEX, altimeters were single frequency systems incapable of removing the effects of ionospheric delay on the radar pulse. With the current state of the art in satellite altimetry, the ionosphere causes the largest single error when using single frequency altimeters. Ionospheric models provide the only recourse short of adding a second frequency to the altimeter. Unfortunately, measurements of the ionosphere are lacking over the oceans or ice sheets where they are most needed. A possible solution to the lack of data density may result from an expanded use of the Global Positioning System (GPS). This paper discusses how the reflection of the GPS signal from the ocean can be used to extend ionospheric measurements by simply adding a GPS receiver and downward-pointing antenna to satellites carrying single frequency altimeters. This paper presents results of a study assessing the feasibility and effectiveness of adding a GPS receiver and downward-pointing antenna to satellites carrying single frequency altimeters.

  20. Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Distribution A GPS Ill Developmental Optical Clock Deployable Antenna Concept 3 \\.J Science and Technology for GPS •:• Spacecraft • AFRL has funded a...Digital Waveform Generators New antenna concepts Supporting electronics Algorithms and new signal combining methods Satellite bus technologies...GPS Military High Gain Antenna Developing Options for Ground Testing 1) Deployable phased array • Low profile element • High efficiency phase

  1. NAVIGATION PERFORMANCE IN HIGH EARTH ORBITS USING NAVIGATOR GPS RECEIVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William; Naasz, Bo; Moreau, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    NASA GSFC has developed a GPS receiver that can acquire and track GPS signals with sensitivity significantly lower than conventional GPS receivers. This opens up the possibility of using GPS based navigation for missions in high altitude orbit, such as Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in a geostationary orbit, and the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission, in highly eccentric orbits extending to 12 Earth radii and higher. Indeed much research has been performed to study the feasibility of using GPS navigation in high Earth orbits and the performance achievable. Recently, GSFC has conducted a series of hardware in-the-loop tests to assess the performance of this new GPS receiver in various high Earth orbits of interest. Tracking GPS signals to down to approximately 22-25 dB-Hz, including signals from the GPS transmitter side-lobes, steady-state navigation performance in a geostationary orbit is on the order of 10 meters. This paper presents the results of these tests, as well as sensitivity analysis to such factors as ionosphere masks, use of GPS side-lobe signals, and GPS receiver sensitivity.

  2. Seasonal and Surface Hydrologic Loading Signals at GPS Stations Processed by the GAGE Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Phillips, D.

    2017-12-01

    UNAVCO is now producing hydrologic displacement model time series at GPS station coordinates in the Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) Facility, including the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The surface loads are obtained from global and national land data assimilation systems (GLDAS and NLDAS, respectively) land surface models produced by the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The land surface models are available as monthly files of environmental parameters documenting water, pressure, temperature, and other measures mass/energy transfer on a grid at the Earth's surface. Grids are 1º for the global GLDAS models and 0.125º for the NLDAS models in the conterminous US. UNAVCO extracts the soil moisture, snowpack, and water stored in vegetation parameters and calculates displacements in an elastic half-space at selected points, i.e., GPS station locations. UNAVCO has recently upgraded its hydrologic data products from GLDAS version 1 to version 2 and added NLDAS-based models, and the new data products are now available from the UNAVCO ftp server (ftp://data-out.unavco.org/pub/products/hydro) and will soon be available through web services. The GLDAS v2 models supersede those based on v1, which will no longer be updated. UNAVCO updates its hydrologic products on a quarterly basis. Seasonal signals in the GAGE GPS position time series have amplitudes on the order of several millimeters, which vary across the PBO network depending on local climate and geology. The signals are thought to be a combination of elastic displacement from surface loading and poroelastic displacement from groundwater depletion and recharge. We present a description of the hydrologic displacement modeling and provide examples of loading and resulting displacement. The GLDAS and NLDAS models are compared with each other and with GPS position time series at selected stations in different geographic regions.

  3. Autonomous Navigation Improvements for High-Earth Orbiters Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Garrison, James; Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center is currently developing autonomous navigation systems for satellites in high-Earth orbits where acquisition of the GPS signals is severely limited This paper discusses autonomous navigation improvements for high-Earth orbiters and assesses projected navigation performance for these satellites using Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) measurements. Navigation performance is evaluated as a function of signal acquisition threshold, measurement errors, and dynamic modeling errors using realistic GPS signal strength and user antenna models. These analyses indicate that an autonomous navigation position accuracy of better than 30 meters root-mean-square (RMS) can be achieved for high-Earth orbiting satellites using a GPS receiver with a very stable oscillator. This accuracy improves to better than 15 meters RMS if the GPS receiver's signal acquisition threshold can be reduced by 5 dB-Hertz to track weaker signals.

  4. Assessment of GPS Reflectometry from TechDemoSat-1 for Scatterometry and Altimetry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R.; Hajj, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    The value of GPS reflectometry for scatterometry and altimetry applications has been a topic of investigation for the past two decades. TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1), a technology demonstration satellite launched in July of 2014, with an instrument to collect GPS reflections from 4 GPS satellites simultaneously, provide the first extensive data that allows for validation and evaluation of GPS reflectometry from space against more established techniques. TDS-1 uses a high gain (~13 dBi) L1 antenna pointing 6 degrees off nadir with a 60ohalf-beam width. Reflected GPS L1 signals are processed into Delay Doppler Maps (DDMs) inside the receiver and made available (through Level-1b) along with metadata describing the bistatic geometry, antenna gain, etc., on a second-by-second basis for each of the 4 GPS tracks recorded at any given time. In this paper we examine level-1b data from TDS-1 for thousands of tracks collected over the span of Jan.-Feb., 2015. This data corresponds to reflections from various types of surfaces throughout the globe including ice, deserts, forests, oceans, lakes, wetlands, etc. Our analysis will consider how the surface type manifests itself in the DDMs (e.g., coherence vs. non-coherence reflection) and derivable physical quantities. We will consider questions regarding footprint resolution, waveform rise time and corresponding bistatic range accuracy, and level of precision for altimetry (sea surface height) and scatterometry (significant wave height and sea surface wind). Tracks from TDS-1 that coincide with Jason-1 or 2 tracks will be analyzed, where the latter can be used as truth for comparison and validation. Where coincidences are found, vertical delay introduced by the media as measured by Jason will be mapped to bistatic propagation path to correct for neutral atmospheric and ionospheric delays.

  5. An Investigation of Multipath Effects on the GPS System During Auto-Rendezvous and Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richie, James E.; Forest, Francis W.

    1995-01-01

    The proposed use of a Cargo Transport Vehicle (CTV) to carry hardware to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) during the construction phase of the SSF project requires remote maneuvering of the CTV. The CTV is not a manned vehicle. Obtaining the relative positions of the CTV and SSF for remote auto-rendezvous and capture (AR&C) scenarios will rely heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS system is expected to guide the CTV up to a distance of 100 to 300 meters from the SSF. At some point within this range, an optical docking system will take over the remote guidance for capture. During any remote guidance by GPS it is possible that significant multipath signals may be caused by large objects in the vicinity of the module being remotely guided. This could alter the position obtained by the GPS system from the actual position. Due to the nature of the GPS signals, it has been estimated that if the difference in distance between the Line of Sight (LOS) path and the multipath is greater than 300 meters, the GPS system is capable of discriminating between the direct signal and the reflected (or multipath) signal. However, if the path difference is less than 300 meters, one must be concerned. This report details the work accomplished by the Electromagnetic Simulations Laboratory at Marquette University over the period December 1993 to May 1995. This work is an investigation of the strength and phase of a multipath signal arriving at the CTV relative to the direct or line of sight (LOS) signal. The signal originates at a GPS satellite in half geo-stationary orbit and takes two paths to the CTV: (1) the direct or LOS path from the GPS satellite to the CTV; and (2) a scattered path from the GPS satellite to the SSF module and then to the CTV. The scattering from a cylinder has been computed using the physical optics approximation for the current. No other approximations or assumptions have been made including no assumptions regarding the far field or Fresnel field

  6. Pandora's electronic box: GPs reflect upon email communication with their patients.

    PubMed

    Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Wearn, Andy; Everts, Hans; Huggard, Peter; Halliwell, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Global access to information technology has increased dramatically in the past decade, with electronic health care changing medical practice. One example for general practitioners (GPs) is communication with patients via electronic mail (email). GPs face issues regarding e-communication with patients, including how and when it should it be used. The study aims were to assess the extent that GPs communicate with patients by email and explore their attitudes to this mode of communication. Design--telephone interview survey. Setting--primary care, largest urban and suburban area in New Zealand (NZ). Subjects--randomly selected GPs from the Auckland region. Main outcome measure--description of email use; analysis of issues by telephone survey. Data analysed using SPSS-12 and by thematic content analysis. At data saturation, 80 GPs had been interviewed. The majority (68%) had not used email with patients. Only 4% used it regularly. However, there was strong interest in this method. Perceived advantages were the ability to communicate at a distance and time convenient to both doctor and patient; communication where disability affected traditional methods; information-giving (for example, web links); passing on normal results. Identified problems involved inequity of access; linking of electronic data; security; unsuitability for some topics; medico-legal concerns; time; remuneration. Study sample closely mirrored current NZ GP population. Although few GPs emailed with patients, many might once barriers are addressed. GPs had a collective view of the appropriate boundaries for email communication, routine tasks and the transmission of information. GPs would encourage professional debate regarding guidelines for good practice, managing demand and remuneration.

  7. Codeless GPS Applications to Multi-Path: CGAMP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Miller, R. B.; Jenkins, D.; Lemmon, J.; Gold, K.; Schreiner, W.; Snyder, G.

    1990-01-01

    Cordless Global Positioning System (GPS) Applications to Multi-Path (CGAMP) is meeting the challenge of exploiting the L-band signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites for the measurement of the impulse response of radio transmission channels over space-Earth paths. This approach was originally suggested by E. K. Smith and has been pursued by J. Lemmon, without an affordable implementation being identifiable. In addition to the high cost of a suitable P code correlating GPS receiver, there is also the major impediment of the often announced Department of Defense policy of selective availability/anti-spoof (SA/AS) that clouds reliable access to the wideband (20 MHz) P channel of the GPS signals without cryptographic access. A technique proposed by MacDoran utilizes codeless methods for exploiting the P channel signals implemented by the use of a pair of antennas and cross correlation signal detection.

  8. Fisheye-Based Method for GPS Localization Improvement in Unknown Semi-Obstructed Areas

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Julien; Ambellouis, Sébastien; Ruichek, Yassine

    2017-01-01

    A precise GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) localization is vital for autonomous road vehicles, especially in cluttered or urban environments where satellites are occluded, preventing accurate positioning. We propose to fuse GPS (Global Positioning System) data with fisheye stereovision to face this problem independently to additional data, possibly outdated, unavailable, and needing correlation with reality. Our stereoscope is sky-facing with 360° × 180° fisheye cameras to observe surrounding obstacles. We propose a 3D modelling and plane extraction through following steps: stereoscope self-calibration for decalibration robustness, stereo matching considering neighbours epipolar curves to compute 3D, and robust plane fitting based on generated cartography and Hough transform. We use these 3D data with GPS raw data to estimate NLOS (Non Line Of Sight) reflected signals pseudorange delay. We exploit extracted planes to build a visibility mask for NLOS detection. A simplified 3D canyon model allows to compute reflections pseudorange delays. In the end, GPS positioning is computed considering corrected pseudoranges. With experimentations on real fixed scenes, we show generated 3D models reaching metric accuracy and improvement of horizontal GPS positioning accuracy by more than 50%. The proposed procedure is effective, and the proposed NLOS detection outperforms CN0-based methods (Carrier-to-receiver Noise density). PMID:28106746

  9. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  10. Signal-enhancement reflective pulse oximeter with Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shuang-Chao; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a new reflective pulse oximeter is proposed and demonstrated with implanting a Fresnel lens, which enhances the reflected signal. An optical simulation model incorporated with human skin characteristics is presented to evaluate the capability of the Fresnel lens. In addition, the distance between the light emitting diode and the photodiode is optimized. Compared with the other reflective oximeters, the reflected signal light detected by the photodiode is enhanced to more than 140%.

  11. GPS antenna designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-01-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  12. Investigation on the coloured noise in GPS-derived position with time-varying seasonal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszczynska, Marta; Klos, Anna; Bos, Machiel Simon; Bogusz, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal signals in the GPS-derived time series arise from real geophysical signals related to tidal (residual) or non-tidal (loadings from atmosphere, ocean and continental hydrosphere, thermo elastic strain, etc.) effects and numerical artefacts including aliasing from mismodelling in short periods or repeatability of the GPS satellite constellation with respect to the Sun (draconitics). Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is a method for investigation of nonlinear dynamics, suitable to either stationary or non-stationary data series without prior knowledge about their character. The aim of SSA is to mathematically decompose the original time series into a sum of slowly varying trend, seasonal oscillations and noise. In this presentation we will explore the ability of SSA to subtract the time-varying seasonal signals in GPS-derived North-East-Up topocentric components and show properties of coloured noise from residua. For this purpose we used data from globally distributed IGS (International GNSS Service) permanent stations processed by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) in a PPP (Precise Point Positioning) mode. After introducing a threshold of 13 years, 264 stations left with a maximum length reaching 23 years. The data was initially pre-processed for outliers, offsets and gaps. The SSA was applied to pre-processed series to estimate the time-varying seasonal signals. We adopted a 3-years window as the optimal dimension of its size determined with the Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC) values. A Fisher-Snedecor test corrected for the presence of temporal correlation was used to determine the statistical significance of reconstructed components. This procedure showed that first four components describing annual and semi-annual signals, are significant at a 99.7% confidence level, which corresponds to 3-sigma criterion. We compared the non-parametric SSA approach with a commonly chosen parametric Least-Squares Estimation that assumes constant amplitudes and

  13. How and Why to Do VLBI on GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to establish the position of the center of mass of the Earth in the International Celestial Reference Frame, observations of the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) constellation using the IVS network are important. With a good frame-tie between the coordinates of the IVS telescopes and nearby GPS receivers, plus a common local oscillator reference signal, it should be possible to observe and record simultaneously signals from the astrometric calibration sources and the GPS satellites. The standard IVS solution would give the atmospheric delay and clock offsets to use in analysis of the GPS data. Correlation of the GPS signals would then give accurate orbital parameters of the satellites in the ICRF reference frame, i.e., relative to the positions of the astrometric sources. This is particularly needed to determine motion of the center of mass of the earth along the rotation axis.

  14. Coastal sea level measurements using a single geodetic GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Löfgren, Johan S.; Haas, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a method to derive local sea level variations using data from a single geodetic-quality Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver using GPS (Global Positioning System) signals. This method is based on multipath theory for specular reflections and the use of Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) data. The technique could be valuable for altimeter calibration and validation. Data from two test sites, a dedicated GPS tide gauge at the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) in Sweden and the Friday Harbor GPS site of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) in USA, are analyzed. The sea level results are compared to independently observed sea level data from nearby and in situ tide gauges. For OSO, the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) agreement is better than 5 cm, while it is in the order of 10 cm for Friday Harbor. The correlation coefficients are better than 0.97 for both sites. For OSO, the SNR-based results are also compared with results from a geodetic analysis of GPS data of a two receivers/antennae tide gauge installation. The SNR-based analysis results in a slightly worse RMS agreement with respect to the independent tide gauge data than the geodetic analysis (4.8 cm and 4.0 cm, respectively). However, it provides results even for rough sea surface conditions when the two receivers/antennae installation no longer records the necessary data for a geodetic analysis.

  15. GPS Technologies as a Tool to Detect the Pre-Earthquake Signals Associated with Strong Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Krankowski, A.; Hernandez-Pajares, M.; Liu, J. Y. G.; Hattori, K.; Davidenko, D.; Ouzounov, D.

    2015-12-01

    The existence of ionospheric anomalies before earthquakes is now widely accepted. These phenomena started to be considered by GPS community to mitigate the GPS signal degradation over the territories of the earthquake preparation. The question is still open if they could be useful for seismology and for short-term earthquake forecast. More than decade of intensive studies proved that ionospheric anomalies registered before earthquakes are initiated by processes in the boundary layer of atmosphere over earthquake preparation zone and are induced in the ionosphere by electromagnetic coupling through the Global Electric Circuit. Multiparameter approach based on the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling model demonstrated that earthquake forecast is possible only if we consider the final stage of earthquake preparation in the multidimensional space where every dimension is one from many precursors in ensemble, and they are synergistically connected. We demonstrate approaches developed in different countries (Russia, Taiwan, Japan, Spain, and Poland) within the framework of the ISSI and ESA projects) to identify the ionospheric precursors. They are also useful to determine the all three parameters necessary for the earthquake forecast: impending earthquake epicenter position, expectation time and magnitude. These parameters are calculated using different technologies of GPS signal processing: time series, correlation, spectral analysis, ionospheric tomography, wave propagation, etc. Obtained results from different teams demonstrate the high level of statistical significance and physical justification what gives us reason to suggest these methodologies for practical validation.

  16. Effect of the X5.4 Class Solar Flare Event of Solar Cycle 24 ON the GPS Signal Reception in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Musa, T. A.; Aris, W. A. W.; Gopir, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of solar flare event on the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia during the X5.4 class solar flare on 7th March 2012, 00:24 UT at active region AR1429. GPS data from six MyRTKnet stations that cover the northern, southern, western and eastern regions of Peninsular Malaysia were used, namely Langkawi (Kedah), Bandar Baharu (Pulau Pinang), Pekan (Pahang), Mersing (Johor), Tanjung Pengelih (Johor) and Malacca (Malacca). The total electron content (TEC) was estimated based on the single layer ionospheric model. Next, the ionospheric delay for each GPS frequency of L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L5 (1176.45 MHz) was then calculated. The results show that solar flare event can influence the GPS signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia where the X5.4 class solar flare shows significant effect of the ionospheric delay within the range of 9 m - 20 m. These research findings will significantly contribute to space weather study and its effects on space-based positioning system such as the GPS.

  17. Gravity Persistent Signal 1 (GPS1) reveals novel cytochrome P450s involved in gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Withers, John C; Shipp, Matthew J; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G; Sukumar, Poornima; Schuler, Mary A; Muday, Gloria K; Wyatt, Sarah E

    2013-01-01

    Gravity is an important environmental factor that affects growth and development of plants. In response to changes in gravity, directional growth occurs along the major axes and lateral branches of both shoots and roots. The gravity persistent signal (gps) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana were previously identified as having an altered response to gravity when reoriented relative to the gravity vector in the cold, with the gps1 mutant exhibiting a complete loss of tropic response under these conditions. Thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL) PCR was used to identify the gene defective in gps1. Gene expression data, molecular modeling and computational substrate dockings, quantitative RT-PCR analyses, reporter gene fusions, and physiological analyses of knockout mutants were used to characterize the genes identified. Cloning of the gene defective in gps1 and genetic complementation revealed that GPS1 encodes CYP705A22, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450). CYP705A5, a closely related family member, was identified as expressed specifically in roots in response to gravistimulation, and a mutation affecting its expression resulted in a delayed gravity response, increased flavonol levels, and decreased basipetal auxin transport. Molecular modeling coupled with in silico substrate docking and diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethyl ester (DBPA) staining indicated that these P450s are involved in biosynthesis of flavonoids potentially involved in auxin transport. The characterization of two novel P450s (CYP705A22 and CYP705A5) and their role in the gravity response has offered new insights into the regulation of the genetic and physiological controls of plant gravitropism.

  18. GPS World, Innovation: Autonomous Navigation at High Earth Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William; Winternitz, Luke; Hay, Curtis

    2005-01-01

    Calculating a spacecraft's precise location at high orbital altitudes-22,000 miles (35,800 km) and beyond-is an important and challenging problem. New and exciting opportunities become possible if satellites are able to autonomously determine their own orbits. First, the repetitive task of periodically collecting range measurements from terrestrial antennas to high altitude spacecraft becomes less important-this lessens competition for control facilities and saves money by reducing operational costs. Also, autonomous navigation at high orbital altitudes introduces the possibility of autonomous station keeping. For example, if a geostationary satellite begins to drift outside of its designated slot it can make orbit adjustments without requiring commands from the ground. Finally, precise onboard orbit determination opens the door to satellites flying in formation-an emerging concept for many scientific space applications. The realization of these benefits is not a trivial task. While the navigation signals broadcast by GPS satellites are well suited for orbit and attitude determination at lower altitudes, acquiring and using these signals at geostationary (GEO) and highly elliptical orbits is much more difficult. The light blue trace describes the GPS orbit at approximately 12,550 miles (20,200 km) altitude. GPS satellites were designed to provide navigation signals to terrestrial users-consequently the antenna array points directly toward the earth. GEO and HE0 orbits, however, are well above the operational GPS constellation, making signal reception at these altitudes more challenging. The nominal beamwidth of a Block II/IIA GPS satellite antenna array is approximately 42.6 degrees. At GEO and HE0 altitudes, most of these primary beam transmissions are blocked by the Earth, leaving only a narrow region of nominal signal visibility near opposing limbs of the earth. This region is highlighted in gray. If GPS receivers at GEO and HE0 orbits were designed to use these

  19. Characterization of Climate Change and Variability with GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, R.

    1999-01-01

    We compared zonal mean specific humidity derived from the 21 June-4 July 1995 Global Positioning System (GPS)/MET occultation observations with that derived from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) global analyses. The GPS/MET results indicate a drier troposphere, especially near the subtropical tradewind inversion. A small, moist bias in the GPS/MET upper northern-hemisphere troposphere compared to ECMWF may be due to a small radiosonde temperature bias. A diagram shows the difference (g/kg) between the GPS/MET zonal mean specific humidity and that for June-August derived from 1963-1973 radiosondes. Although the observing period is short, GPS and ECMWF results both indicate a significantly wetter boundary layer at most latitudes consistent with decadal trends observed in radiosonde data. GPS/MET results exhibit higher tropical convective available potential energy (CAPE), suggesting a more vigorous tropical Hadley circulation. Drier, free troposphere air in the descending branches of the Hadley circulation is due in part to a moist radiosonde bias but may also reflect some negative moisture feedback. Using 1992-1997 ground GPS observations and recent advancements in GPS technology, we removed an apparent altimetric drift (-1.2 +/- 0.4 mm/yr) due to columnar water vapor from the Topography (Ocean) Experiment (TOPEX) microwave radiometer, which brought the TOPEX mean sea level change estimates into better agreement with historical tide gauge records, suggesting global mean sea level is rising at a rate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr. We can also discern a statistically significant increase of 0.2 +/- 0.1 kg/square m/yr in mean columnar water vapor over the ocean from 1992-1997. Optimal fingerprinting can be used for the detection and attribution of tropospheric warming due to an anthropogenic greenhouse. Optimal fingerprinting distinguishes between different types of signals according to their spatial and temporal patterns, while minimizing the

  20. Digital signal processor and processing method for GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A digital signal processor and processing method therefor for use in receivers of the NAVSTAR/GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) employs a digital carrier down-converter, digital code correlator and digital tracking processor. The digital carrier down-converter and code correlator consists of an all-digital, minimum bit implementation that utilizes digital chip and phase advancers, providing exceptional control and accuracy in feedback phase and in feedback delay. Roundoff and commensurability errors can be reduced to extremely small values (e.g., less than 100 nanochips and 100 nanocycles roundoff errors and 0.1 millichip and 1 millicycle commensurability errors). The digital tracking processor bases the fast feedback for phase and for group delay in the C/A, P.sub.1, and P.sub.2 channels on the L.sub.1 C/A carrier phase thereby maintaining lock at lower signal-to-noise ratios, reducing errors in feedback delays, reducing the frequency of cycle slips and in some cases obviating the need for quadrature processing in the P channels. Simple and reliable methods are employed for data bit synchronization, data bit removal and cycle counting. Improved precision in averaged output delay values is provided by carrier-aided data-compression techniques. The signal processor employs purely digital operations in the sense that exactly the same carrier phase and group delay measurements are obtained, to the last decimal place, every time the same sampled data (i.e., exactly the same bits) are processed.

  1. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Galileo satellite navigation system signal, E1. L1C is also compatible with those signals planned for broadcast on Japan’s Quazi-Zenith Satellite...and Galileo constellations, further increasing the accuracy and availability of civil PNT solutions. GPS III December 2013 SAR April 16, 2014...vehicle- level core mate. The overall program continues to make progress on the GPS III Non-Flight Satellite Testbed (GNST), on SV01 development, and

  2. Development of a real time bistatic radar receiver using signals of opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainville, Nicholas

    Passive bistatic radar remote sensing offers a novel method of monitoring the Earth's surface by observing reflected signals of opportunity. The Global Positioning System (GPS) has been used as a source of signals for these observations and the scattering properties of GPS signals from rough surfaces are well understood. Recent work has extended GPS signal reflection observations and scattering models to include communications signals such as XM radio signals. However the communication signal reflectometry experiments to date have relied on collecting raw, high data-rate signals which are then post-processed after the end of the experiment. This thesis describes the development of a communication signal bistatic radar receiver which computes a real time correlation waveform, which can be used to retrieve measurements of the Earth's surface. The real time bistatic receiver greatly reduces the quantity of data that must be stored to perform the remote sensing measurements, as well as offering immediate feedback. This expands the applications for the receiver to include space and bandwidth limited platforms such as aircraft and satellites. It also makes possible the adjustment of flight plans to the observed conditions. This real time receiver required the development of an FGPA based signal processor, along with the integration of commercial Satellite Digital Audio Radio System (SDARS) components. The resulting device was tested both in a lab environment as well on NOAA WP-3D and NASA WB-57 aircraft.

  3. Earth Surface Deformation in the North China Plain Detected by Joint Analysis of GRACE and GPS Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renli; Li, Jiancheng; Fok, Hok Sum; Shum, C.K.; Li, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Mass redistribution of the Earth causes variable loading that deforms the solid Earth. While most recent studies using geodetic techniques focus on regions (such as the Amazon basin and the Nepal Himalayas) with large seasonal deformation amplitudes on the order of 1–4 cm due to hydrologic loading, few such studies have been conducted on the regions where the seasonal deformation amplitude is half as large. Here, we use joint GPS and GRACE data to investigate the vertical deformation due to hydrologic loading in the North China Plain, where significant groundwater depletion has been reported. We found that the GPS- and GRACE-derived secular trends and seasonal signals are in good agreement, with an uplift magnitude of 1–2 mm/year and a correlation of 85.0%–98.5%, respectively. This uplift rate is consistent with groundwater depletion rate estimated from GRACE data and in-situ groundwater measurements from earlier report studies; whereas the seasonal hydrologic variation reflects human behavior of groundwater pumping for agriculture irrigation in spring, leading to less water storage in summer than that in the winter season. However, less than 20% of weighted root-mean-squared (WRMS) reductions were detected for all the selected GPS stations when GRACE-derived seasonal deformations were removed from detrended GPS height time series. This discrepancy is probably because the GRACE-derived seasonal signals are large-scale, while the GPS-derived signals are local point measurements. PMID:25340454

  4. Earth surface deformation in the North China Plain detected by joint analysis of GRACE and GPS data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renli; Li, Jiancheng; Fok, Hok Sum; Shum, C K; Li, Zhao

    2014-10-22

    Mass redistribution of the Earth causes variable loading that deforms the solid Earth. While most recent studies using geodetic techniques focus on regions (such as the Amazon basin and the Nepal Himalayas) with large seasonal deformation amplitudes on the order of 1-4 cm due to hydrologic loading, few such studies have been conducted on the regions where the seasonal deformation amplitude is half as large. Here, we use joint GPS and GRACE data to investigate the vertical deformation due to hydrologic loading in the North China Plain, where significant groundwater depletion has been reported. We found that the GPS- and GRACE-derived secular trends and seasonal signals are in good agreement, with an uplift magnitude of 1-2 mm/year and a correlation of 85.0%-98.5%, respectively. This uplift rate is consistent with groundwater depletion rate estimated from GRACE data and in-situ groundwater measurements from earlier report studies; whereas the seasonal hydrologic variation reflects human behavior of groundwater pumping for agriculture irrigation in spring, leading to less water storage in summer than that in the winter season. However, less than 20% of weighted root-mean-squared (WRMS) reductions were detected for all the selected GPS stations when GRACE-derived seasonal deformations were removed from detrended GPS height time series. This discrepancy is probably because the GRACE-derived seasonal signals are large-scale, while the GPS-derived signals are local point measurements.

  5. GPS: Public Utility or Software Platform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    major occurrences that could interrupt GPS’s operation for an extended period of time . Despite these safeguards, the U.S. government has...in the event of a GPS interruption .178 2. GPS Infrastructure is designed to Prevent and Minimize Disruption Like a public utility, GPS is designed ...production and distribution while at the same time minimizing the likelihood of signal interruptions . Each of GPS’s operational satellites are

  6. The atmosphere- and hydrosphere-correlated signals in GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Boy, Jean-Paul; Klos, Anna; Figurski, Mariusz

    2015-04-01

    analysis of satellite data was performed twofold: firstly, the time series from network solution (NS) processed in Bernese 5.0 software by the Military University of Technology EPN Local Analysis Centre, secondly, the ones from PPP (Precise Point Positioning) from JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) processing in Gipsy-Oasis were analyzed. Both were modelled with wavelet decomposition with Meyer orthogonal mother wavelet. Here, nine levels of decomposition were applied and eighth detail of it was interpreted as changes close to one year. In this way, both NS and PPP time series where presented as curves with annual period with amplitudes and phases changeable in time. The same analysis was performed for atmospheric (ATM) and hydrospheric (HYDR) models. All annual curves (modelled from NS, PPP, ATM and HYDR) were then compared to each other to investigate whether GPS observations contain the atmosphere and hydrosphere correlated signals and in what way the amplitudes of them may disrupt the GPS time series.

  7. GPS Eye-in-the-Sky Software Takes Closer Look Below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    At NASA, GPS is a vital resource for scientific research aimed at understanding and protecting Earth. The Agency employs the band of GPS satellites for such functions as mapping Earth s ionosphere and developing earthquake-prediction tools. Extending this worldly wisdom beyond Earth, NASA researchers are even discussing the possibility of developing global positioning satellites around Mars, in anticipation of future manned missions. Despite all of its terrestrial accomplishments, traditional GPS still has its limitations. The Space Agency is working to address these with many new advances, including a "Global Differential GPS" technology that instantaneously provides a position to within 4 inches horizontally and 8 inches vertically, anywhere on Earth. According to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, no other related system provides the same combination of accuracy and coverage. Furthermore, traditional GPS cannot communicate beyond latitudes of 75deg. That means that most of Greenland and Antarctica cannot receive GPS signals. The Global Differential GPS technology approaches this area of the world using several different GPS signals. These signals overlap to compensate for the gaps in coverage. Now, scientists working in the extreme northernmost and southernmost areas of the world can have access to the same GPS technology that other scientists around the world rely on.

  8. Assessment of GPS Multifrequency Signal Characteristics During Periods of Ionospheric Scintillations from an Anomaly Crest Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, S.; Paul, K. S.; Paul, A.

    2017-09-01

    Multifrequency GPS transmissions have provided the opportunity for testing the applicability of the principle of frequency diversity for scintillation mitigation. Published results addressing this issue with quantified estimates are not available in literature, at least from the anomaly crest location of the Indian longitude sector. Multifrequency scattering within the same L band is often the attributed cause behind simultaneous decorrelated signal fluctuations. The present paper aims to provide proportion of time during scintillation patches that decorrelations are found across GPS L1, L2, and L5 frequencies associated with high S4, corresponding high values of scattering coefficients, and large receiver position deviations thereby seriously compromising the performance of satellite-based navigation system. Results from the anomaly crest station at Calcutta indicate maximum 40% of scintillation time during February-April 2014 and 33% during August-October 2014 that the signals are decorrelated. It is important to note that it is only during these time intervals that the principle of frequency diversity could be applied for scintillation mitigation.

  9. Briefing Highlights Vulnerability of GPS to Adverse Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    Through its effects on GPS and other technologies, space weather can affect a variety of industries, including agriculture, commercial air travel, and emergency response. Speakers focused on these topics at a 22 June briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D. C. Solar flares can produce radio bursts that directly interfere with GPS signals. Solar activity can also cause ionospheric disturbances that produce distortions and delays in GPS signals, degrading the accuracy of positioning and navigation systems.

  10. US Coast Guard GPS Information Center (GPSIC) and its function within the Civil GPS Service (CGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In 1987, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) formally requested that the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) take responsibility for providing an office that would respond to nonmilitary user needs for GPS information, data, and assistance. DOT accepted this responsibility and in February 1989, named the Coast Guard as their lead agency for the project. Since that time, the U.S. Coast Guard has worked with the U.S. Space Command to develop requirements and implement a plan for providing the requested interface with the civil GPS community. The Civil GPS Service (CGS) consists of four main elements: GPS Information Center (GPSIC) - provides GPS status information to civilian users of the system: Civil GPS Service Interface Committee (CGSIC) - established to identify civil GPS user technical information needs in support of the CGS program; Differential GPS (DGPS) - Coast Guard Research and Development Project; and PPS Program Office (PPSPO) - (Under development) will administer the program allowing qualified civil users to have access to the PPS signal. Details about the services these organizations provide are described.

  11. The quasi-biennial vertical oscillations at global GPS stations: identification by ensemble empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanjin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Ding, Hao; Hwang, Cheinway; Li, Jin; Zhang, Tengxu

    2015-10-14

    Modeling nonlinear vertical components of a GPS time series is critical to separating sources contributing to mass displacements. Improved vertical precision in GPS positioning at stations for velocity fields is key to resolving the mechanism of certain geophysical phenomena. In this paper, we use ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) to analyze the daily GPS time series at 89 continuous GPS stations, spanning from 2002 to 2013. EEMD decomposes a GPS time series into different intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), which are used to identify different kinds of signals and secular terms. Our study suggests that the GPS records contain not only the well-known signals (such as semi-annual and annual signals) but also the seldom-noted quasi-biennial oscillations (QBS). The quasi-biennial signals are explained by modeled loadings of atmosphere, non-tidal and hydrology that deform the surface around the GPS stations. In addition, the loadings derived from GRACE gravity changes are also consistent with the quasi-biennial deformations derived from the GPS observations. By removing the modeled components, the weighted root-mean-square (WRMS) variation of the GPS time series is reduced by 7.1% to 42.3%, and especially, after removing the seasonal and QBO signals, the average improvement percentages for seasonal and QBO signals are 25.6% and 7.5%, respectively, suggesting that it is significant to consider the QBS signals in the GPS records to improve the observed vertical deformations.

  12. The Quasi-Biennial Vertical Oscillations at Global GPS Stations: Identification by Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuanjin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Ding, Hao; Hwang, Cheinway; Li, Jin; Zhang, Tengxu

    2015-01-01

    Modeling nonlinear vertical components of a GPS time series is critical to separating sources contributing to mass displacements. Improved vertical precision in GPS positioning at stations for velocity fields is key to resolving the mechanism of certain geophysical phenomena. In this paper, we use ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) to analyze the daily GPS time series at 89 continuous GPS stations, spanning from 2002 to 2013. EEMD decomposes a GPS time series into different intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), which are used to identify different kinds of signals and secular terms. Our study suggests that the GPS records contain not only the well-known signals (such as semi-annual and annual signals) but also the seldom-noted quasi-biennial oscillations (QBS). The quasi-biennial signals are explained by modeled loadings of atmosphere, non-tidal and hydrology that deform the surface around the GPS stations. In addition, the loadings derived from GRACE gravity changes are also consistent with the quasi-biennial deformations derived from the GPS observations. By removing the modeled components, the weighted root-mean-square (WRMS) variation of the GPS time series is reduced by 7.1% to 42.3%, and especially, after removing the seasonal and QBO signals, the average improvement percentages for seasonal and QBO signals are 25.6% and 7.5%, respectively, suggesting that it is significant to consider the QBS signals in the GPS records to improve the observed vertical deformations. PMID:26473882

  13. Development And Test of A Digitally Steered Antenna Array for The Navigator GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Heitor David; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Price, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS)-based navigation has become common for low-Earth orbit spacecraft as the signal environment is similar to that on the Earth s surface. The situation changes abruptly, however, for spacecraft whose orbital altitudes exceed that of the GPS constellation. Visibility is dramatically reduced and signals that are present may be very weak and more susceptible to interference. GPS receivers effective at these altitudes require increased sensitivity, which often requires a high-gain antenna. Pointing such an antenna can pose a challenge. One efficient approach to mitigate these problems is the use of a digitally steered antenna array. Such an antenna can optimally allocate gain toward desired signal sources and away from interferers. This paper presents preliminary results in the development and test of a digitally steered antenna array for the Navigator GPS research program at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. In particular, this paper highlights the development of an array and front-end electronics, the development and test of a real-time software GPS receiver, and implementation of three beamforming methods for combining the signals from the array. Additionally, this paper discusses the development of a GPS signal simulator which produces digital samples of the GPS L1C/A signals as they would be received by an arbitrary antenna array configuration. The simulator models transmitter and receiver dynamics, near-far and multipath interference, and has been a critical component in both the development and test of the GPS receiver. The GPS receiver system was tested with real and simulated GPS signals. Preliminary results show that performance improvement was achieved in both the weak signal and interference environments, matching analytical predictions. This paper summarizes our initial findings and discusses the advantages and limitations of the antenna array and the various beamforming methods.

  14. Exploring the Limits of High Altitude GPS for Future Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashman, Benjamin W.; Parker, Joel J.; Bauer, Frank H.; Esswein, Michael

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of spacecraft are relying on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation at altitudes near or above the GPS constellation itself - the region known as the Space Service Volume (SSV). While the formal definition of the SSV ends at geostationary altitude, the practical limit of high-altitude space usage is not known, and recent missions have demonstrated that signal availability is sufficient for operational navigation at altitudes halfway to the moon. This paper presents simulation results based on a high-fidelity model of the GPS constellation, calibrated and validated through comparisons of simulated GPS signal availability and strength with flight data from recent high-altitude missions including the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 16 (GOES-16) and the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. This improved model is applied to the transfer to a lunar near-rectilinear halo orbit (NRHO) of the class being con- sidered for the international Deep Space Gateway concept. The number of GPS signals visible and their received signal strengths are presented as a function of receiver altitude in order to explore the practical upper limit of high-altitude space usage of GPS.

  15. Exploring the Limits of High Altitude GPS for Future Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashman, Benjamin W.; Parker, Joel J. K.; Bauer, Frank H.; Esswein, Michael

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of spacecraft are relying on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation at altitudes near or above the GPS constellation itself - the region known as the Space Service Volume (SSV). While the formal definition of the SSV ends at geostationary altitude, the practical limit of high-altitude space usage is not known, and recent missions have demonstrated that signal availability is sufficient for operational navigation at altitudes halfway to the moon. This paper presents simulation results based on a high-fidelity model of the GPS constellation, calibrated and validated through comparisons of simulated GPS signal availability and strength with flight data from recent high-altitude missions including the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 16 (GOES-16) and the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. This improved model is applied to the transfer to a lunar near-rectilinear halo orbit (NRHO) of the class being considered for the international Deep Space Gateway concept. The number of GPS signals visible and their received signal strengths are presented as a function of receiver altitude in order to explore the practical upper limit of high-altitude space usage of GPS.

  16. Using GPS Imaging to Unravel Vertical Land Motions in the Interior Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overacker, J.; Hammond, W. C.; Kraner, M.; Blewitt, G.

    2017-12-01

    GPS Imaging uses robust trends in time series of GPS positions to create a velocity field that can reveal rates and patterns of vertical motions that would be otherwise difficult to detect. We have constructed an image of vertical land velocities within the interior Pacific Northwest region of the United States using GPS Imaging. The image shows a 50-250 km wide swath of approximately 2 mm/yr of subsidence seemingly unrelated to topographic features of the region. The extent of the signal roughly corresponds to the Juan de Fuca plate subduction latitudes and longitude of the Cascade arc. This suggests that the signal could be associated with ongoing crustal deformation possibly related to plate-scale geodynamic forces arising from interseismic coupling, long term plate boundary tractions, volcanic loading, and/or mantle flow. However, hydrological loading from accumulating precipitation in the Cascades and in the region's groundwater basins, and possible effects from Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) near its hinge line cannot be discounted as potential contributors to the observed subsidence signal. Here we attempt to unravel the contributions of hydrological loading and GIA to the vertical GPS signal observed within the interior Pacific Northwest. In order to determine the non-tectonic contributions to the observed vertical GPS Image, we will examine how the subsidence rate changes over time using early and late period comparisons. GPS, GRACE, and climatic data will be used in conjunction to disentangle the hydrological effect from the GPS Image. GIA models of the Western Cordillera will be compared with the patterns in the GPS Image to assess whether the signal can be explained with current models of GIA. Our presentation will document the signals, uncertainties, and hypotheses for the possible mechanisms behind this subsidence and attempt to quantify their relation and contribution to the observed deformation signal. Figure 1: Pacific Northwest GPS Imaging

  17. System and method for generating attitude determinations using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clark E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A GPS attitude receiver for determining the attitude of a moving vehicle in conjunction with a first, a second, a third, and a fourth antenna mounted to the moving vehicle. Each of the antennas receives a plurality of GPS signals that each include a carrier component. For each of the carrier components of the received GPS signals there is an integer ambiguity associated with the first and fourth antennas, an integer ambiguity associated with second and fourth antennas, and an integer ambiguity associated with the third and fourth antennas. The GPS attitude receiver measures phase values for the carrier components of the GPS signals received from each of the antennas at a plurality of measurement epochs during an initialization period and at a measurement epoch after the initialization period. In response to the phase values measured at the measurement epochs during the initialization period, the GPS attitude receiver computes integer ambiguity resolution values representing resolution of the integer ambiguities. Then, in response to the computed integer ambiguity resolution values and the phase value measured at the measurement epoch after the initialization period, it computes values defining the attitude of the moving vehicle at the measurement epoch after the initialization period.

  18. Multi-Cone Model for Estimating GPS Ionospheric Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Lawrence; Komjathy, Attila; Mannucci, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The multi-cone model is a computational model for estimating ionospheric delays of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. It is a direct descendant of the conical-domain model. A primary motivation for the development of this model is the need to find alternatives for modeling slant delays at low latitudes, where ionospheric behavior poses an acute challenge for GPS signal-delay estimates based upon the thin-shell model of the ionosphere.

  19. Radiation-hardened fast acquisition/weak signal tracking system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke (Inventor); Boegner, Gregory J. (Inventor); Sirotzky, Steve (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A global positioning system (GPS) receiver and method of acquiring and tracking GPS signals comprises an antenna adapted to receive GPS signals; an analog radio frequency device operatively connected to the antenna and adapted to convert the GPS signals from an analog format to a digital format; a plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators operatively connected to the analog RF device; a GPS signal acquisition component operatively connected to the analog RF device and the plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators, wherein the GPS signal acquisition component is adapted to calculate a maximum vector on a databit correlation grid; and a microprocessor operatively connected to the plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators and the GPS signal acquisition component, wherein the microprocessor is adapted to compare the maximum vector with a predetermined correlation threshold to allow the GPS signal to be fully acquired and tracked.

  20. A Real-Time Capable Software-Defined Receiver Using GPU for Adaptive Anti-Jam GPS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S.; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities. PMID:22164116

  1. A real-time capable software-defined receiver using GPU for adaptive anti-jam GPS sensors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities.

  2. Monitoring of D-layer using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubkov, Maxim; Bessarab, Fedor; Karpov, Ivan; Golubkov, Gennady; Manzheliy, Mikhail; Borchevkina, Olga; Kuverova, Veronika; Malyshev, Nikolay; Ozerov, Georgy

    2016-07-01

    Changes in D layer of ionosphere during the periods of high solar activity lead to non-equilibrium two-temperature plasma parameter variations. Accordingly, the population of orbital degenerate states of Rydberg complexes changes in a fraction of a microsecond. In turn, this affects the operation of any of the systems based on the use of GPS radio signals passing through this layer. It is well known that GPS signals undergo the greatest distortion in the altitude range of 60-110 km. Therefore, the analysis of changes in signal intensity can be useful for plasma diagnosis in these altitudes. In particular, it is useful to determine the vertical temperature profiles and electron density. For this purpose, one can use the satellite radio occultation method. This method is widely used in recent years to solve problems of the electron concentration profile recovery in the F-region of the ionosphere, and also for climate problem solutions. This method allows to define the altitude profiles of the GPS signal propagation delays and to obtain from the inverse problem solution qualitatively high-altitude profiles of the quantities using relative measurements. To ensure the authenticity of the found distributions of electron density and temperature in the D region of the ionosphere, the results should be complemented by measurements of the own atmospheric radiation power at frequencies of 1.4 and 5.0 GHz. This ensures control of the reliability of the results obtained using the "Rydberg" code. Monitoring of the state changes in the D layer by repeatedly following at regular intervals GPS satellite measurements are also of great interest and can provide valuable information on the macroscopic dynamics of D layer containing Rydberg complexes and free electrons. For example, one can monitor changes in the thickness of the emitting layer in time. Such changes lead to an additional contribution to the formation of satellite GPS system errors. It should also be noted that the

  3. Characteristics and Limitations of Submerged GPS L1 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Ladina; Geiger, Alain

    2017-04-01

    Extensive amount of water stored in snow covers has a high impact on flood development during snow melting periods. Early assessment of these parameters in mountain environments enhance early-warning and thus prevention of major impacts. Sub-snow GNSS techniques are lately suggested to determine liquid water content, snow water equivalent or considered for avalanche rescue. This technique is affordable, flexible, and provides accurate and continuous observations independent on weather conditions. However, the characteristics of GNSS observations for applications within a snow-pack still need to be further investigated. The magnitude of the main interaction processes involved for the GPS wavelength propagating through different layers of snow, ice or water is theoretically examined. Liquid water exerts the largest influence on GPS signal propagation through a snow-pack. Therefore, we focus on determining the characteristics of GNSS observables under water. An experiment was set-up to investigate the characteristics and limitations of submerged GPS observations using a pool, a level control by communicating pipes, a geodetic and a low-cost GPS antenna, and a water level sensor. The GPS antennas were placed into the water. The water level was increased daily by a step of two millimeters up to thirty millimeters above the antenna. Based on this experiment, the signal penetration depth, satellite availability, the attenuation of signal strength and the quality of solutions are analyzed. Our experimental results show an agreement with the theoretically derived attenuation parameter and signal penetration depth. The assumption of water as the limiting parameter for GPS observations within a snow-pack can be confirmed. Higher wetness in a snow-pack leads to less transmission, higher refraction, higher attenuation and thus a decreased penetration depth as well as a reduced quality of the solutions. In consequence, GPS applications within a snow-pack are heavily impacted by

  4. Two laboratory methods for the calibration of GPS speed meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yin; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Yu, Mei; Bai, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The set-ups of two calibration systems are presented to investigate calibration methods of GPS speed meters. The GPS speed meter calibrated is a special type of high accuracy speed meter for vehicles which uses Doppler demodulation of GPS signals to calculate the measured speed of a moving target. Three experiments are performed: including simulated calibration, field-test signal replay calibration, and in-field test comparison with an optical speed meter. The experiments are conducted at specific speeds in the range of 40-180 km h-1 with the same GPS speed meter as the device under calibration. The evaluation of measurement results validates both methods for calibrating GPS speed meters. The relative deviations between the measurement results of the GPS-based high accuracy speed meter and those of the optical speed meter are analyzed, and the equivalent uncertainty of the comparison is evaluated. The comparison results justify the utilization of GPS speed meters as reference equipment if no fewer than seven satellites are available. This study contributes to the widespread use of GPS-based high accuracy speed meters as legal reference equipment in traffic speed metrology.

  5. PiVoT GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennersten, Miriam; Banes, Vince; Boegner, Greg; Clagnett, Charles; Dougherty, Lamar; Edwards, Bernard; Roman, Joe; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has built an open architecture, 24 channel spaceflight Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. The compact PCI PiVoT GPS receiver card is based on the Mitel/GEC Plessey Builder 2 board. PiVoT uses two Plessey 2021 correlators to allow tracking of up to 24 separate GPS SV's on unique channels. Its four front ends can support four independent antennas, making it a useful card for hosting GPS attitude determination algorithms. It has been built using space quality, radiation tolerant parts. The PiVoT card works at a lower signal to noise ratio than the original Builder 2 board. It also hosts an improved clock oscillator. The PiVoT software is based on the original Piessey Builder 2 software ported to the Linux operating system. The software is posix compliant and can be easily converted to other posix operating systems. The software is open source to anyone with a licensing agreement with Plessey. Additional tasks can be added to the software to support GPS science experiments or attitude determination algorithms. The next generation PiVoT receiver will be a single radiation hardened compact PCI card containing the microprocessor and the GPS receiver optimized for use above the GPS constellation.

  6. GPS=A Good Candidate for Data Assimilation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, P.; Joiner, J.; Kursinski, R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) enables positioning anywhere about our planet. The microwave signals sent by the 24 transmitters are sensitive to the atmosphere. Using the radio occultation technique, it is possible to perform soundings, with a Low Earth Orbiter (700 km) GPS receiver. The insensitiveness to clouds and aerosols, the relatively high vertical resolution (1.5 km), the self-calibration and stability of the GPS make it a priori a potentially good observing system candidate for data assimilation. A low-computing cost simple method to retrieve both temperature and humidity will be presented. Comparisons with radiosonde show the capability of the GPS to resolve the tropopause. Options for using GPS for data assimilation and remaining issues will be discussed.

  7. Measuring Ocean Surface Waves using Signal Reflections from Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, J. D.; Dowgiallo, D. J.; Hwang, P. A.; Toporkov, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    The delay-Doppler response of communications signals (such as GNSS) reflected off the ocean surface is well-known to have properties which strongly correlate with surface wind conditions and ocean surface roughness. This study extends reflectometry techniques currently applied to the GNSS constellation to include geostationary communications satellites such as XM Radio. In this study, ocean wind conditions and significant wave height will be characterized using the delay-Doppler response of XM Radio signals reflected off of ocean surface waves. Using geostationary satellites for reflectometry-based remote sensing of oceans presents two primary advantages. First, longer coherent integration times can be achieved, which boosts signal processing gain and allows for finer Doppler resolution. Second, being designed for wide-area broadcast communications, the ground-received power of these geostationary satellite signals tends to be many orders of magnitude stronger than e.g. GNSS signals. Reflections of such signals from the ocean are strong enough to be received well outside of the specular region. This flexibility of viewing geometry allows signal processing to be performed on data received from multiple incidence/reception angles, which can provide a more complete characterization of ocean surface roughness and surface wind vectors. This work will include studies of simulated and measured delay-Doppler behavior of XM Radio signals reflected from dynamic ocean surfaces. Simulation studies will include inter-comparison between a number of hydrodynamic and electromagnetic models. Results from simulations will be presented as delay-Doppler plots and will be compared with delay-Doppler behavior observed in measured data. Measured data will include field campaign results from early- to mid-2017 in which the US Naval Research Laboratory's in-house XM reflectometer-receiver was deployed near the coasts of Virginia and North Carolina to observe reflections from wind

  8. A GPS Receiver for Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William A.; Heckler, Gregory W.; Holt, Greg N.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Beginning with the launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in October of 2008, NASA will once again begin its quest to land humans on the Moon. This effort will require the development of new spacecraft which will safely transport people from the Earth to the Moon and back again, as well as robotic probes tagged with science, re-supply, and communication duties. In addition to the next-generation spacecraft currently under construction, including the Orion capsule, NASA is also investigating and developing cutting edge navigation sensors which will allow for autonomous state estimation in low Earth orbit (LEO) and cislunar space. Such instruments could provide an extra layer of redundancy in avionics systems and reduce the reliance on support and on the Deep Space Network (DSN). One such sensor is the weak-signal Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver "Navigator" being developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). At the heart of the Navigator is a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based acquisition engine. This engine allows for the rapid acquisition/reacquisition of strong GPS signals, enabling the receiver to quickly recover from outages due to blocked satellites or atmospheric entry. Additionally, the acquisition algorithm provides significantly lower sensitivities than a conventional space-based GPS receiver, permitting it to acquire satellites well above the GPS constellation. This paper assesses the performance of the Navigator receiver based upon three of the major flight regimes of a manned lunar mission: Earth ascent, cislunar navigation, and entry. Representative trajectories for each of these segments were provided by NASA. The Navigator receiver was connected to a Spirent GPS signal generator, to allow for the collection of real-time, hardware-in-the-loop results for each phase of the flight. For each of the flight segments, the Navigator was tested on its ability to acquire and track GPS satellites under the dynamical

  9. Software Defined GPS Receiver for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Courtney B.; Robison, David E.; Koelewyn, Cynthia Lee

    2011-01-01

    JPL is providing a software defined radio (SDR) that will fly on the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the CoNNeCT project under NASA's SCaN program. The SDR consists of several modules including a Baseband Processor Module (BPM) and a GPS Module (GPSM). The BPM executes applications (waveforms) consisting of software components for the embedded SPARC processor and logic for two Virtex II Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) that operate on data received from the GPSM. GPS waveforms on the SDR are enabled by an L-Band antenna, low noise amplifier (LNA), and the GPSM that performs quadrature downconversion at L1, L2, and L5. The GPS waveform for the JPL SDR will acquire and track L1 C/A, L2C, and L5 GPS signals from a CoNNeCT platform on ISS, providing the best GPS-based positioning of ISS achieved to date, the first use of multiple frequency GPS on ISS, and potentially the first L5 signal tracking from space. The system will also enable various radiometric investigations on ISS such as local multipath or ISS dynamic behavior characterization. In following the software-defined model, this work will create a highly portable GPS software and firmware package that can be adapted to another platform with the necessary processor and FPGA capability. This paper also describes ISS applications for the JPL CoNNeCT SDR GPS waveform, possibilities for future global navigation satellite system (GNSS) tracking development, and the applicability of the waveform components to other space navigation applications.

  10. PiVoT GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennersten, Miriam Dvorak; Banes, Anthony Vince; Boegner, Gregory J.; Dougherty, Lamar; Edwards, Bernard L.; Roman, Joseph; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has built an open architecture, 24 channel space flight GPS receiver. The CompactPCI PiVoT GPS receiver card is based on the Mitel/GEC Plessey Builder-2 board. PiVoT uses two Plessey 2021 correlators to allow tracking of up to 24 separate GPS SV's on unique channels. Its four front ends can support four independent antennas, making it a useful card for hosting GPS attitude determination algorithms. It has been built using space quality, radiation tolerant parts. The PiVoT card will track a weaker signal than the original Builder 2 board. It also hosts an improved clock oscillator. The PiVoT software is based on the original Plessey Builder 2 software ported to the Linux operating system. The software is POSIX complaint and can easily be converted to other POSIX operating systems. The software is open source to anyone with a licensing agreement with Plessey. Additional tasks can be added to the software to support GPS science experiments or attitude determination algorithms. The next generation PiVoT receiver will be a single radiation hardened CompactPCI card containing the microprocessor and the GPS receiver optimized for use above the GPS constellation. PiVoT was flown successfully on a balloon in July, 2001, for its first non-simulated flight.

  11. Review of current GPS methodologies for producing accurate time series and their error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoxing; Montillet, Jean-Philippe; Fernandes, Rui; Bos, Machiel; Yu, Kegen; Hua, Xianghong; Jiang, Weiping

    2017-05-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is an important tool to observe and model geodynamic processes such as plate tectonics and post-glacial rebound. In the last three decades, GPS has seen tremendous advances in the precision of the measurements, which allow researchers to study geophysical signals through a careful analysis of daily time series of GPS receiver coordinates. However, the GPS observations contain errors and the time series can be described as the sum of a real signal and noise. The signal itself can again be divided into station displacements due to geophysical causes and to disturbing factors. Examples of the latter are errors in the realization and stability of the reference frame and corrections due to ionospheric and tropospheric delays and GPS satellite orbit errors. There is an increasing demand on detecting millimeter to sub-millimeter level ground displacement signals in order to further understand regional scale geodetic phenomena hence requiring further improvements in the sensitivity of the GPS solutions. This paper provides a review spanning over 25 years of advances in processing strategies, error mitigation methods and noise modeling for the processing and analysis of GPS daily position time series. The processing of the observations is described step-by-step and mainly with three different strategies in order to explain the weaknesses and strengths of the existing methodologies. In particular, we focus on the choice of the stochastic model in the GPS time series, which directly affects the estimation of the functional model including, for example, tectonic rates, seasonal signals and co-seismic offsets. Moreover, the geodetic community continues to develop computational methods to fully automatize all phases from analysis of GPS time series. This idea is greatly motivated by the large number of GPS receivers installed around the world for diverse applications ranging from surveying small deformations of civil engineering structures (e

  12. Do GPs record the occupation of their patients?

    PubMed

    Richards-Taylor, A; Keay, J; Thorley, K

    2013-03-01

    General practitioners (GPs) have a central role in providing advice about fitness for work, yet there are concerns about their understanding of the relationship between work and health. To assess whether GPs in one Cornish practice record the occupation of patients of working age and to quantify how important GPs in Cornwall consider recording of occupation in working-age patients. An audit of the notes of 300 working-age patients in one practice, a search of the computer records at a different practice and a questionnaire survey of 202 GPs in practices in Cornwall. Occupation was recorded in 50 (17%) of the 300 patient notes audited. The questionnaire response rate was 31%. Few (8%) respondents reported training in occupational medicine. Most (65%) of GPs recorded their patients' occupation some of the time. A third (32%) of GPs did not consider it important to record patients' occupations. GPs in two Cornish practices recorded the occupation of working-age patients infrequently, but over two-thirds of GPs in Cornwall believe it is important to do so. If these results reflect the practice of UK GPs, the new 'e-fit note' may be of limited value in monitoring and analysing sickness absence.

  13. Application of GPS tracking techniques to orbit determination for TDRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, B. J.; Lichten, S. M.; Malla, R. P.; Wu, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate two fundamentally different approaches to TDRS orbit determination utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and GPS-related techniques. In the first, a GPS flight receiver is deployed on the TDRSS spacecraft. The TDRS ephemerides are determined using direct ranging to the GPS spacecraft, and no ground network is required. In the second approach, the TDRSS spacecraft broadcast a suitable beacon signal, permitting the simultaneous tracking of GPS and TDRSS satellites from a small ground network. Both strategies can be designed to meet future operational requirements for TDRS-2 orbit determination.

  14. Using GPS radio occultation data in the study of tropical cyclogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didlake, A. C., Jr.; Kuo, Y. B.; Metcalfe, T.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous studies have examined atmospheric conditions and patterns in tropical cyclogenesis. Although much has been accomplished, a complete understanding of tropical cyclogenesis is hindered by the lack of data in the regions where formation occurs. The GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation technique can provide valuable data in key areas. In GPS radio occultation, GPS satellites emit radio signals through the atmosphere that are received by another satellite in a low Earth orbit. Various atmospheric properties are calculated based on the alteration of the signal. This study assessed the value of GPS radio occultation data in the study of tropical cyclogenesis by examining storms of the 2002 Western North Pacific typhoon season. The signature of precursor disturbances to tropical cyclogenesis was determined by analyzing composites of data from the NCEP Aviation (AVN) analysis over four days. Similar composites of GPS radio occultation data were produced. The AVN analysis showed strong signals of precursor disturbances in the low-level wind fields and atmospheric refractivity. The GPS radio occultation data detected similarly increased refractivity values in corresponding regions, but had sizeable measurement differences with the AVN analysis. These differences were attributed to AVN analysis error due to the lack of input observational data and the high accuracy of GPS radio occultation measurements. Further comparisons showed that with the limited quantity of data currently available, GPS radio occultation by itself was not sufficient to detect precursor disturbances. It can best be used in data assimilation to improve the analysis and forecasts of tropical storms.

  15. Estimation of Sea Level variations with GPS/GLONASS-Reflectometry Technique: Case Study at Stationary Oceanographic Platform in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, G. A.; Padokhin, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work we study GNSS - reflectometry methods for estimation of sea level variations using a single GNSS-receiver, which are based on the multipath propagation effects (interference pattern in SNR of GNSS signals at small elevation angles) caused by the reflection of navigational signals from the sea surface. The measurements were carried out in the coastal zone of Black Sea at the Stationary Oceanographic Platform during one-week campaign in the summer 2017. GPS/GLONASS signals at two working frequencies of both systems were used to study sea level variations which almost doubled the amount of observations compared to GPS-only tide gauge. Moreover all the measurements were conducted with 4-antenna GNSS receiver providing the opportunity for different orientations of antennas including zenith and nadir looking ones as well as two horizontally oriented ones at different azimuths. As the reference we used data from co-located wire wave gauge which showed good correspondence of both datasets. Though tidal effects are not so pronounced for the Black Sea, the described experimental setup allowed to study the effects of sea surface roughness, driven by meteorological conditions (e.g. wind waves), as well as antenna directivity pattern effects on the observed interference patterns of GPS/GLONASS L1/L2 signals (relation of the main spectral peak to the noise power) and the quality of sea level estimations.

  16. P-code enhanced method for processing encrypted GPS signals without knowledge of the encryption code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence E. (Inventor); Meehan, Thomas K. (Inventor); Thomas, Jr., Jess Brooks (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    In the preferred embodiment, an encrypted GPS signal is down-converted from RF to baseband to generate two quadrature components for each RF signal (L1 and L2). Separately and independently for each RF signal and each quadrature component, the four down-converted signals are counter-rotated with a respective model phase, correlated with a respective model P code, and then successively summed and dumped over presum intervals substantially coincident with chips of the respective encryption code. Without knowledge of the encryption-code signs, the effect of encryption-code sign flips is then substantially reduced by selected combinations of the resulting presums between associated quadrature components for each RF signal, separately and independently for the L1 and L2 signals. The resulting combined presums are then summed and dumped over longer intervals and further processed to extract amplitude, phase and delay for each RF signal. Precision of the resulting phase and delay values is approximately four times better than that obtained from straight cross-correlation of L1 and L2. This improved method provides the following options: separate and independent tracking of the L1-Y and L2-Y channels; separate and independent measurement of amplitude, phase and delay L1-Y channel; and removal of the half-cycle ambiguity in L1-Y and L2-Y carrier phase.

  17. Global Positioning Systems Wing : GPS IIR-20 (SVN-49) Information.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-01-25

    Purpose for this briefing: : -Discuss SVN-49 signal problem with GPS community : -Provide information on potential mitigations : -Present way forward for SVN-49 : Background: : -SVN-49 unlike other GPS IIR Satellites had L5 R&D Demonstration Payload ...

  18. Ionospheric corrections to precise time transfer using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Robert W.; Osborne, Allen W., III; Klobuchar, John A.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    1994-01-01

    The free electrons in the earth's ionosphere can retard the time of reception of GPS signals received at a ground station, compared to their time in free space, by many tens of nanoseconds, thus limiting the accuracy of time transfer by GPS. The amount of the ionospheric time delay is proportional to the total number of electrons encountered by the wave on its path from each GPS satellite to a receiver. This integrated number of electrons is called Total Electron Content, or TEC. Dual frequency GPS receivers designed by Allen Osborne Associates, Inc. (AOA) directly measure both the ionospheric differential group delay and the differential carrier phase advance for the two GPS frequencies and derive from this the TEC between the receiver and each GPS satellite in track. The group delay information is mainly used to provide an absolute calibration to the relative differential carrier phase, which is an extremely precise measure of relative TEC. The AOA Mini-Rogue ICS-4Z and the AOA TurboRogue ICS-4000Z receivers normally operate using the GPS P code, when available, and switch to cross-correlation signal processing when the GPS satellites are in the Anti-Spoofing (A-S) mode and the P code is encrypted. An AOA ICS-Z receiver has been operated continuously for over a year at Hanscom AFB, MA to determine the statistics of the variability of the TEC parameter using signals from up to four different directions simultaneously. The 4-channel ICS-4Z and the 8-channel ICS-4000Z, have proven capabilities to make precise, well calibrated, measurements of the ionosphere in several directions simultaneously. In addition to providing ionospheric corrections for precise time transfer via satellite, this dual frequency design allows full code and automatic codeless operation of both the differential group delay and differential carrier phase for numerous ionospheric experiments being conducted. Statistical results of the data collected from the ICS-4Z during the initial year of

  19. Sub-millimeter Signal Detection by GPS: Cross Validation using GIPSY and GAMIT Solutions for the Yucca Mountain Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, E.; Bennett, R. A.; Blewitt, G.; Davis, J. L.; Wernicke, B. P.

    2002-12-01

    A continuous and densely spaced GPS network has been installed at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada, as part of the BARGEN array. It was funded by the Department of Energy to characterize strain at the proposed nuclear waste repository. Each GPS antenna is deep-mounted into solid bedrock and atmospheric effects in the desert climate of the region are relatively low, making this an ideal network to explore the potential precision of GPS. Due to the importance of obtaining an accurate and reliable set of velocity measurements at Yucca Mountain, two separate groups using entirely different methods have independently processed the GPS data from this network. The UNR group has utilized JPL's GIPSY-OASIS II, employing a precise point positioning technique, whereas the CfA group has used MIT's GAMIT software and a double-differencing approach. Comparison of the two sets of results for 28 stations and 2.8 years of data has revealed only small differences in horizontal velocity estimates, with formal errors for both groups less than 0.17 mm/yr and an RMS of residual velocity differences of 0.23 mm/yr. The two solutions are consistent with one another at the two sigma level. Relative horizontal velocities at stations within 40 km of Yucca Mountain itself are on the order of <0.5 mm/yr, with a smooth pattern of NNW shear. In order to obtain negligible differences in results both groups had to account for coseismic offsets caused by the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake. It was also necessary to perform ambiguity resolution in GIPSY. Without ambiguity resolution, the GIPSY results were significantly different to those produced by GAMIT. The data was processed in GIPSY on a line-by-line basis, relative to a station in the center of the Yucca Mountain network, to produce a regionally-referenced solution free of common mode signals. It was evident in both solutions that radome changes produce a measurable effect in the vertical component, giving an apparent vertical swell of

  20. Retained satellite information influences performance of GPS devices in a forested ecosystem

    Treesearch

    Katie M. Moriarty; Clinton W. Epps

    2015-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) units used in animal telemetry often suffer from nonrandom data loss and location error. GPS units use stored satellite information to estimate locations, including almanac and ephemeris data reflecting satellite positions at weekly and at <4-hr temporal scales, respectively. Using the smallest GPS collars (45–51 g) available for...

  1. Communication using eye roll reflective signalling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flamarique, I.N.; Mueller, G.A.; Cheng, C.L.; Figiel, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    Body reflections in the ultraviolet (UV) are a common occurrence in nature. Despite the abundance of such signals and the presence of UV cones in the retinas of many vertebrates, the function of UV cones in the majority of taxa remains unclear. Here, we report on an unusual communication system in the razorback sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, that involves flash signals produced by quick eye rolls. Behavioural experiments and field observations indicate that this form of communication is used to signal territorial presence between males. The flash signal shows highest contrast in the UV region of fhe visual spectrum (??max???380 nm), corresponding to the maximum wavelength of absorption of the UV cone mechanism in suckers. Furthermore, these cones are restricted to the dorsal retina of the animal and the upwelling light background is such that their relative sensitivity would be enhanced by chromatic adaptation of the other cone mechanisms. Thus, the UV cones in the sucker have optimal characteristics (both in terms of absorbance and retinal topography) to constitute the main detectors of the flash signal. Our findings provide the first ecological evidence for restricted distribution of UV cones in the retina of a vertebrate. ?? 2007 The Royal Society.

  2. Calibration of GPS based high accuracy speed meter for vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yin; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Yu, Mei; Bai, Jie

    2015-02-01

    GPS based high accuracy speed meter for vehicles is a special type of GPS speed meter which uses Doppler Demodulation of GPS signals to calculate the speed of a moving target. It is increasingly used as reference equipment in the field of traffic speed measurement, but acknowledged standard calibration methods are still lacking. To solve this problem, this paper presents the set-ups of simulated calibration, field test signal replay calibration, and in-field test comparison with an optical sensor based non-contact speed meter. All the experiments were carried out on particular speed values in the range of (40-180) km/h with the same GPS speed meter. The speed measurement errors of simulated calibration fall in the range of +/-0.1 km/h or +/-0.1%, with uncertainties smaller than 0.02% (k=2). The errors of replay calibration fall in the range of +/-0.1% with uncertainties smaller than 0.10% (k=2). The calibration results justify the effectiveness of the two methods. The relative deviations of the GPS speed meter from the optical sensor based noncontact speed meter fall in the range of +/-0.3%, which validates the use of GPS speed meter as reference instruments. The results of this research can provide technical basis for the establishment of internationally standard calibration methods of GPS speed meters, and thus ensures the legal status of GPS speed meters as reference equipment in the field of traffic speed metrology.

  3. Separation and reconstruction of high pressure water-jet reflective sound signal based on ICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongtao; Sun, Yuling; Li, Meng; Zhang, Dongsu; Wu, Tianfeng

    2011-12-01

    The impact of high pressure water-jet on the different materials target will produce different reflective mixed sound. In order to reconstruct the reflective sound signals distribution on the linear detecting line accurately and to separate the environment noise effectively, the mixed sound signals acquired by linear mike array were processed by ICA. The basic principle of ICA and algorithm of FASTICA were described in detail. The emulation experiment was designed. The environment noise signal was simulated by using band-limited white noise and the reflective sound signal was simulated by using pulse signal. The reflective sound signal attenuation produced by the different distance transmission was simulated by weighting the sound signal with different contingencies. The mixed sound signals acquired by linear mike array were synthesized by using the above simulated signals and were whitened and separated by ICA. The final results verified that the environment noise separation and the reconstruction of the detecting-line sound distribution can be realized effectively.

  4. Airborne Antenna System for Minimum-Cycle-Slip GPS Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    A system that includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) antenna and associated apparatus for keeping the antenna aimed upward has been developed for use aboard a remote-sensing-survey airplane. The purpose served by the system is to enable minimum- cycle-slip reception of GPS signals used in precise computation of the trajectory of the airplane, without having to restrict the airplane to maneuvers that increase the flight time needed to perform a survey. Cycle slip signifies loss of continuous track of the phase of a signal. Minimum-cycle-slip reception is desirable because maintaining constant track of the phase of the carrier signal from each available GPS satellite is necessary for surveying to centimeter or subcentimeter precision. Even a loss of signal for as short a time as a nanosecond can cause cycle slip. Cycle slips degrade the quality and precision of survey data acquired during a flight. The two principal causes of cycle slip are weakness of signals and multipath propagation. Heretofore, it has been standard practice to mount a GPS antenna rigidly on top of an airplane, and the radiation pattern of the antenna is typically hemispherical, so that all GPS satellites above the horizon are viewed by the antenna during level flight. When the airplane must be banked for a turn or other maneuver, the reception hemisphere becomes correspondingly tilted; hence, the antenna no longer views satellites that may still be above the Earth horizon but are now below the equatorial plane of the tilted reception hemisphere. Moreover, part of the reception hemisphere (typically, on the inside of a turn) becomes pointed toward ground, with a consequent increase in received noise and, therefore, degradation of GPS measurements. To minimize the likelihood of loss of signal and cycle slip, bank angles of remote-sensing survey airplanes have generally been limited to 10 or less, resulting in skidding or slipping uncoordinated turns. An airplane must be banked in order to make

  5. Navigating the Return Trip from the Moon Using Earth-Based Ground Tracking and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Kevin; Carpenter, Russell; Moreau, Michael C.; Lee, Taesul; Holt, Gregg N.

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Constellation Program is planning a human return to the Moon late in the next decade. From a navigation perspective, one of the most critical phases of a lunar mission is the series of burns performed to leave lunar orbit, insert onto a trans-Earth trajectory, and target a precise re-entry corridor in the Earth s atmosphere. A study was conducted to examine sensitivity of the navigation performance during this phase of the mission to the type and availability of tracking data from Earth-based ground stations, and the sensitivity to key error sources. This study also investigated whether GPS measurements could be used to augment Earth-based tracking data, and how far from the Earth GPS measurements would be useful. The ability to track and utilize weak GPS signals transmitted across the limb of the Earth is highly dependent on the configuration and sensitivity of the GPS receiver being used. For this study three GPS configurations were considered: a "standard" GPS receiver with zero dB antenna gain, a "weak signal" GPS receiver with zero dB antenna gain, and a "weak signal" GPS receiver with an Earth-pointing direction antenna (providing 10 dB additional gain). The analysis indicates that with proper selection and configuration of the GPS receiver on the Orion spacecraft, GPS can potentially improve navigation performance during the critical final phases of flight prior to Earth atmospheric entry interface, and may reduce reliance on two-way range tracking from Earth-based ground stations.

  6. 77 FR 37660 - ICWG Meeting for the NAVSTAR GPS Public Signals in Space

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... comments must be submitted in Comments Resolution Matrix (CRM) form. These forms along with the Was/Is...-GPS-705, and IS-GPS-800. Please provide them in the CRM form and submit to Tony Marquez by July 20...

  7. Phase Correction for GPS Antenna with Nonunique Phase Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin

    2005-01-01

    A method of determining the position and attitude of a body equipped with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver includes an accounting for the location of the nonunique phase center of a distributed or wraparound GPS antenna. The method applies, more specifically, to the case in which (1) the GPS receiver utilizes measurements of the phases of GPS carrier signals in its position and attitude computations and (2) the body is axisymmetric (e.g., spherical or round cylindrical) and wrapped at its equator with a single- or multiple-element antenna, the radiation pattern of which is also axisymmetric with the same axis of symmetry as that of the body.

  8. Spaceborne GPS remote sensing for atmospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dasheng; Herman, Benjamin M.; Exner, M. L.; Schreiner, B.; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1995-11-01

    The global positioning system (GPS) is based on a constellation of 24 transmitter satellites orbiting the earth at approximately 21,000 km altitude. The original goal of the GPS was to provide global and all-weather precision positioning and navigation for the military. Since this original concept was developed, several civilian applications have been conceived that are making use of these satellites. GPS/MET is one such application. GPS/MET is sponsored by NSF, FAA, NOAA, and NASA. The goal of GPS/MET is to demonstrate the feasibility of recovering atmospheric temperature profiles from occulting radio signals from one of the 24 GPS transmitters. On April 3, 1995, a small radio receiver was launched into a 750 km low- earth orbit and 70 degree inclination. As this receiver orbits, occultations occur when the radio link between any one of the 24 GPS transmitters and the low-earth orbiting (LEO) receiver progressively descends or ascends through the earth's atmosphere. With the current constellation of GPS transmitters, approximately 500 such occultations occur in each 24-hour period per LEO receiver. Several hundred occultations have been analyzed to date, where some type of confirmational data has been available (i.e., radiosonde, satellite, numerical analysis gridded data). In this paper, we present a brief outline of the method followed by a few typical temperature soundings that have been obtained.

  9. A review of GPS-based tracking techniques for TDRS orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, B. J.; Lichten, S. M.; Malla, R. P.; Wu, S.-C.

    1993-01-01

    This article evaluates two fundamentally different approaches to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) orbit determination utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and GPS-related techniques. In the first, a GPS flight receiver is deployed on the TDRS. The TDRS ephemerides are determined using direct ranging to the GPS spacecraft, and no ground network is required. In the second approach, the TDRS's broadcast a suitable beacon signal, permitting the simultaneous tracking of GPS and Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System satellites by ground receivers. Both strategies can be designed to meet future operational requirements for TDRS-II orbit determination.

  10. A comparison of annual vertical crustal displacements from GPS and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, T.; Wahr, J.; LavalléE, David

    2007-03-01

    We compare approximately 3 years of GPS height residuals (with respect to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame) with predictions of vertical surface displacements derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity fields for stations in Europe. An annual signal fit to the residual monthly heights, corrected for atmospheric pressure and barotropic ocean loading effects, should primarily represent surface displacements due to long-wavelength variations in water storage. A comparison of the annual height signal from GPS and GRACE over Europe indicates that at most sites, the annual signals do not agree in amplitude or phase. We find that unlike the annual signal predicted from GRACE, the annual signal in the GPS heights is not coherent over the region, displaying significant variability from site to site. Confidence in the GRACE data and the unlikely possibility of large-amplitude small-scale features in the load field not captured by the GRACE data leads us to conclude that some of the discrepancy between the GPS and GRACE observations is due to technique errors in the GPS data processing. This is evidenced by the fact that the disagreement between GPS and GRACE is largest at coastal sites, where mismodeling of the semidiurnal ocean tidal loading signal can result in spurious annual signals.

  11. Ionospheric scintillation detection based on GPS observations, a case study over Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhkhiz Miandehi, Sahar; Alizadeh Elizei, M. Mahdi; Schuh, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) which is used extensively for various purposes such as navigation, surveying, remote sensing and telecommunication, is strongly affected by the earth's upper atmosphere, the ionosphere. Ionosphere is a highly variable region with complex physical characteristics in which the density of free electrons are large enough to have considerable effects on signals' propagation travelling through this dispersive medium. As GPS signals travel through the ionosphere, they may experience rapid amplitude fluctuations or unexpected phase changes. This is referred to as ionospheric scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation which is caused by small scale irregularities in the electron density, is one of the dominant propagation disturbances at radio frequency signals. These irregularities severely affect the accuracy and reliability of GPS measurements. Therefore it is necessary to investigate ionospheric scintillation and its effects on GPS observations. The focus of this paper is to detect ionospheric scintillations over Iran's region, during different periods of solar activity and to investigate these effects on GPS observations in more detail. Furthermore the effects of these irregularities on regional modeling of ionosphere over Iran is also investigated. The results show that effectiveness of this phenomenon depends on geographic location, local time and global geomagnetic storm index (kp index). The required data for this investigation are ground based measurements of permanent GPS stations over Iran, established by the National Cartographic Center of Iran (NCC).

  12. Comparing land surface phenology derived from satellite and GPS network microwave remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew O; Kimball, John S; Small, Eric E; Larson, Kristine M

    2014-08-01

    The land surface phenology (LSP) start of season (SOS) metric signals the seasonal onset of vegetation activity, including canopy growth and associated increases in land-atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2) exchanges influencing weather and climate variability. The vegetation optical depth (VOD) parameter determined from satellite passive microwave remote sensing provides for global LSP monitoring that is sensitive to changes in vegetation canopy water content and biomass, and insensitive to atmosphere and solar illumination constraints. Direct field measures of canopy water content and biomass changes desired for LSP validation are generally lacking due to the prohibitive costs of maintaining regional monitoring networks. Alternatively, a normalized microwave reflectance index (NMRI) derived from GPS base station measurements is sensitive to daily vegetation water content changes and may provide for effective microwave LSP validation. We compared multiyear (2007-2011) NMRI and satellite VOD records at over 300 GPS sites in North America, and their derived SOS metrics for a subset of 24 homogenous land cover sites to investigate VOD and NMRI correspondence, and potential NMRI utility for LSP validation. Significant correlations (P<0.05) were found at 276 of 305 sites (90.5 %), with generally favorable correspondence in the resulting SOS metrics (r (2)=0.73, P<0.001, RMSE=36.8 days). This study is the first attempt to compare satellite microwave LSP metrics to a GPS network derived reflectance index and highlights both the utility and limitations of the NMRI data for LSP validation, including spatial scale discrepancies between local NMRI measurements and relatively coarse satellite VOD retrievals.

  13. Localization system for use in GPS denied environments

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Trueblood, J. J.

    The military uses to autonomous platforms to complete missions to provide standoff for the warfighters. However autonomous platforms rely on GPS to provide their global position. In many missions spaces the autonomous platforms may encounter GPS denied environments which limits where the platform operates and requires the warfighters to takes its place. GPS denied environments can occur due to tall building, trees, canyon wall blocking the GPS satellite signals or a lack of coverage. An Inertial Navigation System (INS) uses sensors to detect the vehicle movement and direction its traveling to calculate the vehicle. One of biggest challenges with anmore » INS system is the accuracy and accumulation of errors over time of the sensors. If these challenges can be overcome the INS would provide accurate positioning information to the autonomous vehicle in GPS denied environments and allow them to provide the desired standoff for the warfighters.« less

  14. ScienceCast 218: Twinkle Twinkle GPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-14

    Dynamic bubbles of ionization in Earth's upper atmosphere can cause GPS signals to "twinkle" like stars, affecting the quality of navigation on Earth below. NASA recently conducted a mission called CINDI to investigate this phenomenon.

  15. GPS-Based Navigation and Orbit Determination for the AMSAT Phase 3D Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Carpenter, Russell; Moreau, Michael; Bauer, Frank H.; Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Martin, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of processing GPS data from the AMSAT Phase 3D (AP3) satellite for real-time navigation and post-processed orbit determination experiments. AP3 was launched into a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) on November 16, 2000 from Kourou, French Guiana, and then was maneuvered into its HEO over the next several months. It carries two Trimble TANS Vector GPS receivers for signal reception at apogee and at perigee. Its spin stabilization mode currently makes it favorable to track GPS satellites from the backside of the constellation while at perigee, and to track GPS satellites from below while at perigee. To date, the experiment has demonstrated that it is feasible to use GPS for navigation and orbit determination in HEO, which will be of great benefit to planned and proposed missions that will utilize such orbits for science observations. It has also shown that there are many important operational considerations to take into account. For example, GPS signals can be tracked above the constellation at altitudes as high as 58000 km, but sufficient amplification of those weak signals is needed. Moreover, GPS receivers can track up to 4 GPS satellites at perigee while moving as fast as 9.8 km/sec, but unless the receiver can maintain lock on the signals long enough, point solutions will be difficult to generate. The spin stabilization of AP3, for example, appears to cause signal levels to fluctuate as other antennas on the satellite block the signals. As a result, its TANS Vectors have been unable to lock on to the GPS signals long enough to down load the broadcast ephemeris and then generate position and velocity solutions. AP3 is currently in its eclipse season, and thus most of the spacecraft subsystems have been powered off. In Spring 2002, they will again be powered up and AP3 will be placed into a three-axis stabilization mode. This will significantly enhance the likelihood that point solutions can be generated, and perhaps more

  16. GPS Status and Modernization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-10

    Economic Growth, and Public Safety • Extends across all domains -- air, land, sea, space, cyberspace • Effects transcend national and military boundaries...KwajaleinEcuador Argentina South Africa Tahiti Australia 5 New Zealand SPS Signal in Space Performance t e r s N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A (RMS over all SPS SIS URE) 2008...transportation safety-of-life • 1st launch: ~ 2010 (GPS IIF); 24 satellites: ~ 2018 • Fourth civil signal “L1C” • Designed with international partners

  17. Realtime mitigation of GPS SA errors using Loran-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braasch, Soo Y.

    1994-01-01

    The hybrid use of Loran-C with the Global Positioning System (GPS) was shown capable of providing a sole-means of enroute air radionavigation. By allowing pilots to fly direct to their destinations, use of this system is resulting in significant time savings and therefore fuel savings as well. However, a major error source limiting the accuracy of GPS is the intentional degradation of the GPS signal known as Selective Availability (SA). SA-induced position errors are highly correlated and far exceed all other error sources (horizontal position error: 100 meters, 95 percent). Realtime mitigation of SA errors from the position solution is highly desirable. How that can be achieved is discussed. The stability of Loran-C signals is exploited to reduce SA errors. The theory behind this technique is discussed and results using bench and flight data are given.

  18. [Comfort and discomfort: the role of emotions in GPs' prescription practices].

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Kristin; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2005-12-05

    The role of emotions in GPs' prescribing has been ignored. The present article describes 20 GPs' reflections about what precedes comfort and discomfort in prescribing situations. In-depth interviews were done with 20 GPs who contributed with examples on an open comfort-discomfort scale. Analysis of the data was inspired by grounded theory. The GPs experienced a broad spectrum of emotions when prescribing. In every prescribing situation, conditions could pull towards both comfort and discomfort. Comfort appeared when the indication was correct and the patient's condition was serious, when the patient experienced the problem as serious, when the situation was acute and the medicine effective, and when the GP experienced himself as competent. Medicines were placed between comfort and discomfort when prescribing was perceived as indifferent, unproblematic and easy, when the GP was concerned about inflicting a sick role on the patients, and when patients were not convinced about the appropriateness of the medication. Discomfort appeared when there was a great risk of dependence, when GPs experienced and gave in to pressure, when they had to convince patients, and when they prescribed addictive medicine regularly. The totality of conditions in the situation determined the emotional state in the prescribing situation. The GPs' emotions reflected how they evaluated the appropriateness of their prescribing. This should be taken advantage of in rational pharmacotherapy. Future interventions should address both the rationality of GPs and their emotions.

  19. Validation of ionospheric electron density profiles inferred from GPS occultation observations of the GPS/MET experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Todd Mori

    In April of 1995, the launch of the GPS Meteorology Experiment (GPS/MET) onboard the Orbview-1 satellite, formerly known as Microlab-1, provided the first technology demonstration of active limb sounding of the Earth's atmosphere with a low Earth orbiting spacecraft utilizing the signals transmitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Though the experiment's primary mission was to probe the troposphere and stratosphere, GPS/MET was also capable of making radio occultation observations of the ionosphere. The application of the GPS occultation technique to the upper atmosphere created a unique opportunity to conduct ionospheric research with an unprecedented global distribution of observations. For operational support requirements, the Abel transform could be employed to invert the horizontal TEC profiles computed from the L1 and L2 phase measurements observed by GPS/MET into electron density profiles versus altitude in near real time. The usefulness of the method depends on how effectively the TEC limb profiles can be transformed into vertical electron density profiles. An assessment of GPS/MET's ability to determine electron density profiles needs to be examined to validate the significance of the GPS occultation method as a new and complementary ionospheric research tool to enhance the observational databases and improve space weather modeling and forecasting. To that end, simulations of the occultation observations and their inversions have been conducted to test the Abel transform algorithm and to provide qualitative information about the type and range of errors that might be experienced during the processing of real data. Comparisons of the electron density profiles inferred from real GPS/MET observations are then compared with coincident in situ measurements from the satellites of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and ground-based remote sensing from digisonde and incoherent scatter radar facilities. The principal focus of

  20. GPS compound eye attitude and navigation sensor and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, David A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a GPS system for navigation and attitude determination, comprising a sensor array including a convex hemispherical mounting structure having a plurality of mounting surfaces, and a plurality of antennas mounted to the mounting surfaces for receiving signals from space vehicles of a GPS constellation. The present invention also includes a receiver for collecting the signals and making navigation and attitude determinations. In an alternate embodiment the present invention may include two opposing convex hemispherical mounting structures, each of the mounting structures having a plurality of mounting surfaces, and a plurality of antennas mounted to the mounting surfaces.

  1. GPS radio collar 3D performance as influenced by forest structure and topography

    Treesearch

    R. Scott Gamo; Mark A. Rumble; Fred Lindzey; Matt Stefanich

    2000-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) telemetry enables biologists to obtain accurate and systematic locations of animals. Vegetation can block signals from satellites to GPS radio collars. Therefore, a vegetation dependent bias to telemetry data may occur which if quantified, could be accounted for. We evaluated the performance of GPS collars in 6 structural stage...

  2. GPS Water Vapor Tomography Based on Accurate Estimations of the GPS Tropospheric Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champollion, C.; Masson, F.; Bock, O.; Bouin, M.; Walpersdorf, A.; Doerflinger, E.; van Baelen, J.; Brenot, H.

    2003-12-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is now a common technique for the retrieval of zenithal integrated water vapor (IWV). Further applications in meteorology need also slant integrated water vapor (SIWV) which allow to precisely define the high variability of tropospheric water vapor at different temporal and spatial scales. Only precise estimations of IWV and horizontal gradients allow the estimation of accurate SIWV. We present studies developed to improve the estimation of tropospheric water vapor from GPS data. Results are obtained from several field experiments (MAP, ESCOMPTE, OHM-CV, IHOP, .). First IWV are estimated using different GPS processing strategies and results are compared to radiosondes. The role of the reference frame and the a priori constraints on the coordinates of the fiducial and local stations is generally underestimated. It seems to be of first order in the estimation of the IWV. Second we validate the estimated horizontal gradients comparing zenith delay gradients and single site gradients. IWV, gradients and post-fit residuals are used to construct slant integrated water delays. Validation of the SIWV is under progress comparing GPS SIWV, Lidar measurements and high resolution meteorological models (Meso-NH). A careful analysis of the post-fit residuals is needed to separate tropospheric signal from multipaths. The slant tropospheric delays are used to study the 3D heterogeneity of the troposphere. We develop a tomographic software to model the three-dimensional distribution of the tropospheric water vapor from GPS data. The software is applied to the ESCOMPTE field experiment, a dense network of 17 dual frequency GPS receivers operated in southern France. Three inversions have been successfully compared to three successive radiosonde launches. Good resolution is obtained up to heights of 3000 m.

  3. Briefing highlights space weather risks to GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-07-01

    Solar storms, which are expected to increase as the Sun nears the most active phase of the solar cycle, can disrupt a variety of technologies on which society relies. Speakers at a 22 June briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D. C., focused on how space weather can affect the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is used in a wide range of industries, including commercial air travel, agriculture, national security, and emergency response. Rocky Stone, chief technical pilot for United Airlines, noted that GPS allows more aircraft to be in airspace, saves fuel, and helps aircraft move safely on runways. “Improvements in space weather forecasting need to be pursued,” he said. Precision GPS has also “changed the whole nature of farming,” said Ron Hatch, Director of Navigation Systems, NavCom Technology/John Deere. GPS makes it possible for tractors to be driven in the most efficient paths and for fertilizer and water to be applied precisely to the areas that most need them. Space weather-induced degradation of GPS signals can cause significant loss to farms that rely on GPS. Elizabeth Zimmerman, Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Response and Recovery at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), described how FEMA relies on GPS for disaster recovery. The agency is developing an operations plan for dealing with space weather, she said.

  4. Application of Seasonal Trend Loess to GPS data in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, A.; Bartlow, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations provide crucial data for the study of slow slip events and volcanic hazards in the Cascadia region. However, these GPS stations also record seasonal changes in deformation caused by hydrologic, atmospheric, and other seasonal loading. Removing these signals is necessary for accurately modeling the tectonic sources of deformation. Traditionally, seasonal trends in data been accounted for by fitting and removing sine curves from the data. However, not all seasonal trends follow a sinusoidal shape. Seasonal Trend Loess, or STL, is a filtering procedure for a decomposing a time series into trend, seasonal, and remainder components (Cleveland et. al, Journal of Official Statistics, 1990). STL has a simple design that consists of a sequence of applications of the loess smoother which allows for fast computation of large amounts of trend and seasonal smoothing. STL allows for non-sinusoidal shapes in seasonal deformation signals, and allows for evolution of seasonal signals over time. We applied Seasonal Trend Loess to GPS data from the Cascadia region. We compared our results to a traditional sine wave fit for seasonal removal at selected stations, including stations with slow slip event and volcanic signals. We hope that the STL method may be able to more accurately differentiate seasonal and tectonic deformation signals.

  5. Guidelines for the Design of GPS and LORAN Receiver Controls and Displays

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-03-01

    Long range navigation (Loran) and global positioning system (GPS) receivers are widely used in aviation. The Loran and GPS receivers are similar in size and function but derive their navigation signals from different sources. The design of the contro...

  6. Performance Evaluation of Block Acquisition and Tracking Algorithms Using an Open Source GPS Receiver Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Ganesh K.; Akopian, David; Heckler, Gregory W.; Winternitz, Luke B.

    2011-01-01

    Location technologies have many applications in wireless communications, military and space missions, etc. US Global Positioning System (GPS) and other existing and emerging Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are expected to provide accurate location information to enable such applications. While GNSS systems perform very well in strong signal conditions, their operation in many urban, indoor, and space applications is not robust or even impossible due to weak signals and strong distortions. The search for less costly, faster and more sensitive receivers is still in progress. As the research community addresses more and more complicated phenomena there exists a demand on flexible multimode reference receivers, associated SDKs, and development platforms which may accelerate and facilitate the research. One of such concepts is the software GPS/GNSS receiver (GPS SDR) which permits a facilitated access to algorithmic libraries and a possibility to integrate more advanced algorithms without hardware and essential software updates. The GNU-SDR and GPS-SDR open source receiver platforms are such popular examples. This paper evaluates the performance of recently proposed block-corelator techniques for acquisition and tracking of GPS signals using open source GPS-SDR platform.

  7. Combination of Insar and GPS to Measure Ground Motions and Atmospheric Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Errico, M.; Ferri, S.; Novali, F.; Scirpoli, S.; Tiberi, L.

    2010-12-01

    The combination of different techniques such as InSAR and GPS is characterized by the added value of taking advantage of their complementary strengths and of minimizing their respective weaknesses, thus allowing for the full exploitation of the complementary aspects by overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. Another important aspect of the GPS/InSAR integration regards the fact that today’s application of interferometric SAR techniques is limited by the knowledge of the wet tropospheric path delay in microwave observations. GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may help in obtaining better corrections which will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. The area selected for the InSAR/GPS comparison/integration is in northeastern Italy and includes the town of Bologna, and two nearby sites Medicina (agricultural area) and Loiano (a small city on the Apennines) where a small network of permanent GPS stations is operated by the University of Bologna. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in the framework of the research contract AO-1140. The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique will be applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the towns mentioned above. Ultimately this work will contribute demonstrating the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. A PS is a target whose radar signature is stable with time. Such targets can be identified by means of multiple SAR observations and they can be exploited for jointly estimating their relative motion and the atmospheric artifacts on a grid that can be quite dense in space but not in time (depending on the SAR revisiting time interval). On the contrary the GPS can provide very frequent time

  8. GPS Imaging of Time-Dependent Seasonal Strain in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraner, M.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.; Borsa, A. A.; Blewitt, G.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, studies are suggesting that crustal deformation can be time-dependent and nontectonic. Continuous global positioning system (cGPS) measurements are now showing how steady long-term deformation can be influenced by factors such as fluctuations in loading and temperature variations. Here we model the seasonal time-dependent dilatational and shear strain in Central California, specifically surrounding the Parkfield region and try to uncover the sources of these deformation patterns. We use 8 years of cGPS data (2008 - 2016) processed by the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory and carefully select the cGPS stations for our analysis based on the vertical position of cGPS time series during the drought period. In building our strain model, we first detrend the selected station time series using a set of velocities from the robust MIDAS trend estimator. This estimation algorithm is a robust approach that is insensitive to common problems such as step discontinuities, outliers, and seasonality. We use these detrended time series to estimate the median cGPS positions for each month of the 8-year period and filter displacement differences between these monthly median positions using a filtering technique called "GPS Imaging." This technique improves the overall robustness and spatial resolution of the input displacements for the strain model. We then model our dilatational and shear strain field for each month of time series. We also test a variety of a priori constraints, which controls the style of faulting within the strain model. Upon examining our strain maps, we find that a seasonal strain signal exists in Central California. We investigate how this signal compares to thermoelastic, hydrologic, and atmospheric loading models during the 8-year period. We additionally determine whether the drought played a role in influencing the seasonal signal.

  9. Derivation of the Cramér-Rao Bound in the GNSS-Reflectometry Context for Static, Ground-Based Receivers in Scenarios with Coherent Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Botteron, Cyril; Farine, Pierre-André

    2016-01-01

    The use of the reflected Global Navigation Satellite Systems’ (GNSS) signals in Earth observation applications, referred to as GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R), has been already studied for more than two decades. However, the estimation precision that can be achieved by GNSS-R sensors in some particular scenarios is still not fully understood yet. In an effort to partially fill this gap, in this paper, we compute the Cramér–Rao bound (CRB) for the specific case of static ground-based GNSS-R receivers and scenarios where the coherent component of the reflected signal is dominant. We compute the CRB for GNSS signals with different modulations, GPS L1 C/A and GPS L5 I/Q, which use binary phase-shift keying, and Galileo E1 B/C and E5, using the binary offset carrier. The CRB for these signals is evaluated as a function of the receiver bandwidth and different scenario parameters, such as the height of the receiver or the properties of the reflection surface. The CRB computation presented considers observation times of up to several tens of seconds, in which the satellite elevation angle observed changes significantly. Finally, the results obtained show the theoretical benefit of using modern GNSS signals with GNSS-R techniques using long observation times, such as the interference pattern technique. PMID:27929388

  10. Derivation of the Cramér-Rao Bound in the GNSS-Reflectometry Context for Static, Ground-Based Receivers in Scenarios with Coherent Reflection.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Botteron, Cyril; Farine, Pierre-André

    2016-12-05

    The use of the reflected Global Navigation Satellite Systems' (GNSS) signals in Earth observation applications, referred to as GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R), has been already studied for more than two decades. However, the estimation precision that can be achieved by GNSS-R sensors in some particular scenarios is still not fully understood yet. In an effort to partially fill this gap, in this paper, we compute the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB) for the specific case of static ground-based GNSS-R receivers and scenarios where the coherent component of the reflected signal is dominant. We compute the CRB for GNSS signals with different modulations, GPS L1 C/A and GPS L5 I/Q, which use binary phase-shift keying, and Galileo E1 B/C and E5, using the binary offset carrier. The CRB for these signals is evaluated as a function of the receiver bandwidth and different scenario parameters, such as the height of the receiver or the properties of the reflection surface. The CRB computation presented considers observation times of up to several tens of seconds, in which the satellite elevation angle observed changes significantly. Finally, the results obtained show the theoretical benefit of using modern GNSS signals with GNSS-R techniques using long observation times, such as the interference pattern technique.

  11. Multimodal signals: ultraviolet reflectance and chemical cues in stomatopod agonistic encounters

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, N. Justin; Lewis, Sara M.

    2016-01-01

    Complex signals are commonly used during intraspecific contests over resources to assess an opponent's fighting ability and/or aggressive state. Stomatopod crustaceans may use complex signals when competing aggressively for refuges. Before physical attacks, stomatopods assess their opponents using chemical cues and perform threat displays showing a coloured patch, the meral spot. In some species, this spot reflects UV. However, despite their complex visual system with up to 20 photoreceptor classes, we do not know if stomatopods use chromatic or achromatic signals in contests. In a field study, we found that Neogonodactylus oerstedii meral spot luminance varies with sex, habitat and, more weakly, body length. Next, we conducted an experimental manipulation which demonstrated that both chemical cues and chromatic signals are used during contests. In the absence of chemical cues, stomatopods approached an occupied refuge more quickly and performed offensive behaviours at a lower rate. When UV reflectance was absent, stomatopods performed offensive behaviours more frequently and contest duration trended towards shorter fights. These results provide new evidence that UV reflectance and/or visible spectrum luminance is used to amplify threat displays. Our results are the first to demonstrate that chemical and chromatic cues comprise a multimodal signal in stomatopod contests. PMID:27853613

  12. Robust Real-Time Wide-Area Differential GPS Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P. (Inventor); Bertiger, William I. (Inventor); Lichten, Stephen M. (Inventor); Mannucci, Anthony J. (Inventor); Muellerschoen, Ronald J. (Inventor); Wu, Sien-Chong (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and a device for providing superior differential GPS positioning data. The system includes a group of GPS receiving ground stations covering a wide area of the Earth's surface. Unlike other differential GPS systems wherein the known position of each ground station is used to geometrically compute an ephemeris for each GPS satellite. the present system utilizes real-time computation of satellite orbits based on GPS data received from fixed ground stations through a Kalman-type filter/smoother whose output adjusts a real-time orbital model. ne orbital model produces and outputs orbital corrections allowing satellite ephemerides to be known with considerable greater accuracy than from die GPS system broadcasts. The modeled orbits are propagated ahead in time and differenced with actual pseudorange data to compute clock offsets at rapid intervals to compensate for SA clock dither. The orbital and dock calculations are based on dual frequency GPS data which allow computation of estimated signal delay at each ionospheric point. These delay data are used in real-time to construct and update an ionospheric shell map of total electron content which is output as part of the orbital correction data. thereby allowing single frequency users to estimate ionospheric delay with an accuracy approaching that of dual frequency users.

  13. The Effects of L2C Signal Tracking on High-Precision Carrier Phase GPS Positioning: Implications for the Next Generation of GNSS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, F.; Berglund, H.; Estey, L.

    2012-12-01

    In December 2005, the L2C signal was introduced to improve the accuracy, tracking and redundancy of the GPS system for civilian users. The L2C signal also provides improved SNR data when compared with the L2P(Y) legacy signal. However, GNSS network operators have been hesitant to use the new signal as it is not well determined how positions derived from L2 carrier phase measurements are affected. L2C carrier phase is in quadrature with L2P(Y); some manufacturers correct for this when logging L2C phase while others do not. In cases where both L2C and L2P(Y) are logged simultaneously, translation software must be used carefully in order to select which phase is used in positioning. Modifications were made to UNAVCO's teqc pre-processing software to eliminate confusion, however GNSS networks such as the IGS still suffer occasional data loss due to improperly configured GPS receivers or data flow routines. To date L2C analyses have been restricted to special applications such as snow depth and soil moisture using SNR data, as some high-precision data analysis packages are not compatible with L2C. We use several different methods to determine the effect that tracking and logging L2C has on carrier phase measurements and positioning for various receiver models and configurations. Twenty-four hour zero-length baseline solutions using L2 show sub- millimeter differences in mean positions for both horizontal and vertical components. Direct comparisons of the L2 phase observable from RINEX files with and without the L2C observable show sub-millicycle differences. The magnitude of the variations increased at low elevations. The behavior of the L2P(Y) phase observations or positions from a given receiver were not affected by the enabling of L2C tracking. We find that the use of the L2C-derived carrier phase in real-time applications can be disastrous in cases where receiver brands are mixed between those that correct for quadrature and those that do not (Figure 1). Until

  14. 1DVAR Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Using GPS Radio Occultation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Kursinski, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Global Positioning System enables positioning in 3 dimensions about our planet. It has been operational since 1994. Twenty-four satellites are used to aclile\\,e this performance. The signals sent by these satellites are electromagnetic waves travelling through our atmosphere down to the small receivers used by the civilian community and the military. Because of varying meteorological conditions (namely, temperature and humidity changes along the ray path), the rays do not travel in a straight line. They bend towards the surface. As a consequence, the ray path between two points is longer than a straight line, and the time it takes for a signal to travel this distance is longer. In 1995, a small GPS receiver was launched on a satellite (GPS/MET). It become possible to perform radio occultations around the Earth: the source - one of the 24 GPS satellites - is seen by the receiver as it rises or sets around the other side of the Earth. When the source disappears, the receiver progressively loses the signals. By measuring accurately the time delay between the emission and the reception of the signal, it is possible to infer which part of the delay is due to the atmosphere. We use GPS/MET data to retrieve temperature and humidity profiles simultaneously. A specific method is implemented: it combines information from numerical forecasts and GPS observations in an optimal way. Comparing the result with an independent source of observations (weather balloons), we demonstrate that GPS data have the potential to improve weather analyses. We also show that improved temperature and humidity profiles can be obtained using information from a forecast model. This confirms results obtained in this study using simulated data.

  15. Ionospheric reflection coefficient for television signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    From, W. R.

    1984-08-01

    It has been shown that the ionospherically reflected field strength for 50 MHz signals varies (statistically) in proportion to about the 18th power of f(0)E(s) at the midpoint between transmitter and receiver. This note is to point out that this observation provides support for the theory that the horizontal structure of E(s) is due to a horizontal variation in the wind shear rather than horizontal convergence of metallic ions or a horizontal variation in the metallic column content.

  16. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  17. Exploring methods of cGPS transient detections for the Chilean cGPS network in conjunction with displacement predictions from seismic catalogues: To what extent can we detect seismic and aseismic motion in the cGPS network?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, J. R.; Moreno, M.; Oncken, O.; Li, S.; Schurr, B.; Metzger, S.; Baez, J. C.; Deng, Z.; Melnick, D.

    2016-12-01

    Various algorithms for the detection of transient deformation in cGPS networks are under currently being developed to relieve us of by-eye detection, which is an error prone and time-expensive activity. Such algorithms aim to separate the time series into secular, seasonal, and transient components. Additional white and coloured noise, as well as common-mode (network correlated) noise, may remain in the separated transient component of the signal, depending on the processing flow before the separation step. The a-priori knowledge of regional seismicity can assist in the recognition of steps in the data, which are generally corrected for if they are above the noise-floor. Sometimes, the cumulative displacement caused by small earthquakes can create a seemingly continuous transient signal in the cGPS leading to confusion as to whether to attribute this transient motion as seismic or aseismic. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of various transient detection algorithms for subsets of the Chilean cGPS network and present the optimal processing flow for teasing out the transients. We present a step-detection and removal algorithm and estimate the seismic efficiency of any detected transient signals by forward modelling the surface displacements of the earthquakes and comparing to the recovered transient signals. A major challenge in separating signals in the Chilean cGPS network is the overlapping of postseismic effects at adjacent segments: For example, a Mw 9 earthquake will produce a postseismic viscoelastic relaxation that is sustained over decades and several hundreds of kilometres. Additionally, it has been observed in Chile and Japan that following moderately large earthquakes (e.g. Mw > 8) the secular velocities of adjacent segments in the subduction margin suddenly change and remain changed: this effect may be related to a change in speed of slab subduction rather than viscoelastic relaxation, and therefore the signal separation algorithms that assume a time

  18. GPS interferometric reflectometry for ground-based remote sensing of snow depth and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nievinski, F. G.; Larson, K. M.; Gutmann, E. D.; Zavorotny, V.; Williams, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    GPS interferometric reflectometry (GPS-IR) is a method that exploits multipath for ground-based remote sensing in the surroundings of a GPS antenna. It operates on L-band, leveraging hundreds of conventional GPS sites existing in the U.S., with a typical footprint of 30-meter radius. Multipath is the coherent interference of line-of-sight and reflected signals; as the two go in and out of phase, the power recorded by a GPS interferometer goes through peaks and troughs that can be related to land surface characteristics, such as soil moisture and snow depth. GPS-IR has been demonstrated to be capable of retrieving snow depth during extended periods at various locations, as validated by comparisons with a continuously-operating terrestrial scanning laser, an airborne LIDAR campaign, manual stake surveys, and ultrasonic depth sensors. Here we explore the possibility of retrieving snow density, too. This will determine the feasibility and limitations of GPS-IR for monitoring of snow water equivalent (SWE). Data were collected at Niwot Ridge LTER in Colorado, at a 3,500-m altitude alpine tundra site. Niwot receives around 1,000 mm of precipitation per year and has a mean annual air temperature of -3.8°C. Snow density and temperature is measured in 10-cm vertical increments at snowpits dug approximately every week. A continuously-operating GPS system established in 2009 allows for measurement of the snowpack several times a day at multiple azimuths as satellites rise and set. The typical peak snow depth at the GPS site is 1.5 m, with a peak depth during the study period of 1.7 m in 2009/2010 and 2.5 m in 2010/2011; density ranged 200-600 kg/m3. We employ a forward/inverse model originally developed for snow depth and recently extended to account for layering to study both synthetic and real observations. We present comparisons of density estimates obtained using GPS-IR observations to snowpit field data, focusing initially on dry snow. In addition, we explore the

  19. Sea level measurements using multi-frequency GPS and GLONASS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfgren, Johan S.; Haas, Rüdiger

    2014-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) tide gauges have been realized in different configurations, e.g., with one zenith-looking antenna, using the multipath interference pattern for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis, or with one zenith- and one nadir-looking antenna, analyzing the difference in phase delay, to estimate the sea level height. In this study, for the first time, we use a true Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) tide gauge, installed at the Onsala Space Observatory. This GNSS tide gauge is recording both GPS and Globalnaya Navigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) signals and makes it possible to use both the one- and two-antenna analysis approach. Both the SNR analysis and the phase delay analysis were evaluated using dual-frequency GPS and GLONASS signals, i.e., frequencies in the L-band, during a 1-month-long campaign. The GNSS-derived sea level results were compared to independent sea level observations from a co-located pressure tide gauge and show a high correlation for both systems and frequency bands, with correlation coefficients of 0.86 to 0.97. The phase delay results show a better agreement with the tide gauge sea level than the SNR results, with root-mean-square differences of 3.5 cm (GPS L1 and L2) and 3.3/3.2 cm (GLONASS L1/L2 bands) compared to 4.0/9.0 cm (GPS L1/L2) and 4.7/8.9 cm (GLONASS L1/L2 bands). GPS and GLONASS show similar performance in the comparison, and the results prove that for the phase delay analysis, it is possible to use both frequencies, whereas for the SNR analysis, the L2 band should be avoided if other signals are available. Note that standard geodetic receivers using code-based tracking, i.e., tracking the un-encrypted C/A-code on L1 and using the manufacturers' proprietary tracking method for L2, were used. Signals with the new C/A-code on L2, the so-called L2 C , were not tracked. Using wind speed as an indicator for sea surface roughness, we find that the SNR analysis performs better in rough sea

  20. Handling cycle slips in GPS data during ionospheric plasma bubble events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banville, S.; Langley, R. B.; Saito, S.; Yoshihara, T.

    2010-12-01

    During disturbed ionospheric conditions such as the occurrence of plasma bubbles, the phase and amplitude of the electromagnetic waves transmitted by GPS satellites undergo rapid fluctuations called scintillation. When this phenomenon is observed, GPS receivers are more prone to signal tracking interruptions, which prevent continuous measurement of the total electron content (TEC) between a satellite and the receiver. In order to improve TEC monitoring, a study was conducted with the goal of reducing the effects of signal tracking interruptions by correcting for "cycle slips," an integer number of carrier wavelengths not measured by the receiver during a loss of signal lock. In this paper, we review existing cycle-slip correction methods, showing that the characteristics associated with ionospheric plasma bubbles (rapid ionospheric delay fluctuations, data gaps, increased noise, etc.) prevent reliable correction of cycle slips. Then, a reformulation of the "geometry-free" model conventionally used for ionospheric studies with GPS is presented. Geometric information is used to obtain single-frequency estimates of TEC variations during momentary L2 signal interruptions, which also provides instantaneous cycle-slip correction capabilities. The performance of this approach is assessed using data collected on Okinawa Island in Japan during a plasma bubble event that occurred on 23 March 2004. While an improvement in the continuity of TEC time series is obtained, we question the reliability of any cycle-slip correction technique when discontinuities on both GPS legacy frequencies occur simultaneously for more than a few seconds.

  1. Analysis and Simulation of Narrowband GPS Jamming Using Digital Excision Temporal Filtering.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    the sequence of stored values from the P- code sampled at a 20 MHz rate. When correlated with a reference vector of the same length to simulate a GPS ...rate required for the GPS signals, (20 MHz sampling rate for the P- code signal), the personal computer (PC) used run the simulation could not perform...This subroutine is used to perform a fast FFT based 168 biased cross correlation . Written by Capt Gerry Falen, USAF, 16 AUG 94 % start of code

  2. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  3. Wakeshield WSF-02 GPS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Abusali, P. A. M.; Schroeder, Christine; Tapley, Byron; Exner, Michael; Mccloskey, rick; Carpenter, Russell; Cooke, Michael; Mcdonald, samantha; Combs, Nick; hide

    1995-01-01

    Shuttle mission STS-69 was launched on September 7, 1995, 10:09 CDT, carrying the Wake Shield Facility (WSF-02). The WSF-02 spacecraft included a set of payloads provided by the Texas Space Grant Consortium, known as TexasSat. One of the TexasSat payloads was a GPS TurboRogue receiver loaned by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. On September 11, the WSF-02 was unberthed from the Endeavour payload bay using the remote manipulator system. The GPS receiver was powered on prior to release and the WSF-02 remained in free-flight for three days before being retrieved on September 14. All WSF-02 GPS data, which includes dual frequency pseudorange and carrier phase, were stored in an on-board recorder for post-flight analysis, but "snap- shots" of data were transmitted for 2-3 minutes at intervals of several hours, when permitted by the telemetry band- widdl The GPS experiment goals were: (1) an evaluation of precision orbit determination in a low altitude environment (400 km) where perturbations due to atmospheric drag and the Earth's gravity field are more pronounced than for higher altitude satellites with high precision orbit requirements, such as TOPEX/POSEIDON; (2) an assessment of relative positioning using the WSF GPS receiver and the Endeavour Collins receiver; and (3) determination of atmospheric temperature profiles using GPS signals passing through the atmosphere. Analysis of snap-shot telemetry data indicate that 24 hours of continuous data were stored on board, which includes high rate (50 Hz) data for atmosphere temperature profiles. Examination of the limited number of real-time navigation solutions show that at least 7 GPS satellites were tracked simultaneously and the on-board clock corrections were at the microsec level, as expected. Furthermore, a dynamical consistency test provided a further validation of the on-board navigation solutions. Complete analysis will be conducted in post-flight using the data recorded on-board.

  4. Conical-Domain Model for Estimating GPS Ionospheric Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Lawrence; Komjathy, Attila; Mannucci, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The conical-domain model is a computational model, now undergoing development, for estimating ionospheric delays of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. Relative to the standard ionospheric delay model described below, the conical-domain model offers improved accuracy. In the absence of selective availability, the ionosphere is the largest source of error for single-frequency users of GPS. Because ionospheric signal delays contribute to errors in GPS position and time measurements, satellite-based augmentation systems (SBASs) have been designed to estimate these delays and broadcast corrections. Several national and international SBASs are currently in various stages of development to enhance the integrity and accuracy of GPS measurements for airline navigation. In the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) of the United States, slant ionospheric delay errors and confidence bounds are derived from estimates of vertical ionospheric delay modeled on a grid at regularly spaced intervals of latitude and longitude. The estimate of vertical delay at each ionospheric grid point (IGP) is calculated from a planar fit of neighboring slant delay measurements, projected to vertical using a standard, thin-shell model of the ionosphere. Interpolation on the WAAS grid enables estimation of the vertical delay at the ionospheric pierce point (IPP) corresponding to any arbitrary measurement of a user. (The IPP of a given user s measurement is the point where the GPS signal ray path intersects a reference ionospheric height.) The product of the interpolated value and the user s thin-shell obliquity factor provides an estimate of the user s ionospheric slant delay. Two types of error that restrict the accuracy of the thin-shell model are absent in the conical domain model: (1) error due to the implicit assumption that the electron density is independent of the azimuthal angle at the IPP and (2) error arising from the slant-to-vertical conversion. At low latitudes or at mid

  5. Global Ionosphere Perturbations Monitored by the Worldwide GPS Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Manucci, A. T.; Lindqwister, U. J.; Pi, X.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time, measurements from the Global Positioning System (GPS) worldwide network are employed to study the global ionospheric total electron content(TEC) changes during a magnetic storm (November 26, 1994). These measurements are obtained from more than 60 world-wide GPS stations which continuously receive dual-frequency signals. Based on the delays of the signals, we have generated high resolution global ionospheric maps (GIM) of TEC at 15 minute intervals. Using a differential method comparing storm time maps with quiet time maps, we find that significant TEC increases (the positive effect ) are the major feature in the winter hemisphere during this storm (the maximum percent change relative to quiet times is about 150 percent).

  6. Cumulative co-seismic displacement and comparison with GPS observations in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Chao, B. F.; Sun, W.

    2013-12-01

    The island of Taiwan owes its existence to the collision of the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. The strong seismicity can produce permanent displacement field which can be observed by GPS. Both seismological and GPS networks have been fully established in Taiwan for years. In this paper, we will study the earthquake-induced relative movements, including the amplitude and pattern, and determine how much cumulative co-seismic displacement can contribute to the observed GPS signals as long-term 'trends', by comparing the two sets of data. The co-seismic displacement is calculated by adopting the elastic dislocation theory on a spherical Earth as derived by Sun and Okubo. For the GPS observations, we will remove the seasonal and tidal effects by the least square method and the common-mode errors by the empirical orthogonal function technique. The comparison results show that the earthquake-induced displacements account only for a tiny fraction of the GPS signals, implying that the majority of the displacements in Taiwan during the studied period of 1995-2013 (which includes the largest 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake), both horizontal and vertical, are caused aseismically. The comparison also reveals some interesting details about the pattern and behavior of the displacement fields.

  7. A comparison of hydrological deformation using GPS and global hydrological model for the Eurasian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yue, Jianping; Li, Wang; Lu, Dekai; Li, Xiaogen

    2017-08-01

    The 0.5° × 0.5° gridded hydrological loading from Global Land Surface Discharge Model (LSDM) mass distributions is adopted for 32 GPS sites on the Eurasian plate from January 2010 to January 2014. When the heights of these sites that have been corrected for the effects of non-tidal atmospheric and ocean loading are adjusted by the hydrological loading deformation, more than one third of the root-mean-square (RMS) values of the GPS height variability become larger. After analyzing the results by continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and wavelet transform coherence (WTC), we confirm that hydrological loading primarily contributes to the annual variations in GPS heights. Further, the cross wavelet transform (XWT) is used to investigate the relative phase between the time series of GPS heights and hydrological deformation, and it is indicated that the annual oscillations in the two time series are physically related for some sites; other geophysical effect, GPS systematic errors and hydrological modeling errors could result in the phase asynchrony between GPS and hydrological loading signals for the other sites. Consequently, the phase asynchrony confirms that the annual fluctuations in GPS observations result from a combination of geophysical signals and systematic errors.

  8. Assessment of 3D hydrologic deformation using GRACE and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C. S.; Tregoning, P.; Fleming, K.; Burgette, R. J.; Featherstone, W. E.; Awange, J.; Kuhn, M.; Ramillien, G.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrological processes cause variations in gravitational potential and surface deformations, both of which are detectable with ever increasing precision using space geodetic techniques. By comparing the elastic deformation computed from continental water load estimates derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with three-dimensional surface deformation derived from GPS observations, there is clear potential to better understand global to regional hydrological processes, in addition to acquiring further insight into the systematic error contributions affecting each space geodetic technique. In this study, we compare elastic deformation derived from water load estimates taken from the CNES, CSR, GFZ and JPL time variable GRACE fields. We compare these surface displacements with those derived at a global network of GPS sites that have been homogeneously reprocessed in the GAMIT/GLOBK suite. We extend our comparison to include a series of different GPS solutions, with each solution only subtly different based on the methodology used to down weight the height component in realizing site coordinates on the terrestrial reference frame. Each of the GPS solutions incorporate modeling of atmospheric loading and utilization of the VMF1 and a priori zenith hydrostatic delays derived via ray tracing through ECMWF meteorological fields. The agreement between GRACE and GPS derived deformations is not limited to the vertical component, with excellent agreement in the horizontal component across areas where large hydrologic signals occur over broad spatial scales (with correlation in horizontal components as high as 0.9). Agreement is also observed at smaller scales, including across Europe. These comparisons assist in understanding the magnitude of current error contributions within both space geodetic techniques. With the emergence of homogeneously reprocessed GPS time series spanning the GRACE mission, this technique offers one possible means of

  9. The work hours of GPs: survey of English GPs.

    PubMed

    Gravelle, Hugh; Hole, Arne Risa

    2007-02-01

    There is no current information about the hours worked by English GPs. To compare the reported hours worked by GPs with that of other professions and to explain the variation in GP hours worked and on call. National postal survey of 1871 GPs in February 2004. English general practice. Multiple regression analyses of part-time versus full-time status, hours worked, and hours on call. Full-time male GPs report more hours worked (49.6; 95% CI [confidence interval] = 48.9 to 50.2) than males in other professional occupations (47.9; 95% CI = 47.6 to 48.1) and male managers (49.1; 95% CI = 48.8 to 49.5). Full-time female GPs report fewer hours (43.2; 95% CI = 42.0 to 44.3) than females in other professional occupations (44.7; 95% CI = 44.4 to 45.0) and female managers (44.1; 95% CI = 43.7 to 44.5). The number of hours worked decreased with practice list size, and increased with the number of patients per GP. GPs work longer hours in practices with older patients and with a higher proportion of patients in nursing homes. Fewer hours are worked in practices with higher 'additional needs' payments. Having children under 18 years of age increased the probability that female GPs work part-time but has no effect on the probability of male GPs working part-time. Given full-time/part-time status, having children under 18 years of age reduces the hours of male and female GPs. Male English GPs report longer hours worked than other professional groups and managers. The sex differences between GPs in hours worked are mostly attributable to the differential impact of family circumstances, particularly the number of children they have. Perversely, 'additional needs' payments are higher in practices where GPs work fewer hours.

  10. Comparison of observed and modeled seasonal crustal vertical displacements derived from multi-institution GPS and GRACE solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yanchao; Fan, Dongming; You, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Eleven GPS crustal vertical displacement (CVD) solutions for 110 IGS08/IGS14 core stations provided by the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service Analysis Centers are compared with seven Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)-modeled CVD solutions. The results of the internal comparison of the GPS solutions from multiple institutions imply large uncertainty in the GPS postprocessing. There is also evidence that GRACE solutions from both different institutions and different processing approaches (mascon and traditional spherical harmonic coefficients) show similar results, suggesting that GRACE can provide CVD results of good internal consistency. When the uncertainty of the GPS data is accounted for, the GRACE data can explain as much as 50% of the actual signals and more than 80% of the GPS annual signals. Our study strongly indicates that GRACE data have great potential to correct the nontidal loading in GPS time series.

  11. DARPA looks beyond GPS for positioning, navigating, and timing

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kramer, David

    Cold-atom interferometry, microelectromechanical systems, signals of opportunity, and atomic clocks are some of the technologies the defense agency is pursuing to provide precise navigation when GPS is unavailable.

  12. Optical signal suppression by a cascaded SOA/RSOA for wavelength reusing reflective PON upstream transmission.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sang Min; Mun, Kyoung Hak; Kang, Soo Min; Han, Sang Kook

    2017-09-18

    An optical signal suppression technique based on a cascaded SOA and RSOA is proposed for the reflective passive optical networks (PONs) with wavelength division multiplexing (WDM). By suppressing the downstream signal of the optical carrier, the proposed reflective PON effectively reuses the downstream optical carrier for upstream signal transmission. As an experimental demonstration, we show that the proposed optical signal suppression technique is effective in terms of the signal bandwidth and bit-error-rate (BER) performance of the remodulated upstream transmission.

  13. A study of ionospheric grid modification technique for BDS/GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuelin; Li, Meina; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-01

    For the single-frequency GPS receiver, ionospheric delay is an important factor affecting the positioning performance. There are many kinds of ionospheric correction methods, common models are Bent model, IRI model, Klobuchar model, Ne Quick model and so on. The US Global Positioning System (GPS) uses the Klobuchar coefficients transmitted in the satellite signal to correct the ionospheric delay error for a single frequency GPS receiver, but this model can only reduce the ionospheric error of about 50% in the mid-latitudes. In the Beidou system, the accuracy of the correction delay is higher. Therefore, this paper proposes a method that using BD grid information to correct GPS ionospheric delay to improve the ionospheric delay for the BDS/GPS compatible positioning receiver. In this paper, the principle of ionospheric grid algorithm is introduced in detail, and the positioning accuracy of GPS system and BDS/GPS compatible positioning system is compared and analyzed by the real measured data. The results show that the method can effectively improve the positioning accuracy of the receiver in a more concise way.

  14. Detection of plumes at Redoubt and Etna volcanoes using the GPS SNR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Palo, Scott; Roesler, Carolyn; Mattia, Mario; Bruno, Valentina; Coltelli, Mauro; Fee, David

    2017-09-01

    Detection and characterization of volcanic eruptions is important both for public health and aircraft safety. A variety of ground sensors are used to monitor volcanic eruptions. Data from these ground sensors are subsequently incorporated into models that predict the movement of ash. Here a method to detect volcanic plumes using GPS signals is described. Rather than carrier phase data used by geodesists, the method takes advantage of attenuations in signal to noise ratio (SNR) data. Two datasets are evaluated: the 2009 Redoubt Volcano eruptions and the 2013/2015 eruptions at Mt. Etna. SNR-based eruption durations are compared with previously published seismic, infrasonic, and radar studies at Redoubt Volcano. SNR-based plume detections from Mt. Etna are compared with L-band radar and tremor observations. To place these SNR observations from Redoubt and Etna in context, a model of the propagation of GPS signals through both water/water vapor and tephra is developed. Neither water nor fine ash particles will produce the observed attenuation of GPS signals, while scattering caused by particles > 1 cm in diameter potentially could.

  15. GPS aiding of ocean current determination. [Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The navigational accuracy of an oceangoing vessel using conventional GPS p-code data is examined. The GPS signal is transmitted over two carrier frequencies in the L-band at 1575.42 and 1227.6 MHz. Achievable navigational uncertainties of differenced positional estimates are presented as a function of the parameters of the problem, with particular attention given to the effect of sea-state, user equivalent range error, uncompensated antenna motion, varying delay intervals, and reduced data rate examined in the unaided mode. The unmodeled errors resulting from satellite ephemeris uncertainties are shown to be negligible for the GPS-NDS (Navigation Development) satellites. Requirements are met in relatively calm seas, but accuracy degradation by a factor of at least 2 must be anticipated in heavier sea states. The aided mode of operation is examined, and it is shown that requirements can be met by using an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to aid the GPS receiver operation. Since the use of an IMU would mean higher costs, direct Doppler from the GPS satellites is presented as a viable alternative.

  16. Comparing models of seasonal deformation to horizontal and vertical PBO GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, N. M.; Fialko, Y. A.; van Dam, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    GPS monuments around the world exhibit seasonal displacements in both the horizontal and vertical direction with amplitudes on the order of centimeters. For analysis of tectonic signals, researchers typically fit and remove a sine function with an annual period, and sometimes an additional sine function with a semiannual period. As interest grows in analyzing small-amplitude, long-period deformation signals it becomes more important to accurately correct for seasonal variations. It is well established that the vertical component of seasonal GPS signals is largely due to continental water storage cycles (e.g. van Dam et al., GRL, 2001). Other recognized sources of seasonal loading include atmospheric pressure loading and oceanic loading due to non-steric changes in ocean height (e.g. van Dam et al., J. Geodesy, 2012). Here we attempt to build a complete physical model of seasonal loading by considering all of these sources (continental water storage, atmospheric pressure, and oceanic loading) and comparing our model to horizontal and vertical GPS data in the Western US. Atmospheric loading effects are computed from the National Center for Environmental Prediction 6-hourly global reanalysis surface pressure fields; the terrestrial water loading and ocean loading models are generated using SPOTL (Some Programs for Ocean Tide Loading; Agnew, SIO Technical Report, 2012) and parameters from NASA's Land Data Assimilation Systems and the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean model, version 4. We find that with a few exceptions, our seasonal loading model predicts the correct phases but underestimates the amplitudes of vertical seasonal loads, and is a generally poor fit to the observed horizontal seasonal signals. This implies that our understanding of the driving mechanisms behind seasonal variations in the GPS data is still incomplete and needs to be improved before physics-based models can be used as an effective correction tool for the GPS timeseries.

  17. Application of GPS Measurements for Ionospheric and Tropospheric Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendra Prasad, P.; Abdu, M. A.; Furlan, Benedito. M. P.; Koiti Kuga, Hélio

    military navigation. The DOD's primary purposes were to use the system in precision weapon delivery and providing a capability that would help reverse the proliferation of navigation systems in military. Subsequently, it was very quickly realized that civil use and scientific utility would far outstrip military use. A variety of scientific applications are uniquely suited to precise positioning capabilities. The relatively high precision, low cost, mobility and convenience of GPS receivers make positioning attractive. The other applications being precise time measurement, surveying and geodesy purposes apart from orbit and attitude determination along with many user services. The system operates by transmitting radio waves from satellites to receivers on the ground, aircraft, or other satellites. These signals are used to calculate location very accurately. Standard Positioning Services (SPS) which restricts access to Coarse/Access (C/A) code and carrier signals on the L1 frequency only. The accuracy thus provided by SPS fall short of most of the accuracy requirements of users. The upper atmosphere is ionized by the ultra violet radiation from the sun. The significant errors in positioning can result when the signals are refracted and slowed by ionospheric conditions, the parameter of the ionosphere that produces most effects on GPS signals is the total number of electrons in the ionospheric propagation path. This integrated number of electrons, called Total Electron Content (TEC) varies, not only from day to night, time of the year and solar flux cycle, but also with geomagnetic latitude and longitude. Being plasma the ionosphere affects the radio waves propagating through it. Effects of scintillation on GPS satellite navigation systems operating at L1 (1.5754 GHz), L2 (1.2276 GHz) frequencies have not been estimated accurately. It is generally recognized that GPS navigation systems are vulnerable in the polar and especially in the equatorial region during the

  18. Modeling and characterization of multipath in global navigation satellite system ranging signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jan Peter

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides position, velocity, and time information to users in anywhere near the earth in real-time and regardless of weather conditions. Since the system became operational, improvements in many areas have reduced systematic errors affecting GPS measurements such that multipath, defined as any signal taking a path other than the direct, has become a significant, if not dominant, error source for many applications. This dissertation utilizes several approaches to characterize and model multipath errors in GPS measurements. Multipath errors in GPS ranging signals are characterized for several receiver systems and environments. Experimental P(Y) code multipath data are analyzed for ground stations with multipath levels ranging from minimal to severe, a C-12 turboprop, an F-18 jet, and an aircraft carrier. Comparisons between receivers utilizing single patch antennas and multi-element arrays are also made. In general, the results show significant reductions in multipath with antenna array processing, although large errors can occur even with this kind of equipment. Analysis of airborne platform multipath shows that the errors tend to be small in magnitude because the size of the aircraft limits the geometric delay of multipath signals, and high in frequency because aircraft dynamics cause rapid variations in geometric delay. A comprehensive multipath model is developed and validated. The model integrates 3D structure models, satellite ephemerides, electromagnetic ray-tracing algorithms, and detailed antenna and receiver models to predict multipath errors. Validation is performed by comparing experimental and simulated multipath via overall error statistics, per satellite time histories, and frequency content analysis. The validation environments include two urban buildings, an F-18, an aircraft carrier, and a rural area where terrain multipath dominates. The validated models are used to identify multipath sources, characterize signal

  19. GPS for low-cost attitude determination. A review of concepts, in-flight experiences, and current developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Q. P.; Van Woerkom, P. Th. L. M.

    The Global Positioning System or GPS has been developed for the purpose of enabling accurate positioning and navigation anywhere on or near the surface of the Earth. In addition to the US system GPS-NAVSTAR, the Russian GLONASS system is also in place and operational. Other such systems are under study. The key measurement involved is the time of travel of signals from a particular GPS spacecraft to the navigating receiver. Navigation accuracies of the order of tenths of meters are achievable, and accuracies at the centimeter level can also be obtained with special enhancement techniques. In recent years spacecraft have already been exploring the use of GPS for in-orbit navigation. As the receiver is solid state, rugged, power-lean, and cheap, GPS for autonomous navigation will be an objective even for low-cost spacecraft of only modest sophistication. When the GPS receiver is equipped with multiple antennas with baselines even as low as about one meter, it can also give attitude information. In this case, the position of the spacecraft needs to be known with only very moderate accuracy. However, the phase differences between signals received by the different antennas now constitute the key measurements. In this case a centimeter level accuracy of range difference can be obtained. Receivers carrying out the processing of such measurements are already on the market, even in space-qualified versions. For spacecraft maneuvering at low rates, accuracies of the order of tenths of a degree are achievable. There are reasons for maintaining classical attitude sensor suites on a spacecraft even when a GPS receiver is added. In this case the classical sensors may be allowed to be of modest quality only, as subsequent fusion of their data with those from the GPS receiver may restore the accuracy of the final estimate again to an acceptable level. Hence, low-cost attitude sensors combined with a low-cost GPS receiver can still satisfy non-trivial attitude reconstitution

  20. Study on index system of GPS interference effect evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Zeng, Fangling; Zhao, Yuan; Zeng, Ruiqi

    2018-05-01

    Satellite navigation interference effect evaluation is the key technology to break through the research of Navigation countermeasure. To evaluate accurately the interference degree and Anti-jamming ability of GPS receiver, this text based on the existing research results of Navigation interference effect evaluation, build the index system of GPS receiver effectiveness evaluation from four levels of signal acquisition, tracking, demodulation and positioning/timing and establish the model for each index. These indexes can accurately and quantitatively describe the interference effect at all levels.

  1. Directional Networking in GPS Denied Environments - Time Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-14

    RF-based measurements to synchronize time and measure node range.  Satellite Doppler: Using Doppler measurements from multiple satellites along...with satellite catalog data to determine time and position.  LTE : Use existing LTE base-stations for time and position.  Differential GPS: A...Opportunistic Signals: Opportunistically take advantage of existing RF signals (i.e., FM radio, DTV, LTE , etc.) transmitted from known locations

  2. GPS application to mapping, charting and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senus, W. J.; Hill, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    GPSPAC, a receiver being developed for space applications by the Defense Mapping Agency and NASA, will use signals from GPS constellations to generate real-time values of host vehicle position and velocity. The GPSPAC has an L-band antenna and preamp capable of receiving the 1575 MHz and 1227 MHz spread spectrum signals; its stable oscillator at 5.115 MHz provides the basic frequency reference, resulting in a long term drift of less than one part in 10 to the -10th day. The GPSPAC performs many functions on board the spacecraft which were previously relegated to large-scale ground-based computer/receiver systems. A positional accuracy of better than 8 can be achieved for those periods when four or more NAVSTAR satellites are visible to the host satellite. The GPS geodetic receiver development, which will provide prototype receivers for utilization in terrestrial surveying operations, has the potential to significantly enhance the accuracy of point geodetic surveys over the current user hardware capability.

  3. GPS/MEMS IMU/Microprocessor Board for Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James; Ott, William E.

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized instrumentation package comprising a (1) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, (2) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting largely of surface-micromachined sensors of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, and (3) a microprocessor, all residing on a single circuit board, is part of the navigation system of a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft [e.g., the International Space Station (ISS)] for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. Variants of the package may also be useful in terrestrial collision-detection and -avoidance applications. The navigation solution obtained by integrating the IMU outputs is fed back to a correlator in the GPS receiver to aid in tracking GPS signals. The raw GPS and IMU data are blended in a Kalman filter to obtain an optimal navigation solution, which can be supplemented by range and velocity data obtained by use of (l) a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard the robotic spacecraft and/or (2) a laser dynamic range imager aboard the ISS. The novelty of the package lies mostly in those aspects of the design of the MEMS IMU that pertain to controlling mechanical resonances and stabilizing scale factors and biases.

  4. Pre-Flight Testing of Spaceborne GPS Receivers using a GPS Constellation Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Davis, Edward; Alonso, R.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Global Positioning System (GPS) applications test facility has been established within the GSFC Guidance Navigation and Control Center. The GPS test facility is currently housing the Global Simulation Systems Inc. (GSSI) STR2760 GPS satellite 40-channel attitude simulator and a STR4760 12-channel navigation simulator. The facility also contains a few other resources such as an atomic time standard test bed, a rooftop antenna platform and a radome. It provides a new capability for high dynamics GPS simulations of space flight that is unique within the aerospace community. The GPS facility provides a critical element for the development and testing of GPS based technologies i.e. position, attitude and precise time determination used on-board a spacecraft, suborbital rocket balloon. The GPS simulation system is configured in a transportable rack and is available for GPS component development as well as for component, spacecraft subsystem and system level testing at spacecraft integration and tests sites. The GPS facility has been operational since early 1996 and has utilized by space flight projects carrying GPS experiments, such as the OrbView-2 and the Argentine SAC-A spacecrafts. The SAC-A pre-flight test data obtained by using the STR2760 simulator and the comparison with preliminary analysis of the GPS data from SAC-A telemetry are summarized. This paper describes pre-flight tests and simulations used to support a unique spaceborne GPS experiment. The GPS experiment mission objectives and the test program are described, as well as the GPS test facility configuration needed to verify experiment feasibility. Some operational and critical issues inherent in GPS receiver pre-flight tests and simulations using this GPS simulation, and test methodology are described. Simulation and flight data are presented. A complete program of pre-flight testing of spaceborne GPS receivers using a GPS constellation simulator is detailed.

  5. Modeling Infrared Signal Reflections to Characterize Indoor Multipath Propagation

    PubMed Central

    De-La-Llana-Calvo, Álvaro; Lázaro-Galilea, José Luis; Gardel-Vicente, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Navarro, David; Bravo-Muñoz, Ignacio; Tsirigotis, Georgios; Iglesias-Miguel, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a model to characterize Infrared (IR) signal reflections on any kind of surface material, together with a simplified procedure to compute the model parameters. The model works within the framework of Local Positioning Systems (LPS) based on IR signals (IR-LPS) to evaluate the behavior of transmitted signal Multipaths (MP), which are the main cause of error in IR-LPS, and makes several contributions to mitigation methods. Current methods are based on physics, optics, geometry and empirical methods, but these do not meet our requirements because of the need to apply several different restrictions and employ complex tools. We propose a simplified model based on only two reflection components, together with a method for determining the model parameters based on 12 empirical measurements that are easily performed in the real environment where the IR-LPS is being applied. Our experimental results show that the model provides a comprehensive solution to the real behavior of IR MP, yielding small errors when comparing real and modeled data (the mean error ranges from 1% to 4% depending on the environment surface materials). Other state-of-the-art methods yielded mean errors ranging from 15% to 40% in test measurements. PMID:28406436

  6. Calibration of Galileo signals for time metrology.

    PubMed

    Defraigne, Pascale; Aerts, Wim; Cerretto, Giancarlo; Cantoni, Elena; Sleewaegen, Jean-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Using global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals for accurate timing and time transfer requires the knowledge of all electric delays of the signals inside the receiving system. GNSS stations dedicated to timing or time transfer are classically calibrated only for Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. This paper proposes a procedure to determine the hardware delays of a GNSS receiving station for Galileo signals, once the delays of the GPS signals are known. This approach makes use of the broadcast satellite inter-signal biases, and is based on the ionospheric delay measured from dual-frequency combinations of GPS and Galileo signals. The uncertainty on the so-determined hardware delays is estimated to 3.7 ns for each isolated code in the L5 frequency band, and 4.2 ns for the ionosphere-free combination of E1 with a code of the L5 frequency band. For the calibration of a time transfer link between two stations, another approach can be used, based on the difference between the common-view time transfer results obtained with calibrated GPS data and with uncalibrated Galileo data. It is shown that the results obtained with this approach or with the ionospheric method are equivalent.

  7. Assessment of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in Greenland using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Bevis, M. G.; Sasgen, I.; van Dam, T. M.; Wahr, J. M.; Wouters, B.; Bamber, J. L.; Willis, M. J.; Knudsen, P.; Helm, V.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Muresan, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenland GPS network (GNET) was constructed to provide a new means to assess viscoelastic and elastic adjustments driven by past and present-day changes in ice mass. Here we assess existing glacial isostatic adjustments (GIA) predictions by analysing 1995-2015 data from 61 continuous GPS receivers located along the margin of the Greenland ice sheet. Since GPS receivers measure both the GIA and elastic signals, we isolate GIA, by removing the elastic adjustments of the lithosphere due to present-day mass changes using high-resolution fields of ice surface elevation change derived from satellite and airborne altimetry measurements (ERS1/2, ICESat, ATM, ENVISAT, and CryoSat-2). For most GPS stations, our observed GIA rates contradict GIA predictions; particularly, we find huge uplift rates in southeast Greenland of up to 14 mm/yr while models predict rates of 0-2 mm/yr. Our results suggest possible improvements of GIA predictions, and hence of the poorly constrained ice load history and Earth structure models for Greenland.

  8. Evidence for Recent Activity on the Chatham Strait Fault from Seismic Reflection and GPS Modeling, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, J. E.; Brothers, D. S.; Elliott, J.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Chatham Strait and its northern extension, Lynn Canal, form the southern end of the Denali fault system, which arcs across southern Alaska and the Yukon Territory. Paleozoic rocks are offset by 180 km across Chatham Strait, confirming a history of significant dextral faulting. Tertiary volcanic rocks on either side of the fault, dated on one side at 28 Ma, have been interpreted as a piercing point indicating post-Oligocene movement. Historical seismic activity is low along the length of Chatham Strait fault (CSF), but the prominent geomorphological expression of the CSF continues to invite the idea that the fault is active and carries some component of modern plate motion, linking to the Eastern Denali fault at the northern end of Lynn Canal. In 2015, the USGS collected high-frequency chirp and multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles in Lynn Canal, in order to image evidence of deformation related to offset along the CSF. During the Last Glacial Maximum, Lynn Canal was completely filled with ice, which mostly removed older sediments and left an irregular but freshly scraped bedrock surface upon deglaciation. MCS profiles image a sequence of younger onlapping sediments that thicken from about 150 m in the north part of the study area to over 250 m in the south. These sediments record the transition from an initial outwash phase with rapid deposition during early stages of deglaciation to deposition in current open-water conditions in depths of 275-325 m that span the last 12,000-14,000 years. Seismic reflection profiles show only minor and localized faulting in these sediments, and there is no evidence of any continuous deformation along the axis of Lynn Canal that would suggest significant offset along the CSF. Fault models constrained by GPS data allow, but do not require, a maximum slip rate of about 2-3 mm/yr along the CSF; higher slip rates on the CSF result in significant misfit to GPS data in the surrounding region. Overall, our results suggest that

  9. GPS-based tracking system for TOPEX orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, W. G.

    1984-01-01

    A tracking system concept is discussed that is based on the utilization of the constellation of Navstar satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS). The concept involves simultaneous and continuous metric tracking of the signals from all visible Navstar satellites by approximately six globally distributed ground terminals and by the TOPEX spacecraft at 1300-km altitude. Error studies indicate that this system could be capable of obtaining decimeter position accuracies and, most importantly, around 5 cm in the radial component which is key to exploiting the full accuracy potential of the altimetric measurements for ocean topography. Topics covered include: background of the GPS, the precision mode for utilization of the system, past JPL research for using the GPS in precision applications, the present tracking system concept for high accuracy satellite positioning, and results from a proof-of-concept demonstration.

  10. Pre-Flight Testing of Spaceborne GPS Receivers Using a GPS Constellation Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Davis, Edward; Alonso, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Global Positioning System (GPS) applications test facility has been established within the GSFC Guidance Navigation and Control Center. The GPS test facility is currently housing the Global Simulation Systems Inc. (GSSI) STR2760 GPS satellite 40-channel attitude simulator and a STR4760 12-channel navigation simulator. The facility also contains a few other resources such as an atomic time standard test bed, a rooftop antenna platform and a radome. It provides a new capability for high dynamics GPS simulations of space flight that is unique within the aerospace community. The GPS facility provides a critical element for the development and testing of GPS based technologies i.e. position, attitude and precise time determination used on-board a spacecraft, suborbital rocket or balloon. The GPS simulator system is configured in a transportable rack and is available for GPS component development as well as for component, spacecraft subsystem and system level testing at spacecraft integration and test sites. The GPS facility has been operational since early 1996 and has been utilized by space flight projects carrying GPS experiments, such as the OrbView-2 and the Argentine SAC-A spacecrafts. The SAC-A pre-flight test data obtained by using the STR2760 simulator and the comparison with preliminary analysis of the GPS data from SAC-A telemetry are summarized. This paper describes pre-flight tests and simulations used to support a unique spaceborne GPS experiment. The GPS experiment mission objectives and the test program are described, as well as the GPS test facility configuration needed to verify experiment feasibility. Some operational and critical issues inherent in GPS receiver pre-flight tests and simulations using this GPS simulator, and test methodology are described. Simulation and flight data are presented. A complete program of pre-flight testing of spaceborne GPS receivers using a GPS constellation simulator is

  11. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  12. Simulating Future GPS Clock Scenarios with Two Composite Clock Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Matthias; Matsakis, Demetrios; Greenhall, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Using the GPS Toolkit, the GPS constellation is simulated using 31 satellites (SV) and a ground network of 17 monitor stations (MS). At every 15-minutes measurement epoch, the monitor stations measure the time signals of all satellites above a parameterized elevation angle. Once a day, the satellite clock estimates the station and satellite clocks. The first composite clock (B) is based on the Brown algorithm, and is now used by GPS. The second one (G) is based on the Greenhall algorithm. The composite clock of G and B performance are investigated using three ground-clock models. Model C simulates the current GPS configuration, in which all stations are equipped with cesium clocks, except for masers at USNO and Alternate Master Clock (AMC) sites. Model M is an improved situation in which every station is equipped with active hydrogen masers. Finally, Models F and O are future scenarios in which the USNO and AMC stations are equipped with fountain clocks instead of masers. Model F is a rubidium fountain, while Model O is more precise but futuristic Optical Fountain. Each model is evaluated using three performance metrics. The timing-related user range error having all satellites available is the first performance index (PI1). The second performance index (PI2) relates to the stability of the broadcast GPS system time itself. The third performance index (PI3) evaluates the stability of the time scales computed by the two composite clocks. A distinction is made between the "Signal-in-Space" accuracy and that available through a GNSS receiver.

  13. Predictions of GPS X-Set Performance during the Places Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    previously existing GPS X-set receiver simulation was modified to include the received signal spectrum and the receiver code correlation operation... CORRELATION OPERATION The X-set receiver simulation documented in Reference 3-1 is a direct sampled -data digital implementation of the GPS X-set...ul(t) -sin w2t From Carrier and Code Loops (wit +0 1 (t)) Figure 3-6. Simplified block diagram of code correlator operation and I-Q sampling . 6 I

  14. Analysis of strong scintillation events by using GPS data at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Biagio; Jakowski, Norbert; Wilken, Volker

    2010-05-01

    Drifting structures charaterised by inhomogeneities in the spatial electron density distribution at ionospheric heights originate scintillation of radio waves propagating through. The fractional electron density fluctuations and the corresponding scintillation levels may reach extreme values at low latitudes during high solar activity. Strong scintillation events have disruptive effects on a number of technological applications. In particular, operations and services based on GPS signals and receivers may experience severe disruption due to a significant degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio, eventually leading to signal loss of lock. Experimental scintillation data collected in the Asian sector at low latitudes by means of a GPS dual frequency receiver under moderate solar activity (2006) have been analysed. The GPS receiver is particularly modified in firmware in order to record power estimates on the C/A code as well as on the carriers L1 and L2. Strong scintillation activity is recorded in the post-sunset period (saturating S4 and SI as high as 20 dB). An overview of these events is presented, by taking into account scintillation impact on the signal intensity, phase, and dynamics. In particular, the interpretation of these events based on a refined scattering theory is provided with possible consequences for standard scintillation models.

  15. Combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning with Fixed GPS Ambiguities

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lin; Cai, Changsheng; Santerre, Rock; Zhu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP) technology is mostly implemented with an ambiguity-float solution. Its performance may be further improved by performing ambiguity-fixed resolution. Currently, the PPP integer ambiguity resolutions (IARs) are mainly based on GPS-only measurements. The integration of GPS and GLONASS can speed up the convergence and increase the accuracy of float ambiguity estimates, which contributes to enhancing the success rate and reliability of fixing ambiguities. This paper presents an approach of combined GPS/GLONASS PPP with fixed GPS ambiguities (GGPPP-FGA) in which GPS ambiguities are fixed into integers, while all GLONASS ambiguities are kept as float values. An improved minimum constellation method (MCM) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of GPS ambiguity fixing. Datasets from 20 globally distributed stations on two consecutive days are employed to investigate the performance of the GGPPP-FGA, including the positioning accuracy, convergence time and the time to first fix (TTFF). All datasets are processed for a time span of three hours in three scenarios, i.e., the GPS ambiguity-float solution, the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolution and the GGPPP-FGA resolution. The results indicate that the performance of the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolutions is significantly better than that of the GPS ambiguity-float solutions. In addition, the GGPPP-FGA improves the positioning accuracy by 38%, 25% and 44% and reduces the convergence time by 36%, 36% and 29% in the east, north and up coordinate components over the GPS-only ambiguity-fixed resolutions, respectively. Moreover, the TTFF is reduced by 27% after adding GLONASS observations. Wilcoxon rank sum tests and chi-square two-sample tests are made to examine the significance of the improvement on the positioning accuracy, convergence time and TTFF. PMID:25237901

  16. Measuring snow liquid water content with low-cost GPS receivers.

    PubMed

    Koch, Franziska; Prasch, Monika; Schmid, Lino; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2014-11-06

    The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC) in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements.

  17. PFISR GPS tracking mode for researching high-latitude ionospheric electron density gradients associated with GPS scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucks, D. C.; Palo, S. E.; Pilinski, M.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Hampton, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Ionospheric behavior in the high-latitudes can significantly impact Ultra High Frequency (UHF) signals in the 300 MHz to 3 GHz band, resulting in degradation of Global Positioning System (GPS) position solutions and satellite communications interruptions. To address these operational concerns, a need arises to identify and understand the ionospheric structure that leads to disturbed conditions in the Arctic. Structures in the high-latitude ionosphere are known to change on the order of seconds or less, can be decameters to kilometers in scale, and elongate across magnetic field lines at auroral latitudes. Nominal operations at Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) give temporal resolution on the order of minutes, and range resolution on the order of tens of kilometers, while specialized GPS receivers available for ionospheric sensing have a 100Hz observation sampling rate. One of these, ASTRA's Connected Autonomous Space Environment Sensor (CASES) is used for this study. We have developed a new GPS scintillation tracking mode for PFISR to address open scientific questions regarding temporal and spatial electron density gradients. The mode will be described, a number of experimental campaigns will be analyzed, and results and lessons learned will be presented.

  18. Accuracy assessment of high-rate GPS measurements for seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elosegui, P.; Davis, J. L.; Ekström, G.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of GPS measurements with a controlled laboratory system, built to simulate the ground motions caused by tectonic earthquakes and other transient geophysical signals such as glacial earthquakes, enables us to assess the technique of high-rate GPS. The root-mean-square (rms) position error of this system when undergoing realistic simulated seismic motions is 0.05~mm, with maximum position errors of 0.1~mm, thus providing "ground truth" GPS displacements. We have acquired an extensive set of high-rate GPS measurements while inducing seismic motions on a GPS antenna mounted on this system with a temporal spectrum similar to real seismic events. We found that, for a particular 15-min-long test event, the rms error of the 1-Hz GPS position estimates was 2.5~mm, with maximum position errors of 10~mm, and the error spectrum of the GPS estimates was approximately flicker noise. These results may however represent a best-case scenario since they were obtained over a short (~10~m) baseline, thereby greatly mitigating baseline-dependent errors, and when the number and distribution of satellites on the sky was good. For example, we have determined that the rms error can increase by a factor of 2--3 as the GPS constellation changes throughout the day, with an average value of 3.5~mm for eight identical, hourly-spaced, consecutive test events. The rms error also increases with increasing baseline, as one would expect, with an average rms error for a ~1400~km baseline of 9~mm. We will present an assessment of the accuracy of high-rate GPS based on these measurements, discuss the implications of this study for seismology, and describe new applications in glaciology.

  19. Time aspects of the European Complement to GPS: Continental and transatlantic experimental phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhrich, Pierre J. M.; Juompan, B.; Tourde, R.; Brunet, M.; Dutrey, J.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The CNES project of a European Complement to GPS (CE-GPS) is conceived to fulfill the needs of Civil Aviation for a non-precise approach phase with GPS as sole navigation means. This generates two missions: a monitoring mission - alarm of failure - ,and a navigation mission - generating a GPS-like signal on board the geostationary satellites. The host satellites will be the Inmarsat constellation. The CE-GPS missions lead to some time requirements, mainly the accuracy of GPS time restitution and of monitoring clock synchronization. To demonstrate that the requirements of the CE-GPS could be achieved, including the time aspects, an experiment has been scheduled over the Last two years, using a part of the Inmarsat II F-2 payload and specially designed ground stations based on 10 channels GPS receivers. This paper presents a review of the results obtained during the continental phase of the CE-GPS experiment with two stations in France, along with some experimental results obtained during the transatlantic phase (three stations in France, French Guyana, and South Africa). It describes the synchronization of the monitoring clocks using the GPS Common-view or the C- to L-Band transponder of the Inmarsat satellite, with an estimated accuracy better than 10 ns (1 sigma).

  20. Airborne Pseudolites in a Global Positioning System (GPS) Degraded Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    continuously two types of encoded pseudo-random noise (PRN) signals via using two center frequencies 4 in the L- band , namely L1 (1575.42 MHz) and L2...Jovanevic, Aleksandar, Nikhil Bhaita, Joseph Noronha, Brijesh Sirpatil, Michael Kirchner, and Deepak Saxena. “ Piercing the Veil ”. GPS World, 30–37, March...difficulties in receiver design. • Pseudolites can operate either at GPS L1, L2 and L5, or any other available frequency band . Similarly, other parameters to

  1. The role of GPS in precise earth observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Lindal, Gunnar F.; Liu, Chao-Han

    1988-01-01

    The potential of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for precise earth observation is evaluated. It is projected that soon GPS will be utilized to track remote-sensing satellites with subdecimeter accuracy. The first will be Topex/Poseidon, a US/French ocean altimetry mission to be launched in 1991. In addition, it is suggested that developments planned for future platforms may push orbit accuracy near 1 cm within a decade. GPS receivers on some platforms will track the signals down to the earth limb to observe occultation by intervening media. This will provide comprehensive information on global temperature and climate and help detect the possible onset of a greenhouse effect. It is also projected that dual-frequency observations will be used to trace the flow of energy across earth systems through detection of ionospheric gravity waves, and to map the structure of the ionosphere by computer tomography.

  2. Evaluation of GPS Coverage for the X-33 Michael-6 Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundberg, John B.

    1998-01-01

    The onboard navigational system for the X-33 test flights will be based on the use of measurements collected from the Embedded Global Positioning System (GPS)/INS system. Some of the factors which will affect the quality of the GPS contribution to the navigational solution will be the number of pseudorange measurements collected at any instant in time, the distribution of the GPS satellites within the field of view, and the inherent noise level of the GPS receiver. The distribution of GPS satellites within the field of view of the receiver's antenna will depend on the receiver's position, the time of day, pointing direction of the antenna, and the effective cone angle of the antenna. The number of pseudorange measurements collected will depend upon these factors as well as the time required to lock onto a GPS satellite signal once the GPS satellite comes into the field of view of the antenna and the number of available receiver channels. The objective of this study is to evaluate the GPS coverage resulting from the proposed antenna pointing directions, the proposed antenna cone angles, and the effects due to the time of day for the X-33 Michael-6 trajectory from launch at Edwards AFB, California, to the start of the Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) phase on approach to Michael AAF, Utah.

  3. GPS IPW as a Meteorological Parameter and Climate Global Change Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruczyk, M.; Liwosz, T.

    2011-12-01

    exaggerate). Especially intriguing are relatively unique shape of such series in different climates. Long lasting changes in weather conditions: 'dry' and 'wet' years are also visible. The longer and more uniform our series are the better chance to estimate the magnitude of climatological IWV changes. Homogenous ZTD solution during long period is great concern in this approach (problems with GPS strategy and reference system changes). In case of continental network (EUREF Permanent Network) reliable data we get only after reprocessing. Simple sinusoidal model has been adjusted to the IPW series (LS method) for selected stations (mainly Europe but also other continents - IGS stations), every year separately. Not only amplitudes but also phases of annual signal differ from year to year. Longer IPW series (up to 14 years) searched for some climatological signal sometimes reveal weak steady trend. Large number of GPS permanent stations, relative easiness of IPW derivation (only and surface meteo data needed apart from GPS solution) and water vapour significance in water cycle and global climate make this GPS IPW promising element of global environmental change monitoring.

  4. Positioning performance of the NTCM model driven by GPS Klobuchar model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoque, Mohammed Mainul; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens

    2018-03-01

    Users of the Global Positioning System (GPS) utilize the Ionospheric Correction Algorithm (ICA) also known as Klobuchar model for correcting ionospheric signal delay or range error. Recently, we developed an ionosphere correction algorithm called NTCM-Klobpar model for single frequency GNSS applications. The model is driven by a parameter computed from GPS Klobuchar model and consecutively can be used instead of the GPS Klobuchar model for ionospheric corrections. In the presented work we compare the positioning solutions obtained using NTCM-Klobpar with those using the Klobuchar model. Our investigation using worldwide ground GPS data from a quiet and a perturbed ionospheric and geomagnetic activity period of 17 days each shows that the 24-hour prediction performance of the NTCM-Klobpar is better than the GPS Klobuchar model in global average. The root mean squared deviation of the 3D position errors are found to be about 0.24 and 0.45 m less for the NTCM-Klobpar compared to the GPS Klobuchar model during quiet and perturbed condition, respectively. The presented algorithm has the potential to continuously improve the accuracy of GPS single frequency mass market devices with only little software modification.

  5. GPS Data Filtration Method for Drive Cycle Analysis Applications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Duran, A.; Earleywine, M.

    2013-02-01

    When employing GPS data acquisition systems to capture vehicle drive-cycle information, a number of errors often appear in the raw data samples, such as sudden signal loss, extraneous or outlying data points, speed drifting, and signal white noise, all of which limit the quality of field data for use in downstream applications. Unaddressed, these errors significantly impact the reliability of source data and limit the effectiveness of traditional drive-cycle analysis approaches and vehicle simulation software. Without reliable speed and time information, the validity of derived metrics for drive cycles, such as acceleration, power, and distance, become questionable. This study exploresmore » some of the common sources of error present in raw onboard GPS data and presents a detailed filtering process designed to correct for these issues. Test data from both light and medium/heavy duty applications are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed filtration process across the range of vehicle vocations. Graphical comparisons of raw and filtered cycles are presented, and statistical analyses are performed to determine the effects of the proposed filtration process on raw data. Finally, an evaluation of the overall benefits of data filtration on raw GPS data and present potential areas for continued research is presented.« less

  6. Noise analysis of GPS time series in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, You-Chia; Chang, Wu-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) usually used for researches of plate tectonics and crustal deformation. In most studies, GPS time series considered only time-independent noises (white noise), but time-dependent noises (flicker noise, random walk noise) which were found by nearly twenty years are also important to the precision of data. The rate uncertainties of stations will be underestimated if the GPS time series are assumed only time-independent noise. Therefore studying the noise properties of GPS time series is necessary in order to realize the precision and reliability of velocity estimates. The lengths of our GPS time series are from over 500 stations around Taiwan with time spans longer than 2.5 years up to 20 years. The GPS stations include different monument types such as deep drill braced, roof, metal tripod, and concrete pier, and the most common type in Taiwan is the metal tripod. We investigated the noise properties of continuous GPS time series by using the spectral index and amplitude of the power law noise. During the process we first remove the data outliers, and then estimate linear trend, size of offsets, and seasonal signals, and finally the amplitudes of the power-law and white noise are estimated simultaneously. Our preliminary results show that the noise amplitudes of the north component are smaller than that of the other two components, and the largest amplitudes are in the vertical. We also find that the amplitudes of white noise and power-law noises are positively correlated in three components. Comparisons of noise amplitudes of different monument types in Taiwan reveal that the deep drill braced monuments have smaller data uncertainties and therefore are more stable than other monuments.

  7. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; He, Xiufeng; Ferreira, Vagner G

    2015-08-07

    Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet). This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method.

  8. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; He, Xiufeng; Ferreira, Vagner G.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet). This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method. PMID:26262620

  9. Ionospheric scintillation effects on single frequency GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C. G.; Groves, K. M.

    2008-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active within, although not limited to, a belt encircling the Earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increase, so does the potential for degraded precision and availability from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning 7 years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/American longitudinal sector as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K. in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at 1 min resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  10. Spatial scale of deformation constrained by combinations of InSAR and GPS observations in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; Scott, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Efforts to understand the buildup and release of strain within the Earth's crust often rely on well-characterized observations of ground deformation, over time scales that include interseismic periods, earthquakes, and transient deformation episodes. Constraints on current rates of surface deformation in 1-, 2- or 3-dimensions can be obtained by examining sets of GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations, both alone and in combination. Contributions to the observed signal often include motion along faults, seasonal cycles of subsidence and recharge associated with aquifers, anthropogenic extraction of hydrocarbons, and variations in atmospheric water vapor and ionospheric properties. Here we examine methods for extracting time-varying ground deformation signals from combinations of InSAR and GPS data, real and synthetic, applied to Southern California. We show that two methods for combining the data through removal of a GPS-constrained function (a plane, and filtering) from the InSAR result in a clear tradeoff between the contribution from the two datatypes at diffferent spatial scales. We also show that the contribution to the secular rates at GPS sites from seasonal signals is large enough to be a significant error in this estimation process, and should be accounted for.

  11. GPS Imaging of Sierra Nevada Uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent improvements in the scope and precision of GPS networks across California and Nevada have allowed for uplift of the Sierra Nevada to be observed directly. Much of the signal, in the range of 1 to 2 mm/yr, has been attributed to lithospheric scale rebound following massive groundwater withdrawal in the San Joaquin Valley in southern California, exacerbated by drought since 2011. However, natural tectonic deformation associated with long term uplift of the range may also contribute to the observed signal. We have developed new algorithms that enhance the signal of Sierra Nevada uplift and improve our ability to interpret and separate natural tectonic signals from anthropogenic contributions. We apply our new Median Interannual Difference Adjusted for Skewness (MIDAS) algorithm to the vertical times series and a inverse distance-weighted median spatial filtering and Delaunay-based interpolation to despeckle the rate map. The resulting spatially continuous vertical rate field is insensitive to outliers and steps in the GPS time series, and omits isolated features attributable to unstable stations or unrepresentative rates. The resulting vertical rate field for California and Nevada exhibits regionally coherent signals from the earthquake cycle including interseismic strain accumulation in Cascadia, postseismic relaxation of the mantle from recent large earthquakes in central Nevada and southern California, groundwater loading changes, and tectonic uplift of the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges. Uplift of the Sierra Nevada extends from the Garlock Fault in the south to an indefinite boundary in the north near the latitude of Mt. Lassen to the eastern Sierra Nevada range front in Owen's Valley. The rates transition to near zero in the southern Walker Lane. The eastern boundary of uplift coincides with the highest strain rates in the western Great Basin, suggesting higher normal fault slip rates and a component of tectonic uplift of the Sierra Nevada.

  12. Ethics support for GPs: what should it look like?

    PubMed

    Clark-Grill, Monika

    2016-03-01

    INTRODUCTION Ethics support services for hospital clinicians have become increasingly common globally but not as yet in New Zealand. However, an initiative to change this is gathering momentum. Its slogan 'Clinical ethics is everyone's business' indicates that the aim is to encompass all of health care, not just the hospital sector. General Practitioners (GPs) deal with ethical issues on a daily basis. These issues are often quite different from ethical issues in hospitals. To make future ethics support relevant for primary care, local GPs were interviewed to find out how they might envisage ethics support services that could be useful to them. METHODS A focus group interview with six GPs and semi-structured individual interviews with three GPs were conducted. Questions included how they made decisions on ethical issues at present, what they perceived as obstacles to ethical reflection and decision-making, and what support might be helpful. FINDINGS Three areas of ethics support were considered potentially useful: Formal ethics education during GP training, access to an ethicist for assistance with analysing an ethical issue, and professional guidance with structured ethics conversations in peer groups. CONCLUSION The complex nature of general practice requires GPs to be well educated and supported for handling ethical issues. The findings from this study could serve as input to the development of ethics support services. KEYWORDS General practice; primary care; ethics; support; education.

  13. All-digital GPS receiver mechanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ould, P. C.; van Wechel, R. J.

    The paper describes the all-digital baseband correlation processing of GPS signals, which is characterized by (1) a potential for improved antijamming performance, (2) fast acquisition by a digital matched filter, (3) reduction of adjustment, (4) increased system reliability, and (5) provision of a basis for the realization of a high degree of VLSI potential for the development of small economical GPS sets. The basic technical approach consists of a broadband fix-tuned RF converter followed by a digitizer; digital-matched-filter acquisition section; phase- and delay-lock tracking via baseband digital correlation; software acquisition logic and loop filter implementation; and all-digital implementation of the feedback numerical controlled oscillators and code generator. Broadband in-phase and quadrature tracking is performed by an arctangent angle detector followed by a phase-unwrapping algorithm that eliminates false locks induced by sampling and data bit transitions, and yields a wide pull-in frequency range approaching one-fourth of the loop iteration frequency.

  14. Measurement of splanchnic photoplethysmographic signals using a new reflectance fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Michelle; Samuels, Neal; Randive, Nilesh; Langford, Richard M.; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A.

    2010-03-01

    Splanchnic organs are particularly vulnerable to hypoperfusion. Currently, there is no technique that allows for the continuous estimation of splanchnic blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). As a preliminary to developing a suitable splanchnic SpO2 sensor, a new reflectance fiber optic photoplethysmographic (PPG) sensor and processing system are developed. An experimental procedure to examine the effect of fiber source detector separation distance on acquired PPG signals is carried out before finalizing the sensor design. PPG signals are acquired from four volunteers for separation distances of 1 to 8 mm. The separation range of 3 to 6 mm provides the best quality PPG signals with large amplitudes and the highest signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Preliminary calculation of SpO2 shows that distances of 3 and 4 mm provide the most realistic values. Therefore, it is suggested that the separation distance in the design of a fiber optic reflectance pulse oximeter be in the range of 3 to 4 mm. Preliminary PPG signals from various splanchnic organs and the periphery are obtained from six anaesthetized patients. The normalized amplitudes of the splanchnic PPGs are, on average, approximately the same as those obtained simultaneously from the periphery. These observations suggest that fiber optic pulse oximetry may be a valid monitoring technique for splanchnic organs.

  15. Preliminary Results of the GPS Flight Experiment on the High Earth Orbit AMSAT-OSCAR 40 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Michael C.; Bauer, Frank H.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Davis, Edward P.; Davis, George W.; Jackson, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    The GPS flight experiment on the High Earth Orbit (HEO) AMSAT-OSCAR 40 (AO-40) spacecraft was activated for a period of approximately six weeks between 25 September and 2 November, 2001, and the initial results have exciting implications for using GPS as a low-cost orbit determination sensor for future HEO missions. AO-40, an amateur radio satellite launched November 16, 2000, is currently in a low inclination, 1000 by 58,800 km altitude orbit. Although the GPS receiver was not initialized in any way, it regularly returned GPS observations from points all around the orbit. Raw signal to noise levels as high as 9 AMUs (Trimble Amplitude Measurement Units) or approximately 48 dB-Hz have been recorded at apogee, when the spacecraft was close to 60,000 km in altitude. On several occasions when the receiver was below the GPS constellation (below 20,000 krn altitude), observations were reported for GPS satellites tracked through side lobe transmissions. Although the receiver has not returned any point solutions, there has been at least one occasion when four satellites were tracked simultaneously, and this short arc of data was used to compute point solutions after the fact. These results are encouraging, especially considering the spacecraft is currently in a spin-stabilized attitude mode that narrows the effective field of view of the receiving antennas and adversely affects GPS tracking. Already AO-40 has demonstrated the feasibility of recording GPS observations in HEO using an unaided receiver. Furthermore, it is providing important information about the characteristics of GPS signals received by a spacecraft in a HEO, which has long been of interest to many in the GPS community. Based on the data returned so far, the tracking performance is expected to improve when the spacecraft is transitioned to a three axis stabilized, nadir pointing attitude in Summer, 2002.

  16. GPS radio occultation simulation experiments for the upcoming Strateole-2 superpressure balloon campaign investigating equatorial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Cao, B.; Alexander, M. J.; Zhang, W.

    2017-12-01

    Deep tropical convection influences the transport of mass and momentum from the equatorial upper troposphere into the lower stratosphere through the generation and interaction of waves at a broad range of scales. The France-US collaborative Stratéole-2 project will explore equatorial waves in the tropopause region with super-pressure balloons, designed to drift on quasi-Lagrangian trajectories in the lower stratosphere. The Stratéole-2 program will launch 5 balloons from the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean in 2018-2019, and 20 balloons in 2020-2021, each with a flight duration of about 80 days. Five balloons will carry the Radio OCcultation (ROC2) instrument at 20 km altitude to execute a continuous sequence of temperature profiles on either side of the balloon trajectory to sample the equatorial wave field in three dimensions. It will also carry a micro-lidar for detecting cirrus and convective cloud tops. The goals are to describe the horizontal and vertical structure of tropical waves and their impact on cirrus formation and to investigate the relationships of waves to convective clouds. The GPS measurements quantify wave activity by providing precise estimates of balloon velocity and height perturbations due to waves and by providing refractivity profiles that are sensitive to vertical temperature fluctuations caused by waves. We present ray-tracing simulations of the propagation of GPS signals through the Earth's atmosphere, where they will be bent and delayed due to the gradient of atmospheric refractive index. European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses are used to construct the refractive index of the equatorial atmosphere, in which abundant atmospheric waves are present. With the known GPS signal geometry, the excess phase/Doppler are simulated that reflect the wave signatures. The resulting refractivity retrievals provide guidance for interpreting the spectral range of waves that the ROC2 instruments are most likely to reveal.

  17. How GPs learn.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Sheona

    2009-07-01

    As the requirements for the revalidation of general practitioners (GPs) unfold, there is an increasing emphasis on demonstrating effective continued medical education (CME) based on identified learning needs. This qualitative study aimed to promote understanding of how GPs currently approach their learning. The behaviour of one group of GPs was studied to explore how they assessed and met individual learning needs. The GPs studied showed a pragmatic approach, valuing learning that gave them practical advice and instant access to information for patient-specific problems. The main driver for the GPs' learning was discomfort during their daily work if a possible lack of knowledge or skills was perceived. However, some learning benchmarked current good practice or ensured continued expertise. Learning purely for interest was also described. The GPs in this study all demonstrated a commitment to personal learning, although they were not yet thinking about demonstrating the effectiveness of this for revalidation. The GPs prioritised their learning needs and were beginning to use some objective assessment methods to do this and the GP appraisal process was found to have a mainly positive effect on learning.

  18. GPS meteorology - Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevis, Michael; Businger, Steven; Herring, Thomas A.; Rocken, Christian; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new approach to remote sensing of water vapor based on the Global Positioning System (GPS). Geodesists and geophysicists have devised methods for estimating the extent to which signals propagating from GPS satellites to ground-based GPS receivers are delayed by atmospheric water vapor. This delay is parameterized in terms of a time-varying zenith wet delay (ZWD) which is retrieved by stochastic filtering of the GPS data. Given surface temperature and pressure readings at the GPS receiver, the retrieved ZWD can be transformed with very little additional uncertainty into an estimate of the integrated water vapor (IWV) overlying that receiver. Networks of continuously operating GPS receivers are being constructed by geodesists, geophysicists, and government and military agencies, in order to implement a wide range of positioning capabilities. These emerging GPS networks offer the possibility of observing the horizontal distribution of IWV or, equivalently, precipitate water with unprecedented coverage and a temporal resolution of the order of 10 min. These measurements could be utilized in operational weather forecasting and in fundamental research into atmospheric storm systems, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate change.

  19. USNO GPS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1981-01-01

    Initial test results indicated that the Global Positioning System/Time Transfer Unit (GPS/TTU) performed well within the + or - 100 nanosecond range required by the original system specification. Subsequent testing involved the verification of GPS time at the master control site via portable clocks and the acquisition and tracking of as many passes of the space vehicles currently in operation as possible. A description and discussion of the testing, system modifications, test results obtained, and an evaluation of both GPS and the GPS/TTU are presented.

  20. Measuring Snow Liquid Water Content with Low-Cost GPS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Franziska; Prasch, Monika; Schmid, Lino; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC) in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements. PMID:25384007

  1. GPs' Perceptions of Cardiovascular Risk and Views on Patient Compliance: A Qualitative Interview Study.

    PubMed

    Barfoed, Benedicte Lind; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Paulsen, Maja Skov; Christensen, Palle Mark; Halvorsen, Peder Andreas; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Søndergaard, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Objective. General practitioners' (GPs') perception of risk is a cornerstone of preventive care. The aims of this interview study were to explore GPs' professional and personal attitudes and experiences regarding treatment with lipid-lowering drugs and their views on patient compliance. Methods. The material was drawn from semistructured qualitative interviews. We sampled GPs purposively from ten selected practices, ensuring diversity of demographic, professional, and personal characteristics. The GPs were encouraged to describe examples from their own practices and reflect on them and were informed that the focus was their personal attitudes and experiences. Systematic text condensation was applied for analysis in order to uncover the concepts and themes. Results. The analysis revealed the following 3 main themes: (1) use of cardiovascular guidelines and risk assessment tools, (2) strategies for managing patient compliance, and (3) GPs' own risk management. There were substantial differences in the attitudes concerning all three themes. Conclusions. The substantial differences in the GPs' personal and professional risk perceptions may be a key to understanding why GPs do not always follow cardiovascular guidelines. The impact on daily clinical practice, personal consultation style, and patient behaviour with regard to prevention is worth studying further.

  2. GPs' Perceptions of Cardiovascular Risk and Views on Patient Compliance: A Qualitative Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Barfoed, Benedicte Lind; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Paulsen, Maja Skov; Christensen, Palle Mark; Halvorsen, Peder Andreas; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Søndergaard, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Objective. General practitioners' (GPs') perception of risk is a cornerstone of preventive care. The aims of this interview study were to explore GPs' professional and personal attitudes and experiences regarding treatment with lipid-lowering drugs and their views on patient compliance. Methods. The material was drawn from semistructured qualitative interviews. We sampled GPs purposively from ten selected practices, ensuring diversity of demographic, professional, and personal characteristics. The GPs were encouraged to describe examples from their own practices and reflect on them and were informed that the focus was their personal attitudes and experiences. Systematic text condensation was applied for analysis in order to uncover the concepts and themes. Results. The analysis revealed the following 3 main themes: (1) use of cardiovascular guidelines and risk assessment tools, (2) strategies for managing patient compliance, and (3) GPs' own risk management. There were substantial differences in the attitudes concerning all three themes. Conclusions. The substantial differences in the GPs' personal and professional risk perceptions may be a key to understanding why GPs do not always follow cardiovascular guidelines. The impact on daily clinical practice, personal consultation style, and patient behaviour with regard to prevention is worth studying further. PMID:26495143

  3. Ppp Analisys with GPS and Glonass Integration in Periods Under Ionospheric Scintillation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, H. A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The GNSS is widely used nowadays either for geodetic positioning or scientific purposes. The GNSS currently includes GPS, GLONASS, Galileo among other emerging systems. The GPS and GLONASS are currently operational with a full satellite constellation. The GPS is still the most used nowadays and both GPS and GLONASS are under a modernization process. The geodetic positioning by using data from multi-constellation can provide better accuracy in positioning and also more reliability. The PPP is benefited once the satellite geometry is crucial in this method, mainly for kinematic scenarios. The satellite geometry can change suddenly for data collected in urban areas or in conditions of strong atmospheric effects such as Ionospheric Scintillation (IS) that causes weakening of signals with cycle slips and even loss of lock. The IS is caused by small irregularities in the ionosphere layer and is characterized by rapid change in amplitude and phase of the signal being stronger in equatorial and high latitudes regions. In this work the PPP is evaluated with GPS and GLONASS data collected by monitoring receivers from Brazilian CIGALA/CALIBRA network under IS conditions. The PPP processing was accomplished by using the GPSPPP software provided by Natural Resources Canadian (NRCAN). The IS effects were analyzed taking account the S4 and PHI60 indices. Considering periods with moderate IS effects, the use of only GPS data in the PPP presented several peaks in the coordinate time series due to cycle slips and loos of lock. In cycle slip conditions the ambiguity parameter are reinitialized by GPSPPP and considering loss of lock few satellites can be available in some epochs affecting the positioning geometry and consequently decreasing accuracy. In such situations, the PPP using GPS and GLONASS data presented improvements in positioning accuracy of the order to 70% in height component when compared with PPP using only GPS data. Analyses of GDOP and ambiguities parameters were

  4. Long-term mass variations from SLR, VLBI and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luceri, Vincenza; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Bianco, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    The second-degree geopotential coefficients reflect the behaviour of the Earth's inertia tensor of order 2 which describes the main mass variations of our planet impacting polar motion and length of day (EOP). SLR, VLBI and GPS allow the estimation of those variations, either directly in the case of SLR through its dynamics, and indirectly, for all the three geodetic techniques, by deriving excitation functions from the EOP estimations. The geodetic estimates include the influence of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans, both from their mass and motion components, which can be modelled using the atmospheric and oceanic angular momenta variations. The different C21, S21 and C20 geodetic time series are compared in order to evaluate their coherence and their response to the mass variations after the removal of the motion terms. Moreover, the residual signal contents of the geodetic values, deprived by the atmospheric and oceanic mass and motion components, will be investigated.

  5. Aerosol optical depth under "clear" sky conditions derived from sea surface reflection of lidar signals.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Hu, Yongxiang; Huang, Jian Ping; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-12-26

    There are considerable demands for accurate atmospheric correction of satellite observations of the sea surface or subsurface signal. Surface and sub-surface reflection under "clear" atmospheric conditions can be used to study atmospheric correction for the simplest possible situation. Here "clear" sky means a cloud-free atmosphere with sufficiently small aerosol particles. The "clear" aerosol concept is defined according to the spectral dependence of the scattering cross section on particle size. A 5-year combined CALIPSO and AMSR-E data set was used to derive the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the lidar signal reflected from the sea surface. Compared with the traditional lidar-retrieved AOD, which relies on lidar backscattering measurements and an assumed lidar ratio, the AOD retrieved through the surface reflectance method depends on both scattering and absorption because it is based on two-way attenuation of the lidar signal transmitted to and then reflected from the surface. The results show that the clear sky AOD derived from the surface signal agrees with the clear sky AOD available in the CALIPSO level 2 database in the westerly wind belt located in the southern hemisphere, but yields significantly higher aerosol loadings in the tropics and in the northern hemisphere.

  6. What makes up good consultations? A qualitative study of GPs' discourses.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Kaatje; Vanheule, Stijn; Deveugele, Myriam

    2013-05-16

    In medical literature, several principles that define 'good consultations' have been outlined. These principles tend to be prescriptive in nature, overlooking the complexity of general practitioners (GPs)' perspectives of everyday practice. Focusing on perspectives might be particularly relevant, since they may affect decisions and actions. Therefore, the present study adopts a bottom-up approach, analyzing GPs' narratives about 'good' and 'bad' consultations. We aimed at describing the range of discourses GPs use in relating on their practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 Belgian GPs. By means of a qualitative analysis, the authors mapped patterns in the interview narratives and described the range of different discourses. Four discourses were identified: a biomedically-centered discourse, a communication-focused discourse, a problem-solving discourse and a satisfaction-oriented discourse. Each discourse was further specified in terms of predominant themes, problems the GPs prefer to deal with and inherent difficulties. Although most participants used elements from all four discourses, the majority of the GPs relied on an individual set of predominant discourses and focused on a limited number of themes. This study clearly indicates that there is no uniform way in which GPs perceive clinical practice. Each of the participants used a subtle mix of different criteria to define good and bad medical consultations. Some discourse elements appear to be rooted in medical literature, whereas others are of a more personal nature. By focusing on the limitations of each discourse, this study can shed new light on some of the difficulties GPs encounter in their daily practice: being confronted with specific problems might be an effect of adhering to a specific discourse. The typification of different discourses on consultations may function as a framework to help GPs reflect on how they perceive their practice, and help them manage some of the challenges

  7. Evaluation of Mobile Phone Interference With Aircraft GPS Navigation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Scott; Oria, A. J.; Guckian, Paul; Nguyen, Truong X.

    2004-01-01

    This report compiles and analyzes tests that were conducted to measure cell phone spurious emissions in the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio frequency band that could affect the navigation system of an aircraft. The cell phone in question had, as reported to the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration), caused interference to several GPS receivers on-board a small single engine aircraft despite being compliant with data filed at the time with the FCC by the manufacturer. NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and industry tests show that while there is an emission in the 1575 MHz GPS band due to a specific combination of amplifier output impedance and load impedance that induces instability in the power amplifier, these spurious emissions (i.e., not the intentional transmit signal) are similar to those measured on non-intentionally transmitting devices such as, for example, laptop computers. Additional testing on a wide sample of different commercial cell phones did not result in any emission in the 1575 MHz GPS Band above the noise floor of the measurement receiver.

  8. 75 FR 8928 - Announcement of IS-GPS-200, IS-GPS-705, IS-GPS-800 Interface Control Working Group (ICWG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Announcement of IS-GPS-200, IS-GPS-705, IS-GPS-800Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) Teleconference Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, DoD... Positioning Systems Wing will be hosting an Interface Control Working Group (ICWG) teleconference meeting for...

  9. Global Ionospheric Perturbations Monitored by the Worldwide GPS Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Mannucci, A. T.; Lindqwister, U. J.; Pi, X. Q.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the delays of these (Global Positioning System-GPS)signals, we have generated high resolution global ionospheric TEC (Total Electronic Changes) maps at 15-minute intervals. Using a differential method comparing storm time maps with quiet time maps, we find that the ionopshere during this time storm has increased significantly (the percentage change relative to quiet times is greater than 150 percent) ...These preliminary results (those mentioned above plus other in the paper)indicate that the differential maping method, which is based on GPS network measurements appears to be a useful tool for studying the global pattern and evolution process of the entire ionospheric perturbation.

  10. Subnanosecond GPS-based clock synchronization and precision deep-space tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. E.; Lichten, S. M.; Jefferson, D. C.; Border, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric spacecraft tracking is accomplished by the Deep Space Network (DSN) by comparing the arrival time of electromagnetic spacecraft signals at ground antennas separated by baselines on the order of 8000 km. Clock synchronization errors within and between DSN stations directly impact the attainable tracking accuracy, with a 0.3-nsec error in clock synchronization resulting in an 11-nrad angular position error. This level of synchronization is currently achieved by observing a quasar which is angularly close to the spacecraft just after the spacecraft observations. By determining the differential arrival times of the random quasar signal at the stations, clock offsets and propagation delays within the atmosphere and within the DSN stations are calibrated. Recent developments in time transfer techniques may allow medium accuracy (50-100 nrad) spacecraft tracking without near-simultaneous quasar-based calibrations. Solutions are presented for a worldwide network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers in which the formal errors for DSN clock offset parameters are less than 0.5 nsec. Comparisons of clock rate offsets derived from GPS measurements and from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), as well as the examination of clock closure, suggest that these formal errors are a realistic measure of GPS-based clock offset precision and accuracy. Incorporating GPS-based clock synchronization measurements into a spacecraft differential ranging system would allow tracking without near-simultaneous quasar observations. The impact on individual spacecraft navigation-error sources due to elimination of quasar-based calibrations is presented. System implementation, including calibration of station electronic delays, is discussed.

  11. The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull and 2011 Grimsvötn ash plumes as seen by GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapenthin, R.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Gudmundsson, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The injection of a volcanic plume introduces a dynamic, localized, short-term heterogeneity in the atmosphere. Satellite-imagery based remote sensing techniques provide good spatial coverage for the detection of such plumes, but slow satellite repeat times (>30 minutes) and cloud cover can delay, if not entirely prevent, the detection. GPS, in turn, provides excellent temporal coverage, but requires favorable satellite-station-geometry such that the signal propagates through the plume if it is to be used for plume detection and analysis. Two methods exist to detect / analyze ash plumes with GPS: (a) Ash-heavy plumes result in signal dispersion and hence a lowered signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A lowered SNR, recorded by some receivers, can provide useful information about the plume, such as location and velocity of ascent. These data can be evaluated directly as they are recorded by the receiver; without the need of solving for a receiver's position. (b) Wet plumes refract the GPS signals piercing the plume and hence induce a propagation delay. When solving for a receiver position GPS analysis tools do not model this localized phase delay effect and solutions for plume-piercing satellites do not fit the data well. This can be exploited for plume analysis such as the estimation of changes to the atmospheric refractivity index. We analyze GPS data of the ~2 month 2010 Eyafjallajökull erption and the week-long 2011 Grímsvötn eruption to infer a first order estimate of plume geometry and its progression. Using SNR and phase delay information, we evaluate the evolution of the partitioning of wet versus dry parts of the plume. During the GPS processing we iteratively solve for phase-delay and position and fix other parameters, hence reducing the mapping of least-squares misfit into position estimates and other parameters. Nearly continuous webcam imagery provides independent observations of first-order plume characteristics for the Eyafjallajökull event.

  12. Continental-scale water fluxes from continuous GPS observations of Earth surface loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsa, A. A.; Agnew, D. C.; Cayan, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    After more than a decade of observing annual oscillations of Earth's surface from seasonal snow and water loading, continuous GPS is now being used to model time-varying terrestrial water fluxes on the local and regional scale. Although the largest signal is typically due to the seasonal hydrological cycle, GPS can also measure subtle surface deformation caused by sustained wet and dry periods, and to estimate the spatial distribution of the underlying terrestrial water storage changes. The next frontier is expanding this analysis to the continental scale and paving the way for incorporating GPS models into the National Climate Assessment and into the observational infrastructure for national water resource management. This will require reconciling GPS observations with predictions from hydrological models and with remote sensing observations from a suite of satellite instruments (e.g. GRACE, SMAP, SWOT). The elastic Earth response which transforms surface loads into vertical and horizontal displacements is also responsible for the contamination of loading observations by tectonic and anthropogenic transients, and we discuss these and other challenges to this new application of GPS.

  13. Comparison of GPS and GRACE hydrological loading signatures in Myanmar, India, Bangladesh, and Bhutan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materna, K.; Feng, L.; Lindsey, E. O.; Hill, E.; Burgmann, R.

    2017-12-01

    The elastic response of the lithosphere to surface mass redistributions produces significant deformation that can be observed in geodetic time series. This deformation is especially pronounced in Southeast Asia, where the annual monsoon produces large-amplitude hydrological loads. The MIBB network of 20 continuous GPS stations in Myanmar, India, Bangladesh, and Bhutan, operational since 2012, provides an opportunity to study the earth's response to these loads. In this study, we use GRACE gravity products as an estimate of surface water distribution, and input these estimates into an elastic loading calculation. We compare the predicted deformation with that observed with GPS. We find that elastic loading from the GRACE gravity field is able to explain the phase and the peak-to-peak amplitude (typically 2-3 cm) of the vertical GPS oscillations in northeast India and central Myanmar. GRACE-based corrections reduce the RMS scatter of the GPS data by 30%-45% in these regions. However, this approach does not capture all of the variation in central Bangladesh and southern Myanmar. Local hydrological effects, non-tidal ocean loads, poroelastic deformation, or differences in elastic properties may explain discrepancies between the GPS and GRACE signals in these places. The results of our calculations have practical implications for campaign GPS measurements in Myanmar, which make up the majority of geodetic measurements at this point. We may be able to reduce errors in campaign measurements and increase the accuracy of velocity estimates by correcting for hydrologic signals with GRACE data. The results also have potential implications for crustal rheology in Southeast Asia.

  14. GPS Attitude Determination Using Deployable-Mounted Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Michael L.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to develop a method to solve for spacecraft attitude in the presence of potential incomplete antenna deployment. Most research on the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) in attitude determination has assumed that the antenna baselines are known to less than 5 centimeters, or one quarter of the GPS signal wavelength. However, if the GPS antennas are mounted on a deployable fixture such as a solar panel, the actual antenna positions will not necessarily be within 5 cm of nominal. Incomplete antenna deployment could cause the baselines to be grossly in error, perhaps by as much as a meter. Overcoming this large uncertainty in order to accurately determine attitude is the focus of this study. To this end, a two-step solution method is proposed. The first step uses a least-squares estimate of the baselines to geometrically calculate the deployment angle errors of the solar panels. For the spacecraft under investigation, the first step determines the baselines to 3-4 cm with 4-8 minutes of data. A Kalman filter is then used to complete the attitude determination process, resulting in typical attitude errors of 0.50.

  15. Multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis in the Estimates of Common Environmental Effects Affecting GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszczynska, Marta; Rosat, Severine; Klos, Anna; Gruszczynski, Maciej; Bogusz, Janusz

    2018-03-01

    We described a spatio-temporal analysis of environmental loading models: atmospheric, continental hydrology, and non-tidal ocean changes, based on multichannel singular spectrum analysis (MSSA). We extracted the common annual signal for 16 different sections related to climate zones: equatorial, arid, warm, snow, polar and continents. We used the loading models estimated for a set of 229 ITRF2014 (International Terrestrial Reference Frame) International GNSS Service (IGS) stations and discussed the amount of variance explained by individual modes, proving that the common annual signal accounts for 16, 24 and 68% of the total variance of non-tidal ocean, atmospheric and hydrological loading models, respectively. Having removed the common environmental MSSA seasonal curve from the corresponding GPS position time series, we found that the residual station-specific annual curve modelled with the least-squares estimation has the amplitude of maximum 2 mm. This means that the environmental loading models underestimate the seasonalities observed by the GPS system. The remaining signal present in the seasonal frequency band arises from the systematic errors which are not of common environmental or geophysical origin. Using common mode error (CME) estimates, we showed that the direct removal of environmental loading models from the GPS series causes an artificial loss in the CME power spectra between 10 and 80 cycles per year. When environmental effect is removed from GPS series with MSSA curves, no influence on the character of spectra of CME estimates was noticed.

  16. Multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis in the Estimates of Common Environmental Effects Affecting GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszczynska, Marta; Rosat, Severine; Klos, Anna; Gruszczynski, Maciej; Bogusz, Janusz

    2018-05-01

    We described a spatio-temporal analysis of environmental loading models: atmospheric, continental hydrology, and non-tidal ocean changes, based on multichannel singular spectrum analysis (MSSA). We extracted the common annual signal for 16 different sections related to climate zones: equatorial, arid, warm, snow, polar and continents. We used the loading models estimated for a set of 229 ITRF2014 (International Terrestrial Reference Frame) International GNSS Service (IGS) stations and discussed the amount of variance explained by individual modes, proving that the common annual signal accounts for 16, 24 and 68% of the total variance of non-tidal ocean, atmospheric and hydrological loading models, respectively. Having removed the common environmental MSSA seasonal curve from the corresponding GPS position time series, we found that the residual station-specific annual curve modelled with the least-squares estimation has the amplitude of maximum 2 mm. This means that the environmental loading models underestimate the seasonalities observed by the GPS system. The remaining signal present in the seasonal frequency band arises from the systematic errors which are not of common environmental or geophysical origin. Using common mode error (CME) estimates, we showed that the direct removal of environmental loading models from the GPS series causes an artificial loss in the CME power spectra between 10 and 80 cycles per year. When environmental effect is removed from GPS series with MSSA curves, no influence on the character of spectra of CME estimates was noticed.

  17. Analyzing JAVAD TR-G2 GPS Receiver's Sensitivities to SLS Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, Tristan

    2017-01-01

    Automated guidance and navigation systems are an integral part to successful space missions. Previous researchers created Python tools to receive and parse data from a JAVAD TR-G2 space-capable GPS receiver. I improved the tool by customizing the output for plotting and comparing several simulations. I analyzed position errors, data loss, and signal loss by comparing simulated receiver data from an IFEN GPS simulator to ‘truth data’ from a proposed trajectory. By adjusting the trajectory simulation’s gain, attitude, and start time, NASA can assess the best time to launch the SLS, where to position the antennas on the Block 1-B, and which filter to use. Some additional testing has begun with the Novatel SpaceQuestGPS receiver as well as a GNSS SDR receiver.

  18. Mars Exploration Rovers Entry, Descent, and Landing Trajectory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Knocke, Philip C.

    2007-01-01

    In this study we present a novel method of land surface classification using surface-reflected GPS signals in combination with digital imagery. Two GPS-derived classification features are merged with visible image data to create terrain-moisture (TM) classes, defined here as visibly identifiable terrain or landcover classes containing a surface/soil moisture component. As compared to using surface imagery alone, classification accuracy is significantly improved for a number of visible classes when adding the GPS-based signal features. Since the strength of the reflected GPS signal is proportional to the amount of moisture in the surface, use of these GPS features provides information about the surface that is not obtainable using visible wavelengths alone. Application areas include hydrology, precision agriculture, and wetlands mapping.

  19. Factors influencing European GPs' engagement in smoking cessation: a multi-country literature review.

    PubMed

    Stead, Martine; Angus, Kathryn; Holme, Ingrid; Cohen, David; Tait, Gayle

    2009-09-01

    Smoking cessation advice by GPs is an effective and cost-effective intervention, but is not implemented as widely as it could be. This wide-ranging Europe-wide literature review, part of the European Union (EU) PESCE (General Practitioners and the Economics of Smoking Cessation in Europe) project, explored the extent of GPs' engagement in smoking cessation and the factors that influence their engagement. Two searches were conducted, one for grey literature, across all European countries, and one for academic studies. Data from eligible studies published from 1990 onwards were synthesised and reported under four categories of influencing factors: GP characteristics, patient characteristics, structural factors, and cessation-specific knowledge and skills. The literature showed that most GPs in Europe question the smoking status of all new patients but fewer routinely ask this of regular patients, or advise smokers to quit. The proportion offering intensive interventions or prescribing treatments is lower still. Factors influencing GPs' engagement in smoking cessation include GPs' own smoking status and their attitudes towards giving smoking cessation advice; whether patients present with smoking-related symptoms, are pregnant, or heavy smokers; time, training, and reimbursement are important structural factors; and some GPs lack knowledge and skills regarding the use of specific cessation methods and treatments, or have limited awareness of specialist cessation services. No single factor or category of factors explains the variations in GPs' engagement in smoking cessation. Strategies to improve the frequency and quality of GPs' engagement in smoking cessation need to address the multifaceted influences on GPs' practice and to reflect the widely differing contexts across Europe.

  20. Regional model-based computerized ionospheric tomography using GPS measurements: IONOLAB-CIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuna, Hakan; Arikan, Orhan; Arikan, Feza

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of the electron density distribution in the ionosphere is a crucial task for investigating the ionospheric effects. Dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite signals can be used to estimate the slant total electron content (STEC) along the propagation path between a GPS satellite and ground-based receiver station. However, the estimated GPS-STEC is very sparse and highly nonuniformly distributed for obtaining reliable 3-D electron density distributions derived from the measurements alone. Standard tomographic reconstruction techniques are not accurate or reliable enough to represent the full complexity of variable ionosphere. On the other hand, model-based electron density distributions are produced according to the general trends of ionosphere, and these distributions do not agree with measurements, especially for geomagnetically active hours. In this study, a regional 3-D electron density distribution reconstruction method, namely, IONOLAB-CIT, is proposed to assimilate GPS-STEC into physical ionospheric models. The proposed method is based on an iterative optimization framework that tracks the deviations from the ionospheric model in terms of F2 layer critical frequency and maximum ionization height resulting from the comparison of International Reference Ionosphere extended to Plasmasphere (IRI-Plas) model-generated STEC and GPS-STEC. The suggested tomography algorithm is applied successfully for the reconstruction of electron density profiles over Turkey, during quiet and disturbed hours of ionosphere using Turkish National Permanent GPS Network.

  1. Drug reimbursement and GPs' prescribing decisions: a randomized case-vignette study about the pharmacotherapy of obesity associated with type 2 diabetes: how GPs react to drug reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Verger, Pierre; Rolland, Sophie; Paraponaris, Alain; Bouvenot, Julien; Ventelou, Bruno

    2010-08-01

    This study sought to identify the effect of drug reimbursability--a decision made in France by the National Authority for Health--on physicians' prescribing practices for a diet drug such as rimonabant, approved for obese or overweight patients with type-2 diabetes. A cross-sectional survey of French general practitioners (GPs) presented a case-vignette about a patient for whom this drug is indicated in two alternative versions, differing only in its reimbursability, to two separate randomized subsamples of GPs in early 2007, before any decision was made about reimbursement. The results indicate that (i) more than 20% of GPs in private practice would be willing to prescribe a non-reimbursed diet drug for patients with obesity complicated by type 2 diabetes; (ii) the number of GPs willing to prescribe it would increase by 47.6% if the drug were reimbursed, and (iii) such a drug would be adopted at a higher rate by GPs who have regular contacts with pharmaceutical sales representatives. In France, unlike most other countries, drug reimbursement status is a signal of quality. However, our results suggest that a significant proportion of GPs would spontaneously adopt anti-obesity drugs even if they were not reimbursed. Decisions about reimbursement of pharmaceutical products should be made taking into account that reimbursement is likely to intensify prescription.

  2. Utilization of GPS Tropospheric Delays for Climate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparta, Wayan

    2017-05-01

    The tropospheric delay is one of the main error sources in Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and its impact plays a crucial role in near real-time weather forecasting. Accessibility and accurate estimation of this parameter are essential for weather and climate research. Advances in GPS application has allowed the measurements of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) in all weather conditions and on a global scale with fine temporal and spatial resolution. In addition to the rapid advancement of GPS technology and informatics and the development of research in the field of Earth and Planetary Sciences, the GPS data has been available free of charge. Now only required sophisticated processing techniques but user friendly. On the other hand, the ZTD parameter obtained from the models or measurements needs to be converted into precipitable water vapor (PWV) to make it more useful as a component of weather forecasting and analysis atmospheric hazards such as tropical storms, flash floods, landslide, pollution, and earthquake as well as for climate change studies. This paper addresses the determination of ZTD as a signal error or delay source during the propagation from the satellite to a receiver on the ground and is a key driving force behind the atmospheric events. Some results in terms of ZTD and PWV will be highlighted in this paper.

  3. GPS interferometric attitude and heading determination: Initial flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangraas, Frank; Braasch, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Attitude and heading determination using GPS interferometry is a well-understood concept. However, efforts have been concentrated mainly in the development of robust algorithms and applications for low dynamic, rigid platforms (e.g., shipboard). This paper presents results of what is believed by the authors to be the first realtime flight test of a GPS attitude and heading determination system. The system is installed in Ohio University's Douglas DC-3 research aircraft. Signals from four antennas are processed by an Ashtech 3DF 24-channel GPS receiver. Data from the receiver are sent to a microcomputer for storage and further computations. Attitude and heading data are sent to a second computer for display on a software generated artificial horizon. Demonstration of this technique proves its candidacy for augmentation of aircraft state estimation for flight control and navigation as well as for numerous other applications.

  4. Global Scale Observations of Ionospheric Instabilities from GPS in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Leonard; Goodman, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The GPS receiver used for navigation on the Space Shuttle exhibits range rate noise which appears to result from scintillation of the satellite signals by irregularities in ionospheric plasma. The noise events cluster in geographic regions previously identified as susceptible to instability and disturbed ionospheric conditions. These mechanisms are reviewed in the context of the GPS observations. Range rate data continuously monitored during the free orbiting phase of several space shuttle missions reveals global scale distribution of ionospheric irregularities. Equatorial events cluster +/- 20 degrees about the magnetic equator and polar events exhibit hemispheric asymmetry suggesting influence of off axis geomagnetic polar oval system. The diurnal, seasonal and geographic distribution is compared to previous work concerning equatorial spread F, Appleton anomaly and polar oval. The observations provide a succinct demonstration of the utility of space based ionospheric monitoring using GPS. The susceptability of GPS receivers to scintillation represents 'an unanticipated technical risk not factored into the selection of receivers for the United States space program.

  5. First evidence of anisotropy of GPS phase slips caused by the mid-latitude field-aligned ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Ishin, A. B.; Tinin, M. V.; Yasyukevich, Yu. V.; Jin, S. G.

    2011-05-01

    The mid-latitude field-aligned irregularity (FAI) along the magnetic field line is a common phenomenon in the ionosphere. However, few data reveal the field-aligned ionospheric irregularities. They are insufficient to identify FAIs effects so far, particularly effect on global positioning system (GPS) signals. In this paper, the mid-latitude FAIs by line-of-sight angular scanning relative to the local magnetic field vector are investigated using the denser GPS network observations in Japan. It has been the first found that total GPS L2 phase slips over Japan, during the recovery phase of the 12 Feb 2000 geomagnetic storm were caused by GPS signal scattering on FAIs both for the lines-of-sight aligned to the magnetic field line (the field of aligned scattering, FALS) and across the magnetic field line (the field of across scattering, FACS). The FALS results are also in a good agreement with the data of the magnetic field orientation control of GPS occultation observations of equatorial scintillation during thorough low earth orbit (LEO) satellites measurements, e.g. Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C (SAC-C). The role of large-angle scattering almost along the normal to the magnetic field line in GPS scintillation is determined by attenuation of the irregularity anisotropy factor as compared with the other factors.

  6. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design of tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  7. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and Modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design and tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges of that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  8. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Lightsey, Glenn; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X- 38CrewReturnVehicle(CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and modified in software by NASA:s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design of tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  9. Soil Moisture Monitoring Using GNSS-R Signals; First Experimental Results with the SAM Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egido, A.; Martin-Puig, C.; Felip, D.; Garcia, M.; Caparrini, M.; Farres, E.; Ruffini, G.

    2009-04-01

    Observing the Earth surface with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) reflected signals has become a noteworthy remote sensing technique for the scientific community. The growing interest in GNSS as a remote sensing tool is due to its global availability and the carrier frequencies used. In fact, L-band, in which all current and next-future Global Navigation Satellite Systems emit, is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that highly interacts with the natural medium and for this reason, the possible applications exploiting these signals are numerous. In addition, the large number of GNSS signals in space, and their steadily increasing quantity and quality predicts a promising future for this remote sensing technique. Among a wide variety of applications, soil moisture (SM) monitoring represents an important niche for GNSS-R. SM is a prime parameter for the surface hydrologic cycle since it drives the evapotranspiration and the heat storage capability of the soil, as well as determines the possibility of surface runoff after rainfalls. Despite the recognised environmental and commercial relevance of SM, providing such parameter over global and large scales remains a significant challenge. Sensors based on GNSS-R offer a suitable and efficient solution to this issue. The basis for the retrieval of SM with GNSS-R systems lays in the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to water content. The higher the concentration of water in the soil, the higher the dielectric constant and reflectivity, which affects signals that reflect from the Earth surface by increasing their peak power. Previous investigations, [1,2] demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to sense small changes in surface reflectivity, becoming a precedent for this promising research line. GNSS-R present various advantages with respect to others methods currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Firstly, as already mentioned, GNSS signals lie in L band, which

  10. Global Positioning System (GPS): Current status and possible nursery uses

    Treesearch

    Dick Karsky

    2002-01-01

    The GPS (Global Positioning System) is a worldwide satellite-positioning system that was funded, installed, and continues to be operated by the U.S. Department of Defense. The navigation signals are provided free and can be used by anyone who has the equipment necessary to receive them.

  11. Refining the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV) and Building a Multi-GNSS SSV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.

    2017-01-01

    The GPS (Global Positioning System) Space Service Volume (SSV) was first defined to protect the GPS main lobe signals from changes from block to block. First developed as a concept by NASA in 2000, it has been adopted for the GPS III block of satellites, and is being used well beyond the current specification to enable increased navigation performance for key missions like GOES-R. NASA has engaged the US IFOR (Interagency Forum Operational Requirements) process to adopt a revised requirement to protect this increased and emerging use. Also, NASA is working through the UN International Committee on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) to develop an interoperable multi-GNSS SSV in partnership with all of the foreign GNSS providers.

  12. FPGA-based real-time embedded system for RISS/GPS integrated navigation.

    PubMed

    Abdelfatah, Walid Farid; Georgy, Jacques; Iqbal, Umar; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2012-01-01

    Navigation algorithms integrating measurements from multi-sensor systems overcome the problems that arise from using GPS navigation systems in standalone mode. Algorithms which integrate the data from 2D low-cost reduced inertial sensor system (RISS), consisting of a gyroscope and an odometer or wheel encoders, along with a GPS receiver via a Kalman filter has proved to be worthy in providing a consistent and more reliable navigation solution compared to standalone GPS receivers. It has been also shown to be beneficial, especially in GPS-denied environments such as urban canyons and tunnels. The main objective of this paper is to narrow the idea-to-implementation gap that follows the algorithm development by realizing a low-cost real-time embedded navigation system capable of computing the data-fused positioning solution. The role of the developed system is to synchronize the measurements from the three sensors, relative to the pulse per second signal generated from the GPS, after which the navigation algorithm is applied to the synchronized measurements to compute the navigation solution in real-time. Employing a customizable soft-core processor on an FPGA in the kernel of the navigation system, provided the flexibility for communicating with the various sensors and the computation capability required by the Kalman filter integration algorithm.

  13. FPGA-Based Real-Time Embedded System for RISS/GPS Integrated Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Abdelfatah, Walid Farid; Georgy, Jacques; Iqbal, Umar; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2012-01-01

    Navigation algorithms integrating measurements from multi-sensor systems overcome the problems that arise from using GPS navigation systems in standalone mode. Algorithms which integrate the data from 2D low-cost reduced inertial sensor system (RISS), consisting of a gyroscope and an odometer or wheel encoders, along with a GPS receiver via a Kalman filter has proved to be worthy in providing a consistent and more reliable navigation solution compared to standalone GPS receivers. It has been also shown to be beneficial, especially in GPS-denied environments such as urban canyons and tunnels. The main objective of this paper is to narrow the idea-to-implementation gap that follows the algorithm development by realizing a low-cost real-time embedded navigation system capable of computing the data-fused positioning solution. The role of the developed system is to synchronize the measurements from the three sensors, relative to the pulse per second signal generated from the GPS, after which the navigation algorithm is applied to the synchronized measurements to compute the navigation solution in real-time. Employing a customizable soft-core processor on an FPGA in the kernel of the navigation system, provided the flexibility for communicating with the various sensors and the computation capability required by the Kalman filter integration algorithm. PMID:22368460

  14. Factors influencing European GPs' engagement in smoking cessation: a multi-country literature review

    PubMed Central

    Stead, Martine; Angus, Kathryn; Holme, Ingrid; Cohen, David; Tait, Gayle

    2009-01-01

    Background Smoking cessation advice by GPs is an effective and cost-effective intervention, but is not implemented as widely as it could be. Aim This wide-ranging Europe-wide literature review, part of the European Union (EU) PESCE (General Practitioners and the Economics of Smoking Cessation in Europe) project, explored the extent of GPs' engagement in smoking cessation and the factors that influence their engagement. Method Two searches were conducted, one for grey literature, across all European countries, and one for academic studies. Data from eligible studies published from 1990 onwards were synthesised and reported under four categories of influencing factors: GP characteristics, patient characteristics, structural factors, and cessation-specific knowledge and skills. Results The literature showed that most GPs in Europe question the smoking status of all new patients but fewer routinely ask this of regular patients, or advise smokers to quit. The proportion offering intensive interventions or prescribing treatments is lower still. Factors influencing GPs' engagement in smoking cessation include GPs' own smoking status and their attitudes towards giving smoking cessation advice; whether patients present with smoking-related symptoms, are pregnant, or heavy smokers; time, training, and reimbursement are important structural factors; and some GPs lack knowledge and skills regarding the use of specific cessation methods and treatments, or have limited awareness of specialist cessation services. No single factor or category of factors explains the variations in GPs' engagement in smoking cessation. Conclusion Strategies to improve the frequency and quality of GPs' engagement in smoking cessation need to address the multifaceted influences on GPs' practice and to reflect the widely differing contexts across Europe. PMID:19674514

  15. Comparaisons d'étalons primaires de fréquence par GPS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrich, P. J.-M.

    The new primary frequency standard of the BNM-LPTF, LPTF FO1, exhibits a frequency accuracy estimated at 3×10-15. For the comparison with other primary frequency standards, it then requires a method that remains at a stability level better than 10-15 between ten hours, during which it remains generally in continuous operation, and a couple of days, where the local oscillator towards which LPTF FO1 is estimated keeps its frequency at a level of 2×10-15. The well known GPS common-view method does not fit any more when using a single channel receiver: the clock comparison measurements exhibit a frequency stability at a few parts in 10-14 over one day, depending on the distance between the clock, and the intrinsic best stability level limited by the GPS signal currently used can be calculated at 7.7×10-15. But is can be shown that a 4 channel receiver, performing as many regular common-views as possible over each day, would allow to reach 10-15 on actual measurements. That should also be the case for an other option: the use of the carrier phase of the GPS signal, associated with global geodetic computing.

  16. A globally efficient means of distributing UTC time and frequency through GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusters, John A.; Giffard, Robin P.; Cutler, Leonard S.; Allan, David W.; Miranian, Mihran

    1995-01-01

    Time and frequency outputs comparable in quality to the best laboratories have been demonstrated on an integrated system suitable for field application on a global basis. The system measures the time difference between 1 pulse-per-second (pps) signals derived from local primary frequency standards and from a multi-channel GPS C/A receiver. The measured data is processed through optimal SA Filter algorithms that enhance both the stability and accuracy of GPS timing signals. Experiments were run simultaneously at four different sites. Even with large distances between sites, the overall results show a high degree of cross-correlation of the SA noise. With sufficiently long simultaneous measurement sequences, the data shows that determination of the difference in local frequency from an accepted remote standard to better than 1 x 10(exp -14) is possible. This method yields frequency accuracy, stability, and timing stability comparable to that obtained with more conventional common-view experiments. In addition, this approach provides UTC(USNO MC) in real time to an accuracy better than 20 ns without the problems normally associated with conventional common-view techniques. An experimental tracking loop was also set up to demonstrate the use of enhanced GPS for dissemination of UTC(USNO MC) over a wide geographic area. Properly disciplining a cesium standard with a multi-channel GPS receiver, with additional input from USNO, has been found to permit maintaining a timing precision of better than 10 ns between Palo Alto, CA and Washington, DC.

  17. GPs' experiences of children with anxiety disorders in primary care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Doireann; Harvey, Kate; Young, Bridget; Reardon, Tessa; Creswell, Cathy

    2017-12-01

    Anxiety disorders have a median age of onset of 11 years and are the most common emotional disorders in childhood; however, a significant proportion of those affected do not access professional support. In the UK, GPs are often the first medical professional that families see so are in a prime position to support children with anxiety disorders; however, currently there is little research available on GPs' perspectives on and experiences of supporting children with these disorders. To explore the experiences of GPs in relation to identification, management, and access to specialist services for children (<12 years) with anxiety disorders. Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs in primary care throughout England. GPs reflected a diverse group in relation to the ethnic and socioeconomic profile of registered patients, GP age, sex, professional status, previous engagement with research, and practice size and location. Purposive sampling was used to recruit GPs until theoretical saturation was reached. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method of thematic analysis. Data from 20 semi-structured interviews were organised into three themes: decision making, responsibility, and emotional response, with an overarching theme of GPs feeling ill equipped. These themes were retrospectively analysed to illustrate their role at different stages in the primary care process (identification, management, and access to specialist services). GPs feel ill equipped to manage and support childhood anxiety disorders, demonstrating a need for medical training to include greater emphasis on children's mental health, as well as potential for greater collaboration between primary and specialist services. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  18. Long-period GPS waveforms. What can GPS bring to Earth seismic velocity models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelevitz, Krisztina; Houlié, Nicolas; Boschi, Lapo; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Giardini, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    It is now commonly admitted that high rate GPS observations can provide reliable surface displacement waveforms (Cervelli, et al., 2001; Langbein, et al., 2006; Houlié, et al., 2006; Houlié et al., 2011). For long-period (T>5s) transients, it was shown that GPS and seismometer (STS-1) displacements are in agreement at least for vertical component (Houlié, et al., Sci. Rep. 2011). We propose here to supplement existing long-period seismic networks with high rate (>= 1Hz) GPS data in order to improve the resolution of global seismic velocity models. GPS measurements are providing a wide range of frequencies, going beyond the range of STS-1 in the low frequency end. Nowadays, almost 10.000 GPS receivers would be able to record data at 1 Hz with 3000+ stations already streaming data in Real-Time (RT). The reasons for this quick expansion are the price of receivers, their low maintenance, and the wide range of activities they can be used for (transport, science, public apps, navigation, etc.). We are presenting work completed on the 1Hz GPS records of the Hokkaido earthquake (25th of September, 2003, Mw=8.3). 3D Waveforms have been computed with an improved, stabilised inversion algorithm in order to constrain the ground motion history. Through the better resolution of inversion of the GPS phase observations, we determine displacement waveforms of frequencies ranging from 0.77 mHz to 330 mHz for a selection of sites. We compare inverted GPS waveforms with STS-1 waveforms and synthetic waveforms computed using 3D global wave propagation with SPECFEM. At co-located sites (STS-1 and GPS located within 10km) the agreement is good for the vertical component between seismic (both real and synthetic) and GPS waveforms.

  19. Continuous time transfer using GPS carrier phase.

    PubMed

    Dach, Rolf; Schildknecht, Thomas; Springer, Tim; Dudle, Gregor; Prost, Leon

    2002-11-01

    The Astronomical Institute of the University of Berne is hosting one of the Analysis Centers (AC) of the International GPS Service (IGS). A network of a few GPS stations in Europe and North America is routinely analyzed for time transfer purposes, using the carrier phase observations. This work is done in the framework of a joint project with the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation (METAS). The daily solutions are computed independently. The resulting time transfer series show jumps of up to 1 ns at the day boundaries. A method to concatenate the daily time transfer solutions to a continuous series was developed. A continuous time series is available for a time span of more than 4 mo. The results were compared with the time transfer results from other techniques such as two-way satellite time and frequency transfer. This concatenation improves the results obtained in a daily computing scheme because a continuous time series better reflects the characteristics of continuously working clocks.

  20. New advantages of the combined GPS and GLONASS observations for high-latitude ionospheric irregularities monitoring: case study of June 2015 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring, tracking and nowcasting of the ionospheric plasma density disturbances using dual-frequency measurements of the Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are effectively carried out during several decades. Recent rapid growth and modernization of the ground-based segment gives an opportunity to establish a great database consisting of more than 6000 stations worldwide which provide GPS signals measurements with an open access. Apart of the GPS signals, at least two-third of these stations receive simultaneously signals transmitted by another Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)—the Russian system GLONASS. Today, GLONASS signal measurements are mainly used in navigation and geodesy only and very rarely for ionosphere research. We present the first results demonstrating advantages of using several independent but compatible GNSS systems like GPS and GLONASS for improvement of the permanent monitoring of the high-latitude ionospheric irregularities. For the first time, the high-resolution two-dimensional maps of ROTI perturbation were made using not only GPS but also GLONASS measurements. We extend the use of the ROTI maps for analyzing ionospheric irregularities distribution. We demonstrate that the meridional slices of the ROTI maps can be effectively used to study the occurrence and temporal evolution of the ionospheric irregularities. The meridional slices of the geographical sectors with a high density of the GPS and GLONASS measurements can represent spatio-temporal dynamics of the intense ionospheric plasma density irregularities with very high resolution, and they can be effectively used for detailed study of the space weather drivers on the processes of the ionospheric irregularities generation, development and their lifetimes. Using a representative database of 5800 ground-based GNSS stations located worldwide, we have investigated the occurrence of the high-latitude ionospheric plasma density irregularities during the geomagnetic storm of

  1. Combining GPS, GIS, and accelerometry: methodological issues in the assessment of location and intensity of travel behaviors.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Melody; Badland, Hannah; Mavoa, Suzanne; Duncan, Mitch J; Duncan, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Global positioning systems (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), and accelerometers are powerful tools to explain activity within a built environment, yet little integration of these tools has taken place. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of combining GPS, GIS, and accelerometry to understand transport-related physical activity (TPA) in adults. Forty adults wore an accelerometer and portable GPS unit over 7 consecutive days and completed a demographics questionnaire and 7-day travel log. Accelerometer and GPS data were extracted for commutes to/from workplace and integrated into a GIS database. GIS maps were generated to visually explore physical activity intensity, GPS speeds and routes traveled. GPS, accelerometer, and survey data were collected for 37 participants. Loss of GPS data was substantial due to a range of methodological issues, such as low battery life, signal drop out, and participant noncompliance. Nonetheless, greater travel distances and significantly higher speeds were observed for motorized trips when compared with TPA. Pragmatic issues of using GPS monitoring to understand TPA behaviors and methodological recommendations for future research were identified. Although methodologically challenging, the combination of GPS monitoring, accelerometry and GIS technologies holds promise for understanding TPA within the built environment.

  2. Attitudes of GPs towards Older Adults Psychology Services in the Scottish Highlands.

    PubMed

    Todman, Jonathan P F; Law, Jim; MacDougall, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    referrals, rather than low confidence in psychotherapies for this population. The GPs' preference for social interventions may reflect the particular risk of isolation of the elderly in remote communities and may be worthy of consideration when developing services in these areas.

  3. The International GPS Service: A Global Resource for GPS Applications and Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth E.; Zumberge, James F.; Beutler, Gerhard; Kouba, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Since June, 1992, the International GPS service has been coordinating a global civilian GPS infrastructure in order to support numerous GPS applications and research activities. A key aspect of the IGS is the reliability and quality of the analysis products that have been made available over the past five years through the IGS Analysis Centers and the Analysis Center Coordinator.

  4. Evaluation of 14 global GIA forward models using a novel GPS dataset and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamber, J. L.; Schumacher, M.; Sha, Z.; Rougier, J.; King, M. A.; Khan, S. A.; Shum, C. K.; Luthcke, S. B.

    2017-12-01

    Observed mass movement from GRACE and vertical land motion from a global network of permanent GPS stations are used in a data driven approach to estimate GIA signals without introducing any assumptions about Earth structure nor ice loading history. Satellite data and in-situ observations are combined using a multivariate spatiotemporal model within a Bayesian Hierarchical Modelling (BHM) framework. In this study, the GPS data set of the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory (NGL) is used as the starting point for providing an observational estimate of global GIA uplift rates. A novel fully automatic post-processing strategy is developed to correct for non-GIA artifacts, including: (i) outlier detection (e.g. due to icing of Choke Ring Antennas or the antenna being buried in snow); (ii) automatic removal of reported and unreported jumps due to geophysical and hardware issues (a refinement of the jump database provided by NGL); and (iii) filtering for GPS stations that observe primarily the GIA signal rather than unwanted local effects (e.g., unmodelled loading effects from land hydrology, atmosphere, or tides). In order to accurately account for the elastic response of the Earth's crust over Antarctica and Greenland, uplift rates in these regions were corrected for the contemporary ice mass loading impact on elastic deformation using high-resolution ice mass balance time series. The novel global GPS data set shows a clean GIA signal at all post-processed stations and is therefore suitable to investigate the behavior of global GIA forward models. In addition, NASA's GSFC GRACE global mascon solutions are employed. The equal area 1x1 degree gridded mascons are spatially aggregated for larger regions to account for their spatial error correlations. Both the GPS and GRACE datasets are combined with prior information about spatial wavelengths of GIA signals obtained from the ICE-6G model within the BHM framework to solve for GIA. The results are compared with 14 global GIA forward

  5. Ionosphere Threat Model Investigations by Using Turkish National Permanent GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köroǧlu, Meltem; Arikan, Feza; Koroglu, Ozan

    2016-07-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) signal realibity may decrease significantly due to the variable electron density structure of ionosphere. In the literature, ionospheric disturbance is modeled as a linear semi-definite wave which has width, gradient and a constant velocity. To provide precise positioning, Ground Based Augmentation Systems (GBAS) are used. GBAS collects all measurements from GPS network receivers and computes an integrity level for the measurement by comparing the network GPS receivers measurements with the threat models of ionosphere. Threat models are computed according to ionosphere gradient characteristics. Gradient is defined as the difference of slant delays between the receivers. Slant delays are estimated from the STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) values of the ionosphere that is given by the line integral of the electron density between the receiver and GPS satellite. STEC can be estimated over Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals by using IONOLAB-STEC and IONOLAB-BIAS algorithms. Since most of the ionospheric disturbance observed locally, threat models for the GBAS systems must be extracted as locally. In this study, an automated ionosphere gradient estimation algorithm was developed by using Turkish National Permanent GPS Network (TNPGN-Active) data for year 2011. The GPS receivers are grouped within 150 km radius. For each region, for each day and for each satellite all STEC values are estimated by using IONOLAB-STEC and IONOLAB-BIAS softwares (www.ionolab.org). In the gradient estimation, station-pair method is used. Statistical properties of the valid gradients are extracted as tables for each region, day and satellite. By observing the histograms of the maximum gradients and standard deviations of the gradients with respect to the elevation angle for each day, the anomalies and disturbances of the ionosphere can be detected. It is observed that, maximum gradient estimates are less than 40 mm/km and maximum standard

  6. High-resolution station-based diurnal ionospheric total electron content (TEC) from dual-frequency GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćepni, Murat S.; Potts, Laramie V.; Miima, John B.

    2013-09-01

    electron content (TEC) estimates derived from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal delays provide a rich source of information about the Earth's ionosphere. Networks of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers data can be used to represent the ionosphere by a Global Ionospheric Map (GIM). Data input for GIMs is dual-frequency GNSS-only or a mixture of GNSS and altimetry observations. Parameterization of GNSS-only GIMs approaches the ionosphere as a single-layer model (SLM) to determine GPS TEC models over a region. Limitations in GNSS-only GIM TEC are due largely to the nonhomogenous global distribution of GPS tracking stations with large data gaps over the oceans. The utility of slant GPS ionospheric-induced path delays for high temporal resolution from a single-station data rate offers better representation of TEC over a small region. A station-based vertical TEC (TECV) approach modifies the traditional single-layer model (SLM) GPS TEC method by introducing a zenith angle weighting (ZAW) filter to capture signal delays from mostly near-zenith satellite passes. Comparison with GIMs shows the station-dependent TEC (SD-TEC) model exhibits robust performance under variable space weather conditions. The SD-TEC model was applied to investigate ionospheric TEC variability during the geomagnetic storm event of 9 March 2012 at midlatitude station NJJJ located in New Jersey, USA. The high temporal resolution TEC results suggest TEC production and loss rate differences before, during, and after the storm.

  7. A simulation of GPS and differential GPS sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a revolutionary advance in navigation. Users can determine latitude, longitude, and altitude by receiving range information from at least four satellites. The statistical accuracy of the user's position is directly proportional to the statistical accuracy of the range measurement. Range errors are caused by clock errors, ephemeris errors, atmospheric delays, multipath errors, and receiver noise. Selective Availability, which the military uses to intentionally degrade accuracy for non-authorized users, is a major error source. The proportionality constant relating position errors to range errors is the Dilution of Precision (DOP) which is a function of the satellite geometry. Receivers separated by relatively short distances have the same satellite and atmospheric errors. Differential GPS (DGPS) removes these errors by transmitting pseudorange corrections from a fixed receiver to a mobile receiver. The corrected pseudorange at the moving receiver is now corrupted only by errors from the receiver clock, multipath, and measurement noise. This paper describes a software package that models position errors for various GPS and DGPS systems. The error model is used in the Real-Time Simulator and Cockpit Technology workstation simulations at NASA-LaRC. The GPS/DGPS sensor can simulate enroute navigation, instrument approaches, or on-airport navigation.

  8. Real-time estimation of ionospheric delay using GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lao-Sheng

    1997-12-01

    When radio waves such as the GPS signals propagate through the ionosphere, they experience an extra time delay. The ionospheric delay can be eliminated (to the first order) through a linear combination of L1 and L2 observations from dual-frequency GPS receivers. Taking advantage of this dispersive principle, one or more dual- frequency GPS receivers can be used to determine a model of the ionospheric delay across a region of interest and, if implemented in real-time, can support single-frequency GPS positioning and navigation applications. The research objectives of this thesis were: (1) to develop algorithms to obtain accurate absolute Total Electron Content (TEC) estimates from dual-frequency GPS observables, and (2) to develop an algorithm to improve the accuracy of real-time ionosphere modelling. In order to fulfil these objectives, four algorithms have been proposed in this thesis. A 'multi-day multipath template technique' is proposed to mitigate the pseudo-range multipath effects at static GPS reference stations. This technique is based on the assumption that the multipath disturbance at a static station will be constant if the physical environment remains unchanged from day to day. The multipath template, either single-day or multi-day, can be generated from the previous days' GPS data. A 'real-time failure detection and repair algorithm' is proposed to detect and repair the GPS carrier phase 'failures', such as the occurrence of cycle slips. The proposed algorithm uses two procedures: (1) application of a statistical test on the state difference estimated from robust and conventional Kalman filters in order to detect and identify the carrier phase failure, and (2) application of a Kalman filter algorithm to repair the 'identified carrier phase failure'. A 'L1/L2 differential delay estimation algorithm' is proposed to estimate GPS satellite transmitter and receiver L1/L2 differential delays. This algorithm, based on the single-site modelling technique, is

  9. The GPS Burst Detector W-Sensor

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    McCrady, D.D.; Phipps, P.

    1994-08-01

    The NAVSTAR satellites have two missions: navigation and nuclear detonation detection. The main objective of this paper is to describe one of the key elements of the Nuclear Detonation Detection System (NDS), the Burst Detector W-Sensor (BDW) that was developed for the Air Force Space and Missle Systems Center, its mission on GPS Block IIR, and how it utilizes GPS timing signals to precisely locate nuclear detonations (NUDET). The paper will also cover the interface to the Burst Detector Processor (BDP) which links the BDW to the ground station where the BDW is controlled and where data from multiple satellitesmore » are processed to determine the location of the NUDET. The Block IIR BDW is the culmination of a development program that has produced a state-of-the-art, space qualified digital receiver/processor that dissipates only 30 Watts, weighs 57 pounds, and has a 12in. {times} l4.2in. {times} 7.16in. footprint. The paper will highlight several of the key multilayer printed circuit cards without which the required power, weight, size, and radiation requirements could not have been met. In addition, key functions of the system software will be covered. The paper will be concluded with a discussion of the high speed digital signal processing and algorithm used to determine the time-of-arrival (TOA) of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from the NUDET.« less

  10. TLALOCNet continuous GPS-Met Array in Mexico supporting the 2017 NAM GPS Hydrometeorological Network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; Adams, D. K.; Vivoni, E. R.; Grutter, M.; Serra, Y. L.; DeMets, C.; Galetzka, J.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    TLALOCNet is a network of continuous GPS and meteorology stations in Mexico to study atmospheric and solid earth processes. This recently completed network spans most of Mexico with a strong coverage emphasis on southern and western Mexico. This network, funded by NSF, CONACyT and UNAM, recently built 40 cGPS-Met sites to EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory standards and upgraded 25 additional GPS stations. TLALOCNet provides open and freely available raw GPS data, and high frequency surface meteorology measurements, and time series of daily positions. This is accomplished through the development of the TLALOCNet data center (http://tlalocnet.udg.mx) that serves as a collection and distribution point. This data center is based on UNAVCO's Dataworks-GSAC software and also works as part of UNAVCO's seamless archive for discovery, sharing, and access to GPS data. The TLALOCNet data center also contains contributed data from several regional GPS networks in Mexico for a total of 100+ stations. By using the same protocols and structure as the UNAVCO and other COCONet regional data centers, the scientific community has the capability of accessing data from the largest Mexican GPS network. This archive provides a fully queryable and scriptable GPS and Meteorological data retrieval point. In addition, real-time 1Hz streams from selected TLALOCNet stations are available in BINEX, RTCM 2.3 and RTCM 3.1 formats via the Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol (NTRIP) for real-time seismic and weather forecasting applications. TLALOCNet served as a GPS-Met backbone for the binational Mexico-US North American Monsoon GPS Hydrometeorological Network 2017 campaign experiment. This innovative experiment attempts to address water vapor source regions and land-surface water vapor flux contributions to precipitation (i.e., moisture recycling) during the 2017 North American Monsoon in Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, and Arizona. Models suggest that moisture recycling is

  11. GPS Array as a Sensor of Lithosphere, Troposphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Japanese dense array of GPS receivers (GEONET) started operation in 1993, and is currently composed of ~1200 stations. GPS (or GNSS in general) receivers can be compared to a Swiss army knife: it could be used not only for positioning (a knife) but also for various purposes, e.g. remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor or ionospheric electrons (screw driver, tin opener etc). Dense GPS arrays have been found extremely useful for variety of geophysical studies. In this lecture, I briefly review their historical achievements, recent highlights, and future perspectives. In Japan, first generation GPS stations were implemented in 1993 (the Kanto-Tokai region) and 1994 (nationwide) by GSI, Japan. Shortly after the launch, they successfully caught coseismic crustal movement of several major earthquakes, the 1994 October Shikotan (Mw8.3), the 1994 December Sanriku (Mw7.6), and the 1995 January Kobe (Mw7.0) earthquakes. These earthquakes accelerated the densification of the GPS network, achieving 1000 in the number of stations within the following 2-3 years. In addition to coseismic jumps, important discoveries continued in 1990s, e.g. large-scale afterslip of interplate thrust earthquakes and slow slip events (SSE). Later it was shown that tilt- and strainmeter can better observe short-term SSEs, and InSAR can draw more detailed maps of coseismic crustal movements. Now GPS array is recognized as a good tool to measure crustal movement with high temporal resolution and stability and with moderate sensitivity and spatial resolution. GPS data are also useful to study hydrosphere. Seasonal crustal movements in Japan mainly reflect changes in hydrological loads. Multipath signatures in GPS data also provide useful information on the environment around the antenna, e.g. soil moisture, snow depth and vegetation. I will compare the snow depth record over a winter inferred by analyzing GPS multipath signatures, and observed by a conventional apparatus. GPS can also measure

  12. Link calibration against receiver calibration: an assessment of GPS time transfer uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovera, G. D.; Torre, J.-M.; Sherwood, R.; Abgrall, M.; Courde, C.; Laas-Bourez, M.; Uhrich, P.

    2014-10-01

    We present a direct comparison between two different techniques for the relative calibration of time transfer between remote time scales when using the signals transmitted by the Global Positioning System (GPS). Relative calibration estimates the delay of equipment or the delay of a time transfer link with respect to reference equipment. It is based on the circulation of some travelling GPS equipment between the stations in the network, against which the local equipment is measured. Two techniques can be considered: first a station calibration by the computation of the hardware delays of the local GPS equipment; second the computation of a global hardware delay offset for the time transfer between the reference points of two remote time scales. This last technique is called a ‘link’ calibration, with respect to the other one, which is a ‘receiver’ calibration. The two techniques require different measurements on site, which change the uncertainty budgets, and we discuss this and related issues. We report on one calibration campaign organized during Autumn 2013 between Observatoire de Paris (OP), Paris, France, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA), Calern, France, and NERC Space Geodesy Facility (SGF), Herstmonceux, United Kingdom. The travelling equipment comprised two GPS receivers of different types, along with the required signal generator and distribution amplifier, and one time interval counter. We show the different ways to compute uncertainty budgets, leading to improvement factors of 1.2 to 1.5 on the hardware delay uncertainties when comparing the relative link calibration to the relative receiver calibration.

  13. A New Technique to Observe ENSO Activity via Ground-Based GPS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparta, Wayan; Iskandar, Ahmad; Singh, Mandeep Singh Jit

    In an attempt to study the effects of global climate change in the tropics for improving global climate model, this paper aims to detect the ENSO events, especially El Nino phase by using ground-based GPS receivers. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) obtained from the Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology measurements in line with the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTa) are used to connect their response to El Niño activity. The data gathered from four selected stations over the Southeast Asia, namely PIMO (Philippines), KUAL (Malaysia), NTUS (Singapore) and BAKO (Indonesia) for the year of 2009/2010 were processed. A strong correlation was observed for PIMO station with a correlation coefficient of -0.90, significantly at the 99 % confidence level. In general, the relationship between GPS PWV and SSTa at all stations on a weekly basis showed with a negative correlation. The negative correlation indicates that during the El Niño event, the PWV variation was in decreased trend. Decreased trend of PWV value is caused by a dry season that affected the GPS signals in the ocean-atmospheric coupling. Based on these promising results, we can propose that the ground-based GPS receiver is capable used to monitor ENSO activity and this is a new prospective method that previously unexplored.

  14. Regional Deformation Studies with GRACE and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. L.; Elosequi, P.; Tamisiea, M.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2005-01-01

    GRACE data indicate large seasonal variations in gravity that have been shown to be to be related to climate-driven fluxes of surface water. Seasonal redistribution of surface mass deforms the Earth, and our previous study using GRACE data demonstrate that annual radial deformations of +/-13 mm in the region of Amazon River Basin were observed by both GRACE and ten GPS sites in the region. For the GRACE determinations, we estimate in a least-squares solution for each Stokes coefficient parameters that represent the amplitudes of the annual variation. We then filter these parameters based on a statistical test that uses the scatter of the postfit residuals. We demonstrate by comparison to the GPS amplitudes that this method is more accurate, for this region, than Gaussian smoothing. Our model for the temporal behavior of the gravity coefficients includes a rate term, and although the time series are noisy, the glacial isostatic adjustment signal over Hudson s Bay can be observed. .

  15. Synchrophasor Data Correction under GPS Spoofing Attack: A State Estimation Based Approach

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Fan, Xiaoyuan; Du, Liang; Duan, Dongliang

    GPS spoofing attack (GSA) has been shown to be one of the most imminent threats to almost all cyber-physical systems incorporated with the civilian GPS signal. Specifically, for our current agenda of the modernization of the power grid, this may greatly jeopardize the benefits provided by the pervasively installed phasor measurement units (PMU). In this study, we consider the case where synchrophasor data from PMUs are compromised due to the presence of a single GSA, and show that it can be corrected by signal processing techniques. In particular, we introduce a statistical model for synchrophasorbased power system state estimation (SE),more » and then derive the spoofing-matched algorithms for synchrophasor data correction against GPS spoofing attack. Different testing scenarios in IEEE 14-, 30-, 57-, 118-bus systems are simulated to show the proposed algorithms’ performance on GSA detection and state estimation. Numerical results demonstrate that our proposed algorithms can consistently locate and correct the spoofed synchrophasor data with good accuracy as long as the system observability is satisfied. Finally, the accuracy of state estimation is significantly improved compared with the traditional weighted least square method and approaches the performance under the Genie-aided method.« less

  16. Synchrophasor Data Correction under GPS Spoofing Attack: A State Estimation Based Approach

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Xiaoyuan; Du, Liang; Duan, Dongliang

    2017-02-01

    GPS spoofing attack (GSA) has been shown to be one of the most imminent threats to almost all cyber-physical systems incorporated with the civilian GPS signal. Specifically, for our current agenda of the modernization of the power grid, this may greatly jeopardize the benefits provided by the pervasively installed phasor measurement units (PMU). In this study, we consider the case where synchrophasor data from PMUs are compromised due to the presence of a single GSA, and show that it can be corrected by signal processing techniques. In particular, we introduce a statistical model for synchrophasorbased power system state estimation (SE),more » and then derive the spoofing-matched algorithms for synchrophasor data correction against GPS spoofing attack. Different testing scenarios in IEEE 14-, 30-, 57-, 118-bus systems are simulated to show the proposed algorithms’ performance on GSA detection and state estimation. Numerical results demonstrate that our proposed algorithms can consistently locate and correct the spoofed synchrophasor data with good accuracy as long as the system observability is satisfied. Finally, the accuracy of state estimation is significantly improved compared with the traditional weighted least square method and approaches the performance under the Genie-aided method.« less

  17. Mutations in the gravity persistence signal loci in Arabidopsis disrupt the perception and/or signal transduction of gravitropic stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Rashotte, Aaron M.; Shipp, Matthew J.; Robertson, Dominique; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, yet little is understood about the early events of gravitropism. To identify genes affected in the signal perception and/or transduction phase of the gravity response, a mutant screen was devised using cold treatment to delay the gravity response of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis. Inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis show no response to gravistimulation at 4 degrees C for up to 3 h. However, when gravistimulated at 4 degrees C and then returned to vertical at room temperature (RT), stems bend in response to the previous, horizontal gravistimulation (H. Fukaki, H. Fujisawa, M. Tasaka [1996] Plant Physiology 110: 933-943). This indicates that gravity perception, but not the gravitropic response, occurs at 4 degrees C. Recessive mutations were identified at three loci using this cold effect on gravitropism to screen for gravity persistence signal (gps) mutants. All three mutants had an altered response after gravistimulation at 4 degrees C, yet had phenotypically normal responses to stimulations at RT. gps1-1 did not bend in response to the 4 degrees C gravity stimulus upon return to RT. gps2-1 responded to the 4 degrees C stimulus but bent in the opposite direction. gps3-1 over-responded after return to RT, continuing to bend to an angle greater than wild-type plants. At 4 degrees C, starch-containing statoliths sedimented normally in both wild-type and the gps mutants, but auxin transport was abolished at 4 degrees C. These results are consistent with GPS loci affecting an aspect of the gravity signal perception/transduction pathway that occurs after statolith sedimentation, but before auxin transport.

  18. Analysis of continuous GPS measurements from southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willis, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Several years of continuous data have been collected at remote bedrock Global Positioning System (GPS) sites in southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Annual to sub-annual variations are observed in the position time-series. An atmospheric pressure loading (APL) effect is calculated from pressure field anomalies supplied by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model loading an elastic Earth model. The predicted APL signal has a moderate correlation with the vertical position time-series at McMurdo, Ross Island (International Global Navigation Satellite System Service (IGS) station MCM4), produced using a global solution. In contrast, a local solution in which MCM4 is the fiducial site generates a vertical time series for a remote site in Victoria Land (Cape Roberts, ROB4) which exhibits a low, inverse correlation with the predicted atmospheric pressure loading signal. If, in the future, known and well modeled geophysical loads can be separated from the time-series, then local hydrological loading, of interest for glaciological and climate applications, can potentially be extracted from the GPS time-series.

  19. Investigation of a L1-optimized choke ring ground plane for a low-cost GPS receiver-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Schwieger, Volker

    2018-01-01

    Besides the geodetic dual-frequency GNSS receivers-systems (receiver and antenna), there are also low-cost single-frequency GPS receiver-systems. The multipath effect is a limiting factor of accuracy for both geodetic dual-frequency and low-cost single-frequency GPS receivers. And the multipath effect is for the short baselines dominating error (typical for the monitoring in Engineering Geodesy). So accuracy and reliability of GPS measurement for monitoring can be improved by reducing the multipath signal. In this paper, the self-constructed L1-optimized choke ring ground plane (CR-GP) is applied to reduce the multipath signal. Its design will be described and its performance will be investigated. The results show that the introduced low-cost single-frequency GPS receiver-system, which contains the Ublox LEA-6T single-frequency GPS receiver and Trimble Bullet III antenna with a self-constructed L1-optimized CR-GP, can reach standard deviations of 3 mm in east, 5 mm in north and 9 mm in height in the test field which has many reflectors. This accuracy is comparable with the geodetic dual-frequency GNSS receiver-system. The improvement of the standard deviation of the measurement using the CR-GP is about 50 % and 35 % compared to the used antenna without shielding and with flat ground plane respectively.

  20. GPS/INS Sensor Fusion Using GPS Wind up Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Walton R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of stabilizing an inertial navigation system (INS), includes the steps of: receiving data from an inertial navigation system; and receiving a finite number of carrier phase observables using at least one GPS receiver from a plurality of GPS satellites; calculating a phase wind up correction; correcting at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables using the phase wind up correction; and calculating a corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position using the corrected at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables; and performing a step selected from the steps consisting of recording, reporting, or providing the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position to another process that uses the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position. A GPS stabilized inertial navigation system apparatus is also described.

  1. Determining GPS average performance metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    Analytic and semi-analytic methods are used to show that users of the GPS constellation can expect performance variations based on their location. Specifically, performance is shown to be a function of both altitude and latitude. These results stem from the fact that the GPS constellation is itself non-uniform. For example, GPS satellites are over four times as likely to be directly over Tierra del Fuego than over Hawaii or Singapore. Inevitable performance variations due to user location occur for ground, sea, air and space GPS users. These performance variations can be studied in an average relative sense. A semi-analytic tool which symmetrically allocates GPS satellite latitude belt dwell times among longitude points is used to compute average performance metrics. These metrics include average number of GPS vehicles visible, relative average accuracies in the radial, intrack and crosstrack (or radial, north/south, east/west) directions, and relative average PDOP or GDOP. The tool can be quickly changed to incorporate various user antenna obscuration models and various GPS constellation designs. Among other applications, tool results can be used in studies to: predict locations and geometries of best/worst case performance, design GPS constellations, determine optimal user antenna location and understand performance trends among various users.

  2. GPS Navigation for the Magnetospheric Multi-Scale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William; Mitchell, Jason; Southward, Michael; Baldwin, Philip; Winternitz, Luke; Heckler, Gregory; Kurichh, Rishi; Sirotzky, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In 2014. NASA is scheduled to launch the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS), a four-satellite formation designed to monitor fluctuations in the Earth's magnetosphere. This mission has two planned phases with different orbits (1? x 12Re and 1.2 x 25Re) to allow for varying science regions of interest. To minimize ground resources and to mitigate the probability of collisions between formation members, an on-board orbit determination system consisting of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and crosslink transceiver was desired. Candidate sensors would be required to acquire GPS signals both below and above the constellation while spinning at three revolutions-per-minute (RPM) and exchanging state and science information among the constellation. The Intersatellite Ranging and Alarm System (IRAS), developed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) was selected to meet this challenge. IRAS leverages the eight years of development GSFC has invested in the Navigator GPS receiver and its spacecraft communication expertise, culminating in a sensor capable of absolute and relative navigation as well as intersatellite communication. The Navigator is a state-of-the-art receiver designed to acquire and track weak GPS signals down to -147dBm. This innovation allows the receiver to track both the main lobe and the much weaker side lobe signals. The Navigator's four antenna inputs and 24 tracking channels, together with customized hardware and software, allow it to seamlessly maintain visibility while rotating. Additionally, an extended Kalman filter provides autonomous, near real-time, absolute state and time estimates. The Navigator made its maiden voyage on the Space Shuttle during the Hubble Servicing Mission, and is scheduled to fly on MMS as well as the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM). Additionally, Navigator's acquisition engine will be featured in the receiver being developed for the Orion vehicle. The crosslink transceiver is a 1/4 Watt transmitter

  3. Link establishment criterion and topology optimization for hybrid GPS satellite communications with laser crosslinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lun; Wei, Sixiao; Tian, Xin; Hsieh, Li-Tse; Chen, Zhijiang; Pham, Khanh; Lyke, James; Chen, Genshe

    2018-05-01

    In the current global positioning system (GPS), the reliability of information transmissions can be enhanced with the aid of inter-satellite links (ISLs) or crosslinks between satellites. Instead of only using conventional radio frequency (RF) crosslinks, the laser crosslinks provide an option to significantly increase the data throughput. The connectivity and robustness of ISL are needed for analysis, especially for GPS constellations with laser crosslinks. In this paper, we first propose a hybrid GPS communication architecture in which uplinks and downlinks are established via RF signals and crosslinks are established via laser links. Then, we design an optical crosslink assignment criteria considering the practical optical communication factors such as optical line- of-sight (LOS) range, link distance, and angular velocity, etc. After that, to further improve the rationality of establishing crosslinks, a topology control algorithm is formulated to optimize GPS crosslink networks at both physical and network layers. The RF transmission features for uplink and downlink and optical transmission features for crosslinks are taken into account as constraints for the optimization problem. Finally, the proposed link establishment criteria are implemented for GPS communication with optical crosslinks. The designs of this paper provide a potential crosslink establishment and topology control algorithm for the next generation GPS.

  4. Temporal and Spatial Characterization of GPS Fading From Ionospheric Irregularities Under Low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paula, E. R.; Moraes, A. D. O.; Vani, B. C.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Abdu, M. A.; Galera Monico, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    The ionosphere over the peak of the anomaly represents a treat for navigation systems based on GNSS. Brazilian territory is mostly under this harsh layer for satellite communication in general and in particular for navigation, like GPS users, where their receivers tracking performance are damaged under scintillation conditions. Ionospheric scintillation is responsible for significant degradation in the accuracy of navigation and positioning. Phase shifts accompanied by amplitude fades significantly degrades the signal-to-noise ratio of the received signal disrupting the channel and loosing navigation performance. The stronger the scintillations are, more difficulty will be for the GNSS receiver tracking loops to recover the phase and code replicas. These phenomena under specific geophysical conditions may severely affect the system availability and positioning. In this work the temporal characteristics of amplitude scintillation will be analyzed at the three available GPS frequencies, L1, L2C and L5. Aspect like fading duration and depth will be evaluated and compared among the three available frequencies for the current solar cycle. This work will use GPS scintillation data recorded during six months of data during 2014 to 2015 at three stations under Brazilian territory located near the southern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly. The analysis will be performed focusing on the fading profile of the three frequencies comparing how the fading of those signals behave statistically between them. Aspects like loss of lock, spatial orientation between the signal across the ionospheric irregularity will also be discussed showing how much more susceptible the new frequencies might be in comparison to the widely used and studied L1 frequency.

  5. GPS-UTC Time Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    GPS-UTC TIME SYNCHRONIZATION C. H. MCKENZIE W. A. FEESS R, H. LUCAS H. HOLTZ A. L. SATIN The Aerospace Corporation El Segundo, California...Abstract Two automatic algorithms for synchronizing the GPS time standard to the UTC time standard are evaluated. Both algorithms control GPS-UTC...is required to synchronize its broadcast time standard to within one microsecond o f the time standard maintained by the US Naval Observatory

  6. InSAR and GPS Time Series Analysis in Areas with Large Scale Hydrological Deformation: Separating Signal From Noise at Varying Length Scales in the San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. D.; Lohman, R.

    2017-12-01

    Areas of large-scale subsidence are observed over much of the San Joaquin Valley of California due to the extraction of groundwater and hydrocarbons from the subsurface.These signals span regions with spatial extents of up to 100 km and have rates of up to 45 cm/yr or more. InSAR and GPS are complementary methods commonly used to measure such ground displacements and can provide important constraints on crustal deformation models, support groundwater studies, and inform water resource management efforts. However, current standard methods for processing these data sets and creating displacement time series are suboptimal for the deformation observed in areas like the San Joaquin Valley because (1) the ground surface properties are constantly changing due largely to agricultural activity, resulting in low coherence in half or more of a SAR frame, and (2) the deformation signals are distributed throughout the SAR frames, and are comparable to the size of the frames themselves. Therefore, referencing areas of deformation to non-deforming areas and correcting for long wavelength signals (e.g. atmospheric delays, orbital errors) is particularly difficult. We address these challenges by exploiting pixels that are stable in space and time, and use them for weighted spatial averaging and selective filtering before unwrapping. We then compare a range of methods for both long wavelength corrections and referencing via automatic partitioning of non-deforming areas, then benchmark results against continuous GPS measurements. Our final time series consist of nearly 15 years of displacement measurements from continuous GPS data, and Envisat, ALOS-1, Sentinel SAR data, and show significant temporal and spatial variations. We find that the choice of reference and long wavelength corrections can significantly bias long-term rate and seasonal amplitude estimates, causing variations of as much as 100% of the mean estimate. As we enter an era with free and open data access and regular

  7. Analyzing the Impact of Different Pcv Calibration Models on Height Determination Using Gps/Glonass Observations from Asg-Eupos Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidowicz, Karol

    2014-12-01

    The integration of GPS with GLONASS is very important in satellite-based positioning because it can clearly improve reliability and availability. However, unlike GPS, GLONASS satellites transmit signals at different frequencies. This results in significant difficulties in modeling and ambiguity resolution for integrated GNSS positioning. There are also some difficulties related to the antenna Phase Center Variations (PCV) problem because, as is well known, the PCV is dependent on the received signal frequency dependent. Thus, processing simultaneous observations from different positioning systems, e.g. GPS and GLONASS, we can expect complications resulting from the different structure of signals and differences in satellite constellations. The ASG-EUPOS multifunctional system for precise satellite positioning is a part of the EUPOS project involving countries of Central and Eastern Europe. The number of its users is increasing rapidly. Currently 31 of 101 reference stations are equipped with GPS/GLONASS receivers and the number is still increasing. The aim of this paper is to study the height solution differences caused by using different PCV calibration models in integrated GPS/GLONASS observation processing. Studies were conducted based on the datasets from the ASG-EUPOS network. Since the study was intended to evaluate the impact on height determination from the users' point of view, a so-called "commercial" software was chosen for post-processing. The analysis was done in a baseline mode: 3 days of GNSS data collected with three different receivers and antennas were used. For the purposes of research the daily observations were divided into different sessions with a session length of one hour. The results show that switching between relative and absolute PCV models may cause an obvious effect on height determination. This issue is particularly important when mixed GPS/GLONASS observations are post-processed.

  8. GPS satellite clock determination in case of inter-frequency clock biases for triple-frequency precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiang; Geng, Jianghui

    2017-12-01

    Significant time-varying inter-frequency clock biases (IFCBs) within GPS observations prevent the application of the legacy L1/L2 ionosphere-free clock products on L5 signals. Conventional approaches overcoming this problem are to estimate L1/L5 ionosphere-free clocks in addition to their L1/L2 counterparts or to compute IFCBs between the L1/L2 and L1/L5 clocks which are later modeled through a harmonic analysis. In contrast, we start from the undifferenced uncombined GNSS model and propose an alternative approach where a second satellite clock parameter dedicated to the L5 signals is estimated along with the legacy L1/L2 clock. In this manner, we do not need to rely on the correlated L1/L2 and L1/L5 ionosphere-free observables which complicates triple-frequency GPS stochastic models, or account for the unfavorable time-varying hardware biases in undifferenced GPS functional models since they can be absorbed by the L5 clocks. An extra advantage over the ionosphere-free model is that external ionosphere constraints can potentially be introduced to improve PPP. With 27 days of triple-frequency GPS data from globally distributed stations, we find that the RMS of the positioning differences between our GPS model and all conventional models is below 1 mm for all east, north and up components, demonstrating the effectiveness of our model in addressing triple-frequency observations and time-varying IFCBs. Moreover, we can combine the L1/L2 and L5 clocks derived from our model to calculate precisely the L1/L5 clocks which in practice only depart from their legacy counterparts by less than 0.006 ns in RMS. Our triple-frequency GPS model proves convenient and efficient in combating time-varying IFCBs and can be generalized to more than three frequency signals for satellite clock determination.

  9. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  10. Front end for GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess Brooks (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The front end in GPS receivers has the functions of amplifying, down-converting, filtering and sampling the received signals. In the preferred embodiment, only two operations, A/D conversion and a sum, bring the signal from RF to filtered quadrature baseband samples. After amplification and filtering at RF, the L1 and L2 signals are each sampled at RF at a high selected subharmonic rate. The subharmonic sample rates are approximately 900 MHz for L1 and 982 MHz for L2. With the selected subharmonic sampling, the A/D conversion effectively down-converts the signal from RF to quadrature components at baseband. The resulting sample streams for L1 and L2 are each reduced to a lower rate with a digital filter, which becomes a straight sum in the simplest embodiment. The frequency subsystem can be very simple, only requiring the generation of a single reference frequency (e.g. 20.46 MHz minus a small offset) and the simple multiplication of this reference up to the subharmonic sample rates for L1 and L2. The small offset in the reference frequency serves the dual purpose of providing an advantageous offset in the down-converted carrier frequency and in the final baseband sample rate.

  11. Code and codeless ionospheric measurements with NASA's Rogue GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Jeff M.; Meehan, Tom K.; Young, Lawrence E.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Rogue Receiver is an 8-satellite, non-multiplexed, highly digital global positioning system (GPS) receiver that can obtain dual frequency data either with or without knowledge of the P-code. In addition to its applications for high accuracy geodesy and orbit determination, the Rogue uses GPS satellite signals to measure the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere along the lines of sight from the receiver to the satellites. These measurements are used by JPL's Deep Space Network (DSN) for calibrating radiometric data. This paper will discuss Rogue TEC measurements, emphasizing the advantages of a receiver that can use the P-code, when available, but can also obtain reliable dual frequency data when the code is encrypted.

  12. Empathy: what does it mean for GPs? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Derksen, Frans; Bensing, Jozien; Kuiper, Sascha; van Meerendonk, Milou; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine

    2015-02-01

    Research has highlighted empathy as an important and effective factor in patient-physician communication. GPs have extensive practical experience with empathy. However, little is known about the personal views of GPs regarding the meaning and application of empathy in daily practice. To explore GP's experiences and the application of empathy in daily practice and to investigate the practical use of empathy. Facts such as preconditions, barriers and facilitating possibilities are described. Qualitative interview study; 30 in-depth interviews were performed between June 2012 and January 2013 with a heterogeneous sample of Dutch GPs. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim; content analysis was performed with the help of ATLAS-ti. Empathy was seen as an important quality-increasing element during the patient-GP consultation. The application of non-verbal and verbal techniques was described. Attention to cues and references to previous consults were reported separately. Required preconditions were: being physically and mentally fit, feeling no time pressure and having an efficient practice organization. Not feeling connected to the patient and strict medical guidelines and protocols were identified as obstacles. A key consideration was the positive contribution of empathy to job satisfaction. The opinions of GPs in this research can be considered as supplementing and strengthening the findings of previous researches. The GPs in this study discussed, in particular, ideas important to the facilitation of empathy. These included: longer consultations, smaller practices, efficient telephonic triage by practice assistants, using intervision to help reflect on their work and drawing financiers' attention to the effectiveness of empathy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. GPs' communication skills - a study into women's comfort to disclose intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eleanor; O'Doherty, Lorna; Hegarty, Kelsey

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative research investigating the effects of general practitioner communication on a patient's comfort to disclose intimate partner violence is lacking. We explored the association between GPs' communication and patients' comfort to discuss fear of an intimate partner. A health/lifestyle survey mailed to 14 031 women (aged 16-50 years) who attended the participating GPs of 40 Victorian general practices during the previous year. There was a 32% response rate (n=4467). The results showed that female GPs were perceived as having better communication; an association between female GPs and comfort to disclose was not apparent in multivariate analyses. Time, caring, involving the patient in decisions and putting the patient at ease maintained associations with comfort to discuss, as did language, lower education, age >25 years and current fear. This study advocates increasing communication competence to allow for greater disclosure of sensitive issues such as intimate partner violence in the primary care context. However, it also signals a need in research and practice to focus on marginalised groups and intimate partner violence.

  14. Sensing Human Activity: GPS Tracking

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Stefan; van Schaick, Jeroen; de Bois, Peter; de Haan, Remco

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement of GPS technology enables the use of GPS devices not only as navigation and orientation tools, but also as instruments used to capture travelled routes: as sensors that measure activity on a city scale or the regional scale. TU Delft developed a process and database architecture for collecting data on pedestrian movement in three European city centres, Norwich, Rouen and Koblenz, and in another experiment for collecting activity data of 13 families in Almere (The Netherlands) for one week. The question posed in this paper is: what is the value of GPS as ‘sensor technology’ measuring activities of people? The conclusion is that GPS offers a widely useable instrument to collect invaluable spatial-temporal data on different scales and in different settings adding new layers of knowledge to urban studies, but the use of GPS-technology and deployment of GPS-devices still offers significant challenges for future research. PMID:22574061

  15. Satellite-motion Compensation for Monitoring Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) Using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson-Booth, N.; Penney, R.

    2016-12-01

    The ionosphere exerts a strong influence over a wide range of modern communications and navigtion systems, but is subject to complex influences from both terrestrial and solar sources. Ionospheric disturbances can be triggered by lower-atmosphere phenomena such as hurricanes as well as geophysical events such as earthquakes, as well as being strongly influenced by cyclical and unpredictable solar behaviour. Dual-band GPS receivers provide a popular and convenient means of obtaining information about the ionosphere, and ionospheric disturbances. While GPS measurements can provide clues about the state of the ionosphere, there are many challenges in obtaining reliable information from them. For example, drop-outs and carrier-phase cycle slips may have little influence on using GPS for (medium-precision) navigation, but can lead to signal-processing artefacts that would cause false alarms in detecting ionospheric disturbances. If one is interested in measuring the motion of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) one must also be able to disentangle the effects of satellite motion from the TID motion. We discuss a novel approach to robustly separating TID waveforms from background trends within GPS time-series of total electron content (TEC), as well as innovative techniques for estimating TID velocities using ideas from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Underpinning these, we consider how to robustly pre-process GPS time-series to reduce the influence of drop-outs while also reducing data volumes. We present comparisons of our TID velocity estimates with more standard "cross-correlation" techniques, including cases where these standard techniques produce pathological results. We also show results from simulated GPS time-series derived from modelled ionospheric disturbances.

  16. Simulation and analysis of differential GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denaro, R. P.

    NASA is conducting a research program to evaluate differential Global Positioning System (GPS) concepts for civil helicopter navigation. It is pointed out that the civil helicopter community will probably be an early user of GPS because of the unique mission operations in areas where precise navigation aids are not available. However, many of these applications involve accuracy requirements which cannot be satisfied by conventional GPS. Such applications include remote area search and rescue, offshore oil platform approach, remote area precision landing, and other precise navigation operations. Differential GPS provides a promising approach for meeting very demanding accuracy requirements. The considered procedure eliminates some of the common bias errors experienced by conventional GPS. This is done by making use of a second GPS receiver. A simulation process is developed as a tool for analyzing various scenarios of GPS-referenced civil aircraft navigation.

  17. The GPS Topex/Poseidon precise orbit determination experiment - Implications for design of GPS global networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, Ulf J.; Lichten, Stephen M.; Davis, Edgar S.; Theiss, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    Topex/Poseidon, a cooperative satellite mission between United States and France, aims to determine global ocean circulation patterns and to study their influence on world climate through precise measurements of sea surface height above the geoid with an on-board altimeter. To achieve the mission science aims, a goal of 13-cm orbit altitude accuracy was set. Topex/Poseidon includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) precise orbit determination (POD) system that has now demonstrated altitude accuracy better than 5 cm. The GPS POD system includes an on-board GPS receiver and a 6-station GPS global tracking network. This paper reviews early GPS results and discusses multi-mission capabilities available from a future enhanced global GPS network, which would provide ground-based geodetic and atmospheric calibrations needed for NASA deep space missions while also supplying tracking data for future low Earth orbiters. Benefits of the enhanced global GPS network include lower operations costs for deep space tracking and many scientific and societal benefits from the low Earth orbiter missions, including improved understanding of ocean circulation, ocean-weather interactions, the El Nino effect, the Earth thermal balance, and weather forecasting.

  18. Placebo use in the UK: a qualitative study exploring GPs' views on placebo effects in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Felicity L; Howick, Jeremy; Heneghan, Carl; Stevens, Sarah; Hobbs, F D Richard; Lewith, George

    2014-06-01

    Surveys show GPs use placebos in clinical practice and reported prevalence rates vary widely. To explore GPs' perspectives on clinical uses of placebos. A web-based survey of 783 UK GPs' use of placebos in clinical practice. Qualitative descriptive analysis of written responses ('comments') to three open-ended questions. Comments were classified into three categories: (i) defining placebos and their effects in general practice; (ii) ethical, societal and regulatory issues faced by doctors and (iii) reasons why a doctor might use placebos and placebo effects in clinical practice. GPs typically defined placebos as lacking something, be that adverse or beneficial effects, known mechanism of action and/or scientific evidence. Some GPs defined placebos positively as having potential to benefit patients, primarily through psychological mechanisms. GPs described a broad array of possible harms and benefits of placebo prescribing, reflecting fundamental bioethical principles, at the level of the individual, the doctor-patient relationship, the National Health Service and society. While some GPs were adamant that there was no place for placebos in clinical practice, others focused on the clinically beneficial effects of placebos in primary care. This study has elucidated specific costs, benefits and ethical barriers to placebo use as perceived by a large sample of UK GPs. Stand-alone qualitative work would provide a more in-depth understanding of GPs' views. Continuing education and professional guidance could help GPs update and contextualize their understanding of placebos and their clinical effects. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. An exploration of GPs' use of MRI: a critical incident study.

    PubMed

    Robling, M; Kinnersley, P; Houston, H; Hourihan, M; Cohen, D; Hale, J

    1998-06-01

    Direct access to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is becoming available to GPs in the UK, offering major benefits for the improved diagnosis and management of certain clinical conditions. Variations in usage of this service may be large, and effective locally produced guidelines are not currently available. The Department of General Practice is conducting a research programme to develop and evaluate methods to optimize MRI use by GPs. We aimed to describe the current use of MRI by GPs in South Glamorgan; to summarize their reasons for requesting MRI; and to produce criteria to assess the appropriateness of magnetic resonance (MR) scan requests. Using the critical incident technique, 25 GPs were interviewed about recent scans requested for patients with knee and lumbar spine complaints. A local panel of primary and secondary care doctors was convened to develop criteria for assessing MR scan requests. Sixty-two scan requests were discussed. Doctors' reasons for requesting MR scans were identified and classified. Reasons for requests included personal, contextual and biomedical variables. Fifteen patients (24%) were managed in primary care following MRI when otherwise they would have been referred. When referrals were made, GPs felt able to reinforce the request and occasionally to direct the patient somewhere more appropriate. The panel reviewed the interview data to produce objective criteria to assess scan requests. The criteria reflect the relative importance of non-biomedical variables in the decision to request MRI. The study identified those reasons which are important to GPs when requesting MR scans and the impact of this new technology upon patient management. Interview data have been used to inform locally developed consensus criteria, which will be made available as practice guidelines as the research programme progresses.

  20. GPS-SNO: computational prediction of protein S-nitrosylation sites with a modified GPS algorithm.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yu; Liu, Zexian; Gao, Xinjiao; Jin, Changjiang; Wen, Longping; Yao, Xuebiao; Ren, Jian

    2010-06-24

    As one of the most important and ubiquitous post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, S-nitrosylation plays important roles in a variety of biological processes, including the regulation of cellular dynamics and plasticity. Identification of S-nitrosylated substrates with their exact sites is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms of S-nitrosylation. In contrast with labor-intensive and time-consuming experimental approaches, prediction of S-nitrosylation sites using computational methods could provide convenience and increased speed. In this work, we developed a novel software of GPS-SNO 1.0 for the prediction of S-nitrosylation sites. We greatly improved our previously developed algorithm and released the GPS 3.0 algorithm for GPS-SNO. By comparison, the prediction performance of GPS 3.0 algorithm was better than other methods, with an accuracy of 75.80%, a sensitivity of 53.57% and a specificity of 80.14%. As an application of GPS-SNO 1.0, we predicted putative S-nitrosylation sites for hundreds of potentially S-nitrosylated substrates for which the exact S-nitrosylation sites had not been experimentally determined. In this regard, GPS-SNO 1.0 should prove to be a useful tool for experimentalists. The online service and local packages of GPS-SNO were implemented in JAVA and are freely available at: http://sno.biocuckoo.org/.

  1. A New Position Location System Using DTV Transmitter Identification Watermark Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianbin; Wu, Yiyan; Chouinard, Jean-Yves

    2006-12-01

    A new position location technique using the transmitter identification (TxID) RF watermark in the digital TV (DTV) signals is proposed in this paper. Conventional global positioning system (GPS) usually does not work well inside buildings due to the high frequency and weak field strength of the signal. In contrast to the GPS, the DTV signals are received from transmitters at relatively short distance, while the broadcast transmitters operate at levels up to the megawatts effective radiated power (ERP). Also the RF frequency of the DTV signal is much lower than the GPS, which makes it easier for the signal to penetrate buildings and other objects. The proposed position location system based on DTV TxID signal is presented in this paper. Practical receiver implementation issues including nonideal correlation and synchronization are analyzed and discussed. Performance of the proposed technique is evaluated through Monte Carlo simulations and compared with other existing position location systems. Possible ways to improve the accuracy of the new position location system is discussed.

  2. Data analysis of a dense GPS network operated during the ESCOMPTE campaign: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpersdorf, A.; Bock, O.; Doerflinger, E.; Masson, F.; van Baelen, J.; Somieski, A.; Bürki, B.

    The experiment GPS/H 2O involving 17 GPS receivers has been operated for two weeks in June 2001 in a dense network around Marseille. This project was integrated into the ESCOMPTE campaign. This paper will focus on the GPS analysis in preparation of the tomographic inversion of GPS slant delays. As first results, GPS tropospheric parameters zenith delays and horizontal gradients have been extracted. For a first visualization of the humidity field overlying the network, zenith delays have been transformed into precipitable water. Successive humidity fields are presented for a period of sudden drop in humidity, indicating some spatial resolution in the small network. The time series of horizontal gradients evaluated at individual sites are compared to correlated zenith delay variations over the whole network (horizontal gradient of zenith delays), showing that in the small size network horizontal atmospheric structure is reflected by both types of parameters. To compare these two quantities, scaling of zenith delays due to different station altitudes was necessary. In this way, a GPS internal validation of the individual gradients by comparison with the horizontal gradient of zenith delays has been established. Differential features along transects across the network indicate a good spatial resolution of tropospheric phenomena, encouraging for the further tomographic exploitation of the data. Moreover, individual and zenith delay gradients weight differently atmospheric horizontal gradients occurring at different heights. This different sensitivity has been used for a first identification of a vertical atmospheric structure from GPS tropospheric delays, by observing an inclined frontal zone crossing the network.

  3. Ideas for Future GPS Timing Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsell, Steven T.

    1996-01-01

    Having recently met stringent criteria for full operational capability (FOC) certification, the Global Positioning System (GPS) now has higher customer expectations than ever before. In order to maintain customer satisfaction, and the meet the even high customer demands of the future, the GPS Master Control Station (MCS) must play a critical role in the process of carefully refining the performance and integrity of the GPS constellation, particularly in the area of timing. This paper will present an operational perspective on several ideas for improving timing in GPS. These ideas include the desire for improving MCS - US Naval Observatory (USNO) data connectivity, an improved GPS-Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) prediction algorithm, a more robust Kalman Filter, and more features in the GPS reference time algorithm (the GPS composite clock), including frequency step resolution, a more explicit use of the basic time scale equation, and dynamic clock weighting. Current MCS software meets the exceptional challenge of managing an extremely complex constellation of 24 navigation satellites. The GPS community will, however, always seek to improve upon this performance and integrity.

  4. GPS timing products - Naval Oceanography Portal

    Science.gov Websites

    section Advanced Search... Sections Home Time Earth Orientation Astronomy Meteorology Oceanography Ice You are here: Home › USNO › Precise Time › GPS USNO Logo USNO Navigation Master Clock GPS Display Clocks TWSTT Telephone Time NTP Info GPS timing products USNO monitors the GPS constellation and provides

  5. Multipath calibration in GPS pseudorange measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kee, Changdon (Inventor); Parkinson, Bradford W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Novel techniques are disclosed for eliminating multipath errors, including mean bias errors, in pseudorange measurements made by conventional global positioning system receivers. By correlating the multipath signals of different satellites at their cross-over points in the sky, multipath mean bias errors are effectively eliminated. By then taking advantage of the geometrical dependence of multipath, a linear combination of spherical harmonics are fit to the satellite multipath data to create a hemispherical model of the multipath. This calibration model can then be used to compensate for multipath in subsequent measurements and thereby obtain GPS positioning to centimeter accuracy.

  6. The need for GPS standardization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.; Petit, Gerard; Thomas, Claudine

    1992-01-01

    A desirable and necessary step for improvement of the accuracy of Global Positioning System (GPS) time comparisons is the establishment of common GPS standards. For this reason, the CCDS proposed the creation of a special group of experts with the objective of recommending procedures and models for operational time transfer by GPS common-view method. Since the announcement of the implementation of Selective Availability at the end of last spring, action has become much more urgent and this CCDS Group on GPS Time Transfer Standards has now been set up. It operates under the auspices of the permanent CCDS Working Group on TAI and works in close cooperation with the Sub-Committee on Time of the Civil GPS Service Interface Committee (CGSIC). Taking as an example the implementation of SA during the first week of July 1991, this paper illustrates the need to develop urgently at least two standardized procedures in GPS receiver software: monitoring GPS tracks with a common time scale and retaining broadcast ephemeris parameters throughout the duration of a track. Other matters requiring action are the adoption of common models for atmospheric delay, a common approach to hardware design and agreement about short-term data processing. Several examples of such deficiencies in standardization are presented.

  7. SLR tracking of GPS-35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlis, Erricos C.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment was designed to launch a corner cube retroreflector array on one of the Global Positioning Satellites (GPS). The launch on Aug. 31, 1993 ushered in the era of SLR tracking of GPS spacecraft. Once the space operations group finished the check-out procedures for the new satellite, the agreed upon SLR sites were allowed to track it. The first site to acquire GPS-35 was the Russian system at Maidanak and closely after the MLRS system at McDonald Observatory, Texas. The laser tracking network is currently tracking the GPS spacecraft known as GPS-35 or PRN 5 with great success. From the NASA side there are five stations that contribute data regularly and nearly as many from the international partners. Upcoming modifications to the ground receivers will allow for a further increase in the tracking capabilities of several additional sites and add some desperately needed southern hemisphere tracking. We are analyzing the data and are comparing SLR-derived orbits to those determined on the basis of GPS radiometric data.

  8. GPS net­work operations for the International GPS Geodynamics Service

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neilan, Ruth E.

    1993-01-01

    As GPS technology comes of age in the 1990’s, it is evident that an internationally sponsored GPS tracking system is called for to provide consistent, timely ground tracking data and data products to the geophysical community. The planning group for the International GPS Geodynamics Service (IGS), sponsored by the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), is addressing all elements of the end-to-end tracking system, ranging from data collection to data analysis and distribution of products (Mueller, 1992). Part of the planning process is to formulate how these various elements work together to create the common infrastructure needed to support a wide variety of GPS investigations. A key element for any permanent satellite tracking system is certainly the acquisition segment; the reliability and robustness of the ground network operations directly determine the fates and limitations of final products. The IGS planning group therefore included a committee tasked to develop and establish standards governing data acquisition and site-specific characteristics deemed necessary to ensure the collection of a high quality, continuous data set.

  9. Features of High-Latitude Ionospheric Irregularities Development as Revealed by Ground-Based GPS Observations, Satellite-Borne GPS Observations and Satellite In Situ Measurements over the Territory of Russia during the Geomagnetic Storm on March 17-18, 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkova, I. E.; Cherniak, Iu. V.; Shagimuratov, I. I.; Klimenko, M. V.

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic picture of the response of the high- and mid-latitude ionosphere to the strong geomagnetic disturbances on March 17-18, 2015, has been studied with ground-based and satellite observations, mainly, by transionospheric measurements of delays of GPS (Global Positioning System) signals. The advantages of the joint use of ground-based GPS measurements and GPS measurements on board of the Swarm Low-Earth-Orbit satellite mission for monitoring of the appearance of ionospheric irregularities over the territory of Russia are shown for the first time. The results of analysis of ground-based and space-borne GPS observations, as well as satellite, in situ measurements, revealed large-scale ionospheric plasma irregularities observed over the territory of Russia in the latitude range of 50°-85° N during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm. The most intense ionospheric irregularities were detected in the auroral zone and in the region of the main ionospheric trough (MIT). It has been found that sharp changes in the phase of the carrier frequency of the navigation signal from all tracked satellites were recorded at all GPS stations located to the North from 55° MLAT. The development of a deep MIT was related to dynamic processes in the subauroral ionosphere, in particular, with electric fields of the intense subauroral polarization stream. Analysis of the electron and ion density values obtained by instruments on board of the Swarm and DMSP satellites showed that the zone of highly structured auroral ionosphere extended at least to heights of 850-900 km.

  10. A method of undifferenced ambiguity resolution for GPS+GLONASS precise point positioning

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Wenting; Song, Weiwei; Lou, Yidong; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution is critical for achieving positions of high precision and for shortening the convergence time of precise point positioning (PPP). However, GLONASS adopts the signal processing technology of frequency division multiple access and results in inter-frequency code biases (IFCBs), which are currently difficult to correct. This bias makes the methods proposed for GPS ambiguity fixing unsuitable for GLONASS. To realize undifferenced GLONASS ambiguity fixing, we propose an undifferenced ambiguity resolution method for GPS+GLONASS PPP, which considers the IFCBs estimation. The experimental result demonstrates that the success rate of GLONASS ambiguity fixing can reach 75% through the proposed method. Compared with the ambiguity float solutions, the positioning accuracies of ambiguity-fixed solutions of GLONASS-only PPP are increased by 12.2%, 20.9%, and 10.3%, and that of the GPS+GLONASS PPP by 13.0%, 35.2%, and 14.1% in the North, East and Up directions, respectively. PMID:27222361

  11. A method of undifferenced ambiguity resolution for GPS+GLONASS precise point positioning.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wenting; Song, Weiwei; Lou, Yidong; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Yibin

    2016-05-25

    Integer ambiguity resolution is critical for achieving positions of high precision and for shortening the convergence time of precise point positioning (PPP). However, GLONASS adopts the signal processing technology of frequency division multiple access and results in inter-frequency code biases (IFCBs), which are currently difficult to correct. This bias makes the methods proposed for GPS ambiguity fixing unsuitable for GLONASS. To realize undifferenced GLONASS ambiguity fixing, we propose an undifferenced ambiguity resolution method for GPS+GLONASS PPP, which considers the IFCBs estimation. The experimental result demonstrates that the success rate of GLONASS ambiguity fixing can reach 75% through the proposed method. Compared with the ambiguity float solutions, the positioning accuracies of ambiguity-fixed solutions of GLONASS-only PPP are increased by 12.2%, 20.9%, and 10.3%, and that of the GPS+GLONASS PPP by 13.0%, 35.2%, and 14.1% in the North, East and Up directions, respectively.

  12. Study of the GPS inter-frequency calibration of timing receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defraigne, P.; Huang, W.; Bertrand, B.; Rovera, D.

    2018-02-01

    When calibrating Global Positioning System (GPS) stations dedicated to timing, the hardware delays of P1 and P2, the P(Y)-codes on frequencies L1 and L2, are determined separately. In the international atomic time (TAI) network the GPS stations of the time laboratories are calibrated relatively against reference stations. This paper aims at determining the consistency between the P1 and P2 hardware delays (called dP1 and dP2) of these reference stations, and to look at the stability of the inter-signal hardware delays dP1-dP2 of all the stations in the network. The method consists of determining the dP1-dP2 directly from the GPS pseudorange measurements corrected for the frequency-dependent antenna phase center and the frequency-dependent ionosphere corrections, and then to compare these computed dP1-dP2 to the calibrated values. Our results show that the differences between the computed and calibrated dP1-dP2 are well inside the expected combined uncertainty of the two quantities. Furthermore, the consistency between the calibrated time transfer solution obtained from either single-frequency P1 or dual-frequency P3 for reference laboratories is shown to be about 1.0 ns, well inside the 2.1 ns uB uncertainty of a time transfer link based on GPS P3 or Precise Point Positioning. This demonstrates the good consistency between the P1 and P2 hardware delays of the reference stations used for calibration in the TAI network. The long-term stability of the inter-signal hardware delays is also analysed from the computed dP1-dP2. It is shown that only variations larger than 2 ns can be detected for a particular station, while variations of 200 ps can be detected when differentiating the results between two stations. Finally, we also show that in the differential calibration process as used in the TAI network, using the same antenna phase center or using different positions for L1 and L2 signals gives maximum differences of 200 ps on the hardware delays of the separate

  13. GPS in ten years

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-16

    What will GPS look like in ten years? This paper discusses improvements to the overall GPS system planned over the next ten years and examines their impact on system performance for several applications. The Presidential Decision Directive (PDD) rele...

  14. First light from a kilometer-baseline Scintillation Auroral GPS Array.

    PubMed

    Datta-Barua, S; Su, Y; Deshpande, K; Miladinovich, D; Bust, G S; Hampton, D; Crowley, G

    2015-05-28

    We introduce and analyze the first data from an array of closely spaced Global Positioning System (GPS) scintillation receivers established in the auroral zone in late 2013 to measure spatial and temporal variations in L band signals at 100-1000 m and subsecond scales. The seven receivers of the Scintillation Auroral GPS Array (SAGA) are sited at Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska. The receivers produce 100 s scintillation indices and 100 Hz carrier phase and raw in-phase and quadrature-phase samples. SAGA is the largest existing array with baseline lengths of the ionospheric diffractive Fresnel scale at L band. With an initial array of five receivers, we identify a period of simultaneous amplitude and phase scintillation. We compare SAGA power and phase data with collocated 630.0 nm all-sky images of an auroral arc and incoherent scatter radar electron precipitation measurements, to illustrate how SAGA can be used in multi-instrument observations for subkilometer-scale studies. A seven-receiver Scintillation Auroral GPS Array (SAGA) is now at Poker Flat, Alaska SAGA is the largest subkilometer array to enable phase/irregularities studies Simultaneous scintillation, auroral arc, and electron precipitation are observed.

  15. Analysis of Vlbi, Slr and GPS Site Position Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angermann, D.; Krügel, M.; Meisel, B.; Müller, H.; Tesmer, V.

    Conventionally the IERS terrestrial reference frame (ITRF) is realized by the adoption of a set of epoch coordinates and linear velocities for a set of global tracking stations. Due to the remarkable progress of the space geodetic observation techniques (e.g. VLBI, SLR, GPS) the accuracy and consistency of the ITRF increased continuously. The accuracy achieved today is mainly limited by technique-related systematic errors, which are often poorly characterized or quantified. Therefore it is essential to analyze the individual techniques' solutions with respect to systematic differences, models, parameters, datum definition, etc. Main subject of this presentation is the analysis of GPS, SLR and VLBI time series of site positions. The investigations are based on SLR and VLBI solutions computed at DGFI with the software systems DOGS (SLR) and OCCAM (VLBI). The GPS time series are based on weekly IGS station coordinates solutions. We analyze the time series with respect to the issues mentioned above. In particular we characterize the noise in the time series, identify periodic signals, and investigate non-linear effects that complicate the assignment of linear velocities for global tracking sites. One important aspect is the comparison of results obtained by different techniques at colocation sites.

  16. Using Meteosat-10 and GPS ZWD measurements for creating regional water vapor maps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontiev, Anton; Reuveni, Yuval

    2017-04-01

    Water vapor (WV) is one of the greenhouse gases, which plays a crucial role in global warming. It's investigation is of great importance for climate and global warming studies. One of the main difficulties of such studies is that WV varies constantly across the lower part of the atmosphere. Currently, most of studies provides WV estimations using only one technique such as tropospheric GPS path delays [Duan et al.] or multi-spectral reflected measurements from different meteorological satellites such as the Meteosat series [Schroedter et al.]. Constructing WV maps using only interpolated GPS zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimations has a main disadvantage - it doesn't take in account clouds which are located outside the integrated GPS paths. Using our previous work [Leontiev, Reuveni, in review] we were able to estimate Meteosat-10 7.3 μm WV pixel values by extracting the mathematical dependency between the WV amount calculated using GPS ZWD and the Meteosat-10 data. Here, we present a new strategy which combines these two approaches for WV estimation by using the mathematical dependency between GPS-ZWD and Meteosat-10 in order to evaluate the WV amount at cloudy conditions when preforming the interpolation between adjusted GPS station inside our network. This approach increases the accuracy of the estimated regional water vapor maps. References: Duan, J. et al. (1996), GPS Meteorology: Direct Estimation of the Absolute Value of Precipitable Water, J. Appl. Meteorol., 35(6), 830-838, doi:10.1175/15200450(1996)035<0830:GMDEOT>2.0.CO;2. Leontiev, A., Reuveni, Y.: Combining METEOSAT-10 satellite image data with GPS tropospheric path delays to estimate regional Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) distribution, Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss, doi:10.5194/amt-2016-217, in review, 2016. Schroedter-Homscheidt, M., A. Drews, and S. Heise (2008), Total water vapor column retrieval from MSG-SEVIRI split window measurements exploiting the daily cycle of land surface temperatures, Remote Sens

  17. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  18. GPS Metric Tracking Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) applications become more prevalent for land- and air-based vehicles, GPS applications for space vehicles will also increase. The Applied Technology Directorate of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a lightweight, low-cost GPS Metric Tracking Unit (GMTU), the first of two steps in developing a lightweight, low-cost Space-Based Tracking and Command Subsystem (STACS) designed to meet Range Safety's link margin and latency requirements for vehicle command and telemetry data. The goals of STACS are to improve Range Safety operations and expand tracking capabilities for space vehicles. STACS will track the vehicle, receive commands, and send telemetry data through the space-based asset, which will dramatically reduce dependence on ground-based assets. The other step was the Low-Cost Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Transceiver (LCT2), developed by the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), which allows the vehicle to communicate with a geosynchronous relay satellite. Although the GMTU and LCT2 were independently implemented and tested, the design collaboration of KSC and WFF engineers allowed GMTU and LCT2 to be integrated into one enclosure, leading to the final STACS. In operation, GMTU needs only a radio frequency (RF) input from a GPS antenna and outputs position and velocity data to the vehicle through a serial or pulse code modulation (PCM) interface. GMTU includes one commercial GPS receiver board and a custom board, the Command and Telemetry Processor (CTP) developed by KSC. The CTP design is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processors to support GPS functions.

  19. Influence of the ac-Stark shift on GPS atomic clock timekeeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formichella, V.; Camparo, J.; Tavella, P.

    2017-01-01

    The ac-Stark shift (or light shift) is a fundamental aspect of the field/atom interaction arising from virtual transitions between atomic states, and as Alfred Kastler noted, it is the real-photon counterpart of the Lamb shift. In the rubidium atomic frequency standards (RAFS) flying on Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites, it plays an important role as one of the major perturbations defining the RAFS' frequency: the rf-discharge lamp in the RAFS creates an atomic signal via optical pumping and simultaneously perturbs the atoms' ground-state hyperfine splitting via the light shift. Though the significance of the light shift has been known for decades, to date there has been no concrete evidence that it limits the performance of the high-quality RAFS flying on GPS satellites. Here, we show that the long-term frequency stability of GPS RAFS is primarily determined by the light shift as a consequence of stochastic jumps in lamplight intensity. Our results suggest three paths forward for improved GPS system timekeeping: (1) reduce the light-shift coefficient of the RAFS by careful control of the lamp's spectrum; (2) operate the lamp under conditions where lamplight jumps are not so pronounced; and (3) employ a light source for optical pumping that does not suffer pronounced light jumps (e.g., a diode laser).

  20. Monitoring and Prediction of Precipitable Water Vapor using GPS data in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Kutubuddin; Althuwaynee, Omar F.; Corumluoglu, Ozsen

    2016-12-01

    Although Global Positioning System (GPS) primarily provide accurate estimates of position, velocity and time of the receiver, as the signals pass through the atmoshphere carrying its signatures, thus offers opportunities for atmoshpheric applications. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) is a vital component of the atmosphere and significantly influences atmospheric processes like rainfall and atmospheric temperature. The developing networks of continuously operating GPS can be used to efficiently estimate PWV. The Turkish Permanent GPS Network (TPGN) is employed to monitor PWV information in Turkey. This work primarily aims to derive long-term data of PWV by using atmospheric path delays observed through continuously operating TPGN from November 2014 to October 2015. A least square mathematical approach was then applied to establish the relation of the observed PWV to rainfall and temperature. The modeled PWV was correlated with PWV estimated from GPS data, with an average correlation of 67.10 %-88.60 %. The estimated root mean square error (RMSE) varied from 2.840 to 6.380, with an average of 4.697. Finally, data of TPGN, rainfall, and temperature were obtained for less than 2 months (November 2015 to December 2015) and assessed to validate the mathematical model. This study provides a basis for determining PWV by using rainfall and temperature data.

  1. Monitoring beach changes using GPS surveying techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert; Leach, Mark P.; Paine, Jeffrey G.; Cardoza, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    The adaptation of Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying techniques to beach monitoring activities is a promising response to this challenge. An experiment that employed both GPS and conventional beach surveying was conducted, and a new beach monitoring method employing kinematic GPS surveys was devised. This new method involves the collection of precise shore-parallel and shore-normal GPS positions from a moving vehicle so that an accurate two-dimensional beach surface can be generated. Results show that the GPS measurements agree with conventional shore-normal surveys at the 1 cm level, and repeated GPS measurements employing the moving vehicle demonstrate a precision of better than 1 cm. In addition, the nearly continuous sampling and increased resolution provided by the GPS surveying technique reveals alongshore changes in beach morphology that are undetected by conventional shore-normal profiles. The application of GPS surveying techniques combined with the refinement of appropriate methods for data collection and analysis provides a better understanding of beach changes, sediment transport, and storm impacts.

  2. GPS/GNSS Antenna Characterization : GPS-ABC Workshop V RTCA Washington, DC October 14, 2016.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-10-14

    One component of the Department of Transportations GPS Adjacent Band : Compatibility Study is the characterization of GPS/GNSS receiver antennas : Such characterization is needed to: : Compare radiated and conducted (wired) test result...

  3. An evaluation of the accuracy and performance of lightweight GPS collars in a suburban environment.

    PubMed

    Adams, Amy L; Dickinson, Katharine J M; Robertson, Bruce C; van Heezik, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    The recent development of lightweight GPS collars has enabled medium-to-small sized animals to be tracked via GPS telemetry. Evaluation of the performance and accuracy of GPS collars is largely confined to devices designed for large animals for deployment in natural environments. This study aimed to assess the performance of lightweight GPS collars within a suburban environment, which may be different from natural environments in a way that is relevant to satellite signal acquisition. We assessed the effects of vegetation complexity, sky availability (percentage of clear sky not obstructed by natural or artificial features of the environment), proximity to buildings, and satellite geometry on fix success rate (FSR) and location error (LE) for lightweight GPS collars within a suburban environment. Sky availability had the largest affect on FSR, while LE was influenced by sky availability, vegetation complexity, and HDOP (Horizontal Dilution of Precision). Despite the complexity and modified nature of suburban areas, values for FSR (mean= 90.6%) and LE (mean = 30.1 m) obtained within the suburban environment are comparable to those from previous evaluations of GPS collars designed for larger animals and within less built-up environments. Due to fine-scale patchiness of habitat within urban environments, it is recommended that resource selection methods that are not reliant on buffer sizes be utilised for selection studies.

  4. Shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The various integration problems in the Shuttle GPS system were investigated. The analysis of the Shuttle GPS link was studied. A preamplifier was designed since the Shuttle GPS antennas must be located remotely from the receiver. Several GPS receiver architecture trade-offs were discussed. The Shuttle RF harmonics and intermode that fall within the GPS receiver bandwidth were analyzed. The GPS PN code acquisition was examined. Since the receiver clock strongly affects both GPS carrier and code acquisition performance, a clock model was developed.

  5. The X-Ray Weakness of GPS Radio Galaxies: A Volume-Limited Complete Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Siemiginowska, Aneta (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    The XMM observations of Mkn 668 have been analyzed. We found soft X-ray signatures of a hot plasma (kT approximately 10^7 approximately K) and a hard X-ray emission from the nucleus. The X-ray spectrum above 2.5 approximately keV is characterized by a very flat (observed photon index, Gamma approximately 0.5) power-law continuum, alongside with a strong Fe-K-alpha neutral iron fluorescent line (EW approximately 600 approximately eV). The best explanation for the origin of this high energy X-ray emission is in terms of the Compton-reflection of the nuclear emission. The primary X-ray emission is obscured by a Compton-thick (N_H approximately 10^24 approximately cm-2) matter which becomes transparent at higher energies. The observed above 2.5-keV X-rays are mostly due to reflection which is indicated by a strong Fe-K-alpha line. This represents the second hard X-ray detection of the GPS galaxy ever (the first one being 1345+125; O Dea et al. 2000). Interestingly, the both such trend is confirmed by our on going XMM-Newton observations of a larger GPS sample, it would lead us to looking into the question on how the dense nuclear environment impacts the nature and evolution of a GPS source, and more generally, on the history of radio power in the universe. The paper summarizing the results has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics in December 2003.

  6. GPS Timing Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    termed the Galileo -GPS Time Offset (GGTO), and it will be Type 35 in the GPS CNAV message. Knowledge of the GGTO makes it possible for a properly...U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) [1]. Interoperability with Galileo , and perhaps someday with other Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), is to...Interoperability with Galileo , and perhaps someday with other Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), is to be established through transmission of the

  7. Comparisons of COSMIC and C/NOFS GPS Occultation Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements with Ground-based Radar and VHF Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, F. H.; Groves, K. M.; Straus, P. R.; Caton, R. G.; Starks, M. J.; Tanyi, K. L.; Verlinden, M.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities are known to cause scintillation of trans-ionospheric radio signals and can affect space-based UHF/VHF communications, causing outages, and degrading GPS accuracy and precision. Current capability for characterizing and predicting ionospheric scintillation utilizes a network of ground-based receivers to detect scintillation and then extrapolate for short-term forecasts. Practical limits on deploying the ground receivers limits the accuracy and spatial coverage one can achieve with this approach. A more global approach is to use a set of space-based satellites equipped with GPS receivers, such as the COSMIC satellite constellation, to measure scintillations observed during so-called occultations with GPS satellites. In this paper the signal-to-noise values of GPS L1 signals received on the COSMIC and C/NOFS satellites for the portions of the occultations that are not affected by the terrestrial atmosphere are examined to help identify areas of ionospheric scintillation. Three years of S4 scintillation index values from COSMIC occultations are compared with near-zenith ground-based VHF S4 scintillation measurements from the AFRL SCIntillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) network stations. The data are correlated to ascertain the viability of using space-based scintillation measurements to characterize and predict scintillation to ground-based receivers. Several days of COSMIC and C/NOFS data are compared with each other and the ALTAIR radar located on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands to examine how occultation geometry affects observed scintillation and also to verify techniques that provide an upper bound on the spatial location of the ionospheric irregularities contributing to scintillations observed in the occultations.

  8. Solid pole tide in global GPS and superconducting gravimeter observations: Signal retrieval and inference for mantle anelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Chao, Benjamin F.

    2017-02-01

    The mantle anelasticity plays an important role in Earth's interior dynamics. Here we seek to determine the lower-mantle anelasticity through the solution of the complex Love numbers at the Chandler wobble period. The Love numbers h21, l21, δ21 and k21 are obtained in the frequency domain by dividing off the observed polar motion, or more specifically the pole tide potential, from the observed GPS 3-D displacement field and SG gravity variation. The latter signals are obtained through the array processing method of OSE (optimal sequence estimation) that results in greatly enhanced signals to be extracted from global array data. The resultant Love number estimates h21 = 0.6248 (± 5 e - 4) - 0.013 (± 5 e - 3) i, l21 = 0.0904 (± 8 e - 4) - 0.0008 (± 2 e - 3) i, δ21 = 1.156 (± 2 e - 3) - 0.003 (± 1 e - 3) i and k21 = 0.3125 (± 2 e - 3) - 0.0069 (± 3 e - 3) i are thus well-constrained in comparison to past estimates that vary considerably. They further lead to estimates of the corresponding mantle anelastic parameters fr and fi, which in turn determines, under the single-absorption band assumption, the dispersion exponent of α = 0.21 ± 0.02 with respect to the reference frequency of 5 mHz. We believe our estimate is robust and hence can better constrain the mantle anelasticity and attenuation models of the Earth interior.

  9. Lessons Learned in over Two Decades of GPS/GNSS Data Center Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boler, F. M.; Estey, L. H.; Meertens, C. M.; Maggert, D.

    2014-12-01

    The UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, curates, archives, and distributes geodesy data and products, mainly GPS/GNSS data from 3,000 permanent stations and 10,000 campaign sites around the globe. Although now having core support from NSF and NASA, the archive began around 1992 as a grass-roots effort of a few UNAVCO staff and community members to preserve data going back to 1986. Open access to this data is generally desired, but the Data Center in fact operates under an evolving suite of data access policies ranging from open access to nondisclosure for special cases. Key to processing this data is having the correct equipment metadata; reliably obtaining this metadata continues to be a challenge, in spite of modern cyberinfrastructure and tools, mostly due to human errors or lack of consistent operator training. New metadata problems surface when trying to design and publish modern Digital Object Identifiers for data sets where PIs, funding sources, and historical project names now need to be corrected and verified for data sets going back almost three decades. Originally, the data was GPS-only based on three signals on two carrier frequencies. Modern GNSS covers GPS modernization (three more signals and one additional carrier) as well as open signals and carriers of additional systems such as GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, and QZSS, requiring ongoing adaptive strategies to assess the quality of modern datasets. Also, new scientific uses of these data benefit from higher data rates than was needed for early tectonic applications. In addition, there has been a migration from episodic campaign sites (hence sparse data) to continuously operating stations (hence dense data) over the last two decades. All of these factors make it difficult to realistically plan even simple data center functions such as on-line storage capacity.

  10. Precise Positioning of Uavs - Dealing with Challenging Rtk-Gps Measurement Conditions during Automated Uav Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, F.; Eling, C.; Klingbeil, L.; Kuhlmann, H.

    2017-08-01

    For some years now, UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) are commonly used for different mobile mapping applications, such as in the fields of surveying, mining or archeology. To improve the efficiency of these applications an automation of the flight as well as the processing of the collected data is currently aimed at. One precondition for an automated mapping with UAVs is that the georeferencing is performed directly with cm-accuracies or better. Usually, a cm-accurate direct positioning of UAVs is based on an onboard multi-sensor system, which consists of an RTK-capable (real-time kinematic) GPS (global positioning system) receiver and additional sensors (e.g. inertial sensors). In this case, the absolute positioning accuracy essentially depends on the local GPS measurement conditions. Especially during mobile mapping applications in urban areas, these conditions can be very challenging, due to a satellite shadowing, non-line-of sight receptions, signal diffraction or multipath effects. In this paper, two straightforward and easy to implement strategies will be described and analyzed, which improve the direct positioning accuracies for UAV-based mapping and surveying applications under challenging GPS measurement conditions. Based on a 3D model of the surrounding buildings and vegetation in the area of interest, a GPS geometry map is determined, which can be integrated in the flight planning process, to avoid GPS challenging environments as far as possible. If these challenging environments cannot be avoided, the GPS positioning solution is improved by using obstruction adaptive elevation masks, to mitigate systematic GPS errors in the RTK-GPS positioning. Simulations and results of field tests demonstrate the profit of both strategies.

  11. Applications of GPS technologies to field sports.

    PubMed

    Aughey, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology was made possible after the invention of the atomic clock. The first suggestion that GPS could be used to assess the physical activity of humans followed some 40 y later. There was a rapid uptake of GPS technology, with the literature concentrating on validation studies and the measurement of steady-state movement. The first attempts were made to validate GPS for field sport applications in 2006. While GPS has been validated for applications for team sports, some doubts continue to exist on the appropriateness of GPS for measuring short high-velocity movements. Thus, GPS has been applied extensively in Australian football, cricket, hockey, rugby union and league, and soccer. There is extensive information on the activity profile of athletes from field sports in the literature stemming from GPS, and this includes total distance covered by players and distance in velocity bands. Global positioning systems have also been applied to detect fatigue in matches, identify periods of most intense play, different activity profiles by position, competition level, and sport. More recent research has integrated GPS data with the physical capacity or fitness test score of athletes, game-specific tasks, or tactical or strategic information. The future of GPS analysis will involve further miniaturization of devices, longer battery life, and integration of other inertial sensor data to more effectively quantify the effort of athletes.

  12. Global navigation satellite system receiver for weak signals under all dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziedan, Nesreen Ibrahim

    The ability of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver to work under weak signal and various dynamic conditions is required in some applications. For example, to provide a positioning capability in wireless devices, or orbit determination of Geostationary and high Earth orbit satellites. This dissertation develops Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver algorithms for such applications. Fifteen algorithms are developed for the GPS C/A signal. They cover all the receiver main functions, which include acquisition, fine acquisition, bit synchronization, code and carrier tracking, and navigation message decoding. They are integrated together, and they can be used in any software GPS receiver. They also can be modified to fit any other GPS or GNSS signals. The algorithms have new capabilities. The processing and memory requirements are considered in the design to allow the algorithms to fit the limited resources of some applications; they do not require any assisting information. Weak signals can be acquired in the presence of strong interfering signals and under high dynamic conditions. The fine acquisition, bit synchronization, and tracking algorithms are based on the Viterbi algorithm and Extended Kalman filter approaches. The tracking algorithms capabilities increase the time to lose lock. They have the ability to adaptively change the integration length and the code delay separation. More than one code delay separation can be used in the same time. Large tracking errors can be detected and then corrected by a re-initialization and an acquisition-like algorithms. Detecting the navigation message is needed to increase the coherent integration; decoding it is needed to calculate the navigation solution. The decoding algorithm utilizes the message structure to enable its decoding for signals with high Bit Error Rate. The algorithms are demonstrated using simulated GPS C/A code signals, and TCXO clocks. The results have shown the algorithms ability to

  13. Spaceborne GPS: Current Status and Future Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Hartman, Kate; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), developed by the Department of Defense is quickly revolutionizing the architecture of future spacecraft and spacecraft systems. Significant savings in spacecraft life cycle cost, in power, and in mass can be realized by exploiting GPS technology in spaceborne vehicles. These savings are realized because GPS is a systems sensor--it combines the ability to sense space vehicle trajectory, attitude, time, and relative ranging between vehicles into one package. As a result, a reduced spacecraft sensor complement can be employed and significant reductions in space vehicle operations cost can be realized through enhanced on-board autonomy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of spaceborne GPS, a description of spaceborne GPS receivers available now and in the near future, a description of the 1997-2000 GPS flight experiments, and the spaceborne GPS team's vision for the future.

  14. Consistency of GPS and strong-motion records: case study of the Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psimoulis, Panos; Houlié, Nicolas; Michel, Clotaire; Meindl, Michael; Rothacher, Markus

    2014-05-01

    High-rate GPS data are today commonly used to supplement seismic data for the Earth surface motions focusing on earthquake characterisation and rupture modelling. Processing of GPS records using Precise Point Positioning (PPP) can provide real-time information of seismic wave propagation, tsunami early-warning and seismic rupture. Most studies have shown differences between the GPS and seismic systems at very long periods (e.g. >100sec) and static displacements. The aim of this study is the assessment of the consistency of GPS and strong-motion records by comparing their respective displacement waveforms for several frequency bands. For this purpose, the records of the GPS (GEONET) and the strong-motion (KiK-net and K-NET) networks corresponding to the Mw9.0 Tohoku 2011 earthquake were analysed. The comparison of the displacement waveforms of collocated (distance<100m) GPS and strong-motion sites show that the consistency between the two datasets depends on the frequency of the excitation. Differences are mainly due to the GPS noise at relatively short-periods (<3-4 s) and the saturation of the strong-motion sensors for relatively long-periods (40-80 s). Furthermore the agreement between the GPS and strong-motion records also depends on the direction of the excitation signal and the distance from the epicentre. In conclusion, velocities and displacements recovered from GPS and strong-motion records are consistent for long-periods (3-100 s), proving that GPS networks can contribute to the real-time estimation of the long-period ground motion map of an earthquake.

  15. Sampling the Vertical Moisture Structure of an Atmospheric River Event Using Airborne GPS Radio Occultation Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Malloy, K.; Murphy, B.; Sussman, J.; Zhang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are of high concern in California, bringing significant rain to the region over extended time periods of up to 5 days, potentially causing floods, and more importantly, contributing to the Sierra snowpack that provides much of the regional water resources. The CalWater project focuses on predicting the variability of the West Coast water supply, including improving AR forecasting. Unfortunately, data collection over the ocean remains a challenge and impacts forecasting accuracy. One novel technique to address this issue includes airborne GPS radio occultation (ARO), using broadcast GPS signals from space to measure the signal ray path bending angle and refractivity to retrieve vertical water vapor profiles. The Global Navigation Satellite System Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) system was developed for this purpose for recording and processing high-sample rate (10MHz) signals in the lower troposphere. Previous studies (Murphy et al, 2014) have shown promising results in acquiring airborne GPS RO data, comparing it to dropsondes and numerical weather models. CalWater launched a field campaign in the beginning of 2015 which included testing GISMOS ARO on the NOAA GIV aircraft for AR data acquisition, flying into the February 6th AR event that brought up to 35 cm of rain to central California. This case study will compare airborne GPS RO refractivity profiles to the NCEP-NCAR final reanalysis model and dropsonde profiles. We will show the data distribution and explain the sampling characteristics, providing high resolution vertical information to the sides of the aircraft in a manner complementary to dropsondes beneath the flight track. We will show how this method can provide additional reliable data during the development of AR storms.

  16. GPS and GLONASS 1 Hz phase rate observations to study high latitudes ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoddousi-Fard, R.; Prikryl, P.; Jacobsen, K. S.; Lahaye, F.

    2016-12-01

    It has been shown that dual frequency 1 Hz GPS phase rate observations can serve as a promising proxy for phase scintillation over high latitudes (see e.g. Ghoddousi-Fard et al., 2013, 2015). However signals from other GNSS constellations including GLONASS have been available and widely used for positioning applications. Usage of additional GNSS constellations should allow improved sampling of the ionosphere, a critical advantage to study small scale ionospheric irregularities over high latitudes. Migration of global GPS networks to multi-GNSS are now underway such as International GNSS Service (IGS) Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and other national, public and private sector networks. In this presentation, GPS and GLONASS observations from high latitude MGEX stations as well as a dense regional network over Norway are used to map high latitude ionospheric irregularities by means of standard deviation of phase rate variations. Occurrence of GPS phase irregularities as a function of magnetic latitude and local time are compared with those from both GPS and GLONASS. By including 1 Hz GLONASS measurements at about 185 stations over Norway during geomagnetic storm of March 17-18, 2015, this study complements a recently submitted paper that examined the GPS phase scintillation occurrence in the context of solar wind coupling to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system and auroral electrojet currents (Prikryl et al., 2016). Ghoddousi-Fard et al. (2013). GPS phase difference variation statistics: A comparison between phase scintillation index and proxy indices. Adv. Space Res., 52, 1397-1405, doi: 10.1016/j.asr.2013.06.035. Ghoddousi-Fard et al. (2015). Analysis of GPS phase rate variations in response to geomagnetic field perturbations over the Canadian auroral region. Adv. Space Res., 55, 1372-1381, doi: 10.1016/j.asr.2014.12.021. Prikryl et al. (2016). GPS phase scintillation at high latitudes during the geomagnetic storm of March 17-18, 2015, submitted to J. Geophys. Res

  17. Evaluating elk habitat interactions with GPS collars

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble; Lakhdar Benkobi; Fredrick Lindzey; R. Scott Gamo

    2001-01-01

    Global positioning systems (GPS) are likely to revolutionize animal telemetry studies. GPS collars allow biologists to collect systematically scheduled data when VHF telemetry data is difficult or impossible to collect. Past studies have shown that the success of GPS telemetry is greater when animals are standing, or in open habitats. To make effective use of GPS...

  18. TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, andmore » at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.« less

  19. Kinematic-PPP using Single/Dual Frequency Observations from (GPS, GLONASS and GPS/GLONASS) Constellations for Hydrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Ashraf

    2018-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technology is ideally suited for inshore and offshore positioning because of its high accuracy and the short observation time required for a position fix. Precise point positioning (PPP) is a technique used for position computation with a high accuracy using a single GNSS receiver. It relies on highly accurate satellite position and clock data that can be acquired from different sources such as the International GNSS Service (IGS). PPP precision varies based on positioning technique (static or kinematic), observations type (single or dual frequency) and the duration of observations among other factors. PPP offers comparable accuracy to differential GPS with safe in cost and time. For many years, PPP users depended on GPS (American system) which considered the solely reliable system. GLONASS's contribution in PPP techniques was limited due to fail in maintaining full constellation. Yet, GLONASS limited observations could be integrated into GPS-based PPP to improve availability and precision. As GLONASS reached its full constellation early 2013, there is a wide interest in PPP systems based on GLONASS only and independent of GPS. This paper investigates the performance of kinematic PPP solution for the hydrographic applications in the Nile river (Aswan, Egypt) based on GPS, GLONASS and GPS/GLONASS constellations. The study investigates also the effect of using two different observation types; single-frequency and dual frequency observations from the tested constellations.

  20. Spaceborne GPS Current Status and Future Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Hartman, Kate; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    1998-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), developed by the Department of Defense, is quickly revolutionizing the architecture of future spacecraft and spacecraft systems. Significant savings in spacecraft life cycle cost, in power, and in mass can be realized by exploiting Global Positioning System (GPS) technology in spaceborne vehicles. These savings are realized because GPS is a systems sensor-it combines the ability to sense space vehicle trajectory, attitude, time, and relative ranging between vehicles into one package. As a result, a reduced spacecraft sensor complement can be employed on spacecraft and significant reductions in space vehicle operations cost can be realized through enhanced on- board autonomy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of spaceborne GPS, a description of spaceborne GPS receivers available now and in the near future, a description of the 1997-1999 GPS flight experiments and the spaceborne GPS team's vision for the future.

  1. GPS data exploration for seismologists and geodesists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, F.; Bock, Y.; Kedar, S.; Dong, D.; Jamason, P.; Chang, R.; Prawirodirdjo, L.; MacLeod, I.; Wadsworth, G.

    2007-12-01

    Over the past decade, GPS and seismic networks spanning the western US plate boundaries have produced vast amounts of data that need to be made accessible to both the geodesy and seismology communities. Unlike seismic data, raw geodetic data requires significant processing before geophysical interpretations can be made. This requires the generation of data-products (time series, velocities and strain maps) and dissemination strategies to bridge these differences and assure efficient use of data across traditionally separate communities. "GPS DATA PRODUCTS FOR SOLID EARTH SCIENCE" (GDPSES) is a multi-year NASA funded project, designed to produce and deliver high quality GPS time series, velocities, and strain fields, derived from multiple GPS networks along the western US plate boundary, and to make these products easily accessible to geophysicists. Our GPS product dissemination is through modern web-based IT methodology. Product browsing is facilitated through a web tool known as GPS Explorer and continuous streams of GPS time series are provided using web services to the seismic archive, where it can be accessed by seismologists using traditional seismic data viewing and manipulation tools. GPS-Explorer enables users to efficiently browse several layers of data products from raw data through time series, velocities and strain by providing the user with a web interface, which seamlessly interacts with a continuously updated database of these data products through the use of web-services. The current archive contains GDPSES data products beginning in 1995, and includes observations from GPS stations in EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), as well as from real-time real-time CGPS stations. The generic, standards-based approach used in this project enables GDPSES to seamlessly expand indefinitely to include other space-time-dependent data products from additional GPS networks. The prototype GPS-Explorer provides users with a personalized working environment

  2. Research in Application of Geodetic GPS Receivers in Time Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, P.; Sun, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, X.

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of satellite orbit and clock parameters accurately determining technology and the popularity of geodetic GPS receivers, Common-View (CV) which proposed in 1980 by Allan has gained widespread application and achieved higher accuracy time synchronization results. GPS Common View (GPS CV) is the technology that based on multi-channel geodetic GPS receivers located in different place and under the same common-view schedule to receiving same GPS satellite signal at the same time, and then calculating the time difference between respective local receiver time and GPST by weighted theory, we will obtain the difference between above local time of receivers that installed in different station with external atomic clock. Multi-channel geodetic GPS receivers have significant advantages such as higher stability, higher accuracy and more common-view satellites in long baseline time synchronization application over the single-channel geodetic GPS receivers. At present, receiver hardware delay and surrounding environment influence are main error factors that affect the accuracy of GPS common-view result. But most error factors will be suppressed by observation data smoothing and using of observation data from different satellites in multi-channel geodetic GPS receiver. After the SA (Selective Availability) cancellation, using a combination of precise satellite ephemeris, ionospheric-free dual-frequency P-code observations and accurately measuring of receiver hardware delay, we can achieve time synchronization result on the order of nanoseconds (ns). In this paper, 6 days observation data of two IGS core stations with external atomic clock (PTB, USNO distance of two stations about 6000 km) were used to verify the GPS common-view theory. Through GPS observation data analysis, there are at least 2-4 common-view satellites and 5 satellites in a few tracking periods between two stations when the elevation angle is 15°, even there will be at least

  3. Novel Hybrid of LS-SVM and Kalman Filter for GPS/INS Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenkai; Li, Yong; Rizos, Chris; Xu, Xiaosu

    Integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) technologies can overcome the drawbacks of the individual systems. One of the advantages is that the integrated solution can provide continuous navigation capability even during GPS outages. However, bridging the GPS outages is still a challenge when Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) inertial sensors are used. Methods being currently explored by the research community include applying vehicle motion constraints, optimal smoother, and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. In the research area of AI, the neural network (NN) approach has been extensively utilised up to the present. In an NN-based integrated system, a Kalman filter (KF) estimates position, velocity and attitude errors, as well as the inertial sensor errors, to output navigation solutions while GPS signals are available. At the same time, an NN is trained to map the vehicle dynamics with corresponding KF states, and to correct INS measurements when GPS measurements are unavailable. To achieve good performance it is critical to select suitable quality and an optimal number of samples for the NN. This is sometimes too rigorous a requirement which limits real world application of NN-based methods.The support vector machine (SVM) approach is based on the structural risk minimisation principle, instead of the minimised empirical error principle that is commonly implemented in an NN. The SVM can avoid local minimisation and over-fitting problems in an NN, and therefore potentially can achieve a higher level of global performance. This paper focuses on the least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM), which can solve highly nonlinear and noisy black-box modelling problems. This paper explores the application of the LS-SVM to aid the GPS/INS integrated system, especially during GPS outages. The paper describes the principles of the LS-SVM and of the KF hybrid method, and introduces the LS-SVM regression algorithm. Field

  4. Annual variations of monsoon and drought detected by GPS: A case study in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiping; Yuan, Peng; Chen, Hua; Cai, Jianqing; Li, Zhao; Chao, Nengfang; Sneeuw, Nico

    2017-07-19

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) records monsoonal precipitable water vapor (PWV) and vertical crustal displacement (VCD) due to hydrological loading, and can thus be applied jointly to diagnose meteorological and hydrological droughts. We have analyzed the PWV and VCD observations during 2007.0-2015.0 at 26 continuous GPS stations located in Yunnan province, China. We also obtained equivalent water height (EWH) derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and precipitation at these stations with the same period. Then, we quantified the annual variations of PWV, precipitation, EWH and VCD and provided empirical relationships between them. We found that GPS-derived PWV and VCD (positive means downward movement) are in phase with precipitation and GRACE-derived EWH, respectively. The annual signals of VCD and PWV show linearly correlated amplitudes and a two-month phase lag. Furthermore, the results indicate that PWV and VCD anomalies can also be used to explore drought, such as the heavy drought during winter/spring 2010. Our analysis results verify the capability of GPS to monitor monsoon variations and drought in Yunnan and show that a more comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of regional monsoon and drought can be achieved by integrating GPS-derived PWV and VCD with precipitation and GRACE-derived EWH.

  5. Relation of decorrelated transionospheric GPS signal fluctuations from two stations in the northern anomaly crest region with equatorial ionospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, K. S.; Paul, A.

    2017-05-01

    The ionosphere around the northern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) and beyond exhibits rapid temporal as well as spatial development of ionization density irregularities during postsunset hours. A GPS campaign was conducted during September 2012 and April 2013 from the Institute of Radio Physics and Electronics, Calcutta (22.58°N, 88.38°E geographic; magnetic dip: 32°N), and North Bengal University (NBU), Siliguri (26.72°N, 88.39°E geographic, magnetic dip: 39.49°N) in India in order to assess and quantify differences, if any, in the nature of carrier to noise ratio (C/N0) fluctuations observed on the same satellite link around the same time interval from these stations. Significant decorrelation of the received signals was found when tracking the same satellite vehicle (SV) link from these stations during periods of scintillations. Low values of correlation coefficient of C/N0 at L1 frequency recorded on the same SV link at these two stations were found to correspond with high irregularity characteristic velocities. North-south spatial displacement rates of the impact of ionospheric irregularities were calculated based on coordinated GPS observations which followed an increasing trend with irregularity characteristic velocities measured at VHF. Values of characteristic velocities in excess of 36 m/s were also found to result in large receiver position deviations 3.5-4.0 m during periods of scintillations. Information related to time lag associated with occurrence of scintillations on the same SV link observed from two stations could be useful for improving performance of transionospheric satellite-based position determination techniques.

  6. Real-Time Single-Frequency GPS/MEMS-IMU Attitude Determination of Lightweight UAVs

    PubMed Central

    Eling, Christian; Klingbeil, Lasse; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a newly-developed direct georeferencing system for the guidance, navigation and control of lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), having a weight limit of 5 kg and a size limit of 1.5 m, and for UAV-based surveying and remote sensing applications is presented. The system is intended to provide highly accurate positions and attitudes (better than 5 cm and 0.5∘) in real time, using lightweight components. The main focus of this paper is on the attitude determination with the system. This attitude determination is based on an onboard single-frequency GPS baseline, MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) inertial sensor readings, magnetic field observations and a 3D position measurement. All of this information is integrated in a sixteen-state error space Kalman filter. Special attention in the algorithm development is paid to the carrier phase ambiguity resolution of the single-frequency GPS baseline observations. We aim at a reliable and instantaneous ambiguity resolution, since the system is used in urban areas, where frequent losses of the GPS signal lock occur and the GPS measurement conditions are challenging. Flight tests and a comparison to a navigation-grade inertial navigation system illustrate the performance of the developed system in dynamic situations. Evaluations show that the accuracies of the system are 0.05∘ for the roll and the pitch angle and 0.2∘ for the yaw angle. The ambiguities of the single-frequency GPS baseline can be resolved instantaneously in more than 90% of the cases. PMID:26501281

  7. Real-time single-frequency GPS/MEMS-IMU attitude determination of lightweight UAVs.

    PubMed

    Eling, Christian; Klingbeil, Lasse; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2015-10-16

    In this paper, a newly-developed direct georeferencing system for the guidance, navigation and control of lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), having a weight limit of 5 kg and a size limit of 1.5 m, and for UAV-based surveying and remote sensing applications is presented. The system is intended to provide highly accurate positions and attitudes (better than 5 cm and 0.5°) in real time, using lightweight components. The main focus of this paper is on the attitude determination with the system. This attitude determination is based on an onboard single-frequency GPS baseline, MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) inertial sensor readings, magnetic field observations and a 3D position measurement. All of this information is integrated in a sixteen-state error space Kalman filter. Special attention in the algorithm development is paid to the carrier phase ambiguity resolution of the single-frequency GPS baseline observations. We aim at a reliable and instantaneous ambiguity resolution, since the system is used in urban areas, where frequent losses of the GPS signal lock occur and the GPS measurement conditions are challenging. Flight tests and a comparison to a navigation-grade inertial navigation system illustrate the performance of the developed system in dynamic situations. Evaluations show that the accuracies of the system are 0.05° for the roll and the pitch angle and 0.2° for the yaw angle. The ambiguities of the single-frequency GPS baseline can be resolved instantaneously in more than 90% of the cases.

  8. Operational GPS Imaging System at Multiple Scales for Earth Science and Monitoring of Geohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey; Hammond, William; Kreemer, Corné

    2016-04-01

    Toward scientific targets that range from slow deep Earth processes to geohazard rapid response, our operational GPS data analysis system produces smooth, yet detailed maps of 3-dimensional land motion with respect to our Earth's center of mass at multiple spatio-temporal scales with various latencies. "GPS Imaging" is implemented operationally as a back-end processor to our GPS data processing facility, which uses JPL's GIPSY OASIS II software to produce positions from 14,000 GPS stations in ITRF every 5 minutes, with coordinate precision that gradually improves as latency increases upward from 1 hour to 2 weeks. Our GPS Imaging system then applies sophisticated signal processing and image filtering techniques to generate images of land motion covering our Earth's continents with high levels of robustness, accuracy, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution. Techniques employed by our GPS Imaging system include: (1) similarity transformation of polyhedron coordinates to ITRF with optional common-mode filtering to enhance local transient signal to noise ratio, (2) a comprehensive database of ~100,000 potential step events based on earthquake catalogs and equipment logs, (3) an automatic, robust, and accurate non-parametric estimator of station velocity that is insensitive to prevalent step discontinuities, outliers, seasonality, and heteroscedasticity; (4) a realistic estimator of velocity error bars based on subsampling statistics; (5) image processing to create a map of land motion that is based on median spatial filtering on the Delauney triangulation, which is effective at despeckling the data while faithfully preserving edge features; (6) a velocity time series estimator to assist identification of transient behavior, such as unloading caused by drought, and (7) a method of integrating InSAR and GPS for fine-scale seamless imaging in ITRF. Our system is being used to address three main scientific focus areas, including (1) deep Earth processes, (2

  9. Ionospheric Remote Sensing using GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Powell, S. P.; O'Hanlon, B.; Humphreys, T.; Bishop, R. L.; Stephan, A. W.; Gross, J.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2017-12-01

    The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometer Co-located (GROUP-C) experiment launched to the International Space Station (ISS) on February 19, 2017 as part of the Space Test Program Houston #5 payload (STP-H5). After early orbit testing, GROUP-C began routine science operations in late April. GROUP-C includes a high-sensitivity far-ultraviolet photometer measuring horizontal nighttime ionospheric gradients and an advanced software-defined GPS receiver providing ionospheric electron density profiles, scintillation measurements, and lower atmosphere profiles. GROUP-C and a companion experiment, the Limb-Imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES), offer a unique capability to study spatial and temporal variability of the thermosphere and ionosphere using multi-sensor approaches, including ionospheric tomography. Data are collected continuously across low- and mid-latitudes as the ISS orbit precesses through all local times every 60 days. The GROUP-C GPS sensor routinely collects dual-frequency GPS occultations, makes targeted raw signal captures of GPS and Galileo occultations, and includes multiple antennas to characterize multipath in the ISS environment. The UV photometer measures the 135.6 nm ionospheric recombination airglow emision along the nightside orbital track. We present the first analysis of ionospheric observations, discuss the challenges and opportunities of remote sensing from the ISS platform, and explore how these new data help address questions regarding the complex and dynamic features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere-thermosphere relevant to the upcoming GOLD and ICON missions.

  10. The PSA testing dilemma: GPs' reports of consultations with asymptomatic men: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Clements, Alison; Watson, Eila; Rai, Tanvi; Bukach, Colleen; Shine, Brian; Austoker, Joan

    2007-06-25

    The National Health Service Prostate Cancer Risk Management Programme (PCRMP) has recommended that screening for prostate cancer is available for asymptomatic men, on the understanding that they have been provided with full and balanced information about the advantages and limitations of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Guidance has been distributed to all GPs in England and Wales to assist in the provision of information to men. This study aimed to elicit GPs' accounts of their discussions with asymptomatic men who consult with concerns about prostate cancer in order to identify the degree to which the PCRMP guidance was reflected in these consultations. Qualitative interview study. Semi-structured telephone interviews with 21 GPs from 18 GP practices in Oxfordshire. All GPs reported undertaking some discussion with asymptomatic men about the PSA test. They described focussing most of the discussion on the false-positive and false-negative rates of the test, and the risks associated with a prostate biopsy. They reported less discussion of the potential for diagnosing indolent cancers, the dilemmas regarding treatment options for localised prostate cancer and the potential benefits of testing. Considerable variation existed between GPs in their accounts of the degree of detail given, and GP's presentation of information appeared to be affected by their personal views of the PSA test. The GPs in this study appear to recognise the importance of discussions regarding PSA testing; however, a full and balanced picture of the associated advantages and limitations does not seem to be consistently conveyed. Factors specific to PSA testing which appeared to have an impact on the GPs' discussions were the GP's personal opinions of the PSA test, and the need to counter men's primarily positive views of the benefits of PSA testing. Awareness of the impact of their views on the consultations may help GPs give men a more balanced presentation of the benefits and

  11. Measuring atmospheric density using GPS-LEO tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, D.; Desai, S.; Sibthorpe, A.; Pi, X.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to estimate the total neutral atmospheric density from precise orbit determination of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. We derive the total atmospheric density by determining the drag force acting on the LEOs through centimeter-level reduced-dynamic precise orbit determination (POD) using onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking data. The precision of the estimated drag accelerations is assessed using various metrics, including differences between estimated along-track accelerations from consecutive 30-h POD solutions which overlap by 6 h, comparison of the resulting accelerations with accelerometer measurements, and comparison against an existing atmospheric density model, DTM-2000. We apply the method to GPS tracking data from CHAMP, GRACE, SAC-C, Jason-2, TerraSAR-X and COSMIC satellites, spanning 12 years (2001-2012) and covering orbital heights from 400 km to 1300 km. Errors in the estimates, including those introduced by deficiencies in other modeled forces (such as solar radiation pressure and Earth radiation pressure), are evaluated and the signal and noise levels for each satellite are analyzed. The estimated density data from CHAMP, GRACE, SAC-C and TerraSAR-X are identified as having high signal and low noise levels. These data all have high correlations with anominal atmospheric density model and show common features in relative residuals with respect to the nominal model in related parameter space. On the contrary, the estimated density data from COSMIC and Jason-2 show errors larger than the actual signal at corresponding altitudes thus having little practical value for this study. The results demonstrate that this method is applicable to data from a variety of missions and can provide useful total neutral density measurements for atmospheric study up to altitude as high as 715 km, with precision and resolution between those derived from traditional special orbital perturbation analysis and those obtained from onboard

  12. Transient deformation of karst aquifers observed by GPS: improved knowledge from Central Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverii, F.; D'Agostino, N.; Borsa, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The redistribution of water masses due to temporal variations of hydrological conditions can produce observable deformation of the shallow crust. Space geodesy, e.g., GPS and InSAR, has provided a considerable improvement in terms of data accuracy and spatial and temporal resolution for the detection and investigation of this kind of deformation. In particular, in the areas where snow and water accumulate for long periods, such as aquifers, relatively high deformation (up to several millimeters) has been observed. Karst aquifers are able to store huge amounts of water and a clear deformation related to the groundwater storage variations has been observed in some regions. In a recent study we showed that the karst aquifers of Southern Apennines deform in response of seasonal and interannual variations of groundwater content, producing a visible transient signal in the time series of the surrounding GPS sites. In this work, we analyze the GPS time series and hydrological data of Central Italy, an interesting and complex area which hosts huge karst aquifers and is characterized by high seismic activity. We show that a noticeable transient signal with features similar to those of Southern Apennines affects also the time series of Central Apennines, suggesting that the large karst aquifers of this region experience a process analogue to the ones in Southern Italy. Thanks to the availability of a dense GPS network and different kinds of hydrological data (rainfall, spring discharge, groundwater level) we focus on the process causing the observed deformation. In particular, we model the observed deformation by inverting the GPS data using Green's functions for finite strain cuboid sources (Barbot et al. 2017). An enhanced understanding of the causes and implications of the highlighted deformation of karst aquifers is of primary interest for an improved management of this important water resource and for a better understanding of the possible interactions between

  13. Implementing GPS into Pave-IR.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-03-01

    To further enhance the capabilities of the Pave-IR thermal segregation detection system developed at the Texas Transportation Institute, researchers incorporated global positioning system (GPS) data collection into the thermal profiles. This GPS capa...

  14. First light from a kilometer-baseline Scintillation Auroral GPS Array

    PubMed Central

    Datta-Barua, S; Su, Y; Deshpande, K; Miladinovich, D; Bust, G S; Hampton, D; Crowley, G

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and analyze the first data from an array of closely spaced Global Positioning System (GPS) scintillation receivers established in the auroral zone in late 2013 to measure spatial and temporal variations in L band signals at 100–1000 m and subsecond scales. The seven receivers of the Scintillation Auroral GPS Array (SAGA) are sited at Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska. The receivers produce 100 s scintillation indices and 100 Hz carrier phase and raw in-phase and quadrature-phase samples. SAGA is the largest existing array with baseline lengths of the ionospheric diffractive Fresnel scale at L band. With an initial array of five receivers, we identify a period of simultaneous amplitude and phase scintillation. We compare SAGA power and phase data with collocated 630.0 nm all-sky images of an auroral arc and incoherent scatter radar electron precipitation measurements, to illustrate how SAGA can be used in multi-instrument observations for subkilometer-scale studies. Key Points A seven-receiver Scintillation Auroral GPS Array (SAGA) is now at Poker Flat, Alaska SAGA is the largest subkilometer array to enable phase/irregularities studies Simultaneous scintillation, auroral arc, and electron precipitation are observed PMID:26709318

  15. Ionospheric Modelling using GPS to Calibrate the MWA. I: Comparison of First Order Ionospheric Effects between GPS Models and MWA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B. S.; Morgan, J.; Ord, S. M.; Tingay, S. J.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Briggs, F.; Callingham, J. R.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; For, B.-Q.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Jacobs, D.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Mitchell, D.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Pindor, B.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Emrich, D.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kratzenberg, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Prabu, T.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    We compare first-order (refractive) ionospheric effects seen by the MWA with the ionosphere as inferred from GPS data. The first-order ionosphere manifests itself as a bulk position shift of the observed sources across an MWA field of view. These effects can be computed from global ionosphere maps provided by GPS analysis centres, namely the CODE. However, for precision radio astronomy applications, data from local GPS networks needs to be incorporated into ionospheric modelling. For GPS observations, the ionospheric parameters are biased by GPS receiver instrument delays, among other effects, also known as receiver DCBs. The receiver DCBs need to be estimated for any non-CODE GPS station used for ionosphere modelling. In this work, single GPS station-based ionospheric modelling is performed at a time resolution of 10 min. Also the receiver DCBs are estimated for selected Geoscience Australia GPS receivers, located at Murchison Radio Observatory, Yarragadee, Mount Magnet and Wiluna. The ionospheric gradients estimated from GPS are compared with that inferred from MWA. The ionospheric gradients at all the GPS stations show a correlation with the gradients observed with the MWA. The ionosphere estimates obtained using GPS measurements show promise in terms of providing calibration information for the MWA.

  16. Frequency-Locked Detector Threshold Setting Criteria Based on Mean-Time-To-Lose-Lock (MTLL) for GPS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Na; Qin, Honglei; Sun, Kewen; Ji, Yuanfa

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-locked detector (FLD) has been widely utilized in tracking loops of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to indicate their locking status. The relation between FLD and lock status has been seldom discussed. The traditional PLL experience is not suitable for FLL. In this paper, the threshold setting criteria for frequency-locked detector in the GPS receiver has been proposed by analyzing statistical characteristic of FLD output. The approximate probability distribution of frequency-locked detector is theoretically derived by using a statistical approach, which reveals the relationship between probabilities of frequency-locked detector and the carrier-to-noise ratio (C/N0) of the received GPS signal. The relationship among mean-time-to-lose-lock (MTLL), detection threshold and lock probability related to C/N0 can be further discovered by utilizing this probability. Therefore, a theoretical basis for threshold setting criteria in frequency locked loops for GPS receivers is provided based on mean-time-to-lose-lock analysis. PMID:29207546

  17. Frequency-Locked Detector Threshold Setting Criteria Based on Mean-Time-To-Lose-Lock (MTLL) for GPS Receivers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tian; Yuan, Heliang; Zhao, Na; Qin, Honglei; Sun, Kewen; Ji, Yuanfa

    2017-12-04

    Frequency-locked detector (FLD) has been widely utilized in tracking loops of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to indicate their locking status. The relation between FLD and lock status has been seldom discussed. The traditional PLL experience is not suitable for FLL. In this paper, the threshold setting criteria for frequency-locked detector in the GPS receiver has been proposed by analyzing statistical characteristic of FLD output. The approximate probability distribution of frequency-locked detector is theoretically derived by using a statistical approach, which reveals the relationship between probabilities of frequency-locked detector and the carrier-to-noise ratio ( C / N ₀) of the received GPS signal. The relationship among mean-time-to-lose-lock (MTLL), detection threshold and lock probability related to C / N ₀ can be further discovered by utilizing this probability. Therefore, a theoretical basis for threshold setting criteria in frequency locked loops for GPS receivers is provided based on mean-time-to-lose-lock analysis.

  18. Classification of reflected signals from cavitated tooth surfaces using an artificial intelligence technique incorporating a fiber optic displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Husna Abdul; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Arof, Hamzah; Irawati, Ninik; Musirin, Ismail; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Ahmad, Harith

    2014-05-01

    An enhanced dental cavity diameter measurement mechanism using an intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor (FODS) scanning and imaging system, fuzzy logic as well as a single-layer perceptron (SLP) neural network, is presented. The SLP network was employed for the classification of the reflected signals, which were obtained from the surfaces of teeth samples and captured using FODS. Two features were used for the classification of the reflected signals with one of them being the output of a fuzzy logic. The test results showed that the combined fuzzy logic and SLP network methodology contributed to a 100% classification accuracy of the network. The high-classification accuracy significantly demonstrates the suitability of the proposed features and classification using SLP networks for classifying the reflected signals from teeth surfaces, enabling the sensor to accurately measure small diameters of tooth cavity of up to 0.6 mm. The method remains simple enough to allow its easy integration in existing dental restoration support systems.

  19. Classification of reflected signals from cavitated tooth surfaces using an artificial intelligence technique incorporating a fiber optic displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Husna Abdul; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Arof, Hamzah; Irawati, Ninik; Musirin, Ismail; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Ahmad, Harith

    2014-05-01

    An enhanced dental cavity diameter measurement mechanism using an intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor (FODS) scanning and imaging system, fuzzy logic as well as a single-layer perceptron (SLP) neural network, is presented. The SLP network was employed for the classification of the reflected signals, which were obtained from the surfaces of teeth samples and captured using FODS. Two features were used for the classification of the reflected signals with one of them being the output of a fuzzy logic. The test results showed that the combined fuzzy logic and SLP network methodology contributed to a 100% classification accuracy of the network. The high-classification accuracy significantly demonstrates the suitability of the proposed features and classification using SLP networks for classifying the reflected signals from teeth surfaces, enabling the sensor to accurately measure small diameters of tooth cavity of up to 0.6 mm. The method remains simple enough to allow its easy integration in existing dental restoration support systems.

  20. Estimating Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) regional map distribution using METEOSAT satellite data and GPS Zenith Wet Delay (ZWD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Y.; Leontiev, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using GPS satellites signals, we can study atmospheric processes and coupling mechanisms, which can help us understand the physical conditions in the upper atmosphere that might lead or act as proxies for severe weather events such as extreme storms and flooding. GPS signals received by geodetic stations on the ground are multi-purpose and can also provide estimates of tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into mm-accuracy Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) using collocated pressure and temperature measurements on the ground. Here, we present the use of Israel's geodetic GPS receivers network for extracting tropospheric zenith path delays combined with near Real Time (RT) METEOSAT-10 Water Vapor (WV) and surface temperature pixel intensity values (7.3 and 12.1 channels, respectively) in order to obtain absolute IWV (kg/m2) or PWV (mm) map distribution. The results show good agreement between the absolute values obtained from our triangulation strategy based solely on GPS Zenith Total Delays (ZTD) and METEOSAT-10 surface temperature data compared with available radiosonde Precipitable IWV/PWV absolute values. The presented strategy can provide unprecedented temporal and special IWV/PWV distribution, which is needed as part of the accurate and comprehensive initial conditions pro­vided by upper-air observation systems at temporal and spatial resolutions consistent with the models assimilating them.

  1. Integrating GPS, GYRO, vehicle speed sensor, and digital map to provide accurate and real-time position in an intelligent navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingquan; Fang, Zhixiang; Li, Hanwu; Xiao, Hui

    2005-10-01

    The global positioning system (GPS) has become the most extensively used positioning and navigation tool in the world. Applications of GPS abound in surveying, mapping, transportation, agriculture, military planning, GIS, and the geosciences. However, the positional and elevation accuracy of any given GPS location is prone to error, due to a number of factors. The applications of Global Positioning System (GPS) positioning is more and more popular, especially the intelligent navigation system which relies on GPS and Dead Reckoning technology is developing quickly for future huge market in China. In this paper a practical combined positioning model of GPS/DR/MM is put forward, which integrates GPS, Gyro, Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) and digital navigation maps to provide accurate and real-time position for intelligent navigation system. This model is designed for automotive navigation system making use of Kalman filter to improve position and map matching veracity by means of filtering raw GPS and DR signals, and then map-matching technology is used to provide map coordinates for map displaying. In practical examples, for illustrating the validity of the model, several experiments and their results of integrated GPS/DR positioning in intelligent navigation system will be shown for the conclusion that Kalman Filter based GPS/DR integrating position approach is necessary, feasible and efficient for intelligent navigation application. Certainly, this combined positioning model, similar to other model, can not resolve all situation issues. Finally, some suggestions are given for further improving integrated GPS/DR/MM application.

  2. Navigation: National Plans; NAVSTAR-GPS; Laser Gyros

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-31

    REFERENC-~CP STER . TECHNICAL REPORT ! "NO. 12686,-’-. - NAVIGATION: NATIONAL PLANS ; NAVSTAR-GPS; LASER GYROS CONTRACT NO. DAAK30-80-C-0073 31 AUGUST...Technical ReportAW Ng. riiNational Plans ; Navstar-GPS; S... : NavstarGPS; a3 Sept 1980 - 31 Aug 1982 ....Lasr Gyros. 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER PRA...identify by block number) Navigation Navigation Satellites Laser Gyros Position-Location . NAVSTAR-GPS Fiberoptic Gyros Planning Global Positioning System

  3. Precise Clock Solutions Using Carrier Phase from GPS Receivers in the International GPS Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.; Jefferson, D. C.; Stowers, D. A.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Young, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    As one of its activities as an Analysis Center in the International GPS Service (IGS), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) uses data from a globally distributed network of geodetic-quality GPS receivers to estimate precise clock solutions, relative to a chosen reference, for both the GPS satellites and GPS receiver internal clocks, every day. The GPS constellation and ground network provide geometrical strength resulting in formal errors of about 100 p sec for these estimates. Some of the receivers in the global IGS network contain high quality frequency references, such as hydrogen masers. The clock solutions for such receivers are smooth at the 20-p sec level on time scales of a few minutes. There are occasional (daily to weekly) shifts at the microsec level, symptomatic of receiver resets, and 200-p sec-level discontinuities at midnight due to 1-day processing boundaries. Relative clock solutions among 22 IGS sites proposed as "fiducial" in the IGS/BIPM pilot project have been examined over a recent 4-week period. This allows a quantitative measure of receiver reset frequency as a function of site. For days and-sites without resets, the Allan deviation of the relative clock solutions is also computed for subdaily values of tau..

  4. Precision GPS ephemerides and baselines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The required knowledge of the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite position accuracy can vary depending on a particular application. Application to relative positioning of receiver locations on the ground to infer Earth's tectonic plate motion requires the most accurate knowledge of the GPS satellite orbits. Research directed towards improving and evaluating the accuracy of GPS satellite orbits was conducted at the University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR). Understanding and modeling the forces acting on the satellites was a major focus of the research. Other aspects of orbit determination, such as the reference frame, time system, measurement modeling, and parameterization, were also investigated. Gravitational forces were modeled by truncated versions of extant gravity fields such as, Goddard Earth Model (GEM-L2), GEM-T1, TEG-2, and third body perturbations due to the Sun and Moon. Nongravitational forces considered were the solar radiation pressure, and perturbations due to thermal venting and thermal imbalance. At the GPS satellite orbit accuracy level required for crustal dynamic applications, models for the nongravitational perturbation play a critical role, since the gravitational forces are well understood and are modeled adequately for GPS satellite orbits.

  5. Determination of GPS orbits to submeter accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, W. I.; Lichten, S. M.; Katsigris, E. C.

    1988-01-01

    Orbits for satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS) were determined with submeter accuracy. Tests used to assess orbital accuracy include orbit comparisons from independent data sets, orbit prediction, ground baseline determination, and formal errors. One satellite tracked 8 hours each day shows rms error below 1 m even when predicted more than 3 days outside of a 1-week data arc. Differential tracking of the GPS satellites in high Earth orbit provides a powerful relative positioning capability, even when a relatively small continental U.S. fiducial tracking network is used with less than one-third of the full GPS constellation. To demonstrate this capability, baselines of up to 2000 km in North America were also determined with the GPS orbits. The 2000 km baselines show rms daily repeatability of 0.3 to 2 parts in 10 to the 8th power and agree with very long base interferometry (VLBI) solutions at the level of 1.5 parts in 10 to the 8th power. This GPS demonstration provides an opportunity to test different techniques for high-accuracy orbit determination for high Earth orbiters. The best GPS orbit strategies included data arcs of at least 1 week, process noise models for tropospheric fluctuations, estimation of GPS solar pressure coefficients, and combine processing of GPS carrier phase and pseudorange data. For data arc of 2 weeks, constrained process noise models for GPS dynamic parameters significantly improved the situation.

  6. Space Shuttle Navigation in the GPS Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle navigation architecture was originally designed in the 1970s. A variety of on-board and ground based navigation sensors and computers are used during the ascent, orbit coast, rendezvous, (including proximity operations and docking) and entry flight phases. With the advent of GPS navigation and tightly coupled GPS/INS Units employing strapdown sensors, opportunities to improve and streamline the Shuttle navigation process are being pursued. These improvements can potentially result in increased safety, reliability, and cost savings in maintenance through the replacement of older technologies and elimination of ground support systems (such as Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN), Microwave Landing System (MLS) and ground radar). Selection and missionization of "off the shelf" GPS and GPS/INS units pose a unique challenge since the units in question were not originally designed for the Space Shuttle application. Various options for integrating GPS and GPS/INS units with the existing orbiter avionics system were considered in light of budget constraints, software quality concerns, and schedule limitations. An overview of Shuttle navigation methodology from 1981 to the present is given, along with how GPS and GPS/INS technology will change, or not change, the way Space Shuttle navigation is performed in the 21 5 century.

  7. Autofluorescence Imaging With Near-Infrared Excitation:Normalization by Reflectance to Reduce Signal From Choroidal Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Swider, Malgorzata; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We previously developed reduced-illuminance autofluorescence imaging (RAFI) methods involving near-infrared (NIR) excitation to image melanin-based fluorophores and short-wavelength (SW) excitation to image lipofuscin-based flurophores. Here, we propose to normalize NIR-RAFI in order to increase the relative contribution of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) fluorophores. Methods. Retinal imaging was performed with a standard protocol holding system parameters invariant in healthy subjects and in patients. Normalized NIR-RAFI was derived by dividing NIR-RAFI signal by NIR reflectance point-by-point after image registration. Results. Regions of RPE atrophy in Stargardt disease, AMD, retinitis pigmentosa, choroideremia, and Leber congenital amaurosis as defined by low signal on SW-RAFI could correspond to a wide range of signal on NIR-RAFI depending on the contribution from the choroidal component. Retinal pigment epithelium atrophy tended to always correspond to high signal on NIR reflectance. Normalizing NIR-RAFI reduced the choroidal component of the signal in regions of atrophy. Quantitative evaluation of RPE atrophy area showed no significant differences between SW-RAFI and normalized NIR-RAFI. Conclusions. Imaging of RPE atrophy using lipofuscin-based AF imaging has become the gold standard. However, this technique involves bright SW lights that are uncomfortable and may accelerate the rate of disease progression in vulnerable retinas. The NIR-RAFI method developed here is a melanin-based alternative that is not absorbed by opsins and bisretinoid moieties, and is comfortable to view. Further development of this method may result in a nonmydriatic and comfortable imaging method to quantify RPE atrophy extent and its expansion rate. PMID:26024124

  8. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-09-15

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory.

  9. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M.; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  10. Improved planetary boundary layer retrievals using a combination of direct and reflected bending angles from radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. N.; Ao, C. O.; de la Torre Juarez, M.

    2017-12-01

    As a remote sensing technique, Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) is a suitable method to observe lower troposphere due to its high vertical resolution and cloud-penetrating capability. However, super-refraction (SR), or ducting, caused by large refractivity gradients usually associated with the top of the planetary boundary layer, can violate the uniqueness condition necessary for the traditional inverse Abel transform. Consequently, the retrieved refractivity, which is the minimum profile among an infinite number of potential solutions corresponding to the same bending angle profile, will be negatively biased under ducting layers. Previous research has shown that optimal estimation techniques that combine low altitude RO retrievals and the collocated precipitable water (PW) estimates can effectively reduce the negative RO bias and enhance the data quality under the ducting layer (Wang et al, 2017). Here we propose an improvement that uses the reflected RO bending angle observation information as a source for refractivity constraints. The RO signal reflected from the Earth surface profile can be reconstructed by solely using GPS-RO data without requiring external information such as PW. The radio holographic (RH) method is adapted here to calculate the reflected RO bending angle, and the forward model simulation is implemented to validate this preliminary concept. Our results suggest that this new approach can distinguish between different refractivity profiles when ducting occurs and theoretically this should reduce the negative bias. In addition, It also improves the RO observation in lower troposphere by capturing the sharpness and height of the critical layer separating the free troposphere from the boundary layer.

  11. Precise GPS orbits for geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become, in recent years, the main space-based system for surveying and navigation in many military, commercial, cadastral, mapping, and scientific applications. Better receivers, interferometric techniques (DGPS), and advances in post-processing methods have made possible to position fixed or moving receivers with sub-decimeter accuracies in a global reference frame. Improved methods for obtaining the orbits of the GPS satellites have played a major role in these achievements; this paper gives a personal view of the main developments in GPS orbit determination.

  12. On the enhanced detectability of GPS anomalous behavior with relative entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeongho

    2016-10-01

    A standard receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) technique for the global positioning system (GPS) has been dedicated to provide an integrity monitoring capability for safety-critical GPS applications, such as in civil aviation for the en-route (ER) through non-precision approach (NPA) or lateral navigation (LNAV). The performance of the existing RAIM method, however, may not meet more stringent aviation requirements for availability and integrity during the precision approach and landing phases of flight due to insufficient observables and/or untimely warning to the user beyond a specified time-to-alert in the event of a significant GPS failure. This has led to an enhanced RAIM architecture ensuring stricter integrity requirement by greatly decreasing the detection time when a satellite failure or a measurement error has occurred. We thus attempted to devise a user integrity monitor which is capable of identifying the GPS failure more rapidly than a standard RAIM scheme by incorporating the RAIM with the relative entropy, which is a likelihood ratio approach to assess the inconsistence between two data streams, quite different from a Euclidean distance. In addition, the delay-coordinate embedding technique needs to be considered and preprocessed to associate the discriminant measure obtained from the RAIM with the relative entropy in the new RAIM design. In simulation results, we demonstrate that the proposed user integrity monitor outperforms the standard RAIM with a higher level of detection rate of anomalies which could be hazardous to the users in the approach or landing phase and is a very promising alternative for the detection of deviations in GPS signal. The comparison also shows that it enables to catch even small anomalous gradients more rapidly than a typical user integrity monitor.

  13. Different Phases of Earthquake Cycle Reflected in GPS Measured Crustal Deformations along the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaradze, G.; Klotz, J.

    2001-12-01

    largest ever recorded earthquake on the earth. To properly interpret given observations, we developed the fully \\textsc{3D} Andean Elastic Dislocation Model (AEDM), which is used to explain the dominant inter-seismic signal. The subtraction of the AEDM predicted deformation rates from the observations leads towards the "filtered" residual velocity field, that can be used to highlight, for example, the post-seismic deformation effects. Also, in the central section of the SAGA network, the residual velocity field indicates the existence of more long-term (i.e. geologic) deformations. In summary, the changing spatial-temporal pattern of GPS measured crustal deformation rates along the central and southern Andes is governed by the relative importance of different phases of earthquake deformation cycle.

  14. The GPS odograph user's guide

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    The GPS-based Odograph Prototype (GOP or GPS Odograph) was developed in an effort sponsored by The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The purpose of this effort was to develop a means of using inexpensive commercial off-the-self laptop (or notebo...

  15. Study of seasonal and long-term vertical deformation in Nepal based on GPS and GRACE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tengxu; Shen, WenBin; Pan, Yuanjin; Luan, Wei

    2018-02-01

    Lithospheric deformation signal can be detected by combining data from continuous global positioning system (CGPS) and satellite observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). In this paper, we use 2.5- to 19-year-long time series from 35 CGPS stations to estimate vertical deformation rates in Nepal, which is located in the southern side of the Himalaya. GPS results were compared with GRACE observations. Principal component analysis was conducted to decompose the time series into three-dimensional principal components (PCs) and spatial eigenvectors. The top three high-order PCs were calculated to correct common mode errors. Both GPS and GRACE observations showed significant seasonal variations. The observed seasonal GPS vertical variations are in good agreement with those from the GRACE-derived results, particularly for changes in surface pressure, non-tidal oceanic mass loading, and hydrologic loading. The GPS-observed rates of vertical deformation obtained for the region suggest both tectonic impact and mass decrease. The rates of vertical crustal deformation were estimated by removing the GRACE-derived hydrological vertical rates from the GPS measurements. Most of the sites located in the southern part of the Main Himalayan Thrust subsided, whereas the northern part mostly showed an uplift. These results may contribute to the understanding of secular vertical crustal deformation in Nepal.

  16. Networked differential GPS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheynblat, Leonid (Inventor); Kalafus, Rudolph M. (Inventor); Loomis, Peter V. W. (Inventor); Mueller, K. Tysen (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An embodiment of the present invention relates to a worldwide network of differential GPS reference stations (NDGPS) that continually track the entire GPS satellite constellation and provide interpolations of reference station corrections tailored for particular user locations between the reference stations Each reference station takes real-time ionospheric measurements with codeless cross-correlating dual-frequency carrier GPS receivers and computes real-time orbit ephemerides independently. An absolute pseudorange correction (PRC) is defined for each satellite as a function of a particular user's location. A map of the function is constructed, with iso-PRC contours. The network measures the PRCs at a few points, so-called reference stations and constructs an iso-PRC map for each satellite. Corrections are interpolated for each user's site on a subscription basis. The data bandwidths are kept to a minimum by transmitting information that cannot be obtained directly by the user and by updating information by classes and according to how quickly each class of data goes stale given the realities of the GPS system. Sub-decimeter-level kinematic accuracy over a given area is accomplished by establishing a mini-fiducial network.

  17. GPS-Squitter capacity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Vincent A.; Harman, William H.

    1994-05-01

    GPS-Squitter is a system concept that merges the capabilities of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) and the Mode S beacon radar. The result is an integrated concept for seamless surveillance and data link that permits equipped aircraft to participate in ADS and/or beacon ground environments. This concept offers many possibilities for transition from a beacon to an ADS-based environment. This report provides the details of the techniques used to estimate GPS-Squitter surveillance and data link capacity. Surveillance capacity of airborne aircraft is calculated for the omni and six-sector ground stations. Next, the capacity of GPS-Squitter for surface traffic is estimated. The interaction between airborne and surface operations is addressed to show the independence of these systems. Air ground data link capacity for GPS-Squitter is estimated, together with an estimate of the use of the Mode S link to support other ground surveillance and data link activities as well as TCAS operation. The analysis indicates the low transponder occupancy resulting from the total effect of these activities. Low occupancy is a key requirement in avoiding interference with the operation of the current ATCRBS and future Mode S interrogators.

  18. The International GPS Service (IGS) as a Continuous Reference System for Precise GPS Positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth; Heflin, Michael; Watkins, Michael; Zumberge, James

    1996-01-01

    The International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS) is an organization which operates under the auspices of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and has been operational since January 1994. The primary objective of the IGS is to provide precise GPS data and data products to support geodetic and geophysical research activities.

  19. Portable device to assess dynamic accuracy of global positioning systems (GPS) receivers used in agricultural aircraft

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A device was designed to test the dynamic accuracy of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers used in aerial vehicles. The system works by directing a sun-reflected light beam from the ground to the aircraft using mirrors. A photodetector is placed pointing downward from the aircraft and circuitry...

  20. A Study into the Method of Precise Orbit Determination of a HEO Orbiter by GPS and Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikenaga, Toshinori; Hashida, Yoshi; Unwin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    In the present day, orbit determination by Global Positioning System (GPS) is not unusual. Especially for low-cost small satellites, position determination by an on-board GPS receiver provides a cheap, reliable and precise method. However, the original purpose of GPS is for ground users, so the transmissions from all of the GPS satellites are directed toward the Earth s surface. Hence there are some restrictions for users above the GPS constellation to detect those signals. On the other hand, a desire for precise orbit determination for users in orbits higher than GPS constellation exists. For example, the next Japanese Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) mission "ASTRO-G" is trying to determine its orbit in an accuracy of a few centimeters at apogee. The use of GPS is essential for such ultra accurate orbit determination. This study aims to construct a method for precise orbit determination for such high orbit users, especially in High Elliptical Orbits (HEOs). There are several approaches for this objective. In this study, a hybrid method with GPS and an accelerometer is chosen. Basically, while the position cannot be determined by an on-board GPS receiver or other Range and Range Rate (RARR) method, all we can do to estimate the user satellite s position is to propagate the orbit along with the force model, which is not perfectly correct. However if it has an accelerometer (ACC), the coefficients of the air drag and the solar radiation pressure applied to the user satellite can be updated and then the propagation along with the "updated" force model can improve the fitting accuracy of the user satellite s orbit. In this study, it is assumed to use an accelerometer available in the present market. The effects by a bias error of an accelerometer will also be discussed in this paper.

  1. Simulations of direct and reflected wave trajectories for ground-based GNSS-R experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, N.; Frappart, F.; Ramillien, G.; Darrozes, J.; Desjardins, C.; Gegout, P.; Pérosanz, F.; Biancale, R.

    2014-10-01

    The detection of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals that are reflected off the surface, along with the reception of direct GNSS signals, offers a unique opportunity to monitor water level variations over land and ocean. The time delay between the reception of the direct and reflected signals gives access to the altitude of the receiver over the reflecting surface. The field of view of the receiver is highly dependent on both the orbits of the GNSS satellites and the configuration of the study site geometries. A simulator has been developed to determine the location of the reflection points on the surface accurately by modeling the trajectories of GNSS electromagnetic waves that are reflected by the surface of the Earth. Only the geometric problem was considered using a specular reflection assumption. The orbit of the GNSS constellation satellites (mainly GPS, GLONASS and Galileo), and the position of a fixed receiver, are used as inputs. Four different simulation modes are proposed, depending on the choice of the Earth surface model (local plane, osculating sphere or ellipsoid) and the consideration of topography likely to cause masking effects. Angular refraction effects derived from adaptive mapping functions are also taken into account. This simulator was developed to determine where the GNSS-R receivers should be located to monitor a given study area efficiently. In this study, two test sites were considered: the first one at the top of the 65 m Cordouan lighthouse in the Gironde estuary, France, and the second one on the shore of Lake Geneva (50 m above the reflecting surface), at the border between France and Switzerland. This site is hidden by mountains in the south (orthometric altitude up to 2000 m), and overlooking the lake in the north (orthometric altitude of 370 m). For this second test site configuration, reflections occur until 560 m from the receiver. The planimetric (arc length) differences (or altimetric difference as WGS84

  2. Post-flight trajectory reconstruction of suborbital free-flyers using GPS raw data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivchenko, N.; Yuan, Y.; Linden, E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the reconstruction of postflight trajectories of suborbital free flying units by using logged GPS raw data. We took the reconstruction as a global least squares optimization problem, using both the pseudo-range and Doppler observables, and solved it by using the trust-region-reflective algorithm, which enabled navigational solutions of high accuracy. The code tracking was implemented with a large number of correlators and least squares curve fitting, in order to improve the precision of the code start times, while a more conventional phased lock loop was used for Doppler tracking. We proposed a weighting scheme to account for fast signal strength variation due to free-flier fast rotation, and a penalty for jerk to achieve a smooth solution. We applied these methods to flight data of two suborbital free flying units launched on REXUS 12 sounding rocket, reconstructing the trajectory, receiver clock error and wind up rates. The trajectory exhibits a parabola with the apogee around 80 km, and the velocity profile shows the details of payloadwobbling. The wind up rates obtained match the measurements from onboard angular rate sensors.

  3. Miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention documents the efforts on the research and development of a miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system. A miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system is presented; Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) based alignment algorithm for space applications is discussed. Two navigation cameras are also included to measure the range and range rate which can be integrated into the GPS/MEMS IMU system to enhance the navigation solution.

  4. Responses to olfactory signals reflect network structure of flower-visitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Junker, Robert R; Höcherl, Nicole; Blüthgen, Nico

    2010-07-01

    1. Network analyses provide insights into the diversity and complexity of ecological interactions and have motivated conclusions about community stability and co-evolution. However, biological traits and mechanisms such as chemical signals regulating the interactions between individual species--the microstructure of a network--are poorly understood. 2. We linked the responses of receivers (flower visitors) towards signals (flower scent) to the structure of a highly diverse natural flower-insect network. For each interaction, we define link temperature--a newly developed metric--as the deviation of the observed interaction strength from neutrality, assuming that animals randomly interact with flowers. 3. Link temperature was positively correlated to the specific visitors' responses to floral scents, experimentally examined in a mobile olfactometer. Thus, communication between plants and consumers via phytochemical signals reflects a significant part of the microstructure in a complex network. Negative as well as positive responses towards floral scents contributed to these results, where individual experience was important apart from innate behaviour. 4. Our results indicate that: (1) biological mechanisms have a profound impact on the microstructure of complex networks that underlies the outcome of aggregate statistics, and (2) floral scents act as a filter, promoting the visitation of some flower visitors, but also inhibiting the visitation of others.

  5. GPs' thoughts on prescribing medication and evidence-based knowledge: the benefit aspect is a strong motivator. A descriptive focus group study.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, Ingmarie; Segesten, Kerstin; Björkelund, Cecilia

    2007-06-01

    To describe GPs' thoughts of prescribing medication and evidence-based knowledge (EBM) concerning drug therapy. Tape-recorded focus-group interviews transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative methods. GPs from the south-eastern part of Västra Götaland, Sweden. A total of 16 GPs out of 178 from the south-eastern part of the region strategically chosen to represent urban and rural, male and female, long and short GP experience. Transcripts were analysed using a descriptive qualitative method. The categories were: benefits, time and space, and expert knowledge. The benefit was a merge of positive elements, all aspects of the GPs' tasks. Time and space were limitations for GPs' tasks. EBM as a constituent of expert knowledge should be more customer adjusted to be able to be used in practice. Benefit was the most important category, existing in every decision-making situation for the GP. The core category was prompt and pragmatic benefit, which was the utmost benefit. GPs' thoughts on evidence-based medicine and prescribing medication were highly related to reflecting on benefit and results. The interviews indicated that prompt and pragmatic benefit is important for comprehending their thoughts.

  6. Permanent GPS Geodetic Array in Southern California (PGGA) and GPS observations in Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Yehuds

    1994-01-01

    The Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) is a network of permanent monitoring GPS stations in southern California devoted to the continuous measurement of crustal deformation in near real-time. The PGGA plays a unique role in studies of the kinematics of crustal deformation and the earthquake cycle in southern California because it is also providing temporally dense geodetic measurements of crustal motion over periods of minutes to variations in regional crustal strain. As it expands and matures the PGGA will play an increasingly important role in the study of active tectonics of southern California by bridging the frequency range between seismology, observatory geodesy, paleoseismology, and geology. In Indonesia GPS data is used for measurement of a large scale crustal deformation, extending from north China to the Indonesian archipelago. Indonesia offers a tremendous laboratory to study some of the processes that build continents, and mountains are active there. We began GPS observations in August 1989 on mainland Sumatra and the Mentawai Islands to study the phenomena of oblique plate convergence. We have analyzed the Indonesian data in conjunction with data collected on Christmas and Cocos Islands and at Darwin, Australia, and with the triangulation data in Sumatra.

  7. Variation of GPS-TEC in a low latitude Indian region during the year 2012 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nilesh C.; Karia, Sheetal P.; Pathak, Kamlesh N.

    2018-05-01

    The paper is based on the ionospheric variations in terms of vertical total electron content (VTEC) for the period from January 2012 to December 2013 based on the analysis of dual frequency signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites recorded at ground stations Surat (21.16°N, 72.78°E Geog.), situated under the northern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly region (EIA) and other three International GNSS Service (IGS) stations Bangalore (13.02°N, 77.57°E Geog.), Hyderabad (17.25°N, 78.30°E Geog.), and Lucknow (26.91°N, 80.95°E Geog.) in India. We describe the diurnal and seasonal characteristics. It was observed that GPS-TEC reaches its maximum value between 12:00 and 16:00 IST. Further, Seasonal variations of GPS-TEC is categorized into four seasons, i.e., March equinox (February, March, and April), June solstice (May, June, and July), September equinox (August, September, and October) and December solstice (November, December and January). The forenoon rate of production in Lucknow (beyond EIA crest) is faster than Bangalore, Hyderabad and Surat station. It is found that September equinox shows GPS-TEC slightly higher than the March equinox, followed by June solstice and the lowest GPS-TEC are in winter solstice at four stations. The equinoctial asymmetry clearly observed in the current study. Also GPS-TEC shows a semiannual variation.

  8. Better Aircraft Positioning for Airborne Gravimetry: Results from GRAV-D's "Kinematic GPS Challenge" Issued to the GPS Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, T. M.; Mader, G. L.; Preaux, S. A.; Weil, C.

    2011-12-01

    The National Geodetic Survey's (NGS's) Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) program plans to collect airborne gravity data across the entire U.S. and its holdings over the next decade. The goal is to build a geoid accurate to 1-2 cm, for which the airborne gravity data is key. The first phase is underway, with > 13% of data collection already completed across the U.S. To achieve the best airborne gravity data accuracy possible, the GPS position solutions must provide not just accurate positions, but also accurate velocities and accelerations to be used in calculating the gravity corrections. However, to our knowledge, no comparison has been done of available kinematic GPS processing techniques as they pertain to producing accurate airborne gravity results. So, in Fall 2010, NGS issued the "Kinematic GPS Challenge" to the GPS processing community, soliciting position solutions for GPS data of two GRAV-D airborne gravity flights done in Louisiana in 2008. Of the four lines on these two flights, one of the lines on the first flight was noisy (due to excessive turbulence) and was reflown on the second flight. These two flights of data allow the Challenge results to be tested on both good-quality and noisy data, as well as to be compared for repeatability along the reflown line, the assumption being that the solution producing the best fit between the reflown gravity data is the best. Fifteen position results from nine contributors were submitted from the GPS community for each of the two flights. We will present the results of the Kinematic GPS Challenge in an anonymous manner, to provide information to the airborne gravity community while protecting the identities of the GPS contributors while they incorporate the results into their research projects. Initial analyses show that the submitted position solutions are somewhat different, usually by +/- 0.25 m or less in X, Y, and Z. The shape and structure of these differences indicate

  9. Episodic inflation of Akutan volcano, Alaska revealed from GPS and InSAR time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrandpre, K.; Lu, Z.; Wang, T.

    2016-12-01

    Akutan volcano is one of the most active volcanoes located long the Aleutian arc. At least 27 eruptions have been noted since 1790 and an intense swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes occurred in 1996. Surface deformation after the 1996 earthquake sequence has been studied using GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) separately, yet models created from these datasets require different mechanisms to produce the observed surface deformation: an inflating Mogi source results in the best approximation of displacement observed from GPS data, whereas an opening dyke is the best fit to deformation measured from InSAR. A recent study using seismic data revealed complex magmatic structures beneath the caldera, suggesting that the surface deformation may reflect more complicated mechanisms that cannot be estimated using one type of data alone. Here we integrate the surface deformation measured from GPS and InSAR to better understand the magma plumbing system beneath Akutan volcano. GPS time-series at 12 stations from 2006 to 2016 were analyzed, and two transient episodes of inflation in 2008 and 2014 were detected. These GPS stations are, however, too sparse to reveal the spatial distribution of the surface deformation. In order to better define the spatial extent of this inflation four tracks of Envisat data acquired during 2003-2010 and one track of TerraSAR-X data acquired from 2010 to 2016 were processed to produce high-resolution maps of surface deformation. These deformation maps show a consistently uplifting area on the northwestern flank of the volcano. We inverted for the source parameters required to produce the inflation using GPS, InSAR, and a dataset of GPS and InSAR measurements combined, to find that a deep Mogi source below a shallow dyke fit these datasets best. From the TerraSAR-X data, we were also able to measure the subsidence inside the summit caldera due to fumarole activity to be as high as 10 mm/yr. The complex spatial and temporal

  10. Analysis of the ENSO temperature and specific humidity signals in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with global COSMIC GPS RO observations from June 2006 to June 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiping; Luo, Jia

    2017-04-01

    The specific humidity and the temperature response of El Niño-Southern Oscillation in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (TLS) over different areas i.e., Niño 3.4 (N3.4); -5˚ S-5˚ N, 180˚ W-180˚ E (G5); -30˚ S-30˚ N, 180˚ W-180˚ E (G30); -60˚ S-60˚ N, 180˚ W-180˚ E (G60); -90˚ S-90˚ N, 180˚ W-180˚ E (G90) were investigated using Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) data from June 2006 to June 2014. The empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) and band-pass filtering with different filtering ranges at different altitudes were used to extract the ENSO-related signals of the specific humidity and the temperature over different altitude levels in the TLS. The time series that has the maximum correlation coefficient between the ENSO-related signals and the ONI were regarded as the strongest response to ENSO. The results confirmed that the ENSO was originated from tropical Pacific Ocean. The lag time and the phase of the maximum specific humidity or temperature response to ENSO event does not show a uniform patern at different altitudes in the troposphere over different areas, but the 1-2 seasons lag ONI was found and consistent with previous study results. The maximum correlation coefficient between the specific humidity and the ONI was about 0.94 at a lag time of 3 months at about 225 hpa altitude over the statistical areas while the maximum correlation coefficients (0.91) between the temperature and the ONI was found at ˜325 hpa altitude level at a lag time of 1 month in the TLS. The well agreement between the ENSO-related signals in the troposphere and the ONI indicates that the specific humidity and temperature derived from COSMIC GPS RO observations are significant for monitoring the ENSO events.

  11. Applications of Clocks to Space Navigation & "Planetary GPS"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to fly atomic clocks on GPS satellites has profoundly defined the capabilities and limitations of GPS in near-Earth applications. It is likely that future infrastructure for Lunar and Mars applications will be constrained by financial factors. The development of a low cost, small, high performance space clock -- or ultrahigh performance space clocks -- could revolutionize and drive the entire approach to GPS-like systems at the Moon (or Mars), and possibly even change the future of GPS at Earth. Many system trade studies are required. The performance of future GPS-like tracking systems at the Moon or Mars will depend critically on clock performance, availability of inertial sensors, and constellation coverage. Example: present-day GPS carry 10(exp -13) clocks and require several updates per day. With 10(exp -15) clocks, a constellation at Mars could operate autonomously with updates just once per month. Use of GPS tracking at the Moon should be evaluated in a technical study.

  12. Deep Learning for Discovery of Atmospheric Mountain Waves in MODIS and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, V.; Li, J. D.; Rude, C. M.; Gowanlock, M.; Herring, T.

    2017-12-01

    Airflow over mountains can produce gravity waves, called lee waves, which can generate atmospheric turbulence. Since this turbulence poses dangers to aviation, it is critical to identify such regions reliably in an automated fashion. This work leverages two sources of data to go beyond an ad-hoc human visual approach for such identification: MODIS imagery containing cloud patterns formed by lee waves, and patterns in GPS signals resulting from the transmission through atmospheric turbulence due to lee waves. We demonstrate a novel machine learning approach that fuses these two data types to detect atmospheric turbulence associated with lee waves. A convolutional neural network is trained on MODIS tile images to automatically classify the lee wave cloud patterns with 96% correct classifications on a validation set of 20,000 MODIS 64x64 tiles over a test region in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Signals from GPS stations of the Plate Boundary Observatory are used for feature extraction related to lee waves, in order to improve the confidence of a detection in the MODIS imagery at a given position. To our knowledge, this is the first technique to combine these images and time series data types to improve the spatial and temporal resolutions for large-scale measurements of lee wave formations. First results of this work show great potential for improving weather condition monitoring, hazard and cloud pattern detection, as well as GPS navigation uncertainties. We acknowledge support from NASA AISTNNX15AG84G (PI Pankratius), NASA NNX14AQ03G (PI Herring), and NSF ACI1442997 (PI Pankratius).

  13. GPS measurement error gives rise to spurious 180 degree turning angles and strong directional biases in animal movement data.

    PubMed

    Hurford, Amy

    2009-05-20

    Movement data are frequently collected using Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, but recorded GPS locations are subject to errors. While past studies have suggested methods to improve location accuracy, mechanistic movement models utilize distributions of turning angles and directional biases and these data present a new challenge in recognizing and reducing the effect of measurement error. I collected locations from a stationary GPS collar, analyzed a probabilistic model and used Monte Carlo simulations to understand how measurement error affects measured turning angles and directional biases. Results from each of the three methods were in complete agreement: measurement error gives rise to a systematic bias where a stationary animal is most likely to be measured as turning 180 degrees or moving towards a fixed point in space. These spurious effects occur in GPS data when the measured distance between locations is <20 meters. Measurement error must be considered as a possible cause of 180 degree turning angles in GPS data. Consequences of failing to account for measurement error are predicting overly tortuous movement, numerous returns to previously visited locations, inaccurately predicting species range, core areas, and the frequency of crossing linear features. By understanding the effect of GPS measurement error, ecologists are able to disregard false signals to more accurately design conservation plans for endangered wildlife.

  14. Analysis of Spaceborne GPS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmo, Mario L.; Davis, James L.; Elosegui, Pedro; Hill, Michael; ScireScapuzzo, Francesca

    1998-01-01

    A reasonable amount of literature can be found on the general topic of GPS receiving antennas, but very little has been published on spaceborne GPS receiving antennas. This very new topic seems to be so far more of interest for the industrial world than for the academic community. For satellite applications, microstrip antennas are usually preferred over other types of antennas mainly because of their non-electrical characteristics, such as small size, relatively lightweight, shape, possibility of integration with microwave integrated circuits, and relatively low costs. Careful design of patch antennas could meet all the requirements (electrical and non-electrical) of GPS receiving antenna to be mounted on a tethered satellite.

  15. Deconvolution imaging of weak reflective pipe defects using guided-wave signals captured by a scanning receiver.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zeqing; Sun, Anyu; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Guided-wave echoes from weak reflective pipe defects are usually interfered by coherent noise and difficult to interpret. In this paper, a deconvolution imaging method is proposed to reconstruct defect images from synthetically focused guided-wave signals, with enhanced axial resolution. A compact transducer, circumferentially scanning around the pipe, is used to receive guided-wave echoes from discontinuities at a distance. This method achieves a higher circumferential sampling density than arrayed transducers-up to 72 sampling spots per lap for a pipe with a diameter of 180 mm. A noise suppression technique is used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. The enhancement in both signal-to-noise ratio and axial resolution of the method is experimentally validated by the detection of two kinds of artificial defects: a pitting defect of 5 mm in diameter and 0.9 mm in maximum depth, and iron pieces attached to the pipe surface. A reconstructed image of the pitting defect is obtained with a 5.87 dB signal-to-noise ratio. It is revealed that a high circumferential sampling density is important for the enhancement of the inspection sensitivity, by comparing the images reconstructed with different down-sampling ratios. A modified full width at half maximum is used as the criterion to evaluate the circumferential extent of the region where iron pieces are attached, which is applicable for defects with inhomogeneous reflection intensity.

  16. Multiscale GPS tomography during COPS: validation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champollion, Cédric; Flamant, Cyrille; Masson, Frédéric; Gégout, Pascal; Boniface, Karen; Richard, Evelyne

    2010-05-01

    Accurate 3D description of the water vapour field is of interest for process studies such as convection initiation. None of the current techniques (LIDAR, satellite, radio soundings, GPS) can provide an all weather continuous 3D field of moisture. The combination of GPS tomography with radio-soundings (and/or LIDAR) has been used for such process studies using both advantages of vertically resolved soundings and high temporal density of GPS measurements. GPS tomography has been used at short scale (10 km horizontal resolution but in a 50 km² area) for process studies such as the ESCOMPTE experiment (Bastin et al., 2005) and at larger scale (50 km horizontal resolution) during IHOP_2002. But no extensive statistical validation has been done so far. The overarching goal of the COPS field experiment is to advance the quality of forecasts of orographically induced convective precipitation by four-dimensional observations and modeling of its life cycle for identifying the physical and chemical processes responsible for deficiencies in QPF over low-mountain regions. During the COPS field experiment, a GPS network of about 100 GPS stations has been continuously operating during three months in an area of 500 km² in the East of France (Vosges Mountains) and West of Germany (Black Forest). If the mean spacing between the GPS is about 50 km, an East-West GPS profile with a density of about 10 km is dedicated to high resolution tomography. One major goal of the GPS COPS experiment is to validate the GPS tomography with different spatial resolutions. Validation is based on additional radio-soundings and airborne / ground-based LIDAR measurement. The number and the high quality of vertically resolved water vapor observations give an unique data set for GPS tomography validation. Numerous tests have been done on real data to show the type water vapor structures that can be imaging by GPS tomography depending of the assimilation of additional data (radio soundings), the

  17. Retrieval of Water Vapor Anisotropy using the Japanese Nationwide GPS Array and its Potential for Monitoring of Convective Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Procedures for retrieving two indices indicating the degree of anisotropy of water vapor using the carrier phase of a Global Positioning System (GPS) are introduced. One index describes the spatial concentration of water vapor; the other indicates higher-order water vapor inhomogeneity. GPS analysis can provide more atmospheric information than just PWV. Following MacMillan (1995), the slant path delay (SPD) between a GPS satellite and a receiver at the elevation angle θ and direction angle φ can be written in the following form: SPD(θ,φ)=m(θ)[ZTD+cotθ(Gncosφ+Gesinφ)]+ɛ, where ɛ is postfit residual. The postfit residuals contain information on higher-order atmospheric inhomogeneity (HI). However, other errors that do not originate from the atmosphere are also included (e.g., antenna phase center variation (PCV), signal scattering, multipath, and satellite orbit errors). Therefore, in order to estimate SPD accurately, it is necessary to remove all errors not due to atmospheric inhomogeneity. Shoji et al. (2004) demonstrated that the horizontal scale of the ZTD can be considered as about 600 km, the gradient component (Gn and Ge) as 60 km, and the HI as 2 to 3 km. This result insists that ZTD, Gn and Ge, and HI relate to atmospheric motion of the meso- , meso- , and meso- scales, respectively. The fact allows us defining two new atmospheric indices from GPS SPD as: (1) Water vapor concentration (WVC) index Inner product of nabla operator and gradient vector (Gn and Ge) (2) Water vapor inhomogeneity (WVI) index Standard deviation of ɛ after removing non-atmospheric noises The characteristics of the water vapor field over Japan in August 2011 were studied using the temporal-spatial variation in the two indices along with GPS-derived precipitable water vapor (PWV). The monthly averaged indices indicate distinct diurnal variation in the mountainous region of central Honshu and coincidence with the diurnal variation in precipitation frequencies in the area. The

  18. Comparison of Ground Deformation Measurements and Atmospheric Artifacts Using Insar Cosmo-Skymed and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Errico, M.; Novali, F.; Santi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Integrating and exploiting the synergetic combination of the InSAR and GPS techniques allows overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may contribute in obtaining better corrections of the wet tropospheric path delay in InSAR signals. This will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. The test area chosen for the comparison between InSAR and GPS data is in northeastern Italy, in particular, in the city of Bologna (urbanized area) and in the surroundings of Medicina (agricultural area). In these sites, two permanent GPS stations (EUREF EPN sites) of the University of Bologna are operational since mid 1999 (BOLG) and 1996 (MSEL) respectively. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique was applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the two towns mentioned above. The results of this work demonstrate, on the one hand, the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. On the other, the comparison of the differential height between the two stations derived with the GPS and the InSAR data, using both acquisition geometries, is satisfactory. Elevation, ground deformation and atmospheric artifacts were estimated in correspondence of the identified PS and compared with the GPS measurements carried out at the same acquisition time by the permanent stations at Bologna and Medicina. The comparison of the differential height between the two stations shows the sensitivity of the GPS height solution to the length of the observation interval. The vertical dispersion achieved by GPS is higher than that achieved by PS InSAR, as expected; however, a similar linear trend appears in the

  19. The application of NAVSTAR Differential GPS to civil helicopter operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beser, J.; Parkinson, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Principles concerning the operation of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are discussed. Selective availability issues concerning NAVSTAR GPS and differential GPS concepts are analyzed. Civil support and market potential for differential GPS are outlined. It is concluded that differential GPS provides a variation on the baseline GPS system, and gives an assured, uninterrupted level of accuracy for the civilian community.

  20. Accuracy of Tracking Forest Machines with GPS

    Treesearch

    M.W. Veal; S.E. Taylor; T.P. McDonald; D.K. McLemore; M.R. Dunn

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study that measured the accuracy of using GPS to track movement offorest machines. Two different commercially available GPS receivers (Trimble ProXR and GeoExplorer II) were used to track wheeled skidders under three different canopy conditions at two different vehicle speeds. Dynamic GPS data were compared to position data...

  1. Detection of VHF lightning from GPS orbit

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Satellite-based VHF' lightning detection is characterized at GPS orbit by using a VHF receiver system recently launched on the GPS SVN 54 satellite. Collected lightning triggers consist of Narrow Bipolar Events (80%) and strong negative return strokes (20%). The results are used to evaluate the performance of a future GPS-satellite-based VHF global lightning monitor.

  2. Strengths and Weaknesses of Global Positioning System (GPS) Data-Loggers and Semi-structured Interviews for Capturing Fine-scale Human Mobility: Findings from Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.; Reiner, Robert C.; Morrison, Amy C.; Stoddard, Steven T.; Kitron, Uriel; Scott, Thomas W.; Elder, John P.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying human mobility has significant consequences for studying physical activity, exposure to pathogens, and generating more realistic infectious disease models. Location-aware technologies such as Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled devices are used increasingly as a gold standard for mobility research. The main goal of this observational study was to compare and contrast the information obtained through GPS and semi-structured interviews (SSI) to assess issues affecting data quality and, ultimately, our ability to measure fine-scale human mobility. A total of 160 individuals, ages 7 to 74, from Iquitos, Peru, were tracked using GPS data-loggers for 14 days and later interviewed using the SSI about places they visited while tracked. A total of 2,047 and 886 places were reported in the SSI and identified by GPS, respectively. Differences in the concordance between methods occurred by location type, distance threshold (within a given radius to be considered a match) selected, GPS data collection frequency (i.e., 30, 90 or 150 seconds) and number of GPS points near the SSI place considered to define a match. Both methods had perfect concordance identifying each participant's house, followed by 80–100% concordance for identifying schools and lodgings, and 50–80% concordance for residences and commercial and religious locations. As the distance threshold selected increased, the concordance between SSI and raw GPS data increased (beyond 20 meters most locations reached their maximum concordance). Processing raw GPS data using a signal-clustering algorithm decreased overall concordance to 14.3%. The most common causes of discordance as described by a sub-sample (n = 101) with whom we followed-up were GPS units being accidentally off (30%), forgetting or purposely not taking the units when leaving home (24.8%), possible barriers to the signal (4.7%) and leaving units home to recharge (4.6%). We provide a quantitative assessment of the strengths and

  3. GPS water vapour tomography: preliminary results from the ESCOMPTE field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champollion, C.; Masson, F.; Bouin, M.-N.; Walpersdorf, A.; Doerflinger, E.; Bock, O.; Van Baelen, J.

    2005-03-01

    Water vapour plays a major role in atmospheric processes but remains difficult to quantify due to its high variability in time and space and the sparse set of available measurements. The GPS has proved its capacity to measure the integrated water vapour at zenith with the same accuracy as other methods. Recent studies show that it is possible to quantify the integrated water vapour in the line of sight of the GPS satellite. These observations can be used to study the 3D heterogeneity of the troposphere using tomographic techniques. We develop three-dimensional tomographic software to model the three-dimensional distribution of the tropospheric water vapour from GPS data. First, the tomographic software is validated by simulations based on the realistic ESCOMPTE GPS network configuration. Without a priori information, the absolute value of water vapour is less resolved as opposed to relative horizontal variations. During the ESCOMPTE field experiment, a dense network of 17 dual frequency GPS receivers was operated for 2 weeks within a 20×20-km area around Marseille (southern France). The network extends from sea level to the top of the Etoile chain (˜700 m high). Optimal results have been obtained with time windows of 30-min intervals and input data evaluation every 15 min. The optimal grid for the ESCOMTE geometrical configuration has a horizontal step size of 0.05°×0.05° and 500 m vertical step size. Second, we have compared the results of real data inversions with independent observations. Three inversions have been compared to three successive radiosonde launches and shown to be consistent. A good resolution compared to the a priori information is obtained up to heights of 3000 m. A humidity spike at 4000-m altitude remains unresolved. The reason is probably that the signal is spread homogeneously over the whole network and that such a feature is not resolvable by tomographic techniques. The results of our pure GPS inversion show a correlation with

  4. Vertical Guidance Performance Analysis of the L1–L5 Dual-Frequency GPS/WAAS User Avionics Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Shau-Shiun

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential vertical guidance performance of global positioning system (GPS)/wide area augmentation system (WAAS) user avionics sensor when the modernized GPS and Galileo are available. This paper will first investigate the airborne receiver code noise and multipath (CNMP) confidence (σair). The σair will be the dominant factor in the availability analysis of an L1–L5 dual-frequency GPS/WAAS user avionics sensor. This paper uses the MATLAB Algorithm Availability Simulation Tool (MAAST) to determine the required values for the σair, so that an L1–L5 dual-frequency GPS/WAAS user avionics sensor can meet the vertical guidance requirements of APproach with Vertical guidance (APV) II and CATegory (CAT) I over conterminous United States (CONUS). A modified MAAST that includes the Galileo satellite constellation is used to determine under what user configurations WAAS could be an APV II system or a CAT I system over CONUS. Furthermore, this paper examines the combinations of possible improvements in signal models and the addition of Galileo to determine if GPS/WAAS user avionics sensor could achieve 10 m Vertical Alert Limit (VAL) within the service volume. Finally, this paper presents the future vertical guidance performance of GPS user avionics sensor for the United States’ WAAS, Japanese MTSAT-based satellite augmentation system (MSAS) and European geostationary navigation overlay service (EGNOS). PMID:22319263

  5. Assessing the Performance of GPS Precise Point Positioning Under Different Geomagnetic Storm Conditions during Solar Cycle 24.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomin; Gu, Shengfeng; Lou, Yidong; Xiong, Chao; Chen, Biyan; Jin, Xueyuan

    2018-06-01

    The geomagnetic storm, which is an abnormal space weather phenomenon, can sometimes severely affect GPS signal propagation, thereby impacting the performance of GPS precise point positioning (PPP). However, the investigation of GPS PPP accuracy over the global scale under different geomagnetic storm conditions is very limited. This paper for the first time presents the performance of GPS dual-frequency (DF) and single-frequency (SF) PPP under moderate, intense, and super storms conditions during solar cycle 24 using a large data set collected from about 500 international GNSS services (IGS) stations. The global root mean square (RMS) maps of GPS PPP results show that stations with degraded performance are mainly distributed at high-latitude, and the degradation level generally depends on the storm intensity. The three-dimensional (3D) RMS of GPS DF PPP for high-latitude during moderate, intense, and super storms are 0.393 m, 0.680 m and 1.051 m, respectively, with respect to only 0.163 m on quiet day. RMS errors of mid- and low-latitudes show less dependence on the storm intensities, with values less than 0.320 m, compared to 0.153 m on quiet day. Compared with DF PPP, the performance of GPS SF PPP is inferior regardless of quiet or disturbed conditions. The degraded performance of GPS positioning during geomagnetic storms is attributed to the increased ionospheric disturbances, which have been confirmed by our global rate of TEC index (ROTI) maps. Ionospheric disturbances not only lead to the deteriorated ionospheric correction but also to the frequent cycle-slip occurrence. Statistical results show that, compared with that on quiet day, the increased cycle-slip occurrence are 13.04%, 56.52%, and 69.57% under moderate, intense, and super storms conditions, respectively.

  6. Transition of NOAA's GPS-Met Data Acquisition and Processing System to the Commercial Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. E.; Holub, K.; Callahan, W.; Blatt, S.

    2014-12-01

    In April of 2014, NOAA/OAR/ESRL Global Systems Division (GSD) and Trimble, in collaboration with Earth Networks, Inc. (ENI) signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to transfer the existing NOAA GPS-Met Data Acquisition and Processing System (GPS-Met DAPS) technology to a commercial Trimble/ENI partnership. NOAA's GPS-Met DAPS is currently operated in a pseudo-operational mode but has proven highly reliable and running at over 95% uptime. The DAPS uses the GAMIT software to ingest dual frequency carrier phase GPS/GNSS observations and ancillary information such as real-time satellite orbits to estimate the zenith-scaled tropospheric (ZTD) signal delays and, where surface MET data are available, retrieve integrated precipitable water vapor (PWV). The NOAA data and products are made available to end users in near real-time. The Trimble/ENI partnership will use the Trimble Pivot™ software with the Atmosphere App to calculate zenith tropospheric (ZTD), tropospheric slant delay, and integrated precipitable water vapor (PWV). Evaluation of the Trimble software is underway starting with a comparison of ZTD and PWV values determined from GPS stations located near NOAA Radiosonde Observation (Upper-Air Observation) launch sites. A success metric was established that requires Trimble's PWV estimates to match ESRL/GSD's to within 1.5 mm 95% of the time, which corresponds to a ZTD uncertainty of less than 10 mm 95% of the time. Initial results indicate that Trimble/ENI data meet and exceed the ZTD metric, but for some stations PWV estimates are out of specification. These discrepancies are primarily due to how offsets between MET and GPS stations are handled and are easily resolved. Additional test networks are proposed that include low terrain/high moisture variability stations, high terrain/low moisture variability stations, as well as high terrain/high moisture variability stations. We will present results from further testing along with a timeline

  7. A Precision, Low-Cost GPS-Based Transmitter Synchronization Scheme for Improved AM Reception

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Smith, Stephen Fulton; Moore, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a highly accurate carrier-frequency synchronization scheme for actively, automatically locking multiple, remotely located AM broadcast transmitters to a common frequency/timing reference source such as GPS. The extremely tight frequency lock (to {approx}1 part in 10{sup 9} or better) permits the effective elimination of audible and even sub-audible beats between the local (desired) station's carrier signal and the distant stations carriers, usually received via skywave propagation during the evening and nighttime hours. These carrier-beat components cause annoying modulations of the desired station's audio at the receiver and concurrent distortion of the audio modulation from the distant station(s) andmore » often cause listeners to ldquotune outrdquo due to the low reception quality. Significant reduction or elimination of the beats and related effects will greatly enlarge the effective (interference-limited) listening area of the desired station (from 4 to 10 times as indicated in our tests) and simultaneously reduce the corresponding interference of the local transmitter to the distant stations as well. In addition, AM stereo (CQUAM) reception will be particularly improved by minimizing the phase shifts induced by co-channel interfering signals; hybrid digital (HD) signals will also benefit via reduction in beats from analog signals. The automatic frequency-control hardware described is inexpensive ($1000-$2000), requires no periodic recalibration, has essentially zero long-term drift, and could employ alternate wide-area frequency references of suitable accuracy, including broadcasts from WWVB, LORAN-C, and equivalent sources. The basic configuration of the GPS-disciplined oscillator which solves this problem is extremely simple. The main oscillator is a conventional high-stability quartz-crystal type. To counter long- term drifts, the oscillator is slightly adjusted to track a high-precision source of standard frequency obtained from a

  8. Development of GPS survey data management protocols/policy.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-08-01

    This project developed a statewide policy and criteria for collecting, analyzing, and managing global position system (GPS) survey data. The research project determined the needs of the Department in adopting the GPS real time kinetic (GPS RTK) stake...

  9. Tracking magma volume recovery at okmok volcano using GPS and an unscented kalman filter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, T.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Cervelli, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Changes beneath a volcano can be observed through position changes in a GPS network, but distinguishing the source of site motion is not always straightforward. The records of continuous GPS sites provide a favorable data set for tracking magma migration. Dense campaign observations usually provide a better spatial picture of the overall deformation field, at the expense of an episodic temporal record. Combining these observations provides the best of both worlds. A Kalman filter provides a means for integrating discrete and continuous measurements and for interpreting subtle signals. The unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is a nonlinear method for time-dependent observations. We demonstrate the application of this technique to deformation data by applying it to GPS data collected at Okmok volcano. Seven years of GPS observations at Okmok are analyzed using a Mogi source model and the UKF. The deformation source at Okmok is relatively stable at 2.5 km depth below sea level, located beneath the center of the caldera, which means the surface deformation is caused by changes in the strength of the source. During the 7 years of GPS observations more than 0.5 m of uplift has occurred, a majority of that during the time period January 2003 to July 2004. The total volume recovery at Okmok since the last eruption in 1997 is ??60-80%. The UKF allows us to solve simultaneously for the time-dependence of the source strength and for the location without a priori information about the source. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Continuous GPS : pilot applications - Phase II

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-01

    The primary objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of applying Global Positioning System (GPS) technology in the study of geotechnical phenomenon by developing, integrating, and test deploying a GPS-based instrumentation package u...

  11. GPS Usage in a Population of Low-Vision Drivers.

    PubMed

    Cucuras, Maria; Chun, Robert; Lee, Patrick; Jay, Walter M; Pusateri, Gregg

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed bioptic and non-bioptic low-vision drivers in Illinois, USA, to determine their usage of global positioning system (GPS) devices. Low-vision patients completed an IRB-approved phone survey regarding driving demographics and usage of GPS while driving. Participants were required to be active drivers with an Illinois driver's license, and met one of the following criteria: best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) less than or equal to 20/40, central or significant peripheral visual field defects, or a combination of both. Of 27 low-vision drivers, 10 (37%) used GPS while driving. The average age for GPS users was 54.3 and for non-users was 77.6. All 10 drivers who used GPS while driving reported increased comfort or safety level. Since non-GPS users were significantly older than GPS users, it is likely that older participants would benefit from GPS technology training from their low-vision eye care professionals.

  12. Secular and annual hydrologic effects from the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meertens, C. M.; Wahr, J. M.; Borsa, A. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Herring, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS network is providing accurate and spatially coherent vertical signals that can be interpreted in terms of hydrological loading and poroelastic effects from both natural and anthropogenic changes in water storage. Data used for this analysis are the precise coordinate time series produced on a daily basis by PBO Analysis Centers at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and at Central Washington University and combined by the Analysis Center Coordinator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. These products, as well as derived velocity solutions, are made freely available from the UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder. Analysis of secular trends and annual variations in the time series was made using the analysis software of Langbein, 2008. Spatial variations in the amplitude and phase of the annual vertical component of motion allow for identification of anthropogenic effects due to water pumping, irrigation, and reservoir lake variations, and of outliers due to instrumental or other local site effects. Vertical annual signals of 8-10 mm peak-to-peak amplitude are evident at stations in the mountains of northern and central California and the Pacific Northwest. The peak annual uplift is in October and is correlated to hydrological loading effects. Mountainous areas appear to be responding elastically to the load of the water contained in surface soil, fractures, and snow. Vertical signals are highest when the water load is at a minimum. The vertical elastic hydrologic loading signal was modeled using the 0.25 degree community NOAH land-surface model (LSM) and generally fits the observed GPS signal. Addition comparisons will be made using the Mosaic LSM and the NOAA “Leaky Bucket” hydrologic model. In contrast to mountain stations that are installed principally in bedrock, stations in the valleys of California are installed in sediments. Observations from these stations show greater spatial variability ranging from

  13. GPS common-view time transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, W.

    1994-01-01

    The introduction of the GPS common-view method at the beginning of the 1980's led to an immediate and dramatic improvement of international time comparisons. Since then, further progress brought the precision and accuracy of GPS common-view intercontinental time transfer from tens of nanoseconds to a few nanoseconds, even with SA activated. This achievement was made possible by the use of the following: ultra-precise ground antenna coordinates, post-processed precise ephemerides, double-frequency measurements of ionosphere, and appropriate international coordination and standardization. This paper reviews developments and applications of the GPS common-view method during the last decade and comments on possible future improvements whose objective is to attain sub-nanosecond uncertainty.

  14. Toward Continuous GPS Carrier-Phase Time Transfer: Eliminating the Time Discontinuity at an Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jian; Levine, Judah; Weiss, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The wide application of Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier-phase (CP) time transfer is limited by the problem of boundary discontinuity (BD). The discontinuity has two categories. One is “day boundary discontinuity,” which has been studied extensively and can be solved by multiple methods [1–8]. The other category of discontinuity, called “anomaly boundary discontinuity (anomaly-BD),” comes from a GPS data anomaly. The anomaly can be a data gap (i.e., missing data), a GPS measurement error (i.e., bad data), or a cycle slip. Initial study of the anomaly-BD shows that we can fix the discontinuity if the anomaly lasts no more than 20 min, using the polynomial curve-fitting strategy to repair the anomaly [9]. However, sometimes, the data anomaly lasts longer than 20 min. Thus, a better curve-fitting strategy is in need. Besides, a cycle slip, as another type of data anomaly, can occur and lead to an anomaly-BD. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a new strategy, i.e., the satellite-clock-aided curve fitting strategy with the function of cycle slip detection. Basically, this new strategy applies the satellite clock correction to the GPS data. After that, we do the polynomial curve fitting for the code and phase data, as before. Our study shows that the phase-data residual is only ~3 mm for all GPS satellites. The new strategy also detects and finds the number of cycle slips by searching the minimum curve-fitting residual. Extensive examples show that this new strategy enables us to repair up to a 40-min GPS data anomaly, regardless of whether the anomaly is due to a data gap, a cycle slip, or a combination of the two. We also find that interference of the GPS signal, known as “jamming”, can possibly lead to a time-transfer error, and that this new strategy can compensate for jamming outages. Thus, the new strategy can eliminate the impact of jamming on time transfer. As a whole, we greatly improve the robustness of the GPS CP time transfer

  15. SURMODERR: A MATLAB toolbox for estimation of velocity uncertainties of a non-permanent GPS station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teza, Giordano; Pesci, Arianna; Casula, Giuseppe

    2010-08-01

    SURMODERR is a MATLAB toolbox intended for the estimation of reliable velocity uncertainties of a non-permanent GPS station (NPS), i.e. a GPS receiver used in campaign-style measurements. The implemented method is based on the subsampling of daily coordinate time series of one or more continuous GPS stations located inside or close to the area where the NPSs are installed. The continuous time series are subsampled according to real or planned occupation tables and random errors occurring in antenna replacement on different surveys are taken into account. In order to overcome the uncertainty underestimation that typically characterizes short duration GPS time series, statistical analysis of the simulated data is performed to estimate the velocity uncertainties of this real NPS. The basic hypotheses required are: (i) the signal must be a long-term linear trend plus seasonal and colored noise for each coordinate; (ii) the standard data processing should have already been performed to provide daily data series; and (iii) if the method is applied to survey planning, the future behavior should not be significantly different from the past behavior. In order to show the strength of the approach, two case studies with real data are presented and discussed (Central Apennine and Panarea Island, Italy).

  16. Laser, GPS and absolute gravimetry vertical positioning time series comparison at the OCA observatory, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, J.; Nocquet, J.; van Camp, M.; Coulot, D.

    2003-12-01

    Time-dependent displacements of stations usually have magnitude close to the accuracy of each individual technique, and it still remains difficult to separate the true geophysical motion from possible artifacts inherent to each space geodetic technique. The Observatoire de la C“te d'Azur (OCA), located at Grasse, France benefits from the collocation of several geodetic instruments and techniques (3 laser ranging stations, and a permanent GPS) what allows us to do a direct comparison of the time series. Moreover, absolute gravimetry measurement campaigns have also been regularly performed since 1997, first by the "Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre (EOST) of Strasbourg, France, and more recently by the Royal Observatory of Belgium. This study presents a comparison between the positioning time series of the vertical component derived from the SLR and GPS analysis with the gravimetric results from 1997 to 2003. The laser station coordinates are based on a LAGEOS -1 and -2 combined solution using reference 10-day arc orbits, the ITRF2000 reference frame, and the IERS96 conventions. Different GPS weekly global solutions provided from several IGS are combined and compared to the SLR results. The absolute gravimetry measurements are converted into vertical displacements with a classical gradient. The laser time series indicate a strong annual signal at the level of about 3-4 cm peak to peak amplitude on the vertical component. Absolute gravimetry data agrees with the SLR results. GPS positioning solutions also indicate a significant annual term, but with a magnitude of only 50% of the one shown by the SLR solution and by the gravimetry measurements. Similar annual terms are also observed on other SLR sites we processed, but usually with! lower and various amplitudes. These annual signals are also compared to vertical positioning variations corresponding to an atmospheric loading model. We present the level of agreement between the different techniques and we

  17. Comparison of GLONASS and GPS Time Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, P.; Koshelyaevsky, N. B.; Lewandowski, W.; Petit, G.; Thomas, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Russian global space navigation system GLONASS could provide a technique similar to GPS for international time comparison. The main limitation to its use for time transfer is the lack of commercially available time receivers. The University of Leeds built a GPS/GLONASS receiver five years ago and since then has provided continuous information about GLONASS time and its comparison with GPS time. For the last two years the VNIIFTRI and several other Russian time laboratories have used Russian-built GLONASS navigation receivers for time comparisons. Since June 1991, the VNIIFTRI has operated a GPS time receiver which offers, for the first time, an opportunity for the direct comparison of time transfers using GPS and GLONASS. This seven-month experiment shows that even with relatively imprecise data recording and processing, in terms of time metrology, GLONASS can provide continental time transfer at a level of several tens of nanoseconds.

  18. Rigidity of Major Plates and Microplates Estimated From GPS Solution GPS2006.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, M. G.; Steblov, G. M.

    2006-05-01

    Here we analyze the rigidity of eight major lithospheric plates using our global GPS solution GPS2006.0. We included all daily observations in interval 1995.0 to 2006.0 collected at IGS stations, as well as observations at many important stations not included in IGS. Loose multiyear solution GPS2006.0 is based on daily solutions by GAMIT software, performed at SOPAC and at Columbia University; those daily solutions were combined by Kalman filter (GLOBK software) into a loose multiyear solution. The constrained solution for station positions and velocities was obtained without a conventional reference frame; instead, we applied translation and rotation in order to best fit the zero velocities of 76 stations in stable plate cores excluding the regions of postglacial rebound. Simultaneously, we estimated relative plate rotation vectors (RV) and the origin translation rate (OTR), and then corrected station velocities for it. Therefore, the velocities in GPS2006.0 are unaffected by the OTR error of ITRF2000 conventionally used to constrain a loose solution. The 1-sigma plate-residual velocity in a stable plate core is less than 1 mm/yr for the plates: Eurasia, Pacific, North and South Americas, Nubia, Australia, and Antarctica; it is 1.4 mm/yr for the Indian plate, most probably because of poorer data quality. Plate-residuals at other established plates (Arabia, Nazca, Caribbean, Philippine) were not assessed for lack of observations. From our analysis, an upper bound for the mobility of the plate inner area is 1 mm/yr. Plate- residual GPS velocities for several hypothesized microplates in east Asia, such as Okhotsk, Amuria, South China, are 3-4 times higher; corresponding strain rates for these microplates are an order of magnitude higher than for Eurasia, North America, and other large plates.

  19. Fine tuning GPS clock estimation in the MCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsell, Steven T.

    1995-01-01

    With the completion of a 24 operational satellite constellation, GPS is fast approaching the critical milestone, Full Operational Capability (FOC). Although GPS is well capable of providing the timing accuracy and stability figures required by system specifications, the GPS community will continue to strive for further improvements in performance. The GPS Master Control Station (MCS) recently demonstrated that timing improvements are always composite Clock, and hence, Kalman Filter state estimation, providing a small improvement to user accuracy.

  20. Consistent Long-Time Series of GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, P.; Schmid, R.; Rothacher, M.

    2004-12-01

    The current IGS processing strategy disregards satellite antenna phase center variations (pcvs) depending on the nadir angle and applies block-specific phase center offsets only. However, the transition from relative to absolute receiver antenna corrections presently under discussion necessitates the consideration of satellite antenna pcvs. Moreover, studies of several groups have shown that the offsets are not homogeneous within a satellite block. Manufacturer specifications seem to confirm this assumption. In order to get best possible antenna corrections, consistent ten-year time series (1994-2004) of satellite-specific pcvs and offsets were generated. This challenging effort became possible as part of the reprocessing of a global GPS network currently performed by the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden. The data of about 160 stations since the official start of the IGS in 1994 have been reprocessed, as today's GPS time series are mostly inhomogeneous and inconsistent due to continuous improvements in the processing strategies and modeling of global GPS solutions. An analysis of the signals contained in the time series of the phase center offsets demonstrates amplitudes on the decimeter level, at least one order of magnitude worse than the desired accuracy. The periods partly arise from the GPS orbit configuration, as the orientation of the orbit planes with regard to the inertial system repeats after about 350 days due to the rotation of the ascending nodes. In addition, the rms values of the X- and Y-offsets show a high correlation with the angle between the orbit plane and the direction to the sun. The time series of the pcvs mainly point at the correlation with the global terrestrial scale. Solutions with relative and absolute phase center corrections, with block- and satellite-specific satellite antenna corrections demonstrate the effect of this parameter group on other global GPS parameters such as the terrestrial scale, station velocities, the

  1. GPS Tomography: Water Vapour Monitoring for Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Michael; Dick, Galina; Wickert, Jens; Raabe, Armin

    2010-05-01

    Ground based GPS atmosphere sounding provides numerous atmospheric quantities with a high temporal resolution for all weather conditions. The spatial resolution of the GPS observations is mainly given by the number of GNSS satellites and GPS ground stations. The latter could considerably be increased in the last few years leading to more reliable and better resolved GPS products. New techniques such as the GPS water vapour tomography gain increased significance as data from large and dense GPS networks become available. The GPS tomography has the potential to provide spatially resolved fields of different quantities operationally, i. e. the humidity or wet refractivity as required for meteorological applications or the refraction index which is important for several space based observations or for precise positioning. The number of German GPS stations operationally processed by the GFZ in Potsdam was recently enlarged to more than 300. About 28000 IWV observations and more than 1.4 millions of slant total delay data are now available per day with a temporal resolution of 15 min and 2.5 min, respectively. The extended network leads not only to a higher spatial resolution of the tomographically reconstructed 3D fields but also to a much higher stability of the inversion process and with that to an increased quality of the results. Under these improved conditions the GPS tomography can operate continuously over several days or weeks without applying too tight constraints. Time series of tomographically reconstructed humidity fields will be shown and different initialisation strategies will be discussed: Initialisation with a simple exponential profile, with a 3D humidity field extrapolated from synoptic observations and with the result of the preceeding reconstruction. The results are compared to tomographic reconstructions initialised with COSMO-DE analyses and to the corresponding model fields. The inversion can be further stabilised by making use of independent

  2. NAVSTAR GPS Marine Receiver Performance Analysis

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1984-09-01

    This report is an analysis and comparison of the capability of several NAVSTAR GPS receiver configurations to provide accurate position data to the civil marine user. The NAVSTAR GPS system itself has the potential to provide civil marine users with ...

  3. Highlights of Recent Developments in the International GPS Service and Perspectives for Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, R.; Reigber, C.; Springer, T.; Beutler, G.; Kouba, J.

    1999-01-01

    In December 1998, the IGS Governing Board officially changed the name of this IAG service from 'International GPS Service for Geodynamics to simply the 'International GPS Service'. This change of name reflects the fact that today the IGS supports numerous scientific projects outside the traditional geodetic and geodynamic disciplines. A number of IGS projects and working groups have been established, each concentrating on a particular science application, such as the ionosphere, atmosphere, reference frame, precise time transfer, etc. These activities are enabled and simulated by the IGS and directly contribute to the continuing development of the service. The IGS is currently poised to respond to evolving user requirements that focus on timeliness and reliability of data and products, particularly in support of a slate of Low Earth Orbiter missions over the next decade. Perspectives on the future of the IGS will be developed based on current directions as well as anticipated external influences, such as GPS satellite modernization, GLONASS, availability of global communications, and plans for the European GALILEO (Global Navigation Satellite System - GNSS). We will address development of user friendly interfaces and IGS product tutorials.

  4. Tracking Architecture Based on Dual-Filter with State Feedback and Its Application in Ultra-Tight GPS/INS Integration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Miao, Lingjuan; Shao, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    If a Kalman Filter (KF) is applied to Global Positioning System (GPS) baseband signal preprocessing, the estimates of signal phase and frequency can have low variance, even in highly dynamic situations. This paper presents a novel preprocessing scheme based on a dual-filter structure. Compared with the traditional model utilizing a single KF, this structure avoids carrier tracking being subjected to code tracking errors. Meanwhile, as the loop filters are completely removed, state feedback values are adopted to generate local carrier and code. Although local carrier frequency has a wide fluctuation, the accuracy of Doppler shift estimation is improved. In the ultra-tight GPS/Inertial Navigation System (INS) integration, the carrier frequency derived from the external navigation information is not viewed as the local carrier frequency directly. That facilitates retaining the design principle of state feedback. However, under harsh conditions, the GPS outputs may still bear large errors which can destroy the estimation of INS errors. Thus, an innovative integrated navigation filter is constructed by modeling the non-negligible errors in the estimated Doppler shifts, to ensure INS is properly calibrated. Finally, field test and semi-physical simulation based on telemetered missile trajectory validate the effectiveness of methods proposed in this paper. PMID:27144570

  5. Tracking Architecture Based on Dual-Filter with State Feedback and Its Application in Ultra-Tight GPS/INS Integration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Miao, Lingjuan; Shao, Haijun

    2016-05-02

    If a Kalman Filter (KF) is applied to Global Positioning System (GPS) baseband signal preprocessing, the estimates of signal phase and frequency can have low variance, even in highly dynamic situations. This paper presents a novel preprocessing scheme based on a dual-filter structure. Compared with the traditional model utilizing a single KF, this structure avoids carrier tracking being subjected to code tracking errors. Meanwhile, as the loop filters are completely removed, state feedback values are adopted to generate local carrier and code. Although local carrier frequency has a wide fluctuation, the accuracy of Doppler shift estimation is improved. In the ultra-tight GPS/Inertial Navigation System (INS) integration, the carrier frequency derived from the external navigation information is not viewed as the local carrier frequency directly. That facilitates retaining the design principle of state feedback. However, under harsh conditions, the GPS outputs may still bear large errors which can destroy the estimation of INS errors. Thus, an innovative integrated navigation filter is constructed by modeling the non-negligible errors in the estimated Doppler shifts, to ensure INS is properly calibrated. Finally, field test and semi-physical simulation based on telemetered missile trajectory validate the effectiveness of methods proposed in this paper.

  6. GPS-based system for satellite tracking and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, Willy I.; Thornton, Catherine L.

    1989-01-01

    High-performance receivers and data processing systems developed for GPS are reviewed. The GPS Inferred Positioning System (GIPSY) and the Orbiter Analysis and Simulation Software (OASIS) are described. The OASIS software is used to assess GPS system performance using GIPSY for data processing. Consideration is given to parameter estimation for multiday arcs, orbit repeatability, orbit prediction, daily baseline repeatability, agreement with VLBI, and ambiguity resolution. Also, the dual-frequency Rogue receiver, which can track up to eight GPS satellites simultaneously, is discussed.

  7. Sea level rise within the west of Arabian Gulf using tide gauge and continuous GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayhan, M. E.; Alothman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Arabian Gulf is connected to Indian Ocean and located in the south-west of the Zagros Trust Belt. To investigate sea level variations within the west of Arabian Gulf, monthly means of sea level at 13 tide gauges along the coast of Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, available in the database of the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), are studied. We analyzed individually the monthly means at each station, and estimated secular sea level rate by a robust linear trend fitting. We computed the average relative sea level rise rate of 1.96 ± 0.21 mm/yr within the west of Arabian Gulf based on 4 stations spanning longer than 19 years. Vertical land motions are included into the relative sea level measurements at the tide gauges. Therefore sea level rates at the stations are corrected for vertical land motions using the ICE-5G v1.2 VM4 Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) model then we found the average sea level rise rate of 2.27 mm/yr. Bahrain International GPS Service (IGS) GPS station, which is close to the Mina Sulman tide gauge station in Bahrain, is the only continuous GPS station accessible in the region. The weekly GPS time series of vertical component at Bahrain IGS-GPS station referring to the ITRF97 from 1999.2 to 2008.6 are downloaded from http://www-gps.mit.edu/~tah/. We fitted a linear trend with an annual signal and one break to the GPS vertical time series and found a vertical land motion rate of 0.48 ± 0.11 mm/yr. Assuming the vertical rate at Bahrain IGS-GPS station represents the vertical rate at each of the other tide gauge stations studied here in the region, we computed average sea level rise rate of 2.44 ± 0.21 mm/yr within the west of Arabian Gulf.

  8. Heterogeneous regional signal control : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-03-12

    The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive framework with a set of models to improve multi-modal traffic signal control, by incorporating advanced floating sensor data (e.g. GPS data, etc.) and traditional fixed sensor data (e.g. loop det...

  9. Contents of GPS Data Files

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sullivan, John P.; Carver, Matthew Robert; Norman, Benjamin

    There are no very detailed descriptions of most of these instruments in the literature – we will attempt to fix that problem in the future. The BDD instruments are described in [1]. One of the dosimeter instruments on CXD boxes is described in [2]. These documents (or web links to them) and a few others are in this directory tree. The cross calibration of the CXD electron data with RBSP is described in [3]. Each row in the data file contains the data from one time bin from a CXD or BDD instrument along with a variety of parameters derivedmore » from the data. Time steps are commandable but 4 minutes is a typical setting. These instruments are on many (but not all) GPS satellites which are currently in operation. The data come from either BDD instruments on GPS Block IIR satellites (SVN41 and 48), or else CXD-IIR instruments on GPS Block IIR and IIR-M satellites (SVN53-61) or CXD-IIF instruments on GPS block IIF satellites (SVN62-73). The CXD-IIR instruments on block IIR and IIR(M) satellites use the same design.« less

  10. Tracking Human Mobility Using WiFi Signals.

    PubMed

    Sapiezynski, Piotr; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Gatej, Radu; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    We study six months of human mobility data, including WiFi and GPS traces recorded with high temporal resolution, and find that time series of WiFi scans contain a strong latent location signal. In fact, due to inherent stability and low entropy of human mobility, it is possible to assign location to WiFi access points based on a very small number of GPS samples and then use these access points as location beacons. Using just one GPS observation per day per person allows us to estimate the location of, and subsequently use, WiFi access points to account for 80% of mobility across a population. These results reveal a great opportunity for using ubiquitous WiFi routers for high-resolution outdoor positioning, but also significant privacy implications of such side-channel location tracking.

  11. Retrieval and Validation of Precipitable Water Vapor using GPS Datasets of Mobile Observation Vehicle in the Eastern Coast of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. J.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, G. T.; Choi, B. C.; Shim, J.; Kim, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    The results from the global positioning system (GPS) measurements of mobile observation vehicle (MOVE) in the eastern coast of Korea have been compared with a fixed observation reference (REF) values from the fixed GPS sites to assess performance of precipitable water vapor (PWV) retrievals in a kinematic environment. MOVE-PWV retrievals have comparatively similar trends and reasonable agreement with REF-PWV with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 7.4 mm and R2 of 0.61 indicating a statistical significance at the 1% level (p-value of 0.01). Especially PWV retrievals from the June cases showed better agreement (mean bias of 2.1 mm and RMSE of 3.8 mm) with the other cases. We further investigated the relationships of determinant factors of GPS signals with the PWV retrievals for the detailed error analysis. As a result, both multipath (MP) errors of L1 and L2 pseudo-range had the best indices (0.75~0.99 m) for the June cases. We also found that both position dilution of precision (PDOP) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) values in June cases during the 1st period (0000~0100 UTC) are better (lower and higher) than those in Non-June cases, which is strongly associated with good accuracy (RMSE of 3.5 mm) of PWV in June cases. These results clearly demonstrate those effects on PWV accuracy, that is, analytic results of the key factors (MP errors, PDOP, and SNR) that could affect GPS signals should be considered for obtaining more stable performance. Taking advantage of MOVE, we would provide water vapor information with high spatial and temporal resolutions in case that weather dramatically changes such as in Korean Peninsula.

  12. Assessing fitness for work: GPs judgment making.

    PubMed

    Foley, Michelle; Thorley, Kevan; Van Hout, Marie-Claire

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of a fitness for work consultation is well documented. General practitioners (GPs) find that such consultations often create conflict and they feel ill-prepared for the task. We aimed to examine the consultation process in the fitness for work consultation and to report on the response of GPs to two hypothetical consultations of work related sickness absence, one of a psychological and one of a physical nature. Three areas of the consultation were examined; social/family circumstances, workplace history and information required assessing the severity of the condition. We used a randomized design using an online questionnaire completed by 62 GPs located in the Republic of Ireland. Analysis was conducted in NVivo 8 qualitative software using thematic and content analysis techniques. GPs may be expected to collect and consider information relating to social, domestic, financial, lifestyle and workplace factors, including workload, job satisfaction, job strain, work ethic, inter staff relationships and employee support mechanisms. The mode of presentation may trigger specific information seeking in the consultation. GPs may evaluate fitness for work in a variety of ways depending on medical and non-medical factors. Further research should further examine the factors that may influence the GPs decision to prescribe sickness leave.

  13. GPS Modeling and Analysis. Summary of Research: GPS Satellite Axial Ratio Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelrad, Penina; Reeh, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    This report outlines the algorithms developed at the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research to model yaw and predict the axial ratio as measured from a ground station. The algorithms are implemented in a collection of Matlab functions and scripts that read certain user input, such as ground station coordinates, the UTC time, and the desired GPS (Global Positioning System) satellites, and compute the above-mentioned parameters. The position information for the GPS satellites is obtained from Yuma almanac files corresponding to the prescribed date. The results are displayed graphically through time histories and azimuth-elevation plots.

  14. Improving Ambiguity Resolution for Medium Baselines Using Combined GPS and BDS Dual/Triple-Frequency Observations

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wang; Gao, Chengfa; Pan, Shuguo; Wang, Denghui; Deng, Jiadong

    2015-01-01

    The regional constellation of the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) has been providing continuous positioning, navigation and timing services since 27 December 2012, covering China and the surrounding area. Real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning with combined BDS and GPS observations is feasible. Besides, all satellites of BDS can transmit triple-frequency signals. Using the advantages of multi-pseudorange and carrier observations from multi-systems and multi-frequencies is expected to be of much benefit for ambiguity resolution (AR). We propose an integrated AR strategy for medium baselines by using the combined GPS and BDS dual/triple-frequency observations. In the method, firstly the extra-wide-lane (EWL) ambiguities of triple-frequency system, i.e., BDS, are determined first. Then the dual-frequency WL ambiguities of BDS and GPS were resolved with the geometry-based model by using the BDS ambiguity-fixed EWL observations. After that, basic (i.e., L1/L2 or B1/B2) ambiguities of BDS and GPS are estimated together with the so-called ionosphere-constrained model, where the ambiguity-fixed WL observations are added to enhance the model strength. During both of the WL and basic AR, a partial ambiguity fixing (PAF) strategy is adopted to weaken the negative influence of new-rising or low-elevation satellites. Experiments were conducted and presented, in which the GPS/BDS dual/triple-frequency data were collected in Nanjing and Zhengzhou of China, with the baseline distance varying from about 28.6 to 51.9 km. The results indicate that, compared to the single triple-frequency BDS system, the combined system can significantly enhance the AR model strength, and thus improve AR performance for medium baselines with a 75.7% reduction of initialization time on average. Besides, more accurate and stable positioning results can also be derived by using the combined GPS/BDS system. PMID:26528977

  15. Improving Ambiguity Resolution for Medium Baselines Using Combined GPS and BDS Dual/Triple-Frequency Observations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wang; Gao, Chengfa; Pan, Shuguo; Wang, Denghui; Deng, Jiadong

    2015-10-30

    The regional constellation of the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) has been providing continuous positioning, navigation and timing services since 27 December 2012, covering China and the surrounding area. Real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning with combined BDS and GPS observations is feasible. Besides, all satellites of BDS can transmit triple-frequency signals. Using the advantages of multi-pseudorange and carrier observations from multi-systems and multi-frequencies is expected to be of much benefit for ambiguity resolution (AR). We propose an integrated AR strategy for medium baselines by using the combined GPS and BDS dual/triple-frequency observations. In the method, firstly the extra-wide-lane (EWL) ambiguities of triple-frequency system, i.e., BDS, are determined first. Then the dual-frequency WL ambiguities of BDS and GPS were resolved with the geometry-based model by using the BDS ambiguity-fixed EWL observations. After that, basic (i.e., L1/L2 or B1/B2) ambiguities of BDS and GPS are estimated together with the so-called ionosphere-constrained model, where the ambiguity-fixed WL observations are added to enhance the model strength. During both of the WL and basic AR, a partial ambiguity fixing (PAF) strategy is adopted to weaken the negative influence of new-rising or low-elevation satellites. Experiments were conducted and presented, in which the GPS/BDS dual/triple-frequency data were collected in Nanjing and Zhengzhou of China, with the baseline distance varying from about 28.6 to 51.9 km. The results indicate that, compared to the single triple-frequency BDS system, the combined system can significantly enhance the AR model strength, and thus improve AR performance for medium baselines with a 75.7% reduction of initialization time on average. Besides, more accurate and stable positioning results can also be derived by using the combined GPS/BDS system.

  16. Improvement of tsunami detection in timeseries data of GPS buoys with the Continuous Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Y.; Takagawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    The observation data of GPS buoys which are installed in the offshore of Japan are used for monitoring not only waves but also tsunamis in Japan. The real-time data was successfully used to upgrade the tsunami warnings just after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Huge tsunamis can be easily detected because the signal-noise ratio is high enough, but moderate tsunami is not. GPS data sometimes include the error waveforms like tsunamis because of changing accuracy by the number and the position of GPS satellites. To distinguish the true tsunami waveforms from pseudo-tsunami ones is important for tsunami detection. In this research, a method to reduce misdetections of tsunami in the observation data of GPS buoys and to increase the efficiency of tsunami detection was developed.Firstly, the error waveforms were extracted by using the indexes of position dilution of precision, reliability of GPS satellite positioning and satellite number for calculation. Then, the output from this procedure was used for the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyze the time-frequency characteristics of error waveforms and real tsunami waveforms.We found that the error waveforms tended to appear when the accuracy of GPS buoys positioning was low. By extracting these waveforms, it was possible to decrease about 43% error waveforms without the reduction of the tsunami detection rate. Moreover, we found that the amplitudes of power spectra obtained from the error waveforms and real tsunamis were similar in the component of long period (4-65 minutes), on the other hand, the amplitude in the component of short period (< 1 minute) obtained from the error waveforms was significantly larger than that of the real tsunami waveforms. By thresholding of the short-period component, further extraction of error waveforms became possible without a significant reduction of tsunami detection rate.

  17. The Evolution of Global Positioning System (GPS) Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Sameer; Moore, Kevin B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes technological advances in the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is also known as the NAVSTAR GPS satellite constellation program developed in 1937, and changes in the nature of our world by GPS in the areas of agriculture, health, military, transportation, environment, wildlife biology, surveying and mapping, space applications, and…

  18. Work-related sickness absence negotiations: GPs' qualitative perspectives.

    PubMed

    Money, Annemarie; Hussey, Louise; Thorley, Kevan; Turner, Susan; Agius, Raymond

    2010-10-01

    GPs can find their role as issuers of sickness certification problematic, particularly in trying to maintain a balance between certifying absence and preserving the doctor-patient relationship. Little research has been published on consultations in which sickness absence has been certified. To explore negotiations between GPs and patients in sickness absence certification, including how occupational health training may affect this process. A qualitative study was undertaken with GPs trained in occupational health who also participate in a UK wide surveillance scheme studying work-related ill-health. Telephone interviews were conducted with 31 GPs who had reported cases with associated sickness absence. Work-related sickness absence and patients' requests for a 'sick note' vary by diagnosis. Some GPs felt their role as patient advocate was of utmost importance, and issue certificates on a patient's request, whereas others offer more resistance through a greater understanding of issues surrounding work and health acquired through occupational health training. GPs felt that their training helped them to challenge beliefs about absence from work being beneficial to patients experiencing ill-health; they felt b