Science.gov

Sample records for reflected infrared light

  1. Origin of Infrared Light Modulation in Reflectance-Mode Photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Sidorov, Igor S.; Romashko, Roman V.; Koval, Vasily T.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2016-01-01

    We recently pointed out the important role of dermis deformation by pulsating arterial pressure in the formation of a photoplethysmographic signal at green light. The aim of this study was to explore the role of this novel finding in near-infrared (NIR) light. A light-emitting diode (LED)-based imaging photoplethysmography (IPPG) system was used to detect spatial distribution of blood pulsations under frame-to-frame switching green and NIR illumination in the palms of 34 healthy individuals. We observed a significant increase of light-intensity modulation at the heartbeat frequency for both illuminating wavelengths after a palm was contacted with a glass plate. Strong positive correlation between data measured at green and NIR light was found, suggesting that the same signal was read independently from the depth of penetration. Analysis of the data shows that an essential part of remitted NIR light is modulated in time as a result of elastic deformations of dermis caused by variable blood pressure in the arteries. Our observations suggest that in contrast with the classical model, photoplethysmographic waveform originates from the modulation of the density of capillaries caused by the variable pressure applied to the skin from large blood vessels. Particularly, beat-to-beat transmural pressure in arteries compresses/decompresses the dermis and deforms its connective-tissue components, thus affecting the distance between the capillaries, which results in the modulation of absorption and scattering coefficients of both green and NIR light. These findings are important for the correct interpretation of this widely used medical technique, which may have novel applications in diagnosis and treatment monitoring of aging and skin diseases. PMID:27768753

  2. Differences in visible and near-infrared light reflectance between orange fruit and leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Berumen, A.

    1975-01-01

    The objective was to find the best time during the season (April 26, 1972 to January 8, 1973) to distinguish orange fruit from leaves by spectrophotometrically determining at 10-day intervals when the difference in visible (550- and 650-nm wavelengths) and near-infrared (850-nm wavelength) light reflectance between fruit and nearby leaves was largest. December 5 to January 8 was the best time to distinguish fruit from leaves. During this period the fruit's color was rapidly changing from green to yellow, and the difference in visible light reflectance between fruit and leaves was largest. The difference in near-infrared reflectance between leaves and fruit remained essentially constant during ripening when the difference in visible light reflectance between leaves and fruit was largest.

  3. Differences in visible and near-infrared light reflectance between orange fruit and leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Berumen, A.

    1975-01-01

    The objective was to find the best time during the season (April 26, 1972 to January 8, 1973) to distinguish orange fruit from leaves by spectrophotometrically determining at 10-day intervals when the difference in visible (550- and 650-nm wavelengths) and near-infrared (850-nm wavelength) light reflectance between fruit and nearby leaves was largest. December 5 to January 8 was the best time to distinguish fruit from leaves. During this period the fruit's color was rapidly changing from green to yellow, and the difference in visible light reflectance between fruit and leaves was largest. The difference in near-infrared reflectance between leaves and fruit remained essentially constant during ripening when the difference in visible light reflectance between leaves and fruit was largest.

  4. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jie; Li, Yannian; Li, Quan; Paterson, Daniel A; Storey, John M D; Imrie, Corrie T; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-20

    Electrical tuning of selective reflection of light is achieved in a very broad spectral range from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by an oblique helicoidal state of a cholesteric liquid crystal in a wide temperature range (including room temperature). The phenomenon offers potential applications in tunable smart windows, lasers, optical filters and limiters, as well as in displays.

  5. Recognition of Banknote Fitness Based on a Fuzzy System Using Visible Light Reflection and Near-infrared Light Transmission Images

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seung Yong; Pham, Tuyen Danh; Park, Kang Ryoung; Jeong, Dae Sik; Yoon, Sungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Fitness classification is a technique to assess the quality of banknotes in order to determine whether they are usable. Banknote classification techniques are useful in preventing problems that arise from the circulation of substandard banknotes (such as recognition failures, or bill jams in automated teller machines (ATMs) or bank counting machines). By and large, fitness classification continues to be carried out by humans, and this can cause the problem of varying fitness classifications for the same bill by different evaluators, and requires a lot of time. To address these problems, this study proposes a fuzzy system-based method that can reduce the processing time needed for fitness classification, and can determine the fitness of banknotes through an objective, systematic method rather than subjective judgment. Our algorithm was an implementation to actual banknote counting machine. Based on the results of tests on 3856 banknotes in United States currency (USD), 3956 in Korean currency (KRW), and 2300 banknotes in Indian currency (INR) using visible light reflection (VR) and near-infrared light transmission (NIRT) imaging, the proposed method was found to yield higher accuracy than prevalent banknote fitness classification methods. Moreover, it was confirmed that the proposed algorithm can operate in real time, not only in a normal PC environment, but also in an embedded system environment of a banknote counting machine. PMID:27294940

  6. Recognition of Banknote Fitness Based on a Fuzzy System Using Visible Light Reflection and Near-infrared Light Transmission Images.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seung Yong; Pham, Tuyen Danh; Park, Kang Ryoung; Jeong, Dae Sik; Yoon, Sungsoo

    2016-06-11

    Fitness classification is a technique to assess the quality of banknotes in order to determine whether they are usable. Banknote classification techniques are useful in preventing problems that arise from the circulation of substandard banknotes (such as recognition failures, or bill jams in automated teller machines (ATMs) or bank counting machines). By and large, fitness classification continues to be carried out by humans, and this can cause the problem of varying fitness classifications for the same bill by different evaluators, and requires a lot of time. To address these problems, this study proposes a fuzzy system-based method that can reduce the processing time needed for fitness classification, and can determine the fitness of banknotes through an objective, systematic method rather than subjective judgment. Our algorithm was an implementation to actual banknote counting machine. Based on the results of tests on 3856 banknotes in United States currency (USD), 3956 in Korean currency (KRW), and 2300 banknotes in Indian currency (INR) using visible light reflection (VR) and near-infrared light transmission (NIRT) imaging, the proposed method was found to yield higher accuracy than prevalent banknote fitness classification methods. Moreover, it was confirmed that the proposed algorithm can operate in real time, not only in a normal PC environment, but also in an embedded system environment of a banknote counting machine.

  7. Reversible near-infrared light directed reflection in a self-organized helical superstructure loaded with upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Dong, Hao; Li, Yannian; Xue, Chenming; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua; Li, Quan

    2014-03-26

    Adding external, dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with desired functionalities is an important leap necessary in leveraging the fascinating molecular systems for applications. Here, the new light-driven chiral molecular switch and upconversion nanoparticles, doped in a liquid crystal media, were able to self-organize into an optically tunable helical superstructure. The resulting nanoparticle impregnated helical superstructure was found to exhibit unprecedented reversible near-infrared (NIR) light-guided tunable behavior only by modulating the excitation power density of a continuous-wave NIR laser (980 nm). Upon irradiation by the NIR laser at the high power density, the reflection wavelength of the photonic superstructure red-shifted, whereas its reverse process occurred upon irradiation by the same laser but with the lower power density. Furthermore, reversible dynamic NIR-light-driven red, green, and blue reflections in a single thin film, achieved only by varying the power density of the NIR light, were for the first time demonstrated.

  8. Light at the interface: the potential of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy for understanding heterogeneous catalysis in water.

    PubMed

    Mojet, Barbara Louise; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Lefferts, Leon

    2010-12-01

    IR spectroscopy has been an important tool for studying detailed interactions of reactants and reaction-intermediates with catalyst surfaces. Studying reactions in water is, however, far from trivial, due to the excessive absorption of infrared light by water. One way to deal with this is the use of Attenuated Total Reflection spectroscopy (ATR-IR) minimizing the path length of infrared light through the water. Moreover, ATR-IR allows for a direct comparison of reactions in gas and water on the same sample, which bridges the gap between separate catalyst investigations in gas and liquid phase. This tutorial review describes recent progress in using ATR-IR for studying heterogeneous catalysts in water. An overview is given of the important aspects to be taken into account when using ATR-IR to study heterogeneous catalysts in liquid phase, like the procedure to prepare stable catalyst layers on the internal reflection element. As a case study, CO adsorption and oxidation on noble metal catalysts is investigated with ATR-IR in gas and water. The results show a large effect of water and pH on the adsorption and oxidation of CO on Pt/Al(2)O(3) and Pd/Al(2)O(3). From the results it is concluded that water affects the metal particle potential as well as the adsorbed CO molecule directly, resulting in higher oxidation rates in water compared to gas phase. Moreover, also pH influences the metal particle potential with a clear effect on the observed oxidation rates. Finally, the future outlook illustrates that ATR-IR spectroscopy holds great promise in the field of liquid phase heterogeneous catalysis.

  9. Infrared reflectance in leaf-sitting neotropical frogs.

    PubMed

    Schwalm, P A; Starrett, P H; McDiarmid, R W

    1977-06-10

    Two members of the glass-frog family Centrolenidae (Centrolenella fleischmanni, C. prosoblepon) and the hylid subfamily Phyllomedusinae (Agalychnis moreletii, Pachymedusa dacnicolor) reflect near-infrared light (700 to 900 nanometers) when examined by infrared color photography. Infrared reflectance may confer adaptive advantage to these arboreal frogs both in thermoregulation and infrared cryptic coloration.

  10. Mid-infrared reflectivity of experimental atheromas.

    PubMed

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Bjornstad, Kathy A; Martin, Michael C; McKinney, Wayne R; Blakely, Eleanor A; Blankenberg, Francis G

    2008-01-01

    We report that the pathologic components present within the atheromatous plaques of ApoE knock-out mice can reflect significant amounts of mid-infrared (mid-IR) light. Furthermore, the reflected light spectra contained the unique signatures of a variety of biologic features including those found in unstable or "vulnerable" plaque. This discovery may represent a unique opportunity to develop a new intravascular diagnostic modality that can detect and characterize sites of atherosclerosis.

  11. Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region (second report): sensitivity improvement of Fourier-spectroscopic imaging to detect diffuse reflection lights from internal human tissues for healthcare sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Hosono, Satsuki; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We proposed the snapshot-type Fourier spectroscopic imaging for smartphone that was mentioned in 1st. report in this conference. For spectroscopic components analysis, such as non-invasive blood glucose sensors, the diffuse reflection lights from internal human skins are very weak for conventional hyperspectral cameras, such as AOTF (Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter) type. Furthermore, it is well known that the spectral absorption of mid-infrared lights or Raman spectroscopy especially in long wavelength region is effective to distinguish specific biomedical components quantitatively, such as glucose concentration. But the main issue was that photon energies of middle infrared lights and light intensities of Raman scattering are extremely weak. For improving sensitivity of our spectroscopic imager, the wide-field-stop & beam-expansion method was proposed. Our line spectroscopic imager introduced a single slit for field stop on the conjugate objective plane. Obviously to increase detected light intensities, the wider slit width of the field stop makes light intensities higher, regardless of deterioration of spatial resolutions. Because our method is based on wavefront-division interferometry, it becomes problems that the wider width of single slit makes the diffraction angle narrower. This means that the narrower diameter of collimated objective beams deteriorates visibilities of interferograms. By installing the relative inclined phaseshifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems, the collimated half flux of objective beams derived from single-bright points on objective surface penetrate through the wedge prism and the cuboid glass respectively. These two beams interfere each other and form the infererogram as spatial fringe patterns. Thus, we installed concave-cylindrical lens between the wider slit and objective lens as a beam expander. We successfully obtained the spectroscopic characters of hemoglobin from reflected lights from

  12. Infrared Reflective Filter and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Kiyokazu; Ishizaki, Ariyoshi; Yuge, Youji; Saitoh, Tokuyoshi

    1983-12-01

    A thin film, which reflects infra-red ray while transmits visible light, is discussed in a background of energy saving incandescent lamps. The film which consists of multi-layer Ti02-Si02 film reflects infra-red ray effectively and has a high heat resistance. This film is formed from organometallic solutions by dipping method. In order to carry out multi-layer coatings, the organometallic solutions are improved. A film on a substrate turns into a metalic oxide film having desired optical thickness and refractive index. The optical properties of this film and its application to tubular tungsten halogen lamps are discussed in this paper.

  13. Effects of surface contamination on the infrared emissivity and visible-light scattering of highly reflective surfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Eubanks, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is described for the simultaneous in situ measurement of film thickness, refractive index, total normal emissivity, visible-light scattering, and reflectance of contaminant films on a highly reflective liquid-nitrogen cooled, stainless steel substrate. Emissivities and scattering data are obtained for films of water, carbon dioxide, silicone oil, and a number of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons as a function of film thickness between zero and 20 microns. Of the contaminants investigated, water has by far the greatest effect on emissivity, followed by silicone oil, aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide. The emissivity increases more rapidly with film thickness between zero and 2.5 microns than at thicknesses greater than 2.5 microns. Scattering of visible light changes very little below 2 microns thickness but increases rapidly with thickness beyond 2 to 3 microns. The effect of contaminant films on passive radiation coolers is discussed.

  14. Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling using Fresnel's equation (Kumar and Silva, 1973) and Snell's Law successfully approximated the spectral curve for a 0.25-mm turgid oak leaf lying on a Halon background. Calculations were made for ten interfaces, air-wax, wax-cellulose, cellulose-water, cellulose-air, air-water, and their inverses. A water path of 0.5 mm yielded acceptable results, and it was found that assignment of more weight to those interfaces involving air versus water or cellulose, and less to those involving wax, decreased the standard deviation of the error for all wavelengths. Data suggest that the air-cell interface is not the only important contributor to the overall reflectance of a leaf. Results also argue against the assertion that the near infrared plateau is a function of cell structure within the leaf.

  15. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of redox transitions in photosynthetic reaction centers: comparison of perfusion- and light-induced difference spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, Masayo; Andrianambinintsoa, Sandra; Rich, Peter; Breton, Jacques

    2002-05-01

    Chemically induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectra associated with redox transitions of several primary electron donors and acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) have been compared with the light-induced FTIR difference spectra involving the same cofactors. The RCs are deposited on an attenuated total reflection (ATR) prism and form a film that is enclosed in a flow cell. Redox transitions in the film of RCs can be repetitively induced either by perfusion of buffers poised at different redox potentials or by illumination. The perfusion-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectra for the oxidation of the primary electron donor P in the RCs of the purple bacteria Rb.sphaeroides and Rp.viridis and P700 in the photosystem I of Synechocystis 6803, as well as the Q A-/Q A transition of the quinone acceptor (Q A) in Rb.sphaeroides RCs are reported for the first time. They are compared with the light-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectra P +Q A-/PQ A for the RCs of Rb.sphaeroides and P700 +/P700 for photosystem 1. It is shown that the perfusion-induced and light-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectra recorded on the same RC film display identical signal to noise ratios when they are measured under comparable conditions. The ATR-FTIR difference spectra are very similar to the equivalent FTIR difference spectra previously recorded upon photochemical or electrochemical excitation of these RCs in the more conventional transmission mode. The ATR-FTIR technique requires a smaller amount of sample compared with transmission FTIR and allows precise control of the aqueous environment of the RC films.

  16. Lights, Camera, Reflection!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourlam, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to critique teaching, but few are more effective than video. Personal reflection through the use of video allows one to see what really happens in the classrooms--good and bad--and provides a visual path forward for improvement, whether it be in one's teaching, work with a particular student, or learning environment. This…

  17. Estimating the absorption coefficient of the bottom layer in four-layered turbid mediums based on the time-domain depth sensitivity of near-infrared light reflectance.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chie; Shimada, Miho; Tanikawa, Yukari; Hoshi, Yoko

    2013-09-01

    Expanding our previously proposed "time segment analysis" for a two-layered turbid medium, this study attempted to selectively determine the absorption coefficient (μa) of the bottom layer in a four-layered human head model with time-domain near-infrared measurements. The difference curve in the temporal profiles of the light attenuation between an object and a reference medium, which are obtained from Monte Carlo simulations, is divided into segments along the time axis, and a slope for each segment is calculated to obtain the depth-dependent μa(μaseg). The reduced scattering coefficient (μs') of the reference is determined by curve fitting with the temporal point spread function derived from the analytical solution of the diffusion equation to the time-resolved reflectance of the object. The deviation of μaseg from the actual μa is expressed by a function of the ratio of μaseg in an earlier time segment to that in a later segment for mediums with different optical properties and thicknesses of the upper layers. Using this function, it is possible to determine the μa of the bottom layer in a four-layered epoxy resin-based phantom. These results suggest that the method reported here has potential for determining the μa of the cerebral tissue in humans.

  18. Combined Light Microscopy and Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy for Integration of Biofilm Structure, Distribution, and Chemistry at Solid-Liquid Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Suci, P. A.; Siedlecki, K. J.; Palmer, R. J.; White, D. C.; Geesey, G. G.

    1997-01-01

    Reflected differential interference contrast microscopy and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to obtain complementary data on the structural and chemical properties of a biofilm. This information was obtained nondestructively, quasisimultaneously, and in real time, thereby permitting the verification of time-dependent relationships between the biofilm's population structure, distribution, and interfacial chemistry. The approach offers opportunities to examine these relationships on a variety of substrata in the presence of a bulk aqueous phase under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. PMID:16535743

  19. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  20. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Thomas C.

    1986-01-01

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  1. Improved Spatial Resolution For Reflection Mode Infrared Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C.; May, T. E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-08-13

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the numerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using a microscope coupled to a synchrotron source.

  2. Improved Spatial Resolution For Reflection Mode Infrared Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; May, T. E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2010-02-03

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the numerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using a microscope coupled to a synchrotron source.

  3. Strength of mineral absorption features in the transmitted component of near-infrared reflected light - First results from RELAB. [spectrogoniometer for planetary and lunar surface composition experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Bidirectional reflectance measurements are the only type of reflectance data available to the remote observer. For compositional interpretations, data are desired not only for identification of possible mineral components but also for modal abundance. The latter requires detailed information about the strength of absorption features. Using a new laboratory facility, the RELAB, laboratory data in the near infrared are presented that document effects of particle size, mineral mixtures, and viewing geometry for selected materials with well-developed absorption bands. The commonly observed increase in reflectance with decrease in particle size is also observed for absorption bands as well as a related decrease in absorption strength. For small particles in parts of the spectrum of maximum reflectance, however, a minor decrease in reflectance with a decrese in particle size is sometimes observed. Small particles dominate the observed characteristics of particulate surfaces, which contain a range of particle sizes. The mean optical path length (transmission through particles) of reflected radiation measured for a variety of particle sizes has an apparent upper limit of about 2 mm for particles of less than 250 microns. The typical number of particles involved in the optical path is less than 50.

  4. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion Molecular Cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New observations of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 have been made from 1 to 100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry, and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near-infrared sources, IRS 1 and IRS 4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS 1 and IRS 4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far-infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS 1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS 1 can be characterized by L of 500 solar luminosities or less and T of roughly 1000 K. The near-infrared albedo of the grains in the IRS 1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  5. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion molecular cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y.; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New obervations of Orion Molecular Cloud-2 have been made from 1-100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near infrared sources, IRS1 and IRS4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS1 and IRS4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS1 can be characterized by L less than or equal to 500 Solar luminosities and T approx. 1000 K. The near infrared (1-5) micron albedo of the grains in the IRS1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  6. Changes in hemp secondary fiber production related to technical fiber variability revealed by light microscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Tendero, Eva; Day, Arnaud; Legros, Sandrine; Habrant, Anouck; Hawkins, Simon; Chabbert, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Interest in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is increasing due to the development of a new range of industrial applications based on bast fibers. However the variability of bast fiber yield and quality represents an important barrier to further exploitation. Primary and secondary fiber content was examined in two commercial hemp varieties (Fedora 17, Santhica 27) grown under contrasted sowing density and irrigation conditions. Both growing conditions and hemp varieties impact stem tissue architecture with a large effect on the proportion of secondary fibers but not primary fibers. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy allowed the discrimination of manually-isolated native primary fibers and secondary fibers but did not reveal any clustering according to growing conditions and variety. Infrared data were confirmed by wet chemistry analyses that revealed slight but significant differences between primary and secondary fiber cell wall composition. Infrared spectroscopy of technical fibers obtained after mechanical defibering revealed differences with native primary, but not secondary fibers and also discriminated samples obtained from plants grown under different conditions. Altogether the results suggested that the observed variability of hemp technical fibers could be partially explained by i) differences in secondary fiber production and ii) differential behavior during mechanical defibering resulting in unequal separation of primary and secondary fibers.

  7. Changes in hemp secondary fiber production related to technical fiber variability revealed by light microscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Tendero, Eva; Day, Arnaud; Legros, Sandrine; Habrant, Anouck; Hawkins, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Interest in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is increasing due to the development of a new range of industrial applications based on bast fibers. However the variability of bast fiber yield and quality represents an important barrier to further exploitation. Primary and secondary fiber content was examined in two commercial hemp varieties (Fedora 17, Santhica 27) grown under contrasted sowing density and irrigation conditions. Both growing conditions and hemp varieties impact stem tissue architecture with a large effect on the proportion of secondary fibers but not primary fibers. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy allowed the discrimination of manually-isolated native primary fibers and secondary fibers but did not reveal any clustering according to growing conditions and variety. Infrared data were confirmed by wet chemistry analyses that revealed slight but significant differences between primary and secondary fiber cell wall composition. Infrared spectroscopy of technical fibers obtained after mechanical defibering revealed differences with native primary, but not secondary fibers and also discriminated samples obtained from plants grown under different conditions. Altogether the results suggested that the observed variability of hemp technical fibers could be partially explained by i) differences in secondary fiber production and ii) differential behavior during mechanical defibering resulting in unequal separation of primary and secondary fibers. PMID:28640922

  8. Reflective coherent spatial light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Richards, Roger K.; Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.

    2003-04-22

    A reflective coherent spatial light modulator (RCSLM) includes a subwavelength resonant grating structure (SWS), the SWS including at least one subwavelength resonant grating layer (SWL) have a plurality of areas defining a plurality of pixels. Each pixel represents an area capable of individual control of its reflective response. A structure for modulating the resonant reflective response of at least one pixel is provided. The structure for modulating can include at least one electro-optic layer in optical contact with the SWS. The RCSLM is scalable in both pixel size and wavelength. A method for forming a RCSLM includes the steps of selecting a waveguide material and forming a SWS in the waveguide material, the SWS formed from at least one SWL, the SWL having a plurality of areas defining a plurality of pixels.

  9. Value of Reflected Light Microscopy in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasteris, Jill Dill

    1983-01-01

    Briefly reviews some optical and other physical properties of minerals that can be determined in reflected/incident light. Topics include optical properties of minerals, reflectance, internal reflections, color, bireflectance and reflection pleochroism, anisotropism, zonation, and reflected light microscopy as a teaching tool in undergraduate…

  10. Value of Reflected Light Microscopy in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasteris, Jill Dill

    1983-01-01

    Briefly reviews some optical and other physical properties of minerals that can be determined in reflected/incident light. Topics include optical properties of minerals, reflectance, internal reflections, color, bireflectance and reflection pleochroism, anisotropism, zonation, and reflected light microscopy as a teaching tool in undergraduate…

  11. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Werner, M W

    1990-01-20

    We have developed a model for reflection nebulae around luminous infrared sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The aim of this study is to determine the sizes of the scattering grains. In our analysis, we have adopted an MRN-like power-law size distribution (Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck) of graphite and silicate grains, but other current dust models would give results which were substantially the same. In the optically thin limit, the intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the dust column density, while in the optically thick limit, it reflects the grain albedo. The results show that the shape of the infrared spectrum is the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of our model results with infrared observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse interstellar medium, or one consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains (approximately 5000 angstroms). By adding water ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, we have modeled the 3.08 micrometers ice band feature, which has been observed in the spectra of several infrared reflection nebulae. We show that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains. We show that the shape of the ice band is diagnostic of the presence of large grains, as previously suggested by Knacke and McCorkle. Comparison with observations of the BN/KL reflection nebula in the OMC-1 cloud shows that large ice grains (approximately 5000 angstroms) contribute substantially to the scattered light.

  12. Optimization of diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy accessories

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschfeld, T.

    1986-11-01

    The value of diffuse reflectance as an infrared or near-infrared spectroscopic sampling procedure has been limited by the low efficiency of accessories designed for it. In terms of signal-to-noise ratio, these average 2-6% for integrating spheres and 10-12% for various ellipsoidal mirror arrangements. Much better performances, up to 37% efficiency, can be obtained by optimizing a concentric confocal ellipsoidal mirror arrangement by using a very large central opening in the amular collector mirror, and adapting the throughput of the detector to the geometry of the collected beam.

  13. Extended near infrared emission from visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.; Werner, M. W.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Extended near infrared (2 to 5 microns) emission was observed from three visual reflection nebulae, NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. The emission from each nebula consists of a smooth continuum, which can be described by a greybody with a color temperature of 1000 K, and emission features at 3.3 and 3.4 microns. The continuum emission cannot be explained by free-free emission, reflected light, or field stars, or by thermal emission from grains, with commonly accepted ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, which are in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field. A possible explanation is thermal emission from grains with extremely low ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, or from grains with a temperature determined by mechanisms other than equilibrium radiative heating. Another possibility is continuum fluorescence.

  14. Improved Spatial Resolution for Reflection Mode Infrared Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; May, T.E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-10-09

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the umerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using two different microscopes apable of diffraction-limited resolution: the first microscope is coupled to a synchrotron source and utilizes a single point detector, whereas the second microscope has a standard blackbody source and uses a focal planetarray (FPA) detector.

  15. Near-infrared hyperspectral reflective confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yunhai; Miao, Xin; Xue, Xiaojun; Xiao, Yun

    2016-10-01

    A Near-Infrared HyperSpectral Reflective Confocal Microscopy (NIHS-RCM) is proposed in order to get high resolution images of deep biological tissues such as skin. The microscopy system uses a super-continuum laser for illumination, an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for rapid selection of near-infrared spectrum, a resonant galvanometer scanner for high speed imaging (15f/s) and near-infrared avalanche diode as detector. Porcine skin and other experiments show that the microscopy system could get deep tissue images (180 μm), and show the different ingredients of tissue with different wavelength of illumination. The system has the ability of selectively imaging of multiple ingredients at deep tissue which can be used in skin diseases diagnosis and other fields.

  16. Infrared spectroscopy with visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A.; Paterova, Anna V.; Kulik, Sergei P.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral measurements in the infrared optical range provide unique fingerprints of materials, which are useful for material analysis, environmental sensing and health diagnostics. Current infrared spectroscopy techniques require the use of optical equipment suited for operation in the infrared range, components of which face challenges of inferior performance and high cost. Here, we develop a technique that allows spectral measurements in the infrared range using visible-spectral-range components. The technique is based on nonlinear interference of infrared and visible photons, produced via spontaneous parametric down conversion. The intensity interference pattern for a visible photon depends on the phase of an infrared photon travelling through a medium. This allows the absorption coefficient and refractive index of the medium in the infrared range to be determined from the measurements of visible photons. The technique can substitute and/or complement conventional infrared spectroscopy and refractometry techniques, as it uses well-developed components for the visible range.

  17. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  18. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  19. Monitoring hemodynamic and morphologic responses to closed head injury in a mouse model using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2013-04-01

    The authors' aim is to assess and quantitatively measure brain hemodynamic and morphological variations during closed-head injury (CHI) in mice using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (o-DRS). CHI is a type of injury to the head that does not penetrate the skull. Usually, it is caused by mechanical blows to the head and frequently occurs in traffic accidents, falls, and assaults. Measurements of brain optical properties, namely absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000 nm were carried out by employing different source-detector distance and locations to provide depth sensitivity on an intact scalp over the duration of the whole experiment. Furthermore, alteration in both cortical hemodynamics and morphologic markers, i.e., scattering power and amplitude properties were derived. CHI was induced in anesthetized male mice by a weight-drop model using ˜50 g cylindrical metal falling from a height of 90 cm onto the intact scalp producing an impact of 4500 g cm. With respect to baseline, difference in brain physiological properties was observed following injury up to 1 h post-trauma. Additionally, the reduced scattering spectral shapes followed Mie scattering theory was quantified and clearly shows changes in both scattering amplitude and power from baseline indicating structural variations likely from evolving cerebral edema during CHI. We further demonstrate high correlation between scattering amplitude and scattering power, with more than 20% difference in slope in comparison to preinjury. This result indicates the possibility of using the slope also as a marker for detection of structural changes. Finally, experiments investigating brain function during the first 20 min postinjury were conducted and changes in chromophore concentrations and scattering were observed. Overall, our experiments demonstrate the potential of using the proposed technique as a valuable quantitative noninvasive tool for

  20. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  1. Infrared studies of dust grains in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    IR reflection nebulae, regions of dust which are illuminated by nearby embedded sources, were observed in several regions of ongoing star formation. Near IR observation and theoretical modelling of the scattered light form IR reflection nebulae can provide information about the dust grain properties in star forming regions. IR reflection nebulae were modelled as plane parallel slabs assuming isotropically scattering grains. For the grain scattering properties, graphite and silicate grains were used with a power law grain size distribution. Among the free parameters of the model are the stellar luminosity and effective temperature, the optical depth of the nebula, and the extinction by foreground material. The typical results from this model are presented and discussed.

  2. Photovoltaic module with light reflecting backskin

    DOEpatents

    Gonsiorawski, Ronald C.

    2007-07-03

    A photovoltaic module comprises electrically interconnected and mutually spaced photovoltaic cells that are encapsulated by a light-transmitting encapsulant between a light-transparent front cover and a back cover, with the back cover sheet being an ionomer/nylon alloy embossed with V-shaped grooves running in at least two directions and coated with a light reflecting medium so as to provide light-reflecting facets that are aligned with the spaces between adjacent cells and oriented so as to reflect light falling in those spaces back toward said transparent front cover for further internal reflection onto the solar cells, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to the photovoltaic cells, thereby increasing the current output of the module. The internal reflector improves power output by as much as 67%.

  3. Ceres From Dawn, Visible and Infrared Light

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-19

    In this image, taken January 13, 2015, NASA Dawn spacecraft captures the dwarf planet Ceres in both visible and infrared light. The infrared image, right, serves as a temperature map of Ceres, where white is warmer and red is colder. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19169

  4. The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-13

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  5. Thermal consequences of colour and near-infrared reflectance.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Fox, Devi; Newton, Elizabeth; Clusella-Trullas, Susana

    2017-07-05

    The importance of colour for temperature regulation in animals remains controversial. Colour can affect an animal's temperature because all else being equal, dark surfaces absorb more solar energy than do light surfaces, and that energy is converted into heat. However, in reality, the relationship between colour and thermoregulation is complex and varied because it depends on environmental conditions and the physical properties, behaviour and physiology of the animal. Furthermore, the thermal effects of colour depend as much on absorptance of near-infrared ((NIR), 700-2500 nm) as visible (300-700 nm) wavelengths of direct sunlight; yet the NIR is very rarely considered or measured. The few available data on NIR reflectance in animals indicate that the visible reflectance is often a poor predictor of NIR reflectance. Adaptive variation in animal coloration (visible reflectance) reflects a compromise between multiple competing functions such as camouflage, signalling and thermoregulation. By contrast, adaptive variation in NIR reflectance should primarily reflect thermoregulatory requirements because animal visual systems are generally insensitive to NIR wavelengths. Here, we assess evidence and identify key research questions regarding the thermoregulatory function of animal coloration, and specifically consider evidence for adaptive variation in NIR reflectance.This article is part of the themed issue 'Animal coloration: production, perception, function and application'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Final Technical Report - Polymeric Multilayer Infrared Reflecting Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, John

    2016-09-16

    The goal of this project was to develop a clear, polymeric, multilayer film with an expanded infrared (IR) reflection band which would allow improved rejection of incident IR energy. The IR reflection band is covering the region from about 850 nm to 1830 nm. This film is essentially clear and colorless in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectra (visible light transmission of about 89%) while reflecting 90-95% of the IR energy over the portion of the spectra indicated above. This film has a nominal thickness of 3 mils, is polymeric in nature (contains no metals, metal oxides, or other material types) and is essentially clear in appearance This film can then be used as a component of other products such as a solar window film, an IR reflecting interlayer for laminated glass, a heat rejecting skylight film, a base film for daylight redirecting products, a greenhouse film, and many more applications. One of the main strengths of this product is that because it is a standalone IR rejecting film, it can be incorporated and retrofitted into many applications that desire or require the transmission of visible light, but want to block other portions of the solar spectra, especially the IR portion. Many of the applications exist in the window glazing product area where this film can provide for substantial energy improvements in applications where visible light is desired.

  7. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  8. Infrared reflectance measurement of ion implanted silica

    SciTech Connect

    Magruder, R.H. III; Morgan, S.H.; Weeks, R.A.; Zuhr, R.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of silica glass implanted with Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Bi to doses between 0.5 - 6 /times/10/sup 16/ cm/sup /minus/2/ have been measured from 5000 cm/sup /minus/1/ to 400 cm/sup /minus/1/ at room temperature. The ion energy of the implantation was 160 keV and the current was 10..mu..A. Alterations in reflectance of bands at 1125 and 481 cm/sup /minus/1/ in the spectrum of an unimplanted sample of the order of 20% are observed. A band attributed to non-bridging oxygen ions at /approximately/1015 cm/sup /minus/1/ is observed to increase in intensity with increasing dose for all species. The band at 1125 cm/sup /minus/1/ is observed to shift to lower wavenumber with implantation. Bands due to implanted ion-oxygen vibrations were not detected. The magnitudes of the effects on the existing bands were ion specific. This ion specificity is attributed to the differing chemical states of the implanted ions after implantation. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Studies of the Reflection, Refraction and Internal Reflection of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanchester, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive apparatus and associated experiments are described for studying the basic laws of reflection and refraction of light at an air-glass interface, and multiple internal reflections within a glass block. In order to motivate students and encourage their active participation, a novel technique is described for determining the refractive…

  10. Studies of the Reflection, Refraction and Internal Reflection of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanchester, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive apparatus and associated experiments are described for studying the basic laws of reflection and refraction of light at an air-glass interface, and multiple internal reflections within a glass block. In order to motivate students and encourage their active participation, a novel technique is described for determining the refractive…

  11. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR (near-infrared)background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS (Cosmic Evolution Survey) field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of approximately 2 over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (greater than or approximately equal to 100 arcseconds) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.

  12. [Near infrared light irradiator using halogen lamp].

    PubMed

    Ide, Yasuo

    2012-07-01

    The practical electric light bulb was invented by Thomas Alva Edison in 1879. Halogen lamp is the toughest and brightest electric light bulb. With light filter, it is used as a source of near infrared light. Super Lizer and Alphabeam are made as near infrared light irradiator using halogen lamp. The light emmited by Super Lizer is linear polarized near infrared light. The wave length is from 600 to 1,600 nm and strongest at about 1,000 nm. Concerning Super Lizer, there is evidence of analgesic effects and normalization of the sympathetic nervous system. Super Lizer has four types of probes. SG type is used for stellate ganglion irradiation. B type is used for narrow area irradiation. C and D types are for broad area irradiation. The output of Alphabeam is not polarized. The wave length is from 700 to 1,600 nm and the strongest length is about 1,000nm. Standard attachment is used for spot irradiation. Small attachment is used for stellate ganglion irradiation. Wide attachment is used for broad area irradiation. The effects of Alphabeam are thought to be similar to that of Super Lizer.

  13. Thermal imaging technique to characterize laser light reflection from thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhikannickal, Elizabeth; Bates, Philip J.; Zak, Gene

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of laser light reflection during the laser transmission welding (LTW) of thermoplastics is especially important for applications in which non-zero laser incidence angles are used. At higher laser incidence angles, reflection increases and has the potential to burn surrounding features of the part to be welded. This study presents and validates a technique for laser reflection measurement. Reflected energy is absorbed by a black plastic plate (containing carbon black, which is the absorber of the reflected energy). The surface temperature of the plate is measured by an infrared (IR) camera. The distribution of reflected power required to generate this temperature profile is estimated using a simple heat transfer model. The technique was validated by irradiating the black plate by the laser directly, while observing the time-varying temperature distribution of the plate by the IR camera. In this case, good agreement was observed between the estimated total power and the actual laser input power. Good agreement also existed between the estimated power distribution and that determined experimentally via a knife edge based beam profiling technique. The thermal imaging technique was subsequently used to measure the magnitude and distribution of laser light reflection from unreinforced nylon 6. Abbreviations: LTW—laser transmission welding, CB—carbon black, IR—infrared, NPFD—normalized power flux distribution

  14. An infrared light polarized beam splitter based on graphene array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dingbo; Yang, Junbo; Zhang, Jingjing; Wu, Wenjun; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Feifei; Wang, Hongqing

    2016-10-01

    Metamaterials have attracted a lot of attention in the past decade, because of its remarkable properties in electronics and photonics. Recently, a new kind of two-dimensional metamaterial named metasurface have led the research front. Metasurfaces show up excellent optical properties by patterning planar nanostructures. Novel optical phenomena based on graphene include ultra-thin focusing, anomalous reflection or refraction strong spin-orbit and so on. In this work, we have designed a novel infrared light polarized beam splitter by combining the 2D array of graphene with a subwavelength-thickness optical cavity, which demonstrated great splitting effect in infrared wavelength. Our demonstration pave a novel way for the infrared light polarized beam splitting.

  15. Infrared light field imaging using single carbon nanotube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Chen, Liangliang; Zhou, Zhanxin; Yang, Ruiguo; Song, Bo; Sun, Zhiyong

    2014-06-01

    The conventional photographs only record the sum total of light rays of each point on image plane so that they tell little about the amount of light traveling along individual rays. The focus and lens aberration problems have challenged photographers since the very beginning therefore light field photography was proposed to solve these problems. Lens array and multiple camera systems are used to capture 4D light rays, by reordering the different views of scene from multiple directions. The coded aperture is another method to encode the angular information in frequency domain. However, infrared light field sensing is still widely opening to research. In the paper, we will propose micro plane mirror optics together with compressive sensing algorithm to record light field in infrared spectrum. The micro mirror reflects objects irradiation and forms a virtual image behind the plane in which the mirror lies. The Digital Micromirror (DMD) consists of millions microscale mirrors which work as CCD array in the camera and it is controlled separately so as to project linear combination of object image onto lens. Coded aperture could be utilized to control angular resolution of infrared light rays. The carbon nanotube based infrared detector, which has ultra high signal to noise ratio and ultra fast responsibility, will sum up all image information on it without image distortion. Based on a number of measurements, compressive sensing algorithm was used to recover images from distinct angles, which could compute different views of scene to reconstruct infrared light field scence. Two innovative applications of full image recovery using nano scale photodetector and DMD based synthetic aperture photography will also be discussed in this paper.

  16. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  17. Infrared-Bolometer Arrays with Reflective Backshorts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Abrahams, John; Allen, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated circuits that incorporate square arrays of superconducting-transition- edge bolometers with optically reflective backshorts are being developed for use in image sensors in the spectral range from far infrared to millimeter wavelengths. To maximize the optical efficiency (and, thus, sensitivity) of such a sensor at a specific wavelength, resonant optical structures are created by placing the backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometer plane. The bolometer and backshort arrays are fabricated separately, then integrated to form a single unit denoted a backshort-under-grid (BUG) bolometer array. In a subsequent fabrication step, the BUG bolometer array is connected, by use of single-sided indium bump bonding, to a readout device that comprises mostly a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer circuit. The resulting sensor unit comprising the BUG bolometer array and the readout device is operated at a temperature below 1 K. The concept of increasing optical efficiency by use of backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometers is not new. Instead, the novelty of the present development lies mainly in several features of the design of the BUG bolometer array and the fabrication sequence used to implement the design. Prior to joining with the backshort array, the bolometer array comprises, more specifically, a square grid of free-standing molybdenum/gold superconducting-transition-edge bolometer elements on a 1.4- m-thick top layer of silicon that is part of a silicon support frame made from a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The backshort array is fabricated separately as a frame structure that includes support beams and contains a correspond - ing grid of optically reflective patches on a single-crystal silicon substrate. The process used to fabricate the bolometer array includes standard patterning and etching steps that result in the formation of deep notches in the silicon support frame. These notches are designed to

  18. Reflections From Plasma Would Enhance Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Quantum efficiency of proposed photoemission semiconductor detector of long-wavelength infrared radiation enhanced by multiple passes of radiation. Device has features of back-to-back heterojunction internal-photoemission (HIP) detector, and Fabry-Perot interferometer. Arrays of devices of this type incorporated into integrated-circuit infrared imaging devices.

  19. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-15

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region ({lambda}{approx_equal}175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  20. Non-collinear upconversion of infrared light.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Christian; Hu, Qi; Høgstedt, Lasse; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    2014-11-17

    Two dimensional mid-infrared upconversion imaging provides unique spectral and spatial information showing good potential for mid-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging. However, to extract spectral or spatial information from the upconverted images an elaborate model is needed, which includes non-collinear interaction. We derive here a general theory providing the far field of the upconverted light when two arbitrary fields interact inside a nonlinear crystal. Theoretical predictions are experimentally verified for incoherent radiation and subsequently applied to previously published data with good agreement.

  1. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2016-06-01

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of ˜2 over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (≳100″) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.

  2. Novel Techniques for Enhanced Reflectivity Infrared Mirrors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    photodissociation display good reflectivity. Chemical vapor deposition of ZnSe layers has been used to explore the crystalline structures possible with different substrates and growth parameters. (Author)

  3. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  4. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-06-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation.

  5. Near-infrared light photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Wei, Qing; Song, Wei; Burke, Janice M.; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2012-01-01

    We achieved photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) imaging of the retina with near-infrared (NIR) light illumination. A PAOM imaging system with dual-wavelength illumination at 1064 nm and 532 nm was built. We compared in vivo imaging results of both albino and pigmented rat eyes at the two wavelengths. The results show that the bulk optical absorption of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is only slightly higher than that of the retinal vessels at 532 nm while it becomes more than an order of magnitude higher than that of the retinal vessels at 1064 nm. These studies suggest that although visible light illumination is suitable for imaging both the retinal vessels and the RPE, NIR light illumination, being more comfortable to the eye, is better suited for RPE melanin related investigations and diagnoses. PMID:22574266

  6. Venus in Violet and Near Infrared Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    These images of the Venus clouds were taken by Galileo's Solid State Imaging System February 13,1990, at a range of about 1 million miles. The smallest detail visible is about 20 miles. The two right images show Venus in violet light, the top one at a time six hours later than the bottom one. They show the state of the clouds near the top of Venus's cloud deck. A right to left motion of the cloud features is evident and is consistent with westward winds of about 230 mph. The two left images show Venus in near infrared light, at the same times as the two right images. Sunlight penetrates through the clouds more deeply at the near infrared wavelengths, allowing a view near the bottom of the cloud deck. The westward motion of the clouds is slower (about 150 mph) at the lower altitude. The clouds are composed of sulfuric acid droplets and occupy a range of altitudes from 30 to 45 miles. The images have been spatially filtered to bring out small scale details and de-emphasize global shading. The filtering has introduced artifacts (wiggly lines running north/south) that are faintly visible in the infrared image. The Galileo Project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; its mission is to study Jupiter and its satellites and magnetosphere after multiple gravity assist flybys at Venus and Earth.

  7. Juno Captures Jupiter Glow in Infrared Light

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-02

    As NASA's Juno spacecraft approached Jupiter on Aug. 27, 2016, the Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) instrument captured the planet's glow in infrared light. The video is composed of 580 images collected over a period of about nine hours while Jupiter completed nearly a full rotation on its axis. The video shows the two parts composing the JIRAM imager: the lower one, in a red color scale, is used for mapping the planet's thermal emission at wavelengths around 4.8 microns; the upper one, in a blue color scale, is used to map the auroras at wavelengths around 3.45 microns. In this case the exposure time of the imager was optimized to observe the planet's thermal emission. However, it is possible to see a faint aurora and Jupiter's moon Io approaching the planet. The Great Red Spot is also visible just south of the planet's equator. A movie is available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21036

  8. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William W.

    2008-10-01

    A scintillating crystal's surface reflectance has to be well understood in order to accurately predict and optimize the crystal's light collection through Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we measure the inner surface reflectance properties for BGO. The measurements include BGO crystals with a mechanically polished surface, rough-cut surface, and chemically etched surface, and with various reflectors attached, both air-coupled and with coupling compound. The measurements are performed with a laser aimed at the center of a hemispherical shaped BGO crystal. The hemispherical shape eliminates any non-perpendicular angles for light entering and exiting the crystal. The reflected light is collected with an array of photodiodes. The laser can be set at an arbitrary angle, and the photodiode array is rotated to fully cover 2pi of solid angle. The current produced in the photodiodes is readout with a digital multimeter connected through a multiplexer. The two rows of photodiodes achieve 5-degree by 4-degree resolution, and the current measurement has a dynamic range of 105:1. The acquired data was not described by the commonly assumed linear combination of specular and diffuse (Lambertian) distributions, except for a very few surfaces. Surface roughness proved to be the most important parameter when choosing crystal setup. The reflector choice was of less importance and of almost no consequence for rough-cut surfaces. Pure specular reflection distribution for all incidence angles was measured for polished surfaces with VM2000 film, while the most Lambertian distribution for any surface finish was measured for titanium dioxide paint. The distributions acquired in this paper will be used to create more accurate Monte Carlo models for light reflection distribution within BGO crystals.

  9. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William

    2008-07-28

    A scintillating crystal's surface reflectance has to be well understood in order to accurately predict and optimize the crystal?s light collection through Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we measure the inner surface reflectance properties for BGO. The measurements include BGO crystals with a mechanically polished surface, rough-cut surface, and chemically etched surface, and with various reflectors attached, both air- coupled and with coupling compound. The measurements are performed with a laser aimed at the center of a hemispherical shaped BGO crystal. The hemispherical shape eliminates any non-perpendicular angles for light entering and exiting the crystal. The reflected light is collected with an array of photodiodes. The laser can be set at an arbitrary angle, and the photodiode array is rotated to fully cover 2? of solid angle. The current produced in the photodiodes is readout with a digital multimeter connected through a multiplexer. The two rows of photodiodes achieve 5-degree by 4-degree resolution, and the current measurement has a dynamic range of 10^5:1. The acquired data was not described by the commonly assumed linear combination of specular and diffuse (Lambertian) distributions, except for a very few surfaces. Surface roughness proved to be the most important parameter when choosing crystal setup. The reflector choice was of less importance and of almost no consequence for rough-cut surfaces. Pure specular reflection distribution for all incidence angles was measured for polished surfaces with VM2000 film, while the most Lambertian distribution for any surface finish was measured for titanium dioxide paint. The distributions acquired in this paper will be used to create more accurate Monte Carlo models for light reflection distribution within BGO crystals.

  10. Applications of microstructured silicon wafers as internal reflection elements in attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Henrik; Künzelmann, Ulrich; Vasilev, Boris; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Bartha, Johann W

    2010-09-01

    A novel internal reflection element (IRE) for attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectral acquisition is introduced and applied for several surface-sensitive measurements. It is based on microstructured double-side-polished (100) silicon wafers with v-shaped grooves of {111} facets on their backside. These facets of the so-called "microstructured single-reflection elements" (mSRE) are formed by a crystal-oriented anisotropic wet etching process within a conventional wafer structuring process. They are used to couple infrared radiation into and out of the IRE. In contrast to the application of the commonly used silicon multiple-reflection elements (MRE), the new elements provide single-reflection ATR measurements at the opposite wafer side by using simple reflection accessories without any special collimation. Due to the short light path, the spectral range covers the entire mid-infrared region with a high optical throughput, including the range of silicon lattice vibrations from 300 to 1500 cm(-1). In addition to typical ATR applications, i.e., the measurement of bulk liquids and soft materials, the new reflection elements can be effectively used and customer-specifically designed for in situ and ex situ investigations of aqueous solutions, thin films, and monolayers on Si. Examples presented in this article are in situ etching of native as well as thermal SiO(2) and characterization of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films on Si under various measuring conditions.

  11. Red and near-infrared spectral reflectance of snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, H. W.; Munis, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of snow in the range of 0.60 to 2.50 microns wavelengths was studied in a cold laboratory using natural snow and simulated preparations of snow. A white barium sulfate powder was used as the standard for comparison. The high reflectance (usually nearly 100%) of fresh natural snow in visible wavelengths declines rapidly at wavelengths longer than the visible, as the spectral absorption coefficients of ice increase. Aging snow becomes only somewhat less reflective than fresh snow in the visible region and usually retains a reflectance greater than 80%. In the near infrared, aging snow tends to become considerably less reflective than fresh snow.

  12. A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1985-11-21

    A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

  13. Light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.; Sweatt, William

    1987-01-01

    A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

  14. Reflection of a polarized light cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Jed; Weiss, Daniel; Berland, Keith

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a visually appealing experimental demonstration of Fresnel reflection. In this simple optical experiment, a polarized light beam travels through a high numerical-aperture microscope objective, reflects off a glass slide, and travels back through the same objective lens. The return beam is sampled with a polarizing beam splitter and produces a surprising geometric pattern on an observation screen. Understanding the origin of this pattern requires careful attention to geometry and an understanding of the Fresnel coefficients for S and P polarized light. We demonstrate that in addition to a relatively simple experimental implementation, the shape of the observed pattern can be computed both analytically and by using optical modeling software. The experience of working through complex mathematical computations and demonstrating their agreement with a surprising experimental observation makes this a highly educational experiment for undergraduate optics or advanced-lab courses. It also provides a straightforward yet non-trivial system for teaching students how to use optical modeling software.

  15. Capabilities and Limitations of Infrared Reflectance Microspectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, R. L.; Pieters, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Technological improvements in IR microspectroscopy have made it an increasingly appealing tool for planetary mineralogy. Microspectroscopy presents the prospect of examining small samples nondestructively and acquiring spectra that can be related to remote sensing observations. However, complications are introduced as a target beam size is reduced, and it is critical that limitations are understood. We present the results of a series of well constrained spectroscopic measurements, linking microspectroscopic data to traditionally collected reflectance spectra and petrologic information for the same rock.

  16. Infrared Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Andrew Samuel

    2012-05-01

    This thesis presents the CfAIR2 data set, which includes over 4000 near-Infrared (NIR) JHK8-band measurements of 104 Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) observed from 2005-2011 using PAIRITEL, the 1.3-m Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. While the discovery of dark energy and most subsequent supernova cosmology has been performed using optical and Ultraviolet wavelength observations of SN Ia, a growing body of evidence suggests that NIR SN Ia observations will be crucial for future cosmological studies. Whereas SN Ia observed at optical wavelengths have been shown to be excellent standardizeable candles, using empirical correlations between luminosity, light curve shape, and color, the CfAIR2 data set strengthens the evidence that SN Ia at NIR wavelengths are essentially standard candles, even without correction for light-curve shape or for reddening. CfAIR2 was obtained as part of the CfA Supernova Program, an ongoing multi-wavelength follow-up effort at FLWO designed to observe high-quality, densely sampled light curves and spectra of hundreds of low-redshift SN Ia. CfAIR2 is the largest homogeneously observed and processed NIR data set of its kind to date, nearly tripling the number of individual JHK8-band observations and nearly doubling the set of SN Ia with published NIR light curves in the literature. Matched only by the recently published Carnegie Supernova Project sample, CfAIR2 complements the large and growing set of low-redshift optical and NIR SN Ia observations obtained by the CfA and other programs, making this data set a unique and particularly valuable local universe anchor for future supernova cosmology.

  17. Sombrero Galaxy (M104) in Infrared Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The razor sharp eye of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) easily resolves the Sombrero galaxy, Messier 104 (M104). 50,000 light-years across, the galaxy is located 28 million light-years from Earth at the southern edge of the rich Virgo cluster of galaxies. Equivalent to 800 billion suns, Sombrero is one of the most massive objects in that group. The hallmark of Sombrero is a brilliant white, bulbous core encircled by the thick dust lanes comprising the spiral structure of the galaxy. As seen from Earth, the galaxy is tilted nearly edge-on. We view it from just six degrees north of its equatorial plane. This rich system of globular clusters is estimated to be nearly 2,000 in number which is 10 times as many as in our Milky Way galaxy. Similar to the clusters in the Milky Way, the ages range from 10-13 billion years old. Embedded in the bright core of M104 is a smaller disk, which is tilted relative to the large disk. The HST paired with the Spitzer infrared telescope, offers this striking composite capturing the magnificence of the Sombrero galaxy. In the Hubble view, the galaxy resembles a broad-rimmed Mexican hat, whereas in the Spitzer striking infrared view, the galaxy looks more like a bulls eye. The full view provided by Spitzer shows the disk is warped, which is often the result of a gravitational encounter with another galaxy, and clumpy areas spotted in the far edges of the ring indicate young star forming regions. Spitzer detected infrared emission not only from the ring, but from the center of the galaxy as well, where there is a huge black hole believed to be a billion times more massive than our Sun. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST.

  18. Femtowatt incoherent image conversion from mid-infrared light to near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Nan; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing; Zhang, Shuan

    2017-03-01

    We report on the experimental conversion imaging of an incoherent continuous-wave dim source from mid-infrared light to near-infrared light with a lowest input power of 31 femtowatt (fW). Incoherent mid-infrared images of light emission from a heat lamp bulb with an adjustable power supply at window wavelengths ranging from 2.9 µm to 3.5 µm are used for upconversion. The sum-frequency generation is realized in a laser cavity with the resonant wavelength of 1064 nm pumped by an LD at 806 nm built around a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. The converted infrared image in the wavelength range ~785 nm with a resolution of about 120  ×  70 is low-noise detected using a silicon-based camera. By optimizing the system parameters, the upconversion quantum efficiency is predicted to be 28% for correctly polarized, on-axis and phase-matching light.

  19. Near infrared reflectance analysis by Gauss-Jordan linear algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honigs, D. E.; Freelin, J. M.; Hieftje, G. M.

    1983-02-01

    Near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) is an analytical technique that uses the near-infrared diffuse reflectance of a sample at several discrete wavelengths to predict the concentration of one or more of the chemical species in that sample. However, because near-infrared bands from solid samples are both abundant and broad, the reflectance at a given wavelength usually contains contributions from several sample components, requiring extensive calculations on overlapped bands. In the present study, these calculations have been performed using an approach similar to that employed in multi-component spectrophotometry, but with Gauss-Jordan linear algebra serving as the computational vehicle. Using this approach, correlations for percent protein in wheat flour and percent benzene in hydrocarbons have been obtained and are evaluated. The advantages of a linear-algebra approach over the common one employing stepwise regression are explored.

  20. Infrared spectra of lunar soil analogs. [spectral reflectance of minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The infrared spectra of analogs of lunar soils were investigated to further the development of methodology for interpretation of remotely measured infrared spectra of the lunar surface. The optical constants of dunite, bytownite, augite, ilmenite, and a mare glass analog were obtained. The infrared emittance spectra of powdered minerals were measured and compared with spectra calculated by the reflectance theory using a catalog of optical constants. The results indicate that the predictions of the theory closely simulate the experimental measurements if the optical constants are properly derived.

  1. Modeling of Light Reflection from Human Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J. A.; Cornejo, A.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; Rodríguez, E. E.

    2006-09-01

    In this work a two-layer model is used to simulate the spectral reflectance of adult human skin. We report and discuss diffuse reflectance spectra of this model for three values of the volume fraction of melanosomes fme, namely a) lightly pigmented skin fme = 4%, b) moderately pigmented skin fme = 14% and c) heavily pigmented skin fme = 30% at a volume fraction of blood fbl = 0.2%. We also considered the modeling of reflectance spectra for two values of fbl (0.2% and 1%) with fme = 4%. Both simulations were done in the 400-700 nm spectral range using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCML in standard C. Results showed that the principal signatures of human skin reflectance spectrum are obtained with this model and that it could be of valuable use to made predictions of diffuse reflectance of human skin for different values of the parameters related to skin characterization. These parameters can be associated to distinct medical conditions, such as erythema, jaundice, etc.

  2. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  3. Dispersion-free interferometers of reflected light

    SciTech Connect

    Troitskii, Yu.V.

    1995-12-01

    Computer simulation of a double-mirror multiple-beam reflecting interferometer (RI) with {open_quotes}resonant{close_quotes}mirrors is described. To a first approximation, the intensity of reflected light does not depend on the light frequency but depends on the distance l between the mirrors. It is shown that the sensitivity of the dispersion-free RI to variations of l is approximately equal to that of the conventional RI. This sensitivity is 3 to 4 times better than in the case of a Fabry-Perot interferometer operating in the transmission mode. One of the mirrors of the RI should be {open_quotes}resonant,{close_quotes} whereas the other one may be either {open_quotes}resonant{close_quotes} or usual. It is shown that the dispersion-free operation can also be realized in RI with the {open_quotes}transmission-like{close_quotes} response function. For this purpose, a metal-dielectric design of an absorbing resonant mirror providing a {open_quotes}one-sided{close_quotes} reflection is proposed. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Ganymede in Visible and Infrared Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This montage compares New Horizons' best views of Ganymede, Jupiter's largest moon, gathered with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and its infrared spectrometer, the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA).

    LEISA observes its targets in more than 200 separate wavelengths of infrared light, allowing detailed analysis of their surface composition. The LEISA image shown here combines just three of these wavelengths -- 1.3, 1.8 and 2.0 micrometers -- to highlight differences in composition across Ganymede's surface. Blue colors represent relatively clean water ice, while brown colors show regions contaminated by dark material.

    The right panel combines the high-resolution grayscale LORRI image with the color-coded compositional information from the LEISA image, producing a picture that combines the best of both data sets.

    The LEISA and LORRI images were taken at 9:48 and 10:01 Universal Time, respectively, on February 27, 2007, from a range of 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles). The longitude of the disk center is 38 degrees west. With a diameter of 5,268 kilometers (3,273 miles), Ganymede is the largest satellite in the solar system.

  5. Ellipsoidal-mirror reflectometer accurately measures infrared reflectance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, S. T.; Richmond, J. C.

    1967-01-01

    Reflectometer accurately measures the reflectance of specimens in the infrared beyond 2.5 microns and under geometric conditions approximating normal irradiation and hemispherical viewing. It includes an ellipsoidal mirror, a specially coated averaging sphere associated with a detector for minimizing spatial and angular sensitivity, and an incident flux chopper.

  6. Preparation and characterization of nano bismuth titanate powders with high reflectivity in near-infrared waveband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. H.; Wu, Y. B.; Huang, Y.; Zhou, Z. H.; Shen, S.

    2017-03-01

    Nano powders with high reflectivity in near-infrared waveband have broad applications as thermal insulation materials. In this study, nano bismuth titanate powders with the reflectance to near-infrared of as high as 89.5% in average were prepared via a sol-gel method by using tetrabutyl titanate, bismuth nitrate as raw materials and citric acid, acetic acid as reaction adjuvant reagents. Furthermore, to control the reflectivity in the visible light waveband, the as-prepared nano bismuth titanate powders were further coated with nano-Ag by using NaBH4 as a reduction agent. The influence of different dispersants on reflectivity and on powder dispersibility has also been studied. SEM characterization demonstrates that PEG1000, worked as a dispersant, significantly enhances the dispersion of bismuth titanate powders comparing with non-dispersant system. UV-Vis-NIR spectra reveal that with addition amount of AgNO3 of 1.5 ml and PEG1000 as the dispersant, the Ag-coated bismuth titanate nano powders can reach about 60% of reflectance to near-infrared, while the reflectance of visible light can be controlled as low as around 14%. It is very promising for such nano powders to be used in thermal insulation glass materials.

  7. Conversion of infrared light into usable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, Thomas C.; Marinelli, Zachary J.; Kaczmar, Justin M.; Given, Robert P.; Wenger, Kyle S.; Utter, Brian C.; Scarel, Giovanna

    2016-09-01

    Light-matter interaction involving photons with large period τ of 3 fs (10-15 s) and above, i.e. infrared (IR) to microand radio-waves, displays interesting properties so far mostly unexplored. These photons indeed can produce voltages after activating charges or currents. For example, in the literature it is demonstrated that animals and plants neural system (which is similar to a system consisting of capacitors in series) can be stimulated by IR photons. Additionally, radio waves can activate currents in antennas. However, a systematic investigation of the voltages and currents produced, of the charge density changes, and of the number of photons involved is missing. Here we initiate the investigation of the voltages produced by a capacitor-type device. We shine broadband IR light in the middle IR region (MIR) at a power of 25 mW onto capacitors with capacitance C from 30 to 300 pF. We observe that the voltage produced increases with decreasing C while developing negligible temperature changes. Further increases can be obtained by increasing τ and, modestly, by deviating from normal incidence the angle of incidence θ between the IR light and the illuminated plate of the capacitor. Specifically, here we compare τ in the MIR and far IR (FIR) regions, and θ from 0° (normal incidence) to 45°. The effects of the power of the light will be explored in the near future. These results suggest that it is possible to harvest and transform IR, micro- and radio-waves into usable and sustainable electricity.

  8. [Identification of pearl powder using microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Chao; Yan, Yan; Yang, Hai-Feng; Li, Jun-Fang; Bai, Hua; Xi, Guang-Cheng; Liao, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Pearl is a precious ornament and traditional Chinese medicine, which application history in China is more than 2000 years. It is well known that the chemical ingredients of shell and pearl are very similar, which all of them including calcium carbonate and various amino acids. Generally, shell powders also can be used as medicine; however, its medicinal value is much lower than that of pearl powders. Due to the feature similarity between pearl powders and shell powders, the distinguishment of them by detecting chemical composition and morphology is very difficult. It should be noted that shell powders have been often posing as pearl powders in markets, which seriously infringes the interests of consumers. Identification of pearl powder was investigated by microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy, and pearl powder as well as shell powder was calcined at different temperatures for different time before infrared reflectance spectroscopy analysis. The experimental results indicated that when calcined at 400 °C for 30 minutes under atmospheric pressure, aragonite in pearl powder partly transformed into calcite, while aragonite in shell powder completely transformed into calcite. At the same time, the difference in phase transition between the pearl powders 'and shell powders can be easily detected by using the microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Therefore, based on the difference in their phase transition process, infrared reflectance spectroscopy can be used to identify phase transformation differences between pearl powder and shell powder. It's more meaningfully that the proposed infrared reflectance spec- troscopy method was also investigated for the applicability to other common counterfeits, such as oyster shell powders and abalone shell powders, and the results show that the method can be a simple, efficiently and accurately method for identification of pearl powder.

  9. Catheter based mid-infrared reflectance and reflectance generated absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2013-10-29

    A method of characterizing conditions in a tissue, by (a) providing a catheter that has a light source that emits light in selected wavenumbers within the range of mid-IR spectrum; (b) directing the light from the catheter to an area of tissue at a location inside a blood vessel of a subject; (c) collecting light reflected from the location and generating a reflectance spectra; and (d) comparing the reflectance spectra to a reference spectra of normal tissue, whereby a location having an increased number of absorbance peaks at said selected wavenumbers indicates a tissue inside the blood vessel containing a physiological marker for atherosclerosis.

  10. Infrared Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Andrew S.; Kirshner, R. P.; Wood-Vasey, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Mandel, K.; Challis, P.; Hicken, M.; Narayan, G.; Foley, R.; Rest, A.; Modjaz, M.; Starr, D.; Blondin, S.; Blake, C.; CfA Supernova Group; PAIRITEL Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    For my Astronomy Ph.D. thesis at Harvard University, I used the PAIRITEL 1.3m robotic telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona to observe Near-Infrared (NIR) JHKs band light curves of over 100 Type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) in nearby galaxies, compiling a data set that will more than quintuple the number of NIR SN Ia light curves in the literature. With this data, we confirm and strengthen the claim that SN Ia are more standard in NIR luminosity, less sensitive to dust extinction, and crucial to reducing systematic distance errors due to the degeneracy between intrinsic color variation and reddening of light by dust, arguably the most dominant systematic error in SN Ia cosmology. Uncertainty in our knowledge of the distributions of host galaxy dust properties is a major obstacle to obtaining consistent dark energy constraints with different SN Ia cosmological analysis methods. As such, I develop a color curve model using optical and NIR data to estimate the most probable amount of dust extinction and the properties of the host galaxy dust for each SN Ia. Continuing a comprehensive ground based optical and NIR program to observe low redshift SN Ia is one of the best ways to improve the precision and accuracy of SN Ia as standardizeable candles and cosmological distance indicators moving forward. Such data will critically inform the design of the NASA/DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission, and indeed any future cosmology experiment designed to measure cosmic acceleration and dark energy with a sample of high redshift SN Ia. This work has been supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and a NASA GSRP Fellowship.

  11. Remote sensing of vegetation water content using shortwave infrared reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Yilmaz, M. Tugrul

    2007-09-01

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. One of the objectives of the Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) were to develop and test algorithms for a vegetation water content data product using shortwave infrared reflectances. SMEX04 studied native vegetation in Arizona, USA, and Sonora, Mexico, while SMEX05 studied corn and soybean in Iowa, USA. The normalized difference infrared index (NDII) is defined as (R 850 - R 1650)/(R 800 + R 1650), where R 850 is the reflectance in the near infrared and R1650 is the reflectance in the shortwave infrared. Simulations using the Scattering by Arbitrarily Inclined Leaves (SAIL) model indicated that NDII is sensitive to surface moisture content. From Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper and other imagery, NDII is linear with respect to foliar water content with R2 = 0.81. The regression standard error of the y estimate is 0.094 mm, which is equivalent to about a leaf area index of 0.5 m2 m -2. Based on modeling the dynamic water flow through plants, the requirement for detection of water stress is about 0.01 mm, so detection of water stress may not be possible. However, this standard error is accurate for input into the tau-omega model for soil moisture. Therefore, NDII may be a robust backup algorithm for MODIS as a standard data product.

  12. Fourier transform infrared - attenuated total reflection for wheat grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowilska, E.; Kandler, W.; Wiwart, M.; Krska, R.

    2012-04-01

    Mid-infrared regions of the spectrum of grain of four Triticum species were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared - attenuated total reflection. Significant variations were noted in the absorbance of all studied taxa over four wavenumber ranges. The principal component analysis supported strong discrimination of the four examined species. The percentage of variation explained by the first two principal component analyses reached 95.04%, including principal components 1-72.16% and 2-22.88%. The applied method supports quick identification of the grains of various hulled species of wheat and it is a useful tool for evaluating the seeds and food products obtained from those cereal species.

  13. [Drug release system controlled by near infrared light].

    PubMed

    Niidome, Takuro

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanorods have absorption bands in the near-infrared region; in this spectral range, light penetrates deeply into tissues. The absorbed light energy is converted into heat by gold nanorods. This is the so-called photothermal effect. Gold nanorods are therefore expected to act not only as thermal converters for photothermal therapy, but also as controllers for drug-release systems responding to irradiation with near-infrared light. To achieve a controlled-release system that could be triggered by light irradiation, the gold nanorods were modified with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). When the dsDNA-modified gold nanorods were irradiated with near-infrared light, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was released from the gold nanorods because of the photothermal effect. The release of ssDNA was also observed in tumors grown on mice after near-infrared light irradiation. We also proposed a different controlled-release system responding to near-infrared light. Gold nanorods were modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) through Diels-Alder cycloadducts. When the gold nanorods were irradiated with near-infrared light, the PEG chains were released from the gold nanorods because of the retro Diels-Alder reaction induced by the photothermal effect. Such controlled-release systems triggered by near-infrared light irradiation will be expanded for gold nanorod drug delivery system applications.

  14. Characterizing Cool Giant Planets in Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While the James Webb Space Telescope will detect and characterize extrasolar planets by transit and direct imaging, a new generation of telescopes will be required to detect and characterize extrasolar planets by reflected light imaging. NASA's WFIRST space telescope, now in development, will image dozens of cool giant planets at optical wavelengths and will obtain spectra for several of the best and brightest targets. This mission will pave the way for the detection and characterization of terrestrial planets by the planned LUVOIR or HabEx space telescopes. In my presentation I will discuss the challenges that arise in the interpretation of direct imaging data and present the results of our group's effort to develop methods for maximizing the science yield from these planned missions.

  15. Near-Infrared Light Absorption and Scattering Based on a Mono-Layer of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanmoradi, R.; Wang, Q.; Qiu, M.; Popov, S.; Yan, M.

    2015-06-01

    We report fabrication and characterization of large-area ultrathin near-infrared light absorbers and scatterers based on a mono-layer of gold nanoparticles laying on top of a dielectric spacer and an aluminum reflector. The nanoparticles are formed through thermal annealing of an evaporated continuous gold film. Through optimization of initial gold-film thickness, spacer thickness, as well as annealing temperature we obtained samples that exhibit very low (~2%) broadband specular reflectance at near-infrared (NIR) wavelength range. By considering also diffuse reflection, we identify that the low specular reflectance can be due to either relatively high light absorption (~70%) or high light scattering (over 60%), with the latter achieved for samples having relatively sparse gold nanoparticles. Both strong absorption and scattering of NIR light are not inherent properties of the bulk materials used for fabricating the samples. Such composite optical surfaces can potentially be integrated to solar-energy harvesting and LED devices.

  16. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, B. K.; Shepherd, S. D.; Pender, C. W.; Wood, B. E.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps from LDEF are described. The measurements were made using a hemiellipsoidal mirror reflectometer with interferometer for wavelengths between 2-15 microns. The tray clamps investigated were from locations about the entire spacecraft and provided the opportunity for comparing the effects of atomic oxygen at each location. Results indicate there was essentially no dependence on atomic oxygen fluence for the surfaces studied, but there did appear to be a slight dependence on solar radiation exposure. The reflectances of the front sides of the tray clamps consistently were slightly higher than for the protected rear tray clamp surfaces.

  17. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscope using thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, S. J.; Schrader, G. L.

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) has been used extensively in the study of adsorbates and thin layers on metal surfaces, but little work has been performed on non-metals due to the low sensitivity which results when these materials are used. In this work, thin film structures consisting of a thin layer of a semiconductor (silicon) on a metal (copper) surface are used to increase the sensitivity of the technique for examining layers of poly(methylmethacrylate).

  18. Visible and infrared reflectance imaging spectroscopy of paintings: pigment mapping and improved infrared reflectography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, John K.; Zeibel, Jason G.; Thoury, Mathieu; Littleton, Roy; Morales, Kathryn M.; Palmer, Michael; de la Rie, E. René

    2009-07-01

    Reflectance imaging spectroscopy, the collection of images in narrow spectral bands, has been developed for remote sensing of the Earth. In this paper we present findings on the use of imaging spectroscopy to identify and map artist pigments as well as to improve the visualization of preparatory sketches. Two novel hyperspectral cameras, one operating from the visible to near-infrared (VNIR) and the other in the shortwave infrared (SWIR), have been used to collect diffuse reflectance spectral image cubes on a variety of paintings. The resulting image cubes (VNIR 417 to 973 nm, 240 bands, and SWIR 970 to 1650 nm, 85 bands) were calibrated to reflectance and the resulting spectra compared with results from a fiber optics reflectance spectrometer (350 to 2500 nm). The results show good agreement between the spectra acquired with the hyperspectral cameras and those from the fiber reflectance spectrometer. For example, the primary blue pigments and their distribution in Picasso's Harlequin Musician (1924) are identified from the reflectance spectra and agree with results from X-ray fluorescence data and dispersed sample analysis. False color infrared reflectograms, obtained from the SWIR hyperspectral images, of extensively reworked paintings such as Picasso's The Tragedy (1903) are found to give improved visualization of changes made by the artist. These results show that including the NIR and SWIR spectral regions along with the visible provides for a more robust identification and mapping of artist pigments than using visible imaging spectroscopy alone.

  19. Simulation of oceanic whitecaps and their reflectance characteristics in the short wavelength infrared.

    PubMed

    Schwenger, Frédéric; Repasi, Endre

    2017-02-20

    The knowledge of the spatial energy (or power) distribution of light beams reflected at the dynamic sea surface is of great practical interest in maritime environments. For the estimation of the light energy reflected into a specific spatial direction a lot of parameters need to be taken into account. Both whitecap coverage and its optical properties have a large impact upon the calculated value. In published literature, for applications considering vertical light propagation paths, such as bathymetric lidar, the reflectance of sea surface and whitecaps are approximated by constant values. For near-horizontal light propagation paths the optical properties of the sea surface and the whitecaps must be considered in greater detail. The calculated light energy reflected into a specific direction varies statistically and depends largely on the dynamics of the wavy sea surface and the dynamics of whitecaps. A 3D simulation of the dynamic sea surface populated with whitecaps is presented. The simulation considers the evolution of whitecaps depending on wind speed and fetch. The radiance calculation of the maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) populated with whitecaps is done in the short wavelength infrared spectral band. Wave hiding and shadowing, especially occurring at low viewing angles, are considered. The specular reflection of a light beam at the sea surface in the absence of whitecaps is modeled by an analytical statistical bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the sea surface. For whitecaps, a specific BRDF is used by taking into account their shadowing function. To ensure the credibility of the simulation, the whitecap coverage is determined from simulated image sequences for different wind speeds and compared to whitecap coverage functions from literature. The impact of whitecaps on the radiation balance for bistatic configuration of light source and receiver is calculated for a different incident (zenith/azimuth angles) of the light beam and

  20. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  1. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  2. Terahertz and mid-infrared reflectance of epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Cristiane N.; Joucken, Frédéric; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Echegut, Patrick; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Louette, Pierre; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising material for infrared (IR) photodetectors and plasmonics. In this context, wafer scale epitaxial graphene on SiC is of great interest in a variety of applications in optics and nanoelectronics. Here we present IR reflectance spectroscopy of graphene grown epitaxially on the C-face of 6H-SiC over a broad optical range, from terahertz (THz) to mid-infrared (MIR). Contrary to the transmittance, reflectance measurements are not hampered by the transmission window of the substrate, and in particular by the SiC Reststrahlen band in the MIR. This allows us to present IR reflectance data exhibiting a continuous evolution from the regime of intraband to interband charge carrier transitions. A consistent and simultaneous analysis of the contributions from both transitions to the optical response yields precise information on the carrier dynamics and the number of layers. The properties of the graphene layers derived from IR reflection spectroscopy are corroborated by other techniques (micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, transport measurements). Moreover, we also present MIR microscopy mapping, showing that spatially-resolved information can be gathered, giving indications on the sample homogeneity. Our work paves the way for a still scarcely explored field of epitaxial graphene-based THz and MIR optical devices. PMID:27102827

  3. Visible and near infrared reflectances measured from laboratory ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Barkey, Brian; Liou, K N

    2008-05-01

    We present laboratory results of the 0.68 microm visible (VIS) and 1.617 microm near infrared (NIR) reflectances typically used for inferring optical depth and ice crystal size from satellite radiometers, from ice clouds generated in a temperature controlled column cloud chamber. Two types of ice crystals were produced in this experiment: small columns and dendrites with mean maximum dimensions of about 17 and 35 microm. Within experimental uncertainty, the measured reflectances from ice clouds at both wavelengths agree reasonably well with the theoretical results computed from the plane-parallel adding-doubling method for radiative transfer using the measured ice particle morphology. We demonstrate that laboratory scattering and reflectance data for thin ice clouds with optical depths less than 0.4 can be used for validation of the thin cirrus optical depth and ice crystal size that have been routinely retrieved from the satellite VIS-NIR two channel pair.

  4. Air Flow Detection in Crude Oil by Infrared Light

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Guilherme; Martelli, Cicero; Da Silva, Marco José; Patyk, Rodolfo L.; Morales, Rigoberto E. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we used infrared light in the range of 8–12 μm to develop and test an optical imaging system to detect air bubbles flowing in oil. The system basically comprises a broadband light source and a 31 × 32 thermopile array to generate images. To analyze the effects related to light absorption, reflection, and refraction on air-oil boundaries, a numerical model was developed and the predominance of the refraction instead of the absorption in bubbles with diameters below a certain critical value was observed. The IR region of the electromagnetic spectrum has both optical and thermic behavior. To understand the limits of each effect on the oil flow imaging, a study of the influence of temperature variation on the petroleum optical detection was performed. The developed optical imaging system allowed the detection of air flow in static oil and in oil-air two-phase flow. With the presented system, it was possible to achieve images through up to 12 mm of oil volumes, but this may be enhanced by the use of optimized IR sources and detectors. PMID:28587185

  5. Air Flow Detection in Crude Oil by Infrared Light.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Guilherme; Martelli, Cicero; Da Silva, Marco José; Patyk, Rodolfo L; Morales, Rigoberto E M

    2017-06-03

    In this paper, we used infrared light in the range of 8-12 μm to develop and test an optical imaging system to detect air bubbles flowing in oil. The system basically comprises a broadband light source and a 31 × 32 thermopile array to generate images. To analyze the effects related to light absorption, reflection, and refraction on air-oil boundaries, a numerical model was developed and the predominance of the refraction instead of the absorption in bubbles with diameters below a certain critical value was observed. The IR region of the electromagnetic spectrum has both optical and thermic behavior. To understand the limits of each effect on the oil flow imaging, a study of the influence of temperature variation on the petroleum optical detection was performed. The developed optical imaging system allowed the detection of air flow in static oil and in oil-air two-phase flow. With the presented system, it was possible to achieve images through up to 12 mm of oil volumes, but this may be enhanced by the use of optimized IR sources and detectors.

  6. Reflected infrared spectrum of a massive protostar in Orion.

    PubMed

    Morino, J I; Yamashita, T; Hasegawa, T; Nakano, T

    1998-05-28

    The infrared source IRc2 in the star-forming region Orion-KL is generally believed to contain a massive and very young star. Its nature and evolutionary status, however, are difficult to determine because it is hidden from direct view by a dense disklike envelope of gas and dust. Here we report observations of infrared radiation (at a wavelength of about 2 microm) that has escaped the surrounding dust in the polar direction, perpendicular to the plane of the disk, and then been reflected towards us by dust farther away from the star. The reflected spectrum contains absorption lines of neutral metallic atoms and carbon monoxide, which we interpret as indicating a source temperature of about 4,500 K. But, given the luminosity of the source, its radius must be at least 300 solar radii-too large to be attained with the modest gas-accretion rates in existing theories of massive-star formation. Whether the infrared radiation is coming from the protostar itself or the self-luminous accretion disk around it, the accretion rate must be around (5-15) x 10(-3) solar masses per year, at least two orders of magnitude greater than is commonly assumed in models of star formation.

  7. Gate-controlled mid-infrared light bending with aperiodic graphene nanoribbons array.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Eduardo; Tamagnone, Michele; Mosig, Juan R; Low, Tony; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2015-03-27

    Graphene plasmonic nanostructures enable subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic energy from the mid-infrared down to the terahertz frequencies. By exploiting the spectrally varying light scattering phase at the vicinity of the resonant frequency of the plasmonic nanostructure, it is possible to control the angle of reflection of an incoming light beam. We demonstrate, through full-wave electromagnetic simulations based on Maxwell equations, the electrical control of the angle of reflection of a mid-infrared light beam by using an aperiodic array of graphene nanoribbons, whose widths are engineered to produce a spatially varying reflection phase profile that allows for the construction of a far-field collimated beam towards a predefined direction.

  8. Apparatus for and method of correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1985-11-21

    A technique for adjustably correcting for astigmatism in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique defines a flat, rectangular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced side edges and which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex cylindrical curvatures about a particular axis and provides for adjustably bending the light reflecting surface into one of different curvatures depending upon the astigmatism to be corrected and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably bendable into the selected cylindrical curvature by application of a particular bending moment to the reinforced side edges of the light reflecting surface.

  9. Long distance active hyperspectral sensing using high-power near-infrared supercontinuum light source.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Albert; Kääriäinen, Teemu; Parviainen, Tomi; Buchter, Scott; Heiliö, Miika; Laurila, Toni

    2014-03-24

    A hyperspectral remote sensing instrument employing a novel near-infrared supercontinuum light source has been developed for active illumination and identification of targets. The supercontinuum is generated in a standard normal dispersion multi-mode fiber and has 16 W total optical output power covering 1000 nm to 2300 nm spectral range. A commercial 256-channel infrared spectrometer was used for broadband infrared detection. The feasibility of the presented hyperspectral measurement approach was investigated both indoors and in the field. Reflection spectra from several diffusive targets were successfully measured and a measurement range of 1.5 km was demonstrated.

  10. NASA SOFIA International Year of Light (IYL) Event: Infrared Light: Hanging out in the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Coral; Backman, Dana E.; Harman, Pamela; Veronico, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    As an International Year of Light committee endorsed event, Infrared Light: Hanging out in the Stratosphere will engage learners around the world, linking participants with scientists at work on board NASA SOFIA, the world's largest flying observatory. This major event will showcase science-in-action, interviews, live data, and observations performed both aboard the aircraft and at partner centers on land.SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) is an 80% - 20% partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) consisting of an extensively modified Boeing 747SP aircraft carrying a reflecting telescope with an effective diameter of 2.5 meters. SOFIA is a program in NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Astrophysics Division. Science investigators leverage SOFIA's unique capabilities to study the universe at infrared wavelengths by making observations that are impossible for even the largest and highest ground-based telescopes. SOFIA received Full Operating Capacity status in May, 2014, and astrophysicists will continue to utilize the observatory and upgraded instruments to study astronomical objects and phenomena, including star birth and death; planetary system formation; identification of complex molecules in space; planets, comets, and asteroids in our solar system; and nebulae and dust in galaxies.This landmark event will reflect and build on the ProjectLink. In October 1995, SOFIA's predecessor, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), performed the first satellite links from an airplane to the ground. The KAO downlinked to the Exploratorium museum (SF, CA), where over 200 students watched the webcast, conversed, and participated in simultaneous observations at the world-renowned science museum. SOFIA will now take this concept into the 21st century, utilizing internet technologies to engage and inspire 100,000+ learners of all ages through simultaneous presentations and appearances by over 70 SOFIA Educators at schools and informal learning

  11. Proposal of a Smile Sensor Using Light Reflected from a Cheek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Shota; Kitazono, Yuhki; Miyauchi, Makoto; Serikawa, Seiichi

    A new sensor to detect a smile of a person is proposed in this paper. When a person smiles, the shape of cheeks changes. The change is used for the detection of the smile. The sensor consists of a infrared LED, a photodiode and a few electronic parts. When the sensor detects a smile, at first infrared light is irradiated on a cheek. Then the sensor detects the smile by using the strength of light reflected from the cheek. As a result, the sensor is simple and can detect a smile.

  12. Photo-induced reflectivity in the mid and far infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Haar, P.; Harrington, K.J.; Schwettman, H.A.

    1995-12-31

    Interest in switching FEL beams has motivated studies of photo-induced reflectivity in the mid and far infrared. We are particularly interested in Ge{sup 4}, GaAs, and Si{sup 5}, materials that can be pumped with a visible or near-IR conventional laser and which together cover the wavelengths from 3-100{mu}m. We have made quantitative measurements to determine the induced reflectivity, carrier lifetime, and transient absorption of these materials at several wavelengths across this range using a variety of pump laser wavelengths and pulse lengths. These measurements allow us to determine the feasibility of single pulse selection and cavity dumping with our FELs at high repetition rates.

  13. Far-infrared emissivity measurements of reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, J.; Lange, A. E.; Bock, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    An instrument developed to measure the emissivity of reflective surfaces by comparing the thermal emission of a test sample to that of a reference surface is reported. The instrument can accurately measure the emissivity of mirrors made from lightweight thermally insulating materials such as glass and metallized carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Far infrared measurements at a wavelength of 165 micrometers are reported. The instrument has an absolute accuracy of Delta epsilon = 9 x 10(exp -4) and can reproducibly measure an emissivity of as small as 2 x 10(exp -4) between flat reflective surfaces. The instrument was used to measure mirror samples for balloon-borne and spaceborne experiments. An emissivity of (6.05 +/- 1.24) x 10(exp -3) was measured for gold evaporated on glass, and (6.75 +/- 1.17) x 10(exp -3) for aluminum evaporated on glass.

  14. Canopy near-infrared reflectance and terrestrial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Badgley, Grayson; Field, Christopher B.; Berry, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Global estimates of terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) remain highly uncertain, despite decades of satellite measurements and intensive in situ monitoring. We report a new approach for quantifying the near-infrared reflectance of terrestrial vegetation (NIRV). NIRV provides a foundation for a new approach to estimate GPP that consistently untangles the confounding effects of background brightness, leaf area, and the distribution of photosynthetic capacity with depth in canopies using existing moderate spatial and spectral resolution satellite sensors. NIRV is strongly correlated with solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence, a direct index of photons intercepted by chlorophyll, and with site-level and globally gridded estimates of GPP. NIRV makes it possible to use existing and future reflectance data as a starting point for accurately estimating GPP. PMID:28345046

  15. Combined use of visible, reflected infrared, and thermal infrared images for mapping Hawaiian lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael; Abbott, Elsa; Kahle, Anne

    1991-01-01

    The weathering of Hawaiian basalts is accompanied by chemical and physical changes of the surfaces. These changes have been mapped using remote sensing data from the visible and reflected infrared and thermal infrared wavelength regions. They are related to the physical breakdown of surface chill coats, the development and erosion of silica coatings, the oxidation of mafic minerals, and the development of vegetation cover. These effects show systematic behavior with age and can be mapped using the image data and related to relative ages of pahoehoe and aa flows. The thermal data are sensitive to silica rind development and fine structure of the scene; the reflectance data show the degree of oxidation and differentiate vegetation from aa and cinders. Together, data from the two wavelength regions show more than either separately. The combined data potentially provide a powerful tool for mapping basalt flows in arid to semiarid volcanic environments.

  16. Combined use of visible, reflected infrared, and thermal infrared images for mapping Hawaiian lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael; Abbott, Elsa; Kahle, Anne

    1991-01-01

    The weathering of Hawaiian basalts is accompanied by chemical and physical changes of the surfaces. These changes have been mapped using remote sensing data from the visible and reflected infrared and thermal infrared wavelength regions. They are related to the physical breakdown of surface chill coats, the development and erosion of silica coatings, the oxidation of mafic minerals, and the development of vegetation cover. These effects show systematic behavior with age and can be mapped using the image data and related to relative ages of pahoehoe and aa flows. The thermal data are sensitive to silica rind development and fine structure of the scene; the reflectance data show the degree of oxidation and differentiate vegetation from aa and cinders. Together, data from the two wavelength regions show more than either separately. The combined data potentially provide a powerful tool for mapping basalt flows in arid to semiarid volcanic environments.

  17. Narrowband Mid-infrared reflectance filters using guided mode resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Anil K.; Schulmerich, Matthew; Ip, Jason; Yen, Gary; Cunningham, Brian T.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to develop mid-infrared (IR) spectrometers for applications in which the absorbance of only a few vibrational mode (optical) frequencies needs to be recorded; unfortunately, there are limited alternatives for the same. The key requirement is the development of a means to access discretely a small set of spectral positions from the wideband thermal sources commonly used for spectroscopy. We present here the theory, design and practical realization of a new class of filters in the mid-infrared (IR) spectral regions based on using guided mode resonances (GMR) for narrowband optical reflection. A simple, periodic surface-relief configuration is chosen to enable both a spectral response and facile fabrication. A theoretical model based on rigorous coupled wave analysis is developed, incorporating anomalous dispersion of filter materials in the mid-IR spectral region. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, a set of four filters for a spectral region around the C-H stretching mode (2600–3000 cm−1) are fabricated and responses compared to theory. The reflectance spectra were well-predicted by the developed theory and results were found to be sensitive to the angle of incidence and dispersion characteristics of the material. In summary, the work reported here forms the basis for a rational design of filters that can prove useful for IR absorption spectroscopy. PMID:20527738

  18. A reflection on theories of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quehenberger, R. C. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Insights into the foundations of quantum theory, including the wave-particle duality of light as developed in the last century, raise several questions. How can we imagine light both as wave and particle? What is a particle? How can we make comprehensible the phenomenon of light as elec-tromagnetic distortion, incorporating the ideas of Maxwell, Faraday and especially Theodor Kaluza, who placed light in 5-dimensional space? We investigate a 3D digital dynamic geometrical model applied to theories of light in order to provide a visual access for a better mathematical understanding. Hence to achieve this convergence of theories, we examine experimental facts of the famous entangled photon picture and theories of lines of force with AR methods to bring together the notion of "light quanta" and their connection to a discrete space structure in 5D. Examples of 3D animation are here depicted as still frames.

  19. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Cromwell, Brian K.; Pender, Charles W.; Shepherd, Seth D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements (2-15 microns) that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps retrieved from the LDEF spacecraft. These clamps were used for maintaining the experiments in place and were located at various locations about the spacecraft. Changes in reflectance of the tray clamps at these locations were compared with atomic oxygen fluxes at the same locations. A decrease in absorption band depth was seen for the surfaces exposed to space indicating that there was some surface layer erosion. In all of the surfaces measured, little evidence of contamination was observed and none of the samples showed evidence of the brown nicotine stain that was so prominent in other experiments. Total emissivity values were calculated for both exposed and unexposed tray clamp surfaces. Only small differences, usually less than 1 percent, were observed. The spectral reflectances were measured using a hemi-ellipsoidal mirror reflectometer matched with an interferometer spectrometer. The rapid scanning capability of the interferometer allowed the reflectance measurements to be made in a timely fashion. The ellipsoidal mirror has its two foci separated by 2 inches and located on the major axis. A blackbody source was located at one focus while the tray clamp samples were located at the conjugate focus. The blackbody radiation was modulated and then focused by the ellipsoid onto the tray clamps. Radiation reflected from the tray clamp was sampled by the interferometer by viewing through a hole in the ellipsoid. A gold mirror (reflectance approximately 98 percent) was used as the reference surface.

  20. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Cromwell, Brian K.; Pender, Charles W.; Shepherd, Seth D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements (2-15 microns) that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps retrieved from the LDEF spacecraft. These clamps were used for maintaining the experiments in place and were located at various locations about the spacecraft. Changes in reflectance of the tray clamps at these locations were compared with atomic oxygen fluxes at the same locations. A decrease in absorption band depth was seen for the surfaces exposed to space indicating that there was some surface layer erosion. In all of the surfaces measured, little evidence of contamination was observed and none of the samples showed evidence of the brown nicotine stain that was so prominent in other experiments. Total emissivity values were calculated for both exposed and unexposed tray clamp surfaces. Only small differences, usually less than 1 percent, were observed. The spectral reflectances were measured using a hemi-ellipsoidal mirror reflectometer matched with an interferometer spectrometer. The rapid scanning capability of the interferometer allowed the reflectance measurements to be made in a timely fashion. The ellipsoidal mirror has its two foci separated by 2 inches and located on the major axis. A blackbody source was located at one focus while the tray clamp samples were located at the conjugate focus. The blackbody radiation was modulated and then focused by the ellipsoid onto the tray clamps. Radiation reflected from the tray clamp was sampled by the interferometer by viewing through a hole in the ellipsoid. A gold mirror (reflectance approximately 98 percent) was used as the reference surface.

  1. Measurement of the Depolarization of Reflected Light From Spectralon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haner, D. A.; McGuckin, B. T.

    1997-01-01

    Light reflected from Spectralon, the material chosen for on-board radiometric calibration of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is quantified in terms of the fraction of the reflected intensity that has the same polarization as the incident light.

  2. Measurement of elastic waves induced by the reflection of light.

    PubMed

    Požar, Tomaž; Možina, Janez

    2013-11-01

    The reflection of light from the surface of an elastic solid gives rise to various types of elastic waves that propagate inside the solid. The weakest waves are generally those that are generated by the radiation pressure acting during the reflection of the light. Here, we present the first quantitative measurement of such light-pressure-induced elastic waves inside an ultrahigh-reflectivity mirror. Amplitudes of a few picometers were observed at the rear side of the mirror with a displacement-measuring conical piezoelectric sensor when laser pulses with a fluence of 1 J/cm(2) were reflected from the front side of the mirror.

  3. Testing the spectrum of infrared emission reflected by several surfaces with a FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanyu; Hu, Rui; Pang, Minhui; Bai, Haitao; Dong, Wenjie

    2014-09-01

    A set of sectional FTIR is applied to study the reflecting characteristics of several surfaces to infrared emission. The standard infrared source is separated from the host of the FTIR and set in a right-angled triangle with the reflecting plate and the entrance to make the reflecting infrared emission can easily pass into the detector through the route. The reflecting infrared emission from the FTIR source is measured by the FTIR detector. The reflecting plate includes metal plate, mirror, wood block and so on. A high intensity standard infrared source cooled by air is accepted and the testing background is atmosphere. The infrared emission reflected by the plate from the standard source is tested one by one. By the experiment, mirror has a good performance to reflect infrared emission, which is much better than unpainted iron plate or painted wood block. Certainly, unpainted iron plate has stronger capacity to reflect infrared emission than painted wood block, etc. As a result, the smoother the surface is, the stronger the reflecting performance is. The reflecting performance of painted surface to infrared emission is poorer than unpainted one. The various painted surfaces have not a visible difference upon their reflecting performance to infrared emission although they are made from different materials.

  4. Through the Looking-Glass: Reflected Light from Other Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, Jayne; Alonso, Roi; Hoyer, Sergio; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy (R>100,000) is a robust and powerful tool for directly characterizing exoplanet atmospheres that is applicable to both transiting and non-transiting planets, as well as those with relatively large projected separation angles. In the infrared, the technique has unambiguously revealed the presence of complex molecules, such as water, in hot Jupiters, as well as measuring exoplanet rotation rates and their day-to-night winds. In the optical, the technique is highly suited to characterizing the atmosphere of our nearest rocky neighbor, Proxima b, by detecting the Doppler shift and modulation of its host star spectrum as reflected by the planet’s dayside. However, the technique is currently not yet robustly proven at optical wavelengths. Here, we present new results on the non-transiting hot Jupiter, 51 Peg b, using 5 half nights of optical HARPS-N spectroscopy from the 3.5m TNG telescopes. We aimed to detect reflected light from the planet’s dayside and obtain one of the most detailed exoplanet reflection spectra to date, spanning 387-691 nm in bins of 50nm. Our goal is to strongly constrain previous claims of a very high albedo or highly inflated radius for 51 Peg b and assess the potentially cloudy nature of the planet. This will also guide us in using high-resolution spectroscopy to characterize Proxima b in the era of the extremely large telescopes.This work was performed in part under contract with the California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory funded by NASA through the Sagan Fellowship Program executed by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute.

  5. Infrared light emission from semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.; Tangyunyong, P.; Soden, J.M.; Liang, A.Y.; Low, F.J.; Zaplatin, A.N.; Shivanandan, K.; Donohoe, G.

    1996-10-01

    We present results using near-infrared (NIR) cameras to study emission of common defect classes for integrated circuits. The cameras are based on a liquid nitrogen cooled HgCdTe imaging array with high quantum efficiency and very low read noise. The array was developed for infrared astronomy and has high quantum efficiency in the wavelength range from 0.8 to 2.5 {mu}m. For comparison, the same set of samples used to characterize the performance of the NIR camera were studied using a non-intensified, liquid-nitrogen-cooled, slow scan CCD camera (with a spectral range 400-1100 nm). Results show that the NIR camera images all of the defect classes studied here with much shorter integration times than the cooled CCD, suggesting that photon emission beyond 1 {mu}m is significantly stronger than at shorter wavelengths.

  6. Tunable near- to mid-infrared pump terahertz probe spectroscopy in reflection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. J.; Wang, Z. X.; Dong, T.; Wang, N. L.

    2017-10-01

    Strong-field mid-infrared pump-terahertz (THz) probe spectroscopy has been proven as a powerful tool for light control of different orders in strongly correlated materials. We report the construction of an ultrafast broadband infrared pump-THz probe system in reflection geometry. A two-output optical parametric amplifier is used for generating mid-infrared pulses with GaSe as the nonlinear crystal. The setup is capable of pumping bulk materials at wavelengths ranging from 1.2 μm to 15 μm and beyond, and detecting the subtle, transient photoinduced changes in the reflected electric field of the THz probe at different temperatures. As a demonstration, we present 15 μm pump-THz probe measurements of a bulk EuSbTe3 single crystal. A 0:5% transient change in the reflected THz electric field can be clearly resolved. The widely tuned pumping energy could be used in mode-selective excitation experiments and applied to many strongly correlated electron systems.

  7. Cirrus Infrared Parameters and Shortwave Reflectance Relations from Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Hart, William D.; Hlavka, Dennis L.

    1996-05-01

    A summary of experimental observations and analysis of cirrus from high-altitude aircraft remote sensing is presented. The vertical distribution of cirrus optical and infrared cross-section parameters and the relative effective emittance and visible reflectance are derived from nadir-viewing lidar and multispectral radiometer data for observations during the 1986 and 1991 FIRE cirrus experiments. Statistics on scattering and absorption cross sections in relation to altitude and temperature are given. The emittance and reflectance results are considered as a function of solar zenith angle. Comparative radiative transfer calculations based on the discrete-ordinate method were carried out for three representative cloud phase function models: a spherical water droplet, an ice column crystal cloud, and a Henyey-Greenstein function. The agreements between observations of the effective emittance and shortwave reflectance and the model calculations were a function of the solar zenith angle. At angles between 54° and 60° a Henyey-Greenstein (HG) function with an asymmetry factor of 0.6-0.7 produced the best comparison. At 66°-72° the ice column model was equally comparable to observations. Comparisons to the water cloud model wore poor in all cases. The effects of ice crystal microphysical variations on the observed results were not generally apparent, but one dramatic example of difference was found. In order to explain the variations noted for solar zenith angle, an instrument-the Tilt Scan CCD Camera radiometer-was developed to directly observe the shortwave bidirectional reflectance function for 1991 measurements. The results indicate a characteristic angular function of the visible reflectance of cirrus that is flatter than predicted by the ice column scattering model, but the overall asymmetry factor is comparable. The good agreement with values from an HG function at some angles is not generally applicable. The characteristics of the observed cirrus angular

  8. Untwisting the polarization properties of light reflected by scarab beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Luke T.; Finlayson, Ewan D.; Vukusic, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The spectral and angle-dependent optical properties of two scarab beetle species belonging to the genus Chrysina are presented. The species display broadband reflectivity and selectively reflect left-circularly polarized light. We use electron microscopy to detail the left-handed, twisted lamellar structure present in these biological systems and imaging scatterometry to characterize their bidirectional reflectance distribution function. We show that the broadband nature of the beetles' reflectance originates due to the range of pitch dimensions found in the structure.

  9. Near infrared reflectance measurement of nitrogen faecal losses.

    PubMed

    Benini, L; Caliari, S; Bonfante, F; Guidi, G C; Brentegani, M T; Castellani, G; Sembenini, C; Bardelli, E; Vantini, I

    1992-06-01

    Chemical methods of measuring nitrogen in stools are complex, unpleasant, and therefore rarely performed. Recently, near infrared reflectance (NIRA) has been suggested for stool analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible application of this method in routine faecal nitrogen measurement. Nitrogen concentration and daily output were measured in the stools of 83 patients using NIRA and, for comparison, the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen concentration and output ranged between 0.4-2.72 g% and 0.45-8.96 g/day respectively. Correlation coefficients (r), of 0.89 and 0.97 were found between the two methods for concentration and output respectively, and similar values were found in patients on enteral nutrition. Repeated measurements from the same stool collection, requiring only a few minutes, allowed homogenisation to be avoided. NIRA seems to be an easy, fast, and reliable alternative to chemical assays of nitrogen measurement in the management of patients with digestive disorders.

  10. Near infrared reflectance measurement of nitrogen faecal losses.

    PubMed Central

    Benini, L; Caliari, S; Bonfante, F; Guidi, G C; Brentegani, M T; Castellani, G; Sembenini, C; Bardelli, E; Vantini, I

    1992-01-01

    Chemical methods of measuring nitrogen in stools are complex, unpleasant, and therefore rarely performed. Recently, near infrared reflectance (NIRA) has been suggested for stool analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible application of this method in routine faecal nitrogen measurement. Nitrogen concentration and daily output were measured in the stools of 83 patients using NIRA and, for comparison, the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen concentration and output ranged between 0.4-2.72 g% and 0.45-8.96 g/day respectively. Correlation coefficients (r), of 0.89 and 0.97 were found between the two methods for concentration and output respectively, and similar values were found in patients on enteral nutrition. Repeated measurements from the same stool collection, requiring only a few minutes, allowed homogenisation to be avoided. NIRA seems to be an easy, fast, and reliable alternative to chemical assays of nitrogen measurement in the management of patients with digestive disorders. PMID:1624153

  11. Analysis of silage composition by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, James B., III; Blosser, Timothy H.; Colenbrander, V. F.

    1991-02-01

    Two studies were performed to investigate the feasibility of using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) with undried silages. In the first study silages were analyzed for major components (e. g. dry matter crude protein and other forms of nitrogen fiber and in vitro digestible dry matter) and short chain fatty acids (SCFA). NIRS was found to operate satisfactorily except for some forms of nitrogen and SCFA. In study two various methods of grinding spectral regions and sample presentation were examined. Undried Wiley ground samples in a rectangular cell gave the best overall results for non-dry ice undried grinds with wavelengths between 1100 and 2498 nm. Silages scanned after drying however produced the best results. Intact samples did not perform as well as ground samples and wavelengths below 1100 nm were of little use. 2 .

  12. Thermal infrared reflectance and emission spectroscopy of quartzofeldspathic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrnes, J.M.; Ramsey, M.S.; King, P.L.; Lee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks to better understand the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral characteristics of naturally-occurring amorphous materials through laboratory synthesis and analysis of glasses. Because spectra of glass phases differ markedly from their mineral counterparts, examination of glasses is important to accurately determine the composition of amorphous surface materials using remote sensing datasets. Quantitatively characterizing TIR (5-25 ??m) spectral changes that accompany structural changes between glasses and mineral crystals provides the means to understand natural glasses on Earth and Mars. A suite of glasses with compositions analogous to common terrestrial volcanic glasses was created and analyzed using TIR reflectance and emission techniques. Documented spectral characteristics provide a basis for comparison with TIR spectra of other amorphous materials (glasses, clays, etc.). Our results provide the means to better detect and characterize glasses associated with terrestrial volcanoes, as well as contribute toward understanding the nature of amorphous silicates detected on Mars. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Near-infrared branding efficiently correlates light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Derron; Nikić, Ivana; Brinkoetter, Mary; Knecht, Sharmon; Potz, Stephanie; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Misgeld, Thomas

    2011-06-05

    The correlation of light and electron microscopy of complex tissues remains a major challenge. Here we report near-infrared branding (NIRB), which facilitates such correlation by using a pulsed, near-infrared laser to create defined fiducial marks in three dimensions in fixed tissue. As these marks are fluorescent and can be photo-oxidized to generate electron contrast, they can guide re-identification of previously imaged structures as small as dendritic spines by electron microscopy.

  14. Infrared light excites cells by changing their electrical capacitance

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Homma, Kazuaki; Villarreal, Sebastian; Richter, Claus-Peter; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Optical stimulation has enabled important advances in the study of brain function and other biological processes, and holds promise for medical applications ranging from hearing restoration to cardiac pace making. In particular, pulsed laser stimulation using infrared wavelengths >1.5 μm has therapeutic potential based on its ability to directly stimulate nerves and muscles without any genetic or chemical pre-treatment. However, the mechanism of infrared stimulation has been a mystery, hindering its path to the clinic. Here we show that infrared light excites cells through a novel, highly general electrostatic mechanism. Infrared pulses are absorbed by water, producing a rapid local increase in temperature. This heating reversibly alters the electrical capacitance of the plasma membrane, depolarizing the target cell. This mechanism is fully reversible and requires only the most basic properties of cell membranes. Our findings underscore the generality of pulsed infrared stimulation and its medical potential. PMID:22415827

  15. Aerosol collection and analysis using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Wong, Diane M.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Roelant, Geoffrey J.; Williams, Barry R.; Miles, Ronald W., Jr.; Manning, Christopher J.

    2004-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is routinely employed for the identification of organic molecules and, more recently, for the classification of biological materials. We have developed a sample collection method that facilitates infrared analysis of airborne particulates using a diffuse reflectance (DR) technique. Efforts are underway to extend the method to include simultaneous analysis of vapor phase organics by using adsorbent substrates compatible with the DR technique. This series of laboratory results provides proof-of-principle for both the sample collection and data collection processes. Signal processing of the DR spectra is shown to provide rapid qualitative identification of representative aerosol materials, including particulate matter commonly found in the environment. We compare the results for such materials as bacterial spores, pollens and molds, clays and dusts, smoke and soot. Background correction analysis is shown to be useful for differentiation and identification of these constituents. Issues relating to complex mixtures of environmental samples under highly variable conditions are considered. Instrumentation development and materials research are now underway with the aim of constructing a compact sampling system for near real-time monitoring of aerosol and organic pollutants. A miniature, tilt-compensated Fourier transform spectrometer will provide spectroscopic interrogation. A series of advanced digital signal processing methods are also under development to enhance the sensor package. The approach will be useful for industrial applications, chemical and biological agent detection, and environmental monitoring for chemical vapors, hazardous air pollutants, and allergens.

  16. Simulation and assessment of stray light effects in infrared cameras using non-sequential ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtsev, A. V.; Akram, M. N.

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we have evaluated the stray light effects in infrared cameras operating in the 3-5 μm waveband having cooled focal plane array detectors. A non-sequential ray tracing method is used to model the multiple reflections from polished lens surfaces as well as diffused scattering from rough mechanical surfaces inside the camera housing. The flux signature on the detector surface due to the self-emission of in-band radiation from the lenses and camera housing is calculated. The flux signature due to sources beyond the nominal field-of-view of the camera is also calculated. Light splitting into multiple diffraction orders from diffractive lens surfaces is taken into account both in the transmission and the reflection paths. The wavelength and angle dependent reflection coefficient of the anti-reflection coatings on the polished lens surfaces is taken into account. The effect of local heating of camera mounts on the stray light signature on the detector surface is also evaluated. The results show that using the non-sequential ray tracing method, useful predictions can be made for the stray light signature in the infrared cameras. Such calculations can be used to identify areas in the camera housing which need to be temperature stabilized to reduce their detrimental stray-light signature.

  17. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    A model has been developed for reflection nebulae around luminous IR sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The shape of the IR spectrum is shown to be the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of the model results with IR observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse ISM, or consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains. By adding water-ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, the 3.08 micron ice-band feature observed in the spectra of several IR reflection nebulae has been modeled. It is shown that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains.

  18. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Determination of in vivo skin moisture level by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saknite, Inga; Spigulis, Janis

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has a potential for noninvasive determination of skin moisture level due to high water absorption. In this study, diffuse reflectance spectra of in vivo skin were acquired in the spectral range of 900 nm to 1700 nm by using near-infrared spectrometer, optical fiber and halogen bulb light source. Absorption changes after applying skin moisturizers were analyzed over time at different body sites. Results show difference in absorption when comparing dry and normal skin. Comparison of absorption changes over time after applying moisturizer at different body sites is analyzed and discussed. Some patterns of how skin reacts to different skin moisturizers are shown, although no clear pattern can be seen due to signal noise.

  20. Retinal tissue oxygen imaging by near infrared light and white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ronald; Qiang, Bo; Roberts, Cynthia

    2006-02-01

    Human retina consists of multiple layers, with oxygen supply from chorioidal and retinal vascular circulations. A number of ocular disorders are associated with insufficient oxygen supply in the retinal layer. However no effective method has been developed yet to quantify the retinal tissue oxygen saturation. Diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy (DOIS) offers a new opportunity for tissue oximetry. The technique is non-invasive, low cost, non-radioactive and real time. However, the application of DOIS in ocular imaging is hindered by the following limitations: 1) lack of spatial and depth resolution; 2) light transportation in thin layers less than single mean free path; 3) low scattering coefficient in neural retina and high absorption coefficient in RPE; 4) interference by retinal vessels. This paper discussed both theoretical and experimental works toward quantitative assessment of retinal tissue oxygenation. Theoretical side, photon migration in multi-layer tissue was simulated by solving diffusion equations in Fourier domain. The resulting diffuse reflectance was compared with Monte Carlo simulation. Experimental side, a dual modal imaging prototype was developed combining white light interferometry for tissue thickness measurement and near infrared spectroscopy for optical property measurement. The capability for white light interfferometry to capture thin layer thickness was demonstrated by a series of benchtop tests.

  1. Modeling Infrared Signal Reflections to Characterize Indoor Multipath Propagation

    PubMed Central

    De-La-Llana-Calvo, Álvaro; Lázaro-Galilea, José Luis; Gardel-Vicente, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Navarro, David; Bravo-Muñoz, Ignacio; Tsirigotis, Georgios; Iglesias-Miguel, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a model to characterize Infrared (IR) signal reflections on any kind of surface material, together with a simplified procedure to compute the model parameters. The model works within the framework of Local Positioning Systems (LPS) based on IR signals (IR-LPS) to evaluate the behavior of transmitted signal Multipaths (MP), which are the main cause of error in IR-LPS, and makes several contributions to mitigation methods. Current methods are based on physics, optics, geometry and empirical methods, but these do not meet our requirements because of the need to apply several different restrictions and employ complex tools. We propose a simplified model based on only two reflection components, together with a method for determining the model parameters based on 12 empirical measurements that are easily performed in the real environment where the IR-LPS is being applied. Our experimental results show that the model provides a comprehensive solution to the real behavior of IR MP, yielding small errors when comparing real and modeled data (the mean error ranges from 1% to 4% depending on the environment surface materials). Other state-of-the-art methods yielded mean errors ranging from 15% to 40% in test measurements. PMID:28406436

  2. Apparatus for and method of correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface

    DOEpatents

    Sawicki, Richard H.; Sweatt, William

    1987-01-01

    A technique for adjustably correcting for astigmatism in a light beam is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes first means which defines a flat, rectangular light reflecting surface having opposite reinforced side edges and which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex cylindrical curvatures about a particular axis and second means acting on the first means for adjustably bending the light reflecting surface into a particular selected one of the different curvatures depending upon the astigmatism to be corrected for and for fixedly maintaining the curvature selected. In the embodiment disclosed, the light reflecting surface is adjustably bendable into the selected cylindrical curvature by application of a particular bending moment to the reinforced side edges of the light reflecting surface.

  3. Investigation of Latent Traces Using Infrared Reflectance Hyperspectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Till; Wenzel, Susanne; Roscher, Ribana; Stachniss, Cyrill

    2016-06-01

    The detection of traces is a main task of forensics. Hyperspectral imaging is a potential method from which we expect to capture more fluorescence effects than with common forensic light sources. This paper shows that the use of hyperspectral imaging is suited for the analysis of latent traces and extends the classical concept to the conservation of the crime scene for retrospective laboratory analysis. We examine specimen of blood, semen and saliva traces in several dilution steps, prepared on cardboard substrate. As our key result we successfully make latent traces visible up to dilution factor of 1:8000. We can attribute most of the detectability to interference of electromagnetic light with the water content of the traces in the shortwave infrared region of the spectrum. In a classification task we use several dimensionality reduction methods (PCA and LDA) in combination with a Maximum Likelihood classifier, assuming normally distributed data. Further, we use Random Forest as a competitive approach. The classifiers retrieve the exact positions of labelled trace preparation up to highest dilution and determine posterior probabilities. By modelling the classification task with a Markov Random Field we are able to integrate prior information about the spatial relation of neighboured pixel labels.

  4. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  5. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: reflective ruled diffraction grating performance testing and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Elliot; Chen, Shaojie; Wright, Shelley A.; Moore, Anna M.; Larkin, James E.; Simard, Luc; Marie, Jerome; Mieda, Etsuko; Gordon, Jacob

    2014-07-01

    We present the efficiency of near-infrared reflective ruled diffraction gratings designed for the InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is a first light, integral field spectrograph and imager for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and narrow field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS). IRIS will operate across the near-infrared encompassing the ZYJHK bands (~0.84 - 2.4μm) with multiple spectral resolutions. We present our experimental setup and analysis of the efficiency of selected reflective diffraction gratings. These measurements are used as a comparison sample against selected candidate Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings (see Chen et al., this conference). We investigate the efficiencies of five ruled gratings designed for IRIS from two separate vendors. Three of the gratings accept a bandpass of 1.19-1.37μm (J band) with ideal spectral resolutions of R=4000 and R=8000, groove densities of 249 and 516 lines/mm, and blaze angles of 9.86° and 20.54° respectively. The other two gratings accept a bandpass of 1.51-1.82μm (H Band) with an ideal spectral resolution of R=4000, groove density of 141 lines/mm, and blaze angle of 9.86°. The fraction of flux in each diffraction mode was compared to both a pure reflection mirror as well as the sum of the flux measured in all observable modes. We measure the efficiencies off blaze angle for all gratings and the efficiencies between the polarization transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) states. The peak reflective efficiencies are 98.90 +/- 3.36% (TM) and 84.99 +/- 2.74% (TM) for the H-band R=4000 and J-band R=4000 respectively. The peak reflective efficiency for the J-band R=8000 grating is 78.78 +/- 2.54% (TE). We find that these ruled gratings do not exhibit a wide dependency on incident angle within +/-3°. Our best-manufactured gratings were found to exhibit a dependency on the polarization state of the incident beam with a ~10-20% deviation, consistent with the theoretical efficiency

  6. [Visible light reflectance spectrum for measurement of cancerous tissue].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Fan, Jin; Ren, Qiu-Shi

    2008-01-01

    A goal the authors always pursue is to realize diagnosis of precancer in vivo, real-time and non-invasive. In the present paper, results of diagnosis of certain cancer were obtained by pathological analysis of several samples, and then the visible light reflectance spectrum property of cancerous tissue was acquired by the comparison with the reflectance spectrum of normal tissue in the same organ. It was found that the main result of change in the reflectance spectrum was caused by the increases in hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin. The cancerous tissue has a lower reflectance in visible spectrum and has the strongest change in the absorption at 630 nm. Absorption peaks in the reflectance spectrum indicated that there are abundant of oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin in the cancerous tissue. It is the same characteristics as in the cancerous tissue. It was fully indicated experimentally that visible light reflectance spectrum can distinguish normal and cancerous tissue.

  7. Pluto-Charon: Infrared Reflectance from 3.6 to 8.0 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Emery, Joshua P.; Stansberry, John A.; VanCleve, Jeffrey E.

    2004-01-01

    We have measured the spectral reflectance of the Pluto-Charon pair at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micrometers with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) (G. G. Fazzio et al. Ap.J.Supp. 154, 10-17, 2004) on the Spitzer Space Telescope (STS), at eight different longitudes that cover a full rotation of the planet. STS does not have sufficient resolution to separate the light from the planet and the satellite. The image of the Pluto-Charon pair is clearly visible at each of the four wavelengths. We will discuss the spectral reflectance in terms of models that include the known components of Pluto and Charon s surfaces, and evidence for diurnal variations.

  8. Fully reflective deep ultraviolet to near infrared spectrometer and entrance optics for resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, B.; Bäckström, J.; Budelmann, D.; Maeser, R.; Rübhausen, M.; Klein, M. V.; Schoeffel, E.; Mihill, A.; Yoon, S.

    2005-07-01

    We present the design and performance of a new triple-grating deep ultraviolet to near-infrared spectrometer. The system is fully achromatic due to the use of reflective optics. The minimization of image aberrations by using on- and off- axis parabolic mirrors as well as elliptical mirrors yields a strong stray light rejection with high resolution over a wavelength range between 165 and 1000nm. The Raman signal is collected with a reflective entrance objective with a numerical aperture of 0.5, featuring a Cassegrain-type design. Resonance Raman studies on semiconductors and on correlated compounds, such as LaMnO3, highlight the performance of this instrument, and show diverse resonance effects between 1.96 and 5.4eV.

  9. Pluto-Charon: Infrared Reflectance from 3.6 to 8.0 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Emery, Joshua P.; Stansberry, John A.; VanCleve, Jeffrey E.

    2004-01-01

    We have measured the spectral reflectance of the Pluto-Charon pair at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micrometers with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) (G. G. Fazzio et al. Ap.J.Supp. 154, 10-17, 2004) on the Spitzer Space Telescope (STS), at eight different longitudes that cover a full rotation of the planet. STS does not have sufficient resolution to separate the light from the planet and the satellite. The image of the Pluto-Charon pair is clearly visible at each of the four wavelengths. We will discuss the spectral reflectance in terms of models that include the known components of Pluto and Charon s surfaces, and evidence for diurnal variations.

  10. Light Reflection from Water Surfaces Perturbed by Falling Rain Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    An account of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection in a pool under falling rain droplets was recently reported by Molesini and Vannoni (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 403-11). The mathematical approach, however, only covered the case of a symmetrical location of a light source and the observer's eyes with respect to the vertical of the falling…

  11. Light Reflection from Water Surfaces Perturbed by Falling Rain Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    An account of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection in a pool under falling rain droplets was recently reported by Molesini and Vannoni (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 403-11). The mathematical approach, however, only covered the case of a symmetrical location of a light source and the observer's eyes with respect to the vertical of the falling…

  12. Electrical Energy Harvesting from Thermal Energy with Converged Infrared Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, S. Y.; Kok, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) cell is a common energy harvester that had been used to harvest solar energy and convert it into electrical energy. However, the vast energy from the spectrum of sunlight is not fully harvested. Therefore, thermoelectric (TE) module that harvest electrical energy from heat is being proposed in this paper. Generally, the part of the sunlight spectrum that induce heat is in the spectrum band of infrared (IR). For the experimental set-up in this paper, infrared (IR) light bulb was being used to simulate the IR spectrum band of the sunlight. In order to maximize the heat energy collection, a convex lens was being used to converge the IR light and therefore focused the heat on an aluminium sheet and heat sink which was placed on top of the hot side of the TE module. The distance between convex lens and IR light bulb is varying in between 10cm and 55cm and the reading was taken at an interval of 5cm. Firstly, the temperature of the IR light and converged IR light were recorded and plotted in graph. The graph showed that the temperature of the converged IR light bulb is higher than the IR light bulb. Lastly, the voltage and power output of the TE module with different heat source was compared. The output voltage and power of the TE module increased inverse proportional to the distance between IR light bulb and TE module.

  13. Feasibility of conventional and Roundup Ready® soybeans discrimination by different near infrared reflectance technologies.

    PubMed

    Esteve Agelet, Lidia; Gowen, Aoife A; Hurburgh, Charles R; O'Donell, Colm P

    2012-09-15

    Identification and proper labelling of genetically modified organisms is required and increasingly demanded by legislation and consumers worldwide. In this study, the feasibility of three near infrared reflectance technologies (a chemical imaging unit, a commercial diode array instrument, and a light tube non-commercial instrument) were compared for discriminating Roundup Ready® and not genetically modified soybean seeds. Over 200 seeds of each class (Roundup Ready® and conventional) were used. Principal Component Analysis with Artificial Neural Networks (PCA-ANN) and Locally Weighted Principal Component Regression (LW-PCR) were used for creating the discrimination models. Discrimination accuracies when new tested seeds belonged to samples included in the training sets achieved accuracies over 90% of correctly classified seeds for LW-PCR models. The light tube performed the best, while the imaging unit showed the worse accuracies overall. Models validated with new seeds from samples not included in the training set had accuracies of 72-79%.

  14. Development of an ultra-compact mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance spectrophotometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Lee, Tae-Ro; Yoon, Gilwon

    2014-07-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy has been an important tool widely used for qualitative analysis in various fields. However, portable or personal use is size and cost prohibitive for either Fourier transform infrared or attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectrophotometers. In this study, we developed an ultra-compact ATR spectrophotometer whose frequency band was 5.5-11.0 μm. We used miniature components, such as a light source fabricated by semiconductor technology, a linear variable filter, and a pyro-electric array detector. There were no moving parts. Optimal design based on two light sources, a zippered configuration of the array detector and ATR optics could produce absorption spectra that might be used for qualitative analysis. A microprocessor synchronized the pulsed light sources and detector, and all the signals were processed digitally. The size was 13.5×8.5×3.5 cm3 and the weight was 300 grams. Due to its low cost, our spectrophotometer can replace many online monitoring devices. Another application could be for a u-healthcare system installed in the bathroom or attached to a smartphone for monitoring substances in body fluids.

  15. Apparatus for and method of correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1987-03-03

    An apparatus is described for correcting for astigmatism in a light beam reflected off of a light reflecting surface, comprising: (a) a first means defining a flat, rectangular light reflecting surface which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, into different concave and/or convex cylindrical curvatures about a particular axis. The first means is configured so that the light reflecting surface can be adjustably bent into the selected cylindrical curvature by applying a particular bending moment to the first means with respect to the surface, depending upon the curvature desired. The first means includes an integrally formed body member having a main plate-like segment including a front fact defining the light reflecting surface and a pair of spaced-apart flange segments extending rearwardly of the main segment; and (b) second means acting on the first means for adjustably bending the light reflecting surface into a particular selected one of the different cylindrical curvatures, depending upon the astigmatism to be corrected for.

  16. Design and realization of a contact-less interaction system based on infrared reflection photoelectric detection array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Lei, Bing; Feng, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Due to the good performance of high sensitivity, quick response and low cost, infrared reflection detection technology is widely used in various fields. In this work, we present a novel contact-less interaction system which is based on infrared reflection detection technology. The system is mainly composed of a Micro Controller Unit (MCU), upper computer and photoelectric detection module. The MCU is utilized to control the photoelectric detection module and to make sure that the sensing unit is lighted one by one in a given order. When the interactive object appears upon the infrared reflection photoelectric detection array, its position information will be ensured and sent to the upper computer through MCU. In this system, every sensing unit is lighted for 1ms, and the detection array includes 8×8 units. It means that the photoelectric detection array will scan 15.6 times per-second. The experimental research results indicate that the factors affecting the detection range including the working current of transmitting diode, modulation frequency, and the reflectivity of the interactive object. When the working current is 10mA, and the modulation frequency is 80 KHz, the system has a detection range of 20 cm. Moreover, efficient modulation and demodulation of optical signal is quite necessary to remove the influence of surrounding light.

  17. Cholesteric liquid crystals with a broad light reflection band.

    PubMed

    Mitov, Michel

    2012-12-11

    The cholesteric-liquid-crystalline structure, which concerns the organization of chromatin, collagen, chitin, or cellulose, is omnipresent in living matter. In technology, it is found in temperature and pressure sensors, supertwisted nematic liquid crystal displays, optical filters, reflective devices, or cosmetics. A cholesteric liquid crystal reflects light because of its helical structure. The reflection is selective - the bandwidth is limited to a few tens of nanometers and the reflectance is equal to at most 50% for unpolarized incident light, which is a consequence of the polarization-selectivity rule. These limits must be exceeded for innovative applications like polarizer-free reflective displays, broadband polarizers, optical data storage media, polarization-independent devices, stealth technologies, or smart switchable reflective windows to control solar light and heat. Novel cholesteric-liquid-crystalline architectures with the related fabrication procedures must therefore be developed. This article reviews solutions found in living matter and laboratories to broaden the bandwidth around a central reflection wavelength, do without the polarization-selectivity rule and go beyond the reflectance limit.

  18. Near- and Mid-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for the Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Agricultural Products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For several decades near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to determine the composition of a variety of agricultural products. More recently, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) has similarly been shown to be able to determine the co...

  19. Self-assembled flower-like antimony trioxide microstructures with high infrared reflectance performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Shengsong; Yang, Xiaokun; Shao, Qian; Liu, Qingyun; Wang, Tiejun; Wang, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2013-04-15

    A simple hydrothermal process was adopted to self-assembly prepare high infrared reflective antimony trioxide with three-dimensional flower-like microstructures. The morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) respectively. It is also found that experimental parameters, such as NaOH concentration, surfactant concentration and volume ratio of ethanol–water played crucial roles in controlling the morphologies of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures. A possible growth mechanism of flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructure was proposed based on the experimental data. UV–vis–NIR spectra verified that the near infrared reflectivity of the obtained flower-like microstructures could averagely achieve as 92% with maximum reflectivity of 98%, obviously higher than that of other different morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures. It is expected that the flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures have some applications in optical materials and heat insulation coatings. - Graphical abstract: Flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures that composed of nanosheets with thickness of ca. 100 nm exhibit high reflectivity under UV–vis–NIR spectra. Highlights: ► Uniform flower-like microstructures were synthesized via simple hydrothermal reaction. ► The flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures exhibited higher reflectivity than other morphologies under the UV–vis–NIR light. ► Influencing parameters on the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} morphologies have been discussed in detail. ► Possible mechanism leading to flower-like microstructures was proposed.

  20. Strong transmittance above the light line in mid-infrared two-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kraeh, Christian; Martinez-Hurtado, J. L.; Zeitlmair, Martin; Finley, Jonathan J.; Popescu, Alexandru; Hedler, Harry

    2015-06-14

    The mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum between 3 and 8 μm hosts absorption lines of gases relevant for chemical and biological sensing. 2D photonic crystal structures capable of guiding light in this region of the spectrum have been widely studied, and their implementation into miniaturized sensors has been proposed. However, light guiding in conventional 2D photonic crystals is usually restricted to a frequency range below the light line, which is the dispersion relation of light in the media surrounding the structures. These structures rely on total internal reflection for confinement of the light in z-direction normal to the lattice plane. In this work, 2D mid-infrared photonic crystals consisting of microtube arrays that mitigate these limitations have been developed. Due to their high aspect ratios of ∼1:30, they are perceived as semi-infinite in the z-direction. Light transmission experiments in the 5–8 μm range reveal attenuations as low as 0.27 dB/100 μm, surpassing the limitations for light guiding above the light line in conventional 2D photonic crystals. Fair agreement is obtained between these experiments, 2D band structure and transmission simulations.

  1. Bio-inspired, subwavelength surface structures to control reflectivity, transmission, and scattering in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora Gonzalez, Federico

    Controlling the reflection of visible and infrared (IR) light at interfaces is extremely important to increase the power efficiency and performance of optics, electro-optical and (thermo)photovoltaic systems. The eye of the moth has evolved subwavelength protuberances that increase light transmission into the eye tissue and prevent reflection. The subwavelength protuberances effectively grade the refractive index from that of air (n=1) to that of the tissue (n=1.4), making the interface gradual, suppressing reflection. In theory, the moth-eye (ME) structures can be implemented with any material platform to achieve an antireflectance effect by scaling the pitch and size of protuberances for the wavelength range of interest. In this work, a bio-inspired, scalable and substrate-independent surface modification protocol was developed to realize broadband antireflective structures based on the moth-eye principle. Quasi-ordered ME arrays were fabricated in IR relevant materials using a colloidal lithography method to achieve highly efficient, omni-directional transmission of mid and far infrared (IR) radiation. The effect of structure height and aspect ratio on transmittance and scattering is explored, with discussion on experimental techniques and effective medium theory (EMT). The highest aspect ratio structures (AR = 9.4) achieved peak single-side transmittance of 98%, with >85% transmission for lambda = 7--30 microns. A detailed photon balance constructed by transmission, forward scattering, specular reflection and diffuse reflection measurements to quantify optical losses due to near-field effects will be discussed. In addition, angle-dependent transmission measurements showed that moth-eye structures provide superior antireflective properties compared to unstructured interfaces over a wide angular range (0--60° incidence). Finally, subwavelength ME structures are incorporated on a Si substrate to enhance the absorption of near infrared (NIR) light in PtSi films to

  2. A system for simultaneous near-infrared reflectance and transillumination imaging of occlusal carious lesions

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians need technologies to improve the diagnosis of questionable occlusal carious lesions (QOC’s) and determine if decay has penetrated to the underlying dentin. Assessing lesion depth from near-infrared (NIR) images holds great potential due to the high transparency of enamel and stain to NIR light at λ=1300–1700-nm, which allows direct visualization and quantified measurements of enamel demineralization. Unfortunately, NIR reflectance measurements alone are limited in utility for approximating occlusal lesion depth >200-μm due to light attenuation from the lesion body. Previous studies sought to combine NIR reflectance and transillumination measurements taken at λ=1300-nm in order to estimate QOC depth and severity. The objective of this study was to quantify the change in lesion contrast and size measured from multispectral NIR reflectance and transillumination images of natural occlusal carious lesions with increasing lesion depth and severity in order to determine the optimal multimodal wavelength combinations for estimating QOC depth. Extracted teeth with varying amounts of natural occlusal decay were measured using a multispectral-multimodal NIR imaging system at prominent wavelengths within the λ=1300–1700-nm spectral region. Image analysis software was used to calculate lesion contrast and area values between sound and carious enamel regions. PMID:27006524

  3. A system for simultaneous near-infrared reflectance and transillumination imaging of occlusal carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jacob C; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-13

    Clinicians need technologies to improve the diagnosis of questionable occlusal carious lesions (QOC's) and determine if decay has penetrated to the underlying dentin. Assessing lesion depth from near-infrared (NIR) images holds great potential due to the high transparency of enamel and stain to NIR light at λ=1300-1700-nm, which allows direct visualization and quantified measurements of enamel demineralization. Unfortunately, NIR reflectance measurements alone are limited in utility for approximating occlusal lesion depth >200-μm due to light attenuation from the lesion body. Previous studies sought to combine NIR reflectance and transillumination measurements taken at λ=1300-nm in order to estimate QOC depth and severity. The objective of this study was to quantify the change in lesion contrast and size measured from multispectral NIR reflectance and transillumination images of natural occlusal carious lesions with increasing lesion depth and severity in order to determine the optimal multimodal wavelength combinations for estimating QOC depth. Extracted teeth with varying amounts of natural occlusal decay were measured using a multispectral-multimodal NIR imaging system at prominent wavelengths within the λ=1300-1700-nm spectral region. Image analysis software was used to calculate lesion contrast and area values between sound and carious enamel regions.

  4. A system for simultaneous near-infrared reflectance and transillumination imaging of occlusal carious lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Clinicians need technologies to improve the diagnosis of questionable occlusal carious lesions (QOC's) and determine if decay has penetrated to the underlying dentin. Assessing lesion depth from near-infrared (NIR) images holds great potential due to the high transparency of enamel and stain to NIR light at λ=1300-1700-nm, which allows direct visualization and quantified measurements of enamel demineralization. Unfortunately, NIR reflectance measurements alone are limited in utility for approximating occlusal lesion depth >200-μm due to light attenuation from the lesion body. Previous studies sought to combine NIR reflectance and transillumination measurements taken at λ=1300-nm in order to estimate QOC depth and severity. The objective of this study was to quantify the change in lesion contrast and size measured from multispectral NIR reflectance and transillumination images of natural occlusal carious lesions with increasing lesion depth and severity in order to determine the optimal multimodal wavelength combinations for estimating QOC depth. Extracted teeth with varying amounts of natural occlusal decay were measured using a multispectral-multimodal NIR imaging system at prominent wavelengths within the λ=1300-1700-nm spectral region. Image analysis software was used to calculate lesion contrast and area values between sound and carious enamel regions.

  5. A in Situ Study of Plasma Etching Surface Chemistry Using Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesi, Robert Peter

    Plasma etching is an important process in semiconductor manufacturing. The present work describes a means by which plasma etching surface chemistry may be studied in situ. The systems of interest were the sulfur hexafluoride plasma etching of silicon and tungsten in a diode reactor. A reflection infrared spectrometer was designed and constructed to be able to scan the frequency region from about 550cm ^{-1} to 1300cm ^{-1}, and a plasma etch reactor was modified to allow access to the infrared beam. Reflection infrared spectroscopy (RIS) allows the measurement of light absorbed by molecules adsorbed on a reflective surface selectively from light absorbed by molecules in the gas phase. RIS applied to heavily doped silicon substrates had limited success. While sulfur fluorine species were detected on the surface during plasma etching, no silicon fluorine species were ever detected. The sulfur fluorine species (referred to as SF_{rm x}) were not seen under any circumstances in the absence of an SF_6 plasma. Severe baseline drift of the infrared spectrometer during plasma etching was the main reason for the limited success. However, the results were significant in that they demonstrated the presence of sulfur fluorine species during the plasma etching of silicon in an SF_6 plasma. The baseline drift problems experienced with silicon were not found when tungsten was studied. The same SF _{rm x} feature detected on silicon was also found on tungsten during etching in an SF_6 plasma, but was never seen in the absence of the plasma. A detailed experimental and theoretical study was performed to show that the surface absorption feature seen was actually due to SF _{rm x} adsorbed on the surface. A hysteresis behavior was observed in the SF_ {rm x} concentration as the plasma power was ramped up and subsequently decreased. Finally, it could not be concluded if SF_{rm x} participated in the etch reaction by fluorinating the tungsten surface, but the presence of SF_ {rm x} on

  6. Near-infrared reflectance analysis for predicting beef longissimus tenderness.

    PubMed

    Park, B; Chen, Y R; Hruschka, W R; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    1998-08-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectra (1,100 to 2,498 nm) were collected on beef longissimus thoracis steaks for the purpose of establishing the feasibility of predicting meat tenderness by spectroscopy. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis (up to 20 factors) and multiple linear regression (MLR) were used to predict cooked longissimus Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force values from spectra of steaks from 119 beef carcasses. Modeling used the combination of log(1/R) and its second derivative. Overall, absorption was higher for extremely tough steaks than for tender steaks. This was particularly true at wavelengths between 1,100 and 1,350 nm. For PLS regression, optimal model conditions (R2 = .67; SEC = 1.2 kg) occurred with six PLS factors. When the PLS model was tested against the validation subset, similar performance was obtained (R2 = .63; SEP = 1.3 kg) and bias was small (<.3 kg). Among the 39 samples in the validation data set, 48.7, 87.7, and 97.4% of the samples were predicted within 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 kg, respectively, of the observed Warner-Bratzler shear force value. The optimal PLS model was able to predict whether a steak would have a Warner-Bratzler shear force value < 6 kg with 75% accuracy. The R2 of MLR model was .67, and 89% of samples were correctly classified (< 6 vs > 6 kg) for Warner-Bratzler shear force. These data indicate that NIR is capable of predicting Warner-Bratzler shear force values of longissimus steaks. Refinement of this technique may allow nondestructive measurement of beef longissimus at the processing plant level.

  7. Brain tumour differentiation: rapid stratified serum diagnostics via attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hands, James R; Clemens, Graeme; Stables, Ryan; Ashton, Katherine; Brodbelt, Andrew; Davis, Charles; Dawson, Timothy P; Jenkinson, Michael D; Lea, Robert W; Walker, Carol; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity is essential to exploit advances in new treatments to lead significant reductions in mortality and morbidity. Current cancer diagnostic tests observing tissue architecture and specific protein expression for specific cancers suffer from inter-observer variability, poor detection rates and occur when the patient is symptomatic. A new method for the detection of cancer using 1 μl of human serum, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and pattern recognition algorithms is reported using a 433 patient dataset (3897 spectra). To the best of our knowledge, we present the largest study on serum mid-infrared spectroscopy for cancer research. We achieve optimum sensitivities and specificities using a Radial Basis Function Support Vector Machine of between 80.0 and 100 % for all strata and identify the major spectral features, hence biochemical components, responsible for the discrimination within each stratum. We assess feature fed-SVM analysis for our cancer versus non-cancer model and achieve 91.5 and 83.0 % sensitivity and specificity respectively. We demonstrate the use of infrared light to provide a spectral signature from human serum to detect, for the first time, cancer versus non-cancer, metastatic cancer versus organ confined, brain cancer severity and the organ of origin of metastatic disease from the same sample enabling stratified diagnostics depending upon the clinical question asked.

  8. Transient and selective suppression of neural activity with infrared light

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Austin R.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and control of neural circuitry requires the ability to selectively activate or inhibit neurons. Previous work showed that infrared laser light selectively excited neural activity in endogenous unmyelinated and myelinated axons. However, inhibition of neuronal firing with infrared light was only observed in limited cases, is not well understood and was not precisely controlled. Using an experimentally tractable unmyelinated preparation for detailed investigation and a myelinated preparation for validation, we report that it is possible to selectively and transiently inhibit electrically-initiated axonal activation, as well as to both block or enhance the propagation of action potentials of specific motor neurons. Thus, in addition to previously shown excitation, we demonstrate an optical method of suppressing components of the nervous system with functional spatiotemporal precision. We believe this technique is well-suited for non-invasive investigations of diverse excitable tissues and may ultimately be applied for treating neurological disorders. PMID:24009039

  9. Reflection and transmission of twisted light at phase conjugating interfaces.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Anita; Berakdar, Jamal

    2012-01-16

    We study the transmission and the reflection of light beams carrying orbital angular momentum through a dielectric multilayer structure containing phase-conjugating interfaces. We show analytically and demonstrate numerically that the phase conjugation at the interfaces results in a characteristic angular and radial pattern of the reflected beam, a fact that can be exploited for the detection and the characterization of phase conjugation in composite optical materials.

  10. Coherent perfect absorption and reflection in slow-light waveguides.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Nadav; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Chong, Y D; de Sterke, C Martijn

    2013-12-01

    We identify a family of unusual slow-light modes occurring in lossy multimode grating waveguides, for which either the forward or backward mode components, or both, are degenerate. In the fully degenerate case, the response can be modulated between coherent perfect absorption (zero reflection) and perfect reflection by varying the wave amplitudes in a uniform input waveguide. The perfectly absorbed wave has anomalously short absorption length, scaling as the inverse one-third power of the absorptivity.

  11. Robust near-infrared structured light scanning for 3D human model reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bo; Yang, Ruigang

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensing system, robust Near-infrared Structured Light Scanning (NIRSL) for three-dimensional human model scanning application. Human model scanning due to its nature of various hair and dress appearance and body motion has long been a challenging task. Previous structured light scanning methods typically emitted visible coded light patterns onto static and opaque objects to establish correspondence between a projector and a camera for triangulation. In the success of these methods rely on scanning objects with proper reflective surface for visible light, such as plaster, light colored cloth. Whereas for human model scanning application, conventional methods suffer from low signal to noise ratio caused by low contrast of visible light over the human body. The proposed robust NIRSL, as implemented with the near infrared light, is capable of recovering those dark surfaces, such as hair, dark jeans and black shoes under visible illumination. Moreover, successful structured light scan relies on the assumption that the subject is static during scanning. Due to the nature of body motion, it is very time sensitive to keep this assumption in the case of human model scan. The proposed sensing system, by utilizing the new near-infrared capable high speed LightCrafter DLP projector, is robust to motion, provides accurate and high resolution three-dimensional point cloud, making our system more efficient and robust for human model reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that our system is effective and efficient to scan real human models with various dark hair, jeans and shoes, robust to human body motion and produces accurate and high resolution 3D point cloud.

  12. Imaging In focus: Reflected light imaging: Techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Guggenheim, Emily J; Lynch, Iseult; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2017-02-01

    Reflectance imaging is a broad term that describes the formation of images by the detection of illumination light that is back-scattered from reflective features within a sample. Reflectance imaging can be performed in a variety of different configurations, such as confocal, oblique angle illumination, structured illumination, interferometry and total internal reflectance, permitting a plethora of biomedical applications. Reflectance imaging has proven indispensable for critical investigations into the safety and understanding of biomedically and environmentally relevant nano-materials, an area of high priority and investment. The non-destructive in vivo imaging ability of reflectance techniques permits alternative diagnostic strategies that may eventually facilitate the eradication of some invasive biopsy procedures. Reflectance can also provide additional structural information and clarity necessary in fluorescent based in vivo studies. Near-coverslip interrogation techniques, such as reflectance interferometry and total internal reflection, have provided a label free means to investigate cell-surface contacts, cell motility and vesicle trafficking in vivo and in vitro. Other key advances include the ability to acquire superresolution reflectance images providing increased spatial resolution.

  13. J-Black: a stray light coating for optical and infrared systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddell, Patrick; Black, David S.

    2016-07-01

    A new stray light coating, called J-Black, has been developed for NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The coating is a layered composition of Nextel-Suede 3101 primers and top coats and silicon carbide grit. J-Black has been applied to large areas of the SOFIA airborne telescope and is currently operating within the open cavity environment of the Boeing 747. Over a series of discrete filter bands, from 0.4 to 21 microns, J-Black optical and infrared reflectivity performance is compared with other available coatings. Measured total reflectance values are less than 2% at the longest wavelengths, including at high incidence angles. Detailed surface structure characteristics are also compared via electron and ion microscopy. Environmental tests applicable for aerospace applications are presented, as well as the detailed steps required to apply the coating.

  14. Multivariation calibration techniques applied to NIRA (near infrared reflectance analysis) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. L.

    1991-02-01

    Multivariate calibration techniques can reduce the time required for routine testing and can provide new methods of analysis. Multivariate calibration is commonly used with near infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two feasibility studies were performed to determine the capability of NIRA, using multivariate calibration techniques, to perform analyses on the types of samples that are routinely analyzed at this laboratory. The first study performed included a variety of samples and indicated that NIRA would be well-suited to perform analyses on selected materials properties such as water content and hydroxyl number on polyol samples, epoxy content on epoxy resins, water content of desiccants, and the amine values of various amine cure agents. A second study was performed to assess the capability of NIRA to perform quantitative analysis of hydroxyl numbers and water contents of hydroxyl-containing materials. Hydroxyl number and water content were selected for determination because these tests are frequently run on polyol materials and the hydroxyl number determination is time consuming. This study pointed out the necessity of obtaining calibration standards identical to the samples being analyzed for each type of polyol or other material being analyzed. Multivariate calibration techniques are frequently used with FTIR data to determine the composition of a large variety of complex mixtures. A literature search indicated many applications of multivariate calibration to FTIR data. Areas identified where quantitation by FTIR would provide a new capability are quantitation of components in epoxy and silicone resins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in oils, and additives to polymers.

  15. Reflected light imaging of ON and OFF responses in frog retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Liu, Lei; Li, Yang-Guo

    2009-02-01

    Using a near infrared (NIR) light flood-illumination imager equipped with a high-speed CCD camera, we demonstrated reflected light imaging of stimulus-evoked retinal ON and OFF responses in isolated, but intact, frog eye. Both fast and slow transient intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) were observed. Fast optical response occurred immediately after the stimulus onset, and correlated tightly with the ON and OFF edges of the visible light stimulus. High resolution images revealed both positive (increasing) and negative (decreasing) IOSs, and dynamic optical change at individual CCD pixels could often exceed 10% of the background light intensity. Our experiment on isolated eye suggests that further development of fast, high resolution fundus imager will allow robust detection of fast IOSs in vivo, and thus allow noninvasive, three-dimensional evaluation of retinal neural function.

  16. Determination of plant silicon content with near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Smis, Adriaan; Ancin Murguzur, Francisco Javier; Struyf, Eric; Soininen, Eeva M.; Herranz Jusdado, Juan G.; Meire, Patrick; Bråthen, Kari Anne

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most common elements in the earth bedrock, and its continental cycle is strongly biologically controlled. Yet, research on the biogeochemical cycle of Si in ecosystems is hampered by the time and cost associated with the currently used chemical analysis methods. Here, we assessed the suitability of Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) for measuring Si content in plant tissues. NIR spectra depend on the characteristics of the present bonds between H and N, C and O, which can be calibrated against concentrations of various compounds. Because Si in plants always occurs as hydrated condensates of orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), linked to organic biomolecules, we hypothesized that NIRS is suitable for measuring Si content in plants across a range of plant species. We based our testing on 442 samples of 29 plant species belonging to a range of growth forms. We calibrated the NIRS method against a well-established plant Si analysis method by using partial least-squares regression. Si concentrations ranged from detection limit (0.24 ppmSi) to 7.8% Si on dry weight and were well predicted by NIRS. The model fit with validation data was good across all plant species (n = 141, R2 = 0.90, RMSEP = 0.24), but improved when only graminoids were modeled (n = 66, R2 = 0.95, RMSEP = 0.10). A species specific model for the grass Deschampsia cespitosa showed even slightly better results than the model for all graminoids (n = 16, R2 = 0.93, RMSEP = 0.015). We show for the first time that NIRS is applicable for determining plant Si concentration across a range of plant species and growth forms, and represents a time- and cost-effective alternative to the chemical Si analysis methods. As NIRS can be applied concurrently to a range of plant organic constituents, it opens up unprecedented research possibilities for studying interrelations between Si and other plant compounds in vegetation, and for addressing the role of Si in ecosystems across a range of Si

  17. Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy: a comparison of light dosing schedules.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fusa; Nagaya, Tadanobu; Nakamura, Yuko; Sato, Kazuhide; Okuyama, Shuhei; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2017-05-23

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a newly-developed cancer therapy in which a monoclonal antibody is conjugated to a near-infrared photoabsorber, IR700 to form an antibody photoabsorber conjugate (APC). After the APC binds to cancer cells expressing the cognate antigen, exposure to NIR light results in rapid, highly selective necrotic cell death of the cancer cells with minimal off-target effects. Several hours after NIR-PIT, the tumor vessels become supraphysiologically permeable and circulating APC can therefore readily leak into the already-treated tumor space where it can bind with viable cancer cells that is called super-enhanced permeability and retention effect. The presence of the SUPR effect after NIR-PIT has prompted regimens in which there is a repeat exposure of NIR light 24 hours after the initial NIR-PIT to take advantage of the leakage of additional APC deeper into the tumor. However, this post-treatment APC penetration was fully induced within 3 hours, therefore, it is possible that repeated exposures of NIR light could be administered much earlier than 24 hours and still produce the same effects. To test this idea, we compared several modes of delivering additional doses of light after initial NIR-PIT. We found that repeated exposures of NIR light starting 3 hours after initial NIR-PIT produced equal or superior results to more delayed exposures of NIR light. This finding has practical implications of an easy-to-perform regimen as repeated light exposures could be performed during a single day rather than extending the procedure over two days which is the current recommendation.

  18. Diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy: new technique of sample preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrebičík, M.; Budínová, G.; Godarská, T.; Vláčil, D.; Vogenseh, Stine B.; Volka, K.

    1997-06-01

    A new technique of measurement of the diffuse-reflectance infrared FT spectra, based on the preparation of a cylinder from the mixture of the sample and powdered KBr under pressure of about 5.85 MPa, has been tested. During the measurement, the axis of the formed cylinder is perpendicular to the direction of the incident light. A repeatability of the measurement of selected bands and also of the background was investigated for hydroquinone, nicotinamide, silica gel, rice, tea and also lyophilized human aqueous humour. The relative standard deviations of log( {1}/{R}) showed a dependence on the character of the measured compound, but in general were comparable or slightly better than those obtained by the standard method of loosely packed cups. The values were better than 1.5% in the most cases. The main advantage of the proposed technique lies in its simplicity and rapidity of obtaining statistically significant data.

  19. Determination of mean-particle size by diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuge, A.; Uwamino, Y.; Ishizuku, T.; Suzuki, K. )

    1993-01-01

    The mean particle diameter of a powder was measured by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectrometry, using a calibration curve relating the spectral intensity, plotted in Kubelka-Munk units, to the mean particle diameter. The particle sizes of three commercially available Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] powders were determined, using the calibration curve. The analytical results agreed well with the results obtained with a light diffraction and scattering particle counter, i.e., a microtrack analyzer, only with the two powders which had a narrow particle-size distribution. The method can, thus, be used to determine the mean particle size of the Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] in an Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]-alumina mixture.

  20. Observations of the Near-infrared Spectrum of the Zodiacal Light with CIBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, K.; Battle, J.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Keating, B.; Lee, D. H.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U. W.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Suzuki, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2010-08-01

    Interplanetary dust (IPD) scatters solar radiation which results in the zodiacal light that dominates the celestial diffuse brightness at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Both asteroid collisions and cometary ejections produce the IPD, but the relative contribution from these two sources is still unknown. The low resolution spectrometer (LRS) onboard the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) observed the astrophysical sky spectrum between 0.75 and 2.1 μm over a wide range of ecliptic latitude. The resulting zodiacal light spectrum is redder than the solar spectrum, and shows a broad absorption feature, previously unreported, at approximately 0.9 μm, suggesting the existence of silicates in the IPD material. The spectral shape of the zodiacal light is isotropic at all ecliptic latitudes within the measurement error. The zodiacal light spectrum, including the extended wavelength range to 2.5 μm using Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS) data, is qualitatively similar to the reflectance of S-type asteroids. This result can be explained by the proximity of S-type asteroidal dust to Earth's orbit, and the relatively high albedo of asteroidal dust compared with cometary dust.

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRUM OF THE ZODIACAL LIGHT WITH CIBER

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Wada, T.; Battle, J.; Bock, J.; Zemcov, M.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P.; Sullivan, I.; Keating, B.; Renbarger, T.; Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W.; Suzuki, K.

    2010-08-10

    Interplanetary dust (IPD) scatters solar radiation which results in the zodiacal light that dominates the celestial diffuse brightness at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Both asteroid collisions and cometary ejections produce the IPD, but the relative contribution from these two sources is still unknown. The low resolution spectrometer (LRS) onboard the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) observed the astrophysical sky spectrum between 0.75 and 2.1 {mu}m over a wide range of ecliptic latitude. The resulting zodiacal light spectrum is redder than the solar spectrum, and shows a broad absorption feature, previously unreported, at approximately 0.9 {mu}m, suggesting the existence of silicates in the IPD material. The spectral shape of the zodiacal light is isotropic at all ecliptic latitudes within the measurement error. The zodiacal light spectrum, including the extended wavelength range to 2.5 {mu}m using Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS) data, is qualitatively similar to the reflectance of S-type asteroids. This result can be explained by the proximity of S-type asteroidal dust to Earth's orbit, and the relatively high albedo of asteroidal dust compared with cometary dust.

  2. Light Reflection in a Pool under Falling Rain Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The observation of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection from a water surface perturbed by falling droplets is reported. The phenomenon is analysed in some detail, with a simplified model of a surface wave packet. A simple experiment reproducing the phenomenon in the laboratory is presented, also showing evidence of pattern distortions…

  3. Light Reflection in a Pool under Falling Rain Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The observation of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection from a water surface perturbed by falling droplets is reported. The phenomenon is analysed in some detail, with a simplified model of a surface wave packet. A simple experiment reproducing the phenomenon in the laboratory is presented, also showing evidence of pattern distortions…

  4. Recent trends in specular light reflectance beyond clinical fluorescence diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Szepetiuk, Grégory; Piérard, Sébastien; Pierard-Franchimont, Claudine; Caucanas, Marie; Quatresooz, Pascale; Pierard, Gérald E

    2011-01-01

    Under specific light illumination, particularly ultraviolet (UV) and near-UV light stimulation, the skin produces both specular light reflectance and, possibly, specific fluorescent emission. These properties offer diagnostic clues and disclose some peculiar functions of the skin. A series of superficial infections (erythrasma, some tinea capitis types, tinea/pityriasis versicolor, dermatophytoses, etc.) and pilosebaceous follicles enriched in Propionibacterium spp show fluorescence. This latter characteristic is downgraded or lost while on some anti-acne treatments. A quenching effect of fluorescence is observed following the application of sunscreens. The (pre)neoplastic areas prepared for methylaminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) show reddish fluorescence following drug metabolisation producing porphyrins by the abnormal activated cells. Of note, when using a recording sensitive CCD camera instead of casual visual observation, skin fluorescence may be superimposed on the specular reflectance of the incident light. With the current technology, these situations are not distinguished with confidence. Any harsh and scaly lesion appears brighter following yellowish specular light reflectance. Stratum corneum samplings collected on clear self-adhesive discs or cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings are conveniently examined ex vivo, taking advantage of the same optical properties.

  5. Recent Progress in Near Infrared Light Triggered Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kerong; Li, Chunxia; Huang, Shanshan; Xing, Bengang; Jin, Dayong; Zeng, Qingguang; Hou, Zhiyao; Lin, Jun

    2017-09-29

    Nowadays, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is under the research spotlight as an appealing modality for various malignant tumors. Compared with conventional PDT treatment activated by ultraviolet or visible light, near infrared (NIR) light-triggered PDT possessing deeper penetration to lesion area and lower photodamage to normal tissue holds great potential for in vivo deep-seated tumor. In this review, recent research progress related to the exploration of NIR light responsive PDT nanosystems is summarized. To address current obstacles of PDT treatment and facilitate the effective utilization, several innovative strategies are developed and introduced into PDT nanosystems, including the conjugation with targeted moieties, O2 self-sufficient PDT, dual photosensitizers (PSs)-loaded PDT nanoplatform, and PDT-involved synergistic therapy. Finally, the potential challenges as well as the prospective for further development are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Efficient modulation of orthogonally polarized infrared light using graphene metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yudong; Zeng, Chao

    2017-04-01

    We propose an efficient modulation of linearly polarized infrared light using graphene metamaterials (GMMs) by exploiting the phase-coupled plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) mechanism. Because of the phase-coupling effect in GMMs, pronounced PIT peaks can be simultaneously obtained for the orthogonally polarized light through tuning of the Fermi level in graphene. Taking advantage of such polarization-selective PIT spectral responses and precise phase management, a dual-polarization GMM modulator is successfully achieved with ultra-high modulation depths of ˜32 dB at 10 μm and ˜28 dB at 12.45 μm for the x- and y-polarized light beams, respectively. The underlying principle of the proposal is well explained and verified by using transfer matrix method. The proposed scheme provides new opportunities for developing graphene-integrated high-performance electro-optical modulation, switching, and other optoelectronics applications.

  7. Infrared light gated MoS₂ field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huajing; Lin, Ziyuan; Wang, Xinsheng; Tang, Chun-Yin; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Chai, Yang; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Chan, H L W; Dai, Ji-Yan

    2015-12-14

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) as a promising 2D material has attracted extensive attentions due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties. In this work, we demonstrate an infrared (IR) light gated MoS₂ transistor through a device composed of MoS₂ monolayer and a ferroelectric single crystal Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O₃-PbTiO₃ (PMN-PT). With a monolayer MoS₂ onto the top surface of (111) PMN-PT crystal, the drain current of MoS₂ channel can be modulated with infrared illumination and this modulation process is reversible. Thus, the transistor can work as a new kind of IR photodetector with a high IR responsivity of 114%/Wcm⁻². The IR response of MoS₂ transistor is attributed to the polarization change of PMN-PT single crystal induced by the pyroelectric effect which results in a field effect. Our result promises the application of MoS₂ 2D material in infrared optoelectronic devices. Combining with the intrinsic photocurrent feature of MoS₂ in the visible range, the MoS₂ on ferroelectric single crystal may be sensitive to a broadband wavelength of light.

  8. Biological infrared microspectroscopy at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lisa M.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Williams, Gwyn P.; Sullivan, Michael; Chance, Mark R.

    2000-06-01

    Beamline U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source has been designed and built as an infrared beamline dedicated to the study of biomedical problems. In 1997, the horizontal and vertical acceptances of Beamline U2B were increased in order to increase the overall flux of the beamline. A wedged, CVD diamond window separates the UHV vacuum of the VUV ring from the rough vacuum of the beamline. The endstation consists of a Nicolet Magna 860 step-scan FTIR and a NicPlan infrared microscope. The spectrometer is equipped with beamsplitter/detector combinations that permit data collection in the mid-and far-infrared regions. We have also made provisions for mounting an external detector (e.g. bolometer) for far infrared microspectroscopy. Thus far, Beamline U2B has been used to (1) perform chemical imaging of bone tissue and brain cells to address issues related to bone disease and epilepsy, respectively, and (2) examine time-resolved protein structure in the sub-millisecond folding of cytochrome c.

  9. Stray-light suppression in a reflecting white-light coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romoli, Marco; Weiser, Heinz; Gardner, Larry D.; Kohl, John L.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of stray-light suppression in the white-light channel of the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer experiment for the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory is reported. The white-light channel consists of a reflecting telescope with external and internal occultation and a polarimeter section. Laboratory tests and analytical methods are used to perform the analysis. The various stray-light contributions are classified in two main categories: the contribution from sunlight that passes directly through the entrance aperture and the contribution of sunlight that is diffracted by the edges of the entrance aperture. Values of the stray-light contributions from various sources and the total stray-light level for observations at heliocentric heights from 1.4 to 5 solar radii are derived. Anticipated signal-to-stray-light ratios are presented together with the effective stray-light rejection by the polarimeter, demonstrating the efficacy of the stray-light suppression design.

  10. Reflectance dependence of polytetrafluoroethylene on thickness for xenon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, J.; Neff, A.; Arthurs, M.; Batista, E.; Morton, D.; Okunawo, M.; Pushkin, K.; Sander, A.; Stephenson, S.; Wang, Y.; Lorenzon, W.

    2017-06-01

    Many rare event searches including dark matter direct detection and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments take advantage of the high VUV reflective surfaces made from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) reflector materials to achieve high light collection efficiency in their detectors. As the detectors have grown in size over the past decade, there has also been an increased need for ever thinner detector walls without significant loss in reflectance to reduce dead volumes around active noble liquids, outgassing, and potential backgrounds. We report on the experimental results to measure the dependence of the reflectance on thickness of two PTFE samples at wavelengths near 178 nm. No change in reflectance was observed as the wall thickness of a cylindrically shaped PTFE vessel immersed in liquid xenon was varied between 1 mm to 9.5 mm.

  11. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Pan, W.; Zhu, J. F.; Li, J. C.; Gao, N.; Liu, C.; Ji, L.; Yu, E. T.; Kang, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior investigation suggests that the coupling efficiency of localized surface plasmon can be additionally enhanced by separating the metal NPs from substrates using a thin film with refractive index smaller than the substrate. The latter behavior is confirmed via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies using metal nanoparticles on Si/SiO2 substrates.

  12. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Pan, W; Zhu, J F; Li, J C; Gao, N; Liu, C; Ji, L; Yu, E T; Kang, J Y

    2015-12-18

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior investigation suggests that the coupling efficiency of localized surface plasmon can be additionally enhanced by separating the metal NPs from substrates using a thin film with refractive index smaller than the substrate. The latter behavior is confirmed via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies using metal nanoparticles on Si/SiO2 substrates.

  13. Chemical Imaging of Biological Tissue with Synchrotron Infrared Light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,L.; Dumas, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) and imaging (FTIRI) have become valuable techniques for examining the chemical makeup of biological materials by probing their vibrational motions on a microscopic scale. Synchrotron infrared (S-IR) light is an ideal source for FTIRM and FTIRI due to the combination of its high brightness (i.e., flux density), also called brilliance, and broadband nature. Through a 10-{mu}m pinhole, the brightness of a synchrotron source is 100-1000 times higher than a conventional thermal (globar) source. Accordingly, the improvement in spatial resolution and in spectral quality to the diffraction limit has led to a plethora of applications that is just being realized. In this review, we describe the development of synchrotron-based FTIRM, illustrate its advantages in many applications to biological systems, and propose some potential future directions for the technique.

  14. Reflective property of typical microstructures under a white light interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Weckenmann, A.

    2011-08-01

    This paper studies the reflective property of several typical microstructures while a white light interferometer (WLI) is used to measure them. Siemens stars, gratings with rectangular profile and atomic force microscopy cantilevers are measured under the WLI. To compare with the measurement results, the propagation behavior of white light reflection on the surface with micro-objects is simulated numerically on the basis of Maxwell's equations. An interference which is contrived by the steep edges of the surface structures is recognized. This interference plays a key role with the surface plasmon (Raether H 1988 Surface Plasmons ed G Hohler (Berlin: Springer)) when the reflective light does not follow the law of reflection in the area close to the structure edges. The above phenomenon could lead to a measuring error, a decrease in lateral resolution, inducing vertical measuring uncertainty, or even a non-measured signal when using the WLI. This paper was presented at ISMQC-2010, the 10th International Symposium on Measurement and Quality Control, held in Osaka, Japan, on 5-9 September 2010. Two other papers from that meeting also appear in this issue.

  15. On the reflection point where light reflects to a known destination on quadratic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Nuno

    2010-01-15

    We address the problem of determining the reflection point on a specular surface where a light ray that travels from a source to a target is reflected. The specular surfaces considered are those expressed by a quadratic equation. So far, there is no closed form explicit equation for the general solution of this determination of the reflection point, and the usual approach is to use the Snell law or the Fermat principle whose equations are derived in multidimensional nonlinear minimizations. We prove in this Letter that one can impose a set of three restrictions to the reflection point that can impose a set of three restrictions that culminates in a very elegant formalism of searching the reflection point in a unidimensional curve in space. This curve is the intersection of two quadratic equations. Some applications of this framework are also discussed.

  16. Using near infrared light for deep sea mining observation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Huimin; Li, Yujie; Li, Xin; Yang, Jianmin; Serikawa, Seiichi

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we design a novel deep-sea near infrared light based imaging equipment for deep-sea mining observation systems. The spectral sensitivity peaks are in the red region of the invisible spectrum, ranging from 750nm to 900nm. In addition, we propose a novel underwater imaging model that compensates for the attenuation discrepancy along the propagation path. The proposed model fully considered the effects of absorption, scattering and refraction. We also develop a locally adaptive Laplacian filtering for enhancing underwater transmission map after underwater dark channel prior estimation. Furthermore, we propose a spectral characteristic-based color correction algorithm to recover the distorted color. In water tank experiments, we made a linear scale of eight turbidity steps ranging from clean to heavily scattered by adding deep sea soil to the seawater (from 500 to 2000 mg/L). We compared the results of different turbidity underwater scene, illuminated alternately with near infrared light vs. white light. Experiments demonstrate that the enhanced NIR images have a reasonable noise level after the illumination compensation in the dark regions and demonstrates an improved global contrast by which the finest details and edges are significantly enhanced. We also demonstrate that the effective distance of the designed imaging system is about 1.5 meters, which can meet the requirement of micro-terrain observation around the deep-sea mining systems. Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle (ROV)-based experiments also certified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Do cephalopods communicate using polarized light reflections from their skin?

    PubMed

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Shashar, Nadav; Hanlon, Roger T

    2009-07-01

    Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopus) are probably best known for their ability to change color and pattern for camouflage and communication. This is made possible by their complex skin, which contains pigmented chromatophore organs and structural light reflectors (iridophores and leucophores). Iridophores create colorful and linearly polarized reflective patterns. Equally interesting, the photoreceptors of cephalopod eyes are arranged in a way to give these animals the ability to detect the linear polarization of incoming light. The capacity to detect polarized light may have a variety of functions, such as prey detection, navigation, orientation and contrast enhancement. Because the skin of cephalopods can produce polarized reflective patterns, it has been postulated that cephalopods could communicate intraspecifically through this visual system. The term 'hidden' or 'private' communication channel has been given to this concept because many cephalopod predators may not be able to see their polarized reflective patterns. We review the evidence for polarization vision as well as polarization signaling in some cephalopod species and provide examples that tend to support the notion--currently unproven--that some cephalopods communicate using polarized light signals.

  18. A Study of Bi-Directional Reflectance Distribution Functions and Their Effect on Infrared Signature Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    A STUDY OF BI-DIRECTIONAL REFLECTANCE DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AND THEIR EFFECT ON INFRARED SIGNATURE MODELS THESIS Samuel I. Harkiss, Flight...FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or...Infrared Signature Models THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force

  19. Bilaterally asymmetric reflection and transmission of light by a grating structure containing a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diovisalvi, Annunziata; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Chiadini, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    A boundary-value problem was formulated to investigate the reflection and transmission of light by a device consisting of an orthorhombic dielectric material that sits atop a 1D grating and is coated with a 3D topological insulator. In view of the periodicity of the grating, the electromagnetic field phasors were represented in terms of Floquet harmonics and the analysis was conducted by using the rigorous coupled-wave approach. We found that the device can exhibit bilaterally asymmetric reflection and transmission in the mid-infrared wavelength regime, provided that the surface admittance of the topological insulator is sufficiently high. This bilateral asymmetry is exhibited in narrow regimes for both the free-space wavelength and the angle of incidence. Bilateral asymmetry is exhibited more significantly by the specular components than by the nonspecular components of the reflected and transmitted plane waves.

  20. Cholesteric liquid crystalline materials with a dual circularly polarized light reflection band fixed at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Agez, Gonzague; Mitov, Michel

    2011-05-26

    An unpolarized normal-incidence light beam reflected by a cholesteric liquid crystal is left- or right-circularly polarized, in the cholesteric temperature range. In this article, we present a novel approach for fabricating a cholesteric liquid crystalline material that exhibits reflection bands with both senses of polarization at room temperature. A cholesteric liquid crystal that presents a twist inversion at a critical temperature T(c) is blended with a small quantity of photopolymerizable monomers. Upon ultraviolet irradiation above T(c), the liquid crystal becomes a polymer-stabilized liquid crystal. Below T(c), the material reflects a dual circularly polarized band in the infrared. By quenching the experimental cell at a temperature below the blend's melting point, the optical properties of the material in an undercooled state are conserved for months at room temperature, which is critical to potential applications such as heat-repelling windows and polarization-independent photonic devices.

  1. New formulation of the laws of reflection of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Ángel Luis; Martínez, Guadalupe; Suero, María. Isabel

    2013-11-01

    A new formulation of the laws of reflection of light based on the particle model is presented, and it is shown the equivalence between the new and the classic formulations. The proposed formulation has a significant educational value, as it allows drawing analogies between the phenomena of light reflection and elastic collisions, which are very well known by students. The proposed formulation is: "If at one point on a surface whose orientation in space is defined by a unit vector k, strikes an incident ray corresponding to a plane wave (propagating through a homogeneous and isotropic medium) whose direction of propagation coincides with that from a unit vector ui [expressed in terms of its components with respect to an orthonormal coordinate system, with one of its axis coinciding with the direction of k (ui = uix i + uiy j + uiz k)], it will be reflected so that the unit vector whose direction coincides with that from the reflected ray, ur, will only differ from the unit vector whose direction coincides with that from the incident ray, in the change of the sign of the component in the direction of k (ur = uix i + uiy j - uiz k)". Stated in everyday language, is equivalent of saying that the reflection of light occurs as if the photons underwent perfectly elastic collisions with the surface in question. As an example, this formulation is applied for the resolution of the classic reflection problem of the three plane mirrors forming a trirectangular trihedron.

  2. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  3. Non-invasive identification of metal-oxalate complexes on polychrome artwork surfaces by reflection mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monico, Letizia; Rosi, Francesca; Miliani, Costanza; Daveri, Alessia; Brunetti, Brunetto G

    2013-12-01

    In this work a reflection mid-infrared spectroscopy study of twelve metal-oxalate complexes, of interest in art conservation science as alteration compounds, was performed. Spectra of the reference materials highlighted the presence of derivative-like and/or inverted features for the fundamental vibrational modes as result of the main contribution from the surface component of the reflected light. In order to provide insights in the interpretation of theses spectral distortions, reflection spectra were compared with conventional transmission ones. The Kramers-Kronig (KK) algorithm, employed to correct for the surface reflection distortions, worked properly only for the derivative-like bands. Therefore, to pay attention to the use of this algorithm when interpreting the reflection spectra is recommended. The outcome of this investigation was exploited to discriminate among different oxalates on thirteen polychrome artworks analyzed in situ by reflection mid-infrared spectroscopy. The visualization of the νs(CO) modes (1400-1200 cm(-1)) and low wavenumber bands (below 900 cm(-1)) in the raw reflection profiles allowed Ca, Cu and Zn oxalates to be identified. Further information about the speciation of different hydration forms of calcium oxalates were obtained by using the KK transform. The work proves reflection mid-infrared spectroscopy to be a reliable and sensitive spectro-analytical method for identifying and mapping different metal-oxalate alteration compounds on the surface of artworks, thus providing conservation scientists with a non-invasive tool to obtain information on the state of conservation and causes of alteration of artworks.

  4. [Application of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict meat chemical compositions: a review].

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin-Li; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Deng, Jun-Ming; Zhang, Xi

    2013-11-01

    In contrast to conventional methods for the determination of meat chemical composition, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy enables rapid, simple, secure and simultaneous assessment of numerous meat properties. The present review focuses on the use of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict meat chemical compositions. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict crude protein, intramuscular fat, fatty acid, moisture, ash, myoglobin and collagen of beef, pork, chicken and lamb is reviewed. This paper discusses existing questions and reasons in the current research. According to the published results, although published results vary considerably, they suggest that near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy shows a great potential to replace the expensive and time-consuming chemical analysis of meat composition. In particular, under commercial conditions where simultaneous measurements of different chemical components are required, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy is expected to be the method of choice. The majority of studies selected feature-related wavelengths using principal components regression, developed the calibration model using partial least squares and modified partial least squares, and estimated the prediction accuracy by means of cross-validation using the same sample set previously used for the calibration. Meat fatty acid composition predicted by near-infrared spectroscopy and non-destructive prediction and visualization of chemical composition in meat using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging and multivariate regression are the hot studying field now. On the other hand, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy shows great difference for predicting different attributes of meat quality which are closely related to the selection of calibration sample set, preprocessing of near-infrared spectroscopy and modeling approach. Sample preparation also has an important effect on the reliability of NIR prediction; in particular

  5. Tree Canopy Characterization for EO-1 Reflective and Thermal Infrared Validation Studies: Rochester, New York

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Jerrell R., Jr.; Smith, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The tree canopy characterization presented herein provided ground and tree canopy data for different types of tree canopies in support of EO-1 reflective and thermal infrared validation studies. These characterization efforts during August and September of 2001 included stem and trunk location surveys, tree structure geometry measurements, meteorology, and leaf area index (LAI) measurements. Measurements were also collected on thermal and reflective spectral properties of leaves, tree bark, leaf litter, soil, and grass. The data presented in this report were used to generate synthetic reflective and thermal infrared scenes and images that were used for the EO-1 Validation Program. The data also were used to evaluate whether the EO-1 ALI reflective channels can be combined with the Landsat-7 ETM+ thermal infrared channel to estimate canopy temperature, and also test the effects of separating the thermal and reflective measurements in time resulting from satellite formation flying.

  6. Characterization and Application of a Grazing Angle Objective for Quantitative Infrared Reflection Microspectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.

    1995-01-01

    A grazing angle objective on an infrared microspectrometer is studied for quantitative spectroscopy by considering the angular dependence of the incident intensity within the objective's angular aperture. The assumption that there is no angular dependence is tested by comparing the experimental reflectance of Si and KBr surfaces with the reflectance calculated by integrating the Fresnel reflection coefficient over the angular aperture under this assumption. Good agreement was found, indicating that the specular reflectance of surfaces can straight-forwardly be quantitatively integrated over the angular aperture without considering non-uniform incident intensity. This quantitative approach is applied to the thickness determination of dipcoated Krytox on gold. The infrared optical constants of both materials are known, allowing the integration to be carried out. The thickness obtained is in fair agreement with the value determined by ellipsometry in the visible. Therefore, this paper illustrates a method for more quantitative use of a grazing angle objective for infrared reflectance microspectroscopy.

  7. The Effect of Incident Light Polarization on Vegetation Bidirectional Reflectance Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Thome, Kurt; Ranson, Kurtis J.; King, Michael D.; Butler, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The Laboratory-based Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) polarization study of vegetation is presented in this paper. The BRF was measured using a short-arc Xenon lamp/monochromator assembly producing an incoherent, tunable light source with a well-defined spectral bandpass at visible and near-infrared wavelengths of interest at 470 nm and 870 nm and coherent light source at 1.656 microns. All vegetation samples were measured using P and S linearly polarized incident light over a range of incident and scatter angles. By comparing these results, we quantitatively examine how the BRF of the samples depends on the polarization of the incident light. The differences are significant, depend strongly on the incident and scatter angles, and can be as high as 120% at 67 deg incident and 470nm. The global nature of Earth's processes requires consistent long-term calibration of all instruments involved in data retrieval. The BRF defines the reflection characteristics of Earth surface. It provides the reflectance of a target in a specific direction as a function of illumination and viewing geometry. The BRF is a function of wavelength and reflects the structural and optical properties of the surface. Various space and airborne radiometric and imaging remote sensing instruments are used in the remote sensing characterization of vegetation canopies and soils, oceans, or especially large pollution sources. The satellite data is validated through comparison with airborne, ground-based and laboratory-based data in an effort to fully understand the vegetation canopy reflectance, The Sun's light is assumed to be unpolarized at the top of the atmosphere; however it becomes polarized to some degree due to atmospheric effects by the time it reaches the vegetation canopy. Although there are numerous atmospheric correction models, laboratory data is needed for model verification and improvement.

  8. Infrared sensitive liquid crystal light valve with semiconductor substrate.

    PubMed

    Shcherbin, Konstantin; Gvozdovskyy, Igor; Evans, Dean R

    2016-02-10

    A liquid crystal light valve (LCLV) is an optically controlled spatial light modulator that allows recording of dynamic holograms. Almost all known LCLVs operate in the visible range of the spectrum. In the present work we demonstrate a LCLV operating in the infrared. The interaction of signal and pump waves is studied for different applied voltages, grating spacings, and intensities of the recording beams. A fourfold amplification of the weak signal beam is achieved. The amplitude of the refractive index modulation Δn=0.007 and nonlinear coupling constant n₂=-1  cm²/W are estimated from the experimental results. External phase modulation of one of the recording beams is used for a further transient increase of the signal beam gain.

  9. Spectroscopic direct detection of reflected light from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Lovis, C.

    2013-12-01

    At optical wavelengths, an exoplanet's signature is essentially reflected light from the host star - several orders of magnitude fainter. Since it is superimposed on the star spectrum its detection has been a difficult observational challenge. However, the development of a new generation of instruments like Echelle Spectrograph for Rocky Exoplanets and Stable Spectroscopic Observations (ESPRESSO) and next-generation telescopes like the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) put us in a privileged position to detect these planets' reflected light as we will have access to extremely high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. With this work, we propose an alternative approach for the direct detection of the reflected light of an exoplanet. We simulated observations with ESPRESSO at Very Large Telescope (VLT) and high-resolution spectrograph (HIRES) at E-ELT of several star+planet systems, encompassing 10 h of the most favourable orbital phases. To the simulated spectra we applied the cross-correlation function to operate in a much higher signal-to-noise ratio domain than when compared with the spectra. The use of the cross-correlation function permitted us to recover the simulated planet signals at a level above 3σnoise significance on several prototypical (e.g. Neptune-type planet with a 2 d orbit with the VLT at 4.4σnoise significance) and real planetary systems (e.g. 55 Cnc e with the E-ELT at 4.9σnoise significance). Even by using a more pessimistic approach to the noise level estimation, where systematics in the spectra increase the noise 2-3 times, the detection of the reflected light from large close-orbit planets is possible. We have also shown that this kind of study is currently within reach of current instruments and telescopes (e.g. 51 Peg b with the VLT at 5.2σnoise significance), although at the limit of their capabilities.

  10. Infrared reflectometry of skin: Analysis of backscattered light from different skin layers.

    PubMed

    Pleitez, Miguel A; Hertzberg, Otto; Bauer, Alexander; Lieblein, Tobias; Glasmacher, Mathias; Tholl, Hans; Mäntele, Werner

    2017-09-05

    We have recently reported infrared spectroscopy of human skin in vivo using quantum cascade laser excitation and photoacoustic or photothermal detection for non-invasive glucose measurement . Here, we analyze the IR light diffusely reflected from skin layers for spectral contributions of glucose. Excitation of human skin by an external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser in the spectral region from 1000 to 1245cm(-1), where glucose exhibits a fingerprint absorption, yields reflectance spectra with some contributions from glucose molecules. A simple three-layer model of skin was used to calculate the scattering intensities from the surface and from shallow and deeper layers using the Boltzmann radiation transfer equation. Backscattering of light at wavelengths around 10μm from the living skin occurs mostly from the Stratum corneum top layers and the shallow layers of the living epidermis. The analysis of the polarization of the backscattered light confirms this calculation. Polarization is essentially unchanged; only a very small fraction (<3%) is depolarized at 90° with respect to the laser polarization set at 0°. Based on these findings, we propose that the predominant part of the backscattered light is due to specular reflectance and to scattering from layers close to the surface. Diffusely reflected light from deeper layers undergoing one or more scattering processes would appear with significantly altered polarization. We thus conclude that a non-invasive glucose measurement based on backscattering of IR light from skin would have the drawback that only shallow layers containing some glucose at concentrations only weakly related to blood glucose are monitored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Infrared reflectometry of skin: Analysis of backscattered light from different skin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleitez, Miguel A.; Hertzberg, Otto; Bauer, Alexander; Lieblein, Tobias; Glasmacher, Mathias; Tholl, Hans; Mäntele, Werner

    2017-09-01

    We have recently reported infrared spectroscopy of human skin in vivo using quantum cascade laser excitation and photoacoustic or photothermal detection for non-invasive glucose measurement . Here, we analyze the IR light diffusely reflected from skin layers for spectral contributions of glucose. Excitation of human skin by an external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser in the spectral region from 1000 to 1245 cm- 1, where glucose exhibits a fingerprint absorption, yields reflectance spectra with some contributions from glucose molecules. A simple three-layer model of skin was used to calculate the scattering intensities from the surface and from shallow and deeper layers using the Boltzmann radiation transfer equation. Backscattering of light at wavelengths around 10 μm from the living skin occurs mostly from the Stratum corneum top layers and the shallow layers of the living epidermis. The analysis of the polarization of the backscattered light confirms this calculation. Polarization is essentially unchanged; only a very small fraction (< 3%) is depolarized at 90° with respect to the laser polarization set at 0°. Based on these findings, we propose that the predominant part of the backscattered light is due to specular reflectance and to scattering from layers close to the surface. Diffusely reflected light from deeper layers undergoing one or more scattering processes would appear with significantly altered polarization. We thus conclude that a non-invasive glucose measurement based on backscattering of IR light from skin would have the drawback that only shallow layers containing some glucose at concentrations only weakly related to blood glucose are monitored.

  12. Optimal light harvesting structures at optical and infrared frequencies.

    PubMed

    Villate-Guío, F; López-Tejeira, F; García-Vidal, F J; Martín-Moreno, L; de León-Pérez, F

    2012-11-05

    One-dimensional light harvesting structures with a realistic geometry nano-patterned on an opaque metallic film are optimized to render high transmission efficiencies at optical and infrared frequencies. Simple design rules are developed for the particular case of a slit-groove array with a given number of grooves that are symmetrically distributed with respect to a central slit. These rules take advantage of the hybridization of Fabry-Perot modes in the slit and surface modes of the corrugated metal surface. Same design rules apply for optical and infrared frequencies. The parameter space of the groove array is also examined with a conjugate gradient optimization algorithm that used as a seed the geometries optimized following physical intuition. Both uniform and nonuniform groove arrays are considered. The largest transmission enhancement, with respect to a uniform array, is obtained for a chirped groove profile. Such relative enhancement is a function of the wavelength. It decreases from 39 % in the optical part of the spectrum to 15 % at the long wavelength infrared.

  13. Super high power mid-infrared femtosecond light bullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotopoulos, Paris; Whalen, Patrick; Kolesik, Miroslav; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2015-08-01

    Mid-infrared ultrashort high energy laser sources are opening up new opportunities in science, including keV-class high harmonic generation and monoenergetic MeV-class proton acceleration. As new higher energy sources become available, potential applications for atmospheric propagation can dramatically grow to include stand-off detection, laser communications, shock-driven remote terahertz enhancement and extended long-lived thermal waveguides to transport high power microwave and radiofrequency waves. We reveal a new paradigm for long-range, low-loss, ultrahigh power ultrashort pulse propagation at mid-infrared wavelengths in the atmosphere. Before the onset of critical self-focusing, energy in the fundamental wave continually leaks into shock-driven spectrally broadened higher harmonics. A persistent near-invariant solitonic leading edge on the multi-terawatt pulse waveform transports most of the power over hundred-metre-long distances. Such light bullets are resistant to uncontrolled multiple filamentation and are expected to spark extensive research in optics, where the use of mid-infrared lasers is currently much under-utilized.

  14. Development of bacterial colony phenotyping instrument using reflected scatter light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Iyll-Joon

    Bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology (BARDOT) involves in differentiating elastic scattering pattern of bacterial colony. This elastic light scatter technology has shown promising label-free classification rate. However, there is limited success in certain circumstances where either a growth media or a colony has higher opacity. This situation is due to the physical principles of the current BARDOT which mainly relies on optical patterns generated by transmitted signals. Incoming light is obstructed and cannot be transmitted through the dense bacterial colonies, such as Lactobacillus, Yeast, mold and soil bacteria. Moreover, a blood agar, widely used in clinical field, is an example of an opaque media that does not allow light to be transmitted through. Therefore, in this research, a newly designed reflection type scatterometer is presented. The reflection type scatterometer measures the elastic scattering pattern generated by reflected signal. A theoretical model to study the optical pattern characteristic with respect to bacterial colony morphology is presented. Both theoretical and experiment results show good agreement that the size of backward scattering pattern has positive correlation to colony aspect ratio, a colony elevation to diameter ratio. Four pathogenic bacteria on blood agar, Escherichia coli K12, Listeria innocua, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus, are tested and measured with proposed instrument. The measured patterns are analyzed with a classification software, and high classification rate can be achieved.

  15. Infrared reflectance spectra of Hyperion, Titania, and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Lebofsky, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    Medium-resolution infrared (1-2.5 microns; Delta-lambda/lambda = 0.05) photometry of Triton, Titania, and Hyperion and medium-resolution (1.5-2.4 microns; Delta-lambda/lambda not greater than 0.01) spectroscopy of Triton are presented. Hyperion and Titania have spectra roughly similar to the laboratory spectrum of water frost, while the spectrum of Triton is inconsistent with the spectra of frosts likely to be major surface constituents.

  16. Near-Infrared Reflectance of Snow-Covered Substrates,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    I - NEAR-INFRA RED RFETANCE OF SNOW-COVERED SUBSTRATES.IU) INoV SL H B RIEN, . KOH UNCLASSIF IED CRREL-8-21N L ~~LEVE REPORT 81-21 Near-infrared...that more than half of the radiant The condition of the snow cover at the time energy transmitted by the so-called 1.3-,um filter may explain the shape

  17. Magnetically tunable selective reflection of light by heliconical cholesterics.

    PubMed

    Salili, S M; Xiang, J; Wang, H; Li, Q; Paterson, D A; Storey, J M D; Imrie, C T; Lavrentovich, O D; Sprunt, S N; Gleeson, J T; Jákli, A

    2016-10-01

    We present studies of chiral nematic liquid crystals composed of flexible dimer molecules subject to large dc magnetic fields between 0 and 31 T. We observe that these fields lead to selective reflection of light depending on temperature and magnetic field. The band of reflected wavelengths can be tuned from ultraviolet to beyond the IR-C band. A similar effect induced by electric fields has been presented previously, and was explained by a field-induced oblique-heliconical director deformation in accordance with early theoretical predictions. The use of magnetic field here instead of electric field allows precise measurements of some material constants and holds promise for wireless tuning of selective reflection.

  18. Magnetically tunable selective reflection of light by heliconical cholesterics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salili, S. M.; Xiang, J.; Wang, H.; Li, Q.; Paterson, D. A.; Storey, J. M. D.; Imrie, C. T.; Lavrentovich, O. D.; Sprunt, S. N.; Gleeson, J. T.; Jákli, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present studies of chiral nematic liquid crystals composed of flexible dimer molecules subject to large dc magnetic fields between 0 and 31 T. We observe that these fields lead to selective reflection of light depending on temperature and magnetic field. The band of reflected wavelengths can be tuned from ultraviolet to beyond the IR-C band. A similar effect induced by electric fields has been presented previously, and was explained by a field-induced oblique-heliconical director deformation in accordance with early theoretical predictions. The use of magnetic field here instead of electric field allows precise measurements of some material constants and holds promise for wireless tuning of selective reflection.

  19. Broadband mid-infrared superlattice light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, R. J.; Provence, S. R.; Norton, D. T.; Boggess, T. F.; Prineas, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice light-emitting diodes were fabricated to form a device that provides emission over the entire 3-5 μm mid-infrared transmission window. Variable bandgap emission regions were coupled together using tunnel junctions to emit at peak wavelengths of 3.3 μm, 3.5 μm, 3.7 μm, 3.9 μm, 4.1 μm, 4.4 μm, 4.7 μm, and 5.0 μm. Cascading the structure recycles the electrons in each emission region to emit several wavelengths simultaneously. At high current densities, the light-emitting diode spectra broadened into a continuous, broadband spectrum that covered the entire mid-infrared band. When cooled to 77 K, radiances of over 1 W/cm2 sr were achieved, demonstrating apparent temperatures above 1000 K over the 3-5 μm band. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices are capable of emitting from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the device design can be expanded to include longer emission wavelengths.

  20. Near-infrared broad-band cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy using a superluminescent light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Denzer, W; Hamilton, M L; Hancock, G; Islam, M; Langley, C E; Peverall, R; Ritchie, G A D

    2009-11-01

    A fibre coupled near-infrared superluminescent light emitting diode that emits approximately 10 mW of radiation between 1.62 and 1.7 microm is employed in combination with a broad-band cavity enhanced spectrometer consisting of a linear optical cavity with mirrors of reflectivity approximately 99.98% and either a dispersive near-infrared spectrometer or a Fourier transform interferometer. Results are presented on the absorption of 1,3-butadiene, and sensitivities are achieved of 6.1 x 10(-8) cm(-1) using the dispersive spectrometer in combination with phase-sensitive detection, and 1.5 x 10(-8) cm(-1) using the Fourier transform interferometer (expressed as a minimum detectable absorption coefficient) over several minutes of acquisition time.

  1. The Infrared Reflection Nebula Around the Protostellar System in S140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, D.; Bregman, J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the protostellar system in S140 at 2.2, 3.1 and 3.45 microns using a 128x128 InSb array at the Lick Observatory 3m telescope. Besides the protostellar sources, the data reveal a bright infrared reflection nebula. We have developed a simple model of this region and derived the physical conditions. IRSI is surrounded by a dense dusty disk viewed almost edge-on. Photons leaking out through the poles illuminate almost directly north and south the inner edge of a surrounding shell of molecular gas, Analysis of the observed colors and intensities of the NIR light, using Mie scattering theory, reveal that the dust grains in the molecular cloud are somewhat larger than in the general diffuse interstellar medium. Moreover, the incident light has a "cool" color temperature, approximately equals 800K, and likely originates from a dust photosphere close to the protostar. Finally, we find little H2O ice associated with the dusty disk around IRSI. Most of the 3.1 micron ice extinction arises instead from cool intervening molecular cloud material. We have compared our infrared dust observations with millimeter and radio observations of molecular gas associated with this region. The large scale structure observable in the molecular gas is indicative of the interaction between the protostellar wind and the surrounding molecular cloud rather than the geometry of the protostellar disk. We conclude that S140 is a young blister formed by this outflow on the side of a molecular cloud and viewed edge-on.

  2. The Infrared Reflection Nebula Around the Protostellar System in S140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, D.; Bregman, J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the protostellar system in S140 at 2.2, 3.1 and 3.45 microns using a 128x128 InSb array at the Lick Observatory 3m telescope. Besides the protostellar sources, the data reveal a bright infrared reflection nebula. We have developed a simple model of this region and derived the physical conditions. IRSI is surrounded by a dense dusty disk viewed almost edge-on. Photons leaking out through the poles illuminate almost directly north and south the inner edge of a surrounding shell of molecular gas, Analysis of the observed colors and intensities of the NIR light, using Mie scattering theory, reveal that the dust grains in the molecular cloud are somewhat larger than in the general diffuse interstellar medium. Moreover, the incident light has a "cool" color temperature, approximately equals 800K, and likely originates from a dust photosphere close to the protostar. Finally, we find little H2O ice associated with the dusty disk around IRSI. Most of the 3.1 micron ice extinction arises instead from cool intervening molecular cloud material. We have compared our infrared dust observations with millimeter and radio observations of molecular gas associated with this region. The large scale structure observable in the molecular gas is indicative of the interaction between the protostellar wind and the surrounding molecular cloud rather than the geometry of the protostellar disk. We conclude that S140 is a young blister formed by this outflow on the side of a molecular cloud and viewed edge-on.

  3. Optical diffuse reflectance accessory for measurements of skin tissue by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, R.; Heise, H. M.

    1995-02-01

    An optimized accessory for measuring the diffuse reflectance spectra of human skin tissue in the near-infrared spectral range is presented. The device includes an on-axis ellipsoidal collecting mirror with efficient illumination optics for small sampling areas of bulky body specimens. The optical design is supported by the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of the reflectance characteristics of skin tissue. Because the results evolved from efforts to measure blood glucose noninvasively, the main emphasis is placed on the long-wavelength near-infrared range where sufficient penetration depth for radiation into tissue is still available. The accessory is applied for in vivo diffuse reflectance measurements.

  4. Optical diffuse reflectance accessory for measurements of skin tissue by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marbach, R; Heise, H M

    1995-02-01

    An optimized accessory for measuring the diffuse reflectance spectra of human skin tissue in the near-infrared spectral range is presented. The device includes an on-axis ellipsoidal collecting mirror with efficient illumination optics for small sampling areas of bulky body specimens. The optical design is supported by the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of the reflectance characteristics of skin tissue. Because the results evolved from efforts to measure blood glucose noninvasively, the main emphasis is placed on the long-wavelength near-infrared range where sufficient penetration depth for radiation into tissue is still available. The accessory is applied for in vivo diffuse reflectance measurements.

  5. Light shift from ultraviolet to near infrared light: Cerenkov luminescence with gold nanocluster - near infrared (AuNc-NIR) conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Su Woong; Mun, Hyoyoung; Oh, Gyungseok; Ryu, Youngjae; Kim, Min-Gon; Chung, Euiheon

    2015-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) is generated when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in dielectric media. Recently CL imaging becomes an emerging technique with the use of radioisotopes. However, due to relatively weak blue light production and massive tissue attenuation, CL has not been applied widely. Therefore, we attempted to shift the CL emission to more near infrared (NIR) spectrum for better tissue penetration by using Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET). Gold nanoclusters were conjugated with NIR dye molecules (AuNc-IR820 and AuNc-ICG) to be activated with ultraviolet light. We found optimal conjugate concentrations of AuNc-NIR conjugates by spectroscopy system to generate maximal photon emission. When exposed by ultraviolet light, the emission of NIR light from the conjugates were verified. In quantitative analysis, AuNc-NIR conjugates emit brighter light signal than pure AuNc. This result implies that NIR fluorescent dyes (both IR820 and ICG) can be excited by the emission from AuNc. Following the above baseline experiment, we mixed F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) radioisotope to the AuNc- NIR conjugates, to confirm NIR emission induced from Cerenkov radiation. Long pass filter was used to block Cerenkov luminescence and to collect the emission from AuNc-NIR conjugates. Instead of one long exposure imaging with CCD, we used multiple frame scheme to eliminate gamma radiation strike in each frame prior to combination. In summary, we obtained NIR emission light from AuNc-NIR conjugated dyes that is induced from CL. We plan to perform in vivo small animal imaging with these conjugates to assess better tissue penetration.

  6. Simulating Scintillator Light Collection Using Measured Optical Reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William

    2010-01-28

    To accurately predict the light collection from a scintillating crystal through Monte Carlo simulations, it is crucial to know the angular distribution from the surface reflectance. Current Monte Carlo codes allow the user to set the optical reflectance to a linear combination of backscatter spike, specular spike, specular lobe, and Lambertian reflections. However, not all light distributions can be expressed in this way. In addition, the user seldom has the detailed knowledge about the surfaces that is required for accurate modeling. We have previously measured the angular distributions within BGO crystals and now incorporate these data as look-up-tables (LUTs) into modified Geant4 and GATE Monte Carlo codes. The modified codes allow the user to specify the surface treatment (ground, etched, or polished), the attached reflector (Lumirror(R), Teflon(R), ESR film, Tyvek(R), or TiO paint), and the bonding type (air-coupled or glued). Each LUT consists of measured angular distributions with 4o by 5o resolution in theta and phi, respectively, for incidence angles from 0? to 90? degrees, in 1o-steps. We compared the new codes to the original codes by running simulations with a 3 x 10 x 30 mm3 BGO crystal coupled to a PMT. The simulations were then compared to measurements. Light output was measured by counting the photons detected by the PMT with the 3 x 10, 3 x 30, or 10 x 30 mm2 side coupled to the PMT, respectively. Our new code shows better agreement with the measured data than the current Geant4 code. The new code can also simulate reflector materials that are not pure specular or Lambertian reflectors, as was previously required. Our code is also more user friendly, as no detailed knowledge about the surfaces or light distributions is required from the user.

  7. Effect of linear polarized near-infrared light irradiation and light exercise on muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shinichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Uchida, Yuu; Yamaji, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of active warm-up by local muscle light exercise and passive warm-up by polarized light irradiation on skin and muscle temperatures and forearm muscle performance (muscle strength, power, endurance, and controlled force-exertion). Ten healthy males performed various grip tests before and after active (local muscle light exercise) and passive (linear polarized near-infrared light irradiation) warm-ups. An active warm-up involved intermittent gripping exercise (contraction: 1 second and relaxation: 1 second) for 10 minutes using a sponge. A passive warm-up consisted of polarized light irradiation to the forearm (superficial digital flexor) for 10 minutes (irradiation: 5 seconds and rest: 1 second). Skin and muscle temperatures were measured during both warm-ups. Skin and muscle temperatures increased significantly after 5 minutes of local muscle light exercise and after 10 minutes of polarized light irradiation. Temperatures were significantly higher after 6 minutes of local muscle light exercise than after 6 minutes of polarized light irradiation. There were no significant differences of muscle strength, power, and controlled force-exertion before and after either warm-up. Average force outputs in all conditions significantly decreased with exertion time, and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds they were higher in both warm-up conditions than in the non-warm-up condition. In conclusion, both warm-ups may contribute to improve muscle endurance performance in the decreasing force phase.

  8. Thermal Emission and Reflected Light Spectra of Super Earths with Flat Transmission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Line, Michael; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole; Cahoy, Kerri

    2015-12-01

    Planets larger than Earth and smaller than Neptune are some of the most numerous in the galaxy, but observational efforts to understand this population have proved challenging because optically thick clouds or hazes at high altitudes obscure molecular features. We present models of super Earths that include thick clouds and hazes and predict their transmission, thermal emission, and reflected light spectra. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. Cloudy thermal emission spectra have muted features more like blackbodies, and hazy thermal emission spectra have emission features caused by an inversion layer at altitudes where the haze forms. Close analysis of reflected light from warm (˜400-800 K) planets can distinguish cloudy spectra, which have moderate albedos (0.05-0.20), from hazy models, which are very dark (0.0-0.03). Reflected light spectra of cold planets (˜200 K) accessible to a space-based visible light coronagraph will have high albedos and large molecular features that will allow them to be more easily characterized than the warmer transiting planets. We suggest a number of complementary observations to characterize this population of planets, including transmission spectra of hot (≳ 1000 K) targets, thermal emission spectra of warm targets using the James Webb Space Telescope, high spectral resolution (R ˜ 105) observations of cloudy targets, and reflected light spectral observations of directly imaged cold targets. Despite the dearth of features observed in super Earth transmission spectra to date, different observations will provide rich diagnostics of their atmospheres.

  9. The spatial distribution of infrared radiation from visible reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luan, Ling; Werner, Michael W.; Dwek, Eli; Sellgren, Kris

    1989-01-01

    The emission at IRAS 12 and 25 micron bands of reflection nebulae is far in excess of that expected from the longer wavelength equilibrium thermal emission. The excess emission in the IRAS 12 micron band is a general phenomenon, seen in various components of interstellar medium such as IR cirrus clouds, H II regions, atomic and molecular clouds, and also normal spiral galaxies. This excess emission has been attributed to UV excited fluorescence in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules or to the effect of temperature fluctuations in very small grains. Results are presented of studies of IRAS data on reflection nebulae selected from the van den Bergh reflection nebulae sample. Detailed scans of flux ratio and color temperature across the nebulae were obtained in order to study the spatial distribution of IR emission. A model was used to predict the spatial distribution of IR emission from dust grains illuminated by a B type star. The model was also used to explore the excitation of the IRAS 12 micron band emission as a function of stellar temperature. The model predictions are in good agreement with the analysis of reflection nebulae, illuminated by stars with stellar temperature ranging from 21,000 down to 3,000 K.

  10. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.

    1999-08-17

    A system is disclosed for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focused beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focused beams creates a ``light cage`` and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained. 10 figs.

  11. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    A system for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focussed beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focussed beams creates a "light cage" and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained.

  12. Prediction of tablets disintegration times using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a nondestructive method.

    PubMed

    Donoso, M; Ghaly, Evone S

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this study are to user near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy to measure the disintegration time of a series of tablets compacted at different compressional forces, calibrate NIR data vs. laboratory equipment data, develop a model equation, validate the model, and test the model's predictive ability. Seven theophylline tablet formulations of the same composition but with different disintegration time values (0.224, 1.141, 2.797, 5.492, 9.397, 16.8, and 30.092 min) were prepared along with five placebo tablet formulations with different disintegration times. Laboratory disintegration time was compared to near-infrared diffuse reflectance data. Linear regression, quadratic, cubic, and partial least square techniques were used to determine the relationship between disintegration time and near-infrared spectra. The results demonstrated that an increase in disintegration time produced an increase in near-infrared absorbance. Series of model equations, which depended on the mathematical technique used for regression, were developed from the calibration of disintegration time using laboratory equipment vs. the near-infrared diffuse reflectance for each formulation. The results of NIR disintegration time were similar to laboratory tests. The near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method is an alternative nondestructive method for measurement of disintegration time of tablets.

  13. Detecting Phycocynanin-Pigmented Microbes in Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    A recently invented method of measuring concentrations of phycocynanin-pigmented algae and bacteria in water is based on measurement of the spectrum of reflected sunlight. When present in sufficiently high concentrations, phycocynanin-pigmented microorganisms can be hazardous to the health of humans who use, and of animals that depend on, an affected body of water. The present method is intended to satisfy a need for a rapid, convenient means of detecting hazardous concentrations of phycocynanin-pigmented microorganisms. Rapid detection will speed up the issuance of public health warnings and performance of corrective actions. The method involves the measurement of light reflected from a body of water in at least two, but preferably five wavelength bands. In one version of the method, the five wavelength bands are bands 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7 of the Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral imaging instrument aboard the Landsat-7 satellite (see table). In principle, other wavelength bands indicative of phycocynanin could be used alternatively or in addition to these five. Moreover, although the method was originally intended specifically for processing Landsat- 7 TM data, it is equally applicable to processing of data from other satellite-borne instruments or from airborne, hand-held, buoy-mounted, tower-mounted, or otherwise mounted instruments that measure radiances of light reflected from water in the wavelength bands of interest.

  14. Measurement of leaf relative water content by infrared reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Rock, Barrett N.; Nobel, Park S.

    1987-01-01

    From basic considerations and Beer's law, a leaf water content index incorporating reflectances of wavelengths from 0.76 to 0.90 microns and from 1.55 to 1.75 microns was developed that relates leaf reflectance to leaf relative water content. For the leaf succulent, Agave deserti, the leaf water content index was not significantly different from the relative water content for either individual leaves or an entire plant. Also, the relative water contents of intact plants of Encelia farinosa and Hilaria rigida in the field were estimated by the leaf water content index; variations in the proportion of living to dead leaf area could cause large errors in the estimate of relative water content. Thus, the leaf water content index may be able to estimate average relative water content of canopies when TM4 and TM5 are measured at a known relative water content and fraction of dead leaf material.

  15. Anomalous Reflectivity Losses of Coated Mirrors Used in the Infrared,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Fig 1 and Fig 2. Experi- mental observations of anomalous reflectivity losses are discussed in the next 1 paragraph. From Table 1 and the experimental... observations it can be seen that the losses occur for only one direction of polarisation Rp, and are not found at normal incidence. Also that the...protected aluminium (measured for us by SIRA institute (3 )) is illustrated in Fig 2 for comparison with the spectra calculated for Al + SiO and Al + SiO 2

  16. Exoplanet Reflections: the light from 51 Peg b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Santos, N.; Figueira, P.; Melo, C.

    2015-10-01

    The direct detection of reflected light from an exoplanet is, even in the most favourable cases, a herculean task, close to the detection limit of current observing facilities. To surpass this problem, we made used of a technique (Martins et al. 2013, MNRAS, 436, 1215) that uses the power of the Cross Correlation Function to recover the minute reflected signal from 51 Pegasi b with a 3-σ+ significance. This allowed us to conclude that this prototypical hot-Jupiter is most likely a highly inflated planet with a high albedo. These results were presented in the OHP2015: Twenty years of giant exoplanets conference and published in Martins et al. 2015, A&A, 576, A134.

  17. Exact simulation of polarized light reflectance by particle deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezan Pour, B.; Mackowski, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    The use of polarimetric light reflection measurements as a means of identifying the physical and chemical characteristics of particulate materials obviously relies on an accurate model of predicting the effects of particle size, shape, concentration, and refractive index on polarized reflection. The research examines two methods for prediction of reflection from plane parallel layers of wavelength—sized particles. The first method is based on an exact superposition solution to Maxwell's time harmonic wave equations for a deposit of spherical particles that are exposed to a plane incident wave. We use a FORTRAN-90 implementation of this solution (the Multiple Sphere T Matrix (MSTM) code), coupled with parallel computational platforms, to directly simulate the reflection from particle layers. The second method examined is based upon the vector radiative transport equation (RTE). Mie theory is used in our RTE model to predict the extinction coefficient, albedo, and scattering phase function of the particles, and the solution of the RTE is obtained from adding—doubling method applied to a plane—parallel configuration. Our results show that the MSTM and RTE predictions of the Mueller matrix elements converge when particle volume fraction in the particle layer decreases below around five percent. At higher volume fractions the RTE can yield results that, depending on the particle size and refractive index, significantly depart from the exact predictions. The particle regimes which lead to dependent scattering effects, and the application of methods to correct the vector RTE for particle interaction, will be discussed.

  18. Non-invasive neuroimaging using near-infrared light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, Gary; Boas, David A.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews diffuse optical brain imaging, a technique that employs near-infrared light to non-invasively probe the brain for changes in parameters relating to brain function. We describe the general methodology, including types of measurements and instrumentation (including the tradeoffs inherent in the various instrument components), and the basic theory required to interpret the recorded data. A brief review of diffuse optical applications is included, with an emphasis on research that has been done with psychiatric populations. Finally, we discuss some practical issues and limitations that are relevant when conducting diffuse optical experiments. We find that, while diffuse optics can provide substantial advantages to the psychiatric researcher relative to the alternative brain imaging methods, the method remains substantially underutilized in this field.

  19. Non-invasive neuroimaging using near-infrared light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, Gary; Boas, David A.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews diffuse optical brain imaging, a technique that employs near-infrared light to non-invasively probe the brain for changes in parameters relating to brain function. We describe the general methodology, including types of measurements and instrumentation (including the tradeoffs inherent in the various instrument components), and the basic theory required to interpret the recorded data. A brief review of diffuse optical applications is included, with an emphasis on research that has been done with psychiatric populations. Finally, we discuss some practical issues and limitations that are relevant when conducting diffuse optical experiments. We find that, while diffuse optics can provide substantial advantages to the psychiatric researcher relative to the alternative brain imaging methods, the method remains substantially underutilized in this field.

  20. Automatic spreader-container alignment system using infrared structured lights.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Yibo; Lv, Jimin; Zhang, Maojun

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a computer-vision system to assist reach stackers to automatically align the spreader with the target container. By analyzing infrared lines on the top of the container, the proposed system is able to calculate the relative position between the spreader and the container. The invisible structured lights are equipped in this system to enable all-weather operation, which can avoid environmental factors such as shadows and differences in climate. Additionally, the lateral inclination of the spreader is taken into consideration to offer a more accurate alignment than other competing systems. Estimation errors are reduced through approaches including power series and linear regression. The accuracy can be controlled within 2 cm or 2 deg, which meets the requirements of reach stackers' operation.

  1. Dry film preparation from whole blood, plasma and serum for quantitative infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, A.; Heise, H. M.

    1998-06-01

    The potential of infrared spectroscopy in the analysis of biotic fluids for the determination of important clinical parameters such as glucose and other blood substrates has been investigated. For this purpose dried films from whole blood, blood plasma and serum were prepared on diffusely reflecting gold-coated substrates from sandpaper of different grades. This enabled measurements in the mid and near infrared spectral ranges by using special diffuse reflectance accessories. The removal of water leads to a considerable enrichment of the fluid constituents. Due to the reduced sample complexity a considerable gain in spectral information is obtained. This is especially valid for measurements in the near infrared where the problems associated with variability in the spectra of aqueous samples due to several parameters, i.e., temperature, electrolyte content etc., are well known. Additionally, mid infrared studies were carried out into the stability of dried samples.

  2. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-Transform spectra of selected organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, S.H.; Caton, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    Diffuse reflectance infrared spectra of a variety of different organic compounds have been determined. Profiles of the spectra along with the location and relative intensity of the principal bands have been included for each compound studied. In addition both diffuse reflectance and transmittance infrared spectra were obtained for the same samples, and the spectral results were compared. Although some minor variations are observed between a diffuse reflectance spectrum and the corresponding transmittance spectrum, the diffuse reflectance is quite useful and may be a superior technique for the study of many samples because it possesses an inherently higher signal-to-noise response, requires less sample preparation and allows a very wide range of samples (solids, liquids of low volatility, neat sample, or sample diluted in a reflecting medium) to be studied under very similar conditions.

  3. POLARIZED LIGHT REFLECTED AND TRANSMITTED BY THICK RAYLEIGH SCATTERING ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Natraj, Vijay; Hovenier, J. W.

    2012-03-20

    Accurate values for the intensity and polarization of light reflected and transmitted by optically thick Rayleigh scattering atmospheres with a Lambert surface underneath are presented. A recently reported new method for solving integral equations describing Chandrasekhar's X- and Y-functions is used. The results have been validated using various tests and techniques, including the doubling-adding method, and are accurate to within one unit in the eighth decimal place. Tables are stored electronically and expected to be useful as benchmark results for the (exo)planetary science and astrophysics communities. Asymptotic expressions to obtain Stokes parameters for a thick layer from those of a semi-infinite atmosphere are also provided.

  4. Reflectives: Phosphors and lasers - shedding light on rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    The first powder electroluminescent phosphor was introduced in 1936. Today, phosphors, particularly those made of high-purity rare earths, have found their way into a variety of products: industrial, commercial, and consumer, alike. The fluorescent lamp industry which remains the leading market for the use of high-purity rare earths, lit the way for the future of rare earths in the optical, x-ray, and display screen applications. Light combined with rare earth materials is also a successful recipe for reflectivity needed in filtering applications such as optics, lasers, and conductors. This article discusses the applications and markets for phosphors and rare earths.

  5. Reflection of light from a uniformly moving mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar

    2004-10-01

    We derive a formula for the law of reflection of a plane-polarized light beam from an inclined flat mirror in uniform rectilinear motion by applying the Huygens-Fresnel principle. We then use this formula and the postulates of special relativity to show that the moving mirror is contracted along the direction of its motion by the usual Lorentz factor. The result emphasizes the reality of Lorentz contraction by showing that the contraction is a direct consequence of the first and second postulates of special relativity, and is not a consequence of the relativistic measurement of the length.

  6. Measurement of spin Hall effect of reflected light.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Li, Yan; He, Huanyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2009-09-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent nanometer-sized displacements of the spin Hall effect of the reflected light from a planar air-glass interface. In the case of the vertical polarization, the displacement is found to increase with the incident angle and subsequently decrease after approximately 48 deg, while in the case of the horizontal polarization, it changes rapidly near the Brewster angle. For a fixed incident angle of 30 deg, the displacement decreases to zero as the polarization angle approaches approximately 39 deg from 0 deg (the horizontal polarization) and then increases in the opposite direction until 90 deg (the vertical polarization).

  7. Effect of skin and fat layers on the spatial sensitivity profile of continuous wave diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye; Shear, Michael A.; Soyemi, Olusola O.; Soller, Babs R.

    2005-11-01

    In order to measure muscle physiological parameters such as pH and oxygen partial pressure (PO2) by continuous wave (CW) diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), light must penetrate through skin and subcutaneous fat layers overlying muscle. In this study, the effect of skin and subcutaneous fat layer and on the spatial sensitivity profile of CW diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectra is investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation model uses a semi-infinite medium consisting of skin, fat and muscle. The optical properties of each layer are taken from the reported optical data at 750 nm. The skin color is either Caucasian or Negroid and the fat thickness is varied from 0 ~ 20 mm. The spatial sensitivity profile, penetration depth, and sensitivity ratio as functions of optical fiber source-detector separation (SD, 2.5 mm, 5.0 mm, 10.0 mm, 20.0 mm, 30.0 mm and 40.0 mm), skin color and fat thicknesses are predicted by the simulations. It is shown that skin color only slightly influenced the spatial sensitivity profile, while the presence of the fat layer greatly decreased the detector sensitivity. It is also shown that probes with longer SD separations can detect light from deeper inside the medium. The simulation results are used to design a fiber optic probe which ensures that enough light is propagated inside the muscle in NIRS measurement on a leg with a fat layer of normal thickness.

  8. Reflective liquid crystal light valve with hybrid field effect mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Donald D. (Inventor); Grinberg, Jan (Inventor); Jacobson, Alexander D. (Inventor); Myer, Gary D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    There is disclosed a high performance reflective mode liquid crystal light valve suitable for general image processing and projection and particularly suited for application to real-time coherent optical data processing. A preferred example of the device uses a CdS photoconductor, a CdTe light absorbing layer, a dielectric mirror, and a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes deposited on optical quality glass flats. The non-coherent light image is directed onto the photoconductor; this reduces the impedance of the photoconductor, thereby switching the AC voltage that is impressed across the electrodes onto the liquid crystal to activate the device. The liquid crystal is operated in a hybrid field effect mode. It utilizes the twisted nematic effect to create a dark off-state (voltage off the liquid crystal) and the optical birefringence effect to create the bright on-state. The liquid crystal thus modulates the polarization of the coherent read-out or projection light responsively to the non-coherent image. An analyzer is used to create an intensity modulated output beam.

  9. Particle Shape Characterization of Lunar Regolith using Reflected Light Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, C. B.; Garcia, G. C.; Rickman, D.

    2014-12-01

    Automated identification of particles in lunar thin sections is necessary for practical measurement of particle shape, void characterization, and quantitative characterization of sediment fabric. This may be done using image analysis, but several aspects of the lunar regolith make such automations difficult. For example, many of the particles are shattered; others are aggregates of smaller particles. Sieve sizes of the particles span 5 orders of magnitude. The physical thickness of a thin section, at a nominal 30 microns, is large compared to the size of many of the particles. Image acquisition modes, such as SEM and reflected light, while superior to transmitted light, still have significant ambiguity as to the volume being sampled. It is also desirable to have a technique that is inexpensive, not resource intensive, and analytically robust. To this end, we have developed an image acquisition and processing protocol that identifies and delineates resolvable particles on the front surface of a lunar thin section using a petrographic microscope in reflected light. For a polished thin section, a grid is defined covering the entire thin section. The grid defines discrete images taken with 20% overlap, minimizing the number of particles that intersect image boundaries. In reflected light mode, two images are acquired at each grid location, with a closed aperture diaphragm. One image, A, is focused precisely on the front surface of the thin section. The second image, B, is made after the stage is brought toward the objective lens just slightly. A bright fringe line, analogous to a Becke line, appears inside all transparent particles at the front surface of the section in the second image. The added light in the bright line corresponds to a deficit around the particles. Particle identification is done using ImageJ and uses multiple steps. A hybrid 5x5 median filter is used to make images Af and Bf. This primarily removes very small particles just below the front surface

  10. Determination of styrene-butadiene rubber composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. S.; Kiselev, S. A.; Kiseleva, E. A.; Budeeva, A. V.; Mashukov, V. I.

    2013-03-01

    A rapid method for determining the composition of styrene-butadiene rubber using attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was proposed. PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and infrared transmission spectroscopy were used as absolute techniques for determining the compositions of calibration samples. It was shown that the method was applicable to a wide range of styrene-butadiene rubbers, did not require additional sample preparation, and was easily reproducible.

  11. Near-infrared reflectance analysis by Gauss-Jordan linear algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Honigs, D.E.; Freelin, J.M.; Hieftje, G.M.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1983-11-01

    Near-infrared reflectance analysis is an analytical technique that uses the near-infrared diffuse reflectance of a sample at several discrete wavelengths to predict the concentration of one or more of the chemical species in that sample. However, because near-infrared bands from solid samples are both abundant and broad, the reflectance at a given wavelength usually contains contributions from several sample components, requiring extensive calculations on overlapped bands. In the present study, these calculations have been performed using an approach similar to that employed in multi-component spectrophotometry, but with Gauss-Jordan linear algebra serving as the computational vehicle. Using this approach, correlations for percent protein in wheat flour and percent benzene in hydrocarbons have been obtained and are evaluated. The advantages of a linear-algebra approach over the common one employing stepwise regression are explored.

  12. Thermosensitive hydrogel loaded with chitosan-carbon nanotubes for near infrared light triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xia; Wei, Chang; Liang, Jie; Liu, Tianjun; Kong, Deling; Lv, Feng

    2017-03-19

    Controlled drug release with on demand is an important challenge for drug delivery. Near-infrared (NIR) light triggered drug delivery reflected the development of a significant strategy to control drug release based on photothermal effects. Herein, a sustained and controlled drug delivery system was developed based on a PCL-PEG-PCL thermosensitive hydrogel combined with chitosan-multiwalled carbon nanotubes for a near infrared light triggered drug delivery. Carbon nanotubes that incorporate hydrogel can enhance the sustained effect of drug delivery by a dual-stage release and allow drug delivery by controlling light irradiation. This in situ photothermal process was monitored by thermal imaging and the controlled drug delivery of doxorubicin was tracked in real-time by fluorescence imaging in vivo based on the fluorescence ability of the drug using nude mice as models. The results suggest that the photothermal effect of the carbon nanotubes can disrupt the structure of the hydrogel with a gel-sol transition, triggering the release of the drug from the sustained drug delivery system by NIR irradiation while responding on demand. The sustained and controlled drug delivery has the potential to implement the accurate administration of hydrogel-based drug delivery systems.

  13. Carbonates in Antarctic ordinary chondrites inferred from infrared diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Masamichi

    1989-12-01

    Examination of Antarctic ordinary chondrites was made through use of infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The spectra of all the Antarctic ordinary chondrites measured show weak absorption bands near 1350/cm which are caused by carbonates (probably hydrated carbonates). The band is not present after acid dissolution, consistent with the carbonate identification. The carbonates were probably produced by terrestrial weathering, since the spectra of recently fallen non-Antarctic chondrites, Nuevo Mercurio (H5) and La Criolla (L6), do not show the 1350/cm band. Infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is useful for easily detecting the presence (or absence) of the weathering-produced carbonates in meteorites.

  14. [Application of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to the detection and identification of transgenic corn].

    PubMed

    Rui, Yu-kui; Luo, Yun-bo; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Zhang, Lu-da

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of the GMO, more and more GMO food has been pouring into the market. Much attention has been paid to GMO labeling under the controversy of GMO safety. Transgenic corns and their parents were scanned by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy range of 12000-4000 cm(-1); the resolution was 4 cm(-1); scanning was carried out for 64 times; BP algorithm was applied for data processing. The GMO food was easily resolved. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is unpolluted and inexpensive compared with PCR and ELISA, so it is a very promising detection method for GMO food.

  15. Near-infrared light activated delivery platform for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Gao, Yan; Hornicek, Francis; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian; Amiji, Mansoor; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-12-01

    Cancer treatment using conventional drug delivery platforms may lead to fatal damage to normal cells. Among various intelligent delivery platforms, photoresponsive delivery platforms are becoming popular, as light can be easily focused and tuned in terms of power intensity, wavelength, and irradiation time, allowing remote and precise control over therapeutic payload release both spatially and temporally. This unprecedented controlled delivery manner is important to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing side effects. However, most of the existing photoactive delivery platforms require UV/visible excitation to initiate their function, which suffers from phototoxicity and low level of tissue penetration limiting their practical applications in biomedicine. With the advanced optical property of converting near infrared (NIR) excitation to localized UV/visible emission, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have emerged as a promising photoactive delivery platform that provides practical applications for remote spatially and temporally controlled release of therapeutic payload molecules using low phototoxic and high tissue penetration NIR light as the excitation source. This article reviews the state-of-the-art design, synthesis and therapeutic molecular payload encapsulation strategies of UCNP-based photoactive delivery platforms for cancer therapy. Challenges and promises for engineering of advanced delivery platforms are also highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulation and measurement of transcranial near infrared light penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Lan; Monge, Manuel; Ozgur, Mehmet H.; Murphy, Kevin; Louie, Stan; Miller, Carol A.; Emami, Azita; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-03-01

    We are studying the transmission of LED array-emitted near-infrared (NIR) light through human tissues. Herein, we simulated and measured transcranial NIR penetration in highly scattering human head tissues. Using finite element analysis, we simulated photon diffusion in a multilayered 3D human head model that consists of scalp, skull, cerebral spinal fluid, gray matter and white matter. The optical properties of each layer, namely scattering and absorption coefficient, correspond to the 850 nm NIR light. The geometry of the model is minimally modified from the IEEE standard and the multiple LED emitters in an array were evenly distributed on the scalp. Our results show that photon distribution produced by the array exhibits little variation at similar brain depth, suggesting that due to strong scattering effects of the tissues, discrete spatial arrangements of LED emitters in an array has the potential to create a quasi-radially symmetrical illumination field. Measurements on cadaveric human head tissues excised from occipital, parietal, frontal and temporal regions show that illumination with an 850 nm LED emitter rendered a photon flux that closely follows simulation results. In addition, prolonged illumination of LED emitted NIR showed minimal thermal effects on the brain.

  17. Near-infrared light-responsive nanomaterials in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Vijayakumar; Selvakumar, S; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2014-09-07

    Noninvasive techniques, such as breath tests (urea breath test), blood pressure measurements using a sphygmomanometer and electrocardiography, were employed by a physician to perform classical diagnosis. The use of state-of-the-art noninvasive therapies at the organ level in modern medicine has gradually become possible. However, cancer treatment demands spatially and temporally controlled noninvasive therapy at the cell level because nonspecific toxicity often causes complicated side effects. To increase survival in cancer patients further, combination therapy and combination drugs are explored which demand high specificity to avoid combined-drug side effects. We believe that high specificity could be obtained by implementing near-infrared (NIR) light-assisted nanoparticles in photothermal therapy, chemotherapy, and photodynamic therapy. To refine this therapy and subsequently achieve high efficiency, novel nanomaterials have been designed and modified either to enhance the uptake and drug delivery to the cancer site, or control treatment to administer therapy efficiently. These modifications and developments have been demonstrated to achieve spatial and temporal control when conducting an in vivo xenograft, because the NIR light penetrated effectively the biological tissue. The nanoplatforms discussed in this review are grouped under the following subheadings: Au nanorods (NRs), Au nanoshells, other Au-related nanomaterials, graphene oxide, upconversion nanoparticles, and other related materials (including materials such as CuS, Fe3O4-related systems, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)).

  18. Infrared light management in high-efficiency silicon heterojunction and rear-passivated solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Zachary C.; Filipič, Miha; Descoeudres, Antoine; De Wolf, Stefaan; Smole, Franc; Topič, Marko; Ballif, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells have record-high open-circuit voltages but suffer from reduced short-circuit currents due in large part to parasitic absorption in the amorphous silicon, transparent conductive oxide (TCO), and metal layers. We previously identified and quantified visible and ultraviolet parasitic absorption in heterojunctions; here, we extend the analysis to infrared light in heterojunction solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 20%. An extensive experimental investigation of the TCO layers indicates that the rear layer serves as a crucial electrical contact between amorphous silicon and the metal reflector. If very transparent and at least 150 nm thick, the rear TCO layer also maximizes infrared response. An optical model that combines a ray-tracing algorithm and a thin-film simulator reveals why: parallel-polarized light arriving at the rear surface at oblique incidence excites surface plasmons in the metal reflector, and this parasitic absorption in the metal can exceed the absorption in the TCO layer itself. Thick TCO layers—or dielectric layers, in rear-passivated diffused-junction silicon solar cells—reduce the penetration of the evanescent waves to the metal, thereby increasing internal reflectance at the rear surface. With an optimized rear TCO layer, the front TCO dominates the infrared losses in heterojunction solar cells. As its thickness and carrier density are constrained by anti-reflection and lateral conduction requirements, the front TCO can be improved only by increasing its electron mobility. Cell results attest to the power of TCO optimization: With a high-mobility front TCO and a 150-nm-thick, highly transparent rear ITO layer, we recently reported a 4-cm2 silicon heterojunction solar cell with an active-area short-circuit current density of nearly 39 mA/cm2 and a certified efficiency of over 22%.

  19. Improving the light quantification of near infrared (NIR) diffused light optical tomography with ultrasound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman

    According to the statistics published by the American Cancer Society, currently breast cancer is the second most common cancer after skin cancer and the second cause of cancer death after lung cancer in the female population. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared (NIR) light, guided by ultrasound localization, has shown great promise in distinguishing benign from malignant breast tumors and in assessing the response of breast cancer to chemotherapy. Our ultrasound-guided DOT system is based on reflection geometry, with patients scanned in supine position using a hand-held probe. For patients with chest-wall located at a depth shallower than 1 to 2cm, as in about 10% of our clinical cases, the semi-infinite imaging medium is not a valid assumption and the chest-wall effect needs to be considered in the imaging reconstruction procedure. In this dissertation, co-registered ultrasound images were used to model the breast-tissue and chest-wall as a two-layer medium. The effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction was systematically investigated. The performance of the two-layer model-based reconstruction, using the Finite Element Method, was evaluated by simulation, phantom experiments and clinical studies. The results show that the two-layer model can improve the accuracy of estimated background optical properties, the reconstructed absorption map and the total hemoglobin concentration of the lesion. For patients' data affected by chest wall, the perturbation, which is the difference between measurements obtained at lesion and normal reference sites, may include the information of background mismatch between these two sites. Because the imaging reconstruction is based on the perturbation approach, the effect of this mismatch between the optical properties at the two sites on reconstructed optical absorption was studied and a guideline for imaging procedure was developed to reduce these effects during data capturing. To reduce the artifacts

  20. Modeling diffuse reflectance measurements of light scattered by layered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Shelley B.

    In this dissertation, we first present a model for the diffuse reflectance due to a continuous beam incident normally on a half space composed of a uniform scattering and absorbing medium. This model is the result of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption and a defined beam width. Through comparison with the diffuse reflectance computed using the numerical solution of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for small source-detector separation distances. We then present an explicit model for the diffuse reflectance due to a collimated beam of light incident normally on layered tissues. This model is derived using the corrected diffusion approximation applied to a layered medium, and it takes the form of a convolution with an explicit kernel and the incident beam profile. This model corrects the standard diffusion approximation over all source-detector separation distances provided the beam is sufficiently wide compared to the scattering mean-free path. We validate this model through comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Then we use this model to estimate the optical properties of an epithelial layer from Monte Carlo simulation data. Using measurements at small source-detector separations and this model, we are able to estimate the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor of epithelial tissues efficiently with reasonable accuracy. Finally, we present an extension of the corrected diffusion approximation for an obliquely incident beam. This model is formed through a Fourier Series representation in the azimuthal angle which allows us to exhibit the break in axisymmetry when combined with the previous analysis. We validate this model with Monte Carlo simulations. This model can also be written in the form of a convolution of an explicit kernel with the incident beam profile. Additionally, it can be used to

  1. Modeling of diffuse reflectance of light in heterogeneous biological tissue to analysis of the effects of multiple scattering on reflectance pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Mohsen; Setayeshi, Saeed; Ardehali, Seyed Hossein; Arabalibeik, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Fingertip-type pulse oximeters are popular, but their inconvenience for long-term monitoring in daily life means that other types of wearable pulse oximeters, such as reflectance pulse oximeters, need to be developed. For the purpose of developing reflection pulse oximetry, we have analyzed the light propagation in tissue to calculate and estimate the measured intensities of reflected light using the analytical and numerical solutions of the diffusion approximation equation. The reflectance of light from the biological tissue is investigated from theoretical and experimental perspectives, for light in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. To establish the model, the calculated curves were compared with the analytical solution (AS) of the diffusion approximation equation in biological tissue. The results validated that the diffusion approximation equation could resolve the heterogeneous advanced tissue and the finite element method (FEM) could offer the simulation with higher efficiency and accuracy. Our aim has been to demonstrate the power of the FEM and AS in modeling of the steady-state diffusion approximation in a heterogeneous medium. Also, experimental data and the Monte Carlo model as a gold standard were used to verify the effectiveness of these methods.

  2. Comparison of visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy on fat to authenticate dietary history of lambs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Andueza, D; de Oliveira, L; Zawadzki, F; Prache, S

    2015-11-01

    Since consumers are showing increased interest in the origin and method of production of their food, it is important to be able to authenticate dietary history of animals by rapid and robust methods used in the ruminant products. Promising breakthroughs have been made in the use of spectroscopic methods on fat to discriminate pasture-fed and concentrate-fed lambs. However, questions remained on their discriminatory ability in more complex feeding conditions, such as concentrate-finishing after pasture-feeding. We compared the ability of visible reflectance spectroscopy (Vis RS, wavelength range: 400 to 700 nm) with that of visible-near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (Vis-NIR RS, wavelength range: 400 to 2500 nm) to differentiate between carcasses of lambs reared with three feeding regimes, using partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) as a classification method. The sample set comprised perirenal fat of Romane male lambs fattened at pasture (P, n = 69), stall-fattened indoors on commercial concentrate and straw (S, n = 55) and finished indoors with concentrate and straw for 28 days after pasture-feeding (PS, n = 65). The overall correct classification rate was better for Vis-NIR RS than for Vis RS (99.0% v. 95.1%, P < 0.05). Vis-NIR RS allowed a correct classification rate of 98.6%, 100.0% and 98.5% for P, S and PS lambs, respectively, whereas Vis RS allowed a correct classification rate of 98.6%, 94.5% and 92.3% for P, S and PS lambs, respectively. This study suggests the likely implication of molecules absorbing light in the non-visible part of the Vis-NIR spectra (possibly fatty acids), together with carotenoid and haem pigments, in the discrimination of the three feeding regimes.

  3. Quantitative determination of band distortions in diamond attenuated total reflectance infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Buffeteau, Thierry; Boudreault, Simon; Daugey, Nicolas; Pézolet, Michel

    2010-06-24

    Due to its unmatched hardness and chemical inertia, diamond offers many advantages over other materials for extreme conditions and routine analysis by attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy. Its low refractive index can offer up to a 6-fold absorbance increase compared to germanium. Unfortunately, it also results for strong bands in spectral distortions compared to transmission experiments. The aim of this paper is to present a methodological approach to determine quantitatively the degree of the spectral distortions in ATR spectra. This approach requires the determination of the optical constants (refractive index and extinction coefficient) of the investigated sample. As a typical example, the optical constants of the fibroin protein of the silk worm Bombyx mori have been determined from the polarized ATR spectra obtained using both diamond and germanium internal reflection elements. The positions found for the amide I band by germanium and diamond ATR are respectively 6 and 17 cm(-1) lower than the true value dtermined from the k(nu) spectrum, which is calculated to be 1659 cm(-1). To determine quantitatively the effect of relevant parameters such as the film thickness and the protein concentration, various spectral simulations have also been performed. The use of a thinner film probed by light polarized in the plane of incidence and diluting the protein sample can help in obtaining ATR spectra that are closer to their transmittance counterparts. To extend this study to any system, the ATR distortion amplitude has been evaluated using spectral simulations performed for bands of various intensities and widths. From these simulations, a simple empirical relationship has been found to estimate the band shift from the experimental band height and width that could be of practical use for ATR users. This paper shows that the determination of optical constants provides an efficient way to recover the true spectrum shape and band frequencies of

  4. [DWT-iPLS applied in the infrared diffuse reflection spectrum of hydrocarbon source rocks].

    PubMed

    Song, Ning; Xu, Xiao-xuan; Wu, Zhong-chen; Zhang, Cun-zhou; Wang, Bin

    2008-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is useful to monitor the quality of products on-line, or to quality multivariate properties simultaneously. The IR spectrometer satisfies the requirements of users who want to have quantitative product information in real-time because the instrument provides the information promptly and easily. However, Samples that are measured using diffuse reflectance often exhibit significant differences in the spectra due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the particles. In fact, multiple spectral measurements of the same sample can look completely different. In many cases, the scattering can be an overpowering contributor to the spectrum, sometimes accounting for most of the variance in the data. Although the degree of scattering is dependent on the wavelength of the light that is used and the particle size and refractive index of the sample, the scattering is not uniform throughout the spectrum. Typically, this appears as a baseline shift, tilt and sometimes curvature, where the degree of influence is more pronounced at the longer-wavelength end of the spectrum. The diffuse reflection spectrum is unsatisfactory and the calibration may provide unsatisfactory prediction results. So we must use some methods to remove the effects of the scattering for multivariate calibration of IR spectral signals. Discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is a good method to remove the effects of the scattering for multivariate calibration of IR spectral signals. By using DWT on individual signals as a preprocessing method in regression modeling on IR spectra, good compression is achieved with almost no loss of information, the low-frequency varying background and the high-frequency noise be removed simultaneously. In this report, we use the iPLS method to establish the calibration models of hydrocarbon source rocks. iPLS is a new regression method and the authors can get better results by using DTW- iPLS.

  5. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy predictions as indicator traits in breeding programs for enhanced beef quality.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, A; De Marchi, M; Penasa, M; Albera, A; Bittante, G

    2011-09-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to investigate the potential application of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict beef quality (BQ) traits, 2) to assess genetic variations of BQ measures and their predictions obtained by NIRS, and 3) to infer the genetic relationship between measures of BQ and their predictions. Young Piedmontese bulls (n = 1,230) were raised and fattened on 124 farms and slaughtered at the same commercial abattoir. The BQ traits evaluated were shear force (SF, kg), cooking loss (CL, %), drip loss (DL, %), lightness (L*), redness (a*), yellowness (b*), saturation index (SI), and hue angle. Near-infrared spectra were collected using a Foss NIRSystems 5000 instrument over a spectral range of 1,100 to 2,498 nm every 2 nm, in reflectance mode. After editing, prediction models were developed on a calibration subset (n = 268) using partial least squares regressions, followed by application of these models to the validation subset (n = 940). Estimations of (co)variance for measures of BQ and NIRS-based predictions were obtained through a set of bivariate Bayesian analyses on the validation subset. Near-infrared predictions were satisfactory for measurements of L* (R(2) = 0.64), a* (R(2) = 0.68), hue angle (R(2) = 0.81), and saturation index (R(2) = 0.59), but not for b*, DL, CL, and SF. The loss of additive genetic variance of predicted vs. measured L*, a*, DL, CL, and SF was generally high and was similar to the loss of residual variance, being a function of the calibration parameter R(2). As a consequence, estimated heritabilities of measures and predictions of BQ were similar for traits with high calibration R(2) values. Genetic correlations between BQ measures and predictions were high for all color traits and DL, and were greater than the corresponding phenotypic correlations, whereas both the phenotypic and genetic correlations for SF and CL were nil. Results suggest that NIRS-based predictions for color features and DL may be used as

  6. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 1. The luminance factor of reflected light

    SciTech Connect

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2013-08-31

    Based on the analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, we have studied the angular structure of the luminance factor of light reflected by the rough skin surface with large-scale relief elements, illuminated by a directed radiation beam incident at an arbitrary angle inside or outside the medium. The parameters of the surface inhomogeneities are typical of human skin. The calculated angular dependences are interpreted from the point of view of the angular distribution function of micro areas. The results obtained can be used for solving direct and inverse problems in biomedical optics, in particular for determining the depth of light penetration into a biological tissue, for studying the light action spectra on tissue chromophores under the in vivo conditions, for developing diagnostic methods of structural and biophysical parameters of a medium, and for optimising the mechanisms of interaction of light with biological tissues under their noninvasive irradiation through skin. (biomedical optics)

  7. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 1. The luminance factor of reflected light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2013-08-01

    Based on the analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, we have studied the angular structure of the luminance factor of light reflected by the rough skin surface with large-scale relief elements, illuminated by a directed radiation beam incident at an arbitrary angle inside or outside the medium. The parameters of the surface inhomogeneities are typical of human skin. The calculated angular dependences are interpreted from the point of view of the angular distribution function of micro areas. The results obtained can be used for solving direct and inverse problems in biomedical optics, in particular for determining the depth of light penetration into a biological tissue, for studying the light action spectra on tissue chromophores under the in vivo conditions, for developing diagnostic methods of structural and biophysical parameters of a medium, and for optimising the mechanisms of interaction of light with biological tissues under their noninvasive irradiation through skin.

  8. Thermal Infrared Reflective Metal Oxide Sol-Gel Coatings for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Brandon Demar

    Recent trends in composite research include the development of structural materials with multiple functionalities. In new studies, novel materials are being designed, developed, modified, and implemented into composite designs. Typically, an increase in functionality requires additional material phases within one system. The presence of excessive phases can result in deterioration of individual or overall properties. True multi-functional materials must maintain all properties at or above the minimum operating limit. In this project, samples of antimony and cobalt-doped tin oxide (ATO(Co2O 3)) sol-gel solutions are used to coat carbon fibers and are heat treated at a temperature range of 200 - 500 °C. Results from this research are used to model the implementation of sol-gel coatings into carbon fiber reinforced multifunctional composite systems. This research presents a novel thermo-responsive sol-gel/ (dopant) combination and evaluation of the actuating responses (reflectivity and surface heat dissipation) due to various heat treatment temperatures. While ATO is a well-known transparent conductive material, the implementation of ATO on carbon fibers for infrared thermal reflectivity has not been examined. These coatings serve as actuators capable of reflecting thermal infrared radiation in the near infrared wavelengths of 0.7-1.2 μm. By altering the level of Co2O3 and heat treatment temperatures, optimal optical properties are obtained. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used for imaging, electron diffraction spectroscopy (EDS) is used to verify the compounds present in the coatings. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to analyze the chemical bonds and reflectivity in the infrared spectra after the heat treatments. Total reflection and angle-dependent reflectivity measurements were performed on the coatings in the wavelengths of 0.7-2 μm. Laser induced damage threshold testing was done to investigate the dielectric breakdown

  9. Preparation and near-infrared reflective characterization of Cu-doped sodium zincophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Su, Da Gen; Zhong, Ming Feng; Xia, Hui

    2012-02-01

    Cu-doped sodium zincophosphate [NaZn 1- x(Cu) xPO 4; x=0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20] powders were prepared by a coprecipitation method for the use as a dark heat-reflective material. The weighted average of the reflectance was calculated according to the reflectivity data measured using a UV-visible and near-infrared spectrophotometer. The measurement wavelength region was 380-2500 nm. The visible and near-infrared reflective properties of NaZn 1- x(Cu) xPO 4 doped with different amounts of Cu at varied calcination temperatures were investigated. NaZn(Cu)PO 4 was found to be the main phase that crystallized in a monoclinic system of NaZn 0.9(Cu) 0.1PO 4 at 800 °C. The sample of NaZn 0.9(Cu) 0.1PO 4 was black in the visible region because of its high absorption, and its weighted average reflectance reached 51% in the near-infrared region. As a result, NaZn 1- x(Cu) xPO 4 has potential applications as a dark heat-reflective material.

  10. Combined optical and near infrared reflectance measurements of vasomotion in both skin and underlying muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, Clare E.; Shore, Angela C.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2007-02-01

    The cardiovascular system is designed to deliver oxygen to every cell in the body through the microcirculation. Optical Reflectance Spectroscopy (ORS) is a powerful tool used to study oxygen delivery through vessels less than 50 μm in diameter. Depth analysis can be achieved by varying the geometry of the incident light source and the detector of the back-scattered light. A fibre optic probe has been designed with spacings to study the capillary loops and microvessels of the skin. Similarly, Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) can directly measure haemodynamics in muscle. A combined study of ORS and NIRS is currently investigating the relationship of vasomotion in the skin and underlying muscle. Vasomotion is usually defined as rhythmic changes in the diameter of the small blood vessels and has been linked to both endothelial and sympathetic activity. It has been suggested that vasomotion in the muscle preserves nutritive perfusion not only in the muscle itself but also to neighbouring tissue i.e. skin. ORS and NIRS can provide a direct measure of these changes in blood volume. At frequencies linked with endothelial and sympathetic activity, rhythmical oscillations in blood volume of the same magnitude, were demonstrated in both skin and muscle, 15.3(4.0)% skin vs 16.3(5.3)% muscle for endothelial frequencies, (mean(SD), t-test, p=0.633) and 10.9(3.8)% skin and 12.4(5.5)% muscle for sympathetic frequencies (p=0.354). These data demonstrate the potential of these optical techniques to enable simultaneous examination of microvascular haemodynamics in two tissue types.

  11. Infrared light-absorbing gold/gold sulfide nanoparticles induce cell death in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Gobin, Andre M; Dryden, Gerald W; Kang, Xinqin; Xiao, Deyi; Li, Su Ping; Zhang, Guandong; Martin, Robert CG

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles and near infrared-absorbing light are each innocuous to tissue but when combined can destroy malignant tissue while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. This study investigated the feasibility of photothermal ablation therapy for esophageal adenocarcinoma using chitosan-coated gold/gold sulfide (CS-GGS) nanoparticles. A rat esophagoduodenal anastomosis model was used for the in vivo ablation study, and three human esophageal cell lines were used to study the response of cancer cells and benign cells to near infrared light after treatment with CS-GGS. The results indicate that both cancerous tissue and cancer cells took up more gold nanoparticles and were completely ablated after exposure to near infrared light. The benign tissue and noncancerous cells showed less uptake of these nanoparticles, and remained viable after exposure to near infrared light. CS-GGS nanoparticles could provide an optimal endoluminal therapeutic option for near infrared light ablation of esophageal cancer. PMID:23818775

  12. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    techniques such as attenuated total reflectance [6]. The two final papers deal with what seem to be wholly different scientific fields [7, 8]. One paper describes SOFIA, an aeroplane-based astronomical observatory covering the whole IR range [7], while the other represents a small review of the quite new topic of terahertz physics at the upper end of the IR spectral range, from around 30 µm to 3 mm wavelength, and its many applications in science and industry [8]. Although artificially separated, all these fields use similar kinds of detectors, similar kinds of IR sources and similar technologies, while the instruments use the same physical principles. We are convinced that the field of infrared physics will develop over the next decade in the same dynamic way as during the last, and this special issue may serve as starting point for regular submissions on the topic. At any rate, it shines a light on this fascinating and many-faceted subject, which started more than 200 years ago. References [1] Mangold K, Shaw J A and Vollmer M 2013 The physics of near-infrared photography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S51-71 [2] Vollmer M and Möllmann K-P 2013 Characterization of IR cameras in student labs Eur. J. Phys. 34 S73-90 [3] Ibarra-Castanedo C, Tarpani J R and Maldague X P V 2013 Nondestructive testing with thermography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S91-109 [4] Shaw J A and Nugent P W 2013 Physics principles in radiometric infrared imaging of clouds in the atmosphere Eur. J. Phys. 34 S111-21 [5] Möllmann K-P and Vollmer M 2013 Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in physics laboratory courses Eur. J. Phys. 34 S123-37 [6] Heise H M, Fritzsche J, Tkatsch H, Waag F, Karch K, Henze K, Delbeck S and Budde J 2013 Recent advances in mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy with applications for research and teaching, focusing on petrochemistry and biotechnology relevant products Eur. J. Phys. 34 S139-59 [7] Krabbe A, Mehlert D, Röser H-P and Scorza C 2013 SOFIA, an airborne observatory for infrared astronomy

  13. Near-infrared reflectance bull’s eye maculopathy as an early indication of hydroxychloroquine toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keye L; Pautler, Scott E; Browning, David J

    2015-01-01

    Importance In some patients, hydroxychloroquine ocular toxicity may progress even following cessation of therapy. Any leverage the clinician may use to allow earlier detection may avert significant vision loss. Observation We report three cases suggesting that bull’s eye maculopathy seen on near-infrared reflectance with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope could be an early, objective manifestation of hydroxychloroquine ocular toxicity, and with progression of the disease this near-infrared “bull’s eye” change may disappear. Conclusion and relevance Alerting clinicians to this observation may allow a larger case series to corroborate the hypothesis that bull’s eye maculopathy detected by near-infrared reflectance may represent an early sign of hydroxychloroquine toxicity. PMID:25834390

  14. Low-resolution mid-infrared reflection analysis for discernment of contaminants in seed cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contaminants often decrease cotton quality, which subsequently decrease cotton profitability. In this research, a low-resolution mid-infrared reflection instrument was designed and constructed by using only four different wavelengths to accomplish good separation of cotton samples from 14 contaminan...

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Bayerite Samples: Use of Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy to Monitor Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phambu, Nsoki; Humbert, Bernard; Burneau, Andre

    2002-09-01

    We show here how bayerite, a polymorphic form of aluminum trihydroxides, can be synthesized and characterized by simple spectroscopic methods. Purification of the product by washing with water can be monitored by diffuse reflectance infrared spectra. A product with extremely high purity is obtained after repeated washings.

  16. Analysis of Total Oil and Fatty Acids Composition by Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy in Edible Nuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Near Infrared (NIR) Reflectance spectroscopy has established itself as an important tool in quantifying water and oil present in various food materials. It is rapid and nondestructive, easier to use, and does not require processing the samples with corrosive chemicals that would render them non-edib...

  17. Fluorescent light induces neurodegeneration in the rodent nigrostriatal system but near infrared LED light does not.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Stefania; Vitale, Flora; Viaggi, Cristina; di Marco, Stefano; Aloisi, Gabriella; Fasciani, Irene; Pardini, Carla; Pietrantoni, Ilaria; Di Paolo, Mattia; Riccitelli, Serena; Maccarone, Rita; Mattei, Claudia; Capannolo, Marta; Rossi, Mario; Capozzo, Annamaria; Corsini, Giovanni U; Scarnati, Eugenio; Lozzi, Luca; Vaglini, Francesca; Maggio, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous artificial light exposure on the mouse substantia nigra (SN). A three month exposure of C57Bl/6J mice to white fluorescent light induced a 30% reduction in dopamine (DA) neurons in SN compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease of DA and its metabolites in the striatum. After six months of exposure, neurodegeneration progressed slightly, but the level of DA returned to the basal level, while the metabolites increased with respect to the control. Three month exposure to near infrared LED light (∼710nm) did not alter DA neurons in SN, nor did it decrease DA and its metabolites in the striatum. Furthermore mesencephalic cell viability, as tested by [(3)H]DA uptake, did not change. Finally, we observed that 710nm LED light, locally conveyed in the rat SN, could modulate the firing activity of extracellular-recorded DA neurons. These data suggest that light can be detrimental or beneficial to DA neurons in SN, depending on the source and wavelength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcranial Red and Near Infrared Light Transmission in a Cadaveric Model

    PubMed Central

    Jagdeo, Jared R.; Adams, Lauren E.; Brody, Neil I.; Siegel, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Low level light therapy has garnered significant interest within the past decade. The exact molecular mechanisms of how red and near infrared light result in physiologic modulation are not fully understood. Heme moieties and copper within cells are red and near infrared light photoreceptors that induce the mitochondrial respiratory chain component cytochrome C oxidase, resulting in a cascade linked to cytoprotection and cellular metabolism. The copper centers in cytochrome C oxidase have a broad absorption range that peaks around 830 nm. Several in vitro and in vivo animal and human models exist that have demonstrated the benefits of red light and near infrared light for various conditions. Clinical applications for low level light therapy are varied. One study in particular demonstrated improved durable functional outcomes status post-stroke in patients treated with near infrared low level light therapy compared to sham treatment [1]. Despite previous data suggesting the beneficial effect in treating multiple conditions, including stroke, with low level light therapy, limited data exists that measures transmission in a human model. Study Design/Materials and Methods To investigate this idea, we measured the transmission of near infrared light energy, using red light for purposes of comparison, through intact cadaver soft tissue, skull bones, and brain using a commercially available LED device at 830 nm and 633 nm. Results Our results demonstrate that near infrared measurably penetrates soft tissue, bone and brain parenchyma in the formalin preserved cadaveric model, in comparison to negligible red light transmission in the same conditions. Conclusion These findings indicate that near infrared light can penetrate formalin fixed soft tissue, bone and brain and implicate that benefits observed in clinical studies are potentially related to direct action of near infrared light on neural tissue. PMID:23077622

  19. Carbon dioxide adsorption on a ZnO(101[combining macron]0) substrate studied by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Maria; Weidler, Peter G; Bebensee, Fabian; Nefedov, Alexei; Wöll, Christof

    2014-01-28

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide on the mixed-terminated ZnO(101[combining macron]0) surface of a bulk single crystal was studied by UHV Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS). In contrast to metals, the classic surface selection rule for IRRAS does not apply to bulk oxide crystals, and hence vibrational bands can also be observed for s-polarized light. Although this fact substantially complicates data interpretation, a careful analysis allows for a direct determination of the adsorbate geometry. Here, we demonstrate the huge potential of IR-spectroscopy for investigations on oxide single crystal surfaces by considering all three components of the incident polarized light separately. We find that the tridentate (surface) carbonate is aligned along the [0001] direction. A comparison to data reported previously for CO2 adsorbed on the surfaces of ZnO nanoparticles provides important insight into the role of defects in the surface chemistry of powder particles.

  20. Ultra light-trapping filters with broadband reflection holograms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deming; Vorndran, Shelby; Russo, Juan M; Gordon, Michael; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2012-06-18

    Significant optical absorption enhancement can be achieved by incorporating optical diffusers in the thin-film silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells. Absorption can be increased further by angular and spectral selective filters. In this work the properties of volume reflection holograms are examined for realizing ultra light-trapping filters for thin film silicon photovoltaic cell applications. The filter properties of reflection volume hologram are evaluated for this application. It is found that variation in the refractive index profile as a function of depth is an important factor. The optimized design is implemented in dichromated gelatin holograms and found to be in good agreement with predicted performance. The enhancement to the conversion efficiency of silicon PV cells are predicted with the PC-1D simulation tool and is found to be similar to that with an optimized Rugate filter. The simulated short circuit current density enhancement was found to be 8.2% for a 50 µm thick silicon PV cell and 15.8% for a 10 µm thick silicon PV cell.

  1. Infrared imaging of LED lighting tubes and fluorescent tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siikanen, Sami; Kivi, Sini; Kauppinen, Timo; Juuti, Mikko

    2011-05-01

    The low energy efficiency of conventional light sources is mainly caused by generation of waste heat. We used infrared (IR) imaging in order to monitor the heating of both LED tube luminaires and ordinary T8 fluorescent tubes. The IR images showed clearly how the surface temperatures of the fluorescent tube ends quickly rose up to about +50...+70°C, whereas the highest surface temperatures seen on the LED tubes were only about +30...+40°C. The IR images demonstrated how the heat produced by the individual LED chips can be efficiently guided to the supporting structure in order to keep the LED emitters cool and hence maintain efficient operation. The consumed electrical power and produced illuminance were also recorded during 24 hour measurements. In order to assess the total luminous efficacy of the luminaires, separate luminous flux measurements were made in a large integrating sphere. The currently available LED tubes showed efficacies of up to 88 lm/W, whereas a standard "cool white" T8 fluorescent tube produced ca. 75 lm/W. Both lamp types gave ca. 110 - 130 lx right below the ceiling-mounted luminaire, but the LED tubes consume only 40 - 55% of the electric power compared to fluorescent tubes.

  2. Near infrared light responsive hybrid nanoparticles for synergistic therapy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Gao, Wenxia; Peng, Xinyu; Deng, Xin; Sun, Changzhen; Wu, Huayue; He, Bin

    2016-09-01

    A near infrared (NIR) light responsive chromophore 7-(diethylamino)-4-(hydroxymethyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (DEACM) was synthesized and incorporated to β-cyclodextrins with cRGD functionalized poly(ethylene glycol), the amphiphiles were coordinated with Au nanorods or nanoparticles to load anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for fabricating hybrid nanoparticles. The π-π stacking interaction between DEACM and DOX was formed in the hybrid nanoparticles, which contributed to the high drug loading content. The Au nanorods or nanoparticles enhanced the photosolvolysis of DEACM under the irradiation of NIR with 808 nm wavelength and triggered the accelerated drug release from the nanoparticles. The drug loaded hybrid nanoparticles with NIR irradiation exhibited efficient inhibition effect on the proliferation of 4T1 breast cancer cells in vitro. The in vivo anticancer activity study on breast cancer bearing mice revealed that the hybrid nanoparticles containing Au nanorods exhibited excellent anticancer activity under the irradiation of 808 nm wavelength NIR with 800 mW.

  3. Durable silver mirror with ultra-violet thru far infra-red reflection

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.

    2010-11-23

    A durable highly reflective silver mirror characterized by high reflectance in a broad spectral range of about 300 nm in the UV to the far infrared (.about.10000 nm), as well as exceptional environmental durability. A high absorptivity metal underlayer is used which prevents the formation of a galvanic cell with a silver layer while increasing the reflectance of the silver layer. Environmentally durable overcoat layers are provided to enhance mechanical and chemical durability and protect the silver layer from corrosion and tarnishing, for use in a wide variety of surroundings or climates, including harsh or extreme environments.

  4. Light reflection visualization to determine solute diffusion into clays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minjune; Annable, Michael D; Jawitz, James W

    2014-06-01

    Light reflection visualization (LRV) experiments were performed to investigate solute diffusion in low-permeability porous media using a well-controlled two-dimensional flow chamber with a domain composed of two layers (one sand and one clay). Two different dye tracers (Brilliant Blue FCF and Ponceau 4R) and clay domains (kaolinite and montmorillonite) were used. The images obtained through the LRV technique were processed to monitor two-dimensional concentration distributions in the low-permeability zone by applying calibration curves that related light intensity to equilibrium concentrations for each dye tracer in the clay. One dimensional experimentally-measured LRV concentration profiles in the clay were found to be in very good agreement with those predicted from a one-dimensional analytical solution, with coefficient of efficiency values that exceeded 0.97. The retardation factors (R) for both dyes were relatively large, leading to slow diffusive penetration into the clays. At a relative concentration C/C0=0.1, Brilliant Blue FCF in kaolinite (R=11) diffused approximately 10 mm after 21 days of source loading, and Ponceau 4R in montmorillonite (R=7) diffused approximately 12 mm after 23 days of source loading. The LRV experimentally-measured two-dimensional concentration profiles in the clay were also well described by a simple analytical solution. The results from this study demonstrate that the LRV approach is an attractive non-invasive tool to investigate the concentration distribution of dye tracers in clays in laboratory experiments.

  5. Spectral reflectance from plant canopies and optimum spectral channels in the near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, W. A.; Gausman, H. W.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1970-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental aspects of the interaction of light with a typical plant canopy are considered. Both theoretical and experimental results are used to establish optimum electromagnetic wavelength channels for remote sensing in agriculture. The spectral range considered includes half of the visible and much of the near-infrared regions.

  6. Surface extensions of 3T3 cells towards distant infrared light sources

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Using a specially designed phase-contrast light microscope with an infrared spot illuminator we found that approximately 25% of 3T3 cells were able to extend pseudopodia towards single microscopic infrared light sources nearby. If the cells were offered a pair of such light sources next to each other, 47% of the cells extended towards them. In the latter case 30% of the responding cells extended separate pseudopodia towards each individual light source of a pair. The strongest responses were observed if the infrared light sources emitted light of wavelengths in the range of 800-900 nm intermittently at rates of 30-60 pulses per min. The temperature increases of the irradiated spots can be shown to be negligible. The results suggest that the cells are able to sense specific infrared wavelengths and to determine the direction of individual sources. PMID:1860881

  7. Modeling thermal infrared (2-14 micrometer) reflectance spectra of frost and snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Andrew E.

    1994-01-01

    Existing theories of radiative transfer in close-packed media assume that each particle scatters independently of its neighbors. For opaque particles, such as are common in the thermal infrared, this assumption is not valid, and these radiative transfer theories will not be accurate. A new method is proposed, called 'diffraction subtraction', which modifies the scattering cross section of close-packed large, opaque spheres to account for the effect of close packing on the diffraction cross section of a scattering particle. This method predicts the thermal infrared reflectance of coarse (greater than 50 micrometers radius), disaggregated granular snow. However, such coarse snow is typically old and metamorphosed, with adjacent grains welded together. The reflectance of such a welded block can be described as partly Fresnel in nature and cannot be predicted using Mie inputs to radiative transfer theory. Owing to the high absorption coefficient of ice in the thermal infrared, a rough surface reflectance model can be used to calculate reflectance from such a block. For very small (less than 50 micrometers), disaggregated particles, it is incorrect in principle to treat diffraction independently of reflection and refraction, and the theory fails. However, for particles larger than 50 micrometers, independent scattering is a valid assumption, and standard radiative transfer theory works.

  8. Modeling thermal infrared (2-14 micrometer) reflectance spectra of frost and snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Andrew E.

    1994-01-01

    Existing theories of radiative transfer in close-packed media assume that each particle scatters independently of its neighbors. For opaque particles, such as are common in the thermal infrared, this assumption is not valid, and these radiative transfer theories will not be accurate. A new method is proposed, called 'diffraction subtraction', which modifies the scattering cross section of close-packed large, opaque spheres to account for the effect of close packing on the diffraction cross section of a scattering particle. This method predicts the thermal infrared reflectance of coarse (greater than 50 micrometers radius), disaggregated granular snow. However, such coarse snow is typically old and metamorphosed, with adjacent grains welded together. The reflectance of such a welded block can be described as partly Fresnel in nature and cannot be predicted using Mie inputs to radiative transfer theory. Owing to the high absorption coefficient of ice in the thermal infrared, a rough surface reflectance model can be used to calculate reflectance from such a block. For very small (less than 50 micrometers), disaggregated particles, it is incorrect in principle to treat diffraction independently of reflection and refraction, and the theory fails. However, for particles larger than 50 micrometers, independent scattering is a valid assumption, and standard radiative transfer theory works.

  9. Analysis of bacteria on steel surfaces using reflectance micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Jesús J; Romero-González, María E; Banwart, Steven A

    2009-08-01

    Reflectance micro-Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis has been applied to characterize biofilm formation of Aquabacterium commune, a common microorganism present on drinking water distribution systems, onto the increasingly popular pipe material stainless steel EN1.4307. The applicability of the reflectance micro-FT-IR technique for analyzing the bacterial functional groups is discussed, and the results are compared to spectra obtained using more conventional FT-IR techniques: transmission micro-FT-IR, attenuated transmitted reflectance (ATR), and KBr pellets. The differences between the infrared spectra of wet and dried bacteria, as well as free versus attached bacteria, are also discussed. The spectra obtained using reflectance micro-FT-IR spectroscopy were comparable to those obtained using other FT-IR techniques. The absence of sample preparation, the potential to analyze intact samples, and the ability to characterize opaque and thick samples without the need to transfer the bacterial samples to an infrared transparent medium or produce a pure culture were the main advantages of reflectance micro-FT-IR spectroscopy.

  10. Reflection and transmission mid-infrared spectroscopy for rapid determination of coal properties by multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Bona, M T; Andrés, J M

    2008-01-15

    In the present paper, the influence of different acquisition techniques (transmission, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform and attenuated total reflectance) in the determination of nine coal properties related to combustion power plants has been studied. Raw coal samples of different origins were pooled for developing a correlation between the resultant spectra and the corresponding coal properties by multivariate analysis techniques. Thus, the existent collinearity in mid-infrared coal spectra led to the application of partial least squares regression (PLS), studying simultaneously the influence of different spectroscopic units as well as several spectral data mathematical pre-treatments. On the other hand, a principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a relationship between principal components and coal composition in both transmission and reflection techniques. Although the best accuracy and precision results were obtained for coal properties related to organic matter, the system was also able to differentiate coal samples attending to the presence of a specific mineral matter, kaolinite.

  11. Photometric measurements of red blood cell aggregation: light transmission versus light reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskurt, Oguz K.; Uyuklu, Mehmet; Hardeman, Max R.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2009-09-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is the reversible and regular clumping in the presence of certain macromolecules. This is a clinically important phenomenon, being significantly enhanced in the presence of acute phase reactants (e.g., fibrinogen). Both light reflection (LR) and light transmission (LT) from or through thin layers of RBC suspensions during the process of aggregation are accepted to reflect the time course of aggregation. It has been recognized that the time courses of LR and LT might be different from each other. We aim to compare the RBC aggregation measurements based on simultaneous recordings of LR and LT. The results indicate that LR during RBC aggregation is characterized by a faster time course compared to simultaneously recorded LT. This difference in time course of LR and LT is reflected in the calculated parameters reflecting the overall extent and kinetics of RBC aggregation. Additionally, the power of parameters calculated using LR and LT time courses in detecting a given difference in aggregation are significantly different from each other. These differences should be taken into account in selecting the appropriate calculated parameters for analyzing LR or LT time courses for the assessment of RBC aggregation.

  12. Photometric measurements of red blood cell aggregation: light transmission versus light reflectance.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Uyuklu, Mehmet; Hardeman, Max R; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2009-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is the reversible and regular clumping in the presence of certain macromolecules. This is a clinically important phenomenon, being significantly enhanced in the presence of acute phase reactants (e.g., fibrinogen). Both light reflection (LR) and light transmission (LT) from or through thin layers of RBC suspensions during the process of aggregation are accepted to reflect the time course of aggregation. It has been recognized that the time courses of LR and LT might be different from each other. We aim to compare the RBC aggregation measurements based on simultaneous recordings of LR and LT. The results indicate that LR during RBC aggregation is characterized by a faster time course compared to simultaneously recorded LT. This difference in time course of LR and LT is reflected in the calculated parameters reflecting the overall extent and kinetics of RBC aggregation. Additionally, the power of parameters calculated using LR and LT time courses in detecting a given difference in aggregation are significantly different from each other. These differences should be taken into account in selecting the appropriate calculated parameters for analyzing LR or LT time courses for the assessment of RBC aggregation.

  13. [The research progress in determining lignocellulosic content by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology].

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; An, Dong; Xia, Tian; Huang, Yan-Hua; Li, Hong-Chao; Zhang, Yun-Wei

    2013-12-01

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology, as a new analytic method, can be used to determine the content of lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose which is faster, effective, easier to operate, and more accurate than the traditional wet chemical methods. Nowadays it has been widely used in measuring the composition of lignocelluloses in woody plant and herbaceous plant. The domestic and foreign research progress in determining the lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose content in woody plant ( wood and bamboo used as papermaking raw materials and wood served as potential biomass energy) and herbaceous plant (forage grass and energy grass) by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology is comprehensively summarized and the advances in method studies of measuring the composition of lignocelluloses by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology are summed up in three aspects, sample preparation, spectral data pretreatment and wavelength selection methods, and chemometric analysis respectively. Four outlooks are proposed combining the development statues of wood, forage grass and energy grass industry. First of all, the authors need to establish more feasible and applicable models for a variety of uses which can be used for more species from different areas, periods and anatomical parts. Secondly, comprehensive near infrared reflectance spectroscopy data base of grass products quality index needs to be improved to realize on-line quality and process control in grassproducts industry, which can guarantee the quality of the grass product. Thirdly, the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy quality index model of energy plant need to be built which can not only contribute to breed screening, but also improve the development of biomass industry. Besides, modeling approaches are required to be explored and perfected any further. Finally, the authors need to try our best to boost the advancement in the determination method of lignin, cellulose and hemi

  14. Experimental study on synergistic effects of reflectance and transmittance for near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Liu, Jiajia; Ma, Congcong; Li, Lin; Lu, Junsheng; Xu, Kexin

    2016-03-01

    Usually, diffused reflectance or diffused transmittance has been collected respectively when performing the near-infrared spectroscopic measurements. However, glucose-relative spectral signal is quite weak due to the noises from the measuring system and the environment. Previous Monte-Carlo simulation results from our group showed that the spectral magnitude of both diffused reflectance and diffused transmittance can reach the same order. In this talk, it is our aim to further investigate the synergistic effect of diffused reflectance and diffused transmittance for Near Infrared spectral measurements. The diffused reflectance spectra and diffused transmittance spectra of human's earlobe have been obtained simultaneously by home-made optical probes within the wavelength of 1100-1400nm. Two processing methods---Superposition Method and Division Method are introduced to demonstrate the synergistic effect of reflectance and transmittance. Both of the processing methods are performed on diffused reflectance and diffused transmittance in accordance with corresponding wavelengths. The results show that the combination of diffused reflectance and transmittance can effectively enhances the SNR by reducing the interference caused by individual differences and measuring environmental factors. Moreover, comparatively, the Division Method has a more distinguished effect.

  15. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function of Spectralon white reflectance standard illuminated by incoherent unpolarized and plane-polarized light.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Anak; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Øvynd; Zhao, Lu; Stamnes, Jakob J; Kildemo, Morten

    2011-06-01

    A Lambert surface would appear equally bright from all observation directions regardless of the illumination direction. However, the reflection from a randomly scattering object generally has directional variation, which can be described in terms of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). We measured the BRDF of a Spectralon white reflectance standard for incoherent illumination at 405 and 680 nm with unpolarized and plane-polarized light from different directions of incidence. Our measurements show deviations of the BRDF for the Spectralon white reflectance standard from that of a Lambertian reflector that depend both on the angle of incidence and the polarization states of the incident light and detected light. The non-Lambertian reflection characteristics were found to increase more toward the direction of specular reflection as the angle of incidence gets larger.

  16. Evidence of light depolarization in grazing incidence germanium attenuated total reflection prisms.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Névine; Klymko, Nancy; Licitra, Christophe; Gambacorti, Narciso

    2011-09-01

    Attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared absorption spectroscopy is a well-known vibrational spectroscopy technique for many different applications. In recent years this technique has been used to detect thin layer(s) lying on a solid substrate. Such a sample needs high pressure to ensure good optical contact between sample and prism and a p-polarization to enhance the signal to be detected. Such conditions have not been detailed in the literature regarding the effect of high pressure on the ATR measurement. This study shows the detrimental effect of high pressure on the ATR spectra. This effect is related to light depolarization induced by the germanium prism under high pressure. Moreover, the importance of polarizer position in the optical bench is highlighted. Indeed, due to the pressure-induced depolarization of the prism, the polarizer has to be placed before the prism to limit undesirable effects on the ATR spectrum baseline.

  17. Improved calibration technique of the infrared imaging bolometer using ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Drapiko, E; Peterson, B; Alekseev, A; Seo, D C

    2010-10-01

    The technique used until recently utilizing the Ne-He laser for imaging bolometer foils calibration [B. J. Peterson et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. 2, S1018 (2007)] has showed several issues. The method was based on irradiation of 1 cm spaced set of points on a foil by the laser beam moved by set of mirrors. Issues were the nonuniformity of laser power due to the vacuum window transmission nonuniformity and high reflection coefficient for the laser. Also, due to the limited infrared (IR) window size, it was very time consuming. The new methodology uses a compact ultraviolet (uv) light-emitting diodes installed inside the vacuum chamber in a fixed position and the foil itself will be moved in the XY directions by two vacuum feedthroughs. These will help to avoid the above mentioned issues due to lack of a vacuum window, fixed emitters, higher uv power absorption, and a fixed IR camera position.

  18. Improved calibration technique of the infrared imaging bolometer using ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Drapiko, E.; Peterson, B.; Alekseev, A.; Seo, D. C.

    2010-10-15

    The technique used until recently utilizing the Ne-He laser for imaging bolometer foils calibration [B. J. Peterson et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. 2, S1018 (2007)] has showed several issues. The method was based on irradiation of 1 cm spaced set of points on a foil by the laser beam moved by set of mirrors. Issues were the nonuniformity of laser power due to the vacuum window transmission nonuniformity and high reflection coefficient for the laser. Also, due to the limited infrared (IR) window size, it was very time consuming. The new methodology uses a compact ultraviolet (uv) light-emitting diodes installed inside the vacuum chamber in a fixed position and the foil itself will be moved in the XY directions by two vacuum feedthroughs. These will help to avoid the above mentioned issues due to lack of a vacuum window, fixed emitters, higher uv power absorption, and a fixed IR camera position.

  19. Effects of Sample Preparation on the Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.

    2015-05-22

    While reflectance spectroscopy is a useful tool in identifying molecular compounds, laboratory measurement of solid (particularly powder) samples often is confounded by sample preparation methods. For example, both the packing density and surface roughness can have an effect on the quantitative reflectance spectra of powdered samples. Recent efforts in our group have focused on developing standard methods for measuring reflectance spectra that accounts for sample preparation, as well as other factors such as particle size and provenance. In this work, the effect of preparation method on sample reflectivity was investigated by measuring the directional-hemispherical spectra of samples that were hand-packed as well as pressed into pellets using an integrating sphere attached to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The results show that the methods used to prepare the sample have a substantial effect on the measured reflectance spectra, as do other factors such as particle size.

  20. Computational design of solar reflection and far-infrared transmission films for a variable emittance device.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Kazunori; Ohnishi, Akira; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2003-03-01

    A smart radiation device (SRD) that is a variable emittance radiator has been studied as a method of thermal control for spacecraft. The SRD consists of manganese oxide with a perovskite-type structure, and the total hemispherical emittance of the SRD changes considerably depending on temperature. Here we propose an optimal method of designing multilayer films for the SRD by using agenetic algorithm. The multilayer films reflect solar radiation and transmit far-infrared radiation to maintain variation of the infrared optical properties of the SRD.

  1. Infrared reflectance measurements of the insulator-metal transition in solid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, H. K.; Hemley, R. J.; Hanfland, M.

    1990-01-01

    Reflectance measurements on solid hydrogen to 177 GPa (1.77 Mbar) have been performed from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths (0.5 to 3 eV). Above 150 GPa characteristic free-electron behavior in the infrared region is observed to increase sharply with increasing pressure. Analysis of volume dependence of the plasma frequency obtained from Drude-model fits to the spectra indicates that the pressure of the insulator-metal transition is 149 (+ or - 10) GPa at 295 K. The measurements are consistent with metallization by closure of an indirect gap in the molecular solid.

  2. Infrared diffuse reflectances (2.5-25 microns) of some meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamato, M.

    1987-04-01

    Emissionless infrared diffuse reflectances of several meteorites were measured using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer to identify asteroidal surface materials. It is noted that C3 carbonaceous chondrite materials may be distinguished from C3 materials by the depth of their hydration bands around 3 and 6 microns. Acid dissolution experiments suggest that the 6.8-micron band in the spectra of the Murchison (C2) meteorite is due to carbonates. The Norton County enstatite meteorite shows absorption bands around 10 microns which are due to the presence of pyroxene, and which are not found in the Mundrabilla iron meteorite.

  3. Study of ester crosslinking reactions on aluminum surfaces by infrared attenuated total reflectance spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Sanmitra A.; Yang, Charles Q.; de Haseth, James A.

    1998-06-01

    Polycarboxylic acids are used as an alternative nonformaldehyde durable press finishing agents for cotton fabrics. Previous studies have shown that polycarboxylic acids esterify with cotton cellulose through intermediate formation of a cyclic anhydride. Cotton cellulose, due to the presence of hydroxyl groups, is a very active substrate. To understand the mechanism of ester formation, esterification reactions were studied on aluminum surfaces by infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectrometry. The infrared data showed that a five-membered cyclic anhydride is formed as an intermediate, that esterifies with the crosslinking agents. The data also demonstrated that formation of anhydride increases with temperature and also in the presence of a catalyst.

  4. Infrared reflectance measurements of the insulator-metal transition in solid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, H. K.; Hemley, R. J.; Hanfland, M.

    1990-01-01

    Reflectance measurements on solid hydrogen to 177 GPa (1.77 Mbar) have been performed from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths (0.5 to 3 eV). Above 150 GPa characteristic free-electron behavior in the infrared region is observed to increase sharply with increasing pressure. Analysis of volume dependence of the plasma frequency obtained from Drude-model fits to the spectra indicates that the pressure of the insulator-metal transition is 149 (+ or - 10) GPa at 295 K. The measurements are consistent with metallization by closure of an indirect gap in the molecular solid.

  5. Optimally designed narrowband guided-mode resonance reflectance filters for mid-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jui-Nung; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Bhargava, Rohit; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    An alternative to the well-established Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, termed discrete frequency infrared (DFIR) spectrometry, has recently been proposed. This approach uses narrowband mid-infrared reflectance filters based on guided-mode resonance (GMR) in waveguide gratings, but filters designed and fabricated have not attained the spectral selectivity (≤ 32 cm−1) commonly employed for measurements of condensed matter using FT-IR spectroscopy. With the incorporation of dispersion and optical absorption of materials, we present here optimal design of double-layer surface-relief silicon nitride-based GMR filters in the mid-IR for various narrow bandwidths below 32 cm−1. Both shift of the filter resonance wavelengths arising from the dispersion effect and reduction of peak reflection efficiency and electric field enhancement due to the absorption effect show that the optical characteristics of materials must be taken into consideration rigorously for accurate design of narrowband GMR filters. By incorporating considerations for background reflections, the optimally designed GMR filters can have bandwidth narrower than the designed filter by the antireflection equivalence method based on the same index modulation magnitude, without sacrificing low sideband reflections near resonance. The reported work will enable use of GMR filters-based instrumentation for common measurements of condensed matter, including tissues and polymer samples. PMID:22109445

  6. Optimally designed narrowband guided-mode resonance reflectance filters for mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jui-Nung; Schulmerich, Matthew V; Bhargava, Rohit; Cunningham, Brian T

    2011-11-21

    An alternative to the well-established Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, termed discrete frequency infrared (DFIR) spectrometry, has recently been proposed. This approach uses narrowband mid-infrared reflectance filters based on guided-mode resonance (GMR) in waveguide gratings, but filters designed and fabricated have not attained the spectral selectivity (≤ 32 cm(-1)) commonly employed for measurements of condensed matter using FT-IR spectroscopy. With the incorporation of dispersion and optical absorption of materials, we present here optimal design of double-layer surface-relief silicon nitride-based GMR filters in the mid-IR for various narrow bandwidths below 32 cm(-1). Both shift of the filter resonance wavelengths arising from the dispersion effect and reduction of peak reflection efficiency and electric field enhancement due to the absorption effect show that the optical characteristics of materials must be taken into consideration rigorously for accurate design of narrowband GMR filters. By incorporating considerations for background reflections, the optimally designed GMR filters can have bandwidth narrower than the designed filter by the antireflection equivalence method based on the same index modulation magnitude, without sacrificing low sideband reflections near resonance. The reported work will enable use of GMR filters-based instrumentation for common measurements of condensed matter, including tissues and polymer samples. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Spectral Reflectance of Sub-Micron Scale Light Absorbing Impurities Using Hyperspectral Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Dal Farra, A.; Beach, J.; Schaepman, M. E.; Schwikowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    Light absorbing impurities (LAI) include black carbon, mineral dust and colored organic material. When deposited on highly reflective snow and glacier ice, LAI cause darkening of the surface, resulting in greater absorption of solar energy, heating of the snow/ice, and accelerated snow and glacier melt. Efforts to reduce LAI emissions and deposition have the potential to slow melt in regions where LAI are a substantial driver of snow and/or glacier melt. However, difficulties in characterizing the optical properties of mineral dust and organic LAI impede the assessment of the relative importance of black carbon, dust and organic LAI in driving melt. We developed a new method to optically characterize black carbon, mineral dust and organic matter at the particle scale using a Hyperspectral Microscope (HM, Cytoviva). The HM provides quantitative spectral analysis of nanoscale (128 nm pixel resolution) materials in the visible to near-infrared range (400 nm-1000 nm). We present: 1) an overview of the modifications we made to the HM in order to measure LAI reflectance, 2) reflectance spectra of pure minerals, black carbon, and humic substances measured with the HM at the particle scale, 3) a comparison of the HM measured spectra with bulk measurements made of the same materials using a spectroradiometer, and 4) preliminary results from environmental samples.

  8. A partial least squares model for non-volatile residue quantification using diffuse reflectance infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Amylynn; Moision, Robert M.

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, quantification of non-volatile residue (NVR) on surfaces relevant to space systems has been performed using solvent wipes for NVR removal followed by gravimetric analysis. In this approach the detectable levels of NVR are ultimately determined by the mass sensitivity of the analytical balance employed. Unfortunately, for routine samples, gravimetric measurement requires large sampling areas, on the order of a square foot, in order to clearly distinguish sample and background levels. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is one possible alternative to gravimetric analysis for NVR measurement. DRIFTS is an analytical technique used for the identification and quantification of organic compounds that has two primary advantages relative to gravimetric based methods: increased sensitivity and the ability to identify classes of organic species present. However, the use of DRIFTS is not without drawbacks, most notably repeatability of sample preparation and the additive quantification uncertainty arising from overlapping infrared signatures. This can result in traditional calibration methods greatly overestimating the concentration of species in mixtures. In this work, a partial least squares (PLS) regression model is shown to be an effective method for removing the over prediction error of a three component mixture of common contaminant species.

  9. Near-infrared optical properties of ex-vivo human skin and subcutaneous tissues using reflectance and transmittance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Rebecca; Laufer, Jan G.; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias; Essenpreis, Matthias; Cope, Mark

    1997-08-01

    The vast majority of 'non-invasive' measurements of human tissues using near infrared spectroscopy rely on passing light through the dermis and subdermis of the skin. Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of these tissues is essential to put into models of light transport and predict the effects of skin perfusion on measurements of deep tissue. Additionally, the skin could be a useful accessible organ for non-invasively determining the constituents of blood flowing through it. Samples of abdominal human skin (including subdermal tissue) were obtained from either post mortem examinations or plastic surgery. The samples were separated into a dermal layer (epidermis and dermis, 1.5 to 2 mm tick), and a sub-cutaneous layer comprised largely of fat. They were enclosed between two glass coverslips and placed in an integrating sphere to measure their reflectance and transmittance over a range of wavelengths from 600 to 1000 nm. The reflectance and transmittance values were converted into average absorption and reduced scattering coefficients by comparison with a Monte Carlo model of light transport. Improvements to the Monte Carlo model and measurement technique removed some previous uncertainties. The results show excellent separation of reduced scattering and absorption coefficient, with clear absorption peaks of hemoglobin, water and lipid. The effect of tissue storage upon measured optical properties was investigated.

  10. Reflective films and expression of light-regulated genes in field-grown apple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reflective films are used in orchard management to improve fruit coloration. Numerous physiological studies on the effects of application of these films have been conducted, including variation of angles of light incidence and reflection, spectral determination of reflected light and effects on pho...

  11. [Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) and its application in the determination for the quality of animal feed and products].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Meng, Qing-Xiang; Ren, Li-Ping; Yang, Jian-Song

    2010-06-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been the most rapidly developing and noticeable spectrographic analytical technique in recent years. The determining principle and progresses of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy are presented briefly. It mainly includes the progresses in pre-processing technique and analyzing model of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Two pre-processing techniques, including differential coefficient-dealt with technique, the signal-smoothing technique, and four analyzing models of near-infrared spectroscopy, including the multiplied lined regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS), and artificial nerve network (ANN). The application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy to the first time. The investigation of reviewed papers shows that the near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy is widely applied in feed analysis and animal products analysis because of its rapidness, non-destruction and non-pollution. The near infrared reflectance spectroscopy has been used to determine the feed common ingredient, such as dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber, crude fat and so on, micro-components including amino acid, vitamin, and noxious components, and to determine the physical and chemical properties of animal products which including egg, mutton, beef and pork. Details of the analytical characteristics of feed and animal products described in the reviewed papers are given. New trends and limits to the application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy in these fields are also discussed.

  12. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Leng Jinsong; Yu Kai; Lan Xin; Zhang Dawei; Liu Yanju

    2010-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  13. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinsong; Zhang, Dawei; Liu, Yanju; Yu, Kai; Lan, Xin

    2010-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  14. Performance characteristics of multicolor versus blue light and infrared imaging in the identification of reticular pseudodrusen.

    PubMed

    Badal, Josep; Biarnés, Marc; Monés, Jordi

    2017-01-21

    To describe the appearance of reticular pseudodrusen on multicolor imaging and to evaluate its diagnostic accuracy as compared with the two modalities that may be considered the current reference standard, blue light and infrared imaging. Retrospective study in which all multicolor images (constructed from images acquired at 486 nm-blue, 518 nm-green and 815 nm-infrared) of 45 consecutive patients visited in a single center was reviewed. Inclusion criteria involved the presence of >1 reticular pseudodrusen on a 30° × 30° image centered on the fovea as seen with the blue light channel derived from the multicolor imaging. Three experienced observers, masked to each other's results with other imaging modalities, independently classified the number of reticular pseudodrusen with each modality. The median interobserver agreement (kappa) was 0.58 using blue light; 0.65 using infrared; and 0.64 using multicolor images. Multicolor and infrared modalities identified a higher number of reticular pseudodrusen than blue light modality in all fields for all observers (p < 0.0001). Results were not different when multicolor and infrared were compared (p ≥ 0.27). These results suggest that multicolor and infrared are more sensitive and reproducible than blue light in the identification of RPD. Multicolor did not appear to add a significant value to infrared in the evaluation of RDP. Clinicians using infrared do not need to incorporate multicolor for the identification and quantification of RPD.

  15. Total internal reflection and dynamic light scattering microscopy of gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, Brian F.

    Two different techniques which apply optical microscopy in novel ways to the study of biological systems and materials were built and applied to several samples. The first is a system for adapting the well-known technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to an optical microscope. This can detect and scatter light from very small volumes, as compared to standard DLS which studies light scattering from volumes 1000x larger. The small scattering volume also allows for the observation of nonergodic dynamics in appropriate samples. Porcine gastric mucin (PGM) forms a gel at low pH which lines the epithelial cell layer and acts as a protective barrier against the acidic stomach environment. The dynamics and microscopic viscosity of PGM at different pH levels is studied using polystyrene microspheres as tracer particles. The microscopic viscosity and microrheological properties of the commercial basement membrane Matrigel are also studied with this instrument. Matrigel is frequently used to culture cells and its properties remain poorly determined. Well-characterized and purely synthetic Matrigel substitutes will need to have the correct rheological and morphological characteristics. The second instrument designed and built is a microscope which uses an interferometry technique to achieve an improvement in resolution 2.5x better in one dimension than the Abbe diffraction limit. The technique is based upon the interference of the evanescent field generated on the surface of a prism by a laser in a total internal reflection geometry. The enhanced resolution is demonstrated with fluorescent samples. Additionally. Raman imaging microscopy is demonstrated using the evanescent field in resonant and non-resonant samples, although attempts at applying the enhanced resolution technique to the Raman images were ultimately unsuccessful. Applications of this instrument include high resolution imaging of cell membranes and macroscopic structures in gels and proteins. Finally, a third

  16. CSF neurofilament light chain reflects corticospinal tract degeneration in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Menke, Ricarda A L; Gray, Elizabeth; Lu, Ching-Hua; Kuhle, Jens; Talbot, Kevin; Malaspina, Andrea; Turner, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to white matter tract pathology. A core signature involving the corticospinal tracts (CSTs) has been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Raised neurofilament light chain protein (NfL) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is thought to reflect axonal damage in a range of neurological disorders. The relationship between these two measures was explored. Methods CSF and serum NfL concentrations and DTI acquired at 3 Tesla on the same day were obtained from ALS patients (n = 25 CSF, 40 serum) and healthy, age-similar controls (n = 17 CSF, 25 serum). Within-group correlations between NfL and DTI measures of microstructural integrity in major white matter tracts (CSTs, superior longitudinal fasciculi [SLF], and corpus callosum) were performed using tract-based spatial statistics. Results NfL levels were higher in patients compared to controls. CSF levels correlated with clinical upper motor neuron burden and rate of disease progression. Higher NfL levels were significantly associated with lower DTI fractional anisotropy and increased radial diffusivity in the CSTs of ALS patients, but not in controls. Interpretation Elevated CSF and serum NfL is, in part, a result of CST degeneration in ALS. This highlights the wider potential for combining neurochemical and neuroimaging-based biomarkers in neurological disease. PMID:26273687

  17. Evidence for Reflected Light from the Most Eccentric Exoplanet Known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Henry, Gregory W.; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Wright, Jason T.; Ciardi, David R.; Fischer, Debra A.; Butler, R. Paul; Tinney, C. G.; Carter, Brad D.; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Bailey, Jeremy; O'Toole, Simon J.

    2016-04-01

    Planets in highly eccentric orbits form a class of objects not seen within our solar system. The most extreme case known among these objects is the planet orbiting HD 20782, with an orbital period of 597 days and an eccentricity of 0.96. Here we present new data and analysis for this system as part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey. We obtained CHIRON spectra to perform an independent estimation of the fundamental stellar parameters. New radial velocities from Anglo-Australian Telescope and PARAS observations during periastron passage greatly improve our knowledge of the eccentric nature of the orbit. The combined analysis of our Keplerian orbital and Hipparcos astrometry show that the inclination of the planetary orbit is \\gt 1\\_\\_AMP\\_\\_fdg;22, ruling out stellar masses for the companion. Our long-term robotic photometry show that the star is extremely stable over long timescales. Photometric monitoring of the star during predicted transit and periastron times using Microvariability and Oscillations of STars rule out a transit of the planet and reveal evidence of phase variations during periastron. These possible photometric phase variations may be caused by reflected light from the planet’s atmosphere and the dramatic change in star-planet separation surrounding the periastron passage.

  18. Attenuated total reflectance powder cell for infrared analysis of hygroscopic samples.

    PubMed

    Lekgoathi, M D S; le Roux, J P

    2011-11-01

    An attenuated total reflectance (ATR) sample cell has been designed, manufactured and subsequently used for the mid-infrared analysis of hygroscopic samples. This sample cell was installed as a simple drop-in replacement for the cell supplied with our commercially available Harrick Mvp-Pro FTIR-ATR accessory. Calcium chloride, a well-known desiccant that has a propensity to absorb water into its crystal lattice, was selected as non-infrared active substrate to accentuate the efficacy of the cell in preserving the anhydrous state of the sample by straightforward monitoring of the water bands. In contrast, mid-infrared spectra are presented that qualitatively demonstrate the rapid rate at which atmospheric moisture is incorporated into the anhydrous sample when analyzed using the conventional ATR cell assembly.

  19. Cryo-Transmittance and -Reflectance of Filters and Beamsplitters for the SIRTF Infrared Array Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Kenneth P.; Quijada, Manuel A.a

    2000-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) uses two dichroic beamsplitters, four bandpass filters, and four detector arrays to acquire images in four channels at wavelengths between 3 and 10 micron. Accurate knowledge of the pass bands is necessary because, in order to meet the science objectives, IRAC is required to do 2% relative photometry in each band relative to the other bands. We report the in-band and out-of-band polarized transmittance and reflectance of these optical elements measured near the instrument operating temperature of 1.4 K. Details of the experimental apparatus, which include a continuous flow liquid helium optical cryostat and a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer are discussed.

  20. Photoelastic modulation-reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy of CO on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacchiola, D.; Thompson, A. W.; Kaltchev, M.; Tysoe, W. T.

    2002-11-01

    The photoelastic modulation-reflection absorption infrared spectrum (PEM-RAIRS) of CO on single crystal Pd(111) is measured for CO pressures up to ~150 Torr. The ac component of the signal, corresponding to the infrared signal of the surface, is measured using a synchronous demodulator circuit rather than using a lock-in amplifier as used in previous experiments to measure the infrared spectra of model catalysts surfaces. This allows the spectra to be collected at almost the same speed as RAIRS spectra performed in ultrahigh vacuum. A simplified synchronous demodulator circuit is described consisting of two sample-and-hold circuits operating at 100 kHz. Spectra are obtained that are in excellent agreement with previous results showing that a combination of hcp and fcc threefold sites are occupied by CO at 300 K. Atop sites become occupied as the CO pressure increases. Heating the Pd(111) sample to ~500 K removes all adsorbed CO.

  1. [Rapid determination of fatty acids in soybean oils by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Feng-ping; Liu, Yao-min; Wu, Zong-wen; Suo, You-rui

    2012-08-01

    In the present research, a novel method was established for determination of five fatty acids in soybean oil by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy. The optimum conditions of mathematics model of five components (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3) were studied, including the sample set selection, chemical value analysis, the detection methods and condition. Chemical value was analyzed by gas chromatography. One hundred fifty eight samples were selected, 138 for modeling set, 10 for testing set and 10 for unknown sample set. All samples were placed in sample pools and scanned by transmission reflection-near infrared spectrum after sonicleaning for 10 minute. The 1100-2500 nm spectral region was analyzed. The acquisition interval was 2 nm. Modified partial least square method was chosen for calibration mode creating. Result demonstrated that the 1-VR of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.8839, 0.5830, 0.9001, 0.9776 and 0.9596, respectively. And the SECV of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.42, 0.29, 0.83, 0.46 and 0.21, respectively. The standard error of the calibration (SECV) of five fatty acids between the reference value of testing sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.891, 0.790, 0.900, 0.976 and 0.942, respectively. It was proved that the near infrared spectrum predictive value was linear with chemical value and the mathematical model established for fatty acids of soybean oil was feasible. For validation, 10 unknown samples were selected for analysis by near infrared spectrum. The result demonstrated that the relative standard deviation between predict value and chemical value was less than 5.50%. That was to say that transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy had a good veracity in analysis of fatty acids of soybean oil.

  2. [Tri-Level Infrared Spectroscopic Identification of Hot Melting Reflective Road Marking Paint].

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Ma, Fang; Sun, Su-qin

    2015-12-01

    In order to detect the road marking paint from the trace evidence in traffic accident scene, and to differentiate their brands, we use Tri-level infrared spectroscopic identification, which employs the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), the second derivative infrared spectroscopy(SD-IR), two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy(2D-IR) to identify three different domestic brands of hot melting reflective road marking paints and their raw materials in formula we Selected. The experimental results show that three labels coatings in ATR and FTIR spectrograms are very similar in shape, only have different absorption peak wave numbers, they have wide and strong absorption peaks near 1435 cm⁻¹, and strong absorption peak near 879, 2955, 2919, 2870 cm⁻¹. After enlarging the partial areas of spectrograms and comparing them with each kind of raw material of formula spectrograms, we can distinguish them. In the region 700-970 and 1370-1 660 cm⁻¹ the spectrograms mainly reflect the different relative content of heavy calcium carbonate of three brands of the paints, and that of polyethylene wax (PE wax), ethylene vinyl acetate resin (EVA), dioctyl phthalate (DOP) in the region 2800-2960 cm⁻¹. The SD-IR not only verify the result of the FTIR analysis, but also further expand the microcosmic differences and reflect the different relative content of quartz sand in the 512-799 cm-1 region. Within the scope of the 1351 to 1525 cm⁻¹, 2D-IR have more significant differences in positions and numbers of automatically peaks. Therefore, the Tri-level infrared spectroscopic identification is a fast and effective method to distinguish the hot melting road marking paints with a gradually improvement in apparent resolution.

  3. Near-infrared reflectance spectra-applications to problems in asteroid-meteorite relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, Lucy A.; Chamberlin, Alan; Vilas, Faith

    1991-01-01

    Near-infrared spectral reflectance data were collected at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Mauna Kea Observatories in 1985 and 1986 for the purpose of searching the region near the 3:1 Kirkwood gap for asteroids with the spectral signatures of ordinary chondrite parent bodies. Twelve reflectance spectra are observed. The presence of ordinary chondrite parent bodies among this specific set of observed asteroids is not obvious, though the sample is biased towards the larger asteroids in the region due to limitations imposed by detector sensitivity. The data set, which was acquired with the same instrumentation used for the 52-color asteroid survey (Bell et al., 1987), also presents some additional findings. The range of spectral characteristics that exist among asteroids of the same taxonomic type is noted. Conclusions based on the findings are discussed.

  4. Modeling the attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum of apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufort, Julie; Ségalen, Loïc; Gervais, Christel; Brouder, Christian; Balan, Etienne

    2016-10-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectra were measured on a synthetic and a natural fluorapatite sample. A modeling approach based on the computation of the Fresnel reflection coefficient between the ATR crystal and the powder sample was used to analyze the line shape of the spectra. The dielectric properties of the samples were related to those of pure fluorapatite using an effective medium approach, based on Maxwell-Garnett and Bruggeman models. The Bruggeman effective medium model leads to a very good agreement with the experimental data recorded on the synthetic fluorapatite sample. The poorer agreement observed on the natural sample suggests a more significant heterogeneity of the sample at a characteristic length scale larger than the mid-infrared characteristic wavelength, i.e., about 10 micrometers. The results demonstrate the prominent role of macroscopic electrostatic effects over fine details of the microscopic structure in determining the line shape of strong ATR bands.

  5. Prepreg cure monitoring using diffuse reflectance-FTIR. [Fourier Transform Infrared Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    An in situ diffuse reflectance-Fourier transform infrared technique was developed to determine infrared spectra of graphite fiber prepregs as they were being cured. A bismaleimide, an epoxy, and addition polyimide matrix resin prepregs were studied. An experimental polyimide adhesive was also examined. Samples were positioned on a small heater at the focal point of diffuse reflectance optics and programmed at 15 F/min while FTIR spectra were being scanned, averaged, and stored. An analysis of the resulting spectra provided basic insights into changes in matrix resin molecular structure which accompanied reactions such as imidization and crosslinking. An endo-exothermal isomerization involving reactive end-caps was confirmed for the addition polyimide prepregs. The results of this study contribute to a fundamental understanding of the processing of composites and adhesives. Such understanding will promote the development of more efficient cure cycles.

  6. [Detection of erucic acid and glucosinolate in intact rapeseed by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Riu, Yu-kui; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Guo, Jing; Jin, Yin-hua; Luo, Yun-bo

    2006-12-01

    With the rapid development of transgenic food, more and more transgenic food has been pouring into the market, raising great concern about transgenic food' s edible safety. To analyze the content of erucic acid and glucosinolate in transgenic rapeseed and its parents, all the seeds were scanned intact by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectrometry ranging from 12 000 to 4 000 cm(-1) with a resolution of 4 cm(-1) and 64 times of scanning. Bruker OPUS software package was applied for quantification, while the results were compared with the standard methods. The results showed that the method of NIRS was very precise, which proved that infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be applied to detect the toxins in transgenic food. On the other hand, the results also showed that the content of erucic acid in transgenic rapeseeds is 0. 5-1. 0 times

  7. Mix ratio measurements of pozzolanic blends by Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance method

    SciTech Connect

    Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.

    1992-07-01

    The disposal of low-level radioactive liquid wastes at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, involves mixing the wastes with pozzolanic grout-forming solid blends. Checking the quality of each blend component and its mix ratio will ensure processibility of the blend and the long-term performance of the resulting waste grout. In earlier work at Hanford laboratories, Fourier transform infrared-transmission method (FTIR-TR) using KBr pellet was applied successfully in the analysis of blends consisting of cement, fly ash, and clays. This method involves time-consuming sample preparation resulting in slow turnaround for repetitive sampling. Because reflection methods do not require elaborate sample preparation, they have the potential to reduce turnaround analysis time. Neat samples may be examined making these methods attractive for quality control. This study investigates the capability of Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance method (FTIR-ATR) to analyze pozzolanic blends.

  8. Label-free near-infrared reflectance microscopy as a complimentary tool for two-photon fluorescence brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Costantini, Irene; Margoni, Emilia; Iannello, Giulio; Bria, Alessandro; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-11-01

    In vivo two-photon imaging combined with targeted fluorescent indicators is currently extensively used for attaining critical insights into brain functionality and structural plasticity. Additional information might be gained from back-scattered photons from the near-infrared (NIR) laser without introducing any exogenous labelling. Here, we describe a complimentary and versatile approach that, by collecting the reflected NIR light, provides structural details on axons and blood vessels in the brain, both in fixed samples and in live animals under a cranial window. Indeed, by combining NIR reflectance and two-photon imaging of a slice of hippocampus from a Thy1-GFPm mouse, we show the presence of randomly oriented axons intermingled with sparsely fluorescent neuronal processes. The back-scattered photons guide the contextualization of the fluorescence structure within brain atlas thanks to the recognition of characteristic hippocampal structures. Interestingly, NIR reflectance microscopy allowed the label-free detection of axonal elongations over the superficial layers of mouse cortex under a cranial window in vivo. Finally, blood flow can be measured in live preparations, thus validating label free NIR reflectance as a tool for monitoring hemodynamic fluctuations. The prospective versatility of this label-free technique complimentary to two-photon fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated in a mouse model of photothrombotic stroke in which the axonal degeneration and blood flow remodeling can be investigated.

  9. Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Sampling in Infrared Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Materials Requires Reproducible Pressure Control.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Cassidy, Brianna M; DeJong, Stephanie A; Belliveau, Raymond G; Myrick, Michael L; Morgan, Stephen L

    2017-01-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy, in which the sample is pressed against an internal reflection element, is a popular technique for rapid IR spectral collection. However, depending on the accessory design, the pressure applied to the sample is not always well controlled. While collecting data from fabrics with heterogeneous coatings, we have observed systematic pressure-dependent changes in spectra that can be eliminated by more reproducible pressure control. We also described a pressure sensor adapted to work with an ATR tower to enable more precise control of pressure during ATR sampling.

  10. Simulation of infrared emissivity and reflectivity of oil films on sea surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel, Nicolas; Monnier, Goulven; Sergievskaya, Irina; Bourlier, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, an efficient sea surface generation is described for the fast and realistic simulation of the infrared emissivity and reflectivity of clean and contaminated seas. The clean sea surface is modelled by the Elfouhaily et al. spectrum model. For describing the surface damping due to the oil film at the sea surface, the model of local balance (MLB) is used. Thus, these surface models are used as the basis for calculating the emissivity and reflectivity. The numerical efficient computation is tested by comparison with the reference statistical computation for its validation.

  11. Features of the infrared reflection spectra of SmS semiconductor in the homogeneity range

    SciTech Connect

    Ulashkevich, Yu. V. Kaminski, V. V.; Golubkov, A. V.

    2009-03-15

    Infrared reflection spectra in the range of 5200-380 cm{sup -1} were measured for polycrystalline samarium monosulfide samples in the semiconductor phase with compositions Sm{sub 1+x}S lying within the homogeneity range (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.17) in the temperature range of 300-600 K. Five peaks with energies in the range of 1150-880 cm{sup -1}, whose positions depend weakly on the composition and temperature. It was shown that the reflection peaks are associated with {sup 7}F{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions of 4f electrons of Sm{sup 2+} ions.

  12. Measuring near infrared spectral reflectance changes from water stressed conifer stands with AIS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, George; Running, Steven W.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-2 (AIS-2) data was acquired over two paired conifer stands for the purpose of detecting differences in spectral reflectance between stressed and natural canopies. Water stress was induced in a stand of Norway spruce and white pine by severing the sapwood near the ground. Water stress during the AIS flights was evaluated through shoot water potential and relative water content measurements. Preliminary analysis with raw AIS-2 data using SPAM indicates that there were small, inconsistent differences in absolute spectral reflectance in the near infrared 0.97 to 1.3 micron between the stressed and natural canopies.

  13. Dynamic measurement of reflectance/emissivity in mid-infrared band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tian-yu; Chen, Min-sun; Zhang, Xiang-yu; Jiang, Hou-man

    2016-11-01

    In order to measure the change of laser energy coupling coefficient with temperature in mid-infrared wave band, reflectance integrating sphere experiment system was designed and set up. 915nm CW laser was used to heat samples and the wavelength of probe laser is 3.8μm. Chopper and phase-locked amplifier were adopted in the system. Thermal imager was used to measure and record the temperature of samples during laser irradiation. The reflectance of steel and aluminum plates to 3.8μm was measured during 915nm laser irradiation. EDS analysis was done to investigate the change of elemental composition in the samples respectively. The experimental results show that, the results of reflectance and radiation temperature measured by this system are relatively accurate during laser irradiation. In the process of temperature rising from 300K to 785K, the color of 45# steel plates turns blue and black, while the color of aluminum alloy plates is basically unchanged. When temperature reaches about 700K, reflectance of 45# steel decreases obviously with the increase of temperature, while reflectance of aluminum is almost constant. The reflectance is probably determined by the oxide in the surface of samples which is consistent with the results of EDS analysis. Reflectance decreases with the increase of the content of oxygen in the surface. The reason of why the reflectance of aluminum is almost constant is that aluminum oxide is not generate massively under 750K.

  14. Infrared reflection spectroscopy and optical constants of LiNbO3 films on crystal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, N. N.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Medaglia, P. G.

    2017-01-01

    We have measured infrared reflectivity spectra of thin lithium niobate films of nanometer thickness, grown by a pulsed laser deposition technique using KrF-excimer laser (λ=248 nm) on the single crystalline substrates (sapphire, MgO, NdGaO3 and SrTiO3). Using the dispersion analysis technique, we have calculated thicknesses and optical constants of the films. The phonon parameters of the substrates and films are obtained.

  15. Infrared reflection spectroscopy and optical constants of LiNbO3 films on crystal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, N. N.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Medaglia, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    We have measured infrared reflectivity spectra of thin lithium niobate films of nanometer thickness, grown by a pulsed laser deposition technique using KrF-excimer laser (λ=248 nm) on the single crystalline substrates (sapphire, MgO, NdGaO3 and SrTiO3). Using the dispersion analysis technique, we have calculated thicknesses and optical constants of the films. The phonon parameters of the substrates and films are obtained.

  16. Measurement of intrinsic optical backscattering characteristics of cells using fiber-guided near infrared light

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intrinsic optical signals (IOS), which reflect changes in transmittance and scattering light, have been applied to characterize the physiological conditions of target biological tissues. Backscattering approaches allow mounting of the source and detector on the same side of a sample which creates a more compact physical layout of device. This study presents a compact backscattering design using fiber-optic guided near-infrared (NIR) light to measure the amplitude and phase changes of IOS under different osmotic challenges. Methods High-frequency intensity-modulated light was guided via optic fiber, which was controlled by micromanipulator to closely aim at a minimum cluster of cortical neurons. Several factors including the probe design, wavelength selection, optimal measuring distance between the fiber-optical probe and cells were considered. Our experimental setup was tested in cultured cells to observe the relationship between the changes in backscattered NIR light and cellular IOS, which is believed mainly caused by cell volume changes in hypo/hyperosmotic solutions (± 20, ± 40 and ± 60 mOsm). Results The critical parameters of the current setup including the optimal measuring distance from fiber-optical probe to target tissue and the linear relationship between backscattering intensity and cell volume were determined. The backscattering intensity was found to be inversely proportional to osmotic changes. However, the phase shift exhibited a nonlinear feature and reached a plateau at hyperosmotic solution. Conclusions Our study indicated that the backscattering NIR light guided by fiber-optical probe makes it a potential alternative for continuous observation of intrinsic optical properties of cell culture under varied physical or chemical challenges. PMID:20184751

  17. Influence of incident light offset on diffuse reflectance measurement for curved object: a Monte Carlo-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chizhu

    2016-10-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral ranges is a widely used technique for nondestructive inspection of biological tissues. The optical properties, such as absorption and scattering coefficients, can be inversely deduced from the measured quantities and then be used to speculate on some related chemical and physical properties of the tissue. Most studies consider biological tissues as homogeneous semi-infinite turbid media or infinitelywide planar layered turbid media. However, the biological tissues have various geometries, and nearly all of them have curved surfaces. The position and direction of the incident light relative to the tissue surface affect the diffuse reflectance. In this work, we study the influence of incident light offset on the measured diffuse reflectance signals based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The MC method are regarded as golden standard for light propagation in turbid media and can be used without the limitations of complex tissue geometries. A model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurement using optic fiber probe is built. The incident light is assumed to be an infinitely narrow photon beam. The tissue under detection is assumed to be spherical described by its curvature radius. A series of Monte Carlo simulation are carried out with varying incident directions. Simulation results are analyzed and discussed to assess the influence on the measurements for tissues with different curvature radii. This study may aid in achieving more accurate and effective measurement without extensive experiments.

  18. High reflected cubic cavity as long path absorption cell for infrared gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    One direct and efficient method to improve the sensitivity of infrared gas sensors is to increase the optical path length of gas cells according to Beer-Lambert Law. In this paper, cubic shaped cavities with high reflected inner coating as novel long path absorption cells for infrared gas sensing were developed. The effective optical path length (EOPL) for a single cubic cavity and tandem cubic cavities were investigated based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measuring oxygen P11 line at 763 nm. The law of EOPL of a diffuse cubic cavity in relation with the reflectivity of the coating, the port fraction and side length of the cavity was obtained. Experimental results manifested an increase of EOPL for tandem diffuse cubic cavities as the decrease of port fraction of the connecting aperture f', and the EOPL equaled to the sum of that of two single cubic cavities at f'<0.01. The EOPL spectra at infrared wavelength range for different inner coatings including high diffuse coatings and high reflected metallic thin film coatings were deduced.

  19. Graphical Approach to Fresnel's Equations for Reflection and Refraction of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William T.

    1980-01-01

    Develops a coordinate-free approach to Fresnel's equations for the reflection and refraction of light at a plane interface. Describes a graphical construction for finding the vector amplitudes of the reflected and transmitted waves. (Author/CS)

  20. Graphical Approach to Fresnel's Equations for Reflection and Refraction of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William T.

    1980-01-01

    Develops a coordinate-free approach to Fresnel's equations for the reflection and refraction of light at a plane interface. Describes a graphical construction for finding the vector amplitudes of the reflected and transmitted waves. (Author/CS)

  1. Killing Cancer Cells with the Help of Infrared Light – Photoimmunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy uses an antibody–photoabsorber conjugate that binds to cancer cells. When near-infrared light is applied, the cells swell and then burst, causing the cancer cell to die. Photoimmunotherapy is in clinical trials in patients with inoperable tumors.

  2. Manipulating pH using near-infrared light assisted by upconverting nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijun; Xiong, Yubing; Etchenique, Roberto; Wu, Si

    2016-11-29

    Near-infrared light can be used to manipulate the pH of aqueous solutions by using upconverting nanoparticle-assisted photocleavage of a ruthenium complex photobase. Upconverting nanoparticles and the photobase were also introduced into a pH-responsive hydrogel, in which near-infrared irradiation induced swelling of the hydrogel.

  3. Multipitched Diffraction Gratings for Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the application of metal-coated diffraction gratings possessing multiple simultaneous pitch values for surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. SEIRA increases the magnitude of vibrational signals in infrared measurements by one of several mechanisms, most frequently involving the enhanced electric field associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). While the majority of SEIRA applications to date have employed nanoparticle-based plasmonic systems, recent advances have shown how various metals and structures lead to similar signal enhancement. Recently, diffraction grating couplers have been demonstrated as a highly tunable platform for SEIRA. Indeed, gratings are an experimentally advantageous platform due to the inherently tunable nature of surface plasmon excitation at these surfaces since both the grating pitch and incident angle can be used to modify the spectral location of the plasmon resonance. In this work, we use laser interference lithography (LIL) to fabricate gratings possessing multiple pitch values by subjecting photoresist-coated glass slides to repetitive exposures at varying orientations. After metal coating, these gratings produced multiple, simultaneous plasmon peaks associated with the multipitched surface, as identified by infrared reflectance measurements. These plasmon peaks could then be coupled to vibrational modes in thin films to provide localized enhancement of infrared signals. We demonstrate the flexibility and tunability of this platform for signal enhancement. It is anticipated that, with further refinement, this approach might be used as a general platform for broadband enhancement of infrared spectroscopy.

  4. Rapid profiling of Swiss cheese by attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy and descriptive sensory analysis.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu-Vurma, N A; Eliardi, A; Drake, M A; Rodriguez-Saona, L E; Harper, W J

    2009-08-01

    The acceptability of cheese depends largely on the flavor formed during ripening. The flavor profiles of cheeses are complex and region- or manufacturer-specific which have made it challenging to understand the chemistry of flavor development and its correlation with sensory properties. Infrared spectroscopy is an attractive technology for the rapid, sensitive, and high-throughput analysis of foods, providing information related to its composition and conformation of food components from the spectra. Our objectives were to establish infrared spectral profiles to discriminate Swiss cheeses produced by different manufacturers in the United States and to develop predictive models for determination of sensory attributes based on infrared spectra. Fifteen samples from 3 Swiss cheese manufacturers were received and analyzed using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The spectra were analyzed using soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) to build a classification model. The cheeses were profiled by a trained sensory panel using descriptive sensory analysis. The relationship between the descriptive sensory scores and ATR-IR spectra was assessed using partial least square regression (PLSR) analysis. SIMCA discriminated the Swiss cheeses based on manufacturer and production region. PLSR analysis generated prediction models with correlation coefficients of validation (rVal) between 0.69 and 0.96 with standard error of cross-validation (SECV) ranging from 0.04 to 0.29. Implementation of rapid infrared analysis by the Swiss cheese industry would help to streamline quality assurance.

  5. Discrimination between immature and mature green coffees by attenuated total reflectance and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ana Paula; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in the characterization and discrimination between immature and mature or ripe coffee beans. Arabica coffee beans were submitted to FTIR analysis by reflectance readings employing attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and diffuse reflectance (DR) accessories. The obtained spectra were similar, but in general higher absorbance values were observed for nondefective beans in comparison to immature ones. Multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis, PCA, and agglomerative hierarchical clustering, AHC) was performed in order to verify the possibility of discrimination between immature and mature coffee samples. A clear separation between immature and mature coffees was observed based on AHC and PCA analyses of the normalized spectra obtained by employing both ATR and DR accessories. Linear discriminant analysis was employed for developing classification models, with recognition and prediction abilities of 100%. Such results showed that FTIR analysis presents potential for the development of a simple routine methodology for separation of immature and mature coffee beans. Practical Application: The ultimate goal of this research is to be able to propose improvements in the way immature coffee beans are separated from graded mature beans in coffee facilities (cooperatives and other coffee producer's associations). The results obtained herein point toward FTIR as a potential tool for the aimed improvements.

  6. Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors: Device Physics and Light Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandara, S. V.; Gunapala, S. D.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J.; Luong, E.; Hong, W.; Sengupta, D. K.

    1997-01-01

    It is customary to make infrared (IR) detectors in the long wavelength range by utilizing the interband transition which promotes an electron across the band gap (Eg) from the valence band to the conduction.

  7. All-Silicon Ultra-Broadband Infrared Light Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Gorgulu, Kazim; Gok, Abdullah; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Topalli, Kagan; Bıyıklı, Necmi; Okyay, Ali K.

    2016-01-01

    Absorbing infrared radiation efficiently is important for critical applications such as thermal imaging and infrared spectroscopy. Common infrared absorbing materials are not standard in Si VLSI technology. We demonstrate ultra-broadband mid-infrared absorbers based purely on silicon. Broadband absorption is achieved by the combined effects of free carrier absorption, and vibrational and plasmonic absorption resonances. The absorbers, consisting of periodically arranged silicon gratings, can be fabricated using standard optical lithography and deep reactive ion etching techniques, allowing for cost-effective and wafer-scale fabrication of micro-structures. Absorption wavebands in excess of 15 micrometers (5–20 μm) are demonstrated with more than 90% average absorptivity. The structures also exhibit broadband absorption performance even at large angles of incidence (θ = 50°), and independent of polarization. PMID:27924933

  8. Lights, Camera, Action: Facilitating PETE Students' Reflection through Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Okseon; Ravizza, Dean; Lee, Myung-Ah

    2009-01-01

    Preparing teacher candidates to be reflective professionals is a critical component of physical education teacher education programs. Although many specific strategies have been developed to facilitate post-lesson reflection, strategies for reflecting on future work and professional life have not been widely explored. As a way to facilitate…

  9. Characterization of silver halide fiber optics and hollow silica waveguides for use in the construction of a mid-infrared attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy probe.

    PubMed

    Damin, Craig A; Sommer, André J

    2013-11-01

    Advances in fiber optic materials have allowed for the construction of fibers and waveguides capable of transmitting infrared radiation. An investigation of the transmission characteristics associated with two commonly used types of infrared-transmitting fibers/waveguides for prospective use in a fiber/waveguide-coupled attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) probe was performed. Characterization of silver halide polycrystalline fiber optics and hollow silica waveguides was done on the basis of the transmission of infrared light using a conventional fiber optic coupling accessory and an infrared microscope. Using the fiber optic coupling accessory, the average percent transmission for three silver halide fibers was 18.1 ± 6.1% relative to a benchtop reflection accessory. The average transmission for two hollow waveguides (HWGs) using the coupling accessory was 8.0 ± 0.3%. (Uncertainties in the relative percent transmission represent the standard deviations.) Reduced transmission observed for the HWGs was attributed to the high numerical aperture of the coupling accessory. Characterization of the fibers/waveguides using a zinc selenide lens objective on an infrared microscope indicated 24.1 ± 7.2% of the initial light input into the silver halide fibers was transmitted. Percent transmission obtained for the HWGs was 98.7 ± 0.1%. Increased transmission using the HWGs resulted from the absence or minimization of insertion and scattering losses due to the hollow air core and a better-matched numerical aperture. The effect of bending on the transmission characteristics of the fibers/waveguides was also investigated. Significant deviations in the transmission of infrared light by the solid-core silver halide fibers were observed for various bending angles. Percent transmission greater than 98% was consistently observed for the HWGs at the bending angles. The combined benefits of high percent transmission, reproducible instrument responses, and increased bending

  10. Disk-integrated reflection light curves of planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Munoz, A.

    2014-03-01

    The light scattered by a planet atmosphere contains valuable information on the planet's composition and aerosol content. Typically, the interpretation of that information requires elaborate radiative transport models accounting for the absorption and scattering processes undergone by the star photons on their passage through the atmosphere. I have been working on a particular family of algorithms based on Backward Monte Carlo (BMC) integration for solving the multiple-scattering problem in atmospheric media. BMC algorithms simulate statistically the photon trajectories in the reverse order that they actually occur, i.e. they trace the photons from the detector through the atmospheric medium and onwards to the illumination source following probability laws dictated by the medium's optical properties. BMC algorithms are versatile, as they can handle diverse viewing and illumination geometries, and can readily accommodate various physical phenomena. As will be shown, BMC algorithms are very well suited for the prediction of magnitudes integrated over a planet's disk (whether uniform or not). Disk-integrated magnitudes are relevant in the current context of exploration of extrasolar planets because spatial resolution of these objects will not be technologically feasible in the near future. I have been working on various predictions for the disk-integrated properties of planets that demonstrate the capacities of the BMC algorithm. These cases include the variability of the Earth's integrated signal caused by diurnal and seasonal changes in the surface reflectance and cloudiness, or by sporadic injection of large amounts of volcanic particles into the atmosphere. Since the implemented BMC algorithm includes a polarization mode, these examples also serve to illustrate the potential of polarimetry in the characterization of both Solar System and extrasolar planets. The work is complemented with the analysis of disk-integrated photometric observations of Earth and Venus

  11. Characterization of reflected light from the space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, H. B.; Tingey, D. L.; Holze, R. H.; Sperber, B. R.

    1980-01-01

    Sunlight reflected off large space structures is examined. To assure that this illumination does not exceed the irradiance tolerances of the eye, reflections from these satellites must be controlled by vehicle orientation and surface specifications. The components of various space power system vehicles to determine the reflectances which will significantly contribute to the ground illumination are evaluated. Calculations of reflected solar intensity from various satellite system elements requires description of the elements and of the geometry potential reflectance paths. Surface intensity and the conditions under which it will illuminate a portion of the Earth are also determined.

  12. Beyond colour: consistent variation in near infrared and solar reflectivity in sunbirds (Nectariniidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawkey, Matthew D.; Igic, Branislav; Rogalla, Svana; Goldenberg, Jonathan; Clusella-Trullas, Susana; D'Alba, Liliana

    2017-10-01

    The visible spectrum represents a fraction of the sun's radiation, a large portion of which is within the near infrared (NIR). However, wavelengths outside of the visible spectrum that are reflected by coloured tissues have rarely been considered, despite their potential significance to thermal effects. Here, we report the reflectivity from 300 to 2100 nm of differently coloured feathers. We measured reflectivity across the UV-Vis-NIR spectra of different (a) body parts, (b) colour-producing mechanisms and (c) sexes for 252 individuals of 68 sunbird (family: Nectariniidae) species. Breast plumage was the most reflective and cap plumage the least. Female plumage had greater reflectivity than males. Carotenoid-based colours had the greatest reflectivity, followed by non-iridescent and iridescent melanin-based colours. As ordered arrays of melanin-filled organelles (melanosomes) produce iridescent colours, this suggests that nanostructuring may affect reflectance across the spectrum. Our results indicate that differently coloured feathers consistently vary in their thermal, as well as obvious visual, properties.

  13. Health Monitoring of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Mid-Infrared Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Spuckler, C. M.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Street, K. W.

    2002-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) reflectance is shown to be a powerful tool for monitoring the integrity of 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Because of the translucent nature of plasma-sprayed 8YSZ TBCs at MIR wavelengths (3 to 5 pm), measured reflectance does not only originate from the TBC surface, but contains strong contributions from internal scattering within the coating as well as reflectance from the underlying TBC/substrate interface. Therefore, changes in MIR reflectance measurements can be used to monitor the progression of TBC delamination. In particular, MIR reflectance is shown to reproducibly track the progression of TBC delamination produced by repeated thermal cycling (to 1163 C) of plasma-sprayed 8YSZ TBCs on Rene N5 superalloy substrates. To understand the changes in MIR reflectance with the progression of a delamination crack network, a four-flux scattering model is used to predict the increase in MIR reflectance produced by the introduction of these cracks.

  14. Health Monitoring of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Mid-Infrared Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Spuckler, C. M.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Street, K. W.

    2002-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) reflectance is shown to be a powerful tool for monitoring the integrity of 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Because of the translucent nature of plasma-sprayed 8YSZ TBCs, particularly at MIR wavelengths (3 to 5 microns), measured reflectance does not only originate from the TBC surface, but contains strong contributions from internal scattering within the coating as well as reflectance from the underlying TBC/substrate interface. Therefore, changes in MIR reflectance measurements can be used to monitor the progression of TBC delamination. In particular, MIR reflectance is shown to reproducibly track the progression of TBC delamination produced by repeated thermal cycling (to 1163 C) of plasma-sprayed 8YSZ TBCs on Rene N5 superalloy substrates. To understand the changes in MIR reflectance with the progression of a delamination crack network, a four-flux scattering model is used to predict the increase in MIR reflectance produced by the introduction of these cracks.

  15. Reflectance-mode interferometric near-infrared spectroscopy quantifies brain absorption, scattering, and blood flow index in vivo.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Dawid; Kholiqov, Oybek; Srinivasan, Vivek J

    2017-02-01

    Interferometric near-infrared spectroscopy (iNIRS) is a new technique that measures time-of-flight- (TOF-) resolved autocorrelations in turbid media, enabling simultaneous estimation of optical and dynamical properties. Here, we demonstrate reflectance-mode iNIRS for noninvasive monitoring of a mouse brain in vivo. A method for more precise quantification with less static interference from superficial layers, based on separating static and dynamic components of the optical field autocorrelation, is presented. Absolute values of absorption, reduced scattering, and blood flow index (BFI) are measured, and changes in BFI and absorption are monitored during a hypercapnic challenge. Absorption changes from TOF-resolved iNIRS agree with absorption changes from continuous wave NIRS analysis, based on TOF-integrated light intensity changes, an effective path length, and the modified Beer-Lambert Law. Thus, iNIRS is a promising approach for quantitative and noninvasive monitoring of perfusion and optical properties in vivo.

  16. Quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance infrared, near-infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Erxleben, Andrea; Ryder, Alan G; McArdle, Patrick

    2010-11-02

    The simultaneous quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs (forms I, III and V) in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR), near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis is reported. To reduce the effect of systematic variations, four different data pre-processing methods; multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variate (SNV), first and second derivatives, were applied and their performance was evaluated using their prediction errors. It was possible to derive a reliable calibration model for the three polymorphic forms, in powder ternary mixtures, using a partial least squares (PLS) algorithm with SNV pre-processing, which predicted the concentration of polymorphs I, III and V. Root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for ATR-IR spectra were 5.0%, 5.1% and 4.5% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively, while NIR spectra had a RMSEP of 2.0%, 2.9%, and 2.8% and Raman spectra had a RMSEP of 3.5%, 4.1%, and 3.6% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively. NIR spectroscopy exhibits the smallest analytical error, higher accuracy and robustness. When these advantages are combined with the greater convenience of NIR's "in glass bottle" sampling method both ATR-IR and Raman methods appear less attractive.

  17. Infrared complex refractive index measurements and simulated reflection mode infrared absorption spectroscopy of shock-compressed polymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Moore, D S; McGrane, S D; Funk, D J

    2004-05-01

    Thin film interference effects complicate the interpretation of reflection-mode infrared absorption spectra obtained in shock-compressed thin film materials and must be carefully accounted for in any analysis attempting to unravel shock-induced energy transfer or reactivity. We have calculated such effects for spectrally simple model systems and also, to the extent possible, for real systems such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and nitrocellulose (NC). We have utilized angle-dependent infrared (IR) reflectometry to obtain the ambient spectral complex index for PMMA and NC for use in the calculations and to interpret experiments. A number of counter-intuitive spectral effects are observed versus film thickness and during uniaxial shock compression: absorption band shifts, changes of shape, and changes in both absolute and relative peak intensities. The film thickness effects can be predicted by thin film interference alone, while additional assumptions are required to predict the effects due to shock compression. Since it is very difficult to obtain the complex index in the shock state, we made very simple assumptions regarding the change in vibrational spectra upon shock load-ing. We illustrate general thin film interference effects that could be expected and compare them to experimental results for the antisymmetric NO2 stretch mode of NC.

  18. Detection of Cracks on Tomatoes Using a Hyperspectral Near-Infrared Reflectance Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.; Jeong, Danhee; Delwiche, Stephen R.; Chao, Kuanglin; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of hyperspectral near-infrared (NIR) reflectance imaging techniques for detecting cuticle cracks on tomatoes. A hyperspectral NIR reflectance imaging system that analyzed the spectral region of 1000–1700 nm was used to obtain hyperspectral reflectance images of 224 tomatoes: 112 with and 112 without cracks along the stem-scar region. The hyperspectral images were subjected to partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to classify and detect cracks on the tomatoes. Two morphological features, roundness (R) and minimum-maximum distance (D), were calculated from the PLS-DA images to quantify the shape of the stem scar. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and a support vector machine (SVM) were then used to classify R and D. The results revealed 94.6% and 96.4% accuracy for classifications made using LDA and SVM, respectively, for tomatoes with and without crack defects. These data suggest that the hyperspectral near-infrared reflectance imaging system, in addition to traditional NIR spectroscopy-based methods, could potentially be used to detect crack defects on tomatoes and perform quality assessments. PMID:25310472

  19. Noninvasive blood glucose sensing on human body with near-infrared reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhen-hao; Hao, Chang-ning; Zhang, Lin-lin; Huang, Yan-chao; Shi, Yi-qin; Jiang, Geng-ru; Duan, Jun-li

    2011-08-01

    The non-invasive blood glucose sensing method has shown its high impact on the clinic application. This can make the measurement on the clinically relevant concentrations of glucose be free from the pain of patient. The transmission spectrum study indicates that the dependence of glucose concentration on the absorbance is in linear manner for the glucose concentration in the region of 30mg/dL to 4.5×104mg/dL. By the near infrared reflection spectroscopy of fiber spectrometer, the reflection band between 1.2μm and 1.35μm can be used to correlated with the glucose concentration in the range of 30 to 300 mg/dL. This reflection band is finally used to measure the glucose concentration effect in non-invasive manner, which gives the statistical significance of P value 0.02. Our experiment result shows that it is possible to get the glucose concentration by the near infrared reflection spectrum measurement on the human forefinger. This non-invasive blood glucose sensing method may useful in clinic after more experiment for different people.

  20. Near-Infrared Confocal Laser Reflectance Cytoarchitectural Imaging of the Substantia Nigra and Cerebellum in the Fresh Human Cadaver.

    PubMed

    Cheyuo, Cletus; Grand, Walter; Balos, Lucia L

    2017-01-01

    Cytoarchitectural neuroimaging remains critical for diagnosis of many brain diseases. Fluorescent dye-enhanced, near-infrared confocal in situ cellular imaging of the brain has been reported. However, impermeability of the blood-brain barrier to most fluorescent dyes limits clinical utility of this modality. The differential degree of reflectance from brain tissue with unenhanced near-infrared imaging may represent an alternative technique for in situ cytoarchitectural neuroimaging. We assessed the utility of unenhanced near-infrared confocal laser reflectance imaging of the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra in 2 fresh human cadaver brains using a confocal near-infrared laser probe. Cellular images based on near-infrared differential reflectance were captured at depths of 20-180 μm from the brain surface. Parts of the cerebellum and substantia nigra imaged using the probe were subsequently excised and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histologic correlation. Near-infrared reflectance imaging revealed the 3-layered cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum, with Purkinje cells appearing hyperreflectant. In the substantia nigra, neurons appeared hyporeflectant with hyperreflectant neuromelanin cytoplasmic inclusions. Cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra revealed on near-infrared imaging closely correlated with the histology on hematoxylin-eosin staining. We showed that unenhanced near-infrared reflectance imaging of fresh human cadaver brain can reliably identify and distinguish neurons and detailed cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy of cotton fabrics treated with a cyclodextrin derivative finishing auxiliary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. M.; Kuckuk, R.; Damm, U.; Bereck, A.; Riegel, D.

    2005-06-01

    For the textile industry, infrared spectroscopic methods that are based on diffuse reflectance measurements can be used for the non-destructive analysis of polymer composition of the fabric materials including their auxiliaries. Our diffuse reflectance accessory allows the contact-free measurement of sample spots located on large and bulky samples with a sufficient spectral signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, the results of a quantitative analysis of a reactive auxiliary (cyclodextrin derivative) applied on cotton fabrics up to 5% (by weight) are shown and limitations of the diffuse reflectance measurement technique discussed. Reference values had been provided by the laborious Kjeldahl method. Multivariate calibration based on partial least squares was employed using the specific bands of the cyclodextrin derivative within the spectral interval of 1900-1480 cm -1, providing prediction results with around 5% of relative standard prediction error, based on mean sample population concentrations.

  2. Stray light analysis of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breault, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The straylight analysis of the diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) on the cosmic background explorer (COBE) mission is discussed. From the statement of work (SOW), the purpose of DIRBE is to measure, or set upper limits on, the spectral and spatial character of the diffuse extra galactic infrared radiation. Diffuse infrared sources within our own galaxy are measured. The required reduction of the unwanted radiation imposes severe design and operating restrictions on the DIRBE instrument. To accomplish its missions, it will operate at a multitude of wavelengths ranging from 1.25 um out to 200 to 300 microns. The operating bands and the required point source normalized irradiance transmittance (PSNIT) are shown. The important straylight concepts in the DIRBE design are reviewed. The model and assumptions used in APART analysis are explained. The limitations due to the scalar theory used in the analysis are outlined.

  3. Interaction of infrared light with impurity gels in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, A. N.; Efimov, V. B.

    2011-05-01

    Rapid cooling of an impurity-helium mixture into superfluid helium produces a distinctive soft matter—impurity-helium gel, clusters of which coagulate into nanoparticles. The sizes of the particles and their mutual interaction depend on the nature of the impurity atoms and the impurity-helium coupling. Here we describe the setup of and preliminary results from an experiment to study infrared absorption by a water-helium gel. Comparisons of the infrared absorption spectra of the gel and of water and ice suggests a peculiar interaction among water molecules in a water-helium gel.

  4. [Determination of sinigrin in semen Thlaspi from Sichuan and Tibet using near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei-Lei; Chen, Cong; Zhou, Min; Wang, Jian-Zhong; Luo, Xia; Huang, Guo; Ye, Li-Ming

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a method for the determination of sinigrin in semen Thlaspi from Sichuan using near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Near infrared spectra (NIR) in the region of 7,502.1-5,446.2 cm(-1) were recorded for the 246 semen Thlaspi samples containing sinigrin in the content of 1.962%-3.917%. Calibration models were established using the PLS (partial least squares). Different spectra pretreatment methods were compared. The study showed that spectral information can be extracted thoroughly by minimum and maximum normalization pretreatment methods. In this calibration model, the correlation coefficient (R2) was 0.9280, the SEC (standard deviation of the calibration sets) was 0.314 and the SEP (standard deviation of the prediction sets) was 0.388. Results indicated that near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method can be used to rapidly analyze the valid component in traditional Chinese medicine, and also can be used in the quality control of traditional Chinese medicine.

  5. [Determination of baicalin and total flavonoids in Radix scutellariae by near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qian-qian; Pan, Rui-le; Wei, Jian-he; Wu, Yan-wei; Zhang, Lu-da

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a method for rapid determination of baicalin and total flavonoids in radix scutellariae by near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Sixty one samples of radix scutellariae from different areas containing baicalin of 12.24%-21.34% and total flavonoids of 16.08%-26.52% were used. The range of 8000-4000 cm(-1) of near infrared spectra (NIRS) was selected. Calibration models were established using the PLS(partial least squares). Different spectra pretreatment methods were compared and the optimal model was selected. The study showed that first derivative pretreatments and minimum-maximum normalization methods can be used to extracted spectra information thoroughly to analyze the contents of baicalin and total flavonoids, respectively. The correlation coefficient (r) of baicalin was 0.9024, SEC was 1.01 (standard deviation of the calibration sets) and SEP was 0.8764 (standarddeviation ofthe prediction sets). The correlation coefficient(r) of total flavonoids was 0.9527, SEC was 0.7850 and SEP was 0.5211. Results indicated that near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method can be used to analyze the main active components in radix scutellariae rapidly.

  6. [The evaluation of hydrocarbon potential generation for source rocks by near-infrared diffuse reflection spectra].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jia; Xu, Xiao-Xuan; Song, Ning; Wu, Zhong-Chen; Zhou, Xiang; Chen, Jin; Cao, Xue-Wei; Wang, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) diffuse reflection spectra were compared and evaluated for hydrocarbon potential generation of source rocks. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance often exhibits significant differences in the spectra due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the particles, so the signal-to-noise ratio of NIR is much lower than MIR It is too difficult to get accurate results by NIR without using a strong spectral preprocessing method to remove systematic noise such as base-line variation and multiplicative scatter effects. In the present paper, orthogonal signal correction (OSC) and an improved algorithm of it, i.e. direct orthogonal signal correction (DOSC), are used as different methods to preprocess both the NIR and MIR spectra of the hydrocarbon source rocks. Another algorithm, wavelet multi-scale direct orthogonal signal correction (WMDOSC), which is a combination of discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and DOSC, is also used as a preprocessing method. Then, the calibration model of hydrocarbon source rocks before and after pretreatment was established by interval partial least square (iPLS). The experimental results show that WMDOSC is more successfully applied to preprocess the NIR spectra data of the hydrocarbon source rocks than other two algorithms, and NIR performed as good as MIR in the analysis of hydrocarbon potential generation of source rocks with WMDOSC-iPLS pretreatment calibration model.

  7. Development of a realistic photonic modeling for the evaluation of infrared reflections in the metallic environment of ITER.

    PubMed

    Aumeunier, M-H; Travere, J-M

    2010-10-01

    In nuclear fusion experiments, the plasma facing components are exposed to high heat fluxes and infrared (IR) imaging diagnostics are routinely used for surveying their surface temperature for preventing damages. However the future use of metallic components in the ITER tokamak adds complications in temperature estimation. Indeed, low and variable emissivity of the observed surface and the multiple reflections of the light coming from hot regions will have to be understood and then taken into account. In this paper, a realistic photonic modeling based on Monte Carlo ray-tracing codes is used to predict the global response of the complete IR survey system. This also includes the complex vessel geometry and the thermal and optical surface properties using the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function that models the photon-material interactions. The first results of this simulation applied to a reference torus are presented and are used as a benchmark to investigate the validity of the global model. Finally the most critical key model parameters in the reflected signals are identified and their contribution is discussed.

  8. Visible-near-infrared luminescent lanthanide ternary complexes based on beta-diketonate using visible-light excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Qiu, Yannan; Liu, Tao; Feng, Jing; Deng, Wei; Shi, Liyi

    2015-11-01

    We used the synthesized dinaphthylmethane (Hdnm) ligand whose absorption extends to the visible-light wavelength, to prepare a family of ternary lanthanide complexes, named as [Ln(dnm)3 phen] (Ln = Sm, Nd, Yb, Er, Tm, Pr). The properties of these complexes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and excitation and emission spectroscopy. Generally, excitation with visible light is much more advantageous than UV excitation. Importantly, upon excitation with visible light (401-460 nm), the complexes show characteristic visible (Sm(3+)) as well as near-infrared (Sm(3+), Nd(3+), Yb(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Pr(3+)) luminescence of the corresponding lanthanide ions, attributed to the energy transfer from the ligands to the lanthanide ions, an antenna effect. Now, using these near-infrared luminescent lanthanide complexes, the luminescent spectral region from 800 to 1650 nm, can be covered completely, which is of particular interest for biomedical imaging applications, laser systems, and optical amplification applications.

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Mid-infrared Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I; Spuckler, Charles M.; Nesbitt, James A.; Martin, Richard E.

    2005-01-01

    The application of mid-infrared reflectance (MIR) imaging to monitor damage in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been extended from a previously demonstrated area-averaged spectroscopic analysis tool to become a practical imaging tool that provides the spatial resolution needed to quickly identify localized regions of TBC damage by visual inspection, Illumination optics and image collection procedures were developed to produce illumination-normalized flatfield reflectance images after subtraction of the background thermal emission. MIR reflectance images were collected with a bandpass filter centered at a wavelength of 4 microns, which provided the optimum balance between good sensitivity to buried cracks and coating erosion, but with a desirable sensitivity to TBC sintering and absorption from ambient gases. Examples are presented of the application of MIR reflectance imaging to monitor damage progression in plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) TBCs subjected to either furnace cycling or alumina particle jet erosion. These results show that MIR reflectance imaging can reliably track the progression of buried delamination cracks produced by thermal cycling and can also be used to determine when any local section of the TBC has eroded beyond an acceptable limit. Modeling of the effects of buried cracks and erosion on reflectance will be presented to show the dependence of damage sensitivity to TBC thickness.

  10. Angle-tunable enhanced infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy via grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2014-03-04

    Surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy is an attractive method for increasing the prominence of vibrational modes in infrared spectroscopy. To date, the majority of reports associated with SEIRA utilize localized surface plasmon resonance from metal nanoparticles to enhance electromagnetic fields in the region of analytes. Limited work has been performed using propagating surface plasmons as a method for SEIRA excitation. In this report, we demonstrate angle-tunable enhancement of vibrational stretching modes associated with a thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film that is coupled to a silver-coated diffraction grating. Gratings are fabricated using laser interference lithography to achieve precise surface periodicities, which can be used to generate surface plasmons that overlap with specific vibrational modes in the polymer film. Infrared reflection absorption spectra are presented for both bare silver and PMMA-coated silver gratings at a range of angles and polarization states. In addition, spectra were obtained with the grating direction oriented perpendicular and parallel to the infrared source in order to isolate plasmon enhancement effects. Optical simulations using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method were used to identify the origin of the plasmon-induced enhancement. Angle-dependent absorption measurements achieved signal enhancements of more than 10-times the signal in the absence of the plasmon.

  11. High temperature far-infrared dynamics of orthorhombic NdMnO3: emissivity and reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Massa, Néstor E; del Campo, Leire; Meneses, Domingos De Sousa; Echegut, Patrick; Martínez-Lope, María Jesús; Alonso, José Antonio

    2013-06-12

    We report on near normal far- and mid-infrared emission and reflectivity of NdMnO3 perovskite from room temperature to sample decomposition above 1800 K. At 300 K the number of infrared active phonons is in close agreement with the 25 calculated for the orthorhombic D(2h)(16)-Pbnm (Z = 4) space group. Their number gradually decreases as we approach the temperature of orbital disorder at ~1023 K where the orthorhombic O' lower temperature cooperative phase coexists with the cubic orthorhombic O. At above ~1200 K, the three infrared active phonons coincide with that expected for cubic Pm-3m (Z = 1) in the high temperature insulating regime. Heating samples in dry air triggers double exchange conductivity by Mn(3+) and Mn(4+) ions and a small polaron mid-infrared band. Fits to the optical conductivity single out the octahedral antisymmetric and symmetric vibrational modes as the main phonons in the electron-phonon interactions at 875 K. For 1745 K, it is enough to consider the symmetric stretching internal mode. An overdamped defect induced Drude component is clearly outlined at the highest temperatures. We conclude that rare earth manganite eg electrons are prone to spin, charge, orbital, and lattice couplings in an intrinsic orbital distorted perovskite lattice, favoring embryonic low energy collective excitations.

  12. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy as a novel method to detect demyelination in rat sciatic nerve in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Senapati, Arun; Peng, Yuan Bo; Kashyap, Dheerendra; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    This study was done to use near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to bring out differences in the anatomical substructures in the rat spinal cord and further to differentiate scattering between demyelinated and normal sciatic nerves in rat models, thereby exploring a new methodology to localize MS (multiple Sclerosis) lesions in vivo for animal studies. The experimental setup consisted of a tungsten light source, CCD array spectrometer, and bifurcated optical fibers for light delivery and detection of back scattered light from tissue. The measurement system was calibrated with reflectance standard. The spinal cord of 14 rats was exposed by laminectomy, and the measurements were taken on 8 points at intervals of 1 mm on the right and left lumbar-sacral regions and the central blood vessel. For measurements on the sciatic nerve, the spinal nerves of 84 rats were ligated according to the Chung Model. Measurements were taken on five points on both the ligated and the control nerve side after 1, 4, 7 and 14 days. The reduced scattering coefficient, μs', was found to be higher in the lumbar-sacral regions (34.17 +/- 2.05 cm-1) than that near the central blood vessel (19.9 +/- 3.8 cm-1). Statistically, there was significant difference in scattering between the control side and the ligated side on postoperative days 4, 7, and 14. This study shows a promising diagnostic value in the future for monitoring of demyelinated CNS (central nervous system) diseases, like Multiple Sclerosis.

  13. Superfast Near-Infrared Light-Driven Polymer Multilayer Rockets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiguang; Si, Tieyan; Gao, Wei; Lin, Xiankun; Wang, Joseph; He, Qiang

    2016-02-03

    A gold nanoshell-functionalized polymer multilayer nanorocket performs self-propulsion upon the irradiation with NIR light in the absence of chemical fuel. Theoretical simulations reveal that the NIR light-triggered self-thermophoresis drives the propulsion of the nanorocket. The nanorocket also displays -efficient NIR light-triggered propulsion in -biofluids and thus holds considerable promise for various potential biomedical applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Conical reflection of light during free-space coupling into a symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanlin; Cao, Zhuangqi; Chen, Xianfeng

    2013-09-01

    Novel conical reflection of light by a thick three-layered metal-clad optical waveguide is observed. A symmetrical metal-cladding optical waveguide is used, which exhibits extraordinary conical reflection during free-space coupling of light to the waveguide. The phenomenon is attributed to the leakage of excited ultrahigh-order guided modes and their inter- and intramode coupling interaction.

  15. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  16. Electro-optic study of PZT ferroelectric ceramics using modulation of reflected light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniazkov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optic coefficients of variations in the refractive index of PZT and PLZT ceramic materials induced by ac electric field are estimated using modulation of reflected light. The electro-optic coefficients of PLZT ceramics measured with the aid of conventional birefringence using the phase shift of transmitted radiation and the proposed method of birefringence using the modulation of reflected light are compared.

  17. - and Longwave Infrared Total and Diffuse Reflectance Measurements Using AN Integrating Sphere with a Two-Sample Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Juette, Michael; Simon, Arno

    2010-06-01

    We report here improved methodologies for the use of the Bruker A 562-G integrating sphere for quantitative total and diffuse reflectance measurements. The sphere has an internal diameter of 75 mm and the interior surface is coated with matte gold. It has an input port (20 mm diameter), top (32 mm) and bottom (19 mm) sample ports, all on a sphere circumference defined by a vertical plane than includes the sphere center, and a baffled port (10 mm) for an MCT detector (2 mm x 2 mm), that is on a sphere circumference defined by a horizontal plane that includes the sphere center. An interior flip mirror is used to direct light from the input port to either the top or bottom sample ports. The sphere sits in the sample compartment of a benchtop Fourier transform spectrometer. Total reflectance measurements are made by placing the sample in one of the sample ports and blocking the other sample port with a matte gold reference material, recording spectra with the flip mirror pointed towards the sample and then towards the reference material, and then ratio-ing the two spectra. Using this method excellent agreement (< 2% difference) was observed between measurements made using the Bruker sphere and FTIR and reported values for five NIST-calibrated total reflectance standards. Diffuse reflectance measurements are made by placing the sample in one of the sample ports and leaving the other port open to allow the specular reflection component of the sample to exit the sphere, recording spectra with the flip mirror pointing towards the sample and then towards a point on the sphere wall. The two spectra are again ratioed. The diffuse spectrum is thus the total spectrum less the specular component. In the shortwave infrared, where there is sufficient overlap, total and diffuse measurements using the Bruker sphere and FTIR compare favorably with results from a Varian Spectralon-coated integrating sphere and Cary 5000i spectrometer for a number of different materials.

  18. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  19. Infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy: an innovative strategy for analyzing mineral components in energy relevant systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Delle Piane, Claudio; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-31

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  20. An attenuated total reflectance mid infrared (ATR-MIR) spectroscopy study of gelatinization in barley.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, D; Roumeliotis, S; Eglinton, J

    2014-08-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of attenuated total reflectance and mid infrared (ATR-MIR) spectroscopy and to understand the gelatinization and retro-gradation of flour barley samples and the relationship with malting quality. Samples were sourced from two commercial barley varieties exhibiting high hot water extract (HWE) namely Navigator (n=8), and Admiral (n=8). Samples were analysed using the Rapid Visco Analyser (RVA) and ATR-MIR analysis. These results showed that ATR-MIR spectroscopy is capable of characterising gel samples derived from barley flour samples having different malting characteristics. Infrared spectra can effectively represent a 'fingerprint' of the sample being analysed and can be used to simplify and reduce analytical times in the routine methods currently used. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of molecular order in supported lipid membranes by internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Citra, M J; Axelsen, P H

    1996-01-01

    When polarized internal reflection infrared spectroscopy is used to determine molecular order in supported lipid membranes, the results are critically dependent on the accuracy of assumptions made about the evanescent electric field amplitudes in the membrane. In this work, we examine several expressions used for calculating evanescent electric field amplitudes in supported lipid monolayers and bilayers, and test their validity by measuring the infrared dichroism of poly-gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate and poly-beta-benzyl-L-aspartate under conditions in which their molecular order is known. Our results indicate that treating such systems as a simple single interface between two semi-infinite bulk phases is more accurate than the commonly employed thin-film approximation. This implies that earlier conclusions about molecular order in supported lipid membranes may require substantial revision. PMID:8889156

  2. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of red seal inks on questioned document.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yun Sik; Park, Jin Sook; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Kang-Bong

    2014-07-01

    Seals are traditionally used in the Far East Asia to stamp an impression on a document in place of a signature. In this study, an accuser claimed that a personal contract regarding mining development rights acquired by a defendant was devolved to the accuser because the defendant stamped the devolvement contract in the presence of the accuser and a witness. The accuser further stated that the seal ink stamped on the devolvement contract was the same as that stamped on the development rights application document. To verify this, the seals used in two documents were analyzed using micro-attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and infrared spectra. The findings revealed that the seals originated from different manufacturers. Thus, the accuser's claim on the existence of a devolvement contract was proved to be false.

  3. Applications of diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.C.; Noel, D.; Hechler, J.J.

    1988-12-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to obtain infrared spectra directly from the surface of composite materials, with little or no sample preparation. It is thus of interest as a nondestructive method for industrial inspection. In many cases, the IR spectra provide detailed information concerning the chemical composition and molecular structure of the material. The technique works particularly well for carbon-fiber composites. This paper describes the principles involved, some factors which influence the quality of the spectra, and a number of examples of applications. These include the characterization of epoxy matrices (composition, curing, degradation), the detection of surface contamination, and the determination of the degree of crystallinity in poly(phenylene sulfide)-based composites. 24 references.

  4. Silver mirror for enhancing the detection ability of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuicui; Wang, Shuyu; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS) has been proved to be a convenient and fast quantitative method for complex samples. The sensitivity or the detection limit, however, has been the obstacle in practical uses, although great efforts have been made through experimental and chemometric approaches. Due to the strong reflectivity of silver in near-infrared region, a novel method that utilizes silver layer as the adsorption substrate was developed to enhance the detection ability of NIRDRS in this study. For investigating the enhancement effect of the method, lysozyme samples with different concentrations were spotted on the silver layer and NIR spectra were measured. Then quantitative determination was performed using multivariate calibration. For comparison, the comparative experiment was performed using the copper sheet as the substrate. The results show that the intensity of diffuse reflection can be enhanced, and the background variation was reduced by taking the mirror layer as the substrate. A linear variation was obtained between the concentrations and the intensities of the spectral response at a wavenumber. Using multivariate calibration for quantitative analysis, the optimal PLS model was obtained. The maximum deviation of the prediction results can be as low as 12.8µg. Therefore, this study made a progress for NIRDRS technique in microanalysis.

  5. The synthesis and characterization of Al/Co3O4 magnetic composite pigments with low infrared emissivity and low lightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunfeng; Xie, Jianliang; Luo, Mei; Jian, Shuai; Peng, Bo; Deng, Longjiang

    2017-06-01

    The main challenge of low infrared emissivity coatings based on aluminum flake lies in finding an efficient method to synthesize the composite pigment with low infrared emissivity and low lightness simultaneously. In this work, we overcome this constraint to some extent, synthesizing a novel Al/Co3O4 magnetic composite pigments with low infrared emissivity and low lightness by thermal cracking and hot flowing method. The results show that the covering area of Co3O4 on the aluminum flake can be tuned by the amount of CoCO3 adding in precursor and the reaction temperature of hot flowing, both of which pay a key factor on the VIS and IR spectral reflectance and magnetic properties. The magnetic Al/Co3O4 composite pigments with low lightness and low infrared emissivity can be obtained at 130 °C for 24 h in hot flowing liquid. The lightness L∗ can be decreased to 69.2, however the infrared emissivity (8-14 μm) is also low to 0.45. Compared with the single Al flakes, Al/Co3O4 magnetic composite pigments present stronger magnetic properties. Therefore, the Al/Co3O4 magnetic composite pigments have offered new choice for the pigments of low infrared emissivity coatings.

  6. Dressed-photon–phonon (DPP)-assisted visible- and infrared-light water splitting

    PubMed Central

    Yatsui, Takashi; Imoto, Tsubasa; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Kitamura, Kokoro; Kawazoe, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    A dressed-phonon–phonon (DPP) assisted photocatalyst reaction was carried out to increase the visible light responsibility, where the photon energy of the radiation, which ranged from visible to infrared light is less than band gap energy of the photocatalyst (ZnO, 3.3 eV). The dependence of the photocurrent on excitation power indicated that two-step excitation occurred in DPP-assisted process. A cathodoluminescence measurement also supported the conclusion that the visible- and infrared-light excitation originated from DPP excitation, not from defect states in the ZnO nanorod photocatalyst. PMID:24691359

  7. Development of Mid-infrared GeSn Light Emitting Diodes on a Silicon Substrate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-22

    Final 3. DATES COVERED 13-01-2013 to 30-07-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Mid-infrared GeSn Light Emitting Diodes on a Silicon...to develop 1) direct-bandgap Sn-based group-IV material with very low defect densities and 2) a new type of Sn-based group-IV light - emitting diode ...infrared GeSn Light Emitting Diodes on a Silicon Substrate” 22/4/2015 PI and Co-PI information: - Name of Principal Investigators: Prof. H

  8. Near-infrared light as a possible treatment option for Parkinson's disease and laser eye injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSmet, Kristina; Buchmann, Ellen; Henry, Michele; Wong-Riley, Margaret; Eells, Janis; VerHoeve, Jim; Whelan, Harry

    2009-02-01

    Studies in our laboratory demonstrate that the action spectrum for stimulation of cytochrome oxidase activity and cellular ATP parallels the near-infrared absorption spectrum of cytochrome oxidase and that 660-680 nm irradiation upregulates cytochrome oxidase activity in cultured neurons. Treatment with nearinfrared light augments cellular energy production and neuronal viability following mitochondrial injury linking the actions of red to near-infrared light on mitochondrial metabolism in vitro and cell injury in vivo. NIR light treatment represents an innovative therapeutic approach for disease processes in which mitochondrial dysfunction is postulated to play a role including Parkinson's disease, laser eye injury and Age-related macular degeneration.

  9. Slow-light total-internal-reflection switch with bending angle of 30 deg.

    PubMed

    Fuchida, Ayumi; Matsutani, Akihiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2011-07-15

    Slowing light in a Bragg reflector waveguide is used to miniaturize optical waveguide switches. We can realize a giant equivalent refractive index change induced by carrier injection near a cutoff wavelength due to its large waveguide dispersion. We fabricate and characterize a reflection-type slow-light switch. Input light is reflected at the off state due to an equivalent index difference between an oxide aperture and an oxide region, while it passes through at the on state, since the equivalent index difference is compensated using carrier injection. We obtained a large bending angle of 30° with total internal reflection of slow light.

  10. A Near-Infrared Spectrometer to Measure Zodiacal Light Absorption Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, A. S.; Arendt, R.; Dwek, E.; Kimble, R.; Moseley, S. H.; Rapchun, D.; Silverberg, R. F.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a high throughput infrared spectrometer for zodiacal light fraunhofer lines measurements. The instrument is based on a cryogenic dual silicon Fabry-Perot etalon which is designed to achieve high signal to noise Fraunhofer line profile measurements. Very large aperture silicon Fabry-Perot etalons and fast camera optics make these measurements possible. The results of the absorption line profile measurements will provide a model free measure of the zodiacal Light intensity in the near infrared. The knowledge of the zodiacal light brightness is crucial for accurate subtraction of zodiacal light foreground for accurate measure of the extragalactic background light after the subtraction of zodiacal light foreground. We present the final design of the instrument and the first results of its performance.

  11. The Investigation of Property of Radiation and Absorbed of Infrared Lights of the Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Bo; Xiao, He-Lan; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2010-04-01

    The properties of absorption of infrared light for collagen, hemoglobin, bivine serum albumen (BSA) protein molecules with α- helix structure and water in the living systems as well as the infrared transmission spectra for person’s skins and finger hands of human body in the region of 400-4000 cm-1 (i.e., wavelengths of 2-20 μm) have been collected and determined by using a Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR Spectrometer, a Perkin Elmer GX FT-IR spectrometer, an OMA (optical multichannel analysis) and an infrared probe systems, respectively. The experimental results obtained show that the protein molecules and water can all absorb the infrared lights in the ranges of 600-1900 cm-1 and 2900-3900 cm-l, but their properties of absorption are somewhat different due to distinctions of their structure and conformation and molecular weight. We know from the transmission spectra of person’s finger hands and skin that the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm can not only transmit over the person’s skin and finger hands, but also be absorbed by the above proteins and water in the living systems. Thus, we can conclude from this study that the human beings and animals can absorb the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm.

  12. Atomic Scale Flatness of Chemically Cleaned Silicon Surfaces Studied by Infrared Attenuated-Total-Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawara, Kenichi; Yasaka, Tatsuhiro; Miyazaki, Seiichi; Hirose, Masataka

    1992-07-01

    Hydrogen-terminated Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces obtained by aqueous HF or pH-modified (pH{=}5.3) buffered-HF (BHF) treatments have been characterized by a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) technique. The BHF treatment provides better surface flatness than the HF treatment. Pure water rinse is effective for improving the Si(111) surface flatness, while this is not the case for Si(100) because the pure water acts as an alkaline etchant and promotes the formation of (111) microfacets or microdefects on the (100) surface.

  13. Infrared reflectance spectra (2.2-15 microns) of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.; Salisbury, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory results show that (1) the Christiansen frequency (CF) feature in mid-infrared reflectance spectra of powders can be used to accurately distinguish plagioclase composition, and (2) the wavelength position of the CF is not affected by vitrification of the plagioclase. Although the CF position does not distinguish glass from crystalline forms of plagioclase, other features (combination-tone, overtone, restrahlen bands) in the mid-IR spectra of plagioclase can be used for that purpose. These results have important implications for application of thermal emission spectroscopy to mapping the surface composition of regolith-covered planetary bodies like the moon, Mars, and asteroids.

  14. Preliminary Method for Direct Quantification of Colistin Methanesulfonate by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Niece, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin use has increased in response to the advent of infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. It is administered parenterally as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS). Various formulations of CMS and labeling conventions can lead to confusion about colistin dosing, and questions remain about the pharmacokinetics of CMS. Since CMS does not have strong UV absorbance, current methods employ a laborious process of chemical conversion to colistin followed by precolumn derivatization to detect formed colistin by high-performance liquid chromatography. Here, we report a method for direct quantification of colistin methanesulfonate by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR). PMID:26124160

  15. [Sugar characterization of mini-watermelon and rapid sugar determination by near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Yuan, Hong-fu; Song, Chun-feng; Xie, Jin-chun; Li, Xiao-yu; Feng, Le-ping

    2012-08-01

    In the present paper, the distribution of sugar level within the mini-watermelon was studied, a new sugar characterization method of mini-watermelon using average sugar level, the highest sugar level and the lowest sugar level index is proposed. Feasibility of nondestructive determination of mini-watermenlon sugar level using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy information was investigated by an experiment. PLS models for measuring the 3 sugar levels were established. The results obtained by near infrared spectroscopy agreed with that of the new method established above.

  16. Soil moisture estimation using reflected solar and emitted thermal infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Cihlar, J.; Estes, J. E.; Heilman, J. L.; Kahle, A.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Millard, J.; Price, J. C.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Classical methods of measuring soil moisture such as gravimetric sampling and the use of neutron moisture probes are useful for cases where a point measurement is sufficient to approximate the water content of a small surrounding area. However, there is an increasing need for rapid and repetitive estimations of soil moisture over large areas. Remote sensing techniques potentially have the capability of meeting this need. The use of reflected-solar and emitted thermal-infrared radiation, measured remotely, to estimate soil moisture is examined.

  17. Determination of Moisture Content in 5-Fluorouracil using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parul; Jangir, Deepak Kumar; Mehrotra, Ranjana; Kandpal, H. C.

    2008-11-01

    Determination of moisture content in pharmaceuticals is very important, as moisture is mainly responsible for the degradation of drugs. The degraded drug has not only reduced efficacy but is also hazardous for health. The objective of the present work is to replace the Karl Fischer (KF) titration method used for moisture analysis with a method that is rapid, involves no toxic materials and is more effective. Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which is explored as a potential alternate for various applications, is investigated for moisture analysis in 5-Fluorouracil, an anticancer drug.

  18. Microscopic observation of strain induced in heteroepitaxial layers with reflection type of infrared polariscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masayoshi; Chu, Tao

    2000-03-01

    Photoelastic measurements using a reflection type of infrared polariscope have been done for the first time to investigate birefringence or residual strain induced in as-grown and pulsed-laser-annealed silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) wafers. It was found that the residual strain, arising from mismatchings of the lattice constants and the thermal expansion coefficients between silicon and sapphire, was reduced effectively by pulsed-laser annealing with laser energy density beyond a threshold value. Also found was a mosaic pattern due to local melting at about the threshold energy density, indicating the coexistence of solid and liquid phases.

  19. Diagnosis of the phase function of random media from light reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min

    2016-03-01

    Light reflectance has been widely used to diagnose random media in both in situ and in vivo applications. The quantification of the phase function of the medium from reflectance measurements, however, remains elusive due to the lack of an explicit connection between the light reflectance profile and the phase function. Here we first present an analytical model for reflectance of scattered light at an arbitrary source-detector separation by forward-peaked scattering media such as biological tissue and cells. The model incorporates the improved small-angle scattering approximation (SAA) to radiative transfer for sub-diffusive light reflectance and expresses the dependence of the light reflectance on the phase function of the scattering medium in a closed form. A spreading length scale, lΘ, is found to characterise subdiffusive light reflectance at the high spatial frequency (close separation) limit. After validation by Monte Carlo simulations, we then demonstrate the application of the model in accurate determination of the complete set of optical properties and the phase function of a turbid medium from the profile of subdiffusive and diffusive light reflectance.

  20. Diagnosis of the phase function of random media from light reflectance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min

    2016-03-03

    Light reflectance has been widely used to diagnose random media in both in situ and in vivo applications. The quantification of the phase function of the medium from reflectance measurements, however, remains elusive due to the lack of an explicit connection between the light reflectance profile and the phase function. Here we first present an analytical model for reflectance of scattered light at an arbitrary source-detector separation by forward-peaked scattering media such as biological tissue and cells. The model incorporates the improved small-angle scattering approximation (SAA) to radiative transfer for sub-diffusive light reflectance and expresses the dependence of the light reflectance on the phase function of the scattering medium in a closed form. A spreading length scale, lΘ, is found to characterise subdiffusive light reflectance at the high spatial frequency (close separation) limit. After validation by Monte Carlo simulations, we then demonstrate the application of the model in accurate determination of the complete set of optical properties and the phase function of a turbid medium from the profile of subdiffusive and diffusive light reflectance.

  1. Diagnosis of the phase function of random media from light reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Light reflectance has been widely used to diagnose random media in both in situ and in vivo applications. The quantification of the phase function of the medium from reflectance measurements, however, remains elusive due to the lack of an explicit connection between the light reflectance profile and the phase function. Here we first present an analytical model for reflectance of scattered light at an arbitrary source-detector separation by forward-peaked scattering media such as biological tissue and cells. The model incorporates the improved small-angle scattering approximation (SAA) to radiative transfer for sub-diffusive light reflectance and expresses the dependence of the light reflectance on the phase function of the scattering medium in a closed form. A spreading length scale, lΘ, is found to characterise subdiffusive light reflectance at the high spatial frequency (close separation) limit. After validation by Monte Carlo simulations, we then demonstrate the application of the model in accurate determination of the complete set of optical properties and the phase function of a turbid medium from the profile of subdiffusive and diffusive light reflectance. PMID:26935167

  2. Small-diameter hollow waveguides based on silver-clad stainless steel tube for infrared laser light transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Akihito; Ohkawa, Masahiro; Shiina, Noribumi; Sato, Shinobu

    2012-01-01

    We have fabricated hollow waveguides based on a silver-clad stainless steel tube for delivery of infrared (IR) laser light such as Er-YAG and CO2 laser light. The silver-clad layer's inner wall was polished to a mirror-smooth state. A thin silver iodide (AgI) layer was formed by iodination of the layer's inner surface to enhance reflection of the propagating IR light at the inner wall of the hollow waveguide. The waveguide's inner and outer diameters are 0.4 and 0.6 mm, respectively. Since this type of metallic hollow waveguide has high mechanical strength and heat resistance, it seldom fractures or melts. Moreover, it has such a small diameter that it can be bent flexibly. We have experimentally fabricated a 1-m-long hollow waveguide with a 0.24 μm thick inner AgI layer, which is optimum thickness for Er-YAG laser light transmission. The transmissions of Er-YAG laser light were 64% and 60% under a straight condition and a 90° bend with a 7.5-cm radius condition, respectively. By optimizing the thickness of the inner AgI layer according to the propagating light's wavelength, CO2 laser light can also be transmitted effectively though the hollow waveguide.

  3. Imaging the Material Properties of Bone Specimens using Reflection-Based Infrared Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Acerbo, Alvin S.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Judex, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier Transform InfraRed Microspectroscopy (FTIRM) is a widely used method for mapping the material properties of bone and other mineralized tissues, including mineralization, crystallinity, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking. This technique is traditionally performed in a transmission-based geometry, which requires the preparation of plastic-embedded thin sections, limiting its functionality. Here, we theoretically and empirically demonstrate the development of reflection-based FTIRM as an alternative to the widely adopted transmission-based FTIRM, which reduces specimen preparation time and broadens the range of specimens that can be imaged. In this study, mature mouse femurs were plastic-embedded and longitudinal sections were cut at a thickness of 4 μm for transmission-based FTIRM measurements. The remaining bone blocks were polished for specular reflectance-based FTIRM measurements on regions immediately adjacent to the transmission sections. Kramers-Kronig analysis of the reflectance data yielded the dielectric response from which the absorption coefficients were directly determined. The reflectance-derived absorbance was validated empirically using the transmission spectra from the thin sections. The spectral assignments for mineralization, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking were indistinguishable in transmission and reflection geometries, while the stoichiometric/non-stoichiometric apatite crystallinity parameter shifted from 1032 / 1021 cm−1 in transmission-based to 1035 / 1025 cm−1 in reflection-based data. This theoretical demonstration and empirical validation of reflection-based FTIRM eliminates the need for thin sections of bone and more readily facilitates direct correlations with other methods such nanoindentation and quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBSE) from the same specimen. It provides a unique framework for correlating bone’s material and mechanical properties. PMID:22455306

  4. High-accuracy infra-red thermography method using reflective marker arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirollos, Benjamin; Povey, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for high-accuracy infra-red (IR) thermography measurements in situations with significant spatial variation in reflected radiation from the surroundings, or significant spatial variation in surface emissivity due to viewing angle non-uniformity across the field of view. The method employs a reflective marker array (RMA) on the target surface—typically, high emissivity circular dots—and an integrated image analysis algorithm designed to require minimal human input. The new technique has two particular advantages which make it suited to high-accuracy measurements in demanding environments: (i) it allows the reflected radiation component to be calculated directly, in situ, and as a function of position, overcoming a key problem in measurement environments with non-uniform and unsteady stray radiation from the surroundings; (ii) using image analysis of the marker array (via apparent aspect ratio of the circular reflective markers), the local viewing angle of the target surface can be estimated, allowing corrections for angular variation of local emissivity to be performed without prior knowledge of the geometry. A third advantage of the technique is that allows for simple focus-stacking algorithms due to increased image entropy. The reflective marker array method is demonstrated for an isothermal, hemispherical object exposed to an external IR source arranged to give a significant non-uniform reflected radiation term. This is an example of a challenging environment, both because of the significant non-uniform reflected radiation term, and also the significant variation in target emissivity due to surface angle variation. We demonstrate that the new RMA IR technique leads to significantly lower error in evaluated surface temperature than conventional IR techniques. The method is applicable to any complex radiative environment.

  5. Imaging the Material Properties of Bone Specimens Using Reflection-Based Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Acerbo A. S.; Carr, G.L.; Judex, S.; Miller, L.M.

    2012-03-13

    Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) is a widely used method for mapping the material properties of bone and other mineralized tissues, including mineralization, crystallinity, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking. This technique is traditionally performed in a transmission-based geometry, which requires the preparation of plastic-embedded thin sections, limiting its functionality. Here, we theoretically and empirically demonstrate the development of reflection-based FTIRM as an alternative to the widely adopted transmission-based FTIRM, which reduces specimen preparation time and broadens the range of specimens that can be imaged. In this study, mature mouse femurs were plastic-embedded and longitudinal sections were cut at a thickness of 4 {micro}m for transmission-based FTIRM measurements. The remaining bone blocks were polished for specular reflectance-based FTIRM measurements on regions immediately adjacent to the transmission sections. Kramers-Kronig analysis of the reflectance data yielded the dielectric response from which the absorption coefficients were directly determined. The reflectance-derived absorbance was validated empirically using the transmission spectra from the thin sections. The spectral assignments for mineralization, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking were indistinguishable in transmission and reflection geometries, while the stoichiometric/nonstoichiometric apatite crystallinity parameter shifted from 1032/1021 cm{sup -1} in transmission-based to 1035/1025 cm{sup -1} in reflection-based data. This theoretical demonstration and empirical validation of reflection-based FTIRM eliminates the need for thin sections of bone and more readily facilitates direct correlations with other methods such as nanoindentation and quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBSE) from the same specimen. It provides a unique framework for correlating bone's material and mechanical properties.

  6. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite solar-shield material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, J. E.; Nofziger, M. J.; Bartell, F. O.; Wolfe, W. L.; Brooks, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) telescope has an outer shield on it which is used to reduce the amount of thermal radiation that enters the telescope. The shield forms the first part of the baffle structure which reduces the photon incidence on the focal plane. It was, therefore, necessary to model this structure for scattering, and a required input for such modeling is the scattering characteristic of this surface. Attention is given to the measurement of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), the reflected radiance divided by the incident irradiance at 10.6 micrometers, 118 micrometers, and at several angles of incidence. Visual observation of the gold sample shows that there are striations which line up in a single direction. The data were, therefore, taken with the sample oriented in each of two directions.

  7. Sediment mineralogy based on visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrard, R.D.; Vanden Berg, M.D.; ,

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIS) can be used to measure reflectance spectra (wavelength 350-2500 nm) for sediment cores and samples. A local ground-truth calibration of spectral features to mineral percentages is calculated by measuring reflectance spectra for a suite of samples of known mineralogy. This approach has been tested on powders, core plugs and split cores, and we conclude that it works well on all three, unless pore water is present. Initial VNIS studies have concentrated on determination of relative proportions of carbonate, opal, smectite and illite in equatorial Pacific sediments. Shipboard VNIS-based determination of these four components was demonstrated on Ocean Drilling Program Leg 199. ?? The Geological Society of London 2006.

  8. Modelling of sensory and instrumental texture parameters in processed cheese by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, Carmen; Downey, Gerard; O'Callaghan, Donal; Howard, Vincent; Delahunty, Conor; Sheehan, Elizabeth; Everard, Colm; O'Donnell, Colm P

    2006-02-01

    This study investigated the application of near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy to the measurement of texture (sensory and instrumental) in experimental processed cheese samples. Spectra (750 to 2498 nm) of cheeses were recorded after 2 and 4 weeks storage at 4 degrees C. Trained assessors evaluated 9 sensory properties, a texture profile analyser (TPA) was used to record 5 instrumental parameters and cheese 'meltability' was measured by computer vision. Predictive models for sensory and instrumental texture parameters were developed using partial least squares regression on raw or pre-treated spectral data. Sensory attributes and instrumental texture measurements were modelled with sufficient accuracy to recommend the use of NIR reflectance spectroscopy for routine quality assessment of processed cheese.

  9. A variable reflectivity output coupler for optically pumped far infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, U. U.; Harris, A. I.; Stutzki, J.; Genzel, R.

    1992-06-01

    The design and performance of a variable reflectivity output coupler for optically pumped far infrared lasers are investigated. The output coupler is a compact, tunable Michelson interferometer. The output coupling ratio is adjustable between 0 and equal to or greater than 60% for laser line wavelengths between 110 and 500 micrometers. This output coupler provides increased output power and flexibility. Beam profile measurements show that the Michelson output coupler produces a well collimated Gaussian laser beam. Design features are: the use of a 10 micrometers reflection coated quartz vacuum window which acts as a dichroic mirror for the pump radiation; the high mechanical stability obtained by leaf sping flexure mount of the movable Michelson mirror and by restricted alignment devices.

  10. Near-infrared spectral reflectance of mineral mixtures - Systematic combinations of pyroxenes, olivine, and iron oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Near-infrared spectral reflectance data are presented for systematic variations in weight percent of two component mixtures of ferromagnesium and iron oxide minerals used to study the dark materials on Mars. Olivine spectral features are greatly reduced in contrast by admixture of other phases but remain distinctive even for low olivine contents. Clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene mixtures show resolved pyroxene absorptions near 2 microns. Limonite greatly modifies pyroxene and olivine reflectance, but does not fully eliminate distinctive spectral characteristics. Using only spectral data in the 1 micron region, it is difficult to differentiate orthopyroxene and limonite in a mixture. All composite mineral absorptions were either weaker than or intermediate in strength to the end-member absorptions and have bandwidths greater than or equal to those for the end members. In general, spectral properties in an intimate mixture combine in a complex, nonadditive manner, with features demonstrating a regular but usually nonlinear variation as a function of end-member phase proportions.

  11. Dark Reflections in the Southern Cross

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-27

    NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer captured this colorful image of the reflection nebula IRAS 12116-6001. This cloud of interstellar dust cannot be seen directly in visible light, but WISE detectors observed the nebula at infrared wavelengths.

  12. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  13. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, Steven E.; Caunt, James W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  14. Correcting for diffraction in the far-infrared reflectance measurement of rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon M.

    1993-01-01

    The manner in which diffraction can increase the reflectance measured from very rough surfaces is shown by observations of diffracted light within the instrument profile of a far-IR reflectometer system. A correction to the calibration signal based on numerical integration of the diffracted part of the instrument profile is described. Diffraction correction factors as large as 2.94 have been found with small optics at long wavelength (630 microns). The effect of diffraction on diffuse reflectance measurements of a very rough perfect reflector is shown at wavelengths from 56 to 200 microns.

  15. Correcting for diffraction in the far-infrared reflectance measurement of rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon M.

    1993-01-01

    The manner in which diffraction can increase the reflectance measured from very rough surfaces is shown by observations of diffracted light within the instrument profile of a far-IR reflectometer system. A correction to the calibration signal based on numerical integration of the diffracted part of the instrument profile is described. Diffraction correction factors as large as 2.94 have been found with small optics at long wavelength (630 microns). The effect of diffraction on diffuse reflectance measurements of a very rough perfect reflector is shown at wavelengths from 56 to 200 microns.

  16. An Overview of Ultraviolet Through Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopic Observations of Mercury During the First MESSENGER Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; McClintock, W. E.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Blewett, D. T.; Domingue, D. L.; Head, J. W.; Jensen, E. A.; Kochte, M. C.; Lankton, M. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Sprague, A. L.; Vilas, F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-05-01

    During the first MESSENGER flyby of Mercury on January 14, 2008, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) measured reflectance spectra from Mercury's surface over the wavelength range 220-1450 nm. These are the first high-spatial-resolution (<10 km) spectra at any wavelength and the first reported ultraviolet (UV, wavelength < 360 nm) observations of the surface. MASCS observed the sunlit surface for approximately 14 minutes after closest approach, acquiring over 650 spectra with the Visible and Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) detectors of MASCS sensitive to wavelengths of 350-1450 nm. MASCS also obtained just under four grating scans in the middle ultraviolet (220-320 nm) using MASCS's Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) component. Most of the near-equatorial ground track of the observation covered terrain in the previously unseen hemisphere of Mercury but also crossed into the hemisphere viewed by Mariner 10 south of Mozart crater and in Tir Planitia. Ground-based observations of Mercury reveal a surface with a red, nearly featureless spectrum in the visible and near-infrared (wavelengths greater than ~ 500 nm) that has been interpreted as evidence for a largely iron-poor feldspathic composition. Initial analyses of VIRS spectra also show strongly red-sloped, near featureless spectra, appearing to support contentions of low iron abundance in surface materials. However, interpretation of Mercury's spectral reflectance is complicated by our lack of knowledge about the effects on its surface materials of space weathering, which both suppresses the strength of spectral absorption features and reddens the spectrum. Brightness variations and absorption bands in ultraviolet reflectance may help determine both the nature and extent of processes that modify observed reflectance at longer wavelengths. MASCS surface observation data demonstrate spectral variations across the Mercury surface that can be related to previous telescopic

  17. Quantitative mid-infrared diffuse reflection of occupational wood dust exposures.

    PubMed

    Chirila, Madalina M; Lee, Taekhee; Flemmer, Michael M; Slaven, James E; Harper, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Occupational exposure to airborne wood dust has been implicated in the development of several symptoms and diseases, including nasal carcinoma. However, the assessment of occupational wood dust exposure is usually performed by gravimetric analysis, which is non-specific. In this study, a mid-infrared (mid-IR) diffuse reflection method was adapted for direct on-filter determination of wood dust mass. The cup from the diffuse reflection unit was replaced with a horizontal translational stage and a filter with wood dust was set thereon. Diffuse reflection (DR) spectra were collected from filters with six different diameters in order to average the signal from the most filter surface. Two absorption bands around 1595 and 1510 cm(-1), attributed to lignin, were monitored for quantitative analysis. Calibration curves were constructed for standard extrathoracic red oak and yellow pine (aerodynamic particle diameters between 10 and 100 μm). Calibration of DR intensity versus known wood dust mass on the filter using the Kubelka-Munk function showed a nonlinear dependence for mass of less than 10 mg of wood dust. The experimental data and small-thickness samples indicate that Kubelka-Munk conditions are not obeyed. Alternatively, the pseudo-absorption function log(1/R), for which R is the relative reflectance, while still giving nonlinear dependence against mass, is closer to a linear dependence and has been preferred by other researchers. Therefore, we consider the use of the log(1/R) function for mid-infrared DR analysis of neat, small-thickness wood dust samples. Furthermore, we suggest the use of a silver metal membrane filter for direct on-filter analysis of wood dust rather than the glass fiber filters that have been used previously.

  18. Surface Compositional Units on Mercury from Spectral Reflectance at Ultraviolet to Near-infrared Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Domingue, D. L.; McClintock, W. E.; Klima, R. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Helbert, J.; Head, J. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Vilas, F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has been acquiring reflectance spectra of Mercury's surface for over 16 months. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) component of MASCS has accumulated a global data set of more than 2 million spectra over the wavelength range 300-1450 nm. We have derived a set of VIRS spectral units (VSUs) from the following spectral parameters: visible brightness (R575: reflectance at 575 nm); visible/near-infrared reflectance ratio (VISr: reflectance at 415 nm to that at 750 nm); and ultraviolet reflectance ratio (UVr: reflectance at 310 nm to that at 390 nm). Five broad, slightly overlapping VSUs may be distinguished from these parameters. "Average VSU" areas have spectral parameters close to mean global values. "Dark blue VSU" areas have spectra with low R575 and high UVr. "Red VSU" areas have spectra with low UVr and higher VISr and R575 than average. "Intermediate VSU" areas have spectra with higher VISr than VSU red, generally higher R575, and a wide range of UVr. "Bright VSU" areas have high R575 and VISr and intermediate UVr. Several units defined by morphological or multispectral criteria correspond to specific VSUs, including low-reflectance material (dark blue VSU), pyroclastic deposits (red VSU), and hollows (intermediate VSU), but these VSUs generally include other types of areas as well. VSU definitions are complementary to those obtained by unsupervised clustering analysis. The global distribution of VIRS spectral units provides new information on Mercury's geological evolution. Much of Mercury's northern volcanic plains show spectral properties ranging from those of average VSU to those of red VSU, as does a large region in the southern hemisphere centered near 50°S, 245°E. Dark blue VSU material is widely distributed, with concentrations south of the northern plains, around the Rembrandt and

  19. Reflection Matrix Method for Controlling Light After Reflection From a Diffuse Scattering Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-22

    policy or position of the United States Air Force, the United States Department of Defense or the United States Government. This material is declared a...for Reflective Inverse Diffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.1 Enhancement for Reflective Inverse Diffusion...66 5.4.4 Predicted vs Measured Enhancement

  20. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Ueta, Hirokazu; Bisson, Régis; Beck, Rainer D

    2013-05-01

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S(θ). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  1. Infrared Studies of the Reflective Properties of Solar Cells and the HS376 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frith, James; Reyes, Jacqueline; Cowardin, Heather; Anz-Meador, Phillip; Buckalew, Brent; Lederer, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, a selection of HS-376 buses were observed photometrically with the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) to explore relationships between time-on-orbit and Near Infrared (NIR) color. These buses were chosen because of their relatively simple shape, for the abundance of similar observable targets, and their surface material being primarily covered by solar cells. While the HS-376 spacecraft were all very similar in design, differences in the specific solar cells used in the construction of each model proved to be an unconstrained variable that could affect the observed reflective properties. In 2016, samples of the solar cells used on various models of HS-376 spacecraft were obtained from Boeing and were analyzed in the Optical Measurements Center at the Johnson Space Center using a visible-near infrared field spectrometer. The laboratory-based spectra are convolved to match the photometric bands previously obtained using UKIRT and compared with the on-orbit photometry. The results and future work are discussed here.

  2. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Li; Ueta, Hirokazu; Beck, Rainer D.; Bisson, Regis

    2013-05-15

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S({theta}). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  3. Feasibility for quantitative determination of deoxyribonucleic acid by using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yafei; Tu, Jiarun; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2012-09-15

    A method for quantitative determination of fish sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (fsDNA) in solutions was developed by using adsorption preconcentration and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS). A high capacity adsorbent of amino-modified silica particle (AMSP) was prepared for preconcentration of fsDNA in solutions. Under the optimized conditions, the adsorption rate can be above 90% within 3 min. After adsorbing the DNA onto the adsorbent, near-infrared (NIR) spectra in diffuse reflectance mode were measured and partial least squares (PLS) model was established for fast quantitative prediction. The results show that the correlation coefficient (R) between the predicted and the reference concentration is 0.9894 and the recoveries are in the range of 92.9-123.4% for the validation samples in the concentration range of 3.00-29.38 mg L(-1). Therefore, the feasibility for quantitative analysis of DNA in solutions by NIRDRS is proved. This may provide an alternative way for fast determination of DNA in solutions.

  4. Reflective and photoacoustic infrared spectroscopic techniques in assessment of binding media in paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łojewski, Tomasz; Bagniuk, Jacek; Kołodziej, Andrzej; Łojewska, Joanna

    2011-11-01

    This study proposes a method to estimate the lipid content in binding media in paintings that can be used at any laboratory equipped with an infrared spectrometer. The lipid content estimator, termed greasiness index (GI), is defined as a ratio of lipid ν(C=O) and protein amide I bands at 1743 and 1635 cm-1, respectively. Three Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) sampling techniques were evaluated for GI determination: reflective attenuated total reflection—ATR, specular reflection microscopy— μSR and photoacoustic—PAS. A set of model painting samples containing three tempera binding media (casein, egg, egg + oil), seven pigments and one varnish type were used in the study. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the resulting data. A good reproducibility of GI was obtained by ATR and PAS but not with μSR. The discriminative power of the technique is higher for unvarnished samples, but, generally, the GI estimator can be used for the categorisation of binding media in large populations of painting samples analysed with the same FTIR technique (sampling technique, detection, etc.).

  5. At-line prediction of fatty acid profile in chicken breast using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, M; Riovanto, R; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M

    2012-03-01

    Near infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy was evaluated as at-line technique to predict FA profile of chicken breast directly at the slaughterhouse. Intact breasts of 214 chickens were scanned by applying a fiber optic probe to the Pectoralis superficialis muscle. Meat samples were analyzed by gas chromatography as the reference method for the determination of FA composition. Calibration equations were developed considering NIR wavelengths between 1100 and 1830nm, and modified partial least square (MPLS) was chosen as the chemometrics method to perform the calibrations. Different mathematical pre-treatments were tested and the best calibration equation for each FA was retained. Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy did not result in satisfactory predictions of FA. The best predictions were observed for oleic acid (C18:1n-9), monounsaturated FA (MUFA), and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA), and for a few minor FA. Results suggest that for chicken breast muscle, a lean meat, it was not possible to predict FA using NIR spectroscopy as an at-line technique in the abattoir. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Discrimination of Alicyclobacillus strains using nitrocellulose membrane filter and attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong; Lu, Xiaonan; Shin, Joong-Han; Rasco, Barbara

    2011-03-01

    Alicyclobacillus spp. are thermoacidophilic, spore-forming bacteria, some of which cause spoilage in pasteurized and heat-treated apple juice products through the production of guaiacol. It would be helpful if a rapid method to detect and discriminate Alicyclobacillus strains was available. A simple and rapid sample preparation method using nitrocellulose membrane filter (NMF) and a single reflection horizontal attenuated total reflection (HATR) accessory with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) was developed here. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used and tested on 8 Alicyclobacillus strains (KF, WAC, NWN-13501, NWN-12697, NWN-12654, NWN-10682, 1016, 1101). A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was established to discriminate Alicyclobacillus strains. The sample preparation method could successfully separated strains into different groups by principal component analysis (PCA). High identification accuracy (95%) was achieved with the LDA model. The method developed in the paper can be used to discriminate different Alicyclobacillus strains from each other making it possible to easily determine whether the strain of Alicyclobacillus present is associated with juice spoilage.

  7. [Evaluation of fresh sample of alfalfa silage through near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng-Fei; Rong, Yu-Ping; Han, Jian-Guo; Wang, Ji-Hua; Zhang, Lu-Da; Xu, Xiao-Jie

    2007-07-01

    It is very important to evaluate the fresh sample of alfalfa silage using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology (NIRS) for animal production. The nutrient content of forage means the contents of dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) in the forage. Because of the high moisture content, it is difficult to make uniform samples for fresh forage and to get useful information from the spectrum. Therefore, it is hard to use NIRS analysis. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using NIRS to analyse the fresh alfalfa silage, the DM, CP, NDF and ADF contents of fresh alfalfa silage were evaluated by the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy model in this experiment using partial least square regression (PLS), Fourier transform technology and sample preparation with liquid nitrogen technology. The analysis samples were obtained through different cultivars, maturity, cuttings and ensiling method. The cross validation was determined between 0.884 6-0. 989 8. The standard error of cross validation was between 3.9 and 9.7 g x kg(-1) fresh weight. Fifty samples were used to test the performance of the models. The coefficients of correlation between the chemical value and the NIRS value are between 0.939 7 and 0.994 9, and the root mean square errors of prediction are between 1.9 and 8.3 g x kg(-1) fresh weight. The results showed that NIRS could be used to evaluate the nutrition of fresh forage.

  8. [Evaluation of fermentation character of alfalfa silage through near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng-fei; Rong, Yu-ping; Han, Jian-guo

    2008-12-01

    It is very important to evaluate the fermentation character of alfalfa silage using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology (NIRS) for animal production, including the content of NH3-N, lactic acid, acetic acid and butyric acid in silage. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using NIRS to analyze the formation character of alfalfa silage, the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy models were built for NH3-N, lactic acid, zcetic acid and butyric acid in this experiment. Partial least square regression (PLS), Fourier transform technology and sample preparation with liquid nitrogen technology were used to optimize the model. The analyzed samples were obtained with different cultivars, maturity, cuttings and ensiling method. The determination of cross validation was between 0.6024 and 0.9497. The standard errors of cross validation were between 5.59 x 10(-1) and 3.78 g x kg(-1) fresh weight. The validation samples were used to test the performance of the models. The correlation coefficients between the chemical value and the NIRS value were between 0.8826 and 0.9853, and the root mean square errors of prediction were between 5.71 x 10(-1) and 3.15 g x kg(-1) fresh weight. The results showed the NIRS could evaluate the fermentation of the fresh forage.

  9. Glucose quantification in dried-down nanoliter samples using mid-infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Diessel, Edgar; Willmann, Stefan; Kamphaus, Peter; Kurte, Roland; Damm, Uwe; Heise, H Michael

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of minimally invasive glucose concentration measurement of a body fluid within the physiologically important range below 100 nL with a number of samples such as interstitial fluid, plasma, or whole blood using mid-infrared spectroscopy, but starting with preliminary measurements on samples of simple aqueous glucose solutions. The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was equipped with a Golden Gate single reflection diamond attenuated total reflection (ATR) accessory and a room-temperature pyroelectric detector. As the necessary detection limits can be achieved only for dried samples within the spectrometric conditions realized by a commercial instrument, the work focused on the optimization of such ATR measurements. We achieved quantification of samples with volumes as low as 7 nL between 10 and 600 mg/dL. The standard error of prediction (SEP) for the concentration range 10-100 mg/dL is 3.2 mg/dL with full interval data between 1180 and 940 cm(-1). The performance of the prediction is given by a coefficient of variation of prediction (CV(pred) ) of 6.2%. When all samples within the whole concentration range are included, the SEP increases to 20.2 mg/dL, and hence the CV(pred) to 10.6% due to a nonlinear signal dependence on glucose concentration. A detection limit for glucose of 0.7 ng with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 was obtained.

  10. Combination of infrared thermography and reflectance spectroscopy for precise classification of hair follicle stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianru; Guan, Yue; Liu, Caihua; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Hair follicles enjoy continual cycle of anagen, catagen and telogen all life. They not only provide a unique opportunity to study the physiological mechanism of organ regeneration, but also benefit to guide the treatment of organ repair in regenerative medicine. Usually, the histological examination as a gold standard has been applied to determine the stage of hair follicle cycle, but noninvasive classification of hair cycle in vivo remains unsolved. In this study, the thermal infrared imager was applied to measure the temperature change of mouse dorsal skin with hair follicle cycle, and the change of diffuse reflectance was monitored by the optical fiber spectrometer. Histological examination was used to verify the hair follicle stages. The results indicated that the skin temperature increased at the beginning of anagen. After having stayed a high value for several days, the temperature began to decrease. At the same time, the skin diffuse reflectance decreased until the end of this period. Then the temperature increased gradually after slightly decreased when the hair follicle entered into catagen stage, and the diffuse reflectance increased at this time. In telogen, both the temperature and the diffuse reflectance went back to a steady state all the time. Sub-stages of hair follicle cycle could be distinguished based on the joint curves. This study provided a new method to noninvasively recognize the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for the basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  11. Classification of the waxy condition of durum wheat by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy using wavelets and a genetic algorithm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been applied to the problem of differentiating four genotypes of durum wheat: ‘waxy’, wx-A1 null, wx-B1 null and wild type. The test data consisted of 95 NIR reflectance spectra of wheat samples obtained from a USDA-ARS wheat breeding program. A two...

  12. Application analysis of near-infrared illuminators using diode laser light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Arthur; Fohl, Timothy

    2004-09-01

    We describe a new class of eye safe near infrared (~810 nm) illuminators based on diode laser sources. These illuminators are the most efficient available by a large margin. We show examples of how the high output allowed by lasers can be used to illuminate very large areas and improve images in difficult lighting situations. We also show examples of how the narrow specral band of laser light can be used with filtered cameras to achieve unique results in applications such as facial recognition in open daylight. Application data on effective ranges and other factors are presented. Comparisons are made with other lighting systems such as arc lamps, tungsten lamps and light emitting diodes. We also compare results of systems that operate without supplemental light such as intensified cameras and thermal infrared cameras.

  13. Visible light guidance in silica capillaries by antiresonant reflection.

    PubMed

    Rugeland, Patrik; Sterner, Carola; Margulis, Walter

    2013-12-02

    Hollow silica capillaries are examined as optical waveguides evaluating the antiresonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW) effect by sequentially reducing the wall thickness through etching and measuring the optical transmission. It is found that the periodicity of the transmission bands is proportional to the wall thickness and that the propagation loss is of the order of a few dB/m.

  14. Penetration depth of photons in biological tissues from hyperspectral imaging in shortwave infrared in transmission and reflection geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hairong; Salo, Daniel; Kim, David M.; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of photon penetration in biological tissues is a central theme in optical imaging. A great number of endogenous tissue factors such as absorption, scattering, and anisotropy affect the path of photons in tissue, making it difficult to predict the penetration depth at different wavelengths. Traditional studies evaluating photon penetration at different wavelengths are focused on tissue spectroscopy that does not take into account the heterogeneity within the sample. This is especially critical in shortwave infrared where the individual vibration-based absorption properties of the tissue molecules are affected by nearby tissue components. We have explored the depth penetration in biological tissues from 900 to 1650 nm using Monte-Carlo simulation and a hyperspectral imaging system with Michelson spatial contrast as a metric of light penetration. Chromatic aberration-free hyperspectral images in transmission and reflection geometries were collected with a spectral resolution of 5.27 nm and a total acquisition time of 3 min. Relatively short recording time minimized artifacts from sample drying. Results from both transmission and reflection geometries consistently revealed that the highest spatial contrast in the wavelength range for deep tissue lies within 1300 to 1375 nm however, in heavily pigmented tissue such as the liver, the range 1550 to 1600 nm is also prominent.

  15. Optical measurement of temperature in biological cells under infrared laser light exposure (λ=800 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rod P.

    2015-07-01

    Interest in the interaction between laser light and biological samples has gained momentum in recent years, particularly in neurobiology, where there is significant potential to stimulate neurons with infrared laser light. Despite recent reports showing the application of infrared light for neurostimulation, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The two main hypotheses are based on thermal or electrostatic mechanisms. Here, a novel optical method is presented to make temperature measurements in human neural cells under infrared laser excitation (λ=800nm) using the dye Rhodamine B (RhB). The measurement of temperature is based on the property of RhB, a fluorescent dye whose fluorescence intensity decreases linearly with increases in temperature. We present and detail the setup and measurement procedure that has temporal resolution of few milliseconds, based around a fluorescent live-cell imaging microscope used for cellular microfluorimetry experiments.

  16. Characterization of a variable angle reflection Fourier transform infrared accessory modified for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Menegazzo, Nicola; Kegel, Laurel L; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Booksh, Karl S

    2010-10-01

    The Harrick AutoSeagull variable angle reflection accessory for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers provides access to various spectroscopic techniques in a highly flexible platform. In particular, its ability to perform total internal reflection measurements is of interest because it also forms the basis for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy in prism-based configurations. The work presented here discusses the modification of the AutoSeagull to perform SPR spectroscopy, allowing for easy incorporation of the technique into most common FT-IR spectrometers. The wavelength dependency of the dielectric constant of the plasmon-supporting metal (in our case, gold) is largely responsible for the sensitivity attributed to changes in the sample's refractive index (RI) monitored by SPR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the optical properties of gold are such that when near-infrared (NIR) and/or mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths are used to excite surface plasmons, higher sensitivities to RI changes are experienced compared to surface plasmons excited with visible wavelengths. The result is that in addition to instrumental simplicity, SPR analysis on FT-IR spectrometers, as permitted by the modified AutoSeagull, also benefits from the wavelength ranges accessible. Adaptation of the AutoSeagull to SPR spectroscopy involved the incorporation of slit apertures to minimize the angular spread reaching the detector, resulting in sharper SPR "dips" but at the cost of noisier spectra. In addition, discussion of the system's analytical performance includes comparison of dip quality as a function of slit size, tailoring of the dip minima location with respect to incident angle, and sensitivity to bulk RI changes.

  17. Improved near-infrared ocean reflectance correction algorithm for satellite ocean color data processing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lide; Wang, Menghua

    2014-09-08

    A new approach for the near-infrared (NIR) ocean reflectance correction in atmospheric correction for satellite ocean color data processing in coastal and inland waters is proposed, which combines the advantages of the three existing NIR ocean reflectance correction algorithms, i.e., Bailey et al. (2010) [Opt. Express18, 7521 (2010)Appl. Opt.39, 897 (2000)Opt. Express20, 741 (2012)], and is named BMW. The normalized water-leaving radiance spectra nLw(λ) obtained from this new NIR-based atmospheric correction approach are evaluated against those obtained from the shortwave infrared (SWIR)-based atmospheric correction algorithm, as well as those from some existing NIR atmospheric correction algorithms based on several case studies. The scenes selected for case studies are obtained from two different satellite ocean color sensors, i.e., the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the satellite Aqua and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP), with an emphasis on several turbid water regions in the world. The new approach has shown to produce nLw(λ) spectra most consistent with the SWIR results among all NIR algorithms. Furthermore, validations against the in situ measurements also show that in less turbid water regions the new approach produces reasonable and similar results comparable to the current operational algorithm. In addition, by combining the new NIR atmospheric correction with the SWIR-based approach, the new NIR-SWIR atmospheric correction can produce further improved ocean color products. The new NIR atmospheric correction can be implemented in a global operational satellite ocean color data processing system.

  18. Infrared divergence on the light-front and dynamical Higgs mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maedan, Shinji

    1998-10-01

    Dynamical Higgs mechanism on the light-front (LF) is studied using a (1+1)-dimensional model, with emphasis on the infrared divergence problem. The consideration of the zero mode k+=0 is not sufficient for investigating dynamical symmetry breaking on the LF. It also needs to treat properly an infrared divergence caused by internal momentum p+-->0 (p+≠0) in the continuum limit. In order to avoid the divergence, we introduce an infrared cutoff function FIR(p,Λ) which is not Lorentz invariant. It is then shown that the gauge boson obtains mass dynamically on the LF.

  19. Hygrothermal degradation of 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane films studied by neutron and X-ray reflectivity and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, David Robert; Garcia, Manuel Joseph; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Kent, Michael Stuart; Yim, Hyun

    2005-05-01

    Thin films of organosilanes have great technological importance in the areas of adhesion promotion, durability, and corrosion resistance. However, it is well-known that water can degrade organosilane films, particularly at elevated temperatures. In this work, X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR and NR) were combined with attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to study the chemical and structural changes within thin films of (3-glycidoxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPS) after exposure for various periods of time to air saturated with either D{sub 2}O or H{sub 2}O at 80 C. For NR and XR, ultrathin ({approx}100 {angstrom}) films were prepared by spin-coating. Both D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O provide neutron scattering contrast with GPS. Variations in the neutron scattering length density (SLD) profiles (a function of mass density and atomic composition) with conditioning time were measured after drying the samples out and also swelled with H{sub 2}O or D{sub 2}O vapor at room temperature. For samples that were dried out prior to measurement, little or no change was observed for H{sub 2}O conditioning up to 3.5 days, but large changes were observed after 30 days of conditioning. The range of conditioning time for this structural change was narrowed to between 4 and 10 days with XR. The SLD profiles indicated that the top portion of the GPS film was transformed into a thick low-density layer after conditioning, but the bottom portion showed little structural change. A previous NR study of as-prepared GPS films involving swelling with deuterated nitrobenzene showed that the central portion of the film has much lower cross-link density than the region nearest the substrate. The present data show that the central portion also swells to a much greater extent with water and hydrolyzes more rapidly. The chemical degradation mechanism was identified by IR as hydrolysis of siloxane bonds. For ATR-IR, GPS films were prepared by dip-coating, which resulted in a greater

  20. Using reflectance measurements to determine light use efficiency in corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examines the ability of narrow band vegetation indexes to detect spectral changes associated with stress and relate them to light use efficiency (LUE) over the course of a day as well as through the growing season. In a corn field in Beltsville, MD, carbon flux measurements were made at a...

  1. Optimum conditions of the distributed bragg reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Su-Chang; Lee, Byung-Teak; An, Won-Chan; Kim, Dae-Kwang; Jang, In-Kyu; So, Jin-Su; Lee, Hyung-Joo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for a bottom reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes (Ir-LEDs) was developed and optimized. At an 850-nm wavelength, markedly improved reflection spectra were observed from DBRs consisting of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs materials. In addition, the reflection spectra of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs-based DBRs was found to increase with increasing difference between the high and the low refractive indices. At multiple layers of 10 pairs, maximal reflection spectra having about a 92% reflectivity were obtained from DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. At 20 pairs, however, outstanding reflection spectra having a higher reflectivity and broader width were clearly observed from DBRs consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As. Some incident light appears to have been absorbed and confined by the narrow bandgap of the GaAs material used in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. This fact could be supported by the decrease in the reflectivity of the shorter wavelength region in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. For this reason, a remarkable output power could be obtained from the 850-nm GaAs Ir-LED chip having a DBR consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As.

  2. An Optical/Infrared Astrometric Satellite Project LIGHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, M.; Sato, K.; Nishikawa, J.; Fukushima, T.; Miyamoto, M.

    1997-08-01

    LIGHT is the name of a scanning astrometric satellite for stellar and galactic astronomy planned to be launched between 2007 and 2010. Four sets of Fizeau-type interferometers with a beam combiner unit of 1m baseline are the basic structure of the satellite optics. LIGHT is expected to observe the parallaxes and proper motions of nearly a hundred million stars up to V=18 mag (K=15 mag) magnitude with the precision better than 0.1 milliarcsec (about 50 microarcsec in V-band and 90 microarcsec in K-band) in parallaxes and better than 0.1 milliarcsec per year in proper motions, as well as the precise photometric characteristics of the observed stars. Almost all of the giant and supergiant stars belonging to the disk and halo components of our Galaxy within 10 to 15kpc from the sun will be observed by LIGHT to study the most fundamental structure and evolution of the Galaxy. LIGHT will become a precursor of a more sophisticated future astrometric interferometer satellite like GAIA (Lindegren & Perryman 1996).

  3. Stray light in the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, S. R.; Breault, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    Changes made to the telescope and critical objects considered in modeling these changes into the APART program are described. The optical system was analyzed for scattered light, diffracted then scattered radiation, and thermally emitted radiation. The damaged area of the primary to mirror was also examined. Results are presented in tables and graphs.

  4. Ranging system which compares an object reflected component of a light beam to a reference component of the light beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclauchlan, J. M.; Auyeung, J.; Tubbs, E. F.; Goss, W. C.; Psaltis, D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for measuring the distance to an object by comparing a first component of a light pulse that is reflected off the object with a second component of the light pulse that passes along a reference path of known length, which provides great accuracy with a relatively simple and rugged design. The reference path can be changed in precise steps so that it has an equivalent length approximately equal to the path length of the light pulse component that is reflected from the object. The resulting small difference in path lengths can be precisely determined by directing the light pulse components into opposite ends of a detector formed of a material that emits a second harmonic light output at the locations where the opposite going pulses past simultaneously across one another.

  5. A remote controllable fiber-type near-infrared light-responsive actuator.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiuwei; Li, Jiahui; Hou, Chengyi; Shao, Yuanlong; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang; Wang, Hongzhi

    2017-06-08

    A novel near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive sodium polyacrylate (PAAS)/graphene oxide (GO) fiber with a torsional pre-deformation structure is reported to realize remote control actuation. The torsional pre-deformed PAAS/GO fiber exhibited various actuation phenomena, under the control of a low powered near-infrared light (50 mW cm(-2)), such as rotating in a low-temperature range (<25 °C), rolling a distance of 10 times of its diameter within 10 s, and even driving the shape change of a fabric (the weight is as high as 20 times of the fiber itself).

  6. Nondestructive inspection of organic films on sandblasted metals using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Cox, R.L.; Barber, T.E.; Neu, J.T.

    1996-07-08

    Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy is a very useful tool for the determination of surface contamination and characterization of films in manufacturing applications. Spectral data from the surfaces of a host of practical materials may be obtained with sufficient insensitivity to characterize relatively thick films, such as paint, and the potential exists to detect very thin films, such as trace oil contamination on metals. The SOC 400 Surface Inspection Machine/InfraRed (SIMIR) has been developed as a nondestructive inspection tool to exploit this potential in practical situations. This SIMIR is a complete and ruggidized Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with a very efficient and robust barrel ellipse diffuse reflectance optical collection system and operating software system. The SIMIR weighs less than 8 Kg, occupies less than 14 L volume, and may be manipulated into any orientation during operation. The surface to be inspected is placed at the focal point of the SIMIR by manipulating the SIMIR or the surface. The SIMIR may or may not contact the surface being inspected. For flat or convex items, there are no size limits to items being inspected. For concave surfaces, the SIMIR geometry limits the surface to those having a radius of curvature greater than 0.2 m. For highly reflective metal surfaces, the SIMIR has a noise level approaching 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} absorbance units, which is sufficient for detecting nanometer thick organic film residues on metals. The use of this nondestructive inspection tool is demonstrated by the spatial mapping of organic stains on sand blasted metals in which organic stains such as silicone oils, mineral oils, and triglycerides are identified both qualitatively and quantitatively over the surface of the metal specimen.

  7. A study on the influence of reflected arc light on vision sensors for welding automation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.W.; Na, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    Vision sensors using optical triangulation have been widely sued for automatic welding systems in various ways. Their reliability is, however, seriously influenced by the arc light reflected from the base metal surface. In this study, the reliability of vision sensors was analyzed for the variation of the arc noise by considering the reflectance of the base metal surface. The property of the surface reflection of the base metal was modeled using the bidirectional reflectance-distribution function (BRDF), and then the intensity variation of the reflected arc was formulated for various configurations of the torch, base metal and sensor. The experimental data of the arc light reflection were obtained for two materials, mild steel and stainless steel, each having different surface reflection characteristics. It was found that the results calculated from the proposed model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Comparative effectiveness of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers in near infrared photoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Rira; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Takahito; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-03-22

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a new cancer treatment that combines the specificity of antibodies for targeting tumors with the toxicity induced by photosensitizers after exposure to near infrared (NIR) light. Herein we compare two NIR-light sources; light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers, for their effectiveness in NIR-PIT. A photosensitizer, IRDye-700DX, conjugated to panitumumab (pan-IR700), was incubated with EGFR-expressing A431 and MDA-MB-468-luc cells. NIR-light was provided by LEDs or Lasers at the same light dose. Laser-light produced more cytotoxicity and greater reductions in IR700-fluorescence intensity than LED-light. Laser-light also produced more cytotoxicity in vivo in both cell lines. Assessment of super-enhanced permeability and retention (SUPR) effects were stronger with Laser than LED. These results suggest that Laser-light produced significantly more cytotoxic effects compared to LEDs. Although LED is less expensive, Laser-light produces superior results in NIR-PIT.

  9. Innovative light collimator with afocal lens and total internal reflection lens for daylighting system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Jian; Chen, Yin-Ti; Ullah, Irfan; Chou, Chun-Han; Chan, Kai-Cyuan; Lai, Yi-Lung; Lin, Chia-Ming; Chang, Cheng-Ming; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei

    2015-10-01

    This research presents a novel design of the collimator, which uses total internal reflection (TIR), convex, and concave lenses for the natural light illumination system (NLIS). The concept of the NLIS is to illuminate building interiors with natural light, which saves energy consumption. The TIR lens is used to collimate the light, and convex and concave lenses are used to converge the light to the required area. The results have shown that the efficiency in terms of achieving collimated light using the proposed collimator at the output of the light collector is better than that of a previous system without a collimator.

  10. Penetration Depth Measurement of Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Light for Milk Powder

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Mo, Changyeun; Esquerre, Carlos; Delwiche, Stephen; Zhu, Qibing

    2016-01-01

    The increasingly common application of the near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique to the analysis of food powders has led to the need for optical characterization of samples. This study was aimed at exploring the feasibility of quantifying penetration depth of NIR hyperspectral imaging light for milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR reflectance images were collected for eight different milk powder products that included five brands of non-fat milk powder and three brands of whole milk powder. For each milk powder, five different powder depths ranging from 1 mm–5 mm were prepared on the top of a base layer of melamine, to test spectral-based detection of the melamine through the milk. A relationship was established between the NIR reflectance spectra (937.5–1653.7 nm) and the penetration depth was investigated by means of the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) technique to classify pixels as being milk-only or a mixture of milk and melamine. With increasing milk depth, classification model accuracy was gradually decreased. The results from the 1-mm, 2-mm and 3-mm models showed that the average classification accuracy of the validation set for milk-melamine samples was reduced from 99.86% down to 94.93% as the milk depth increased from 1 mm–3 mm. As the milk depth increased to 4 mm and 5 mm, model performance deteriorated further to accuracies as low as 81.83% and 58.26%, respectively. The results suggest that a 2-mm sample depth is recommended for the screening/evaluation of milk powders using an online NIR hyperspectral imaging system similar to that used in this study. PMID:27023555

  11. Light Reflection and Wavelength-downshifting from Relativistic Flying Mirrors Formed in Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kando, Masaki

    The relativistic flying mirror concept uses nonlinear plasma waves formed by an ultra-short intense laser pulse in tenuous plasma to reflect incoming laser light. Because the nonlinear plasma wave is moving approximately at the speed of light, the reflected light is downshifted in wavelength and shortened in pulse length. This concept has been originally invented to intensify focused laser intensity towards extremely high electric field, in which a vacuum starts to break. This scheme is also useful to generate ultra-short, soft-X-ray to XUV light.

  12. Reflected-light-source-based three-dimensional display with high brightness.

    PubMed

    Lv, Guo-Jiao; Wu, Fei; Zhao, Wu-Xiang; Fan, Jun; Zhao, Bai-Chuan; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A reflected-light-source (RLS)-based 3D display is proposed. This display consists of an RLS and a 2D display panel. The 2D display panel is located in front of the RLS. The RLS consists of a light source, a light guide plate (LGP), and a reflection cavity. The light source and the LGP are located in the reflection cavity. Light from the light source can enter into the LGP and reflect continuously in the reflection cavity. The reflection cavity has a series of slits, and light can exit only from these slits. These slits can work as a postpositional parallax barrier, so when they modulate the parallax images on the 2D display, 3D images are formed. Different from the conventional 3D display based on a parallax barrier, this RLS has less optical loss, so it can provide higher brightness. A prototype of this display is developed. Experimental results show that this RLS-based 3D display can provide higher brightness than the conventional one.

  13. A robust color image fusion for low light level and infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Hu, Qing-ping; Chen, Yong-kang

    2016-09-01

    The low light level and infrared color fusion technology has achieved great success in the field of night vision, the technology is designed to make the hot target of fused image pop out with intenser colors, represent the background details with a nearest color appearance to nature, and improve the ability in target discovery, detection and identification. The low light level images have great noise under low illumination, and that the existing color fusion methods are easily to be influenced by low light level channel noise. To be explicit, when the low light level image noise is very large, the quality of the fused image decreases significantly, and even targets in infrared image would be submerged by the noise. This paper proposes an adaptive color night vision technology, the noise evaluation parameters of low light level image is introduced into fusion process, which improve the robustness of the color fusion. The color fuse results are still very good in low-light situations, which shows that this method can effectively improve the quality of low light level and infrared fused image under low illumination conditions.

  14. The cosmic infrared background experiment-2 (CIBER-2) for studying the near-infrared extragalactic background light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirahata, Mai; Arai, Toshiaki; Battle, John; Bock, James; Cooray, Asantha; Enokuchi, Akito; Hristov, Viktor; Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kim, Min Gyu; Korngut, Phillip; Lanz, Alicia; Lee, Dae-Hee; Mason, Peter; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Morford, Tracy; Ohnishi, Yosuke; Park, Won-Kee; Sano, Kei; Takeyama, Norihide; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We present the current status of the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment-2 (CIBER-2) project, whose goal is to make a rocket-borne measurement of the near-infrared Extragalactic Background Light (EBL), under a collaboration with U.S.A., Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. The EBL is the integrated light of all extragalactic sources of emission back to the early Universe. At near-infrared wavelengths, measurement of the EBL is a promising way to detect the diffuse light from the first collapsed structures at redshift z˜10, which are impossible to detect as individual sources. However, recently, the intra-halo light (IHL) model is advocated as the main contribution to the EBL, and our new result of the EBL fluctuation from CIBER-1 experiment is also supporting this model. In this model, EBL is contributed by accumulated light from stars in the dark halo regions of low- redshift (z<2) galaxies, those were tidally stripped by the interaction of satellite dwarf galaxies. Thus, in order to understand the origin of the EBL, both the spatial fluctuation observations with multiple wavelength bands and the absolute spectroscopic observations for the EBL are highly required. After the successful initial CIBER- 1 experiment, we are now developing a new instrument CIBER-2, which is comprised of a 28.5-cm aluminum telescope and three broad-band, wide-field imaging cameras. The three wide-field (2.3×2.3 degrees) imaging cameras use the 2K×2K HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG arrays, and cover the optical and near-infrared wavelength range of 0.5-0.9 μm, 1.0-1.4 μm and 1.5-2.0 μm, respectively. Combining a large area telescope with the high sensitivity detectors, CIBER-2 will be able to measure the spatial fluctuations in the EBL at much fainter levels than those detected in previous CIBER-1 experiment. Additionally, we will use a linear variable filter installed just above the detectors so that a measurement of the absolute spectrum of the EBL is also possible. In this paper, the scientific

  15. Near infrared biosensor based on Classical Electromagnetically Induced Reflectance (Cl-EIR) in a planar complementary metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafapour, Zohreh

    2017-03-01

    In the field of plasmonic metamaterials (MMs), the sub-wavelength metallic structures play a role similar to atoms in nature. Classical electromagnetically induced reflectance (Cl-EIR) is a classical phenomenon which is analogue to the EIR quantum phenomenon in atomic systems. A sensitive control of the Cl-EIR is crucial to a range of potential applications such as slowing light and biosensor. Here we report on our three-dimensional nanophotonic complementary planar metamaterial consisting of an array of three slot strips plasmonic that exhibits Cl-EIR phenomenon with magnetic and electric dipolar and quadruplar interaction between the plasmonic molecules. Simply by introducing symmetry broken of the proposed MM, the Cl-EIR can be dynamically tuned. We further demonstrate using a numerical simulation that the coupling between the plasmonic modes in one asymmetric case with changing the dielectric surrounding of the nano-structure to prove our design has a great potential for near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing applications. The changing of the used metal in thin-film was also proposed to explain the coupling effects between the bright and dark modes of the Cl-EIR electromagnetic spectra on sensitivity of our proposed nano-structure in plasmonic sensing. This work paves a promising approach to achieve plasmonic sensing devices. Actually, the reflection of more than 97% is observed which is very high for the EIR effect. Furthermore, the figure of merit (FOM) of 17.3 and the group index of 413 are obtained. These mentioned characteristics make the proposed metamaterial with potential to apply for ultrafast switches, bio-sensors, and slow-light devices.

  16. Infrared Reflectance Analysis of Epitaxial n-Type Doped GaN Layers Grown on Sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsykaniuk, Bogdan I.; Nikolenko, Andrii S.; Strelchuk, Viktor V.; Naseka, Viktor M.; Mazur, Yuriy I.; Ware, Morgan E.; DeCuir, Eric A.; Sadovyi, Bogdan; Weyher, Jan L.; Jakiela, Rafal; Salamo, Gregory J.; Belyaev, Alexander E.

    2017-06-01

    Infrared (IR) reflectance spectroscopy is applied to study Si-doped multilayer n+/n0/n+-GaN structure grown on GaN buffer with GaN-template/sapphire substrate. Analysis of the investigated structure by photo-etching, SEM, and SIMS methods showed the existence of the additional layer with the drastic difference in Si and O doping levels and located between the epitaxial GaN buffer and template. Simulation of the experimental reflectivity spectra was performed in a wide frequency range. It is shown that the modeling of IR reflectance spectrum using 2 × 2 transfer matrix method and including into analysis the additional layer make it possible to obtain the best fitting of the experimental spectrum, which follows in the evaluation of GaN layer thicknesses which are in good agreement with the SEM and SIMS data. Spectral dependence of plasmon-LO-phonon coupled modes for each GaN layer is obtained from the spectral dependence of dielectric of Si doping impurity, which is attributed to compensation effects by the acceptor states.

  17. Identification of cattle, llama and horse meat by near infrared reflectance or transflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mamani-Linares, L W; Gallo, C; Alomar, D

    2012-02-01

    Visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (VIS-NIRS) was used to discriminate meat and meat juices from three livestock species. In a first trial, samples of Longissimus lumborum muscle, corresponding to beef (31) llamas (21) and horses (27), were homogenised and their spectra collected in reflectance (NIRSystems 6500 scanning monochromator, in the range of 400-2500 nm). In the second trial, samples of meat juice (same muscle) from the same species (20 beef, 19 llama and 19 horse) were scanned in folded transmission (transflectance). Discriminating models (PLS regression) were developed against "dummy" variables, testing different mathematical treatments of the spectra. Best models indentified the species of almost all samples by their meat (reflectance) or meat juice (transflectance) spectra. A few (three of beef and one of llama, for meat samples; one of beef and one of horse, for juice samples) were classified as uncertain. It is concluded that NIRS is an effective tool to recognise meat and meat juice from beef, llama and horses.

  18. Effects on biological systems of reflected light from a satellite power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, M.

    1981-01-01

    Light reflection produced by the satellite power system and the possible effects of that light on the human eye, plants, and animals were studied. For the human eye, two cases of reflected light, might cause eye damage if viewed for too long. These cases are: (1) if, while in low Earth orbit, the orbital transfer vehicle is misaligned to reflect the Sun to Earth there exists a maximum safe fixation time for the naked eye of 42.4 secs; (2) reflection from the aluminum paint on the back of the orbital transfer vehicle, while in or near low Earth orbit, can be safely viewed by the naked eye for 129 sec. For plants and animals the intensity and timing of light are not a major problem. Ways for reducing and/or eliminating the irradiances are proposed.

  19. Experiment in the Bragg Reflection of Light for the Undergraduate Using Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olah, A.; Doane, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a simple experimental setup in which the student can detect and record light spectra, study and test the concept of Bragg reflection, and measure the anisotropy of the index of refraction in a cholesteric liquid crystal. (MLH)

  20. Experiment in the Bragg Reflection of Light for the Undergraduate Using Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olah, A.; Doane, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a simple experimental setup in which the student can detect and record light spectra, study and test the concept of Bragg reflection, and measure the anisotropy of the index of refraction in a cholesteric liquid crystal. (MLH)

  1. Method and apparatus for detecting phycocyanin-pigmented algae and bacteria from reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting phycocyanin algae or bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  2. Method and apparatus for detecting phycocyanin-pigmented algae and bacteria from reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting phycocyanin algae or bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  3. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials

  4. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrate and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O and adsorbed H2O. The spectal character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micrometers, 2.2 micrometers, 2.7 micrometers, 3 micrometers, and 6 micrometers are reported here in spetra measured under Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stonger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micrometer feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3- micrometer band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micromter band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural

  5. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrate and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O and adsorbed H2O. The spectal character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micrometers, 2.2 micrometers, 2.7 micrometers, 3 micrometers, and 6 micrometers are reported here in spetra measured under Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stonger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micrometer feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3- micrometer band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micromter band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural

  6. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials

  7. [Fast determination of induction period of motor gasoline using Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fei; Yuan, Hong-Fu; Song, Chun-Feng; Xie, Jin-Chun; Li, Xiao-Yu; Yan, De-Lin

    2014-11-01

    A new method is proposed for the fast determination of the induction period of gasoline using Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). A dedicated analysis system with the function of spectral measurement, data processing, display and storage was designed and integrated using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer module and chemometric software. The sample presentation accessory designed which has advantages of constant optical path, convenient sample injection and cleaning is composed of a nine times reflection attenuated total reflectance (ATR) crystal of zinc selenide (ZnSe) coated with a diamond film and a stainless steel lid with sealing device. The influence of spectral scanning number and repeated sample loading times on the spectral signal-to-noise ratio was studied. The optimum spectral scanning number is 15 times and the optimum sample loading number is 4 times. Sixty four different gasoline samples were collected from the Beijing-Tianjin area and the induction period values were determined as reference data by standard method GB/T 8018-87. The infrared spectra of these samples were collected in the operating condition mentioned above using the dedicated fast analysis system. Spectra were pretreated using mean centering and 1st derivative to reduce the influence of spectral noise and baseline shift A PLS calibration model for the induction period was established by correlating the known induction period values of the samples with their spectra. The correlation coefficient (R2), standard error of calibration (SEC) and standard error of prediction (SEP) of the model are 0.897, 68.3 and 91.9 minutes, respectively. The relative deviation of the model for gasoline induction period prediction is less than 5%, which meets the requirements of repeatability tolerance in GB method. The new method is simple and fast. It takes no more than 3 minutes to detect one sample. Therefore, the method is feasible for implementing

  8. In vivo measurement of mid-infrared light scattering from human skin

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anna P. M.; Liakat, Sabbir; Bors, Kevin; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2013-01-01

    Two mid-infrared light sources, a broadband source from a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and a pulsed Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser, are used to measure angle-resolved backscattering in vivo from human skin across a broad spectral range. Scattering profiles measured using the FTIR suggest limited penetration of the light into the skin, with most of the light interacting with the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis. Scattering profiles from the QC laser show modulation patterns with angle suggesting interaction with scattering centers in the skin. The scattering is attributed to interaction of the laser light with components such as collagen fibers and capillaries in the dermis layer of the skin. PMID:23577287

  9. Face Recognition in Low-Light Environments Using Fusion of Thermal Infrared and Intensified Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolinsky, Diego A.; Wolff, Lawrence B.

    This chapter presents a study of face recognition performance as a function of light level using intensified near infrared imagery in conjunction with thermal infrared imagery. Intensification technology is the most prevalent in both civilian and military night vision equipment and provides enough enhancement for human operators to perform standard tasks under extremely low light conditions. We describe a comprehensive data collection effort undertaken to image subjects under carefully controlled illumination and quantify the performance of standard face recognition algorithms on visible, intensified, and thermal imagery as a function of light level. Performance comparisons for automatic face recognition are reported using the standardized implementations from the Colorado State University Face Identification Evaluation System, as well as Equinox's algorithms. The results contained in this chapter should constitute the initial step for analysis and deployment of face recognition systems designed to work in low-light conditions.

  10. Face recognition in low-light environments using fusion of thermal infrared and intensified imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolinsky, Diego A.; Wolff, Lawrence B.; Lundberg, Andrew J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a study of face recognition performance as a function of light level using intensified near infrared imagery in conjunction with thermal infrared imagery. Intensification technology is the most prevalent in both civilian and military night vision equipment, and provides enough enhancement for human operators to perform standard tasks under extremely low-light conditions. We describe a comprehensive data collection effort undertaken by the authors to image subjects under carefully controlled illumination and quantify the performance of standard face recognition algorithms on visible, intensified and thermal imagery as a function of light level. Performance comparisons for automatic face recognition are reported using the standardized implementations from the CSU Face Identification Evaluation System, as well as Equinox own algorithms. The results contained in this paper should constitute the initial step for analysis and deployment of face recognition systems designed to work in low-light level conditions.

  11. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize

  12. Giant Planets in Reflected Light: What Science Can We Expect?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting the reflection spectra of cool giant planets will be a challenge. Spectra of such worlds are expected to be primarily shaped by scattering from clouds and hazes and punctuated by absorption bands of methane, water, and ammonia. While the warmest giants may be cloudless, their atmospheres will almost certainly sport substantial photochemical hazes. Furthermore the masses of most direct imaging targets will be constrained by radial velocity observations, their radii, and thus atmospheric gravity, will be imperfectly known. The uncertainty in planet radius and gravity will compound with uncertain aerosol properties to make estimation of key absorber abundances difficult. To address such concerns our group is developing atmospheric retrieval tools to constrain quantities of interest, particular gas mixing ratios. We have applied our Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to simulated data of the quality expected from the WFIRST CGI instrument and found that given sufficiently high SNR data we can confidentially identify and constrain the abundance of methane, cloud top pressures, gravity, and the star-planet-observer phase angle. In my presentation I will explain the expected characteristics of cool extrasolar giant planet reflection spectra, discuss these and other challenges in their interpretation, and summarize the science results we can expect from direct imaging observations.

  13. Light Reflectance Spectroscopy to Detect Positive Surgical Margins on Prostate Cancer Specimens.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Monica S C; Lay, Aaron H; Wang, Xinlong; Kapur, Payal; Ozayar, Asim; Sayah, Maryam; Zeng, Li; Liu, Hanli; Roehrborn, Claus G; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative frozen section analysis is not routinely performed to determine positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy due to time requirements and unproven clinical usefulness. Light reflectance spectroscopy, which measures light intensity reflected or backscattered from tissues, can be applied to differentiate malignant from benign tissue. We used a novel light reflectance spectroscopy probe to evaluate positive surgical margins on ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens and correlate its findings with pathological examination. Patients with intermediate to high risk disease undergoing radical prostatectomy were enrolled. Light reflectance spectroscopy was performed on suspected malignant and benign prostate capsule immediately following organ extraction. Each light reflectance spectroscopy at 530 to 830 nm was analyzed and correlated with pathological results. A regression model and forward sequential selection algorithm were developed for optimal feature selection. Eighty percent of light reflectance spectroscopy data were selected to train a logistic regression model, which was evaluated by the remaining 20% data. This was repeated 5 times to calculate averaged sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Light reflectance spectroscopy analysis was performed on 17 ex vivo prostate specimens, on which a total of 11 histologically positive and 22 negative surgical margins were measured. Two select features from 700 to 830 nm were identified as unique to malignant tissue. Cross-validation when performing the predictive model showed that the optical probe predicted positive surgical margins with 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 86% accuracy and an AUC of 0.95. Light reflectance spectroscopy can identify positive surgical margins accurately in fresh ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens. Further study is required to determine whether such analysis may be used in real time to improve surgical decision making and decrease positive surgical margin rates

  14. Does infrared or ultraviolet light damage the lens?

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, P G; Talebizadeh, N; Yu, Z; Galichanin, K

    2016-01-01

    In daylight, the human eye is exposed to long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVR), visible radiation and short wavelength infrared radiation (IRR). Almost all the UVR and a fraction of the IRR waveband, respectively, left over after attenuation in the cornea, is absorbed in the lens. The time delay between exposure and onset of biological response in the lens varies from immediate-to-short-to-late. After exposure to sunlight or artificial sources, generating irradiances of the same order of magnitude or slightly higher, biological damage may occur photochemically or thermally. Epidemiological studies suggest a dose-dependent association between short wavelength UVR and cortical cataract. Experimental data infer that repeated daily in vivo exposures to short wavelength UVR generate photochemically induced damage in the lens, and that short delay onset cataract after UVR exposure is photochemically induced. Epidemiology suggests that daily high-intensity short wavelength IRR exposure of workers, is associated with a higher prevalence of age-related cataract. It cannot be excluded that this effect is owing to a thermally induced higher denaturation rate. Recent experimental data rule out a photochemical effect of 1090 nm in the lens but other wavelengths in the near IRR should be investigated. PMID:26768915

  15. Cooling atomic ions with visible and infra-red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenfelser, F.; Marinelli, M.; Negnevitsky, V.; Ragg, S.; Home, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate the ability to load, cool and detect singly charged calcium ions in a surface electrode trap using only visible and infrared lasers for the trapped-ion control. As opposed to the standard methods of cooling using dipole-allowed transitions, we combine power broadening of a quadrupole transition at 729 nm with quenching of the upper level using a dipole allowed transition at 854 nm. By observing the resulting 393 nm fluorescence we are able to perform background-free detection of the ion. We show that this system can be used to smoothly transition between the Doppler cooling and sideband cooling regimes, and verify theoretical predictions throughout this range. We achieve scattering rates which reliably allow recooling after collision events and allow ions to be loaded from a thermal atomic beam. This work is compatible with recent advances in optical waveguides, and thus opens a path in current technologies for large-scale quantum information processing. In situations where dielectric materials are placed close to trapped ions, it carries the additional advantage of using wavelengths which do not lead to significant charging, which should facilitate high rate optical interfaces between remotely held ions.

  16. Photosynthesis-related infrared light transmission changes in spinach leaf segments

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, T.

    1985-10-01

    The time courses of infrared light transmission changes and fluorescence induced by light in spinach leaf segments were measured. The illumination by red light exhibited a complex wave pattern. The transmission approached the baseline after repeating decreases and increases. Illumination by far-red light decreased the transmission. One of the differences between the two responses was the difference between the two amplitudes of the first increasing component. The component in the red light response was larger than the component in the far-red light response. The transmission decrease by far-red light is supposed to correspond to ''red drop.'' The transmission decrease by far-red light was suppressed by red light. This is due to an activation of a transmission-increasing component. This probably corresponds to ''enhancement.'' A proportional correlation existed between the intensity of far-red light and the minimum intensity of red light that suppressed the transmission decrease induced by far-red light. The component which made Peak D in the time course of fluorescence yield and the first increasing component in the transmission changes were suppressed by intense light.

  17. Turning On Lights to Stop Neurodegeneration: The Potential of Near Infrared Light Therapy in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Daniel M.; Moro, Cécile; Stone, Jonathan; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Mitrofanis, John

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders. They develop after a progressive death of many neurons in the brain. Although therapies are available to treat the signs and symptoms of both diseases, the progression of neuronal death remains relentless, and it has proved difficult to slow or stop. Hence, there is a need to develop neuroprotective or disease-modifying treatments that stabilize this degeneration. Red to infrared light therapy (λ = 600–1070 nm), and in particular light in the near infrared (NIr) range, is emerging as a safe and effective therapy that is capable of arresting neuronal death. Previous studies have used NIr to treat tissue stressed by hypoxia, toxic insult, genetic mutation and mitochondrial dysfunction with much success. Here we propose NIr therapy as a neuroprotective or disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients. PMID:26793049

  18. "Lights, Camera, Reflection": Using Peer Video to Promote Reflective Dialogue among Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harford, Judith; MacRuairc, Gerry; McCartan, Dermot

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the use of peer-videoing in the classroom as a means of promoting reflection among student teachers. Ten pre-service teachers participating in a teacher education programme in a university in the Republic of Ireland and ten pre-service teachers participating in a teacher education programme in a university in the North of…

  19. Reflectance-based skin detection in the short wave infrared band and its application to video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, Tye

    2016-10-01

    Robust reflectance-based skin detection is a potentially powerful tool for security and search and rescue applications, especially when applied to video. However, to be useful it must be able to account for the variations of human skin, as well as other items in the environment that could cause false detections. This effort focused on identifying a robust skin detection scheme that is appropriate for video application. Skin reflectance was modeled to identify unique skin features and compare them to potential false positive materials. Based on these comparisons, specific wavelength bands were selected and different combinations of two and three optical filters were used for actively identifying skin, as well as identifying and removing potential false positive materials. One wavelength combination (1072/1250 nm) was applied to video using both single- and dual-camera configurations based on its still image performance, as well as its appropriateness for video application. There are several important factors regarding the extension of still image skin detection to video, including light available for detection (solar irradiance and reflectance intensity), overall intensity differences between different optical filters, optical component light loss, frame rate, time lag when switching between filters, image coregistration, and camera auto gain behavior.

  20. Diffuse reflectance near infrared-chemometric methods development and validation of amoxicillin capsule formulations

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahmed Nawaz; Khar, Roop Krishen; Ajayakumar, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was to establish near infrared-chemometric methods that could be effectively used for quality profiling through identification and quantification of amoxicillin (AMOX) in formulated capsule which were similar to commercial products. In order to evaluate a large number of market products easily and quickly, these methods were modeled. Materials and Methods: Thermo Scientific Antaris II near infrared analyzer with TQ Analyst Chemometric Software were used for the development and validation of the identification and quantification models. Several AMOX formulations were composed with four excipients microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, croscarmellose sodium and colloidal silicon dioxide. Development includes quadratic mixture formulation design, near infrared spectrum acquisition, spectral pretreatment and outlier detection. According to prescribed guidelines by International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) and European Medicine Agency (EMA) developed methods were validated in terms of specificity, accuracy, precision, linearity, and robustness. Results: On diffuse reflectance mode, an identification model based on discriminant analysis was successfully processed with 76 formulations; and same samples were also used for quantitative analysis using partial least square algorithm with four latent variables and 0.9937 correlation of coefficient followed by 2.17% root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC), 2.38% root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), 2.43% root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV). Conclusion: Proposed model established a good relationship between the spectral information and AMOX identity as well as content. Resulted values show the performance of the proposed models which offers alternate choice for AMOX capsule evaluation, relative to that of well-established high-performance liquid chromatography method. Ultimately three commercial products were successfully evaluated using developed

  1. [Testing of germination rate of hybrid rice seeds based on near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-nian; Jiang, Dan; Liu, Ying-ying; Ding, Wei-min; Ding, Qi-shuo; Zha, Liang-yu

    2014-06-01

    Germination rate of rice seeds was measured according to technical stipulation of germination testing for agricultural crop seeds at present. There existed many faults for this technical stipulation such as long experimental period, more costing and higher professional requirement. A rapid and non-invasive method was put forward to measure the germination rate of hybrid rice seeds based on near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Two varieties of hybrid rice seeds were aged artificially at temperature 45 degrees C and humidity 100% condition for 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 and 144 h. Spectral data of 280 samples for 2 varieties of hybrid rice seeds with different aging time were acquired individually by near-infrared spectra analyzer. Spectral data of 280 samples for 2 varieties of hybrid rice seeds were randomly divided into calibration set (168 samples) and prediction set (112 samples). Gormination rate of rice seed with different aging time was tested. Regression model was established by using partial least squares (PLS). The effect of the different spectral bands on the accuracy of models was analyzed and the effect of the different spectral preprocessing methods on the accuracy of models was also compared. Optimal model was achieved under the whole bands and by using standardization and orthogonal signal correction (OSC) preprocessing algorithms with CM2000 software for spectral data of 2 varieties of hybrid rice seeds, the coefficient of determination of the calibration set (Rc) and that of the prediction set (Rp) were 0.965 and 0.931 individually, standard error of calibration set (SEC) and that of prediction set (SEP) were 1.929 and 2.899 respectively. Relative error between tested value and predicted value for prediction set of rice seeds is below 4.2%. The experimental results show that it is feasible that rice germination rate is detected rapidly and nondestructively by using the near-infrared spectroscopy analysis technology.

  2. Determination of moisture in Cheddar cheese by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wehling, R L; Pierce, M M

    1988-01-01

    Near infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the moisture content of Cheddar cheese. Through multiple linear regression analysis, a 3-wavelength calibration was developed for use with a commercial filter monochromator instrument. For a validation set of 47 samples, the correlation coefficient squared (r2) between the NIR and oven moisture methods was 0.92, with a standard error of performance (SEP) of 0.38%. Sample temperature was found to significantly affect the spectral response; therefore, it was necessary to equilibrate all samples to a uniform temperature prior to NIR analysis. Aging may also affect the NIR characteristics of cheese, although it was possible to develop a successful calibration that encompassed a wide range of aging times.

  3. Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy of thin films using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with <1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  4. Evaluation of apparent viscosity of Para rubber latex by diffuse reflection near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sirisomboon, Panmanas; Chowbankrang, Rawiphan; Williams, Phil

    2012-05-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy in diffuse reflection mode was used to evaluate the apparent viscosity of Para rubber field latex and concentrated latex over the wavelength range of 1100 to 2500 nm, using partial least square regression (PLSR). The model with ten principal components (PCs) developed using the raw spectra accurately predicted the apparent viscosity with correlation coefficient (r), standard error of prediction (SEP), and bias of 0.974, 8.6 cP, and -0.4 cP, respectively. The ratio of the SEP to the standard deviation (RPD) and the ratio of the SEP to the range (RER) for the prediction were 4.4 and 16.7, respectively. Therefore, the model can be used for measurement of the apparent viscosity of field latex and concentrated latex in quality assurance and process control in the factory.

  5. Fast determination of total ginsenosides content in ginseng powder by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-cai; Chen, Xing-dan; Lu, Yong-jun; Cao, Zhi-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was used to develop a fast determination method for total ginsenosides in Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) powder. The spectra were analyzed with multiplicative signal correction (MSC) correlation method. The best correlative spectra region with the total ginsenosides content was 1660 nm~1880 nm and 2230nm~2380 nm. The NIR calibration models of ginsenosides were built with multiple linear regression (MLR), principle component regression (PCR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression respectively. The results showed that the calibration model built with PLS combined with MSC and the optimal spectrum region was the best one. The correlation coefficient and the root mean square error of correction validation (RMSEC) of the best calibration model were 0.98 and 0.15% respectively. The optimal spectrum region for calibration was 1204nm~2014nm. The result suggested that using NIR to rapidly determinate the total ginsenosides content in ginseng powder were feasible.

  6. Diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy can distinguish normal from enzymatically digested cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. P.; Bowden, J. C.; Rintoul, L.; Meder, R.; Oloyede, A.; Crawford, R. W.

    2009-09-01

    A non-destructive, diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy (DR-NIRS) approach is considered as a potential tool for determining the component-level structural properties of articular cartilage. To this end, DR-NIRS was applied in vitro to detect structural changes, using principal component analysis as the statistical basis for characterization. The results show that this technique, particularly with first-derivative pretreatment, can distinguish normal, intact cartilage from enzymatically digested cartilage. Further, this paper establishes that the use of DR-NIRS enables the probing of the full depth of the uncalcified cartilage matrix, potentially allowing the assessment of degenerative changes in joint tissue, independent of the site of initiation of the osteoarthritic process.

  7. Pectin functionalised by fatty acids: Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopic characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Calce, Enrica; Tarantilis, Petros A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Chemically modified pectin derivatives obtained by partial esterification of its hydroxyl moieties with fatty acids (FA; oleic, linoleic and palmitic acids), as well as the initial apple peel pectin were comparatively characterised using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Characteristic changes observed in DRIFT spectra in going from pectin to its FA esters are related to the corresponding chemical modifications. Comparing the DRIFT spectra with some reported data on FTIR spectra of the same materials measured in KBr or NaCl matrices has revealed noticeable shifts of several polar functional groups both in pectin and in its FA-esterified products induced by the halide salts. The results obtained have implications for careful structural analyses of biopolymers with hydrophilic functional groups by means of different FTIR spectroscopic methodologies.

  8. Rapid and nondestructive analysis of pharmaceutical products using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Pao; Du, Guorong; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2012-11-01

    Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS) was applied to classification and quantification of azithromycin tablets with the aid of chemometric multivariate analysis. Repeatability was investigated by repeated measurements, and the effect of morphology was examined by preparing the tablets in four forms, i.e. tablet product, tablet without coating, powder of tablet without coating, and powder of tablet. Furthermore, baseline elimination by continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and wavenumber selection was discussed for improving the repeatability and accuracy of the method. The results show that the spectra of the samples in the four forms can be measured with an acceptable repeatability, and classification of manufacture sites and quantitative analysis of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) can be achieved by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression, respectively. More importantly, baseline elimination and wavenumber selection can significantly simplify the calculation and improve the results.

  9. Prediction of Japanese green tea ranking by fourier transform near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tatsuhiko; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Yonetani, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Akio; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2007-11-28

    A rapid and easy determination method of green tea's quality was developed by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) reflectance spectroscopy and metabolomics techniques. The method is applied to an online measurement and an online prediction of green tea's quality. FT-NIR was employed to measure green tea metabolites' alteration affected by green tea varieties and manufacturing processes. A set of ranked green tea samples from a Japanese commercial tea contest was analyzed to create a reliable quality-prediction model. As multivariate analyses, principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares projections to latent structures (PLS) were used. It was indicated that the wavenumber region from 5500 to 5200 cm(-1) had high correlation with the quality of the tea. In this study, a reliable quality-prediction model of green tea has been achieved.

  10. Detection of whitening agents in illegal cosmetics using attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Bothy, J L; Desmedt, B; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O

    2014-09-01

    Cosmetic products containing illegal whitening agents are still found on the European market. They represent a considerable risk to public health, since they are often characterised by severe side effects when used chronically. The detection of such products at customs is not always simple, due to misleading packaging and the existence of products containing only legal components. Therefore there is a need for easy to use equipment and techniques to perform an initial screening of samples. The use of attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, combined with chemometrics, was evaluated for that purpose. It was found that the combination of ATR-IR with the simple chemometric technique k-nearest neighbours gave good results. A model was obtained in which a minimum of illegal samples was categorised as legal. The correctly classified illegal samples could be attributed to the illegal components present.

  11. Electrically controlled infrared optical transmission and reflection through metallic grating using NEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Fujii, Masamitsu

    2015-12-01

    The enhanced optical properties of metallic subwavelength gratings with very narrow slits have recently been extensively studied in the field of plasmonics. The optical transmission and reflection of such nanostructures, which act as nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) actuators, can be electrically controlled by varying their geometrical parameters, giving them great flexibility for numerous applications in photonics, opto-electronics, and sensing. The previous challenges in controlling the optical properties were overcome by forming a metallic subwavelength grating with an NEMS actuator in mid-air, allowing the grating to be physically moved with the bias voltage. The device can shift the plasmon resonance wavelength with an electrical signal. The resonance wavelength for Wood's anomaly at the infrared region is predicted through simulations to shift by approximately 150 nm. We discuss the effect of polarization on the optical properties and grating mechanism. The reported effect may be used to achieve active spectral tuning and switching in a wide range of applications.

  12. Determination of soil content in chlordecone (organochlorine pesticide) using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS).

    PubMed

    Brunet, Didier; Woignier, Thierry; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie; Achard, Raphaël; Rangon, Luc; Barthès, Bernard G

    2009-11-01

    Chlordecone is a toxic organochlorine insecticide that was used in banana plantations until 1993 in the French West Indies. This study aimed at assessing the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) for determining chlordecone content in Andosols, Nitisols and Ferralsols from Martinique. Using partial least square regression, chlordecone content conventionally determined through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry could be correctly predicted by NIRS (Q(2) = 0.75, R(2) = 0.82 for the total set), especially for samples with chlordecone content <12 mg kg(-1) or when the sample set was rather homogeneous (Q(2) = 0.91, R(2) = 0.82 for the Andosols). Conventional measures and NIRS predictions were poorly correlated for chlordecone content >12 mg kg(-1), nevertheless ca. 80% samples were correctly predicted when the set was divided into three or four classes of chlordecone content. Thus NIRS could be considered a time- and cost-effective method for characterising soil contamination by chlordecone.

  13. Minimally invasive screening for colitis using attenuated total internal reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Titus, Jitto; Viennois, Emilie; Merlin, Didier; Unil Perera, A G

    2017-03-01

    This article describes a rapid, simple and cost-effective technique that could lead to a screening method for colitis without the need for biopsies or in vivo measurements. This screening technique includes the testing of serum using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy for the colitis-induced increased presence of mannose. Chronic (Interleukin 10 knockout) and acute (Dextran Sodium Sulphate-induced) models for colitis are tested using the ATR-FTIR technique. Arthritis (Collagen Antibody Induced Arthritis) and metabolic syndrome (Toll like receptor 5 knockout) models are also tested as controls. The marker identified as mannose uniquely screens and distinguishes the colitic from the non-colitic samples and the controls. The reference or the baseline spectrum could be the pooled and averaged spectra of non-colitic samples or the subject's previous sample spectrum. This shows the potential of having individualized route maps of disease status, leading to personalized diagnosis and drug management.

  14. Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications to Lipid-Protein Interaction in Langmuir Films

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Flach, Carol R.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) of lipid/protein monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface provides unique molecular structure and orientation information from the film constituents. The technique is thus well suited for studies of lipid/protein interaction in a physiologically relevant environment. Initially, the nature of the IRRAS experiment is described and the molecular structure information that may be obtained is recapitulated. Subsequently, several types of applications, including the determination of lipid chain conformation and tilt as well as elucidation of protein secondary structure are reviewed. The current article attempts to provide the reader with an understanding of the current capabilities of IRRAS instrumentation and the type of results that have been achieved to date from IRRAS studies of lipids, proteins and lipid/protein films of progressively increasing complexity. Finally, possible extensions of the technology are briefly considered. PMID:20004639

  15. Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy of Thin Films Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-02-04

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with < 1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  16. Studying substrate binding to reconstituted secondary transporters by attenuated total reflection infrared difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; León, Xavier; Padrós, Esteve

    2012-01-01

    The determination of protein conformational changes induced by the interaction of substrates with secondary transporters is an important step toward the elucidation of their transport mechanism. Since conformational changes in a protein alter its vibrational patterns, they can be detected with high sensitivity by infrared difference (IR(diff)) spectroscopy without the need for external probes. We describe a general procedure to obtain substrate-induced IR(diff) spectra by alternating perfusion of buffers over an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal containing an adhered film of a membrane protein reconstituted in lipids. As an example, we provide specific protocols to obtain melibiose and Na(+)-induced ATR-IR(diff) spectra of reconstituted melibiose permease, a sodium/melibiose co-transporter from E. coli. The presented methodology is applicable in principle to any membrane protein, provided that it can be purified and reconstituted in functional form, and appropriate substrates are available.

  17. Titanium-silicon oxide film structures for polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Iain E.; Zorn, Stefan; Richter, Gunther; Srot, Vesna; Kelsch, Marion; van Aken, Peter A.; Skoda, Maximilian; Gerlach, Alexander; Spatz, Joachim P.; Schreiber, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a titanium-silicon oxide film structure that permits polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy on silicon oxide surfaces. The structure consists of a ~6 nm sputtered silicon oxide film on a ~200 nm sputtered titanium film. Characterization using conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray reflectometry is presented. We demonstrate the use of this structure to investigate a selectively protein-resistant self-assembled monolayer (SAM) consisting of silane-anchored, biotin-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). PEG-associated IR bands were observed. Measurements of protein-characteristic band intensities showed that this SAM adsorbed streptavidin whereas it repelled bovine serum albumin, as had been expected from its structure. PMID:20418963

  18. Diffuse reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of surface contamination on sandblasted metals

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Barber, T.E.; Neu, J.T.; Nerren, B.H.

    1996-07-30

    The SOC 400 Surface Inspection Machine/Infrared (SIMIR) is a small, ruggedized Fourier transform infrared spectrometer having dedicated diffuse reflectance optics. The SOC 400 was designed for the purpose of detecting (qualitatively and quantitatively) oil stains on the inside surface of solid rocket motor casings in the as-sandblasted and cleaned condition at levels approaching 1 mg ft{sup {minus}2}. The performance of this instrument is described using spectral mapping techniques.

  19. Diffuse Reflectance Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Tool for the Identification of Surface Contamination on Sandblasted Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Louis G.; Barber, Tye E.; Neu, John T.; Nerren, Billy H.

    1997-01-01

    The SOC 400 Surface Inspection Machine/Infrared (SIMIR) is a small, ruggedized Fourier transform infrared spectrometer having dedicated diffuse reflectance optics. The SOC 400 was designed for the purpose of detecting (qualitatively and quantitatively) oil stains on the inside surface of solid rocket motor casings in the as-sandblasted and cleaned condition at levels approaching 1 mg. sq ft. The performance of this instrument is described using spectral mapping techniques.

  20. Diffuse Reflectance Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Tool for the Identification of Surface Contamination on Sandblasted Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Louis G.; Barber, Tye E.; Neu, John T.; Nerren, Billy H.

    1997-01-01

    The SOC 400 Surface Inspection Machine/Infrared (SIMIR) is a small, ruggedized Fourier transform infrared spectrometer having dedicated diffuse reflectance optics. The SOC 400 was designed for the purpose of detecting (qualitatively and quantitatively) oil stains on the inside surface of solid rocket motor casings in the as-sandblasted and cleaned condition at levels approaching 1 mg. sq ft. The performance of this instrument is described using spectral mapping techniques.