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  1. Enhancing the clinical reflective capacities of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of clinical practicums is to help nursing students learn from real clinical experiences. In clinical settings, nursing instructors set-aside time at the end of each clinical day for reflective, debriefing discussions that are designed to draw the students' attention to relevant information and help them understand their beliefs and experiences. The students' competence and decision-making skills are enhanced when they are able to reflect on critical incidents or everyday practice events. It is sometimes difficult, however, for instructors to engage students meaningfully in discussions and promote reflection when students are fatigued. In this article, I argue that it is possible to refresh, support, and inspire undergraduate nursing students by engaging them in an activity designed to distract them and occupy their conscious attention, so that their more divergent and less accessible ideas are allowed to surface. Less accessible ideas are associated with the default network; regions in the brain that are most active when the brain is allowed to rest and wander. Congruent with the middle range theory of comfort, a distracting activity will provide comfort to students who are fatigued and/or distressed, and at the same time, will enhance their reflective capacities. A distracting activity that is enjoyable, not too demanding, and can be sustained for more than just a few minutes works best for idea generation and reflection.

  2. Cognitive Expertise, Emotional Development and Reflective Capacity: Clinical Skills for Improved Pain Care

    PubMed Central

    Murinson, Beth B.; Agarwal, Aakash K.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    The overarching goal of medical training is to nurture the growth of knowledgeable, caring and insightful clinicians guided by the ideals of medical professionalism. Recent definitions of professional competence identify essential clinical skills, including cognitive expertise, emotional competence, and reflective capacity. This modern framework reflects the increasingly complex nature of the patient-clinician interaction, in which the clinician must exchange diagnostic information while supportively engaging the patient on a deeper, affective level. The affective dimension can be particularly potent when pain is the primary symptom, as it is for the majority of medical visits. Unfortunately, however, current models of professionalism, used as an early guide for medical trainees to develop an understanding of the clinical exchange, largely focus on interactions in the cognitive domain. To emphasize the importance of emotions in professional development, we propose the Cognitive and Emotional Preparedness Model (CEPM), which describes the clinical encounter occurring on two channels, one cognitive and the other emotional, and stresses the importance of multidimensional development in preparing the clinician to 1) communicate clinical information, 2) provide emotional support, and 3) actively reflect on experiences for continued improvement. Together, acquisition of knowledge, emotional development, and reflective skill will improve the clinical interaction. Perspective The proficiency of medical trainees in developing clinical skills profoundly shapes patient satisfaction and treatment outcomes. This article reviews the cognitive, emotional and reflective development of medical trainees and presents a model illustrating how clinical development impacts pain care. For improved efficacy, pain education should be calibrated to students' developmental needs. PMID:18984501

  3. Capacity development through reflective practice and collaborative research among clinic supervisors in rural South Africa--a case study.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, U; Blom, W; Dlanjwa, M; Fikeni, L; Hewana, N; Madlavu, N; Makaula, V; Pennacchini, M; Seal, S; Sivuku, T; Snyman, K

    2004-03-01

    This article provides an example of one form of action research, collaborative enquiry, in the health sector. It argues that collaborative inquiry is a powerful tool to develop reflective capacity among health workers and can facilitate the ownership of learning and the production of usable knowledge. It reports the results of a research project investigating the roles and functions of clinic supervisors in three districts in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Clinics are the cornerstone of the new district-based health system. They are staffed primarily by nurses and are often the only contact point for large parts of the rural population. In conditions of remoteness and isolation, clinic staff depend upon personal interaction with clinic supervisors to enable them to function productively. Yet experience has shown that supervisors do not always fulfil this role. This project aimed at gaining insight into the status of clinic supervision, understanding the factors that hinder effective supervision and making recommendations for improvements. Using a participative approach of Collaborative Inquiry, a team of 10 clinic supervisors and the research co-ordinator collected data reflecting on their own practice over a period of 5 months. These data were then jointly analysed and written up. The participating clinic supervisors went through several periods of uncertainty, when many of them asked themselves why they agreed to this project. However, the engagement with stakeholders and colleagues and the joint analysis of research data soon proved to be a valuable source of insight. There was unanimity in the end that the research process had been very valuable and enabling.

  4. Beyond the margins: reflective writing and development of reflective capacity in medical education.

    PubMed

    Wald, Hedy S; Reis, Shmuel P

    2010-07-01

    Reflective capacity has been described as an essential characteristic of professionally competent clinical practice, core to ACGME competencies. Reflection has been recently linked to promoting effective use of feedback in medical education and associated with improved diagnostic accuracy, suggesting promising outcomes. There has been a proliferation of reflective writing pedagogy within medical education to foster development of reflective capacity, extend empathy with deepened understanding of patients' experience of illness, and promote practitioner well-being. At Alpert Med, "interactive" reflective writing with guided individualized feedback from interdisciplinary faculty to students' reflective writing has been implemented in a Doctoring course and Family Medicine clerkship as an educational method to achieve these aims. Such initiatives, however, raise fundamental questions of reflection definition, program design, efficacy of methods, and outcomes assessment. Within this article, we consider opportunities and challenges associated with implementation of reflective writing curricula for promotion of reflective capacity within medical education. We reflect upon reflection.

  5. Beyond the Margins: Reflective Writing and Development of Reflective Capacity in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Shmuel P.

    2010-01-01

    Reflective capacity has been described as an essential characteristic of professionally competent clinical practice, core to ACGME competencies. Reflection has been recently linked to promoting effective use of feedback in medical education and associated with improved diagnostic accuracy, suggesting promising outcomes. There has been a proliferation of reflective writing pedagogy within medical education to foster development of reflective capacity, extend empathy with deepened understanding of patients’ experience of illness, and promote practitioner well-being. At Alpert Med, “interactive” reflective writing with guided individualized feedback from interdisciplinary faculty to students’ reflective writing has been implemented in a Doctoring course and Family Medicine clerkship as an educational method to achieve these aims. Such initiatives, however, raise fundamental questions of reflection definition, program design, efficacy of methods, and outcomes assessment. Within this article, we consider opportunities and challenges associated with implementation of reflective writing curricula for promotion of reflective capacity within medical education. We reflect upon reflection. PMID:20407840

  6. Fostering and evaluating reflective capacity in medical education: developing the REFLECT rubric for assessing reflective writing.

    PubMed

    Wald, Hedy S; Borkan, Jeffrey M; Taylor, Julie Scott; Anthony, David; Reis, Shmuel P

    2012-01-01

    Reflective writing (RW) curriculum initiatives to promote reflective capacity are proliferating within medical education. The authors developed a new evaluative tool that can be effectively applied to assess students' reflective levels and assist with the process of providing individualized written feedback to guide reflective capacity promotion. Following a comprehensive search and analysis of the literature, the authors developed an analytic rubric through repeated iterative cycles of development, including empiric testing and determination of interrater reliability, reevaluation and refinement, and redesign. Rubric iterations were applied in successive development phases to Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University students' 2009 and 2010 RW narratives with determination of intraclass correlations (ICCs). The final rubric, the Reflection Evaluation for Learners' Enhanced Competencies Tool (REFLECT), consisted of four reflective capacity levels ranging from habitual action to critical reflection, with focused criteria for each level. The rubric also evaluated RW for transformative reflection and learning and confirmatory learning. ICC ranged from 0.376 to 0.748 for datasets and rater combinations and was 0.632 for the final REFLECT iteration analysis. The REFLECT is a rigorously developed, theory-informed analytic rubric, demonstrating adequate interrater reliability, face validity, feasibility, and acceptability. The REFLECT rubric is a reflective analysis innovation supporting development of a reflective clinician via formative assessment and enhanced crafting of faculty feedback to reflective narratives.

  7. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  8. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  9. Clinical linguistics: conversational reflections.

    PubMed

    Crystal, David

    2013-04-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference participants during that time.

  10. Building the Reflective Capacity of Practicing Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Robert A.; Jackson, Sherion H.

    2006-01-01

    Reflection is often used as a professional development tool in coaching and mentoring leaders. Outside of education, research is underway to learn how managers can develop as learning facilitators in the workplace. However, the current focus on learning communities and learning organizations within education makes reflective thinking particularly…

  11. Building the Reflective Capacity of Practicing Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Robert A.; Jackson, Sherion H.

    2006-01-01

    Reflection is often used as a professional development tool in coaching and mentoring leaders. Outside of education, research is underway to learn how managers can develop as learning facilitators in the workplace. However, the current focus on learning communities and learning organizations within education makes reflective thinking particularly…

  12. Reflections in the clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Borrell-Carrió, F; Hernández-Clemente, J C

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze some models of expert decision and their impact on the clinical practice. We have analyzed decision-making considering the cognitive aspects (explanatory models, perceptual skills, analysis of the variability of a phenomenon, creating habits and inertia of reasoning and declarative models based on criteria). We have added the importance of emotions in decision making within highly complex situations, such as those occurring within the clinical practice. The quality of the reflective act depends, among other factors, on the ability of metacognition (thinking about what we think). Finally, we propose an educational strategy based on having a task supervisor and rectification scenarios to improve the quality of medical decision making.

  13. Developing clinical teaching capacities of midwifery students.

    PubMed

    Rance, Sharon; Sweet, Linda

    2016-06-01

    Competency Standards in Australia articulate that the midwife must be able to contribute to the professional development of themselves and others. Few undergraduate health professional curricula currently incorporate content for the development of specific knowledge and skills required for clinical teaching. This project aimed to understand and enhance midwifery students' preparedness to assume their future clinical teaching responsibilities. Design-based research was used to implement an educational intervention aimed at developing clinical teaching skills through a peer education session between 1st and 3rd year students. The perspectives of 30 undergraduate midwifery students about their preparedness for their teaching role and the intervention were obtained through 3 focus groups. A thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Three themes were identified encompassing the research aims and objectives; 'Co-creating a culture for learning', 'reciprocal teaching and learning' and 'developing clinical teaching capacities'. The findings indicate that the midwifery students had a holistic understanding of their responsibilities in clinical teaching in the workplace. They were able to identify ways in which their teaching capacities were being developed through their clinical experiences and the curriculum, both intended and hidden. Despite limited educational activities for clinical teaching, the midwifery students made explicit connections of the relational interdependence of workplace-based experiences and their learning. Students were clearly able to identify ways in which their own learning experiences and the culture in which this learning is embedded, assists them to develop clinical teaching skills, ready to support the next generation of midwifery students. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reflections on the clinical implications of symbolism.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Barros, Elias M; da Rocha Barros, Elizabeth L

    2011-08-01

    We start by stressing the idea that the process itself of constructing the symbol in its different components and its vicissitudes is centrally important to contemporary psychoanalysis as symbols are essential for thinking and for storing emotional experiences in our memory and for conveying our affects to others and to ourselves. Our implicit idea is that internal attacks are not directed only at the internal objects, but also include attacks on the structure or forms of the mental representations before and while they become constituted in symbols. It is by this means that destructive impulses invade the processes of symbolic construction. Symbols can lose their plasticity and thus silence the emotions and therefore cut off the patient from their meanings. Our clinical material allows us to increase our understanding of how the formal qualities of symbols operate in mental life, and how they can interfere in the capacity to work through emotional experiences. Finally, our reflections based on the analysis of a patient with difficulty in relating with the meanings of the symbols he produced will highlight the importance of the analyst's reverie along the process of formulating an interpretation. This paper is also part of a development in the study of the process of reverie. Copyright © 2011 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  15. Subitizing Reflects Visuo-Spatial Object Individuation Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Manuela; Fumarola, Antonia; Chinello, Alessandro; Melcher, David

    2011-01-01

    Subitizing is the immediate apprehension of the exact number of items in small sets. Despite more than a 100 years of research around this phenomenon, its nature and origin are still unknown. One view posits that it reflects a number estimation process common for small and large sets, which precision decreases as the number of items increases,…

  16. Subitizing Reflects Visuo-Spatial Object Individuation Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Manuela; Fumarola, Antonia; Chinello, Alessandro; Melcher, David

    2011-01-01

    Subitizing is the immediate apprehension of the exact number of items in small sets. Despite more than a 100 years of research around this phenomenon, its nature and origin are still unknown. One view posits that it reflects a number estimation process common for small and large sets, which precision decreases as the number of items increases,…

  17. Conceptual Models and Guidelines for Clinical Assessment of Financial Capacity.

    PubMed

    Marson, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The ability to manage financial affairs is a life skill of critical importance, and neuropsychologists are increasingly asked to assess financial capacity across a variety of settings. Sound clinical assessment of financial capacity requires knowledge and appreciation of applicable clinical conceptual models and principles. However, the literature has presented relatively little conceptual guidance for clinicians concerning financial capacity and its assessment. This article seeks to address this gap. The article presents six clinical models of financial capacity : (1) the early gerontological IADL model of Lawton, (2) the clinical skills model and (3) related cognitive psychological model developed by Marson and colleagues, (4) a financial decision-making model adapting earlier decisional capacity work of Appelbaum and Grisso, (5) a person-centered model of financial decision-making developed by Lichtenberg and colleagues, and (6) a recent model of financial capacity in the real world developed through the Institute of Medicine. Accompanying presentation of the models is discussion of conceptual and practical perspectives they represent for clinician assessment. Based on the models, the article concludes by presenting a series of conceptually oriented guidelines for clinical assessment of financial capacity. In summary, sound assessment of financial capacity requires knowledge and appreciation of clinical conceptual models and principles. Awareness of such models, principles and guidelines will strengthen and advance clinical assessment of financial capacity.

  18. An analysis of reflective writing early in the medical curriculum: The relationship between reflective capacity and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Ottenberg, Abigale L; Pasalic, Dario; Bui, Gloria T; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2016-07-01

    To examine the relationship between reflection, gender, residency choice, word count, and academic achievement among medical students. A modified version of the Reflection Evaluation for Learners' Enhanced Competencies Tool (REFLECT) was developed and used for this study (Cronbach's alpha of 0.86 with an intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] of 0.68). This was applied to writing samples about professionalism in gross anatomy from first-year medical students between 2005 and 2011. Four analysts reviewed and scored written reflections independently. Composite reflection scores were compared with gender, residency choice, length of written reflection, NBME® Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Examination scores, and final gross anatomy course. Total of 319 written reflections were evaluated. Female students who pursued medicine specialties had the highest composite reflection scores (87 [27.2%]). Word count frequently correlated with reflection score (p < 0.0001). Students who performed well on the NBME® Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Examination tended to achieve high anatomy course grades (p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant relationship between composite reflection scores and NBME® Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Examination scores (p = 0.16) or anatomy course grades (p = 0.90). This study suggests there are likely no correlations between reflective capacity and academic performance on tests of medical knowledge administered early in the medical curriculum.

  19. Reflective journaling for clinical judgment development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lasater, Kathie; Nielsen, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Reflective journaling is a strategy used often in clinical education to gain insight into students' clinical thinking; however, studies indicate that students may benefit from guided reflections. Numerous tools have been used to structure student reflection with varying results. This article describes the outcomes from using the Guide for Reflection based on Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model. The Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, created from the Model, is used to evaluate development of clinical judgment and provides language to communicate about clinical thinking with students. Senior immersion course competencies, also developed with language from Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model,offer a comprehensive package that fosters students' clinical judgment development, faculty-student communication about clinical judgment, and evaluation of students' clinical thinking.

  20. Reflective strategies in the neonatal clinical area.

    PubMed

    Vittner, Dorothy

    2009-02-01

    By nature and history, the newborn intensive care unit (NICU) is technology focused and crisis driven. Working there demands technical competence as well as the emotional aptitude to ensure that infants are cared for in an environment that values their basic humanness. Reflective strategies augment professional caregivers' perception of the emotional experience of working with others. Reflection is an essential skill that enhances the nursing profession. Reflection is a process of creating meaning from interpreting experiences through purposeful thought that guides decision making for taking the next step of action. In an effort to make a major change in our NICU, we incorporated reflective process to prepare us for implementing change. We used reflective practices to enhance the implementation efforts of individualized developmentally supportive care.

  1. Machine Learning Techniques for Predicting Crop Photosynthetic Capacity from Leaf Reflectance Spectra.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, David; Schlüter, Urte; Weber, Andreas P M

    2017-06-05

    Harnessing natural variation in photosynthetic capacity is a promising route toward yield increases, but physiological phenotyping is still too laborious for large-scale genetic screens. Here, we evaluate the potential of leaf reflectance spectroscopy to predict parameters of photosynthetic capacity in Brassica oleracea and Zea mays, a C3 and a C4 crop, respectively. To this end, we systematically evaluated properties of reflectance spectra and found that they are surprisingly similar over a wide range of species. We assessed the performance of a wide range of machine learning methods and selected recursive feature elimination on untransformed spectra followed by partial least squares regression as the preferred algorithm that yielded the highest predictive power. Learning curves of this algorithm suggest optimal species-specific sample sizes. Using the Brassica relative Moricandia, we evaluated the model transferability between species and found that cross-species performance cannot be predicted from phylogenetic proximity. The final intra-species models predict crop photosynthetic capacity with high accuracy. Based on the estimated model accuracy, we simulated the use of the models in selective breeding experiments, and showed that high-throughput photosynthetic phenotyping using our method has the potential to greatly improve breeding success. Our results indicate that leaf reflectance phenotyping is an efficient method for improving crop photosynthetic capacity. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Peer group reflection helps clinical teachers to critically reflect on their teaching.

    PubMed

    Boerboom, Tobias B B; Jaarsma, Debbie; Dolmans, Diana H J M; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Mastenbroek, Nicole J J M; Van Beukelen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Student evaluations can help clinical teachers to reflect on their teaching skills and find ways to improve their teaching. Studies have shown that the mere presentation of student evaluations is not a sufficient incentive for teachers to critically reflect on their teaching. We evaluated and compared the effectiveness of two feedback facilitation strategies that were identical except for a peer reflection meeting. In this study, 54 clinical teachers were randomly assigned to two feedback strategies. In one strategy, a peer reflection was added as an additional step. All teachers completed a questionnaire evaluating the strategy that they had experienced. We analysed the reflection reports and the evaluation questionnaire. Both strategies stimulated teachers to reflect on feedback and formulate alternative actions for their teaching practice. The teachers who had participated in the peer reflection meeting showed deeper critical reflection and more concrete plans to change their teaching. All feedback strategies were considered effective by the majority of the teachers. Strategies with student feedback and self-assessment stimulated reflection on teaching and helped clinical teachers to formulate plans for improvement. A peer reflection meeting seemed to enhance reflection quality. Further research should establish whether it can have lasting effects on teaching quality.

  3. Primary Care Collaborative Memory Clinics: Building Capacity for Optimized Dementia Care.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda; Hillier, Loretta M; Molnar, Frank; Borrie, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, primary care collaborative memory clinics (PCCMCs) are being established to build capacity for person-centred dementia care. This paper reflects on the significance of PCCMCs within the system of care for older adults, supported with data from ongoing evaluation studies. Results highlight timelier access to assessment with a high proportion of patients being managed in primary care within a person-centred approach to care. Enhancing primary care capacity for dementia care with interprofessional and collaborative care will strengthen the system's ability to respond to increasing demands for service and mitigate the growth of wait times to access geriatric specialist assessment.

  4. Building capacity for the clinical placement of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Tony; Cross, Merylin; Jacob, Elisabeth; Shahwan-Akl, Lina; Welch, Anthony; Caldwell, Alison; Berry, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    The current workforce crisis mandates that education providers increase the number of graduates from nursing courses. In a practice-based profession however, any growth in student numbers is constrained by the ability of clinical venues to accept students for clinical experience. Factors within the operating environment such as bed capacity, staffing mix and shortage of experienced clinicians to act as preceptors, clinical teachers, mentors or role models; limit the number of students that can be accommodated and both the quality and level of educational support provided. These factors are compounded in rural hospitals, where opportunities for placements can be also overlooked or ineffectively utilised. This paper reports on a project undertaken by a rural health service, two universities and a TAFE institute. It demonstrates that a greater number of students can be accommodated when all major stakeholders accept responsibility and agree to work together to create a learning community and find ways to overcome barriers and impediments that constrain capacity. It is concluded that the capacity of a rural hospital to accept students for placement can be increased when cancellation rates are reduced, the clinical timetable rationalised and more collaborative approaches to clinical education are implemented.

  5. Special Issue on Clinical Supervision: A Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    This special issue about clinical supervision offers an array of contributions with disparate insights into the supervision process. Using a synergy of supervision model, the articles are categorized as addressing the infrastructure required for adequate supervision, the relationship dynamics endemic to supervision, or the process of delivering…

  6. Design of reflectance confocal microscopes for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavislan, James M.

    2009-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy provides real time, cellular resolution images of in-vivo and ex-vivo tissues and has been cleared by the FDA and international regulatory agencies for medical applications. Clinical applications of reflectance confocal microscopy are being tested in single- and multi-center clinical trials. In this paper I will review the design challenges of sub-surface imaging with confocal microscopy and techniques to compare the instruments performance between different sites.

  7. Reflective thinking in clinical nursing education: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Chabeli, M; Muller, M

    2004-11-01

    Over decades nursing had an interest in clarifying and developing its knowledge base and its conceptual foundation. Reflective thinking has become a popular word in nursing education world wide, but its meaning and effective use remains debatable because of lack of clarity in its meaning (Mackintosh, 1998:553). The researcher engaged in the concept analysis of reflective thinking so as to fully understand its meaning and interpretation, hence the research question to be addressed by this article is: "What is the meaning of reflective thinking in clinical nursing education?" This article seeks to explore and describe the conceptual meaning of reflective thinking in clinical nursing education using the method of concept analysis as outlined by Wilson (1963:23-39) and Gift (1997:75,76). Concept analysis of reflective thinking constitutes the first phase of a study to develop a model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education, thus ensuring theoretical validity of the model. An extensive examination of domain specific and various disciplines' literature was explored as part of the concept analysis. A selection of information regarding variations and similarities in the use and interpretation of reflective thinking across clinical nursing education was drawn from computerised data bases. This increased the rigor and the findings of the analysis. Through deductive reasoning and drawing of inferences, attributes were clustered in an attempt to identify the apparent essence of the concept. Three categories and the related connotations emerged as follows: Antecedents (Cognitive and affective thinking skills). Process (The three phases of reflective thinking). Outcome ( New insight and changed perspective). Reflective thinking was considered from the result of concept analysis as a cyclic, interactive constructing mental process to improve practice in a specific context. It is recommended that a model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing

  8. Using reflection to influence practice: student perceptions of daily reflection in clinical education.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Douglas P; London, Daniel A; Emke, Amanda R

    2016-10-01

    Reflection is a key element in learning from experience, but the impact of most programmes of reflection on daily practice remains unclear. We investigated students' perceptions of adding a daily written reflection assignment to a clinical rotation. Third-year medical students on a single two-week rotation completed daily reflections analyzing their performance. Programme evaluation used a 33-question anonymized survey. Quantitative data were summarized and qualitative responses coded for recurring themes. Twenty-six students completed the survey (90 % response rate). Eighty-five percent of students felt that the daily reflections had a positive impact on their learning from clinical experience. Seventy-seven percent of students reported that the programme changed their awareness of their thoughts and actions, and 80 % felt that it improved their recall of experiences. A greater sense of mindfulness and focus on self-improvement were major themes that emerge from students' descriptions of the role of daily reflections in their learning. Overall, daily reflections demonstrated a positive learning influence. This exploratory study suggests students may benefit from more frequent, short reflections as opposed to more typically spaced reflective assignments.

  9. Clinical and symptomatological reflections: the fascial system

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Every body structure is wrapped in connective tissue, or fascia, creating a structural continuity that gives form and function to every tissue and organ. Currently, there is still little information on the functions and interactions between the fascial continuum and the body system; unfortunately, in medical literature there are few texts explaining how fascial stasis or altered movement of the various connective layers can generate a clinical problem. Certainly, the fascia plays a significant role in conveying mechanical tension, in order to control an inflammatory environment. The fascial continuum is essential for transmitting muscle force, for correct motor coordination, and for preserving the organs in their site; the fascia is a vital instrument that enables the individual to communicate and live independently. This article considers what the literature offers on symptoms related to the fascial system, trying to connect the existing information on the continuity of the connective tissue and symptoms that are not always clearly defined. In our opinion, knowing and understanding this complex system of fascial layers is essential for the clinician and other health practitioners in finding the best treatment strategy for the patient. PMID:25258540

  10. Reflective journal writing: how it promotes reflective thinking in clinical nursing education: a students' perspective.

    PubMed

    Kok, J; Chabeli, M M

    2002-08-01

    According to the outcomes-based education and training system of education (OBET) in the country and the South African Nursing Council, education should focus on "creating" reflective learners and practitioners. This article seeks to determine the effectiveness of reflective journal writing in promoting the reflective thinking of learners in clinical nursing education and to validate the guidelines described in a bigger study on how to facilitate reflective thinking using reflective journal writing. A qualitative, contextual, explorative, descriptive research design was used to determine the learners' perceptions on whether reflective journal writing did promote their higher-level thinking skills during the six-month placement in a psychiatric clinical practice using the reflective diaries. From a population of seventeen fourth-year students, six volunteered to participate in a focus group interview. The data was analysed by means of the descriptive method of open coding of Tesch (in Creswell, 1994:154-156). Positive and negative results from the perceptions of the participants and a literature review served as a basis for deducing and describing guidelines for the effective use of reflective journal writing in promoting reflective thinking in clinical nursing education. The positive perception was the development of problem-solving skills attained through reflection by using analytical critical thinking, synthesis and the evaluation of situations. Self-evaluation leading to intellectual growth and self-awareness indicated a positive perception. Negative perceptions were that reflective journal writing is time consuming, content based with a lack of clear expectations from the teacher, and distrust of students about the information written. Guba's model of ensuring trustworthiness in qualitative research as described in Krefting (1991:215-222) was employed. It is concluded that reflective journal writing in clinical nursing education does promote reflective

  11. Reflection-in-Action: Case Study of a Clinical Supervisor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner-Muecke, Lee A.

    1986-01-01

    Applies Donald Schon's concept of the "reflective practitioner" to Robert Goldhammer's clinical supervision cycle (pre-observation conference, observation, analysis and strategy, supervision conference, and postconference analysis), stressing personal growth purposes for teacher and supervisor alike. Explores a clinical supervisor's…

  12. Acting on reflection: the effect of reflection on students' clinical performance on a standardized patient examination.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Benjamin; Plack, Margaret; Maring, Joyce; Mintz, Matthew; Simmens, Samuel J

    2007-01-01

    Little evidence exists to support the value of reflection in the clinical setting. To determine whether reflecting and revisiting the "patient" during a standardized patient (SP) examination improves junior medical students' performance and to analyze students' perceptions of its value. Students completed a six-encounter clinical skills examination, writing a guided assessment after each encounter to trigger reflection. SPs evaluated the students with Medical Skills and Patient Satisfaction checklists. During the last three encounters, students could opt to revisit the SP and be reevaluated with identical checklists. One hundred and forty-nine third year medical students. Changes in scores in the Medical Skills and Patient Satisfaction checklists between first visit and revisit were tested separately per case as well as across cases. On the medical skills and patient satisfaction checklists, mean revisit scores across cases were significantly higher than mean first visit scores [12.6 vs 12.2 (pooled SD = 2.4), P = .0001; 31.2 vs 31.0 (pooled SD = 3.5), P = .0001)]. Sixty-five percent of the time, students rated "reflect-revisit" positively, 34% neutrally, and 0.4% negatively. Five themes were identified in the positive comments: enhancement of (1) medical decision making, (2) patient education/counseling, (3) student satisfaction/confidence, (4) patient satisfaction/confidence, and (5) clinical realism. Offering third year medical students the option to reflect and revisit an SP during a clinical skills examination produced a small but nontrivial increase in clinical performance. Students perceived the reflect-revisit experience as enhancing patient-centered practices (counseling, education) as well as their own medical decision making and clinical confidence.

  13. Developing a Capacity to Engage in Critical Reflection: Students' "Ways of Knowing" within an Undergraduate Business and Accounting Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Ursula; Tan, Phaik Leng

    2013-01-01

    The development of a capacity to engage in critical reflection is central to higher education. However, students vary in this capacity and its development requires students to move from an absolute towards a contextual way of knowing. Using 32 semi-structured interviews, this study identifies the ways of knowing of 17 business and accounting…

  14. Enhancing reflective practice through online learning: impact on clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Sim, J; Radloff, A

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, radiographers and radiation therapists function in a workplace environment that is protocol-driven with limited functional autonomy. The workplace promotes a culture of conformity and discourages practitioners from reflective and critical thinking, essential attributes for continuing learning and advancing workplace practices. As part of the first author’s doctoral study, a continuing professional development (CPD) educational framework was used to design and implement an online module for radiation therapists’ CPD activities. The study aimed to determine if it is possible to enhance healthcare practitioners’ reflective practice via online learning and to establish the impact of reflective learning on clinical practice. Materials and methods The objectives of the online module were to increase radiation therapists’ knowledge in planning for radiation therapy for the breast by assisting them engage in reflective practice. The cyclical process of action research was used to pilot the module twice with two groups of volunteer radiation therapists (twenty-six participants) from Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Results The online module was evaluated using Kirkpatrick’s four-level evaluation model. Evidence indicated that participants were empowered as a result of participation in the module. They began reflecting in the workplace while assuming a more proactive role and increased clinical responsibilities, engaged colleagues in collaborative reflections and adopted evidence-based approaches in advancing clinical practices. Conclusion The study shows that it is possible to assist practitioners engage in reflective practice using an online CPD educational framework. Participants were able to apply the reflective learning they had developed in their workplace. As a result of their learning, they felt empowered to continue to effect changes in their workplace beyond the cessation of the online module. PMID:21614319

  15. The Provider Reflective Process Assessment Scales (PRPAS): Taking a Deep Look into Growing Reflective Capacity in Early Childhood Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Sherryl Scott; Ash, Jordana

    2016-01-01

    The need to build an evidence base for reflective supervision (RS) is threefold: (1) to determine the elements of a supervision session that make it reflective, (2) to demonstrate that change occurs within the supervisee, and (3) to demonstrate that having staff members participate in RS enhances positive program (or client) outcomes. This article…

  16. The Provider Reflective Process Assessment Scales (PRPAS): Taking a Deep Look into Growing Reflective Capacity in Early Childhood Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Sherryl Scott; Ash, Jordana

    2016-01-01

    The need to build an evidence base for reflective supervision (RS) is threefold: (1) to determine the elements of a supervision session that make it reflective, (2) to demonstrate that change occurs within the supervisee, and (3) to demonstrate that having staff members participate in RS enhances positive program (or client) outcomes. This article…

  17. A model for reflection for good clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Balla, John I; Heneghan, Carl; Glasziou, Paul; Thompson, Matthew; Balla, Margaret E

    2009-12-01

    Rationale and aim The rapidly changing knowledge base of clinical practice highlights the need to keep abreast of knowledge changes that are most relevant for the practitioner. We aimed to develop a model for reflection on clinical practice that identified the key elements of medical knowledge needed for good medical practice. Method The dual theory of cognition, an integration of intuitive and analytic processes, provided the framework for the study. The design looked at the congruence between the clinical thinking process and the dual theory. A one-year study was conducted in general practice clinics in Oxfordshire, UK. Thirty-five general practitioners participated in 20-minute interviews to discuss how they worked through recently seen clinical cases. Over a one-year period 72 cases were recorded from 35 interviews. These were categorized according to emerging themes, which were manually coded and substantiated with verbatim quotations. Results There was a close fit between the dual theory and participants' clinical thinking processes. This included instant problem framing, consistent with automatic intuitive thinking, focusing on the risk and urgency of the case. Salient features accounting for these choices were recognizable. There was a second reflective phase, leading to the review of initial judgements. Conclusions The proposed model highlights the critical steps in decision making. This allows regular recalibration of knowledge that is most critical at each of these steps. In line with good practice, the model also links the crucial knowledge used in decision making, to value judgments made in relation to the patient.

  18. The use of abstract paintings and narratives to foster reflective capacity in medical educators: a multinational faculty development workshop.

    PubMed

    Karkabi, Khaled; Wald, Hedy S; Cohen Castel, Orit

    2014-06-01

    Reflective capacity is integral to core healthcare professional practice competencies. Reflection plays a central role in teacher education as reflecting on teaching behaviours with critical analysis can potentially improve teaching practice. The humanities including narrative and the visual arts can serve as a valuable tool for fostering reflection. We conducted a multinational faculty development workshop aiming to enhance reflective capacity in medical educators by using a combination of abstract paintings and narratives. Twenty-three family physicians or physicians-in-training from 10 countries participated in the workshop. Qualitative assessment of the workshop showed that the combined use of art and narrative was well received and perceived as contributing to the reflective exercise. Participants generally felt that viewing abstract paintings had facilitated a valuable mood transformation and prepared them emotionally for the reflective writing. Our analysis found that the following themes emerged from participants' responses: (1) narratives from different countries are similar; (2) the use of art helped access feelings; (3) viewing abstract paintings facilitated next steps; (4) writing reflective narratives promoted examination of educational challenges, compassion for self and other, and building an action plan; and (5) sharing of narrative was helpful for fostering active listening and appreciating multiple perspectives. Future research might include comparing outcomes for a group participating in arts-narrative-based workshops with those of a control group using only reflective narrative or in combination with figurative art, and implementing a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods of assessment.

  19. The use of abstract paintings and narratives to foster reflective capacity in medical educators: a multinational faculty development workshop

    PubMed Central

    Karkabi, Khaled; Wald, Hedy S; Cohen Castel, Orit

    2014-01-01

    Reflective capacity is integral to core healthcare professional practice competencies. Reflection plays a central role in teacher education as reflecting on teaching behaviours with critical analysis can potentially improve teaching practice. The humanities including narrative and the visual arts can serve as a valuable tool for fostering reflection. We conducted a multinational faculty development workshop aiming to enhance reflective capacity in medical educators by using a combination of abstract paintings and narratives. Twenty-three family physicians or physicians-in-training from 10 countries participated in the workshop. Qualitative assessment of the workshop showed that the combined use of art and narrative was well received and perceived as contributing to the reflective exercise. Participants generally felt that viewing abstract paintings had facilitated a valuable mood transformation and prepared them emotionally for the reflective writing. Our analysis found that the following themes emerged from participants’ responses: (1) narratives from different countries are similar; (2) the use of art helped access feelings; (3) viewing abstract paintings facilitated next steps; (4) writing reflective narratives promoted examination of educational challenges, compassion for self and other, and building an action plan; and (5) sharing of narrative was helpful for fostering active listening and appreciating multiple perspectives. Future research might include comparing outcomes for a group participating in arts–narrative-based workshops with those of a control group using only reflective narrative or in combination with figurative art, and implementing a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods of assessment. PMID:24273319

  20. Interpreting the Clinical Significance of Capacity Scores for Informed Consent in Alzheimer Disease Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Karlawish, Jason; Kim, Scott Y. H.; Knopman, David; van Dyck, Christopher H.; James, Bryan D.; Bioethics, M.; Marson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Among Alzheimer disease (AD) patients enrolled in a clinical trial, the authors assessed the ability of a standardized capacity assessment procedure to identify persons who are capable of giving their own informed consent. Design Cross-sectional interview. Setting Thirteen sites participating in a randomized and placebo controlled study of simvastatin for the treatment of mild to moderate AD. Participants Persons with mild to moderate AD and their study partners enrolled in the simvastatin clinical trial. Measurements Interviews to assess decision-making capacity using the MacArthur Competency Assessment Tool for Clinical Research (MacCAT-CR). Results Judges blinded to the subject’s clinical status had a high rate of agreement on patients capable of giving their own informed consent (κ = 0.73). The understanding subscale had the best receiver operator characteristic and an analysis of positive and negative predictive values over a range of hypothetical prevalences of incapacity to consent demonstrated the value of a range of understanding cut-points. Conclusion Among mild to moderate AD patients, enrolled in an actual clinical trial, these results suggest evidence based guidelines for using the MacCAT-CR understanding subscale to help guide judgments about whether a patient has the capacity to consent. PMID:18556397

  1. The 6-min Walk Test Reflects Functional Capacity in Primary Care and Obese Patients.

    PubMed

    Baillot, A; Baillargeon, J-P; Brown, C; Langlois, M-F

    2015-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the association between the 6-min walk test distance (6MWTD) and physical functional capacity (PF) in primary care patients, as well as in obese individuals. We studied 351 subjects (age=56.8±14.6 years; BMI=29.4±5.7 kg/m(2); 68% women), including 141 obese subjects (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)), recruited in 10 different family practices. Physical (PCS) and mental component summary of the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the 8 sub-scores were measured using the Short Form-36 Health Survey. Anthropometry, vital signs and physical testing were measured according to standardized protocols. Recreational physical activity (LPA) and sedentary levels were determined using the Canadian Community Health Survey. In a stepwise multivariate analysis, 65% of the 6MWTD variance was explained by PF of the HRQOL, age, quadriceps strength, number of chronic diseases, LPA categories, BMI, resting heart rate, PCS, height and TV-viewing categories in primary care subjects. In the obese individuals, PF, age, quadriceps strength and BMI explained 57% of the 6MWTD variance. In these 2 groups, 44% of the 6MWTD variance is explained by PF only. To conclude, the 6MWTD is strongly associated with PF of the HRQOL. Thus, it adequately reflects physical limitations in daily life activities of primary care patients, including obese individuals. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Exploratory study of the characteristics of feedback in the reflective dialogue group given to medical students in a clinical clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chin-Chen; Lin, Meei-Ju; Lin, Chi-Wei; Chu, Shao-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Structured narrative reflective writing combined with guided feedback is an efficient teaching method for enhancing medical students’ reflective capacity. However, what kinds of feedback offered and reflection presented in a reflective group remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of feedback in a reflective dialogue group. Methods Fifth-year medical students on a monthly interval rotation at the pediatric department of a medical center in eastern Taiwan during the 2012 academic year completed their reflective writing regarding patient and family psychosocial issues, and were subsequently debriefed in a 2-h group discussion session to receive feedback from a clinical tutor and peers. Content analysis was conducted to explore the characteristics of feedback and reflection presented in the reflective dialogue. The evaluative questionnaire regarding the benefits of reflection with others was administrated following the group session. Results Forty students participated in five reflective groups and 108 psychosocial issues were discussed and identified. The tutor played an initiating role in the group discussion by providing six equal feedback types involving exploring new knowledge, initiating advanced discussion, highlighting the issues, and encouraging the students. The students provided eight types of feedback that involved a substantial deep discussion on psychosocial issues and action plans based on the complex interactive ecological network of clinical encounters. Each student attained 1.25 times the depth or breadth of reflection after receiving feedback and experienced the benefits of reflection with others. Conclusion Through structured narrative reflective writing combined with pluralistic group discussion with a tutor and peers, the medical students had time to think deeply and broadly about psychosocial issues among patients and their family members. Facilitative feedback providing new knowledge, deeper

  3. A model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Chabeli, M; Muller, M

    2004-11-01

    A qualitative, contextual, exploratory and descriptive design for theory generation was used to develop a model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education (Mouton & Marais, 1990:43; Mouton, 1996: 103-109; Chinn & Kramer 1991:79-120). A model was developed within the existing frameworks of theory generation. Wilson (1963:23-39) and Gift (1997:75,76) provided a theoretical framework for a concept analysis of reflective thinking in phase one of the study. Further conceptual meaning was attained through a perceptual survey where twelve nurse educators participated in a focus group interview with regard to how reflective thinking can be facilitated in clinical nursing education. Classification of the main concepts and sub-concepts was made through a conceptualisation process within Dickoff, James and Wiedenbach's (1968:415-435) theoretical framework using the six elements of practice theory. Concluding relation statements were inferred through deductive analysis and synthesis after conceptualisation of each main concept. The relation statements provided the basis for model description (Chinn & Kramer, 1991:107-125). Definitions of the main concepts and sub-concepts were described using the basic rules by (Rossouw, 2001:10-11; Cohen & Copi, 1994:192-195). The adapted educational process from five learning theories provided a framework through which the procedure to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education was described. Lastly, the model was evaluated using the pre-determined criteria by Chinn and Kramer (1991:128-137) and refined by experts in qualitative research and theory generation. Guidelines were developed which do not form part of this article. Theoretical validity was ensured. Recommendations, limitations, challenging hypothesis and a conclusion were made.

  4. Preservice Teachers' Reflection on Clinical Experiences: A Comparison of Blog and Final Paper Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Darci J.; Wondra, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the depth of reflection in the writing of preservice teachers who completed end-of-the-semester reflective papers or reflective blogs for undergraduate education courses associated with clinical experiences. Coders rated the depth of reflection as one of four categories: non-reflection, understanding, reflection, or critical…

  5. Oral health students as reflective practitioners: changing patterns of student clinical reflections over a period of 12 months.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Annetta K L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of reflection shown by bachelor of oral health students in relation to their clinical and professional practice. Reflective learning was embedded as a topic in the oral health curriculum within the discipline of dental hygiene practice. Reflective journal writing was integrated with clinical practice and linked with assessment requirements. Students' reflective writing was analyzed thematically to elucidate levels of reflection based on Boud's 4 Rs of Reflection (review, react, relate and respond) over a period of 12 months. Differences in the levels of reflection at different time intervals were examined. Students' ability to critically reflect improved over the period of 12 months. The predominant level of reflection changed from primarily descriptive and superficial at the start of the academic year to primarily critical and relational by the end. As expected, the highest level of critical reflection (respond) occurred infrequently, although it became more frequent as the academic year progressed. Bachelor of oral health students do reflect critically. Regular reflective writing contributed to the development of critical reflective skills in the context of clinical and professional development.

  6. Does Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Score Reflect the Clinical Reasoning Ability of Medical Students?

    PubMed

    Park, Wan Beom; Kang, Seok Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Seong; Myung, Sun Jung

    2015-07-01

    Clinical reasoning ability is an important factor in a physician's competence and thus should be taught and tested in medical schools. Medical schools generally use objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) to measure the clinical competency of medical students. However, it is unknown whether OSCE can also evaluate clinical reasoning ability. In this study, the authors investigated whether OSCE scores reflected students' clinical reasoning abilities. Sixty-five fourth-year medical students participated in this study. Medical students completed the OSCE with 4 cases using standardized patients. For assessment of clinical reasoning, students were asked to list differential diagnoses and the findings that were compatible or not compatible with each diagnosis. The OSCE score (score of patient encounter), diagnostic accuracy score, clinical reasoning score, clinical knowledge score and grade point average (GPA) were obtained for each student, and correlation analysis was performed. Clinical reasoning score was significantly correlated with diagnostic accuracy and GPA (correlation coefficient = 0.258 and 0.380; P = 0.038 and 0.002, respectively) but not with OSCE score or clinical knowledge score (correlation coefficient = 0.137 and 0.242; P = 0.276 and 0.052, respectively). Total OSCE score was not significantly correlated with clinical knowledge test score, clinical reasoning score, diagnostic accuracy score or GPA. OSCE score from patient encounters did not reflect the clinical reasoning abilities of the medical students in this study. The evaluation of medical students' clinical reasoning abilities through OSCE should be strengthened.

  7. Reflections on Speech-Language Therapists' Talk: Implications for Clinical Practice and Education. Clinical Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Alison; Armstrong, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Research into the practices of speech-language therapists in clinical sessions is beginning to identify the way communication in clinical interactions both facilitates and potentially impedes the achievement of therapy goals. Aims: This target article aims to raise the issues that arise from critical reflections on the communication of…

  8. A shared, flexible neural map architecture reflects capacity limits in both visual short-term memory and enumeration.

    PubMed

    Knops, André; Piazza, Manuela; Sengupta, Rakesh; Eger, Evelyn; Melcher, David

    2014-07-23

    Human cognition is characterized by severe capacity limits: we can accurately track, enumerate, or hold in mind only a small number of items at a time. It remains debated whether capacity limitations across tasks are determined by a common system. Here we measure brain activation of adult subjects performing either a visual short-term memory (vSTM) task consisting of holding in mind precise information about the orientation and position of a variable number of items, or an enumeration task consisting of assessing the number of items in those sets. We show that task-specific capacity limits (three to four items in enumeration and two to three in vSTM) are neurally reflected in the activity of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC): an identical set of voxels in this region, commonly activated during the two tasks, changed its overall response profile reflecting task-specific capacity limitations. These results, replicated in a second experiment, were further supported by multivariate pattern analysis in which we could decode the number of items presented over a larger range during enumeration than during vSTM. Finally, we simulated our results with a computational model of PPC using a saliency map architecture in which the level of mutual inhibition between nodes gives rise to capacity limitations and reflects the task-dependent precision with which objects need to be encoded (high precision for vSTM, lower precision for enumeration). Together, our work supports the existence of a common, flexible system underlying capacity limits across tasks in PPC that may take the form of a saliency map.

  9. Excess digestive capacity in predators reflects a life of feast and famine.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jonathan B; Schindler, Daniel E

    2011-07-06

    A central challenge for predators is achieving positive energy balance when prey are spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Ecological heterogeneity produces evolutionary trade-offs in the physiological design of predators; this is because the ability to capitalize on pulses of food abundance requires high capacity for food-processing, yet maintaining such capacity imposes energetic costs that are taxing during periods of food scarcity. Recent advances in physiology show that when variation in foraging opportunities is predictable, animals may adjust energetic trade-offs by rapidly modulating their digestive system to track variation in foraging opportunities. However, it is increasingly recognized that foraging opportunities for animals are unpredictable, which should favour animals that maintain a capacity for food-processing that exceeds average levels of consumption (loads). Despite this basic principle of quantitative evolutionary design, estimates of digestive load:capacity ratios in wild animals are virtually non-existent. Here we provide an extensive assessment of load:capacity ratios for the digestive systems of predators in the wild, compiling 639 estimates across 38 species of fish. We found that piscine predators typically maintain the physiological capacity to feed at daily rates 2-3 times higher than what they experience on average. A numerical simulation of the trade-off between food-processing capacity and metabolic cost suggests that the observed level of physiological opportunism is profitable only if predator-prey encounters, and thus predator energy budgets, are far more variable in nature than currently assumed.

  10. Research on the fiber reflecting sensor for detecting the residual capacity of the lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingfu; Zhong, Nianbing; Chen, Yan; Luo, Yuwei

    2006-11-01

    According to the Lambert-Bee law, we can see that the photic absorption coefficient is related to the matter's concentration, the distance of the light through the absorption medium and the transmitted light intensity. The paper just according to the physical phenomena and the theory make the reflex energy relate to the concentration testing of the electrolyte, at the same time the electrolyte's concentration is related to the capacity of lead-acid battery on a corresponding function relation, so we can know the capacity state of the lead-acid battery according to the measurement on the electrolyte's concentration. According to the experiment and research the author deeply discussed how the temperature change affects the capacity of lead-acid battery and the concentration's changing relation, according to the analyses of the thermo-optic effect, we made a new reflecting fiber sensor based on the comparative temperature testing theory and absorption which can eliminate the temperature effect on the tested signal namely the output signal just related to the concentration, so really reflects the change of the capacity of the lead-acid battery when it is in the charge and discharge process. The results of the experiment and theory analyses show that this method is easy to realize the online testing of the capacity of lead-acid battery. This sensor has many merits such as precise measurement, sensitive reaction, long-life use etc. It can be widely used in the electric capacity testing of the automobile lead-acid battery, the electric capacity testing of the industry lead-acid battery, liquor's concentration testing and salinity testing of the sea and have a bright future.

  11. Reflections of a Catholic theologian on visiting an abortion clinic.

    PubMed

    Maguire, D C

    1996-01-01

    A male Irish Catholic moral theologian paid several visits to an abortion clinic to attempt to reflect a woman's understanding of the abortion decision in his writing and thinking. At the clinic he saw the measures taken to protect clients and staff from attacks by anti-abortion protestors. The clinic director described the clinic's activities and patients and noted that none were rich and that the doctors performing the abortions could all make more money doing something else. Patient counseling stressed reproductive responsibility, and the clinic staff did more to prevent abortion than the protestors outside. During his second visit, he met a woman waiting for an abortion who was 5-6 weeks pregnant and who sustained her mental health by taking lithium which could cause abnormalities in embryos. This made the visitor determine that saving life involves more than cardiopulmonary continuity. He observed interviews with patients and learned that abortion is often caused by economic distress, which was exacerbated among the poor by the anti-abortion President, Reagan's, economic policies. When he met with the picketers outside, he was repulsed by the fact that they equated abortion with the Nazi Holocaust. On his third visit, he viewed the products of abortion and concurred with the Church's Council of Trent that the embryonic clump of cells was not a person. His visits left him eager to keep abortion legal and to reduce the need for abortion in women's lives. He also wished that American Catholic bishops would stop making sanctimonious utterances about abortion and would embrace the more moderate traditional teachings of the church about abortion rather than squandering their moral authority on an issue which allied them with right-wing forces which have a destructive social agenda.

  12. Clinical and Ethical Aspects of Financial Capacity in Dementia: A Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Marson, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to issues like treatment and research consent capacity, financial capacity has received relatively little clinical and ethical attention in the dementia literature. Yet issues of financial capacity emerge frequently in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and related dementias, and commonly present ethical and clinical challenges for clinicians treating these patients. These issues include whether a patient with possible dementia has sufficient capacity independently to manage their financial affairs, needs referral for financial capacity assessment, and/or is being financially exploited or abused by others. The accurate identification, assessment and successful handling of such financial capacity issues can have a substantial impact on the financial and psychological well-being of patients and their family members. The present commentary presents an overview of financial capacity and associated clinical and ethical issues in dementia, and describes a set of possible clinician roles regarding these issues as they arise in clinical practice. The commentary concludes with a section describing educational resources available to clinicians and bioethicists seeking additional guidance in handling financial capacity issues. The ultimate goal of the paper is to focus clinical and ethical attention on a neglected capacity that is of fundamental importance for patients, families, and health care and legal professionals. PMID:24078779

  13. Does Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Score Reflect the Clinical Reasoning Ability of Medical Students?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wan Beom; Kang, Seok Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Clinical reasoning ability is an important factor in a physician's competence and thus should be taught and tested in medical schools. Medical schools generally use objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) to measure the clinical competency of medical students. However, it is unknown whether OSCE can also evaluate clinical reasoning ability. In this study, the authors investigated whether OSCE scores reflected students' clinical reasoning abilities. Methods: Sixty-five fourth-year medical students participated in this study. Medical students completed the OSCE with 4 cases using standardized patients. For assessment of clinical reasoning, students were asked to list differential diagnoses and the findings that were compatible or not compatible with each diagnosis. The OSCE score (score of patient encounter), diagnostic accuracy score, clinical reasoning score, clinical knowledge score and grade point average (GPA) were obtained for each student, and correlation analysis was performed. Results: Clinical reasoning score was significantly correlated with diagnostic accuracy and GPA (correlation coefficient = 0.258 and 0.380; P = 0.038 and 0.002, respectively) but not with OSCE score or clinical knowledge score (correlation coefficient = 0.137 and 0.242; P = 0.276 and 0.052, respectively). Total OSCE score was not significantly correlated with clinical knowledge test score, clinical reasoning score, diagnostic accuracy score or GPA. Conclusions: OSCE score from patient encounters did not reflect the clinical reasoning abilities of the medical students in this study. The evaluation of medical students' clinical reasoning abilities through OSCE should be strengthened. PMID:25647834

  14. Capacity for Clinical Research on Herbal Medicines in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Siegfried, Nandi; Johnson, Quinton

    2012-01-01

    Abstract An electronic survey was used to assess the training needs of clinical and public health researchers who have been involved, and/or plan to become involved, in clinical trials of herbal medicines in Africa. Over 90 researchers were contacted through pre-existing networks, of whom 58 (64%) responded, from 35 institutions in 14 African countries. Over half (57%) had already been involved in a clinical trial of an herbal medicine, and gave information about a total of 23 trials that have already been completed. Of these, only five had been published, and only one had resulted in a licensed product. Fifty-four (54) of the researchers were planning to conduct a clinical trial of an herbal medicine in the future, and gave information about 54 possible trials. Respondents outlined the following most commonly encountered difficulties when conducting clinical trials: resource constraints (including lack of funding, equipment, staff, and infrastructure); social acceptance of the clinical trial (including difficulty recruiting enough patients, poor rapport with traditional healers, and willingness of biomedical staff to be involved); herbal medicine supply (including insufficient cultivation, production, and quality control); lack of trained staff; and logistical issues in conducting trials. The topics in which researchers were least confident were Intellectual Property Rights issues, statistical issues, and issues related to Good Clinical Practice guidelines. PMID:22784350

  15. Building health systems capacity in global health graduate programs: reflections from Australian educators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There has been increasing focus on the role of health systems in low and middle-income countries. Despite this, very little evidence exists on how best to build health systems program and research capacity in educational programs. The current experiences in building capacity in health systems in five of the most prominent global health programs at Australian universities are outlined. The strengths and weaknesses of various approaches and techniques are provided along with examples of global practice in order to provide a foundation for future discussion and thus improvements in global health systems education. PMID:22920502

  16. Building health systems capacity in global health graduate programs: reflections from Australian educators.

    PubMed

    Negin, Joel; Martiniuk, Alexandra; Morgan, Chris; Davies, Philip; Zwi, Anthony

    2012-08-24

    There has been increasing focus on the role of health systems in low and middle-income countries. Despite this, very little evidence exists on how best to build health systems program and research capacity in educational programs. The current experiences in building capacity in health systems in five of the most prominent global health programs at Australian universities are outlined. The strengths and weaknesses of various approaches and techniques are provided along with examples of global practice in order to provide a foundation for future discussion and thus improvements in global health systems education.

  17. Functional capacity of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): relationship between clinical characteristics and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Rinaldi, Natalia M; Santos, Paulo Cezar R; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Vitório, Rodrigo; Teixeira-Arroyo, Cláudia; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa B

    2012-01-01

    The present study had three objectives: (a) to characterize the functional capacity of patients with PD, (b) to assess the relationship between the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics and disease severity, and (c) to compare the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics according to disease severity. The study included 54 patients with idiopathic PD who were distributed into two groups according to PD severity: unilateral group (n=35); and bilateral group (n=19). All patients underwent psychiatric assessment by means of the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging of PD, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively), and The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The physical fitness components of functional capacity were evaluated over a 2-day period, using recommendations by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regressions were calculated to test the correlation between functional capacity and clinical characteristics, and to predict clinical scores from physical performance, respectively. Clinical variables and physical component data were compared between groups using analysis of variance to determine the effects of disease severity. Patients with advanced disease showed low levels of functional capacity. Interestingly, patients with good functional capacity in one of the physical fitness components also showed good capacities in the other components. Disease severity is a major factor affecting functional capacity and clinical characteristics. Medical providers should take disease severity into consideration when prescribing physical activity for PD patients, since the relationship between functional capacity and clinical characteristics is dependent on disease severity.

  18. In vitro osteogenic capacity of bone marrow MSCs from postmenopausal women reflect the osseointegration of their cementless hip stems.

    PubMed

    Alm, Jessica J; Moritz, Niko; Aro, Hannu T

    2016-12-01

    Age-related dysfunction of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is suggested as a main cause of altered bone repair with aging. We recently showed that in postmenopausal women undergoing cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) aging, low bone mineral density (BMD) and age-related geometric changes of the proximal femur are risk factors for increased early migration and delayed osseointegration of the femoral stems. Extending these analyses, we have here explored how the in vitro osteogenic capacity of bone marrow MSCs from these patients reflects implant osseointegration, representing the patient's in vivo bone healing capacity. A total of 19 postmenopausal women with primary hip osteoarthritis (mean age 65 years, range 50-78) and well-defined bone quality underwent successful preoperative in vitro analysis of osteogenic capacity of iliac crest bone marrow MSCs as well as two-year radiostereometric (RSA) follow-up of femoral stem migration after cementless THA. In patients with MSCs of low osteogenic capacity, the magnitude of cumulative stem subsidence after the settling period of three months was greater (p = 0.028) and the time point for translational osseointegration was significantly delayed (p = 0.030) compared to patients with MSCs of high osteogenic capacity. This study suggests that patients with MSCs of low in vitro osteogenic capacity may display increased stem subsidence after the settling period of 3 months and thereby delayed osseointegration. Our study presents a novel approach for studying the biological progress of hip implant osseointegration and to verify the impact of decreased MSCs function, especially in patients with age-related dysfunction of MSCs and bone healing capacity.

  19. A New Model of Clinical Education to Increase Student Placement Availability: The Capacity Development Facilitator Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Michele; Nicole, Madelyn; Blackford, Julia; Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; McAllister, Lindy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a trial of a new model of clinical education designed to increase student clinical placement availability and address workforce constraints on supervision. The University of Sydney deployed the Capacity Development Facilitators (CDF) in selected Sydney hospitals to work with staff to expand student clinical placement…

  20. Financial capacity in persons with schizophrenia and serious mental illness: clinical and research ethics aspects.

    PubMed

    Marson, Daniel C; Savage, Robert; Phillips, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    In contrast with issues of consent capacity, financial capacity has received surprisingly little clinical or ethical attention in the psychiatric literature. Issues of financial capacity emerge frequently regarding clients with serious mental illness (SMI), and their resolution has practical and ethical significance for clients, their families, and mental health professionals. These issues include whether a client has sufficient financial skills and judgment to live independently, whether a client requires a representative payee, and what goals for community reintegration should be established with a client. Similar to informed consent, issues of financial capacity raise ethical challenges for clinicians, caseworkers, and agencies. The present article addresses clinical and research ethics questions related to financial capacity in clients with schizophrenia and SMI. Clinical questions concern evaluation of financial capacity in clients with SMI, whether to seek assignment of a mandatory representative payee, whether to leverage treatment compliance through a representative payee arrangement, and whether a mental health professional should also serve as a client's representative payee. The research ethics question addresses implications of providing financial compensation for research participation to individuals with SMI and limited financial capacity and means. The ultimate goal of this article is to focus clinical and ethical attention on a neglected decisional capacity in SMI that is of fundamental importance for clients, families, clinicians, and researchers.

  1. The capacity to tell a joke: Reflections from work with Asperger children.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lawrence J

    2016-12-01

    The capacity to tell a joke is a highly complex interpersonal event that depends upon the maturation of certain developmental achievements which are absent or stunted in children with Asperger's Syndrome. These include the ability to know another's mind, a sense of interpersonal timing and, most notably, a capacity for abstract thinking. The author discusses Freud's () notion of joke-work, which is akin to dream-work, both of which are pathways to forming mental representations. Freud considered joke-work as a mental activity that operated on the verbal level and the author examines the preverbal dimensions that are rooted in the earliest mother/infant interactions. An extended case discussion of the psychoanalytic treatment of an Asperger boy is offered to illustrate these points and to demonstrate the activity of joke-work as a means of building mental representations.

  2. Reflections on Clinical Learning in Novice Speech-Language Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Anne E.; Davidson, Bronwyn J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reflective practice is reported to enhance clinical reasoning and therefore to maximize client outcomes. The inclusion of targeted reflective practice in academic programmes in speech-language therapy has not been consistent, although providing opportunities for speech-language therapy students to reflect during their clinical practice…

  3. Reflections on Clinical Learning in Novice Speech-Language Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Anne E.; Davidson, Bronwyn J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reflective practice is reported to enhance clinical reasoning and therefore to maximize client outcomes. The inclusion of targeted reflective practice in academic programmes in speech-language therapy has not been consistent, although providing opportunities for speech-language therapy students to reflect during their clinical practice…

  4. Determination of antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of chocolate by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transformed-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaxi; Pan, Zhi Jie; Liao, Wen; Li, Jiaqi; Gruget, Pierre; Kitts, David D; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-07-01

    Antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of chocolate, containing different amounts of cacao (35-100%), were determined using attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-Fourier transformed-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy (4000-550cm(-1)). Antioxidant capacities were first characterized using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) assays. Phenolic contents, including total phenol and procyanidins monomers, were quantified using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector (HPLC-DAD), respectively. Five partial least-squares regression (PLSR) models were constructed and cross-validated using FT-IR spectra from 18 types of chocolate and corresponding reference values determined using DPPH, ORAC, Folin-Ciocalteu, and HPLC assays. The models were validated using seven unknown samples of chocolate. PLSR models showed good prediction capability for DPPH [R(2)-P (prediction)=0.88, RMSEP (root mean squares error of prediction)=12.62μmol Trolox/g DFW], ORAC (R(2)-P=0.90, RMSEP=37.92), Folin-Ciocalteu (R(2)-P=0.88, RMSEP=5.08), and (+)-catechin (R(2)-P=0.86, RMSEP=0.10), but lacked accuracy in the prediction of (-)-epicatechin (R(2)-P=0.72, RMSEP=0.57). ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy can be used for rapid prediction of antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content, and (+)-catechin in chocolate.

  5. Clinical experience of a new reference material for exercise capacity in exercise stress testing in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lindow, Thomas; Mosén, Henrik; Engblom, Henrik

    2017-09-21

    In 2014, the Swedish Association of Clinical Physiology recommended the use of a new reference material for exercise capacity in bicycle exercise stress testing, 'the Kalmar material'. Compared to the formerly used reference material, 'the Kristianstad material', an increase in the amount of patients being classified as having decreased exercise capacity was expected, but the extent of this in clinical practice is not known. Results of exercise capacity from 1449 bicycle exercise tests, in patients aged ≥20 years (656 women, 793 men) performed at two departments of Clinical Physiology before and after change of reference materials, were collected. Maximal workload was related to the predicted values of both reference materials. If made, recommendations for supplemental nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging study by the attending physician were noted. Using the new reference material, 31% of all patients were classified as having a decreased exercise capacity, compared to 17% using the formerly used reference material. The difference between the two reference materials was largest in the older age groups. In one of the departments, an increase in recommendations of supplemental myocardial perfusion studies was seen after introduction of the new reference material, whereas the opposite was seen at the other department. A large amount of patients are being classified as having decreased exercise capacity and very few as having good exercise capacity using the new reference material for exercise capacity. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Multidimensional Collaboration: Reflections on Action Research in a Clinical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Sheila; Poland, Fiona; Spalding, Nicola J.; Sargen, Kevin; McCulloch, Jane; Vicary, Penny

    2011-01-01

    This paper reflects on the challenges and benefits of multidimensional collaboration in an action research study to evaluate and improve preoperative education for patients awaiting colorectal surgery. Three cycles of planning, acting, observing and reflecting were designed to evaluate practice and implement change in this interactive setting,…

  7. Multidimensional Collaboration: Reflections on Action Research in a Clinical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Sheila; Poland, Fiona; Spalding, Nicola J.; Sargen, Kevin; McCulloch, Jane; Vicary, Penny

    2011-01-01

    This paper reflects on the challenges and benefits of multidimensional collaboration in an action research study to evaluate and improve preoperative education for patients awaiting colorectal surgery. Three cycles of planning, acting, observing and reflecting were designed to evaluate practice and implement change in this interactive setting,…

  8. Cortical potentials in an auditory oddball task reflect individual differences in working memory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Yurgil, Kate A.; Golob, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined whether auditory cortical responses associated with mechanisms of attention vary with individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) and perceptual load. The operation span test defined subjects with low vs. high WMC, who then discriminated target/nontarget tones while EEG was recorded. Infrequent white noise distracters were presented at midline or ±90° locations, and perceptual load was manipulated by varying nontarget frequency. Amplitude of the N100 to distracters was negatively correlated with WMC. Relative to targets, only high WMC subjects showed attenuated N100 amplitudes to nontargets. In the higher WMC group, increased perceptual load was associated with decreased P3a amplitudes to distracters and longer-lasting negative slow wave to nontargets. Results show that auditory cortical processing is associated with multiple facets of attention control related to WMC and possibly higher-level cognition. PMID:24016201

  9. Putting evaluation capacity building in context: Reflections on the Ontario Brain Institute's Evaluation Support Program.

    PubMed

    King, Jean A

    2017-05-13

    This article, in three parts, reflects on the content of the six articles included in the forum. It begins with a description of the Evaluation Support Program, emphasizing its key attributes. Next, it raises two points regarding ECB theory: (1) the need to become clearer about the concepts and terms used to describe and study this phenomenon, and (2) the potential value of social science theory to understand ECB and improve its practice. The article concludes with practical ideas for improving ECB: (1) framing it as an educative act, which assigns the evaluator the critical role of evaluation teacher/coach; and (2) the importance of never assuming that an ECB effort begins in unchartered territory, but rather that it builds on people's knowledge, skills, attitudes, and previous experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional capacity and obesity reflect the cognitive performance of older adults living in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Damascena, Karine; Batisti Ferreira, Cristiane; Dos Santos Teixeira, Pâmela; Madrid, Bibiano; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Córdova, Cláudio; de Toledo Nóbrega, Otávio; Pimentel Ferreira, Aparecido

    2017-06-06

    With the increase in life expectancy, the elderly Brazilian population has grown considerably. However, longevity is usually accompanied by problems such as the loss of functional capacity, cognitive decline, and deterioration in anthropometric parameters, particularly among those living in long-term care facilities. We analyzed the relationship among cognitive performance, anthropometry, and functional capacity in institutionalized elderly individuals. In a sample of 38 older adults (20 men, 18 women) aged 73.4 ± 8.1 years, data regarding anthropometric and functional measurements as well as the Mini-Mental State Examination were collected. Functional tests were based on a battery adapted from the Functional Fitness Test. The independent t-test and χ(2) test were applied. P < 0.05 was set as the significance threshold. The rate of cognitive impairment among obese individuals (78.6%) differed from that among eutrophic subjects (45.8%), but there was no difference between sexes. There was a significant positive correlation between handgrip strength and Mini-Mental State Examination score, and the scores of the timed up-and-go test and the sitting-rising test were negatively correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination score. Cognitive impairment in the elderly living in long-term care facilities was more pronounced and frequent in obese individuals. This study also demonstrated that better functional capacity reflects better cognitive performance. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  11. The NIDA Methamphetamine Clinical Trials Group: a strategy to increase clinical trials research capacity.

    PubMed

    Elkashef, Ahmed; Rawson, Richard A; Smith, Edwina; Pearce, Valerie; Flammino, Frank; Campbell, Jan; Donovick, Roger; Gorodetzky, Charles; Haning, William; Mawhinney, Joseph; McCann, Michael; Weis, Dennis; Williams, Lorie; Ling, Walter; Vocci, Frank

    2007-04-01

    assess promising pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine addiction treatment medications. The MCTG strategy appears to be a feasible approach to increase NIDA's capacity to conduct clinical trials to evaluate potential pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine addiction.

  12. Primary Care-Based Memory Clinics: Expanding Capacity for Dementia Care.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda; Hillier, Loretta M; Heckman, George; Gagnon, Micheline; Borrie, Michael J; Stolee, Paul; Harvey, David

    2014-09-01

    The implementation in Ontario of 15 primary-care-based interprofessional memory clinics represented a unique model of team-based case management aimed at increasing capacity for dementia care at the primary-care level. Each clinic tracked referrals; in a subset of clinics, charts were audited by geriatricians, clinic members were interviewed, and patients, caregivers, and referring physicians completed satisfaction surveys. Across all clinics, 582 patients were assessed, and 8.9 per cent were referred to a specialist. Patients and caregivers were very satisfied with the care received, as were referring family physicians, who reported increased capacity to manage dementia. Geriatricians' chart audits revealed a high level of agreement with diagnosis and management. This study demonstrated acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary effectiveness of the primary-care memory clinic model. Led by specially trained family physicians, it provided timely access to high-quality collaborative dementia care, impacting health service utilization by more-efficient use of scarce geriatric specialist resources.

  13. Supporting youth and community capacity through photovoice: Reflections on participatory research on maternal health in Wakiso district, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Musoke, David; Ndejjo, Rawlance; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; George, Asha S

    2016-01-01

    This paper reflects on the experiences of using photovoice to examine maternal health in Wakiso district, Uganda. The project involved 10 youth aged 18-29 years old, who were diverse in education, occupation, and marital status and identified by community leaders with researchers. By taking photos and sharing images and experiences in monthly meetings over five months, youth reported becoming more knowledgeable. They realised that they had common experiences but also reflected on and reinterpreted their circumstances. While they acquired self-confidence and enhanced their communication skills, they also initially faced community resistance regarding consent and lack of trust in their motives. Ethical practice in photovoice goes beyond institutional approval and individual consent. It includes extensively discussing the project with community members and building relationships with them. In certain instances, photos needed not to identify community members, or not be taken at all. Through these relationships and with improved capacity, youth engaged in individual instances of health education and advocacy, as well as spurred further local action through community dialogues. Researchers supporting photovoice must be open to learning alongside participants, flexible regarding study focus and processes, sustain interest and manage logistics, all while being reflective about the balance of power in such partnerships.

  14. Predicting field capacity, wilting point, and the other physical properties of soils using hyperspectral reflectance spectroscopy: two different statistical approaches.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hakan; Tasan, Mehmet; Yildirim, Demet; Koksal, Eyüp Selim; Cemek, Bilal

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we examined the ability of reflectance spectroscopy to predict some of the most important soil parameters for irrigation such as field capacity (FC), wilting point (WP), clay, sand, and silt content. FC and WP were determined for 305 soil samples. In addition to these soil analyses, clay, silt, and sand contents of 145 soil samples were detected. Raw spectral reflectance (raw) of these soil samples, between 350 and 2,500-nm wavelengths, was measured. In addition, first order derivatives of the reflectance (first) were calculated. Two different statistical approaches were used in detecting soil properties from hyperspectral data. Models were evaluated using the correlation of coefficient (r), coefficient of determination (R (2)), root mean square error (RMSE), and residual prediction deviation (RPD). In the first method, two appropriate wavelengths were selected for raw reflectance and first derivative separately for each soil property. Selection of wavelengths was carried out based on the highest positive and negative correlations between soil property and raw reflectance or first order derivatives. By means of detected wavelengths, new combinations for each soil property were calculated using rationing, differencing, normalized differencing, and multiple regression techniques. Of these techniques, multiple regression provided the best correlation (P < 0.01) for selected wavelengths and all soil properties. To estimate FC, WP, clay, sand, and silt, multiple regression equations based on first(2,310)-first(2,360), first(2,310)-first(2,360), first(2,240)-first(1,320), first(2,240)-first(1,330), and raw(2,260)-raw(360) were used. Partial least square regression (PLSR) was performed as the second method. Raw reflectance was a better predictor of WP and FC, whereas first order derivative was a better predictor of clay, sand, and silt content. According to RPD values, statistically excellent predictions were obtained for FC (2.18), and estimations for

  15. A clinical decision algorithm for hospital inpatients with impaired decision-making capacity.

    PubMed

    Chase, Jack

    2014-08-01

    Impaired decision-making capacity is a frequent complication of inpatient hospitalization, with potential negative impacts on patients and the healthcare system. Studies of clinician behavior show difficulty in diagnosis and management of capacity impairment. Appropriate management of incapacitated patients may benefit safety, medical outcomes, and healthcare expenditure. To create a clinical decision algorithm for identification and management of hospital inpatients with impaired capacity. The Department of Risk Management at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) convened a multidisciplinary workgroup to improve management of incapacitated patients. The workgroup studied institutional data and case experience, solicited mental health expertise, and performed a brief review of published tools for management of incapacitated patients. The workgroup produced a clinical decision algorithm for hospital inpatients with impaired decision-making capacity. The algorithm is explained via 3 common scenarios, and notable details include identification and management in a single visual diagram, emphasis on safety planning for a high-risk subset of incapacitated patients, and explanation for multiple disciplines of consultation. The algorithm was disseminated to providers, workshops were conducted, and associated quality improvements were implemented. Initial feedback was positive, relating to clinical competency, decreased practice anxiety, and improved teamwork. Impaired decision-making capacity is frequent among hospitalized patients, including at SFGH. An algorithm, based on institutional review and prior published work, is presented as an example to address the common challenge of acutely ill patients with impaired decision-making capacity. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Predictive capacity of risk assessment scales and clinical judgment for pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Agreda, J Javier Soldevilla

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis was completed to determine the capacity of risk assessment scales and nurses' clinical judgment to predict pressure ulcer (PU) development. Electronic databases were searched for prospective studies on the validity and predictive capacity of PUs risk assessment scales published between 1962 and 2010 in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, German, and Greek. We excluded gray literature sources, integrative review articles, and retrospective or cross-sectional studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to the guidelines of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. Predictive capacity was measured as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. When 2 or more valid original studies were found, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model and sensitivity analysis. We identified 57 studies, including 31 that included a validation study. We also retrieved 4 studies that tested clinical judgment as a risk prediction factor. Meta-analysis produced the following pooled predictive capacity indicators: Braden (RR = 4.26); Norton (RR = 3.69); Waterlow (RR = 2.66); Cubbin-Jackson (RR = 8.63); EMINA (RR = 6.17); Pressure Sore Predictor Scale (RR = 21.4); and clinical judgment (RR = 1.89). Pooled analysis of 11 studies found adequate risk prediction capacity in various clinical settings; the Braden, Norton, EMINA (mEntal state, Mobility, Incontinence, Nutrition, Activity), Waterlow, and Cubbin-Jackson scales showed the highest predictive capacity. The clinical judgment of nurses was found to achieve inadequate predictive capacity when used alone, and should be used in combination with a validated scale.

  17. 21 CFR 862.2400 - Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. 862.2400 Section 862.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. (a) Identification. A densitometer/scanner...

  18. 21 CFR 862.2400 - Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. 862.2400 Section 862.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. (a) Identification. A densitometer/scanner...

  19. 21 CFR 862.2400 - Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. 862.2400 Section 862.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. (a) Identification. A densitometer/scanner...

  20. 21 CFR 862.2400 - Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. 862.2400 Section 862.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. (a) Identification. A densitometer/scanner...

  1. 21 CFR 862.2400 - Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Densitometer/scanner (integrating, reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. 862.2400 Section 862.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., reflectance, TLC, or radiochromatogram) for clinical use. (a) Identification. A densitometer/scanner...

  2. Enhancing Learning in Clinical Placements: Reflective Practice, Self-Assessment, Rubrics and Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupans, Ieva; March, Geoff; Owen, Susanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional preparatory health programmes generally involve clinical placements with a focus on integration of theory into real life practice. Reflective writing is often included in the assessment requirements for clinical placement courses. However enabling students to engage in deeper levels of reflective writing in action, on action and for…

  3. Enhancing Learning in Clinical Placements: Reflective Practice, Self-Assessment, Rubrics and Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupans, Ieva; March, Geoff; Owen, Susanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional preparatory health programmes generally involve clinical placements with a focus on integration of theory into real life practice. Reflective writing is often included in the assessment requirements for clinical placement courses. However enabling students to engage in deeper levels of reflective writing in action, on action and for…

  4. Reflective writing in the competency-based curriculum at the cleveland clinic lerner college of medicine.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments.

  5. Do the deceleration/acceleration capacities of heart rate reflect cardiac sympathetic or vagal activity? A model study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qing; Zhou, Gongzhan; Wang, Ruofan; Cai, Guolong; Yan, Jing; Fang, Luping; Ning, Gangmin

    2016-12-01

    Despite increased application of the deceleration capacity (DC) and acceleration capacity (AC) of heart rate indices as indicators of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function, it remains controversial as to whether they reflect cardiac sympathetic or vagal activity. We addressed this problem using a cardiovascular system model that allows analysis of DC and AC under controllable levels of sympathetic and vagal activities. Multi-scale DCs and ACs with various timescales T and wavelet scales s were computed from the simulated RR interval series under randomly fluctuating levels of ANS activity, and the correlations of the indices to ANS functions were assessed. Results showed that under the conventional scales (T = 1, s = 2), both DC and AC were solely dependent on vagal activity. With higher scales (T = 3, s = 5), both DC and AC were positively correlated to sympathetic activity and negatively correlated to vagal activity. These data suggest that DC and AC provide information on the same aspects of ANS activity and that their physiological significance is highly influenced by the timescales and wavelet scales used in the computation.

  6. Recent trends in specular light reflectance beyond clinical fluorescence diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Szepetiuk, Grégory; Piérard, Sébastien; Pierard-Franchimont, Claudine; Caucanas, Marie; Quatresooz, Pascale; Pierard, Gérald E

    2011-01-01

    Under specific light illumination, particularly ultraviolet (UV) and near-UV light stimulation, the skin produces both specular light reflectance and, possibly, specific fluorescent emission. These properties offer diagnostic clues and disclose some peculiar functions of the skin. A series of superficial infections (erythrasma, some tinea capitis types, tinea/pityriasis versicolor, dermatophytoses, etc.) and pilosebaceous follicles enriched in Propionibacterium spp show fluorescence. This latter characteristic is downgraded or lost while on some anti-acne treatments. A quenching effect of fluorescence is observed following the application of sunscreens. The (pre)neoplastic areas prepared for methylaminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) show reddish fluorescence following drug metabolisation producing porphyrins by the abnormal activated cells. Of note, when using a recording sensitive CCD camera instead of casual visual observation, skin fluorescence may be superimposed on the specular reflectance of the incident light. With the current technology, these situations are not distinguished with confidence. Any harsh and scaly lesion appears brighter following yellowish specular light reflectance. Stratum corneum samplings collected on clear self-adhesive discs or cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings are conveniently examined ex vivo, taking advantage of the same optical properties.

  7. Measuring faculty reflection on medical grand rounds at Mayo Clinic: associations with teaching experience, clinical exposure, and presenter effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Wittich, Christopher M; Szostek, Jason H; Reed, Darcy A; Kiefer, Jeanine L; Mueller, Paul S; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Beckman, Thomas J

    2013-03-01

    To develop and validate a new instrument for measuring participant reflection on continuing medical education (CME) and determine associations between the reflection instrument scores and CME presenter, participant, and presentation characteristics. This was a prospective validation study of presenters and faculty at the weekly medical grand rounds at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from January 1, 2011, through June 30, 2011. Eight items (5-point Likert scales) were developed on the basis of 4 reflection levels: habitual action, understanding, reflection, and critical reflection. Factor analysis was performed to account for clustered data. Interrater and internal consistency reliabilities were calculated. Associations between reflection scores and characteristics of presenters, participants, and presentations were determined. Participants completed a total of 1134 reflection forms. Factor analysis revealed a 2-dimensional model (eigenvalue; Cronbach α): minimal reflection (1.19; 0.77) and high reflection (2.51; 0.81). Item mean (SD) scores ranged from 2.97 (1.17) to 4.01 (0.83) on a 5-point scale. Interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient) for individual items ranged from 0.58 (95% CI, 0.31-0.78) to 0.88 (95% CI, 0.80-0.94). Reflection scores were associated with presenters' speaking effectiveness (P<.001) and prior CME teaching experience (P=.02), participants' prior clinical experiences (P<.001), and presentations that were case based (P<.001) and used the audience response system (P<.001). We report the first validated measure of reflection on CME at medical grand rounds. Reflection scores were associated with presenters' effectiveness and prior teaching experience, participants' clinical exposures, and presentations that were interactive and clinically relevant. Future research should determine whether reflection on CME leads to better patient outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by

  8. Reflections on clinical learning in novice speech-language therapy students.

    PubMed

    Hill, Anne E; Davidson, Bronwyn J; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice is reported to enhance clinical reasoning and therefore to maximize client outcomes. The inclusion of targeted reflective practice in academic programmes in speech-language therapy has not been consistent, although providing opportunities for speech-language therapy students to reflect during their clinical practice has been reported. Indeed, there has been limited investigation of the nature of speech-language therapy students' reflections. (1) To describe the breadth and depth of reflection skills of novice speech-language therapy students by utilizing structured reflective learning journals. (2) To evaluate the use of a coding system to determine its reliability and relevance in identifying reflection skills. Participants were 52 students in their second year of a 4-year undergraduate speech-language therapy programme. Mean participant age was 20.5 years; all students were female. Participants completed guided written reflections following three interviews with a standardized patient (an actor portraying a parent of a child with delayed speech development). Reflections were coded by two raters. Nine participants' reflections were recoded by raters A and B to establish intra-rater reliability. Inter-rater reliability between these two raters was calculated and a third rater completed coding of 20% of students' reflections to further establish inter-rater reliability. Results indicated that the majority of students were categorized as 'reflectors'. All students demonstrated at least one element of reflection. Their reflective writing primarily focused on a discussion of the content of and strategies used within the interviews, and reflection on and for action. Results also indicated that the coding system used within the study was reliable in determining both the breadth and depth of student reflections. This study found that novice speech-language therapy students can reflect on their clinical learning experiences within a structured clinical

  9. Clinical applications of lightguide diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry in vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, David K.; Delaney, Colin; Brown, Linda; Newton, David J.; McCollum, Peter T.

    1994-02-01

    There is enormous potential for application of lightguide tissue reflectance spectrophotometry in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral vascular disease. In the present study, measurements were carried out in 10 such pre-amputation patients to compare the use of micro-lightguide spectrophotometry with the macro-lightguide technique. These preliminary results show excellent agreement between the new, non-invasive micro-lightguide technique and the `gold standard' skin blood flow measurements. This technique could thus provide a more functional, non-invasive assessment of healing potential than skin blood flow measurement.

  10. Some reflections on clinical supervision: an existential-phenomenological paradigm.

    PubMed

    Jones, A

    1998-03-01

    This paper reviews psychotherapy, counselling, and nursing literature related to ideas of clinical supervision and attempts to illuminate areas important to effective health related practice and specifically palliative care. Included are explorations of existentialism, phenomenology, existential phenomenology and psychoanalytical concepts. The phenomenological idea of lived experience is outlined and the Heideggerian notion of authenticity is explored in context. The paper also examines dynamic forces such as hope, trust and personal values that might influence clinical supervision design and so inform a framework for practice. An existential-phenomenological method of supervision is offered as one basis for professional practice. The central recommendation of this paper is, however, to identify relevant value and belief systems to direct clinical supervision. Nursing models might appropriately instruct approaches to supervision. The writer considers the phenomenological idea of the lived experiences as a means by which to at once capture the essence of palliative care nursing and guide the supervision towards the existential idea of authenticity.

  11. [Preliminary questions to a reflection on clinical impasses].

    PubMed

    Cantin, Lucie

    2010-01-01

    The definition of 'clinical impasse' depends not only on the clinician who-as the proposed argument suggests-would be faced to his powerlessness in specific situations, but this definition is tributary to the clinical and theoretical field inscribed within this clinician's practice. Thus, for example, the practice of psychotherapy and the practice of psychoanalysis implies very different if not opposed positions of the clinician, bringing on the patient's side, very specific difficulties and impasses. In the field of psychoanalysis conceived essentially as a practice of the ethical, one cannot address this notion of 'clinical impasse' without first questioning the position of the analyst, not as much in his rapport with theory and technique used but mainly by questioning the point and the locus within himself from which he directs the treatment. Likewise, for the analysed, can what entails impasse in the treatment be indissociable to the ethical position of the subject?

  12. Social factors in clinical complexity: reflections from a paediatric unit.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shruti; Sarkar, Dipankar

    2010-06-01

    Medical text books have taught us evaluation and diagnosis of disease based on patients' symptoms, signs and relevant investigations and treatment is then implemented according to the clinical condition and current best available evidence. There are objective scoring scales to assess the severity of the condition, progress and eventual outcome. These scales rarely if ever consider the impact of social factors on the course of treatment and eventual clinical outcome. But in a country like India with diverse cultural backgrounds and deep social structures social, cultural and economic factors have great ramifications on the clinical course, treatment and ultimate outcome. Diverse beliefs, faiths, social norms and cultural practices not only have a direct effect on a person's daily life but indirectly also effect educational, professional and health care access. The effects of these factors on families and their way of deciding on their child's management in complex systems show multifaceted dynamic interactions leading to at times unexpected outcomes.

  13. Clinical judgment development using structured classroom reflective practice: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Donna M

    2012-03-01

    This qualitative study examined the incorporation of "reflection-on-action" in a structured reflective classroom format as defined by Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model on the development of perceived clinical judgment and clinical confidence in Bachelor of Science nursing students. The qualitative results described the students' perceptions of the benefit of the intervention on their development of clinical judgment and clinical confidence. This research was an important contribution to the debate regarding the benefit of structured reflection in a classroom setting. By using reflection in the classroom, nurse educators may influence the education-practice gap and incorporate new pedagogies to strengthen the educational preparedness of nursing students to provide high-quality, competent, compassionate care to patients and their families.

  14. A Qualitative Inquiry into Nursing Students' Experience of Facilitating Reflection in Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Yamani, Nikoo

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim. Reflection is known as a skill that is central to nursing students' professional development. Due to the importance and the role of reflection in clinical areas of nursing, it is important to know how to achieve it. However, nursing trainers face the challenge of how to help their students to improve reflection in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the nursing students' experiences of facilitating reflection during clinical practice. This qualitative study was conducted by qualitative content analysis approach. Twenty nursing students during the second to eighth semester of their educational program were selected for participation using purposive sampling. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. From the data analysis, four main themes were extracted. Motivation to reflect, complex experiences, efficient trainer, and effective relations were four main themes obtained from study that, in interaction with each other, had facilitating roles in students' reflective process on experiences. The findings revealed that the nursing students' reflection in clinical settings is effective in personal and professional level. Reflection of nursing students depends on motivational and educational factors and these factors increase the quality of care in patients. Furthermore, nursing educators need to create nurturing climate as well as supporting reflective behaviors of nursing students. PMID:28474003

  15. A Qualitative Inquiry into Nursing Students' Experience of Facilitating Reflection in Clinical Setting.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Shahnaz; Haghani, Fariba; Yamani, Nikoo; Najafi Kalyani, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim. Reflection is known as a skill that is central to nursing students' professional development. Due to the importance and the role of reflection in clinical areas of nursing, it is important to know how to achieve it. However, nursing trainers face the challenge of how to help their students to improve reflection in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the nursing students' experiences of facilitating reflection during clinical practice. This qualitative study was conducted by qualitative content analysis approach. Twenty nursing students during the second to eighth semester of their educational program were selected for participation using purposive sampling. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. From the data analysis, four main themes were extracted. Motivation to reflect, complex experiences, efficient trainer, and effective relations were four main themes obtained from study that, in interaction with each other, had facilitating roles in students' reflective process on experiences. The findings revealed that the nursing students' reflection in clinical settings is effective in personal and professional level. Reflection of nursing students depends on motivational and educational factors and these factors increase the quality of care in patients. Furthermore, nursing educators need to create nurturing climate as well as supporting reflective behaviors of nursing students.

  16. Research Capacity at Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Centers in China: A Survey of Clinical Investigators.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuo; Han, Mei; Lai, Lily; Wang, Si-Cheng; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Background. The development of an evidence-based approach to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), which depends on the generation of good quality evidence, requires an adequate workforce. However, the research capacity of TCM investigators is not known. Study Design. This cross-sectional study was conducted to describe the research capacity of TCM clinical investigators in China. Participants. A total of 584 participants from TCM hospitals and research centers were included. They were asked about the academic and research characteristics, needs for research capacity building, and barriers to clinical research. Results. The majority (80.82%) were qualified to at least a Master's degree, whilst a smaller proportion (40.24%) held a senior professional title. We found that academic outputs were low with the majority (62.16%) authoring less than five publications in total. The most pressing needs for building research capacity identified were training in research methodology (97.43%) and identification of research questions (86.81%), whilst the highest ranking barriers to conducting research were limited motivation, funding (40.72%), and time (37.15%). Conclusion. The methodology training, along with investment in the research workforce, needs to be urgently addressed to improve investigators' research capacity and the development of an evidence-based approach of TCM.

  17. Research Capacity at Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Centers in China: A Survey of Clinical Investigators

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mei; Lai, Lily; Wang, Si-cheng

    2017-01-01

    Background. The development of an evidence-based approach to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), which depends on the generation of good quality evidence, requires an adequate workforce. However, the research capacity of TCM investigators is not known. Study Design. This cross-sectional study was conducted to describe the research capacity of TCM clinical investigators in China. Participants. A total of 584 participants from TCM hospitals and research centers were included. They were asked about the academic and research characteristics, needs for research capacity building, and barriers to clinical research. Results. The majority (80.82%) were qualified to at least a Master's degree, whilst a smaller proportion (40.24%) held a senior professional title. We found that academic outputs were low with the majority (62.16%) authoring less than five publications in total. The most pressing needs for building research capacity identified were training in research methodology (97.43%) and identification of research questions (86.81%), whilst the highest ranking barriers to conducting research were limited motivation, funding (40.72%), and time (37.15%). Conclusion. The methodology training, along with investment in the research workforce, needs to be urgently addressed to improve investigators' research capacity and the development of an evidence-based approach of TCM. PMID:28373888

  18. Clinical features of drug abuse that reflect genetic risk

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, K. S.; Ohlsson, H.; Sundquist, K.; Sundquist, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug abuse (DA) is a clinically heterogeneous syndrome. Can we, in a large epidemiological sample, identify clinical features of DA cases that index genetic risk? Method Using registration in medical, legal or pharmacy records, we identified four kinds of relative pairs (n =935854) starting with a proband with DA: monozygotic co-twins; full siblings; half-siblings; and cousins. Using linear hazard regression, we examined the interaction between three clinical features of DA in the proband and risk for DA in these four relative pairs, ordered by degree of genetic relationship. Results Increased risk for DA in relatives was robustly predicted by early age at first registration, total number of registrations, and ascertainment in the criminal versus the medical or pharmacy registry. In multivariate models, all three of these variables remained significant and in aggregate strongly predicted DA risk in relatives. The risk for DA in siblings of DA probands in the highest decile of genetic risk predicted by our three indices was more than twice as great as that predicted in siblings of probands in the lowest decile of risk. Conclusions In an epidemiological sample, genetic risk for DA can be substantially indexed by simple clinical and historical variables. PMID:24461082

  19. Improving Critical Thinking Skills through Reflective Clinical Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collentine, Donna

    This report describes a program designed to increase critical thinking skills in order to improve the transfer of material from the classroom to the clinic. The targeted population consisted of second year community college radiography students in a growing, middle class community in the Midwest. Evidence for the existence of the problem included…

  20. Reflective blogs in clinical education to promote critical thinking in dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Ann O'Kelley; Boyd, Linda D; Bowen, Denise M; Pattillo, Robin E

    2010-12-01

    One challenge facing dental hygiene, as well as dental, education is to identify clinical teaching strategies promoting critical thinking and clinical reasoning. These skills are crucial elements in the practice of dental hygiene. A two-group design (intervention, n=28, and control, n=30) assessed first-year dental hygiene students using pre-and post-Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT) scores to evaluate the effect of reflective blogging on critical thinking skills. A reflective blog rubric, based on Mezirow's levels of reflection, determined if reflective blogging increased the level of reflection for dental hygiene students. The results suggest within this nonprobability sample that reflective blogging did not produce a significant change in students' HSRT scores (p>0.05). However, analyses of reflective blog rubric scores demonstrated statistically significant improvements (p<0.05) in students' levels of reflection. Furthermore, data analysis revealed a correlation (p<0.05) between HSRT subscale scores and the element of reflection scores for the intervention group. This study addressed needs of the dental and dental hygiene education community by examining the use of blogs, an emerging technology, as a tool for reflecting on clinical experiences and, in turn, for promoting critical thinking.

  1. Pearls of wisdom for clinical teaching: expert educators reflect.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, Ronnie; Varney Burst, Helen; Campau, Nancy; Carrington, Betty; Diegmann, Elaine K; Hsia, Lily; Thompson, Joyce E

    2003-01-01

    A group of expert educators, each with more than 20 years of experience in midwifery education, was asked to contribute a "pearl (or pearls) of wisdom" for clinical teaching. Despite minimal instructions regarding what type of wisdom was being solicited, remarkable similarities emerged from the educators' contributions. Themes included the need for self-evaluation to become a competent preceptor, the role-modeling function of the preceptor, the development of critical thinking in students, the need to appreciate students' varying learning styles and individual ways of functioning, and the use of positive reinforcement. Although these may seem like universally accepted concepts in clinical teaching, one contributor related stories she heard from students about "hazing" behaviors that have a negative impact on learning. This points to the need for ongoing education about being an educator, another theme echoed in several of the contributions.

  2. [Reflecting on a religious conversion event in a clinical setting].

    PubMed

    Binkowski, Gabriel; Baubet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    What should be the clinical approach to the event represented by a religious conversion, adherence or attraction to extreme groups and ideas? It requires a conceptual analysis, an ethical and epistemological approach at the centre of social situations presenting a high level of ambiguity, tinged even with a certain sense of unreality, as is being experienced in France. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical exome sequencing: results from 2819 samples reflecting 1000 families

    PubMed Central

    Trujillano, Daniel; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Kumar Kandaswamy, Krishna; Weiss, Maximilian ER; Köster, Julia; Marais, Anett; Paknia, Omid; Schröder, Rolf; Garcia-Aznar, Jose Maria; Werber, Martin; Brandau, Oliver; Calvo del Castillo, Maria; Baldi, Caterina; Wessel, Karen; Kishore, Shivendra; Nahavandi, Nahid; Eyaid, Wafaa; Al Rifai, Muhammad Talal; Al-Rumayyan, Ahmed; Al-Twaijri, Waleed; Alothaim, Ali; Alhashem, Amal; Al-Sannaa, Nouriya; Al-Balwi, Mohammed; Alfadhel, Majid; Rolfs, Arndt; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2017-01-01

    We report our results of 1000 diagnostic WES cases based on 2819 sequenced samples from 54 countries with a wide phenotypic spectrum. Clinical information given by the requesting physicians was translated to HPO terms. WES processes were performed according to standardized settings. We identified the underlying pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in 307 families (30.7%). In further 253 families (25.3%) a variant of unknown significance, possibly explaining the clinical symptoms of the index patient was identified. WES enabled timely diagnosing of genetic diseases, validation of causality of specific genetic disorders of PTPN23, KCTD3, SCN3A, PPOX, FRMPD4, and SCN1B, and setting dual diagnoses by detecting two causative variants in distinct genes in the same patient. We observed a better diagnostic yield in consanguineous families, in severe and in syndromic phenotypes. Our results suggest that WES has a better yield in patients that present with several symptoms, rather than an isolated abnormality. We also validate the clinical benefit of WES as an effective diagnostic tool, particularly in nonspecific or heterogeneous phenotypes. We recommend WES as a first-line diagnostic in all cases without a clear differential diagnosis, to facilitate personal medical care. PMID:27848944

  4. Clinging, gripping, holding, containment: Reflections on a survival reflex and the development of a capacity to separate.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Alessandra

    2014-09-01

    This paper attempts to describe how, in the very first months of extra-uterine life, personality structures are formed around notions of personal space, separateness, attachment and individuation. The contribution of a forgotten Hungarian analyst, Imre Hermann, who wrote about the 'clinging reflex', will be explored in relation to the origin of Bowlby's concept of attachment and Rey's theoretical understanding of personal space. Particular attention will be given to transitions, transitional experiences and the development of a sense of internal space. Vignettes from infant observations will be used to illustrate the theoretical frame of reference. Clinical material from the analysis of a child and an adult patient will be provided to postulate how a distorted perception of personal space and separateness in the first few months of life may affect the capacity to attach and to individuate. © 2014, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  5. Mentalizing Makes Parenting Work: A Review about Parental Reflective Functioning and Clinical Interventions to Improve It.

    PubMed

    Camoirano, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade several studies have investigated the role of parental reflective functioning (RF), defined as the parental ability to understand his/her child's mental states, on the child's development. Herein, a narrative review on parental RF is presented aimed at (1) presenting an overview of the existing empirical studies, (2) pinpointing unrequited questions, and (3) identifying future research directions. Specifically, the current review focused on (a) the impact of parental RF on the quality of caregiving and the child's attachment security, (b) the effect of parental RF on the child's emotion regulation and the child's RF, (c) maternal RF in women with a history of neglect and abuse, (d) the efficacy of mentalization-based clinical interventions, and (e) the recently developed Parental Reflective Questionnaire. The following terms "maternal RF," "paternal RF," "parental RF," "parental mentalization," "maternal mentalization," and "paternal mentalization" were searched in titles, abstracts, and main texts using Medline, Web of Science, and Scopus databases. Next, a search in Mendeley was also conducted. Inclusion criteria comprised original articles if they refer to the RF Scale (Fonagy et al., 1998) and were published in an English language, peer-reviewed journal before July, 2016. According to exclusion criteria, dissertations, qualitative or theoretical papers, and chapters in books were not taken into account. The review includes 47 studies that, taken together, supported the notion that higher parental RF was associated with adequate caregiving and the child's attachment security, whereas low maternal RF was found in mothers whose children suffered from anxiety disorders, impairment in emotion regulation, and externalizing behaviors. In addition, higher parental RF was associated with better mentalizing abilities in children. However, unexpected findings have emerged from the most recent randomized controlled trials that tested the efficacy of

  6. On the Science of Consciousness: Epistemological Reflections and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Facco, Enrico; Lucangeli, Daniela; Tressoldi, Patrizio

    Consciousness has been one of the most important and tantalizing issues ever since the origin of philosophy and medicine. The concept of consciousness and the so-called "hard problem" (i.e., the mind-brain relationship) are highly complex topics that have yet to be elucidated, involving the realms of both science and philosophy with profound epistemological implications. In the lively debate on the foundations of the science of consciousness there are several potential biases of an essentially philosophical nature, such as those related to the paradigm and axioms adopted, and the ostensible logical contradiction between monism and dualism. Their origin dates back largely to Descartes' thinking and the birth of the new sciences as a compromise with the Inquisition, but they have been handed down through the Enlightenment and Positivism. A proper investigation of consciousness and the world of subjectivity demands a careful reflection on the paradigm of scientific medicine to identify possible flaws and overcome the limits of the mechanistic-reductionist approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: towards clinical application in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Evers, Daniel J; Nachabe, Rami; Vranken Peeters, Marie-Jeanne; van der Hage, Jos A; Oldenburg, Hester S; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lucassen, Gerald W; Hendriks, Benno H W; Wesseling, Jelle; Ruers, Theo J M

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a promising new technique for breast cancer diagnosis. However, inter-patient variation due to breast tissue heterogeneity may interfere with the accuracy of this technique. To tackle this issue, we aim to determine the diagnostic accuracy of DRS in individual patients. With this approach, DRS measurements of normal breast tissue in every individual patient are directly compared with measurements of the suspected malignant tissue. Breast tissue from 47 female patients was analysed ex vivo by DRS. A total of 1,073 optical spectra were collected. These spectra were analyzed for each patient individually as well as for all patients collectively and results were compared to the pathology analyses. Collective patient data analysis for discrimination between normal and malignant breast tissue resulted in a sensitivity of 90 %, a specificity of 88 %, and an overall accuracy of 89 %. In the individual analyses all measurements per patient were categorized as either benign or malignant. The discriminative accuracy of these individual analyses was nearly 100 %. The diagnosis was classified as uncertain in only one patient. Based on the results presented in this study, we conclude that the analysis of optical characteristics of different tissue classes within the breast of a single patient is superior to an analysis using the results of a cohort data analysis. When integrated into a biopsy device, our results demonstrate that DRS may have the potential to improve the diagnostic workflow in breast cancer.

  8. Generic Reflective Feedback: An Effective Approach to Developing Clinical Reasoning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojcikowski, K.; Brownie, S.

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning can be an effective tool to develop clinical reasoning skills. However, it traditionally takes place in tutorial groups, giving students little flexibility in how and when they learn. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of generic reflective feedback (GRF) with tutorial-based reflective feedback on the development of…

  9. Generic Reflective Feedback: An Effective Approach to Developing Clinical Reasoning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojcikowski, K.; Brownie, S.

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning can be an effective tool to develop clinical reasoning skills. However, it traditionally takes place in tutorial groups, giving students little flexibility in how and when they learn. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of generic reflective feedback (GRF) with tutorial-based reflective feedback on the development of…

  10. An International Congress on Violence in Clinical Psychiatry: Reflections and Takeaways.

    PubMed

    Repique, Renee John R; Polacek, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric-mental health nurses are lifelong learners and reflective practitioners. In this brief article, the authors share their professional reflections and pearls on innovative mental health nursing practice from a recent international conference on violence in clinical psychiatry. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. They Went, They Saw, They Learned: Medical Students' Reflections on Community Clinic Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beylefeld, Adriana A.

    2014-01-01

    Medicine has become a profession with increasing accountability to the needs of society. To meet this need, real-world, community-located experiences and reflection are frequently used to promote students' learning and personal growth. This article reports first-year medical students' reflective writing after visiting a primary healthcare clinic.…

  12. [Methodological reflections on 20 randomized clinical hydrotherapy trials in rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Queneau, P; Françon, A; Graber-Duvernay, B

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the level of scientific evidence contributed by randomized clinical trials in rheumatologic indication of spa therapy. A literature search was made of computer data banks, with analysis of 20 randomized hydrotherapy trials. On the 20 identified randomized hydrotherapy trials, four were carried out double-blind; nine included a comparison of inter-groups evolution. The indications assessed are chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis of the knee and hip joints, osteoarthritis of fingers, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis arthritis. The results suggest durable, persisting improvement several months after balneological care, in accordance with the following evaluation criteria: pain, handicap, quality of life, consumption of analgesics and of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It was concluded that randomized evaluations, demonstrating a beneficial and prolonged clinical effect of balneologic treatments, exist in respect of the main indications for rheumatologic hydrotherapy. These results acknowledge the medical help given by hydrotherapy within the aforesaid parameters, to which may be added a reduction of the adverse gastrointestinal events of NSAIDs. Evaluation needs to be continued to clarify the medical benefit offered by rheumatologic hydrotherapy.

  13. Developing a globally applicable evidence-informed competency framework to support capacity strengthening in clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Julé, Amélie; Boggs, Liam; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Ewing, Victoria; Vahedi, Manhaz; Launois, Pascal; Lang, Trudie

    2017-01-01

    Capacity development for clinical research is held back by a lack of recognition for the skills acquired through involvement in clinical trials and in other varied types of global health research studies. Although some competency frameworks and associated recognised career pathways exist for different clinical research roles, they mostly apply to a single role or study setting. Our experience supports the need for an integrated approach, looking at the many roles in parallel and at all types of clinical research beyond trials. Here, we propose a single, flexible framework which is applicable to the full global health research team, and can be used for recognising staff by highlighting acquired skills and possible progression between various roles. It can also illuminate where capacity needs strengthening and contribute to raising research engagement. Through systematic analysis of existing competency frameworks and current job descriptions covering 11 distinct, broad clinical research roles, we identified and defined 50 key competencies required by the team as a whole and throughout the study life cycle. The competencies are relevant and adaptable to studies that differ in design, geographical location or disease, and fall in five main areas—(1) Ethics, Quality and Risk Management; (2) Study and Site Management; (3) Research Operations; (4) Scientific Thinking; and (5) Professional Skills. A pilot framework and implementation tools are now available online and in paper format. They have the potential to be a new mechanism for enabling research skills development and career progression for all staff engaged in clinical research globally. PMID:28589027

  14. Development of reflective judgement in the pre-doctoral dental clinical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Boyd, L D

    2008-08-01

    When dental students begin patient care in the clinical curriculum, they are required to move from the well-defined problems of the classroom to the more ambiguous and real life problems encountered in the context of patient care in the clinical setting. This change in learning environment requires development of reflective thinking. Reflective thinking refers to the process of thinking about uncertainty or ill-defined problems. King and Kitchener refer to the outcome of the reflective thinking process as reflective judgement. The purpose of this study was to explore the development of reflective judgement in the initial phase of the clinical curriculum. This exploratory study used a case study approach with qualitative methods. A convenience sample of third year predoctoral dental students (n = 16) volunteered to participate in writing a clinic journal and semi-structured interviews at three time points over a time period of one year. Student compliance in writing clinical journals was poor; therefore the qualitative data was primarily gathered from interview transcripts. The qualitative interview data were analysed using a coding scheme based on King and Kitchener's Reflective Judgement Model of Intellectual Development. The Cronbach alpha was 0.76 for reliability of the coding scheme. Based on the analysis of interview data, the there was an average growth in reflective judgement over the year from Stage 4.89 to 5.59 for an overall change of +0.70. Additional research is needed to explore the growth in reflective judgement over the final year of the clinical curriculum as well as to identify the most effective educational strategies to facilitate growth in reflective judgment.

  15. Reflective Writing in the Competency-Based Curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments. PMID:21364819

  16. A Time for Reflection: Should We Reconsider the Direct Supervision Standard in Clinical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Educational reform is occurring again in athletic training. The profession, at this time, should reflect on the structure of clinical education, particularly with direct supervision. Clinical education plays a critical role in the development of future practitioners and should provide students with a chance to gain autonomous experience,…

  17. Surge capacity for response to bioterrorism in hospital clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Daniel S

    2003-12-01

    Surge capacity is the ability to rapidly mobilize to meet an increased demand. While large amounts of federal funding have been allocated to public health laboratories, little federal funding has been allocated to hospital microbiology laboratories. There are concerns that hospital laboratories may have inadequate surge capacities to deal with a significant bioterrorism incident. A workflow analysis of a clinical microbiology laboratory that serves an urban medical center was performed to identify barriers to surge capacity in the setting of a bioterrorism event and to identify solutions to these problems. Barriers include a national shortage of trained medical technologists, the inability of clinical laboratories to deal with a dramatic increase in the number of blood cultures, a delay while manufacturers increase production of critical products and then transport and deliver these products to clinical laboratories, and a shortage of class II biological safety cabinets. Federal funding could remedy staffing shortages by making the salaries of medical technologists comparable to those of similarly educated health care professionals and by providing financial incentives for students to enroll in clinical laboratory science programs. Blood culture bottles, and possibly continuous-monitoring blood culture instruments, should be added to the national antibiotic stockpile. Federal support must ensure that companies that manufacture essential laboratory supplies are capable of rapidly scaling up production. Hospitals must provide increased numbers of biological safety cabinets and amounts of space dedicated to clinical microbiology laboratories. Laboratories should undertake limited cross-training of technologists, ensure that adequate packaging supplies are available, and be able to move to a 4-day blood culture protocol.

  18. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study of tuberculin skin tests reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Anne; Grande, Sophie; Dahel, Karima; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Poher, Vincent; Goujon, Catherine; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a technique widely used to determine optical properties of tissues: scattering and absorption coefficients. In this study, we present the development of a low-cost optical instrument usable in a clinical environment based upon the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy approach. This instrument has been used in a clinical study to support the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The idea is to establish a new scanning method for an early detection of inflammation due to a reagent injection, before the onset of visual signs. Results comparing the instrumental and classical clinical readings are presented.

  19. Journaling and dialogue pairs to promote reflection in clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, Rita; Freed, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    This research focused on the use of writing to increase reflection and problem solving in the clinical setting. Two groups of associate degree students provided clinical care and maintained journals, answering a series of focused questions. One group of students worked as individuals in the clinical setting; the other consisted of students working in pairs. There were significant differences between levels of reflection of students who worked in pairs and those who were not paired. Three major themes were found in students' journals: emotions, connections between theory and practice, and learning.

  20. Self-Reflection of Video-Recorded High-Fidelity Simulations and Development of Clinical Judgment.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Michelle E

    2016-09-01

    Nurse educators are increasingly using high-fidelity simulators to improve prelicensure nursing students' ability to develop clinical judgment. Traditionally, oral debriefing sessions have immediately followed the simulation scenarios as a method for students to connect theory to practice and therefore develop clinical judgment. Recently, video recording of the simulation scenarios is being incorporated. This qualitative, interpretive description study was conducted to identify whether self-reflection on video-recorded high-fidelity simulation (HFS) scenarios helped prelicensure nursing students to develop clinical judgment. Tanner's clinical judgment model was the framework for this study. Four themes emerged from this study: Confidence, Communication, Decision Making, and Change in Clinical Practice. This study indicated that self-reflection of video-recorded HFS scenarios is beneficial for prelicensure nursing students to develop clinical judgment. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(9):522-527.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Midwifery competence: Content in midwifery students' daily written reflections on clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ekelin, Maria; Kvist, Linda J; Persson, Eva K

    2016-01-01

    to examine the content in midwifery students' written daily reflections and in their supervisors' written feedback during clinical practice at birth units. a total of 388 reflections written by a cohort of 18 midwifery students and written feedback provided by their supervisors have been analysed using content analysis. one main category, transition to midwifery competence emerged and was interpreted as a process of development in midwifery skills over time. This main category encompasses five categories: evaluations, own actions, communication, own emotions and insights comprising fourteen subcategories. As the education programme progressed there was evidence of development from fragmented reflections about care and learning to holistic reflections on learning. Comments from the clinical supervisors contained acknowledgement of the students' reflections or comments with a didactic content. daily written reflections on practice may be a useful pedagogical tool as reflective writing helps students to be active in transition to midwifery competence. Professional development may be facilitated by insights generated by reflection. Amount and content of feedback varied between supervisors which can result in a discrepancy in pedagogical value for individual students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Building capacity for clinical research in developing countries: the INDOX Cancer Research Network experience.

    PubMed

    Ali, Raghib; Finlayson, Alexander; Indox Cancer Research Network

    2012-01-01

    Transnational Organisations increasingly prioritise the need to support local research capacity in low and middle income countries in order that local priorities are addressed with due consideration of contextual issues. There remains limited evidence on the best way in which this should be done or the ways in which external agencies can support this process.We present an analysis of the learning from the INDOX Research Network, established in 2005 as a partnership between the Institute of Cancer Medicine at the University of Oxford and India's top nine comprehensive cancer centres. INDOX aims to enable Indian centres to conduct clinical research to the highest international standards; to ensure that trials are developed to address the specific needs of Indian patients by involving Indian investigators from the outset; and to provide the training to enable them to design and conduct their own studies. We report on the implementation, outputs and challenges of simultaneously trying to build capacity and deliver meaningful research output.

  3. Agreement between clinical methods of measurement of urinary frequency and functional bladder capacity.

    PubMed

    McCormack, M; Infante-Rivard, C; Schick, E

    1992-01-01

    We assessed the agreement between 2 methods of data gathering of particular interest in urology: patient questionnaire and examination vs. frequency-volume charts. One hundred consecutive patients consulting our out-patient clinic were chosen for this study; 88 completed the study. Urinary frequency and bladder capacity were evaluated in each patient by using the above methods. The agreement between different methods of measurement was assessed by determining whether the 2 methods were interchangeable, a condition occurring if results of both methods fall within predetermined limits of variability. The results showed poor agreement between subjectively estimated urinary frequency and chart-determined urinary frequency. Moreover, different methods of measuring bladder capacity (endoscopic vs. chart) gave different results. Since chart-determined data are probably a more valid indication of urinary habits, we suggest that frequency-volume charts should be used more often in the investigation and follow-up of patients with micturition disorders.

  4. Assessing an Adolescent's Capacity for Autonomous Decision-Making in Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Blum, Robert Wm; Benaroyo, Lazare; Zermatten, Jean; Baltag, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide policy guidance on how to assess the capacity of minor adolescents for autonomous decision-making without a third party authorization, in the field of clinical care. In June 2014, a two-day meeting gathered 20 professionals from all continents, working in the field of adolescent medicine, neurosciences, developmental and clinical psychology, sociology, ethics, and law. Formal presentations and discussions were based on a literature search and the participants' experience. The assessment of adolescent decision-making capacity includes the following: (1) a review of the legal context consistent with the principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; (2) an empathetic relationship between the adolescent and the health care professional/team; (3) the respect of the adolescent's developmental stage and capacities; (4) the inclusion, if relevant, of relatives, peers, teachers, or social and mental health providers with the adolescent's consent; (5) the control of coercion and other social forces that influence decision-making; and (6) a deliberative stepwise appraisal of the adolescent's decision-making process. This stepwise approach, already used among adults with psychiatric disorders, includes understanding the different facets of the given situation, reasoning on the involved issues, appreciating the outcomes linked with the decision(s), and expressing a choice. Contextual and psychosocial factors play pivotal roles in the assessment of adolescents' decision-making capacity. The evaluation must be guided by a well-established procedure, and health professionals should be trained accordingly. These proposals are the first to have been developed by a multicultural, multidisciplinary expert panel. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nursing students' reflections on the learning experience of a unique mental health clinical placement.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Christopher; Moxham, Lorna; Brighton, Renee; Taylor, Ellie; Sumskis, Susan; Perlman, Dana; Heffernan, Tim; Hadfield, Louise

    2016-11-01

    There exists a need for innovative thinking to identify new clinical placement opportunities for nursing students. Recovery-based clinical placements for mental health nurse students remain unique and require investigation. To examine the learning experience of Bachelor of Nursing students who undertook an innovative mental health clinical placement known as Recovery Camp. This study incorporated qualitative analysis of written reflections. Using Braun and Clarke's (2006) six phases of thematic analysis the corpus of student reflections were reviewed by three members of the research team independent to each other. Four themes emerged. The theme of Pre-placement Expectations incorporates participant foci on pre-conceptions of Recovery Camp. The theme of Student Learning incorporates the ways in which participants recognised the experience of Recovery Camp influenced learning. Reflections themed under the title Placement Setting include discussion of the Recovery Camp as a clinical placement. The theme of Future Practice incorporates students' reflections on how they plan to practice as nurses as a result the learning experiences of Recovery Camp. An immersive clinical placement such as Recovery Camp can influence students' perceptions of people with mental illness, have a positive impact on student learning and influence students' decisions about future practice. The learning experience of nursing students whom attend unique, recovery-orientated clinical placements can be both positive and educative. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mentalizing Makes Parenting Work: A Review about Parental Reflective Functioning and Clinical Interventions to Improve It

    PubMed Central

    Camoirano, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade several studies have investigated the role of parental reflective functioning (RF), defined as the parental ability to understand his/her child’s mental states, on the child’s development. Herein, a narrative review on parental RF is presented aimed at (1) presenting an overview of the existing empirical studies, (2) pinpointing unrequited questions, and (3) identifying future research directions. Specifically, the current review focused on (a) the impact of parental RF on the quality of caregiving and the child’s attachment security, (b) the effect of parental RF on the child’s emotion regulation and the child’s RF, (c) maternal RF in women with a history of neglect and abuse, (d) the efficacy of mentalization-based clinical interventions, and (e) the recently developed Parental Reflective Questionnaire. The following terms “maternal RF,” “paternal RF,” “parental RF,” “parental mentalization,” “maternal mentalization,” and “paternal mentalization” were searched in titles, abstracts, and main texts using Medline, Web of Science, and Scopus databases. Next, a search in Mendeley was also conducted. Inclusion criteria comprised original articles if they refer to the RF Scale (Fonagy et al., 1998) and were published in an English language, peer-reviewed journal before July, 2016. According to exclusion criteria, dissertations, qualitative or theoretical papers, and chapters in books were not taken into account. The review includes 47 studies that, taken together, supported the notion that higher parental RF was associated with adequate caregiving and the child’s attachment security, whereas low maternal RF was found in mothers whose children suffered from anxiety disorders, impairment in emotion regulation, and externalizing behaviors. In addition, higher parental RF was associated with better mentalizing abilities in children. However, unexpected findings have emerged from the most recent randomized controlled

  7. Building capacity in Clinical Epidemiology in Africa: experiences from Masters programmes.

    PubMed

    Young, Taryn; Naude, Celeste; Brodovcky, Tania; Esterhuizen, Tonya

    2017-02-27

    To describe and contrast programmatic offering of Clinical Epidemiology Masters programmes in Africa, to evaluate experiences of graduates and faculty, and assess if graduates are playing roles in research, practice and teaching of Clinical Epidemiology. We searched and identified relevant programmes, reviewed programmatic documentation, interviewed convenors and surveyed graduates. Participants provided informed consent, interviews with faculty were recorded and transcribed for analysis purposes, and graduates participated in an online survey. Five structured Masters programmes requiring health science professionals to complete modules and research projects were assessed. Demand for programmes was high. Graduates enjoyed the variety of modules, preferred blended teaching, and regarded assessments as fair. Graduates felt that career paths were not obvious after graduating. Despite this, some have gone on to promote and teach evidence-based health care, and conduct and disseminate research. Areas of concern raised by faculty were quality assurance; research project initiation, implementation and supervisory capacity; staff availability; funding to support implementation and lack of experiential learning. Although faced with challenges, these programmes build capacity of health professionals to practice in an evidence-informed way, and conduct rigorous research, which are central to advancing the practice of Clinical Epidemiology in Africa.

  8. Genital warts: comparing clinical findings to dermatoscopic aspects, in vivo reflectance confocal features and histopathologic exam.

    PubMed

    Veasey, John Verrinder; Framil, Valéria Maria de Souza; Nadal, Sidney Roberto; Marta, Alessandra Cristine; Lellis, Rute Facchini

    2014-01-01

    Genital warts can be diagnosed through physical examination and confirmed by histopathology. Noninvasive methods are useful for ruling out other diagnoses with no harm to the patient. In this study the clinical findings were compared to dermoscopy, reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), and to histopathology findings, in order to determine possible patterns that can aid diagnosis of the lesion. It was possible to identify structural changes on reflectance confocal microscopy that are already known by dermoscopy, in addition to cellular changes previously seen only by histopathological examination. This study shows the use of reflectance confocal microscopy in cases of genital warts, providing important information that can be used in further studies.

  9. Genital warts: comparing clinical findings to dermatoscopic aspects, in vivo reflectance confocal features and histopathologic exam*

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, John Verrinder; Framil, Valéria Maria de Souza; Nadal, Sidney Roberto; Marta, Alessandra Cristine; Lellis, Rute Facchini

    2014-01-01

    Genital warts can be diagnosed through physical examination and confirmed by histopathology. Noninvasive methods are useful for ruling out other diagnoses with no harm to the patient. In this study the clinical findings were compared to dermoscopy, reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), and to histopathology findings, in order to determine possible patterns that can aid diagnosis of the lesion. It was possible to identify structural changes on reflectance confocal microscopy that are already known by dermoscopy, in addition to cellular changes previously seen only by histopathological examination. This study shows the use of reflectance confocal microscopy in cases of genital warts, providing important information that can be used in further studies. PMID:24626658

  10. Evaluation of a Clinical Cancer Trial Research Training Workshop: Helping Nurses Build Capacity in Southwest Virginia.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Camille; Bullock, Linda; Collins, Cathleen A; Hauser, Lindsay

    2016-11-01

    Residents of Southwest Virginia (SWVA) face significant barriers in accessing the most advanced forms of cancer care, cancer risk reduction, and clinical trials involvement. A collaboration between the University of Virginia (UVA) Cancer Center and UVA School of Nursing was forged with oncology caregivers in this region to build community capacity to support Cancer Clinical trials (CCT) by strengthening the workforce, and thus improving health outcomes for this underserved region of Appalachia. The UVA School of Nursing designed an educational workshop focusing on the basics of CCT to facilitate the development of a skilled nursing workforce in the SWVA region that could provide care to patients on protocol and/or to encourage residents to participate in trials. The goal of the workshop was to offer a CCT training session for oncology nurses that fostered the knowledge and skills necessary to facilitate and support CCT infrastructure across this high-risk region. This evaluation reports the learning outcomes of the CCT training on 32 nurse participants from SWVA. Evaluations of the training program showed high rates of satisfaction, increased comfort level with CCTs, and increased knowledge and attitude toward CCTs. These findings provide information about a curriculum that could be useful in educating other oncology nurses and student nurses how to care for patients who may be enrolled in a clinical trial. Nurses can also be advocates for participation in clinical trials once they have the knowledge and are comfortable in their own understanding of a trial's usefulness. Educating the nursing workforce is an essential component of building capacity and infrastructure to support clinical trials research.

  11. Impact of clinical urgency, physician supply and procedural capacity on regional variations in wait times for coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite universal health care, there continues to be regional access disparities to coronary angiography in Canada. Our objective was to evaluate the extent to which demand-side factors such as clinical urgency/need, and supply-side factors, as reflected by differences in physician and procedural supply account for these inequalities. Methods Our cohort consisted of 74,254 consecutive patients referred for coronary angiography in Ontario, Canada between April 1st 2005 and March 31st 2006, divided into three urgency strata based on a clinical urgency scale. Cox-proportional hazard models were developed, adjusting for age, gender, socioeconomic status (SES), region, and urgency score, with greater hazard ratios (HR) indicating shorter wait times. To evaluate mediators of any residual wait-time differences, we examined the influence of the regional supply of cath lab facilities, invasive cardiologists and general practitioners (GP). Results We found that the urgency score was a significant predictor of wait time in all three strata (urgent patients: HR 1.61 for each unit increase in patient urgency (95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.55-1.67); semi-urgent patients: HR 1.55 (95% CI 1.44-1.68); elective patients: HR 1.13 (95% CI 1.08-1.18)). After accounting for clinical need/urgency, regional wait time differences persisted; these were most consistently associated with variation in cath lab supply. The impact of invasive cardiologist supply was restricted to urgent patients while that of GP supply was confined to semi-urgent and elective patients. Conclusion We found that there remained significant regional disparities in access to coronary angiography after accounting for clinical need. These disparities are partially explained by variations in supply of both procedural capacity and physician services, most notably in elective and semi-urgent patients. PMID:20051136

  12. Clinical and Translational Research and Community Engagement: Implications for Researcher Capacity Building

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Linda Sprague; Russell, Beverley; Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Leslie, Laurel K.; Brugge, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This research sought to better understand how clinical and translational research is defined and perceived by community service providers. In addition, the research sought to elicit how the perspectives of service providers may hinder or facilitate collaborative research efforts. The study employed a qualitative methodology, focus groups. A nonprobability sampling strategy was used to recruit participants from three neighborhoods in the Tufts University’s catchment area. Focus group findings add to the nascent body of literature on how community partners view clinical and translational research and researchers. Findings indicate that cultural disconnects, between researchers and community partners exist, as does mistrust, all of which serve as potential barriers to community research partnerships. This paper suggests rethinking the business of community engagement in researcher, particularly as it relates to building research capacity to approach, engage, and partner with communities. Clin Trans Sci 2012; Volume 5: 329–332 PMID:22883610

  13. Developing a Culture to Facilitate Research Capacity Building for Clinical Nurse Consultants in Generalist Paediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Lesley; Cummings, Joanne; McKay, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a research capacity building exercise with a group of CNCs practicing in the speciality of paediatrics in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. It explores the first step in building a research culture, through identifying the research priorities of members of the NSW Child Health Networks Paediatric Clinical Nurse Consultant group, and this forms the major focus of this paper. A nominal group technique (NGT) was utilised with sixteen members to identify research topics for investigation which were considered a priority for improving children's health care. The group reviewed and prioritised 43 research topics in children's health which were identified in the literature. As a result of conducting this research prioritisation exercise, the group chose two research topics to investigate: reasons for children representing to the Emergency Department and a comparison of the use of high-flow and low-flow nasal prongs in children with bronchiolitis. The research team will continue to mentor the nurses throughout their research projects which resulted from the NGT. One bridge to leadership development in enhancing patient care is translating knowledge to practice and policy development. This study leads the way for a group of CNCs in paediatric nursing to combine their research capacity and influence clinical knowledge. PMID:23956854

  14. The Use of Reflection and Inquiry in an Online Clinical Post-Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapko, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    An important goal of nursing education is to produce graduates who are problem solvers and competent clinical practitioners able to practice in a very complicated health care environment; reflection and inquiry are two ways to accomplish this goal. This qualitative study explored how eight senior baccalaureate nursing students developed in their…

  15. The Use of Reflection and Inquiry in an Online Clinical Post-Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapko, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    An important goal of nursing education is to produce graduates who are problem solvers and competent clinical practitioners able to practice in a very complicated health care environment; reflection and inquiry are two ways to accomplish this goal. This qualitative study explored how eight senior baccalaureate nursing students developed in their…

  16. Reflections of physiotherapy students in the United Arab Emirates during their clinical placements: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Larin, Hélène; Wessel, Jean; Al-Shamlan, Amal

    2005-01-01

    Background Although Western models of education are being used to establish health professional programs in non-Western countries, little is known about how students in these countries perceive their learning experiences. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the reflections of physiotherapy students from a Middle East culture during their clinical placements and to compare them to reflections of physiotherapy students from a Western culture. Methods Subjects were six senior students (3 females, 3 males, mean age 22.6 years) and 15 junior, female students (mean age 20.1 years) in the baccalaureate physiotherapy program at a university in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). They wrote weekly entries in a journal while in their clinical placements. They described an event, their reaction to it, and how it might affect their future behavior. Two evaluators independently read and coded the content of all the journals, and then worked together to categorize the data and develop themes. A third evaluator, an UAE national, independently read the journals to validate the content analysis. A feedback session with students was used to further validate the data interpretation. The themes were compared to those derived from a similar study of Canadian physiotherapy students. Results The content of the students' reflections were grouped into 4 themes: professional behavior, awareness of learning, self-development and shift to a patient orientation, and identification and analysis of ethical issues. Although the events were different, students from the UAE considered many of the same issues reflected on by Canadian students. Conclusion Physiotherapy students from a Middle East culture consider many of the same issues as students from a Western culture when asked to reflect on their clinical experience. They reflect on their personal growth, on how they learn in a clinical setting, and on the ethical and professional behaviors of themselves and others. PMID:15661079

  17. Self-regulated learning during a clinical preceptorship: the reflections of senior baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, RuthAnne

    2005-01-01

    This research was conducted to test the efficacy of audiotapes as a method of recording reflections of senior baccalaureate nursing students in a clinical preceptorship. The over-all aim of the research was to promote cognitive and metacognitive thinking processes with self-regulated learning strategies for problem solving in clinical situations. Verbal protocol technique revealed a consistent use of self-regulated learning strategies with a focus on environmental structuring for metacognitive activities. Common themes of thought were found in both clinical experiences and the use of critical thinking skills.

  18. Impact of the Accreditation of Clinical Educators scheme: reflections from one higher education institution.

    PubMed

    Sellars, Julie; Clouder, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    To provide a critically reflective account of clinical educators' experiences of the Accreditation of Clinical Educators (ACE) scheme, launched by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy in 2004, and its impact on practice. A qualitative methodology with three elements: focus group interviews during the accreditation process, and completion of a questionnaire at its conclusion and 6 months following completion. All data were transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. Seventeen participants provided initial feedback through focus group interviews. Thirteen participants completed all three phases of the inquiry. The sample was purposive. Three main themes emerged: getting to grips with reflection: a benefit for CPD; the relationship between professional recognition, competence and confidence; and perceived impact within the educators' scope of influence. This small-scale study of the outcomes of clinical educators' engagement with the ACE process suggests that it contributes to their personal and professional development by helping them to gain experience of portfolio building and reflective writing, and increasing confidence in their own competence through providing acknowledgment of having achieved a recognised standard. The ACE scheme appears to impact positively on clinical educators' approaches to supporting students on clinical placement. However, positive effects also extend to colleagues and clients. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. STRENGTHENING THE REFLECTIVE FUNCTIONING CAPACITIES OF PARENTS WHO HAVE A CHILD WITH A NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY THROUGH A BRIEF, RELATIONSHIP-FOCUSED INTERVENTION.

    PubMed

    Sealy, Julie; Glovinsky, Ira P

    2016-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the reflective functioning capacities of caregivers who have a child with a neurodevelopmental disorder between the ages of 2 years 0 months and 6 years 11 months. Children with a neurodevelopmental disorder receive a range of diagnoses, including sutism; however, they all exhibit social communication challenges that can derail social relationships. Forty parent-child dyads in Barbados were randomly assigned to either a developmental individual-difference, relationship-based/floortime(DIR/FT) group (n = 20), or a psychoeducational (wait-list) group (n = 20) with parental reflective functioning measured before and after a 12-week DIR/FT treatment intervention. Results revealed significant gains in parental reflective functioning in the treatment group, as compared to the psychoeducational (wait-list) group, after the 12-week relationship-focused intervention.

  20. Individual differences in working memory capacity are reflected in different ERP and EEG patterns to task difficulty.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shanshan; Reder, Lynne M; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Yuqiu; Chen, Feiyan

    2015-08-07

    This study examined whether there are neural markers of individual differences in working memory (WM) capacity and whether these differences are only manifest when performing a demanding WM task or at all levels of difficulty. Each subject's WM capacity was estimated using a modified digit span task prior to participation in an N-back task that varied difficulty from 1- to 4-back. While performing the N-back task, subjects wore scalp electrodes that allowed measurement of both event-related potentials (ERP) and event-related synchronization and desynchronization (ERS/ERD). Those subjects classified as low WM were more affected by the higher cognitive demands (many more errors in the 4-back task and generally slower responses) than those classified as high WM. These behavioral differences between the two groups were also apparent in the neural markers. Specifically, low WM subjects, when compared with high WM subjects, produced smaller P300 amplitudes and theta ERS, as well as greater alpha ERD at the most difficult level. Importantly, the observed differences in electrophysiological responses between the two groups were also observed at the lowest difficulty level, not just when the task challenged WM capacity. In addition, P300 amplitudes and alpha ERD responses were found to correlate with individual WM capacities independent of the task difficulty. These results suggest that there are qualitative neural differences among individuals with different WM capacities when approaching cognitive operations. Individuals with high WM capacities may make more efficient use of neural resources to keep their attention focused on the task-relevant information when performing cognitive tasks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Narrative thematic analysis of baccalaureate nursing students' reflections: critical thinking in the clinical education context.

    PubMed

    Naber, Jessica L; Hall, Joanne; Schadler, Craig Matthew

    2014-09-01

    This study sought to identify characteristics of clinically situated critical thinking in nursing students' reflections, originally part of a study guided by Richard Paul's model of critical thinking. Nurses are expected to apply critical thinking in all practice situations to improve health outcomes, including patient safety and satisfaction. In a previous study, Paul's model of critical thinking was used to develop questions for reflective writing assignments. Within that study, 30 nursing students completed six open-ended narratives of nurse-patient clinical encounters during an 8-week period. Improvements were seen in critical thinking scores after the intervention. This article reports the qualitative analysis of the content of six open-ended narratives. Six overarching themes were identified and combined into a tentative conceptual model. Faculty's understanding of the characteristics of critical thinking in the context of clinical education will help them to teach and evaluate students' progress and competencies for future practice.

  2. A Data-Driven Approach For Better Assignment Of Clinical And Surgical Capacity In An Elective Surgical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Gabriela; Bernard, Brian J.; Larson, David W.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Sir, Mustafa Y.

    2016-01-01

    This work analyzes strategies for better allocation of surgeon resources in an elective surgical practice. Among the metrics considered to evaluate the assignment of tasks are OR-to-Clinic ratio per provider, OR-to-Clinic ratio per day, patient access to clinic, and patient access to surgery. In addition, a simulation model is used to evaluate the clinical and surgical capacity of the calendar to identify potential inefficiencies and propose strategic changes to the calendar. PMID:28269884

  3. Learning from clinical placement experience: Analysing nursing students' final reflections in a digital storytelling activity.

    PubMed

    Paliadelis, Penny; Wood, Pamela

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on the learning potential of a reflective activity undertaken by final year nursing students, in which they were asked to recount two meaningful events that occurred during their clinical placements over the duration of their 3-year nursing degree program and reflect on how these events contributed to their learning to become beginning level Registered Nurses (RNs). This descriptive qualitative study gathered narratives from 92 students as individual postings in an online forum created within the University's learning management system. An analysis of the students' reflections are the focus of this paper particularly in relation to the value of reflecting on the identified events. Four themes emerged that clearly highlight the way in which these students interpreted and learned from both positive and negative clinical experiences, their strong desire to fit into their new role and their ability to re-imagine how they might respond to clinical events when they become Registered Nurses. The findings of this study may contribute to developing nursing curricula that better prepares final year students for the realities of practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The clinical utility of functional capacity evaluations: the opinion of health professionals working within occupational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    James, Carole; MacKenzie, Lynette

    2009-01-01

    Functional Capacity Evaluations (FCE's) are used within the occupational rehabilitation arena with the aim of assessing an individual's functional abilities in relation to work tasks. Therapists use a variety of different FCE's, both standardized and non standardized. This study aimed to investigate therapists' views on the clinical utility of FCE's in general and to identify if these differed between professional groups. A cross sectional study design was used. Health professionals who conduct FCE's and who worked for WorkCover accredited rehabilitation providers in NSW were surveyed. Surveys were returned from 79 participants working for 65 different rehabilitation providers. Of those who replied, 82\\% (n=63) were occupational therapists, 13% (n=10) physiotherapists and 5% (n=5) exercise physiologists. The mean years of professional experience was 10.9 years and the mean years of FCE experience was 5.3 years. Data were analyzed using STATA [v8.0] and the clinical utility of FCE's was considered relating to: usefulness & relevance; adaptability and flexibility; therapist perceived requirements and issues in practice. No differences were found related to the clinical utility of FCE's between professional groups or years of professional experience. The results suggest consistency and similarities in how FCE's are currently used in practice across NSW (Australia). Limitations of this study and areas for further research are suggested.

  5. Capacity Building in Southern Africa: Experiences and Reflections--Towards Joint Knowledge Production and Social Change in International Development Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeelen, Jacques; van der Linden, Josje

    2009-01-01

    The intent of capacity building in international development cooperation is to enable people to control their own development. Important premises are ownership, choice and self-esteem. The authors analyse the dynamics of the enabling process in practice, based on their own experiences working for several years in universities in developing…

  6. The Canadian guidelines and the interdisciplinary clinical capacity of Canada to diagnose fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Clarren, Sterling K; Lutke, Jan; Sherbuck, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the CMAJ published the Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: Canadian guidelines for diagnosis. The intent of this publication was to encourage a more consistent interdisciplinary team approach and diagnostic procedure for FASD diagnoses. That same year, the Canada Northwest FASD Research Network (CanFASD Northwest) determined the locations and capacity for interdisciplinary FASD diagnosis across Canada. Six years later, we wondered how successfully these Guidelines had been in bringing consistency to FASD clinical work. All clinical programs in Canada that routinely performed FASD evaluations were identified through membership in either our Network Action Team on FASD Diagnosis, professional meetings, organizational memberships, websites, programs lists available from Provincial or Federal offices or by word of mouth. Surveys were sent to all of the programs identified. A total of 55 clinics had been identified in seven provinces and one territory in 2005 that did FASD multidisciplinary diagnostics. In 2011 only 44 clinics were identified in six provinces and one territory using the same methodology. Survey responses were completed by 89% of these 44 clinics identified in 2011. The Guidelines were well known to all programs and actively referred to by most. Only 46% of respondents had a full staff of professionals on site for diagnosis, however 90% did use the team approach in determining final FASD diagnosis, while 79% used the team to help in developing a treatment plan. Among the clinics reporting, 74% of them used the new diagnostic schema proposed in the Guidelines and another 12% report using both the Guidelines and another system for diagnosis. The Guidelines have become well known to the medical community. They have contributed to increased consistency in approach and in diagnosis. The variations in clinical ability to fully staff themselves, and the 20% decline in clinic numbers suggest important funding gaps. Many provinces and territories still have

  7. Prognostic capacity of a clinically indicated exercise test for cardiovascular mortality is enhanced by combined analysis of exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and T-wave alternans.

    PubMed

    Minkkinen, Mikko; Nieminen, Tuomo; Verrier, Richard L; Leino, Johanna; Lehtimäki, Terho; Viik, Jari; Lehtinen, Rami; Nikus, Kjell; Kööbi, Tiit; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Kähönen, Mika

    2015-09-01

    Exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and T-wave alternans are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. We tested whether these parameters contain supplementary prognostic information. A total of 3609 consecutive patients (2157 men) referred for a routine, clinically indicated bicycle exercise test were enrolled in the Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS). Exercise capacity was measured in metabolic equivalents, heart rate recovery as the decrease in heart rate from maximum to one minute post-exercise, and T-wave alternans by time-domain Modified Moving Average method. During 57-month median follow-up (interquartile range 35-78 months), 96 patients died of cardiovascular causes (primary endpoint) and 233 from any cause. All three parameters were independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality when analysed as continuous variables. Adding metabolic equivalents (p < 0.001), heart rate recovery (p = 0.002) or T-wave alternans (p = 0.01) to the linear model improved its predictive power for cardiovascular mortality. The combination of low exercise capacity (<6 metabolic equivalents), reduced heart rate recovery (≤12 beats/min) and elevated T-wave alternans (≥60 μV) yielded the highest hazard ratio for cardiovascular mortality of 16.5 (95% confidence interval 4.0-67.7, p < 0.001). Harrell's C index was 0.719 (confidence interval 0.665-0.772) for cardiovascular mortality with previously defined cutpoints (<8 units for metabolic equivalents, ≤18 beats/min for heart rate recovery and ≥60 μV for T-wave alternans). The prognostic capacity of the clinical exercise test is enhanced by combined analysis of exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and T-wave alternans. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  8. Does Reflective Learning with Feedback Improve Dental Students' Self-Perceived Competence in Clinical Preparedness?

    PubMed

    Ihm, Jung-Joon; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2016-02-01

    The value of dental students' self-assessment is often debated. The aim of this study was to explore whether reflective learning with feedback enabled dental students to more accurately assess their self-perceived levels of preparedness on dental competencies. Over 16 weeks, all third- and fourth-year students at a dental school in the Republic of Korea took part in clinical rotations that incorporated reflective learning and feedback. Following this educational intervention, they were asked to assess their perceptions of their clinical competence. The results showed that the students reported feeling most confident about performing periodontal treatment (mean 7.1 on a ten-point scale) and least confident about providing orthodontic care (mean 5.6). The fourth-year students reported feeling more confident on all the competencies than the third-year students. Their self-perceived competence in periodontal treatment and oral medicine significantly predicted the instructors' clinical evaluations. This study offered insights into determining if structured reflective learning with effective feedback helps to increase dental students' self-perceived level of clinical preparedness.

  9. A Call for Innovation: Reflective Practices and Clinical Curricula of US Army Special Operations Forces Medics.

    PubMed

    Rocklein, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics have written and published numerous practice reflections that intricately describe their practice environments, clinical dilemmas, and suggestions for teaching and practice. The lack of translation of SOF medics experiential evidence to their curriculum has created a gap in evidence-based curriculum development. This study analyzed SOF medics learning and practice patterns and compared it to the evidence in the interdisciplinary clinical literature. After framing the problem, the literature was reviewed to determine appropriate tools by which perceptions and attitudes toward reflection-centered curricula could be measured. A recognizable practice reflection was extracted from the published SOF clinical literature and presented in writing to self-identified SOF medics and medic instructors via a descriptive crossover design, to ensure possible biases were mitigated. To measure SOF medics perceptions of reflection-based curricula, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure survey instrument was used, as it has validated psychometric properties and is used worldwide. SOF medics averaged scores of perceptions of their medic education indicated positive but not completely statistically significant preferences toward reflection-based curricula over traditional curriculum. Special Operations, medics, reflective practice, curricula BACKGROUND Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics practice in environments that are violent, austere, clandestine, and far removed from definitive hospital facilities. What was true almost 20 years ago?". . . academic demands of [Special Forces medic training] are roughly equivalent to those of an upper-level undergraduate curriculum in science or perhaps to those of first year medical school"?is even more challenging today. During this study, medics, physicians, and educators within the SOF medical community publicly and privately (ergo, names were redacted) expressed the need for curricular changes to

  10. Relationship between reflection ability and clinical performance: a cross-sectional and retrospective-longitudinal correlational cohort study in midwifery.

    PubMed

    Embo, M; Driessen, E; Valcke, M; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2015-01-01

    increasingly, reflection is highlighted as integral to core practice competencies but empirical research into the relationship between reflection and performance in the clinical workplace is scarce. this study investigated the relationship between reflection ability and clinical performance. we designed a cross-sectional and a retrospective-longitudinal cohort study. Data from first, second and third year midwifery students were collected to study the variables 'clinical performance' and 'reflection ability'. Data were analysed with SPSS for Windows, Release 20.0. Descriptive statistics, Pearson׳s Product Moment Correlation Coefficients (r) and r² values were computed to investigate associations between the research variables. the results showed a moderate observed correlation between reflection ability and clinical performance scores. When adopting a cross-sectional perspective, all correlation values were significant (p<0.01) and above 0.4, with the exception of the third year correlations. Assuming perfect reliability in the measurement, the adjusted correlations, for year 2 and year 3 indicated a high association between reflection ability and clinical performance (>0.6). The results based on the retrospective-longitudinal data set explained a moderate proportion of the variance after correction for attenuation. Finally, the results indicate that 'reflection ability' scores of earlier years are significant related with 'clinical performance' scores of subsequent years. These results suggest that (1) reflection ability is linked to clinical performance; (2) that written reflections are an important, but not the sole way to assess professional competence and that (3) reflection is a contributor to clinical performance improvement. the data showed a moderate but significant relationship between 'reflection ability' and 'clinical performance' scores in clinical practice of midwifery students. Reflection therefore seems an important component of professional

  11. Enhancing Capacity for Success in the Creative Industries: Undergraduate Student Reflections on the Implementation of Work-Integrated Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Ryan; Daniel, Leah

    2015-01-01

    This article reflects on ongoing research-led teaching in the area of creative industries in higher education. Specifically it reports on key work-integrated learning strategies designed to better prepare graduates for the employment sector. The creative industries sector is complex and competitive, characterized by non-linear career paths driven…

  12. Veterinary public health capacity-building in India: a grim reflection of the developing world's underpreparedness to address zoonotic risks.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Manish; Abbas, Syed Shahid; Kumar, Ashok; Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar; Sharma, Kavya; Bhatt, Purvi Mehta; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary public health (VPH) is ideally suited to promote convergence between human, animal and environmental sectors. Recent zoonotic and emerging infectious disease events have given rise to increasing calls for efforts to build global VPH capacities. However, even with their greater vulnerability to such events, including their economic and livelihood impacts, the response from low-and middle-income countries such as India has been suboptimal, thereby elevating global health risks. Addressing risks effectively at the human-animal interface in these countries will require a clear vision, consistent policies, strategic approach and sustained political commitment to reform and refine the current VPH capacity-building efforts. Only then can the discipline serve its goal of disease prevention, poverty alleviation and support for sustainable livelihoods through improvements in human and animal health.

  13. [Embracing Jean Watson's theory of Human Caring through a reflective practice within a clinical situation].

    PubMed

    Cara, Chantal; O'Reilly, Louise

    2008-12-01

    Essentially based on humanistic values of respect, collaboration, and uniqueness rather than on objectification, control, and categorization of the person cared-for, a professional's practice rooted in caring is aimed at helping individuals and their families, which can only be carried out through respect for human dignity. If we are to consider caring as the core of nursing, nurses will undoubtedly have to make a conscious effort to preserve human caring within their clinical practice (Cara, 2004b; O'Reilly, 2008, Watson, 2002). However, to support this endeavour, caring theories, such as the one proposed by Jean Watson, are essential. Inspired by Cara's (2003) continuing education paper, this reflection paper takes a pragmatic approach to promote the understanding of key elements involved in Watson's caring theory through a process of reflective practice within a rehabilitation clinical situation.

  14. An Integrative Professional Theory and Practice Paper: Personal Reflections from the Journey through Clinical Pastoral Education.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gillian

    2015-12-01

    CPE is an experience-based approach to learning spiritual care which combines clinical care with qualified supervision, in-class education and group reflection (CASC--http://www.spiritualcare.ca/). Through didactic seminars, group presentations and personal reading there is opportunity for the student to acquire, apply and integrate relevant theoretical information into their practice. Written for my CPE Specialist application, this paper describes how, through the course of advanced CPE education, I learn to utilize and integrate theory into my clinical work. Beginning with three strands--authenticity, listening and storytelling--I then discuss how the behavioural sciences and theology inform my practice. Focusing on empathy, I speak of the application of disclosure, the use of counter-transference as a diagnostic tool, and the place of therapeutic termination. Group theory, family systems theory, theological reflection, liturgical ministry, and multi-faith practices are considered.

  15. How can we know what we need to know? Reflections on clinical judgment formation.

    PubMed

    Busch, Fred; Schmidt-Hellerau, Cordelia

    2004-01-01

    What distinguishes a psychoanalyst from any other psychologically minded, empathic human being? This seemingly simple question goes to the heart of our profession, the way we see ourselves as competent clinicians. To understand a patient's material beyond ordinary empathy--that is, to come to a clinical judgment--we need to step out of the dyadic, countertransference situation and reflect what we've experienced in reference to our clinical theories. An analytic vignette shows how a theoretical background can be used to understand and interpret to a patient in a way that is deeply meaningful.

  16. Clinical Interview Assessment of Financial Capacity in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Roy C.; Wadley, Virginia; Griffith, H. Randall; Snyder, Scott; Goode, Patricia S.; Kinney, F. Cleveland; Nicholas, Anthony P.; Steele, Terri; Anderson, Britt; Zamrini, Edward; Raman, Rema; Bartolucci, Alfred; Harrell, Lindy E.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate financial capacity in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) using a clinician interview approach. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Tertiary care medical center. Participants Healthy older adults (N=75), patients with amnestic MCI (N=58), mild AD (N=97), and moderate AD (N=31). Measurements The investigators and five study physicians developed a conceptually based, semi-structured clinical interview for evaluating seven core financial domains and overall financial capacity (Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Financial Capacity; SCIFC). For each participant, a physician made capacity judgments (capable, marginally capable, or incapable) for each financial domain and for overall capacity. Results Study physicians made a total of over 11,000 capacity judgments across the study sample (N=261). Very good inter-rater agreement was obtained for the SCIFC judgments. Increasing proportions of marginal and incapable judgment ratings were associated with increasing disease severity across the four study groups. For overall financial capacity, 95 percent of physician judgments for older controls were rated as capable, as compared to only 82% for patients with MCI, 26% for patients with mild AD, and 4% for patients with moderate AD. Conclusion Financial capacity in cognitively impaired older adults can be reliably evaluated by physicians using a relatively brief, semi-structured clinical interview. Financial capacity shows mild impairment in MCI, emerging global impairment in mild AD, and advanced global impairment in moderate AD. MCI patients and their families should proactively engage in financial and legal planning given these patients’ risk of developing AD and accelerated loss of financial abilities. PMID:19453308

  17. Does reflective web-based discussion strengthen nursing students' learning experiences during clinical training?

    PubMed

    Mettiäinen, Sari; Vähämaa, Kristiina

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this research was to study how a web-based discussion forum can be used as a supervision tool during nursing students' clinical training. The study emphasises peer support and its importance for the students. The empirical research was carried out at a Finnish university of applied sciences. 25 nursing students took part in web-based discussion during their eight-week clinical training period. All in all, 395 comments were submitted. The material was analysed by using categorisation and a thematic analysis process. Finally, the results were reported using a modified Salmon's (2002) 5-stage model of Teaching and Learning On-line and Mezirow's (1981) levels of reflection. The students motivated each other by sharing their feelings and experiences. They noticed the value of peer support and started to learn from each other as well. By reflecting on their experiences, the students progressed in their learning process and at the same time advanced their reflective thinking process. This combination of theoretical knowledge and practice, based on the students' needs and interests, could lead to a deeper understanding which could also result in better clinical skills. This method offers the lecturers the possibility to support and follow the professional growth process in a new evidence-based manner.

  18. Refinement of the Facility-Level Medical Technology Score to Reflect Key Disease Response Capacity and Personnel Availability

    PubMed Central

    Kotin, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a second look at the computation of the Medical Technology Score (MTS), a metric designed to convey the relative technical competence of a health facility. Modification of the score to reflect local disease burden is discussed, as are its intended interpretations. Extensive data collection on up-to-date equipment and personnel resources must be undertaken before the MTS can become useful as a policy-relevant tool. PMID:27170857

  19. Plasma Total Antioxidant Capacity and Cardiometabolic Risk in Non-Obese and Clinically Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jamille Oliveira; Vásquez, Cecília M Passos; Santana, Gleiciane de Jesus; Silva, Natanael de Jesus; Braz, Juciene de Matos; Jesus, Amélia M Ribeiro de; Silva, Danielle Góes da; Cunha, Luana Celina Seraphim; Barbosa, Kiriaque Barra Ferreira

    2017-07-10

    The oxidative biomarkers play an important role in the genesis of cardiometabolic risk-related processes. To investigate the total antioxidant capacity of plasma and its association with cardiometabolic risk in non-obese and clinically healthy young adults. University students of the state of Sergipe, Brazil, aged between 18 and 25 years, were recruited for this study from May of 2013 and October of 2014. Anthropometric, clinical and biochemical parameters were measured and analyzed using protocols which were previously standardized and described in the literature. The measurement of plasma total antioxidant capacity was based on the ability that all the antioxidants present in the sample (plasma) have to inhibit the oxidation of the oxidizable substrate ABTS (2,2`- Azino-di-[3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulphonate]) to ABTS•+ by metmyoglobin. Approximately 25% of the sample presented more than one component of cardiometabolic risk. Low HDL-cholesterol was the most prevalent component. Compared to absence of components, the subjects with at least one component presented greater body weight and waist circumference, higher levels of diastolic blood pressure and fasting glucose, greater total cholesterol/HDL-c ratio, and lower levels of HDL-c (p < 0.05). Fasting glycemia was the only parameter which was associated with total antioxidant capacity (R2 = 0.10; β = 0.17; p = 0.001). The plasma total antioxidant capacity was not able to predict the cardiometabolic risk components due possibly to the establishment of compensatory mechanisms that become activated in physiological conditions. Os biomarcadores oxidativos exercem um importante papel na gênese dos processos relacionados ao risco cardiometabólico. Investigar a capacidade antioxidante total do plasma e sua associação com risco cardiometabólico em adultos jovens, não obesos e clinicamente saudáveis. Estudantes universitários do estado de Sergipe, Brasil, com idade entre 18 e 25 anos, foram recrutados entre maio

  20. Maximum acceptable weight of lift reflects peak lumbosacral extension moments in a functional capacity evaluation test using free style, stoop and squat lifting.

    PubMed

    Kuijer, P P F M; van Oostrom, S H; Duijzer, K; van Dieën, J H

    2012-01-01

    It is unclear whether the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL), a common psychophysical method, reflects joint kinetics when different lifting techniques are employed. In a within-participants study (n = 12), participants performed three lifting techniques--free style, stoop and squat lifting from knee to waist level--using the same dynamic functional capacity evaluation lifting test to assess MAWL and to calculate low back and knee kinetics. We assessed which knee and back kinetic parameters increased with the load mass lifted, and whether the magnitudes of the kinetic parameters were consistent across techniques when lifting MAWL. MAWL was significantly different between techniques (p = 0.03). The peak lumbosacral extension moment met both criteria: it had the highest association with the load masses lifted (r > 0.9) and was most consistent between the three techniques when lifting MAWL (ICC = 0.87). In conclusion, MAWL reflects the lumbosacral extension moment across free style, stoop and squat lifting in healthy young males, but the relation between the load mass lifted and lumbosacral extension moment is different between techniques. Tests of maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) from knee to waist height are used to assess work capacity of individuals with low-back disorders. This article shows that the MAWL reflects the lumbosacral extension moment across free style, stoop and squat lifting in healthy young males, but the relation between the load mass lifted and lumbosacral extension moment is different between techniques. This suggests that standardisation of lifting technique used in tests of the MAWL would be indicated if the aim is to assess the capacity of the low back.

  1. Virtual Patients in Primary Care: Developing a Reusable Model That Fosters Reflective Practice and Clinical Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Zary, Nabil; Björklund, Karin; Toth-Pal, Eva; Leanderson, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care is an integral part of the medical curriculum at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. It is present at every stage of the students’ education. Virtual patients (VPs) may support learning processes and be a valuable complement in teaching communication skills, patient-centeredness, clinical reasoning, and reflective thinking. Current literature on virtual patients lacks reports on how to design and use virtual patients with a primary care perspective. Objective The objective of this study was to create a model for a virtual patient in primary care that facilitates medical students’ reflective practice and clinical reasoning. The main research question was how to design a virtual patient model with embedded process skills suitable for primary care education. Methods The VP model was developed using the Open Tufts University Sciences Knowledgebase (OpenTUSK) virtual patient system as a prototyping tool. Both the VP model and the case created using the developed model were validated by a group of 10 experienced primary care physicians and then further improved by a work group of faculty involved in the medical program. The students’ opinions on the VP were investigated through focus group interviews with 14 students and the results analyzed using content analysis. Results The VP primary care model was based on a patient-centered model of consultation modified according to the Calgary-Cambridge Guides, and the learning outcomes of the study program in medicine were taken into account. The VP primary care model is based on Kolb’s learning theories and consists of several learning cycles. Each learning cycle includes a didactic inventory and then provides the student with a concrete experience (video, pictures, and other material) and preformulated feedback. The students’ learning process was visualized by requiring the students to expose their clinical reasoning and reflections in-action in every learning cycle. Content analysis of the focus

  2. A preclinical rodent model of acute radiation-induced lung injury after ablative focal irradiation reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Hae-June; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Eun, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Kwangwoo; Lee, Ji Min; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we established an image-guided small-animal micro-irradiation system mimicking clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this study was to develop a rodent model of acute phase lung injury after ablative irradiation. A radiation dose of 90 Gy was focally delivered to the left lung of C57BL/6 mice using a small animal stereotactic irradiator. At days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after irradiation, the lungs were perfused with formalin for fixation and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome. At days 7 and 14 after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (CT) images of the lung were taken and lung functional measurements were performed with a flexiVent™ system. Gross morphological injury was evident 9 days after irradiation of normal lung tissues and dynamic sequential events occurring during the acute phase were validated by histopathological analysis. CT images of the mouse lungs indicated partial obstruction located in the peripheral area of the left lung. Significant alteration in inspiratory capacity and tissue damping were detected on day 14 after irradiation. An animal model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in the acute phase reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy was established and validated with histopathological and functional analysis. This model enhances our understanding of the dynamic sequential events occurring in the acute phase of radiation-induced lung injury induced by ablative dose focal volume irradiation.

  3. A Difficult Journey: Reflections on Driving and Driving Cessation From a Team of Clinical Researchers.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Jacki; Gustafsson, Louise; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Pachana, Nancy A

    2017-02-01

    Recognizing the clinical importance and safety and well-being implications for the population, a multidisciplinary team has been researching older drivers and driving cessation issues for more than 15 years. Using empirical approaches, the team has explored quality of life and participation outcomes related to driving and nondriving for older people and has developed interventions to improve outcomes after driving cessation. The team members represent occupational therapists, medical practitioners, and clinical and neuropsychologists. While building the evidence base for driving- and driving cessation-related clinical practice, the researchers have also had first-hand experiences of interruptions to their own or parents' driving; involvement of older family members in road crashes; and provision of support during family members' driving assessment and cessation. This has led to reflection on their understandings and re-evaluation and refocusing of their perspectives in driving cessation research. This work will share the narratives of the authors and note their developing perspectives and foci within research as well as their clinical practice. Personal reflections have indicated the far-reaching implications for older drivers and family members of involvement in road crashes: the potential for interruptions to driving as a time for support and future planning and the conflicting and difficult roles of family members within the driving cessation process. Overall the lived, personal experience of the authors has reinforced the complex nature of driving and changes to driving status for the driver and their support team and the need for further research and support.

  4. Clinical assessment of decision-making capacity in acquired brain injury with personality change.

    PubMed

    Owen, Gareth S; Freyenhagen, Fabian; Martin, Wayne; David, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of decision-making capacity (DMC) can be difficult in acquired brain injury (ABI) particularly with the syndrome of organic personality disorder (OPD) (the "frontal lobe syndrome"). Clinical neuroscience may help but there are challenges translating its constructs to the decision-making abilities considered relevant by law and ethics. An in-depth interview study of DMC in OPD was undertaken. Six patients were purposefully sampled and rich interview data were acquired for scrutiny using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Interview data revealed that awareness of deficit and thinking about psychological states can be present. However, the awareness of deficit may not be "online" and effectively integrated into decision-making. Without this online awareness of deficit the ability to appreciate or use and weigh information in the process of deciding some matters appeared absent. We argue that the decision-making abilities discussed are: (1) necessary for DMC, (2) threatened by ABI , and (3) assessable at interview. Some advice for practically incorporating these abilities within assessments of DMC in patients with OPD is outlined.

  5. Building a long distance training program to enhance clinical cancer research capacity in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Appleyard, Caroline B; Antonia, Scott J; Sullivan, Daniel M; Santiago-Cardona, Pedro G; Cáceres, William; Velez, Hector; Torres-Ruiz, Jose A; Wright, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    Barriers persist in the development and delivery of effective cancer therapies to under-represented minority populations. In Puerto Rico, cancer is the second leading cause of death, yet cancer research awareness and training opportunities remain somewhat limited on the island. These limitations hinder progress toward decreasing the cancer health disparities that exist within the Puerto Rican population. The predominantly Hispanic population of Puerto Rico is the focus of a partnership between the Ponce Health Sciences University-Medical School and Ponce Research Institute (PHSU) in Ponce, Puerto Rico and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. The Partnership goals are to reduce these barriers through an integrated, multipronged approach of training and education alongside outreach and research components. This report describes the approaches, successes and challenges of enhancing clinical cancer research capacity on the island and the unique challenges of a partnership between two institutes physically separated by long distances. Once fully developed this model may be exportable to other Latin American countries where the need is even greater.

  6. Building a Long Distance Training Program to Enhance Clinical Cancer Research Capacity in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Appleyard, Caroline B.; Antonia, Scott J.; Sullivan, Daniel M.; Santiago-Cardona, Pedro G.; Cáceres, William; Velez, Hector; Torres-Ruiz, Jose A.; Wright, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    Barriers persist in the development and delivery of effective cancer therapies to under-represented minority populations. In Puerto Rico, cancer is the second leading cause of death, yet cancer research awareness and training opportunities remain somewhat limited on the island. These limitations hinder progress toward decreasing the cancer health disparities that exist within the Puerto Rican population. The predominantly Hispanic population of Puerto Rico is the focus of a partnership between the Ponce Health Sciences University-Medical School and Ponce Research Institute (PHSU) in Ponce, Puerto Rico and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. The Partnership goals are to reduce these barriers through an integrated, multipronged approach of training and education alongside outreach and research components. This report describes the approaches, successes and challenges of enhancing clinical cancer research capacity on the island and the unique challenges of a partnership between two institutes physically separated by long distances. Once fully developed this model may be exportable to other Latin American countries where the need is even greater. PMID:25626061

  7. [Recipient capacity of clinical strains of staphylococci belonging to different phage groups].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, T R; Smolianskaia, A Z

    1976-11-01

    The recipient capacity of the strains of Staph. epidermidis and Staph. areus belonging to different phage groups, as well as the possibility of epidemic distribution of the erythromycin resistance marker among the clinical staphyloccal strains on using the defective phage obtained from strain 8325 P IIde was studied. The defective phage P IIde may be the source of epidemic distribution of the drug resistance among the competent strains of Staph. aureus. All erythromycin sensitive strains of Staph. aureus lysed by the phages of groups I and III proved to be competent recipients of the erythromycin resistance marker. The strains of Staph. aureus of phage group II and phage type 80/81, as well as the strains of Staph. epidermidis were not competent recipients under our experimental conditions. It was not possible to transfer the high level of erythromycin resistance (1000 gamma/ml) on transduction to the strains of phage group I with a relatively low level of resistance to this antibiotic (20-50 gamma/ml.

  8. Clinical assessment of decision-making capacity in acquired brain injury with personality change

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Gareth S.; Freyenhagen, Fabian; Martin, Wayne; David, Anthony S.

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of decision-making capacity (DMC) can be difficult in acquired brain injury (ABI) particularly with the syndrome of organic personality disorder (OPD) (the “frontal lobe syndrome”). Clinical neuroscience may help but there are challenges translating its constructs to the decision-making abilities considered relevant by law and ethics. An in-depth interview study of DMC in OPD was undertaken. Six patients were purposefully sampled and rich interview data were acquired for scrutiny using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Interview data revealed that awareness of deficit and thinking about psychological states can be present. However, the awareness of deficit may not be “online” and effectively integrated into decision-making. Without this online awareness of deficit the ability to appreciate or use and weigh information in the process of deciding some matters appeared absent. We argue that the decision-making abilities discussed are: (1) necessary for DMC, (2) threatened by ABI , and (3) assessable at interview. Some advice for practically incorporating these abilities within assessments of DMC in patients with OPD is outlined. PMID:26088818

  9. Hiding clinical information in medical images: A new high capacity and reversible data hiding technique.

    PubMed

    Parah, Shabir A; Ahad, Farhana; Sheikh, Javaid A; Bhat, G M

    2017-02-01

    A new high capacity and reversible data hiding scheme for e-healthcare applications has been presented in this paper. Pixel to Block (PTB) conversion technique has been used as an effective and computationally efficient alternative to interpolation for the cover image generation to ensure reversibility of medical images. A fragile watermark and Block Checksum (computed for each 4×4 block) have been embedded in the cover image for facilitating tamper detection and tamper localization, and hence content authentication at receiver. The EPR, watermark data and checksum data has been embedded using Intermediate Significant Bit Substitution (ISBS) to avoid commonly used LSB removal/replacement attack. Non-linear dynamics of chaos have been put to use for encrypting the Electronic Patient Record (EPR)/clinical data and watermark data for improving the security of data embedded. The scheme has been evaluated for perceptual imperceptibility and tamper detection capability by subjecting it to various image processing and geometric attacks. Experimental results reveal that the proposed system besides being completely reversible is capable of providing high quality watermarked images for fairly high payload. Further, it has been observed that the proposed technique is able to detect and localise the tamper. A comparison of the observed results with that of some state-of-art schemes show that our scheme performs better.

  10. Student Reflection Papers on a Global Clinical Experience: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Carmi Z; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Tsang, Luisa; Fleischer, Jennifer; Graham, Mark J; Kellett, Anne; Hafler, Janet P

    Many of the 70,000 graduating US medical students [per year] have reported participating in a global health activity at some stage of medical school. This case study design provided a method for understanding the student's experience that included student's learning about culture, health disparities, exposure and reaction to a range of diseases actually encountered. The broad diversity of themes among students indicated that the GCE provided a flexible, personalized experience. We need to understand the student's experience in order to help design appropriate curricular experiences [and valid student assessment]. Our research aim was to analyze medical student reflection papers to understand how they viewed their Global Clinical Experience (GCE). A qualitative case study design was used to analyze student reflection papers. All 28 students who participated in a GCE from 2008-2010 and in 2014-2015 and submitted a reflection paper on completion of the GCE were eligible to participate in the study. One student did not submit a reflection paper and was not included in the study. All 27 papers were coded by paragraph for reflection and for themes. System of Care/Range of Care was mentioned most often, Aids to Adjustment Process was mentioned least. The theme, "Diseases," referred to any mention of a disease in the reflection papers, and 44 diseases were mentioned in the papers. The analysis for depth of reflection yielded the following data: Observation, 81/248 paragraphs; Observation and Interpretation, 130/248 paragraphs; and Observation, Interpretation, and Suggestions for change, 36/248 paragraphs; 9 reflection papers contained 27 separate accounts of a transformational experience. This study provided a method for understanding the student's experience that included student's learning about culture, health disparities, and exposure and reaction to a range of diseases actually encountered. The broad diversity of themes among students indicated that the GCE provided a

  11. Novel Paths to Relevance: How Clinical Ethics Committees Promote Ethical Reflection.

    PubMed

    Magelssen, Morten; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun

    2016-09-01

    How may clinical ethics committees (CECs) inspire ethical reflection among healthcare professionals? How may they deal with organizational ethics issues? In recent years, Norwegian CECs have attempted different activites that stretch or go beyond the standard trio of education, consultation, and policy work. We studied the novel activities of Norwegian CECs by examining annual reports and interviewing CEC members. Through qualitative analysis we identified nine categories of novel CEC activities, which we describe by way of examples. In light of the findings, we argue that some novel working methods may be well suited to promote ethical reflection among clinicians, and that the CEC may be a suitable venue for discussing issues of organizational ethics.

  12. Meeting local complex health needs by building the capacity of general practice: the University of Queensland GP super clinic model.

    PubMed

    Dart, Jared M; Jackson, Claire L; Chenery, Helen J; Shaw, Paul N; Wilkinson, David

    2010-07-19

    The GP Super Clinics Program is a highly topical and controversial initiative with varying levels of support within the policy, consumer and health care communities. Here, we describe the GP super clinic initiative of the University of Queensland (UQ), and how it aims to enhance primary-care capacity in the regions where clinics are based. The UQ GP super clinic model has considered the concerns of general practitioners, patients and other stakeholders, and addresses the needs of these groups while providing an excellent opportunity for the university to be involved in innovative service delivery, community-based education, primary-care service design and evaluation.

  13. Right ventricular wave reflection relate to clinical measures in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kjellström, Barbro; Manouras, Aristomenis; Wikström, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    When a forward running pressure wave from the right ventricle reaches the narrow vessels in the pulmonary circulation, it is reflected as a backward running wave. We aimed to relate changes in right ventricular waveform reflection (RVWR) to changes in clinical variables in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients. Twenty-one PAH patients with RV waveform recordings from two sequential catheterisations at least 6 months apart were included. Six-minute walked distance (6MWD) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level were also available. RVWR was defined as 'the pressure from the inflection point on the upstroke RV pressure wave to RV peak pressure'. Direction of change in RVWR, 6MWD and BNP was classified as (+) if increased and (-) if decreased. Spearman correlations were used to analyse the relation between changes. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to analyse relation between RVWR and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). The correlation between change in RVWR and 6MWD was - 0.67 (p < 0.01) and between RVWR and BNP was - 0.53 (p < 0.05). Actual RVWR and PVR correlated both at first (0.56, p < 0.001) and at second right heart catheterisation (0.45, p < 0.001). RVWR might have clinical implications indicating a change in clinical status and disease progression in patients with PAH.

  14. Predictors and Association With Clinical Outcomes of the Changes in Exercise Capacity After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; Puri, Rishi; Regueiro, Ander; Chamandi, Chekrallah; Rodriguez-Gabella, Tania; Del Trigo, Maria; Campelo-Parada, Francisco; Couture, Thomas; Marsal, Josep Ramon; Côté, Mélanie; Paradis, Jean-Michel; DeLarochellière, Robert; Doyle, Daniel; Mohammadi, Siamak; Dumont, Eric; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2017-08-15

    At present, there are no objective data specifically examining the clinical impact of variations in exercise capacity post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We describe the changes in exercise capacity between baseline and 6 months post-TAVR, and ascertain factors associated with and clinical implications of a lack of improvement in exercise capacity post-TAVR. A total of 305 patients (mean age, 79±9 years; 44% men; Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk mortality score, 6.7±4.2%) undergoing TAVR completed both baseline and follow-up exercise capacity assessments at 6 months post-TAVR. Exercise capacity was evaluated by the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Clinical outcomes were compared between patients displaying greater than (n=152; improving group) versus less than (n=153; nonimproving group) the median percentage change in distance walked between baseline and 6-month follow-up examinations. The primary outcome measure was clinical event rates, measured from the 6-month post-TAVR period onward. Further dichotomization according to baseline 6MWT distance (less than versus more than median walking distance, or slow walker versus fast walker) was also assessed. The mean overall distances walked pre- and post-TAVR (6 months post-TAVR) were 204±119 and 263±116 m, respectively (Δ6MWT=60±106 m), with 219 (72%) patients demonstrating an increase in their walking distance (median percentage increase of the entire population was 20% [interquartile range, 0%-80%]). Factors independently correlated with reduced exercise capacity improvement included a range of baseline clinical characteristics (older age, female sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; P<0.05 for all), periprocedural major or life-threatening bleeding (P=0.009) and new-onset anemia at 6 months post-TAVR (P=0.009). Failure to improve the 6MWT distance by at least 20% was independently associated with all-cause mortality (P=0.002) and cardiovascular death or rehospitalization for

  15. Palliative Care Bedside Teaching: A Qualitative Analysis of Medical Students' Reflective Writings after Clinical Practices.

    PubMed

    Rojí, Rocío; Noguera-Tejedor, Antonio; Pikabea-Díaz, Fernando; Carrasco, José Miguel; Centeno, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    A mandatory course in palliative care (PC) is organized for all final-year medical students at the University of Navarre. It consists of 24 lectures, 4 workshops, and 1 scheduled five hour clinical PC service experience at two different sites. In the 48 hours after the visit and related to the clinical experience, each student has to complete a 500-word reflective writing (RW) piece. To investigate how a brief PC clinical experience helps equip the medical student. Qualitative study of RW. Two researchers produced a content analysis of students' RW. They collaboratively developed themes and categories with a constant review of the classification tree and an exhaustive collection of quotes. Differences between services were analyzed (λ(2)). One hundred sixty-seven RW were analyzed from the 197 students on the course (response rate 85%). Six major themes emerged: All the students identified central aspects of PC work dynamics; students acquired specific PC knowledge (86%); the personal influence of the experience was reported (68%); students described how patients and their caregivers deal with the patients' illness (68%); students talked about the essence of PC and essential aspects of medicine (42%); students reported spontaneously having changed their assumptions about PC (15%); and they realized that the experience was relevant to all clinical practice. Categories such as teamwork, the expression of patients' and caregivers' feelings, and family devotion showed statistical differences between services (λ(2) p < 0.05). A short bedside clinical experience in PC, encouraging student reflection, provides a deeper understanding of PC and even of core medicine values. The data we gather cannot explain only new skill acquisition but seems to suggest a life-changing personal experience for the student.

  16. Immunonutrition improves functional capacities in head and neck and esophageal cancer patients undergoing radiochemotherapy: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Vasson, M-P; Talvas, J; Perche, O; Dillies, A-F; Bachmann, P; Pezet, D; Achim, A-C; Pommier, P; Racadot, S; Weber, A; Ramdani, M; Kwiatkowski, F; Bouteloup, C

    2014-04-01

    Malnutrition is frequent in head and neck (HN) and esophageal cancer patients and aggravated by radiochemotherapy (RCT), increasing morbi-mortality and treatment toxicity. Our goal was to investigate the effect of immunonutrition consisting of an arginine, omega-3 fatty acid, nucleotides-enriched diet on nutritional status, and functional capacity in HN or esophageal cancer patients undergoing RCT. 37 patients were randomized in a double-blind clinical trial. 5 days before and until the end of RCT (5-7 weeks), they received either an Immunomodulating Enteral Nutrition (IEN) or an isonitrogenous, isoenergetic Standard Enteral Nutrition (SEN). Anthropometrical parameters, nutritional risk index (NRI), serum albumin, plasma antioxidant capacity, and functional capacity were recorded between the beginning and the end of RCT. A significant gain in total body weight (+2.1 ± 3.1 kg) was observed in IEN patients. Albuminemia and NRI were improved concomitantly in IEN malnourished patients. Plasma antioxidant capacity was improved (+100 ± 13 μM EqTrolox) in IEN patients. Functional capacity measured by WHO Performance Status and Karnofsky index was maintained in IEN patients but significantly reduced in SEN patients. These preliminary data show that immunonutrition could improve the nutritional status together with functional capacity in HN and esophageal cancer patients undergoing RCT. This clinical trial promoted by the University Hospital Center of Clermont-Ferrand has been registered at ClinicalTrial.gov website under the following reference: NCT00333099. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigating the impact of alliance-focused training on interpersonal process and therapists' capacity for experiential reflection.

    PubMed

    Safran, Jeremy; Muran, J Christopher; Demaria, Anthony; Boutwell, Catherine; Eubanks-Carter, Catherine; Winston, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    In this article we present preliminary findings from a research program designed to investigate the value of alliance-focused training (AFT), a supervision approach designed to enhance therapists' ability to work constructively with negative therapeutic process. In the context of a multiple baseline design, all therapists began treating their patients using cognitive therapy and then joined AFT supervision groups at either session 8 or 16 of a 30 session protocol. Study I investigated the impact of AFT on patient and therapist interpersonal process as assessed through the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). Study 2 investigated the impact of AFT on therapists' tendency to reflect on their relationships with their patients in an experientially grounded fashion, as assessed via the Experiencing Scale (EXP). Since one of the goals of AFT is to train therapists to use their own emerging feelings as important clues regarding what may be taking place in the therapeutic relationship, we hypothesized that they would show increased levels of EXP after undergoing AFT. The results of both studies 1 and 2 were for the most part consistent with hypotheses. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  18. A Model for Strengthening Collaborative Research Capacity: Illustrations from the Atlanta Clinical Translational Science Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Kirsten C.; Akintobi, Tabia; Thompson, Winifred Wilkins; Evans, Donoria; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Community-engaged research is effective in addressing health disparities but may present challenges for both academic institutions and community partners. Therefore, the need to build capacity for conducting collaborative research exists. The purpose of this study is to present a model for building research capacity in…

  19. A Model for Strengthening Collaborative Research Capacity: Illustrations from the Atlanta Clinical Translational Science Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Kirsten C.; Akintobi, Tabia; Thompson, Winifred Wilkins; Evans, Donoria; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Community-engaged research is effective in addressing health disparities but may present challenges for both academic institutions and community partners. Therefore, the need to build capacity for conducting collaborative research exists. The purpose of this study is to present a model for building research capacity in…

  20. A clinical evaluation of the ability of the Dentobuff method to estimate buffer capacity of saliva.

    PubMed

    Wikner, S; Nedlich, U

    1985-01-01

    The power of a colourimetric method to estimate buffer capacity of saliva (Dentobuff) was compared with an electrometric method in 220 adults. The methods correlated well but Dentobuff frequently underestimated high buffer values which was considered to be of minor practical importance. Dentobuff identified groups with low, intermediate and high buffer capacity as good as the electrometric method.

  1. Mindfulness in the Maintenance of Cognitive Capacities in Alzheimer's Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Hernández, Domingo J; Miró-Barrachina, María T; Ibáñez-Fernández, Ignacio J; Pino, Angelo Santana-Del; Quintana-Montesdeoca, María P; Rodríguez-de Vera, Bienvenida; Morales-Casanova, David; Pérez-Vieitez, María Del Carmen; Rodríguez-García, Javier; Bravo-Caraduje, Noelia

    2016-01-01

    The Canary Islands longitudinal study on non-pharmacological treatments showed the overall effectiveness of mindfulness in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, no specific data on the maintenance of cognitive capacities were presented. To determine whether the practice of mindfulness modifies the course of cognitive impairment in AD. Longitudinal, non-inferiority and equivalence, randomized clinical trial, repeated-measures design, with three experimental groups and one control group. Patients with AD who voluntarily attended the Lidia García Foundation (n = 502). Only those who were treated with donepezil and MMSE ≥18 were included (n = 120). Over a two-year period, each group carried out three weekly sessions of stimulation based on mindfulness, cognitive stimulation therapy, and progressive muscle relaxation. Cognitive assessment CAMDEX-R (MMSE and CAMCOG). Repeated-measures ANOVA (p <  0.05) and the effect size Cohen's d were performed. The mindfulness group showed significant scores compared with the control and muscle relaxation groups (p <  0.05), while mindfulness and cognitive stimulation therapy were equivalent (p≥0.05). Group cognitive stimulation evolved better than the control (p <  0.05) group but not better than the muscle relaxation group (p≥0.05). The effect size compared over two years was large for the mindfulness group (p≥0.80), moderate for the relaxation group (p≥0.50), and low for the cognitive stimulation group (p≥0.20). The practice of mindfulness maintained cognitive function over a period of two years. This longitudinal study suggests that mindfulness can be used as a non-pharmacological treatment to slow cognitive impairment in AD.

  2. A Retrospective Study on Students’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of the Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate student and teacher perceptions of the utility of the Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment (RACA) in an undergraduate pharmacy curriculum at an Australian university. Methods. A mixed-method study comprising the administration of a 7-item student survey on a 6-point Likert-type scale and a 45-minute focus group/phone interview with teachers. Results. Student (n=199) and teaching staff respondents (n=3) provided their perceptions of the implementation of the new educational tool. Student responses showed significant positive correlations between self-directed learning, counseling skills, relevance to future practice, and performance in an oral examination. Seven key themes emerged from the teacher interviews. Conclusion. The study revealed both students and teachers perceive the RACA as an effective educational tool that may enhance skill development for future clinical practice. PMID:27667838

  3. Decision-making capacity and competency in the elderly: a clinical and neuropsychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Moberg, Paul J; Rick, Jacqueline H

    2008-01-01

    With our ageing population, the number of older adults with cognitive impairment has also increased. There is both an acute and growing need for evidence-based assessments to identify their decision making capacity and competence. In the present article we (1) present definitions of decision-making capacity and competence, (2) review cognitive functions that are central to decision-making capacity as well as the methods and procedures commonly used to assess these domains, and (3) address the communication of assessment findings to patients and their loved ones. The importance of assessing decision-making capacity in the context of specific functions and of respecting the values and interests of older adults are emphasized.

  4. Reflective practice and its role in facilitating creative responses to dilemmas within clinical communication - a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Gabriele; Roling, Gudrun; Berger, Bettina; Edelhäuser, Friedrich; Scheffer, Christian

    2016-11-24

    Good communication is a major factor in delivering high quality in care. Research indicates that current communication skills training alone might not sufficiently enable students to find context-specific creative solutions to individual complex personal and interpersonal challenges in the clinical context. This study explores medical students' experiences with real communication dilemmas in a facilitated group setting. The aims were to gain a better understanding of whether and, if so, how reflective practice can enhance students' ability to find creative individual solutions in difficult communication situations and to identify factors within the reflective setting that foster their creative competency. Thematic content analysis was used to perform a secondary analysis of semi-structured interview data from a qualitative evaluation of a group reflective practice training for final-year medical students. The categories that arose from the iterative deductive-inductive approach were analyzed in light of current scientific understandings of creativity. Reflection on real difficult clinical communication situations appears to increase medical students' ability to handle such situations creatively. Although group reflection on clinical dilemmas involving personal aspects can stir up emotions, participating students stated they had learned a cognitive process tool that enhanced their communicative competence in clinical practice. They also described changes in personal attitudes: they felt more able to persevere and to tolerate ambiguity, described themselves more open and self-efficient in such complex clinical communication situations and thus more motivated. Furthermore, they reported on factors that were essential in this process, such as reflection on current and real challenges, a group format with a trainer. Reflective practice providing a cognitive process tool and using real clinical challenges and trainer support in communication education may provide

  5. The Effect of Reflective Activities on Reflective Thinking Ability in an Undergraduate Pharmacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Schneider, Carl R.; Smith, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of integrating reflective practice activities into a second-year undergraduate pharmacy curriculum and their impact on reflective thinking ability. Design. A cross-over design with repeated measures was employed. Newly developed reflective modules based on real hospital and community pharmacy cases were integrated into the second-year pharmacy practice curriculum. A novel strategy, the Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment (RACA), was introduced to enhance self- and peer reflection. Assessment. Student responses (n=214) to the adapted Kember et al1 Reflective Thinking Questionnaire (RTQ) were compared before and after reflective activities were undertaken. Significant improvement in three indicators of reflective thinking was shown after students engaged in reflective activities. Conclusion. Integration of reflective activities into a pharmacy curriculum increased the reflective thinking capacity of students. Enhancing reflective thinking ability may help students make better informed decisions and clinical judgments, thus improving future practice. PMID:27293232

  6. The Effect of Reflective Activities on Reflective Thinking Ability in an Undergraduate Pharmacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Tsingos-Lucas, Cherie; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Schneider, Carl R; Smith, Lorraine

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of integrating reflective practice activities into a second-year undergraduate pharmacy curriculum and their impact on reflective thinking ability. Design. A cross-over design with repeated measures was employed. Newly developed reflective modules based on real hospital and community pharmacy cases were integrated into the second-year pharmacy practice curriculum. A novel strategy, the Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment (RACA), was introduced to enhance self- and peer reflection. Assessment. Student responses (n=214) to the adapted Kember et al(1) Reflective Thinking Questionnaire (RTQ) were compared before and after reflective activities were undertaken. Significant improvement in three indicators of reflective thinking was shown after students engaged in reflective activities. Conclusion. Integration of reflective activities into a pharmacy curriculum increased the reflective thinking capacity of students. Enhancing reflective thinking ability may help students make better informed decisions and clinical judgments, thus improving future practice.

  7. Non-invasive detection of periodontal disease using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Subhash, Narayanan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Prasanthila, Janam

    2012-03-01

    In clinical diagnostic procedures, gingival inflammation is considered as the initial stage of periodontal breakdown. This is often detected clinically by bleeding on probing as it is an objective measure of inflammation. Since conventional diagnostic procedures have several inherent drawbacks, development of novel non-invasive diagnostic techniques assumes significance. This clinical study was carried out in 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy for quantification and discrimination of various stages of inflammatory conditions in periodontal disease. The DR spectra of diseased lesions recorded using a point monitoring system consisting of a tungsten halogen lamp and a fiber-optic spectrometer showed oxygenated hemoglobin absorption dips at 545 and 575 nm. Mean DR spectra on normalization shows marked differences between healthy and different stages of gingival inflammation. Among the various DR intensity ratios investigated, involving oxy Hb absorption peaks, the R620/R575 ratio was found to be a good parameter of gingival inflammation. In order to screen the entire diseased area and its surroundings instantaneously, DR images were recorded with an EMCCD camera at 620 and 575 nm. We have observed that using the DR image intensity ratio R620/R575 mild inflammatory tissues could be discriminated from healthy with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%, and from moderate with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 96%. The sensitivity and specificity obtained between moderate and severe inflammation are 82% and 76% respectively.

  8. Reflective THz and MR imaging of burn wounds: a potential clinical validation of THz contrast mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Nowroozi, Bryan; Sung, Shijun; Garritano, James; Maccabi, Ashkan; Tewari, Priyamvada; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Alger, Jeffry; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging is an expanding area of research in the field of medical imaging due to its high sensitivity to changes in tissue water content. Previously reported in vivo rat studies demonstrate that spatially resolved hydration mapping with THz illumination can be used to rapidly and accurately detect fluid shifts following induction of burns and provide highly resolved spatial and temporal characterization of edematous tissue. THz imagery of partial and full thickness burn wounds acquired by our group correlate well with burn severity and suggest that hydration gradients are responsible for the observed contrast. This research aims to confirm the dominant contrast mechanism of THz burn imaging using a clinically accepted diagnostic method that relies on tissue water content for contrast generation to support the translation of this technology to clinical application. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically T2 relaxation times and proton density values N(H), are well established and provide measures of mobile water content, lending MRI as a suitable method to validate hydration states of skin burns. This paper presents correlational studies performed with MR imaging of ex vivo porcine skin that confirm tissue hydration as the principal sensing mechanism in THz burn imaging. Insights from this preliminary research will be used to lay the groundwork for future, parallel MRI and THz imaging of in vivo rat models to further substantiate the clinical efficacy of reflective THz imaging in burn wound care.

  9. Experimental and clinical evaluation of a noninvasive reflectance pulse oximeter sensor.

    PubMed

    Takatani, S; Davies, C; Sakakibara, N; Zurick, A; Kraenzler, E; Golding, L R; Noon, G P; Nose, Y; DeBakey, M E

    1992-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a new reflectance pulse oximeter sensor. The prototype sensor consists of 8 light-emitting diode (LED) chips (4 at 665 nm and 4 at 820 nm) and a photodiode chip mounted on a single substrate. The 4 LED chips for each wavelength are spaced at 90-degree intervals around the substrate and at an equal radial distance from the photodiode chip. An optical barrier between the photodiode and LED chips prevents a direct coupling effect between them. Near-infrared LEDs (940 nm) in the sensor warm the tissue. The microthermocouple mounted on the sensor surface measures the temperature of the skin-sensor interface and maintains it at a present level by servoregulating the current in the 940-nm LEDs. An animal study and a clinical study were performed. In the animal study, 5 mongrel dogs (weight, 10-20 kg) were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and cannulated. In each animal, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) was measured continuously by a standard transmission oximeter probe placed on the dog's earlobe and a reflectance oximeter sensor placed on the dog's tongue. In the first phase of the experiment, signals from the reflectance sensor were recorded while the dog was immersed in ice water until its body temperature decreased to 30 degrees C. In the second phase, the animal's body temperature was normal, and the oxygen content of the ventilator was varied to alter the SaO2. In the clinical study, 18 critically ill patients were monitored perioperatively with the prototype reflectance sensor. The first phase of the study investigated the relationship between local skin temperature and the accuracy of oximeter readings with the reflectance sensor. Each measurement was taken at a high saturation level as a function of local skin temperature. The second phase of the study compared measurements of oxygen saturation by a reflectance oximeter (SpO2[r]) with those made by a co-oximeter (SaO2[IL]) and a standard transmission oximeter (Sp

  10. Learning pathways during clinical placement of physiotherapy students: a Malaysian experience of using learning contracts and reflective diaries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Learning contracts and reflective diaries are educational tools that have been recently introduced to physiotherapy students from Malaysia during clinical education. It is unclear how students perceive the experience of using a learning contract and reflective diary. This study explores the learning pathways of the students after using a learning contract and a reflective diary for the first time in their clinical placement. Methods: A total of 26 final-year physiotherapy students completed a learning contract and a reflective diary during clinical placements. Two researchers explored the data qualitatively by the thematic content analysis method using NVivo. Results: A total of four and six main learning themes were identified from the data of the students through a learning contract and reflective diary. Conclusion: These learning themes reflected the views of the students about what they have considered to be important learning pathways during their clinical placements. They give valuable insights into the experiences and opinions of students during their clinical education process, which should be useful for enhancing teaching and learning methods in physiotherapy education. PMID:23997897

  11. In vivo reflectance-mode confocal microscopy in clinical dermatology and cosmetology.

    PubMed

    González, S; Gilaberte-Calzada, Y

    2008-02-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive imaging tool that allows real-time visualization of cells and structures in living skin with near histological resolution. RCM has been used for the assessment of benign and malignant lesions, showing great potential for applications in basic skin research and clinical dermatology. RCM also reveals dynamic changes in the skin over time and in response to specific stimuli, like ultraviolet exposure, which makes it a promising tool in cosmetology, as it allows repetitive sampling without biopsy collection, causing no further damage to the areas under investigation. This review summarizes the latest advances in RCM, and its applications in the characterization of both normal and pathological skin.

  12. Capacity Analysis of a Family Care Clinic Using Computer Simulation to Determine Optimal Enrollment Under Capitated Resource Allocation Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    throughout the Capacity Analysis 16 locations, entities, and resources within the simulation ( PROMODEL 1996). This will be especially useful when... PROMODEL Corporation. Paul, R., & Kuljis, J. (1995). A generic simulation package for organizing outpatient clinics. Proceedings of the HIMSS 1995 Winter...Command. PROMODEL Corporation. (1996). User’s guide to MedModel® healthcare simulation software. Orem, UT: PROMODEL Corporation. Searle, S. (1971

  13. Light-induced autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in clinical diagnosis of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Pavlova, E.; Kundurjiev, T.; Troyanova, P.; Genova, Ts.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    We investigated more than 500 clinical cases to receive the spectral properties of basal cell (136 patients) and squamous cell carcinoma (28), malignant melanoma (41) and different cutaneous dysplastic and benign cutaneous lesions. Excitation at 365, 385 and 405 nm using LEDs sources is applied to obtain autofluorescence spectra, and broad-band illumination in the region of 400-900 nm is used to detect diffuse reflectance spectra of all pathologies investigated. USB4000 microspectrometer (Ocean Optics Inc, USA) is applied as a detector and fiber-optic probe is used for delivery of the light. In the case of in vivo tumor measurements spectral shape and intensity changes are observed that are specific for a given type of lesion. Autofluorescence origins of the signals coming from skin tissues are mainly due to proteins, such as collagen, elastin, keratin, their cross-links, co-enzimes - NADH and flavins and endogenous porphyrins. Spectral features significant into diffuse spectroscopy diagnosis are related to the effects of re-absorption of hemoglobin and its forms, as well as melanin and its concentration in different pathologies. We developed significant database and revealed specific features for a large class of cutaneous neoplasia, using about 30 different spectral peculiarities to differentiate cutaneous tumors. Sensitivity and specificity obtained exceed 90%, which make optical biopsy very useful tool for clinical practice. These results are obtained in the frames of clinical investigations for development of significant "spectral features" database for the most common cutaneous malignant, dysplastic and benign lesions. In the forthcoming plans, our group tries to optimize the existing experimental system for optical biopsy of skin, and to introduce it and the diagnostic algorithms developed into clinical practice, based on the high diagnostic accuracy achieved.

  14. Evaluating the Use of Reflective Practice in a Nonprofessional, Undergraduate Clinical Communication Skills Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Tyler S.; Fruchter, Lauren L.; Sanmartin, Cleo V.; deLottinville, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the quality of reflective practice being achieved in educational settings is inadequate. Our study aims to determine the level of reflection present in written student reflections in a nonprofessional undergraduate course. We also seek to explore student and instructor perspectives on the value of reflective practices.…

  15. Evaluating the Use of Reflective Practice in a Nonprofessional, Undergraduate Clinical Communication Skills Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Tyler S.; Fruchter, Lauren L.; Sanmartin, Cleo V.; deLottinville, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the quality of reflective practice being achieved in educational settings is inadequate. Our study aims to determine the level of reflection present in written student reflections in a nonprofessional undergraduate course. We also seek to explore student and instructor perspectives on the value of reflective practices.…

  16. Antimicrobial resistance: capacity and practices among clinical laboratories in Kenya, 2013.

    PubMed

    Odhiambo, Fredrick; Galgalo, Tura; Wences, Arvelo; Muchemi, Onesmus Maina; Kanyina, Evalyne Wambui; Tonui, Juliana Chepkemoi; Amwayi, Samwel; Boru, Waqo

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is neglected in developing countries; associated with limited surveillance and unregulated use of antimicrobials. Consequently, delayed patient recoveries, deaths and further antimicrobial resistance occur. Recent gastroenteritis outbreak at a children's home associated with multidrug resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella spp, raised concerns about the magnitude of the problem in Kenya, prompting antimicrobial resistance assessment preceding surveillance system establishment. Eight public medical laboratories were conveniently selected. Questionnaires were administered to key informants to evaluate capacity, practice and utilization of antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Retrospective review of laboratory records determined antimicrobial resistance to isolates. Antimicrobial resistance was defined as resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial agent to which it was previously sensitive and multidrug resistance as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in three or more antimicrobial categories. The laboratories comprised; 2(25%) national, 4(50%) sub-national and 2(25%) district. Overall, antimicrobial susceptibility testing capacity was inadequate in all. Seven (88%) had basic capacity for stool cultures, 3(38%) had capacity for blood culture. Resistance to enteric organisms was observed with the following and other commonly prescribed antimicrobials, ampicillin: 40(91%) Salmonella spp isolates; Tetracycline: 16(84%) Shigella flexineri isolates; cotrimoxazole: 20(100%) Shigella spp isolates, 24(91%) Salmonella spp isolates. Comparable patterns of multidrug resistance were evident with Shigella flexineri and Salmonella typhimurium. Ten (100%) clinicians reported not using laboratory results for patient management, for various reasons.

  17. The Development of a Scale to Assess Practitioner Capacity to Engage in Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abey, Sally; Lea, Susan; Callaghan, Lynne; Cotton, Debby; Shaw, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical educators play an important role in the development of clinical skills during health care undergraduates' practice placements. The supportiveness of the learning environment and the attitude of the clinical educator towards student development are considered to be important factors that impact upon practice placement experience, although…

  18. The Development of a Scale to Assess Practitioner Capacity to Engage in Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abey, Sally; Lea, Susan; Callaghan, Lynne; Cotton, Debby; Shaw, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical educators play an important role in the development of clinical skills during health care undergraduates' practice placements. The supportiveness of the learning environment and the attitude of the clinical educator towards student development are considered to be important factors that impact upon practice placement experience, although…

  19. Structured learning and self-reflection: strategies to decrease anxiety in the psychiatric mental health clinical nursing experience.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, Christine Anne; Zauderer, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to test a teaching-learning strategy to help nursing students decrease stress and anxiety that may be brought about by the psychiatric mental health clinical experience. Undergraduate nursing students are known to experience affective stress prior to their first psychiatric mental health clinical practicum. A stressful learning environment can affect the success of the student's clinical performance. Thirty nursing students participated in this study. A structured preclinical workshop combined with self-reflection provided insight into students' perceptions of the psychiatric mental health clinical experience. Overall, students reported that participating in the teaching-learning strategy and self-reflection helped mitigate Combining structured learning with self-reflection is a useful tool for helping nursing students increase self-awareness and ease anxiety that may interfere with learning.

  20. Analysis of midwifery students' written reflections to evaluate progression in learning during clinical practice at birthing units.

    PubMed

    Persson, Eva K; Kvist, Linda J; Ekelin, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Written daily reflections during clinical practice on birthing units have been used during several years in midwifery education at Lund University, Sweden. However, the usefulness of these reflections for evaluation of progression in learning and professional development of students has to date not been evaluated. In order to analyse written reflections, two taxonomies developed by Bloom and Pettersen have been applied to the texts. Progression in the professional development of midwifery students can be seen through levels of complexity in cognitive and psycho-motor learning areas and also in the description of learning situations. Progression can be seen from a basic description of facts in simple situations at the beginning of the students' practice to a complex description of complicated situations towards the end of the practice. Written daily reflections appear to be a suitable method to help students to reflect in a structured way, thereby helping their professional development. Reflections can help clinical supervisors to understand the needs of the individual student and to support their knowledge accruement. Daily written reflections on clinical practice can be of use in other health education programs.

  1. Reproductive options for prospective parents in families with Huntington's disease: clinical, psychological and ethical reflections.

    PubMed

    de Die-Smulders, C E M; de Wert, G M W R; Liebaers, I; Tibben, A; Evers-Kiebooms, G

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative late onset disorder. This review of reproductive options aims to increase reproductive confidence and to prevent suffering in relation to family planning around HD and possibly other late onset neurodegenerative disorders. METHODS Selected relevant literature and own views and experiences as clinical geneticists, psychologists and ethicists have been used. RESULTS Possible options, with emphasis on prenatal diagnosis (PD) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent the transmission of HD to the next generation, are described and discussed. They are formally presented in a decision tree, taking into account the presence or absence of a fully penetrant allele (FPA), a reduced penetrant allele (RPA) or an intermediate allele (IA). A table compares invasive and non-invasive PD and PGD. From a psychological perspective, the complex process of counselling and decision-making regarding reproductive options is discussed. Special attention is paid to the decision to avoid the transmission of the mutation and to the confrontation and coping of a mutation-free child growing up with a parent developing disease symptoms. From an ethical point of view, reflections on both PD and PGD are brought forward taking into account the difference between FPA, RPA and IA, direct testing or exclusion testing and taking into account the welfare of the child in the context of medically assisted reproduction. CONCLUSION Recommendations and suggestions for good clinical practice in the reproductive care for HD families are formulated.

  2. Tongue somatosensory evoked potentials reflect midbrain involvement in patients with clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Adamec, Ivan; Crnošija, Luka; Gabelić, Tereza; Barun, Barbara; Zadro, Ivana; Butković Soldo, Silva; Habek, Mario

    2016-12-31

    To test the hypothesis that tSSEP findings reflect clinical and MRI MS lesions, the aim of this study was to investigate tSSEP changes in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) in relation to clinical and brainstem MRI findings. The second aim was to investigate whether the interpretation of the tSSEP results in the form of the tSSEP score enables better evaluation of the afferent trigeminal pathway involvement than analyzing each tSSEP parameter separately. 115 consecutive CIS patients were enrolled from August 1, 2014 until March 1, 2016. Facial sensory symptoms and brainstem MRI (1.5 T) lesions were analyzed. tSSEP testing was performed for each patient from the raw tSSEP data. The tSSEP score was calculated separately for the left and right side (according to the cut-off values for absent response and prolonged latency of the main component, P1 (0=normal response, 1=prolonged latency, 3=absent response) and the two values were summed. There was no difference in the absolute values of the tSSEP variables regarding the presence of clinical symptoms. No association was found between tSSEP abnormalities and clinical symptoms (P=0.544). Brainstem lesions (midbrain and pons) were associated with the absent tSSEP responses (P=0.002 and P=0.005, respectively). tSSEP score was significantly higher in patients with brainstem lesions (P=0.01), especially midbrain (P=0.004) and pontine (P=0.008) lesions. Binary logistic regression showed that tSSEP score had a significant effect on the likelihood that patients have midbrain MR lesions, ?2(1)=6.804, P=0.009; and the model correctly classified 87% of cases. The consistent finding of this study was the association between tSSEP and midbrain lesions on MRI, indicating that tSSEP evaluates proprioception of the face. This study establishes the value of tSSEP in assessing brainstem function in early multiple sclerosis.

  3. Tongue somatosensory evoked potentials reflect midbrain involvement in patients with clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Adamec, Ivan; Crnošija, Luka; Gabelić, Tereza; Barun, Barbara; Zadro, Ivana; Butković Soldo, Silva; Habek, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that tSSEP findings reflect clinical and MRI MS lesions, the aim of this study was to investigate tSSEP changes in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) in relation to clinical and brainstem MRI findings. The second aim was to investigate whether the interpretation of the tSSEP results in the form of the tSSEP score enables better evaluation of the afferent trigeminal pathway involvement than analyzing each tSSEP parameter separately. Methods 115 consecutive CIS patients were enrolled from August 1, 2014 until March 1, 2016. Facial sensory symptoms and brainstem MRI (1.5 T) lesions were analyzed. tSSEP testing was performed for each patient from the raw tSSEP data. The tSSEP score was calculated separately for the left and right side (according to the cut-off values for absent response and prolonged latency of the main component, P1 (0 = normal response, 1 = prolonged latency, 3 = absent response) and the two values were summed. Results There was no difference in the absolute values of the tSSEP variables regarding the presence of clinical symptoms. No association was found between tSSEP abnormalities and clinical symptoms (P = 0.544). Brainstem lesions (midbrain and pons) were associated with the absent tSSEP responses (P = 0.002 and P = 0.005, respectively). tSSEP score was significantly higher in patients with brainstem lesions (P = 0.01), especially midbrain (P = 0.004) and pontine (P = 0.008) lesions. Binary logistic regression showed that tSSEP score had a significant effect on the likelihood that patients have midbrain MR lesions, χ2(1) = 6.804, P = 0.009; and the model correctly classified 87% of cases. Conclusions The consistent finding of this study was the association between tSSEP and midbrain lesions on MRI, indicating that tSSEP evaluates proprioception of the face. This study establishes the value of tSSEP in assessing brainstem function in early multiple sclerosis

  4. Biased Recognition of Facial Affect in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder Reflects Clinical State

    PubMed Central

    Münkler, Paula; Rothkirch, Marcus; Dalati, Yasmin; Schmack, Katharina; Sterzer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theories of depression posit that perception is negatively biased in depressive disorder. Previous studies have provided empirical evidence for this notion, but left open the question whether the negative perceptual bias reflects a stable trait or the current depressive state. Here we investigated the stability of negatively biased perception over time. Emotion perception was examined in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and healthy control participants in two experiments. In the first experiment subjective biases in the recognition of facial emotional expressions were assessed. Participants were presented with faces that were morphed between sad and neutral and happy expressions and had to decide whether the face was sad or happy. The second experiment assessed automatic emotion processing by measuring the potency of emotional faces to gain access to awareness using interocular suppression. A follow-up investigation using the same tests was performed three months later. In the emotion recognition task, patients with major depression showed a shift in the criterion for the differentiation between sad and happy faces: In comparison to healthy controls, patients with MDD required a greater intensity of the happy expression to recognize a face as happy. After three months, this negative perceptual bias was reduced in comparison to the control group. The reduction in negative perceptual bias correlated with the reduction of depressive symptoms. In contrast to previous work, we found no evidence for preferential access to awareness of sad vs. happy faces. Taken together, our results indicate that MDD-related perceptual biases in emotion recognition reflect the current clinical state rather than a stable depressive trait. PMID:26039710

  5. How Well Do Clinical Pain Assessment Tools Reflect Pain in Infants?

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Rebeccah; Cantarella, Anne; Franck, Linda; Meek, Judith; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Background Pain in infancy is poorly understood, and medical staff often have difficulty assessing whether an infant is in pain. Current pain assessment tools rely on behavioural and physiological measures, such as change in facial expression, which may not accurately reflect pain experience. Our ability to measure cortical pain responses in young infants gives us the first opportunity to evaluate pain assessment tools with respect to the sensory input and establish whether the resultant pain scores reflect cortical pain processing. Methods and Findings Cortical haemodynamic activity was measured in infants, aged 25–43 wk postmenstrual, using near-infrared spectroscopy following a clinically required heel lance and compared to the magnitude of the premature infant pain profile (PIPP) score in the same infant to the same stimulus (n = 12, 33 test occasions). Overall, there was good correlation between the PIPP score and the level of cortical activity (regression coefficient = 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] limits 0.32–1.11, p = 0.001; correlation coefficient = 0.57). Of the different PIPP components, facial expression correlated best with cortical activity (regression coefficient = 1.26, 95% CI limits 0.84–1.67, p < 0.0001; correlation coefficient = 0.74) (n = 12, 33 test occasions). Cortical pain responses were still recorded in some infants who did not display a change in facial expression. Conclusions While painful stimulation generally evokes parallel cortical and behavioural responses in infants, pain may be processed at the cortical level without producing detectable behavioural changes. As a result, an infant with a low pain score based on behavioural assessment tools alone may not be pain free. PMID:18578562

  6. Detection of cervical lesions by multivariate analysis of diffuse reflectance spectra: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Prabitha, Vasumathi Gopala; Suchetha, Sambasivan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj Lalitha; Baiju, Kamalasanan Vijayakumary; Rema, Prabhakaran; Anuraj, Koyippurath; Mathews, Anita; Sebastian, Paul; Subhash, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy is a non-invasive, real-time, and cost-effective tool for early detection of malignant changes in squamous epithelial tissues. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic power of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for non-invasive discrimination of cervical lesions in vivo. A clinical trial was carried out on 48 sites in 34 patients by recording DR spectra using a point-monitoring device with white light illumination. The acquired data were analyzed and classified using multivariate statistical analysis based on principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Diagnostic accuracies were validated using random number generators. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted for evaluating the discriminating power of the proposed statistical technique. An algorithm was developed and used to classify non-diseased (normal) from diseased sites (abnormal) with a sensitivity of 72 % and specificity of 87 %. While low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) could be discriminated from normal with a sensitivity of 56 % and specificity of 80 %, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) from normal with a sensitivity of 89 % and specificity of 97 %, LSIL could be discriminated from HSIL with 100 % sensitivity and specificity. The areas under the ROC curves were 0.993 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.0 to 1) and 1 (95 % CI 1) for the discrimination of HSIL from normal and HSIL from LSIL, respectively. The results of the study show that DR spectroscopy could be used along with multivariate analytical techniques as a non-invasive technique to monitor cervical disease status in real time.

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension: Clinical challenges reflecting the diversity of pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, Evangelia; Sourla, Evdokia; Kotoulas, Serafim Xrisovalantis; Akritidou, Sofia; Bikos, Vasileios; Bagalas, Vasileios; Stanopoulos, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    The present article reports three clinical cases in order to elucidate the diversity of the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension. The condition's three major causes are: interstitial lung disease, vasculitis, and chronic thromboembolic disease, but it should be noted that the multiple pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, can all contribute to chronic lung disease or hypoxia. The first patient in this report suffered from moderate restriction due to fibrosis and was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension during an episode of life threatening hypoxia. Early upfront combination therapy prevented intubation and reversed hypoxia to adequate levels. The second presented patient was a case of isolated pulmonary hypertension attributable to vasculopathy. The patient maintained normal lung volumes but low diffusion capacity and echocardiography dictated the need for right heart catheterization. Finally, the third patient presented severe functional limitation due to several manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, but a past episode of acute pulmonary embolism was also reported although it had never been evaluated. Chronic thromboembolic disease was eventually proved to be one major cause of the patient's pulmonary hypertension. The importance of early identification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is therefore emphasized, especially since multiple treatment options are available, symptoms can be treated, and right heart failure can be avoided.

  8. Bespoke video vignettes - an approach to enhancing reflective learning developed by dental undergraduates and their clinical teachers.

    PubMed

    Davies, B R; Leung, A N; Dunne, S M; Dillon, J; Blum, I R

    2017-02-01

    This study explores the selective use of video as a medium to support reflective processes as related to dental undergraduate learning. With the objective of developing and enhancing high-quality adult dental care, the use of compiled video materials created in an undergraduate clinical setting was investigated. Video cameras were used to capture elements of reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action typically found during everyday clinical practice. 'Gold standard' or 'textbook outcomes' are rarely, if ever, fully achieved in dental practice. Real-life clinical experiences offer challenges and opportunities for both teachers and students to engage with reflective learning processes. The materials generated allowed for an experience of individual reflective learning and the creation of a data bank or archive with potential use for the benefit of a wider student cohort. Various aspects of the students' views and comments on the process of reflection were reported and explored by means of a semi-structured focus group moderated by a linked educational advisor.

  9. Clinical effects of closed root planing compared to papilla reflection and fiber optic augmentation.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, R A; Johnson, G K; DuBois, L M

    1991-05-01

    Mini-surgical approaches in 4 to 7 mm probing depths have been shown to facilitate improved deposit removal as compared to closed instrumentation. At the same time this treatment is less traumatic than more extensive flap reflection for root planing. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effects of closed root planing (C/SCRP) to those of root planing augmented by papilla reflection and fiber optic illumination (PR/SCRP) over a 6-month period. Fourteen patients with moderate/advanced adult periodontitis received each therapy in 2 experimental periodontitis sites (PS = greater than or equal to 5 mm probing depth and greater than 5 mm attachment loss) and one non-periodontitis site (NPS = less than or equal to 3 mm probing depth and no recession). Presence of supragingival plaque, bleeding on probing, probing depths, and clinical attachment levels were measured before treatment and 6, 12, and 24 weeks posttreatment. Mean supragingival plaque levels were high and did not vary significantly over the course of the study, but bleeding on probing was significantly reduced in PS following both C/SCRP and PR/SCRP (P less than or equal to 0.0001). Mean probing depths were significantly reduced after 6 months (P less than or equal to 0.01) in NPS-PR/SCRP from 2.8 +/- 0.1 to 2.0 +/- 0.2 mm, in PS-C/SCRP from 5.5 +/- 0.2 to 4.5 +/- 0.4 mm, and in PS-PR/SCRP from 5.8 +/- 0.2 to 3.2 +/- 0.1 mm. In periodontitis sites, PR/SCRP demonstrated greater probing depth reductions than C/SCRP at all time periods (P less than or equal to 0.004). PS attachment levels also improved following C/SCRP and PR/SCRP at all postoperative times (P less than or equal to 0.01). PR/SCRP appears to provide better short-term mean probing depth reduction (2.6 mm) than C/SCRP (1.0 mm), presumably due to apical positioning of the papillae and periodontal repair following improved access for root planing.

  10. Does the MUNIX Method Reflect Clinical Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Practical Experience.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Malgorzata; Kuzma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of the MUNIX method in reflecting the clinical dysfunction in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as to assess an intra-rater reproducibility of MUNIX. The study group consisted of a total of 15 ALS patients. The mean age of symptoms onset was 55 years, and the mean disease duration was 10 months. The muscle strength and patients' functional status were assessed according to the Medical Research Council (MRC) and by ALS functional rating scale revised (ALSFRS-R), respectively. The MUNIX was performed in 6 muscles: abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), biceps brachii (BB), tibial anterior (TA), extensor digitorum brevis (EDB), and abductor hallucis (AH), unilaterally, at a less affected side. Both muscle-specific and global MRC and MUNIX scores were calculated. In 11 patients, the study protocol was repeated at least twice every 3 months. An additional testing of the intra-rater reliability was performed at the first visit.There were no significant differences between MUNIX test and re-test values in the APB, ADM, BB, TA, EDB, and AH muscles (P >0.05). The highest variability of the test-retest values was found in the BB muscle (7.53%). Although there was a significant test-retest difference in the global MUNIX score (P = 0.02), the variability of the results was as low as 1.26%. The MUNIX value correlated with the muscle-specific MRC score in ABP, ADM, TA, EDB and AH (P <0.05), and the global MUNIX values correlated with global MRC scores (P <0.05). There was also a significant correlation between the global MUNIX score and the clinical dysfunction measured by the ALSFRS-R scale (P <0.05). The global MUNIX showed a higher monthly decline (4.3%) as compared with ALFRS-R (0.7%) and the MRC global score (0.5%).This study confirms that the MUNIX method is a sensitive, reliable, and accurate tool reflecting both motor dysfunction and disease progression in ALS

  11. Physiotherapy students find guided journals useful to develop reflective thinking and practice during their first clinical placement: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Maria; Kuys, Suzanne S

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated physiotherapy students' perception of a reflective journal in developing reflective thinking and practice and identified the main concepts recorded by students in the journal. A mixed methods study with qualitative content analysis of student journals and quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses. 131 (74 female, 57 male) physiotherapy students undergoing their first clinical placement. On completion of their placement, students submitted a reflective journal electronically and completed a questionnaire of closed and open ended questions. Questionnaires were analysed using frequencies for the responses of the closed questions and thematic analysis of the open ended questions. Journals were de-indentified and underwent a content analysis using Leximancer software to obtain a concept map and frequencies of the main concepts identified in the journals, with specific examples. The majority (88%, 79/90) of respondents found the journal useful in assisting them to learn from their experiences, and to develop reflective thinking and practice. 54% (49/90) indicated they would continue to use the journals. The most frequently identified concepts were residents, time and exercises; representing more than 5000 of the total concepts identified in the journals. Analysis of the reflective journals indicated that students demonstrated improvements in the three stages of reflective practice: awareness of thoughts and feelings, critical analysis of situation, and development of new perspectives. Guided journal writing may be a useful tool in facilitating reflective thinking and practice during clinical placements of physiotherapy students. Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical and translational research capacity building needs in minority medical and health science Hispanic institutions.

    PubMed

    Estapé-Garrastazu, Estela S; Noboa-Ramos, Carlamarie; De Jesús-Ojeda, Lizbelle; De Pedro-Serbiá, Zulmarie; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Camacho-Feliciano, Delia M

    2014-10-01

    A preliminary needs assessment was conducted among faculty and students of three minority medical and health science institutions comprising the Puerto Rico Clinical and Translational Research Consortium (PRCTRC). The Web-based survey was focused on evaluating the training interests in the clinical and translational research core areas and competencies developed by the National Institutes of Health-Clinical and Translational Sciences Award. The survey was the result of a team effort of three PRCTRC key function's leaderships: Multidisciplinary Training and Career Development, Tracking and Evaluation and Community Research and Engagement. The questionnaire included 45 items distributed across five content areas including demographics, research training needs, training activities coordination and knowledge about the services offered by the PRCTRC. Analysis of research needs includes a sample distribution according to professor, assistant/associate professor and graduate students. The thematic area with highest response rate among the three groups was: "Identify major clinical/public health problems and relevant translational research questions," with the competency "Identify basic and preclinical studies that are potential testable clinical research hypothesis." These preliminary results will guide the training and professional development of the new generation of clinical and translational researchers needed to eliminate health disparities. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. "Ballooning" patterns in takotsubo cardiomyopathy reflect different clinical backgrounds and outcomes: a BOREAS-TCM study.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Junichi; Kouzu, Hidemichi; Hashimoto, Akiyoshi; Fujito, Takefumi; Kawamukai, Mina; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Muranaka, Atsuko; Kokubu, Nobuaki; Shimoshige, Shinya; Yuda, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Tsuchihashi, Kazufumi; Miura, Tetsuji

    2015-11-01

    Whether different patterns of ventricular ballooning in takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) reflect differences in trigger mechanisms or clinical outcomes is unclear. Here we examined differences in the clinical characteristics of typical and atypical forms of TCM. TCM patients (n = 251) in the BOREAS Registry were enrolled for comparison of TCM with apical ballooning (type A, n = 217) and TCM with non-apical ballooning (type non-A, n = 34). The percentage of females was significantly lower in the type non-A group (58.8 vs. 75.6 %), while other demographic parameters and triggers of TCM were similar in the two groups. Rate of mid-ventricular obstruction (MVO) was lower (2.9 vs. 14.3 %) in the type non-A group than in the type A group, though left ventricular ejection fractions in the two groups were comparable. During a follow-up period of 2.6 ± 2.8 years, TCM recurred in 2.9 % of the patients and cardiac death occurred in 4.0 %. Cox proportional hazard analysis indicated that body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.75, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.54-0.99) and MVO (HR: 14.71, CI 1.87-304.66) were determinants of TCM recurrence and that advanced age (HR: 1.09, CI 1.02-1.17) and cardiogenic shock (HR: 4.27, CI 1.07-18.93) were significantly associated with cardiac death. In conclusion, approximately 20 % of TCM patients show non-apical left ventricular ballooning, and female sex and MVO are less frequent in this type than in apical ballooning type TCM. Low body mass index and MVO are risk factors of recurrence, and advanced age and cardiogenic shock are risk factors of cardiac death in TCM.

  14. In vivo inflammation mapping of periodontal disease based on diffuse reflectance spectral imaging: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Nisha, Unni G.; Prasantila, Janam; Subhash, Narayanan

    2013-02-01

    Since conventional techniques using periodontal probes have inherent drawbacks in the diagnosis of different grades of gingival inflammation, development of noninvasive screening devices becomes significant. Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra recorded with white light illumination is utilized to detect periodontal inflammation from the oxygenated hemoglobin absorption ratio R620/R575. A multispectral imaging system is utilized to record narrow-band DR images at 575 and 620 nm from the anterior sextant of the gingivia of 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients (N=40). An experienced periodontist assesses the level of gingival inflammation at each site through periodontal probing and assigns diagnosis as healthy, mild, moderate, or severe inflammation. The DR image ratio R620/R575 computed for each pixel (8-μm resolution) from the monochrome images is pseudo-color-mapped to identify gingival inflammation sites. The DR image ratio values at each site are compared with clinical diagnosis to estimate the specificity and sensitivity of the DR imaging technique in inflammation mapping. The high diagnostic accuracy is utilized to detect underlying inflammation in six patients with a previous history of periodontitis.

  15. Endoscopic reflectance spectrophotometry and visible light spectroscopy in clinical gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix W

    2008-06-01

    The use of reflectance spectrophotometry (RS) for mucosal hemodynamic measurement relies on the recognition of changes in indexes of mucosal hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. Endoscopic application in clinical studies has confirmed important observations demonstrated in animal experiments. The vasoconstriction induced by propranolol, vasopressin, glypressin, or somatostatin in the portal hypertensive gastric mucosa and the reduction of gastroduodenal mucosal perfusion by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or smoking, mesenteric venoconstriction associated with systemic hypoxia, and acid-induced duodenal hyperemia are important examples. Prognostic predictions include the development of stress-induced gastric ulcerations in patients with significant reductions in gastric perfusion after thermal or head injury, or the demonstration of delayed gastric or duodenal ulcer healing when the hyperemia at the ulcer margin fails to materialize. In mechanical-ventilator-dependent patients with sepsis, a significantly reduced gastric mucosal RS measurement portends a grave prognosis (mortality >80%). Recent advances in technology resulted in the construction and validation of instruments for visible light spectroscopy. Measurements focused on tissue oxygen saturation demonstrated epinephrine and vessel-ligation-induced vasoconstriction, the absence of ischemia in radiation-induced rectal telangiectasias, and gut ischemia responsive to revascularization treatment. Endoscopic RS and visible light spectroscopy are suitable for assessing the role of blood flow in conditions with a lesser degree of ischemia and for testing the hypothesis that functional dyspepsia and dysmotility syndromes may be due to gut ischemia.

  16. A critical reappraisal of the ATLS classification of hypovolaemic shock: does it really reflect clinical reality?

    PubMed

    Mutschler, M; Nienaber, U; Brockamp, T; Wafaisade, A; Wyen, H; Peiniger, S; Paffrath, T; Bouillon, B; Maegele, M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the classification of hypovolaemic shock given by the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS). Patients derived from the TraumaRegister DGU(®) database between 2002 and 2010 were analyzed. First, patients were allocated into the four classes of hypovolaemic shock by matching the combination of heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) according to ATLS. Second, patients were classified by only one parameter (HR, SBP or GCS) according to the ATLS classification and the corresponding changes of the remaining two parameters were assessed within these four groups. Analyses of demographic, injury and therapy characteristics were performed as well. 36,504 patients were identified for further analysis. Only 3411 patients (9.3%) could be adequately classified according to ATLS, whereas 33,093 did not match the combination of all three criteria given by ATLS. When patients were grouped by HR, there was only a slight reduction of SBP associated with tachycardia. The median GCS declined from 12 to 3. When grouped by SBP, GCS dropped from 13 to 3 while there was no relevant tachycardia observed in any group. Patients with a GCS=15 presented normotensive and with a HR of 88/min, whereas patients with a GCS<12 showed a slight reduced SBP of 117mmHg and HR was unaltered. This study indicates that the ATLS classification of hypovolaemic shock does not seem to reflect clinical reality accurately. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hemodynamic stress distribution reflects ischemic clinical symptoms of patients with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Kimura, Hiroaki; Akaji, Kazunori; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2015-11-01

    Currently, the probability of diagnosing asymptomatic moyamoya disease is increasing. In this study, we consider a less invasive method for predicting future ischemic symptoms in patients with moyamoya disease. We reviewed cerebral blood flow (CBF)-related data obtained by xenon CT imaging (XeCT) in six patients with ischemic-type or asymptomatic moyamoya disease. The data were obtained as volume data using a 320-row CT, and applied to the automated region-of-interest-determining software (3DSRT) and converted to standardized images. Eight CBF-related parameters, including CBF value, cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC), and hemodynamic distribution (hdSD), were compared between asymptomatic hemispheres and ischemic symptomatic hemispheres. A significant difference was determined by a two-sample t test. A difference with p<0.05 was considered significant. When statistically significant differences between parameters of asymptomatic hemispheres and ischemic symptomatic hemispheres were identified, cut-off points were calculated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Change in the parameters before and after bypass surgery was also assessed. Of the eight CBF-related parameters evaluated, statistically significant differences between the asymptomatic hemispheres and ischemic hemispheres were observed in the CBF value of the MCA region (CBF-MCA), both at rest and after acetazolamide loading, and in the hdSD, also both at rest and after acetazolamide loading. Of the four statistically significant parameters, ROC analysis revealed that the hdSD at rest and CBF-MCA after acetazolamide loading were the most sensitive and specific parameters (threshold 1.2, sensitivity 1, specificity 1 for hdSD at rest, and threshold 26.44mL/100g/min, sensitivity 1, specificity 1 for CBF-MCA after acetazolamide loading). From the CBF data obtained both before and after surgery from the three patients who had undergone direct bypass surgeries, the hdSD was higher than the

  18. Chromophore based analyses of steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: current status and perspectives for clinical adoption.

    PubMed

    Bydlon, Torre M; Nachabé, Rami; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Hendriks, Benno H W

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a rapidly growing technology in the biophotonics community where it has shown promise in its ability to classify different tissues. In the steady-state domain a wide spectrum of clinical applications is supported with this technology ranging from diagnostic to guided interventions. Diffuse reflectance spectra provide a wealth of information about tissue composition; however, extracting biologically relevant information from the spectra in terms of chromophores may be more useful to gain acceptance into the clinical community. The chromophores that absorb light in the visible and near infrared wavelengths can provide information about tissue composition. The key characteristics of these chromophores and their relevance in different organs and clinical applications is the focus of this review, along with translating their use to the clinic.

  19. Broadening the "Ports of Entry" for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Relational and Reflective Model for Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Elaine; Foley, Gilbert M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To offer a framework for clinical supervision in speech-language pathology that embeds a mental health perspective within the study of communication sciences and disorders. Method: Key mental health constructs are examined as to how they are applied in traditional versus relational and reflective supervision models. Comparisons between…

  20. Portable instrument that integrates irradiation with fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopies during clinical photodynamic therapy of cutaneous disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, W. J.; Oseroff, A. R.; Foster, T. H.

    2006-06-01

    We report a portable clinical instrument for delivering photodynamic therapy (PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivers the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performs reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument is being used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, blood volume, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation during a pilot clinical trial of 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 633nm PDT treatment laser is collected between 655 and 800nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programable time points, white light reflectance spectra between 475 and 800nm are acquired. Fluorescence spectra are corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provide information on blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation. Monitoring blood oxygenation and implicit dose metrics such as photosensitizer photobleaching during PDT allows the improved interpretation of clinical results and is helping to guide the treatment protocol for an anticipated low-irradiance PDT clinical trial of BCC.

  1. High-Density Lipoprotein Proteomic Composition, and not Efflux Capacity, Reflects Differential Modulation of Reverse Cholesterol Transport by Saturated and Monounsaturated Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Marcella; Dillon, Eugene; Guo, Weili; Finucane, Orla; McMorrow, Aoibheann; Murphy, Aoife; Lyons, Claire; Jones, Daniel; Ryan, Miriam; Gibney, Michael; Gibney, Eileen; Brennan, Lorraine; de la Llera Moya, Margarita; Reilly, Muredach P; Roche, Helen M; McGillicuddy, Fiona C

    2016-05-10

    Acute inflammation impairs reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and reduces high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function in vivo. This study hypothesized that obesity-induced inflammation impedes RCT and alters HDL composition, and investigated if dietary replacement of saturated (SFA) for monounsaturated (MUFA) fatty acids modulates RCT. Macrophage-to-feces RCT, HDL efflux capacity, and HDL proteomic profiling was determined in C57BL/6j mice following 24 weeks on SFA- or MUFA-enriched high-fat diets (HFDs) or low-fat diet. The impact of dietary SFA consumption and insulin resistance on HDL efflux function was also assessed in humans. Both HFDs increased plasma (3)H-cholesterol counts during RCT in vivo and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1-independent efflux to plasma ex vivo, effects that were attributable to elevated HDL cholesterol. By contrast, ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1-dependent efflux was reduced after both HFDs, an effect that was also observed with insulin resistance and high SFA consumption in humans. SFA-HFD impaired liver-to-feces RCT, increased hepatic inflammation, and reduced ABC subfamily G member 5/8 and ABC subfamily B member 11 transporter expression in comparison with low-fat diet, whereas liver-to-feces RCT was preserved after MUFA-HFD. HDL particles were enriched with acute-phase proteins (serum amyloid A, haptoglobin, and hemopexin) and depleted of paraoxonase-1 after SFA-HFD in comparison with MUFA-HFD. Ex vivo efflux assays validated increased macrophage-to-plasma RCT in vivo after both HFDs but failed to capture differential modulation of hepatic cholesterol trafficking. By contrast, proteomics revealed the association of hepatic-derived inflammatory proteins on HDL after SFA-HFD in comparison with MUFA-HFD, which reflected differential hepatic cholesterol trafficking between groups. Acute-phase protein levels on HDL may serve as novel biomarkers of impaired liver-to-feces RCT in vivo. © 2016 The Authors.

  2. Reflectance confocal microscopy-guided laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas: initial clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Heidy; Yélamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-08-01

    Laser ablation offers a procedure for precise, fast, and minimally invasive removal of superficial and early nodular basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). However, the lack of histopathological confirmation has been a limitation toward widespread use in the clinic. A reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging-guided approach offers cellular-level histopathology-like feedback directly on the patient, which may then guide and help improve the efficacy of the ablation procedure. Following an ex vivo benchtop study (reported in our earlier papers), we performed an initial study on 44 BCCs on 21 patients in vivo, using a pulsed erbium:ytterbium aluminum garnet laser and a contrast agent (aluminum chloride). In 10 lesions on six patients, the RCM imaging-guided detection of either presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was immediately confirmed with histopathology. Additionally, 34 BCCs on 15 patients were treated with RCM imaging-guided laser ablation, with immediate confirmation for clearance of tumor (no histopathology), followed by longer-term monitoring, currently in progress, with follow-up imaging (again, no histopathology) at 3, 6, and 18 months. Thus far, the imaging resolution appears to be sufficient and consistent for monitoring efficacy of ablation in the wound, both immediately postablation and subsequently during recovery. The efficacy results appear to be promising, with observed clearance in 19 cases of 22 cases with follow-ups ranging from 6 to 21 months. An additional 12 cases with 1 to 3 months of follow-ups has shown clearance of tumor but a longer follow-up time is required to establish conclusive results. Further instrumentation development will be necessary to cover larger areas with a more automatically controlled instrument for more uniform, faster, and deeper imaging of margins.

  3. The Pitfalls of Collegial Coaching: An Analysis of Collegial Coaching in Medical Education and Its Influence on Stimulating Reflection and Performance of Novice Clinical Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truijen, Karin J. P.; van Woerkom, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Competent clinical teachers are essential for clinical teaching. According to the literature, coaching can contribute to improved levels of reflection and better performance of clinical teachers. By engaging in a dialogue about coachee's teaching behaviour, coaches can stimulate reflection of novice teachers. This study aims to gain…

  4. The Pitfalls of Collegial Coaching: An Analysis of Collegial Coaching in Medical Education and Its Influence on Stimulating Reflection and Performance of Novice Clinical Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truijen, Karin J. P.; van Woerkom, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Competent clinical teachers are essential for clinical teaching. According to the literature, coaching can contribute to improved levels of reflection and better performance of clinical teachers. By engaging in a dialogue about coachee's teaching behaviour, coaches can stimulate reflection of novice teachers. This study aims to gain…

  5. An integrated model for the effects of self-reflection and clinical experiential learning on clinical nursing performance in nursing students: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu

    2016-10-01

    The use of clinical simulation in undergraduate nursing programs in Taiwan has gradually increased over the past 5years. Previous research has shown that students' experience of anxiety during simulated laboratory sessions influences their self-reflection and learning effectiveness. Thus, further study that tracks what influences students' clinical performance in actual clinical sites is vital. The aim of the study is to develop an integrated model that considers the associations among anxiety, self-reflection, and learning effectiveness and to understand how this model applies to student nurses' clinical performance while on clinical placement. This study used a correlational and longitudinal study design. The 80 nursing students, who ranged in age from 19 to 21 (mean=20.38, SD=0.56), were recruited from a nursing school in southern Taiwan. Data were collected during three phases of implementation using four questionnaires. During the first phase, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Simulation Learning Effectiveness Scale (SLES), and Self-Reflection and Insight Scale (SRIS) were used after students completed the simulation course in the school simulation laboratory. Nursing students also completed the Holistic Nursing Competence Scale at 2months (Phase 2) and 4months (Phase 3) after clinical practice experience. In Phase 3, students again completed the STAI and SRIS. Partial least squares (PLS), a structural equation modeling (SEM) procedure, was used to test the research model. The findings showed that: (1) at the start of the simulation laboratory, anxiety had a significant negative effect on students' simulation learning effectiveness (SLE; β=-0.14, p<0.05) and on self-reflection with insight (SRI; β=-0.52, p<0.01). Self-reflection also had a significant positive effect on simulation learning effectiveness (β=0.37, p<0.01). Anxiety had a significant negative effect on students' nursing competence during the first 2months of practice in a clinical

  6. Evaluation of a capacity building clinical educational model for oral health clinicians treating very young children.

    PubMed

    Martin, J M; O'Halloran, K A; Butcher, J A; Hopcraft, M S; Arnold-Smith, T S; Calache, H

    2014-09-01

    There are significant levels of dental caries in Australian school-aged children, with children aged five years having a mean dmft of 1.3. It has also been identified that, in general, oral health clinicians lack confidence to treat very young children and this study aimed to increase capacity of public sector oral health clinicians to treat preschool children. An educational program was developed, implemented and evaluated for its capability to increase the confidence and knowledge of oral health clinicians and dental assistants in providing oral care for children aged 12 months to 5 years. In 2011 and 2012, the course was delivered to 36 clinicians (22 dentists, 12 dental therapists, and two oral health therapists) and showed increases in their confidence and knowledge for participants when providing dental procedures to preschool children. The educational program that was developed and implemented has met its objective of increasing the knowledge and confidence of practicing oral health clinicians and dental assistants in the management of preschool children. Strategies to further enhance the outcomes of this educational program have been proposed.

  7. Teaching Reflective Practice in Practice Settings: Students' Perceptions of Their Clinical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trede, Franziska; Smith, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, self-assessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice…

  8. Teaching Reflective Practice in Practice Settings: Students' Perceptions of Their Clinical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trede, Franziska; Smith, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, self-assessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice…

  9. Teaching Softly in Hard Environments: Meanings of Small-Group Reflective Teaching to Clinical Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Ellen; Wear, Delese; Aultman, Julie M.; Zupp, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    A vast literature exists on teaching reflection and reflective practice to trainees in small groups, yet with few exceptions the literature does not address the benefits of these interactions to faculty. Like multiculturalism or cultural competency, the literature assumes that faculty have themselves "achieved" these propensities and…

  10. Preparing to care for an aging population: medical student reflections on their clinical mentors within a new geriatrics curriculum.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Timothy W; Shield, Renée R; Wetle, Terrie; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Reflective writing techniques such as journaling help provide insights into the process by which medical students are mentored and develop into practicing physicians. The authors sought to analyze medical students' journals regarding their mentored experiences within a new geriatrics curriculum at a U.S. medical school. Thirty preclinical and clinical medical student journalers participated in this project. The authors employed qualitative analytic techniques using an interdisciplinary team process. Three major themes emerged: (a) exposure to clinical mentors challenged medical students' preconceptions regarding older adults and geriatric medicine; (b) students learned new medical knowledge and techniques from observing their mentors; and (c) students provided positive and negative assessments of their mentors. Reflective journaling provides important insights into the process by which medical students draw upon mentored clinical experiences during their training. Such mentorship may be particularly relevant to promoting their interest in geriatrics.

  11. First Clinical Experience with a High-Capacity Implantable Infusion Pump for Continuous Intravenous Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Damascelli, Bruno; Patelli, Gianluigi; Frigerio, Laura F.; Lanocita, Rodolfo; Di Tolla, Giuseppe; Marchiano, Alfonso; Spreafico, Carlo; Garbagnati, Francesco; Bonalumi, Maria G.; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Ticha, Vladimira; Prino, Aurelio

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of a new high-capacity pump for systemic venous chemotherapy and to verify the quality of implantation by interventional radiology staff. Methods: A total of 47 infusion pumps with a 60-ml reservoir and variable flow rates (2, 6, 8, or 12 ml/24 hr) were implanted by radiologists in 46 patients with solid tumor metastases requiring treatment with a single, continuously infused cytostatic agent. The reservoir was refilled transcutaneously, usually once weekly. The flow accuracy of the pump was assessed from actual drug delivery recorded on 34 patients over a minimum observation period of 180 days. Results: No early complications occurred in any of the 47 implants in 46 patients. A total of 12 (25.53%) complications occurred between 3 and 24 months after implantation. Seven (14.90%) of these were due to the external design of the pump, while five (10.63%) were related to the central venous catheter. In the 34 patients available for pump evaluation (follow-up of at least 180 days), the system was used for a total of 14,191 days (range 180-911 days, mean 417.38 days), giving an overall complication rate of 0.84 per 1000 days of operation. The mean flow rate accuracy was 90.26%. Conclusion: The new implantable pump showed good flow rate accuracy and reliable operation. The pump-related complications were related to its external design and have now been corrected by appropriate modifications. From a radiologic and surgical viewpoint, the venous implantation procedure is identical to that of conventional vascular access devices and can be performed by radiologists familiar with these techniques. The current limitations lie in the high cost of the pump and, for certain drugs, the short time between refills.

  12. Exercise capacity in ventricular assist device patients: clinical relevance of pump speed and power.

    PubMed

    Fresiello, Libera; Buys, Roselien; Timmermans, Philippe; Vandersmissen, Katrien; Jacobs, Steven; Droogne, Walter; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Rega, Filip; Meyns, Bart

    2016-10-01

    Patients with ventricular assist device (VAD) show a limited exercise capacity. The aim of this work is to investigate whether VAD speed increase has an effect on exercise performance in the upright position. Fourteen patients implanted with a HeartMate II underwent two cardiopulmonary maximal exercise tests on an upright bicycle ergometer the same day. During one test, VAD speed was set as constant (CONST) and during the other test, VAD speed was increased by 200 rpm each minute (INCR). No statistical differences were found between the two tests in terms of maximum heart rate, peak oxygen uptake, peak minute ventilation, ventilation efficiency slope and arterial blood pressure. Patients' fatigue perception, measured with a Borg scale, was similar between the two tests over the entire group (15 ± 1 for both CONST and INCR). VAD flow increased from 4.5 ± 0.7 to 6.0 ± 1.0 l/min during CONST and to 7.6 ± 1.4 l/min during INCR. Four patients experienced an easier cycling during INCR, and the other patients noticed no difference. One patient had a suction event during INCR and another had non-sustained ventricular tachycardia at peak exercise. A negative correlation was found between the rate of increase in VAD power during exercise and peak oxygen uptake. Although VAD speed increase provided an additional pump flow of 1.6 l/min at peak exercise, no significant objective and subjective benefits on patients' exercise performance were observed. Finally, VAD power could be a useful parameter to monitor patients during exercise. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing the Impact of Airborne Outreach to Build Clinical Capacity in Rural Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Brianna L.

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of research demonstrating how best to address inequalities in health and access to specialist care faced by rural disadvantaged populations in high HIV-prevalent settings in Sub Saharan Africa. Delivering equitable and cost-effective specialist clinical services in many parts of Africa is challenging, given human resource shortages, poor transport infrastructure and competing health priorities. In this report we describe how an airborne outreach program to provide HIV services to high HIV burden health facilities in rural Botswana has been an important catalyst for improving specialist service delivery across the spectrum of clinical care. The success of Botswana’s airborne program is a consequence of many country-specific determinants as well as external funding support. We argue that lessons learned from the experience in Botswana are normative for other African settings. Specialist medical airborne outreach to rural hospitals can improve access to and quality of care, when part of a multifaceted, multidisciplinary intervention. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an HIV funded program can be a vehicle for enhanced access to essential sub-specialist clinicians in rural Botswana. PMID:28299100

  14. Assessing the Impact of Airborne Outreach to Build Clinical Capacity in Rural Botswana.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michael J A; Kirk, Brianna L

    2013-12-03

    There is a paucity of research demonstrating how best to address inequalities in health and access to specialist care faced by rural disadvantaged populations in high HIV-prevalent settings in Sub Saharan Africa. Delivering equitable and cost-effective specialist clinical services in many parts of Africa is challenging, given human resource shortages, poor transport infrastructure and competing health priorities. In this report we describe how an airborne outreach program to provide HIV services to high HIV burden health facilities in rural Botswana has been an important catalyst for improving specialist service delivery across the spectrum of clinical care. The success of Botswana's airborne program is a consequence of many country-specific determinants as well as external funding support. We argue that lessons learned from the experience in Botswana are normative for other African settings. Specialist medical airborne outreach to rural hospitals can improve access to and quality of care, when part of a multifaceted, multidisciplinary intervention. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an HIV funded program can be a vehicle for enhanced access to essential sub-specialist clinicians in rural Botswana.

  15. Computerised mirror therapy with Augmented Reflection Technology for early stroke rehabilitation: clinical feasibility and integration as an adjunct therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoermann, Simon; Ferreira Dos Santos, Luara; Morkisch, Nadine; Jettkowski, Katrin; Sillis, Moran; Devan, Hemakumar; Kanagasabai, Parimala S; Schmidt, Henning; Krüger, Jörg; Dohle, Christian; Regenbrecht, Holger; Hale, Leigh; Cutfield, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    New rehabilitation strategies for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation employing visual stimulation show promising results, however, cost-efficient and clinically feasible ways to provide these interventions are still lacking. An integral step is to translate recent technological advances, such as in virtual and augmented reality, into therapeutic practice to improve outcomes for patients. This requires research on the adaptation of the technology for clinical use as well as on the appropriate guidelines and protocols for sustainable integration into therapeutic routines. Here, we present and evaluate a novel and affordable augmented reality system (Augmented Reflection Technology, ART) in combination with a validated mirror therapy protocol for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke. We evaluated components of the therapeutic intervention, from the patients' and the therapists' points of view in a clinical feasibility study at a rehabilitation centre. We also assessed the integration of ART as an adjunct therapy for the clinical rehabilitation of subacute patients at two different hospitals. The results showed that the combination and application of the Berlin Protocol for Mirror Therapy together with ART was feasible for clinical use. This combination was integrated into the therapeutic plan of subacute stroke patients at the two clinical locations where the second part of this research was conducted. Our findings pave the way for using technology to provide mirror therapy in clinical settings and show potential for the more effective use of inpatient time and enhanced recoveries for patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Computerised Mirror Therapy is feasible for clinical use Augmented Reflection Technology can be integrated as an adjunctive therapeutic intervention for subacute stroke patients in an inpatient setting Virtual Rehabilitation devices such as Augmented Reflection Technology have considerable potential to enhance stroke rehabilitation.

  16. Patient-powered research networks: building capacity for conducting patient-centered clinical outcomes research

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Sarah E; Wahba, Sarita; Fleurence, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) recently launched PCORnet to establish a single inter-operable multicenter data research network that will support observational research and randomized clinical trials. This paper provides an overview of the patient-powered research networks (PPRNs), networks of patient organizations focused on a particular health condition that are interested in sharing health information and engaging in research. PPRNs will build on their foundation of trust within the patient communities and draw on their expertise, working with participants to identify true patient-centered outcomes and direct a patient-centered research agenda. The PPRNs will overcome common challenges including enrolling a diverse and representative patient population; engaging patients in governance; designing the data infrastructure; sharing data securely while protecting privacy; prioritizing research questions; scaling small networks into a larger network; and identifying pathways to sustainability. PCORnet will be the first distributed research network to bring PCOR to national scale. PMID:24821741

  17. Routine clinical evaluation of cerebrovascular reserve capacity using carbogen in patients with intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Manus J; Dethrage, Lindsey M; Faraco, Carlos C; Jordan, Lori C; Clemmons, Paul; Singer, Robert; Mocco, J; Shyr, Yu; Desai, Aditi; O'Duffy, Anne; Riebau, Derek; Hermann, Lisa; Connors, John; Kirshner, Howard; Strother, Megan K

    2014-08-01

    A promising method for identifying hemodynamic impairment that may serve as a biomarker for stroke risk in patients with intracranial stenosis is cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) mapping using noninvasive MRI. Here, abilities to measure CVR safely in the clinic using hypercarbic hyperoxic (carbogen) gas challenges, which increase oxygen delivery to tissue, are investigated. In sequence with structural and angiographic imaging, blood oxygenation level-dependent carbogen-induced CVR scans were performed in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis (n=92) and control (n=10) volunteers, with a subgroup of patients (n=57) undergoing cerebral blood flow-weighted pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling CVR. Subjects were stratified for 4 substudies to evaluate relationships between (1) carbogen and hypercarbic normoxic CVR in healthy tissue (n=10), (2) carbogen cerebral blood flow CVR and blood oxygenation level-dependent CVR in intracranial stenosis patients (n=57), (3) carbogen CVR and clinical measures of disease in patients with asymmetrical intracranial atherosclerotic (n=31) and moyamoya (n=29) disease, and (4) the CVR scan and immediate and longer-term complications (n=92). Noninvasive blood oxygenation level-dependent carbogen-induced CVR values correlate with (1) lobar hypercarbic normoxic gas stimuli in healthy tissue (R=0.92; P<0.001), (2) carbogen-induced cerebral blood flow CVR in patients with intracranial stenosis (R=0.30-0.33; P<0.012), and (3) angiographic measures of disease severity both in atherosclerotic and moyamoya patients after appropriate processing. No immediate stroke-related complications were reported in response to carbogen administration; longer-term neurological events fell within the range for expected events in this patient population. Carbogen-induced CVR elicited no added adverse events and provided a surrogate marker of cerebrovascular reserve consistent with intracranial vasculopathy. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Routine clinical evaluation of cerebrovascular reserve capacity using carbogen in patients with intracranial stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Manus J.; Dethrage, Lindsey; Faraco, Carlos C.; Jordan, Lori C.; Clemmons, Paul; Singer, Robert; Mocco, J; Shyr, Yu; Desai, Aditi; O’Duffy, Anne; Riebau, Derek; Hermann, Lisa; Connors, John; Kirshner, Howard; Strother, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A promising method for identifying hemodynamic impairment that may serve as a biomarker for stroke risk in patients with intracranial (IC) stenosis is cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) mapping using non-invasive MRI. Here, abilities to measure CVR safely in the clinic using hypercarbic hyperoxic (carbogen) gas challenges, which increase oxygen delivery to tissue, are investigated. Methods In sequence with structural and angiographic imaging, blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) carbogen-induced CVR scans were performed in patients with symptomatic IC stenosis (n=92) and control (n=10) volunteers, with a subgroup of patients (n=57) undergoing cerebral blood flow-weighted (CBFw) pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) CVR. Subjects were stratified for four sub-studies: to evaluate relationships between (i) carbogen and hyercarbic normoxic (HN) CVR in healthy tissue (n=10), (ii) carbogen CBF CVR and BOLD CVR in IC stenosis patients (n=57), (iii) carbogen CVR and clinical measures of disease in patients with asymmetric IC atherosclerotic (n=31) and moyamoya (n=29) disease, and (iv) the CVR scan and immediate and longer-term complications (n=92). Results Non-invasive BOLD carbogen-induced CVR values correlate with (i) lobar HN gas stimuli in healthy tissue (R=0.92; P<0.001), (ii) carbogen-induced CBF CVR in IC stenosis patients (R=0.30–0.33; P<0.012), and (iii) angiographic measures of disease severity both in atherosclerotic and moyamoya patients after appropriate processing. No immediate stroke-related complications were reported in response to carbogen administration; longer-term neurological events fell within the range for expected events in this patient population. Conclusions Carbogen-induced CVR elicited no added adverse events and provided a surrogate marker of cerebrovascular reserve consistent with IC vasculopathy. PMID:24938845

  19. A Learner-Centered Technique and Clinical Reasoning, Reflection, and Case Presentation Attributes in Athletic Training Students

    PubMed Central

    Heinerichs, Scott; Vela, Luzita I.; Drouin, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Providing opportunities to develop clinical decision-making skills, including clinical reasoning, is an important aspect of clinical education. The learner-centered technique of summarizing the history and findings, narrowing the differential, analyzing the differential, probing the instructor about uncertainties, plan management, and selecting an issue for self-directed study (SNAPPS) is used in medicine to express clinical reasoning. Objective: To investigate the effects of SNAPPS on the clinical reasoning, reflection, and 4 case presentation attributes (length, conciseness, case summary, and expression of clinical reasoning) in athletic training students. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Three undergraduate programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: We randomly assigned 38 athletic training students (17 men, 21 women; age = 21.53 ± 1.18 years, grade point average = 3.25 ± 0.31) who had completed at least 1 year of clinical education and all orthopaedic evaluation coursework to the SNAPPS group or the usual and customary group using a stratification scheme. Intervention(s): The SNAPPS group completed four 45-minute clinical reasoning and case presentation learning modules led by an investigator to learn the SNAPPS technique, whereas the usual and customary group received no formal instruction. Both groups audio recorded all injury evaluations performed over a 2-week period. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory and Reflection in Learning Scale twice. Case presentations were analyzed for 4 attributes: length, conciseness, case summary, and expression of clinical reasoning. Results: Case presentations were longer (t18.806 = −5.862, P < .001) but were more concise (t32 = 11.297, P < .001) for the SNAPPS group than for the usual and customary group. The SNAPPS group performed better on both the case summary subscale

  20. A learner-centered technique and clinical reasoning, reflection, and case presentation attributes in athletic training students.

    PubMed

    Heinerichs, Scott; Vela, Luzita I; Drouin, Joshua M

    2013-01-01

    Providing opportunities to develop clinical decision-making skills, including clinical reasoning, is an important aspect of clinical education. The learner-centered technique of summarizing the history and findings, narrowing the differential, analyzing the differential, probing the instructor about uncertainties, plan management, and selecting an issue for self-directed study (SNAPPS) is used in medicine to express clinical reasoning. To investigate the effects of SNAPPS on the clinical reasoning, reflection, and 4 case presentation attributes (length, conciseness, case summary, and expression of clinical reasoning) in athletic training students. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Three undergraduate programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. We randomly assigned 38 athletic training students (17 men, 21 women; age = 21.53 ± 1.18 years, grade point average = 3.25 ± 0.31) who had completed at least 1 year of clinical education and all orthopaedic evaluation coursework to the SNAPPS group or the usual and customary group using a stratification scheme. The SNAPPS group completed four 45-minute clinical reasoning and case presentation learning modules led by an investigator to learn the SNAPPS technique, whereas the usual and customary group received no formal instruction. Both groups audio recorded all injury evaluations performed over a 2-week period. Participants completed the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory and Reflection in Learning Scale twice. Case presentations were analyzed for 4 attributes: length, conciseness, case summary, and expression of clinical reasoning. Case presentations were longer (t18.806 = -5.862, P < .001) but were more concise (t32 = 11.297, P < .001) for the SNAPPS group than for the usual and customary group. The SNAPPS group performed better on both the case summary subscale (t32 = 2.857, P = .007) and the clinical reasoning subscale (t25.773 = -14.162, P < .001) than the other group. We found

  1. Building the capacity for evidence-based clinical nursing leadership: the role of executive co-coaching and group clinical supervision for quality patient services.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, Jo; Jumaa, Mansour Olawale

    2007-03-01

    The general aims of this article were to facilitate primary care nurses (District Nurse Team Leaders) to link management and leadership theories with clinical practice and to improve the quality of the service provided to their patients. The specific aim was to identify, create and evaluate effective processes for collaborative working so that the nurses' capacity for clinical decision-making could be improved. This article, part of a doctoral study on Clinical Leadership in Nursing, has wider application in the workplace of the future where professional standards based on collaboration will be more critical in a world of work that will be increasingly complex and uncertain. This article heralds the type of research and development activities that the nursing and midwifery professions should give premier attention to, particularly given the recent developments within the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. The implications of: Agenda for Change, the Knowledge and Skills Framework, 'Our Health, Our Care, Our Say' and the recent proposals from the article 'Modernising Nursing Career', to name but a few, are the key influences impacting on and demanding new ways of clinical supervision for nurses and midwives to improve the quality of patient management and services. The overall approach was based on an action research using a collaborative enquiry within a case study. This was facilitated by a process of executive co-coaching for focused group clinical supervision sessions involving six district nurses as co-researchers and two professional doctoral candidates as the main researchers. The enquiry conducted over a period of two and a half years used evidence-based management and leadership interventions to assist the participants to develop 'actionable knowledge'. Group clinical supervision was not practised in this study as a form of 'therapy' but as a focus for the development of actionable knowledge, knowledge needed for effective clinical management and

  2. Patient-powered research networks: building capacity for conducting patient-centered clinical outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Sarah E; Wahba, Sarita; Fleurence, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) recently launched PCORnet to establish a single inter-operable multicenter data research network that will support observational research and randomized clinical trials. This paper provides an overview of the patient-powered research networks (PPRNs), networks of patient organizations focused on a particular health condition that are interested in sharing health information and engaging in research. PPRNs will build on their foundation of trust within the patient communities and draw on their expertise, working with participants to identify true patient-centered outcomes and direct a patient-centered research agenda. The PPRNs will overcome common challenges including enrolling a diverse and representative patient population; engaging patients in governance; designing the data infrastructure; sharing data securely while protecting privacy; prioritizing research questions; scaling small networks into a larger network; and identifying pathways to sustainability. PCORnet will be the first distributed research network to bring PCOR to national scale. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. The Vital Capacity Is Vital: Epidemiology and Clinical Significance of the Restrictive Spirometry Pattern.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Mark S; Jankowich, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic research has revealed a substantial portion of the general population with abnormal spirometry results that are characterized by decreased FEV1 and FVC but a preserved FEV1/FVC ratio. This restrictive spirometry pattern (RSP) is inconsistently defined in the literature and not well addressed by current guidelines; there is an accumulating body of evidence, however, that RSP is prevalent to a similar degree as airflow obstruction. Genetic and other risk factors for RSP, such as inhalational injuries and early life exposures, continue to be actively described. Although it seems that RSP is closely associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and systemic inflammation, it is not a simple marker of obesity. RSP is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as well as mortality, and it may be an underappreciated cause of functional impairments and respiratory symptoms. Improvement in outcomes in this population will require that clinicians have an appreciation for the significance of this spirometry pattern; additional research into the clinical and radiologic phenotype of these subjects is also needed. This article provides an overview of the recent developments in our understanding of this prevalent and highly morbid spirometry pattern.

  4. Rural mental health: implications for telepsychiatry in clinical service, workforce development, and organizational capacity.

    PubMed

    Chung-Do, Jane; Helm, Susana; Fukuda, Michael; Alicata, Dan; Nishimura, Stephanie; Else, Iwalani

    2012-04-01

    In Hawai'i, rural residents suffer disproportionately from poor health and mental health outcomes. Hawai'i's island geography makes rural health service disparities especially compelling. Physician workforce shortages are projected to increase, despite 30 years of programs aimed at recruiting physicians to rural areas. Telepsychiatry has been shown to be a feasible way to provide a variety of health services to individuals living in rural areas with limited access to healthcare. The University of Hawai'i Rural Health Collaboration (UHRHC) was established by the Department of Psychiatry to address the need for workforce development and rural access to mental health services across the State of Hawai'i by using telepsychiatry. Partnerships with community health clinics have been formed to provide patient care and consultation-liaison services through telepsychiatry technology. In addition, UHRHC focuses on workforce development in its residency training curriculum by utilizing a service-learning approach to rural mental health. Evaluation of these efforts is currently underway, with preliminary evidence suggesting that UHRHC is a promising strategy to increase access to critical mental health services and reduce health disparities in rural Hawai'i.

  5. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights,…

  6. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights,…

  7. Fostering Dental Students' Academic Achievements and Reflection Skills Through Clinical Peer Assessment and Feedback.

    PubMed

    Tricio, Jorge A; Woolford, Mark J; Escudier, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Peer assessment is increasingly being encouraged to enhance dental students' learning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the educational impact in terms of academic achievements and reflective thinking of a formative prospective peer assessment and feedback protocol. Volunteer final-year dental students at King's College London Dental Institute, UK, received training on peer assessment, peer feedback, and self-reflection. At the beginning (baseline) and end (resultant) of the 2012-13 academic year, 86 students (55% of the year group) completed a reflection questionnaire (RQ). Sixty-eight of those students used a modified Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) as a framework for peer assessment and peer feedback during a complete academic year. End-of-year, high-stakes examination grades and RQ scores from the participants and nonparticipants were statistically compared. The participants completed 576 peer DOPS. Those 22 students who peer assessed each other ≥10 times exhibited highly statistically significant differences and powerful positive effect sizes in their high-stakes exam grades (p=0.0001, d=0.74) and critical reflection skills (p=0.005, d=1.41) when compared to those who did not assess one another. Furthermore, only the same 22 students showed a statistically significant increase and positive effect size in their critical reflection skills from baseline to resultant (p=0.003, d=1.04). The results of this study suggest that the protocol used has the potential to impact dental students' academic and reflection skills, provided it is practiced in ten or more peer encounters and ensuring peer feedback is provided followed by self-reflection.

  8. The use of structured reflective journal questions to promote fundamental development of clinical decision-making abilities of the first-semester nursing student.

    PubMed

    Croke, Eileen

    2004-01-01

    The ability to reflect is becoming a core competency in many nursing educational programs. A clinical journal assignment was developed for first-semester (novice) nursing students. The aim was to see if the process of reflection-on-action through the medium of journal writing promoted fundamental clinical decision-making abilities of the first semester nursing student. This author discusses components of the clinical decision-making process used to structure six clinical journal questions for use by the first semester nursing students during their clinical rotation. Exemplars of students' self-reported reflections are included.

  9. Effect of UV irradiation on cutaneous cicatrices: a randomized, controlled trial with clinical, skin reflectance, histological, immunohistochemical and biochemical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Due, Eva; Rossen, Kristian; Sorensen, Lars Tue; Kliem, Anette; Karlsmark, Tonny; Haedersdal, Merete

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on human cutaneous cicatrices. In this randomized, controlled study, dermal punch biopsy wounds served as a wound healing model. Wounds healed by primary or second intention and were randomized to postoperative solar UV irradiation or to no UV exposure. Evaluations after 5 and 12 weeks included blinded clinical assessments, skin reflectance measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical analyses of the N-terminal propeptide from procollagen-1, hydroxyproline, hydroxylysine, and proline. Twelve weeks postoperatively, UV-irradiated cicatrices healing by second intention: (i) were significantly pointed out as the most disfiguring; (ii) obtained significantly higher scores of colour, infiltration and cicatrix area; and (iii) showed significantly higher increase in skin-reflectance measurements of skin-pigmentation vs. non-irradiated cicatrices. No histological, immunohistochemical or biochemical differences were found. In conclusion, postoperative UV exposure aggravates the clinical appearance of cicatrices in humans.

  10. Effect of Oral Iron Repletion on Exercise Capacity in Patients With Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction and Iron Deficiency: The IRONOUT HF Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gregory D; Malhotra, Rajeev; Hernandez, Adrian F; McNulty, Steven E; Smith, Andrew; Felker, G Michael; Tang, W H Wilson; LaRue, Shane J; Redfield, Margaret M; Semigran, Marc J; Givertz, Michael M; Van Buren, Peter; Whellan, David; Anstrom, Kevin J; Shah, Monica R; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Butler, Javed; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-05-16

    Iron deficiency is present in approximately 50% of patients with heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) and is an independent predictor of reduced functional capacity and mortality. However, the efficacy of inexpensive readily available oral iron supplementation in heart failure is unknown. To test whether therapy with oral iron improves peak exercise capacity in patients with HFrEF and iron deficiency. Phase 2, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of patients with HFrEF (<40%) and iron deficiency, defined as a serum ferritin level of 15 to 100 ng/mL or a serum ferritin level of 101 to 299 ng/mL with transferrin saturation of less than 20%. Participants were enrolled between September 2014 and November 2015 at 23 US sites. Oral iron polysaccharide (n = 111) or placebo (n = 114), 150 mg twice daily for 16 weeks. The primary end point was a change in peak oxygen uptake (V̇o2) from baseline to 16 weeks. Secondary end points were change in 6-minute walk distance, plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, and health status as assessed by Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ, range 0-100, higher scores reflect better quality of life). Among 225 randomized participants (median age, 63 years; 36% women) 203 completed the study. The median baseline peak V̇o2 was 1196 mL/min (interquartile range [IQR], 887-1448 mL/min) in the oral iron group and 1167 mL/min (IQR, 887-1449 mL/min) in the placebo group. The primary end point, change in peak V̇o2 at 16 weeks, did not significantly differ between the oral iron and placebo groups (+23 mL/min vs -2 mL/min; difference, 21 mL/min [95% CI, -34 to +76 mL/min]; P = .46). Similarly, at 16 weeks, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in changes in 6-minute walk distance (-13 m; 95% CI, -32 to 6 m), NT-proBNP levels (159; 95% CI, -280 to 599 pg/mL), or KCCQ score (1; 95% CI, -2.4 to 4.4), all P > .05. Among

  11. Effect of Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibition on Exercise Capacity and Clinical Status in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, Margaret M; Chen, Horng H; Borlaug, Barry A; Semigran, Marc J.; Lee, Kerry L.; Lewis, Gregory; LeWinter, Martin M.; Rouleau, Jean L.; Bull, David A.; Mann, Douglas L.; Deswal, Anita; Stevenson, Lynne W.; Givertz, Michael M.; Ofili, Elizabeth O.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Felker, G. Michael; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Bart, Bradley A.; McNulty, Steven E; Ibarra, Jenny C.; Lin, Grace; Oh, Jae K.; Patel, Manesh R.; Kim, Raymond J.; Tracy, Russell P.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Mascette, Alice M.; Braunwald, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Importance Studies in experimental and human heart failure suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors may enhance cardiovascular function, and thus, exercise capacity in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Objective To determine the effect of the phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, sildenafil, in comparison to placebo on exercise capacity and clinical status in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Design, setting, and patients Multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design, randomized clinical trial of 216 stable outpatients with heart failure, ejection fraction ≥ 50%, elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide or elevated invasively-measured filling pressures, and reduced exercise capacity. Participants were randomized from October 2008 through February 2012 at 26 centers in the United States and Canada. Intervention Sildenafil (n=113) or placebo (n=103) administered orally at 20 mg three times daily for 12 weeks followed by 60 mg three times daily for 12 weeks. Main outcome measures Primary endpoint was change in peak oxygen consumption after 24 weeks of therapy. Secondary endpoints included change in six-minute walk distance and a three tier hierarchical composite clinical status score where patients were ranked (range 1-N) based on time to death, time to cardiovascular or cardiorenal hospitalization and change in quality of life for participants alive without cardiovascular or cardiorenal hospitalization at 24 weeks. Results Median age was 69 years and 48% of patients were female. At baseline, median peak oxygen consumption (11.7 ml/kg/min) and six-minute walk distance (308 meters) were reduced and median E/e′ (16), left atrial volume index (44 ml/m2) and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (41 mmHg) were consistent with chronically-elevated left ventricular filling pressures. At 24 weeks, median (interquartile range) changes in peak oxygen consumption (ml/kg/min) in patients who received placebo [−0

  12. Statistical tests based on new composite hypotheses in clinical trials reflecting the relative clinical importance of multiple endpoints quantitatively.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masako; Tango, Toshiro; Ohtaki, Megu

    2009-10-01

    In clinical trials, several endpoints (EPs) are often evaluated to compare treatments in some therapeutic area. Suppose that there are two EPs in a clinical trial. We propose a new set of composite hypotheses for continuous variables, taking the relative clinical importance of the EPs into account. The main hypotheses were formulated to show that a treatment is so superior to the control treatment, which is not necessarily a placebo, in one EP, that the possible non-inferiority of the treatment by at most a certain value in the other EP can be compensated sufficiently, taking the clinical point of view into account. The maximum non-inferiority margin of one EP might not be a biologically unimportant difference in exchange for much superiority of the other EP. This formulation leads to a new composite EP and a very simple test statistic. The intersection-union principle was employed to derive the proposed test.

  13. Wave reflection quantification based on pressure waveforms alone--methods, comparison, and clinical covariates.

    PubMed

    Hametner, Bernhard; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Kropf, Johannes; Mayer, Christopher; Holzinger, Andreas; Eber, Bernd; Weber, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Within the last decade the quantification of pulse wave reflections mainly focused on measures of central aortic systolic pressure and its augmentation through reflections based on pulse wave analysis (PWA). A complementary approach is the wave separation analysis (WSA), which quantifies the total amount of arterial wave reflection considering both aortic pulse and flow waves. The aim of this work is the introduction and comparison of aortic blood flow models for WSA assessment. To evaluate the performance of the proposed modeling approaches (Windkessel, triangular and averaged flow), comparisons against Doppler measurements are made for 148 patients with preserved ejection fraction. Stepwise regression analysis between WSA and PWA parameters are performed to provide determinants of methodological differences. Against Doppler measurement mean difference and standard deviation of the amplitudes of the decomposed forward and backward pressure waves are comparable for Windkessel and averaged flow models. Stepwise regression analysis shows similar determinants between Doppler and Windkessel model only. The results indicate that the Windkessel method provides accurate estimates of wave reflection in subjects with preserved ejection fraction. The comparison with waveforms derived from Doppler ultrasound as well as recently proposed simple triangular and averaged flow waves showed that this approach may reduce variability and provide realistic results.

  14. Reflection photoelasticity: a new method for studies of clinical mechanics in prosthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudio P; Glantz, Per Olof J; Svensson, Stig A; Bergmark, Anders

    2003-03-01

    This research was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of reflective photoelasticity as an in vivo technique for monitoring the strain/stress distribution in prosthetic devices during function. Seven subjects were selected for this study and divided into three groups according to the design of the prostheses. The buccal surfaces of the experimental prostheses were coated with a birefringent resin 2mm thick. Using a reflection polariscope, fringe patterns were documented on video tape during standardized in vivo loadings. Strain and stress levels (gamma(max) and tau(max)) were calculated from isochromatic fringe order determinations. The intra-observer variability in counting fringe orders and the accuracy level of reflective photoelasticity as compared to strain gauge results were also studied. The strain results of in vivo loading of the prostheses were analyzed with ANOVA and Scheffés tests. The intra-observer variability was analyzed with the Friedman nonparametric test. Comparisons of photoelastic data and strain gauges were tested with Pearson's correlation. Coated areas accessible to normally incident light, produced comprehensive maps of strain distribution. Significant differences were found in the in vivo gamma(max) values for the prostheses designs (p<0.05). The test for intra-observer variability showed that no significant differences occurred in counting fringe orders. Strain values obtained with reflective photoelasticity showed a high correlation r=0.98 and 0.99) with values obtained at the same areas using strain gauges. Reflective photoelasticity is a valid, reliable and accurate technique to be used for in vivo studies on the biomechanical behavior of prosthetic devices.

  15. Does the shift to higher capacities for isoprene emission at extreme temperatures in some oak species reflect acclimation to extreme drought and high temperature conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, C.; Gramann, J. H.; White, S. L.; Schade, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    decrease of 40% in the sensitive species. As opposed to 2011, the above average precipitation in the first months of 2012, allowed for recovery in both studied species. Photosynthesis rates were maintained at optimum levels throughout the summer of 2012, while standard isoprene emission rates completely recovered in the resistant Q.stellata. Photosynthesis and isoprene emission of the sensitive Q. nigra recovered only partially. Isoprene emission response to increasing temperatures in Q. stellata indicated a shift to higher capacities for isoprene emission at extreme temperatures, exceeding current model predictions during all three years, possibly reflecting an adaptation to the local climate. Additionally, in 2012 and 2013 we recorded a further shift of 3-5°C in the optimum temperature for isoprene emission in this species. We hypothesize, that these responses are due to the evolution of a more thermo-tolerant isoprene synthase enzyme in this species. For comparison, the sensitive species' emissions decreased above 40°C, as predicted by models.

  16. Peer Assisted Learning and Blogging: A Strategy to Promote Reflective Practice during Clinical Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Gardner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The use of peer assisted learning in clinical education is explored in this case study. Groups of undergraduate physiotherapy students were structured into communities of practice during the second half of their clinical fieldwork program. They collaborated online in an asynchronous manner, using information communications technology (blogs) and…

  17. Clinical Teacher Education: Reflections from an Urban Professional Development School Network. Readings in Educational Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, Chara Haeussler, Ed.; Many, Joyce E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Teacher Education focuses on how to build a school-university partnership network for clinical teacher education in urban school systems serving culturally and linguistically diverse populations. The labor intensive nature of professional development school work has resulted in research institutions being slow to fully adopt a clinical…

  18. Peer Assisted Learning and Blogging: A Strategy to Promote Reflective Practice during Clinical Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Gardner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The use of peer assisted learning in clinical education is explored in this case study. Groups of undergraduate physiotherapy students were structured into communities of practice during the second half of their clinical fieldwork program. They collaborated online in an asynchronous manner, using information communications technology (blogs) and…

  19. Clinical Teacher Education: Reflections from an Urban Professional Development School Network. Readings in Educational Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, Chara Haeussler, Ed.; Many, Joyce E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Teacher Education focuses on how to build a school-university partnership network for clinical teacher education in urban school systems serving culturally and linguistically diverse populations. The labor intensive nature of professional development school work has resulted in research institutions being slow to fully adopt a clinical…

  20. Theory before practice: implicit assumptions about clinical nursing education in Australia as revealed through a shared critical reflection.

    PubMed

    Grealish, Laurie; Smale, Lacey Anne

    2011-08-01

    The transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector occurred over a 10-year period in Australia (1985-1994). Australian nurse leaders settled on a single outcome measure to be applied for all nursing graduates in the form of national competency standards. While this move enabled diversity, the lack of consistency in curriculum design has subsequently led to increasing confusion for clinicians who support students' learning in clinical placements. Using a shared critical reflection method, the authors reviewed (1) the evaluation comments from nurses in one nursing unit of a hospital in one Australian jurisdiction and (2) an historical review of nursing literature at the time of the transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector. The reflection suggests that the aim of the transfer, to create critical thinking graduates, has been undermined by the implicit clinical education practices that have since emerged. In order to address the contemporary challenges for clinical staff working with students from multiple universities, as well as increased student numbers to address the nursing shortage, we recommend a new approach to curriculum design: a national clinical curriculum drawn from social, as well as cognitive, learning theory that at once informs clinicians of students' potential abilities and provides the scope to accommodate the increasingly difficult and critical learning requirements of tertiary-based nursing students.

  1. An infant with pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis: clinical improvement is associated with improvement in the pulmonary diffusion capacity.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Zarmina; Montgomery, Gregory S; Tiller, Christina; Kisling, Jeffrey; Chang, Daniel V; Tepper, Robert S

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis (PIG) is an idiopathic interstitial lung disease of infants. The underlying pulmonary pathophysiology of PIG has not been well characterized. Herein we report a term-gestation infant who presented with persistent tachypnea and hypoxia. A chest CT scan demonstrated a diffuse ground glass appearance and lung biopsy demonstrated increased alveolar septae cellularity with glycogen-containing cells, consistent with a diagnosis of PIG. At 3 months of age, pulmonary function testing included: pre- and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory flows using the raised-volume technique and the ratio of pulmonary diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide to alveolar volume (DLCO /VA ). He was prescribed 5 days of oral prednisolone (2mg/kg/day) and pulmonary function testing (PFT) was repeated at 5, 13, and 20 months of age. Initial PFTs demonstrated reduced forced vital capacity (FVC: Z-score = -2.36) and an increased ratio of forced expiratory volume in 0.5 sec to FVC (FEV0.5/FVC: Z-score = 1.15) with no significant change following an inhaled bronchodilator. There was also a marked reduction in DLCO /VA (Z-score = -4.74) compared to age-matched controls. Follow-up demonstrated progressive clinical improvement as well as an increase in Z-FVC and normalization of DLCO /VA . Our in vivo physiological findings are consistent with previous reports that symptom resolution correlated with histological thinning of the alveolar septae upon repeat lung biopsy. The restrictive lung disease we observed is consistent with expected reduced compliance of an alveolar interstitial lung process like PIG, whereas the absence of a reduction in FEV0.5/FVC confirms the absence of obstructive airway disease.

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation increases physical capacity but not mental health after heart valve surgery: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sibilitz, Kirstine L; Berg, Selina K; Rasmussen, Trine B; Risom, Signe Stelling; Thygesen, Lau C; Tang, Lars; Hansen, Tina B; Johansen, Pernille Palm; Gluud, Christian; Lindschou, Jane; Schmid, Jean Paul; Hassager, Christian; Køber, Lars; Taylor, Rod S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2016-12-15

    The evidence for cardiac rehabilitation after valve surgery remains sparse. Current recommendations are therefore based on patients with ischaemic heart disease. The aim of this randomised clinical trial was to assess the effects of cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care after heart valve surgery. The trial was an investigator-initiated, randomised superiority trial (The CopenHeartVR trial, VR; valve replacement or repair). We randomised 147 patients after heart valve surgery 1:1 to 12 weeks of cardiac rehabilitation consisting of physical exercise and monthly psycho-educational consultations (intervention) versus usual care without structured physical exercise or psycho-educational consultations (control). Primary outcome was physical capacity measured by VO2 peak and secondary outcome was self-reported mental health measured by Short Form-36. 76% were men, mean age 62 years, with aortic (62%), mitral (36%) or tricuspid/pulmonary valve surgery (2%). Cardiac rehabilitation compared with control had a beneficial effect on VO2 peak at 4 months (24.8 mL/kg/min vs 22.5 mL/kg/min, p=0.045) but did not affect Short Form-36 Mental Component Scale at 6 months (53.7 vs 55.2 points, p=0.40) or the exploratory physical and mental outcomes. Cardiac rehabilitation increased the occurrence of self-reported non-serious adverse events (11/72 vs 3/75, p=0.02). Cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery significantly improves VO2 peak at 4 months but has no effect on mental health and other measures of exercise capacity and self-reported outcomes. Further research is needed to justify cardiac rehabilitation in this patient group. NCT01558765, Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Helen Flanders Dunbar, John Dewey, and clinical pragmatism: reflections on method in psychosomatic medicine and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Hart, Curtis W

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines the method utilized by physicians and major figures in the founding of Clinical Pastoral Education, Helen Flanders Dunbar, in her work of 1943, Psychosomatic Diagnosis, and relates it to the currently evolving approach in bioethics known as clinical pragmatism. It assesses Dewey's influence on both Dunbar in psychosomatic medicine and clinical pragmatism in bioethics, and illustrates the breadth of influence of the school of philosophical thought known as pragmatism with which Dewey's name and those of William James and Charles Sanders Pierce are most often identified.

  4. Real-time, non-invasive microscopic confirmation of clinical diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid using in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, M; Agozzino, M; Amorosi, B; Moscarella, E; Cota, C; de Abreu, L; Berardesca, E

    2014-05-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune disease affecting prevalently the elder. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy is a non-invasive technique for real-time imaging of the skin with cellular-level resolution. No previous data has been reported about confocal microscopy of bullous pemphigoid. Aim of this preliminary study is the evaluation of the potential of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy for real-time, microscopical confirmation of clinical bullous pemphigoid diagnosis. A total of nine lesions from patients affected by pemphigoid underwent in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy before histological examination. In our preliminary study, confocal microscopy showed high grade of correspondence to histopathology. In particular, presence of sub-epidermal cleft and variable amount of oedema of the upper dermis associated with inflammatory cells infiltration were seen as prevalent confocal features in the bullous lesions considered. Differently, in urticarial lesions, no specific features could be appreciated at confocal analysis beside the presence of signs of spongiosis and perivascular inflammation. Confocal microscopy seems to be useful for in vivo, microscopical confirmation of the clinical suspect of bullous pemphigoid and for biopsy site selection in urticarial lesions to obtain a more significant specimen for histopathological examination. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Reflections on clinical expertise and silent know-how in voice therapy.

    PubMed

    Iwarsson, Jenny

    2015-07-01

    The concept of 'clinical expertise' is described as a part of evidence-based practice (EBP) together with 'external scientific evidence' and 'patient values and perspectives'. However, clinical expertise in the management of voice disorders has not been described or discussed in much detail. The expertise seems to consist partly of silent know-how that, from the outside, may seem improperly related to the personality of the speech-language pathologist or exclusively dependent on the number of years in the field. In this paper, it is suggested that clinical expertise in voice therapy consists of specific skills that can be explicitly described and trained. These skills are discussed together with educational aspects that contribute to the development of clinical expertise. The skills are also discussed from the perspectives of the past, present, and future.

  6. Clinical Thanatology and Psychotherapy: Some Reflections on Caring for the Dying Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigenberg, Loma; Shneidman, Edwin S.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the relationship between psychotherapy and clinical thanatology relative to working with dying patients and their survivors. Eight special characteristics of thanatological exchanges are explained including comments on time, transference, aspirations, and empathy. Conversation, heirarchical exchange, psychotherapy, and thanatological…

  7. Clinical Thanatology and Psychotherapy: Some Reflections on Caring for the Dying Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigenberg, Loma; Shneidman, Edwin S.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the relationship between psychotherapy and clinical thanatology relative to working with dying patients and their survivors. Eight special characteristics of thanatological exchanges are explained including comments on time, transference, aspirations, and empathy. Conversation, heirarchical exchange, psychotherapy, and thanatological…

  8. Research Capacity-Building with New Technologies within New Communities of Practice: Reflections on the First Year of the Teacher Education Research Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Zoe; Stanley, Grant; Murray, Jean; Jones, Marion; McNamara, Olwen

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on a virtual research environment (VRE) and how it facilitated the networking of teacher educators participating in an Economic and Social Research Council-funded research capacity-building project. Using the theoretical lenses of situated learning and socio-cultural approaches to literacy, participants' ways of engaging with…

  9. Do leaf total antioxidant capacities (TAC) reflect specific antioxidant potentials? - A comparison of TAC and reactive oxygen scavenging in tobacco leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Majer, Petra; Stoyanova, Silviya; Hideg, Eva

    2010-07-02

    Two traditional methods of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assessment, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) were applied to water extracts from tobacco leaves at various stages of senescence. Physiological status of the leaves was characterized by the effective photochemical quantum yield of photosynthesis (Y(II)). TAC values were compared to amounts of total phenolics, carotenoid contents and also to reactive oxygen scavenging capacities of the leaf extracts. To this end a new, simple fluorimetric assay was introduced for testing hydroxyl radical neutralizing capacity in leaf extracts. We found that while both TAC values increased with declining photosynthesis and decreasing pigment content, they were not characteristic to specific superoxide or hydroxyl radical scavenging and had limited connection to leaf antioxidant content. Good linear correlations were only found between the following pairs of parameters: Y(II) - total carotenoid, TEAC - total carotenoid, FRAP - total phenolics. Our data show that TEAC and FRAP are not interchangeable in leaf studies and do not represent antioxidant action on ROS.

  10. Research Capacity-Building with New Technologies within New Communities of Practice: Reflections on the First Year of the Teacher Education Research Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Zoe; Stanley, Grant; Murray, Jean; Jones, Marion; McNamara, Olwen

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on a virtual research environment (VRE) and how it facilitated the networking of teacher educators participating in an Economic and Social Research Council-funded research capacity-building project. Using the theoretical lenses of situated learning and socio-cultural approaches to literacy, participants' ways of engaging with…

  11. Some reflections on the unique time of Nachträglichkeit in theory and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Marion, Paola

    2012-04-01

    Of the various forms that the matter of time assumes in analysis, Nachträglichkeit represents Freud's first intuition on the subject. The focus of this article is directed toward the specific temporal dimension that the concept of Nachträglichkeit expresses, and how that dimension, which overturns linear time, is expressed in clinical work. The concept of Nachträglichkeit is approached from a theoretical point of view, tracing back the role and development that this notion has had in psychoanalytic Freudian and post-Freudian thinking. The goal of this article is to demonstrate how Nachträglichkeit represents the unique temporal movement of the analytic session and the characteristic positioning of the mind of the analyst at work. Three clinical examples are presented. The analytic scene is formulated as occurring in two times, and through the working through that takes place, patients can recover the enigmatic 'remainder', which is consequently traumatic and which has compulsively accompanied them through the various times of their existence. Nachträglichkeit, as a non-linear temporality, introduces a unique dimension into the clinical work that influences listening to and interpretation of the material. The recognition of that (trauma, infantile sexuality, non-linear temporality) has consequences for the analyst's way of working in session and on the interpretation of clinical material, as I will try to show through my theoretical exposition and clinical examples.

  12. The Value of Clinical Jazz: Teaching Critical Reflection on, in, and Toward Action.

    PubMed

    Casapulla, Sharon; Longenecker, Randall; Beverly, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Clinical Jazz is a small-group strategy in medical education designed to develop interpersonal skills and improve doctor-patient and interprofessional relationships. The purpose of this study was to explore medical students' and faculty facilitators' perceived value of Clinical Jazz. We conducted a modified Nominal Group Process with participating medical students (n=21), faculty facilitators (n=5), and research team members (n=3). Students and faculty facilitators independently answered the question, "What do you value about Clinical Jazz?" We then conducted content and thematic analyses on the resulting data. Three themes emerged during analysis: (1) students and faculty appreciated the opportunity to learn and practice a thoughtful and structured process for problem solving, (2) students and faculty valued the safety of the group process in sharing a diversity of perspectives on topics in medicine, and (3) students and faculty acknowledged the importance of addressing real and challenging problems that are rarely addressed in formal lectures and other planned small-group settings. Clinical Jazz provides students and faculty with the opportunity to address the hidden and/or informal curriculum in medical education, while providing a safe space and time to solve important clinical and interprofessional problems.

  13. Harnessing the hidden curriculum: a four-step approach to developing and reinforcing reflective competencies in medical clinical clerkship.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Cheryl L; Harris, Ilene B; Schwartz, Alan J; Regehr, Glenn

    2015-12-01

    Changing the culture of medicine through the education of medical students has been proposed as a solution to the intractable problems of our profession. Yet few have explored the issues associated with making students partners in this change. There is a powerful hidden curriculum that perpetuates not only desired attitudes and behaviors but also those that are less than desirable. So, how do we educate medical students to resist adopting unprofessional practices they see modeled by supervisors and mentors in the clinical environment? This paper explores these issues and, informed by the literature, we propose a specific set of reflective competencies for medical students as they transition from classroom curricula to clinical practice in a four-step approach: (1) Priming-students about hidden curriculum in their clinical environment and their motivations to conform or comply with external pressures; (2) Noticing-educating students to be aware of their motivations and actions in situations where they experience pressures to conform to practices that they may view as unprofessional; (3) Processing-guiding students to analyze their experiences in collaborative reflective exercises and finally; (4) Choosing-supporting students in selecting behaviors that validate and reinforce their aspirations to develop their best professional identity.

  14. A cluster randomized clinical trial comparing functional capacity evaluation and functional interviewing as components of occupational rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Gross, Douglas P; Asante, Alexander K; Miciak, Maxi; Battié, Michele C; Carroll, Linda J; Sun, Ambrose; Mikalsky, Marti; Huellstrung, Rene; Niemeläinen, Riikka

    2014-12-01

    Functional capacity evaluations (FCE) are used to identify work abilities and are commonly integrated into rehabilitation programs. We studied whether integrating FCE into rehabilitation leads to better outcomes for injured workers. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted at a workers' compensation rehabilitation facility (registration ISRCTN61284905). Clinicians were randomised into 2 groups: 1 group used FCE while another conducted semi-structured functional interviews. Outcomes included recommendations following assessment, rehabilitation program outcomes including functional work levels and pain intensity, as well as compensation outcomes at 1, 3, and 6 months after assessment. Analysis included Mann-Whitney U, Chi square and t tests. Subjects included 225 claimants of whom 105 were tested with FCE. Subjects were predominantly employed (84 %) males (63 %) with sub-acute musculoskeletal conditions (median duration 67 days). Claimants undergoing FCE had ~15 % higher average functional work levels recommended at time of assessment (Mann-Whitney U = 4,391.0, p < 0.001) but differences at other follow-up times were smaller (0-8 %), in favour of functional interviewing, and not statistically significant. Clinically important improvement during rehabilitation in functional work level (0.9/4, SRM = 0.94), pain intensity (2.0/10, SRM = 0.88) and self-reported disability (21.8/100, SRM = 1.45) were only observed in those undergoing the functional interview. Performance-based FCE integrated into occupational rehabilitation appears to lead to higher baseline functional work levels compared to a semi-structured functional interview, but not improved RTW rates or functional work levels at follow-up. Functional interviewing has potential for efficiency gains and higher likelihood of clinically important improvement following rehabilitation, however further research is needed.

  15. Capacity of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System and the Canadian Problem Checklist to screen clinical insomnia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Savard, Josée; Ivers, Hans; Savard, Marie-Hélène

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is highly prevalent in cancer patients. Efficacious treatments exist for this condition but, for these interventions to be offered, an effective screening needs to be carried out beforehand. The pan-Canadian practice guidelines on sleep disturbances provide recommendations on how to use the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and the Canadian Problem Checklist (CPC) to screen for sleep difficulties in cancer. However, empirical evidence to support these recommendations is lacking. The goal of this study was to assess the capacity of the ESAS (drowsiness and "other" items) and the CPC (sleep item) to screen for clinical insomnia in cancer patients. As part of routine care, 615 patients with various cancer types completed the ESAS, the CPC, and the Insomnia Severity Index, used as the standard for establishing the presence of clinical insomnia. None of the criteria provided an effective screening when used alone. No patient used the ESAS-other item to report sleep difficulties. The sensitivity and specificity rates of the CPC-sleep item alone were 60.4 and 89.6 %, respectively. A score ≥2 on the ESAS-drowsiness item had a sensitivity of 61.5 % and a specificity of 75.4 %. When used in combination, the best option was scoring positively on the CPC-sleep item OR a score ≥2 on the ESAS-drowsiness item (sensitivity 84.2 %; specificity 69.7 %). When used alone, the CPC-sleep and the ESAS-drowsiness items yielded insufficient sensitivity rates for a first screening, but when used in combination, they provided a good balance between sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), Epidemiology, and Epistemology: Reflections on EMRs and Future Pediatric Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly common in pediatric patient care. EMR data represent a relatively novel and rich resource for clinical research. The fact, however, that pediatric EMR data are collected for the purposes of clinical documentation and billing rather than research creates obstacles to their use in scientific investigation. Particular issues include accuracy, completeness, comparability between settings, ease of extraction, and context of recording. Although these problems can be addressed through standard strategies for dealing with partially accurate and incomplete data, a longer term solution will involve work with pediatric clinicians to improve data quality. As research becomes one of the explicit purposes for which pediatricians collect EMR data, the pediatric clinician will play a central role in future pediatric clinical research. PMID:21622040

  17. Electronic medical records (EMRs), epidemiology, and epistemology: reflections on EMRs and future pediatric clinical research.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly common in pediatric patient care. EMR data represent a relatively novel and rich resource for clinical research. The fact, however, that pediatric EMR data are collected for the purposes of clinical documentation and billing rather than research creates obstacles to their use in scientific investigation. Particular issues include accuracy, completeness, comparability between settings, ease of extraction, and context of recording. Although these problems can be addressed through standard strategies for dealing with partially accurate and incomplete data, a longer-term solution will involve work with pediatric clinicians to improve data quality. As research becomes one of the explicit purposes for which pediatricians collect EMR data, the pediatric clinician will play a central role in future pediatric clinical research.

  18. Clinical usefulness of reflectance confocal microscopy in the management of facial lentigo maligna melanoma.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, I; Carrera, C; Puig, S; Malvehy, J

    2014-04-01

    Facial lentigo maligna melanoma can be a diagnostic challenge in daily clinical practice as it has similar clinical and morphological features to other lesions such as solar lentigines and pigmented actinic keratoses. Confocal microscopy is a noninvasive technique that provides real-time images of the epidermis and superficial dermis with cellular-level resolution. We describe 3 cases of suspected facial lentigo maligna that were assessed using dermoscopy and confocal microscopy before histopathology study. In the first case, diagnosed as lentigo maligna melanoma, presurgical mapping by confocal microscopy was performed to define the margins more accurately. In the second and third cases, with a clinical and dermoscopic suspicion of lentigo maligna melanoma, confocal microscopy was used to identify the optimal site for biopsy.

  19. Methodological Reflections on the Contribution of Qualitative Research to the Evaluation of Clinical Ethics Support Services.

    PubMed

    Wäscher, Sebastian; Salloch, Sabine; Ritter, Peter; Vollmann, Jochen; Schildmann, Jan

    2017-05-01

    This article describes a process of developing, implementing and evaluating a clinical ethics support service intervention with the goal of building up a context-sensitive structure of minimal clinical-ethics in an oncology department without prior clinical ethics structure. Scholars from different disciplines have called for an improvement in the evaluation of clinical ethics support services (CESS) for different reasons over several decades. However, while a lot has been said about the concepts and methodological challenges of evaluating CESS up to the present time, relatively few empirical studies have been carried out. The aim of this article is twofold. On the one hand, it describes a process of development, modifying and evaluating a CESS intervention as part of the ETHICO research project, using the approach of qualitative-formative evaluation. On the other hand, it provides a methodological analysis which specifies the contribution of qualitative empirical methods to the (formative) evaluation of CESS. We conclude with a consideration of the strengths and limitations of qualitative evaluation research with regards to the evaluation and development of context sensitive CESS. We further discuss our own approach in contrast to rather traditional consult or committee models. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Reflective Observation in the Clinical Education Setting: A Way to Promote Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Benes, Sarah S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Clinical experiences help athletic training students gain real-time learning experiences by engaging in patient care. Observational learning has been identified as important to athletic training student development, yet little is known about its effectiveness. Objective: To explore the athletic training students' perspectives on their…

  1. An Instructional Design Course for Clinical Educators: First Iteration Design Research Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Adam; Doherty, Iain

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical foundations of an online course to teach clinical educators how to convert a traditional face-to-face course for either flexible or distance delivery. We describe the design research approach to the creation of the course and the pedagogical theory behind the course development. We also present the details of…

  2. Drug administration in animal studies of cardiac arrest does not reflect human clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To date, there is no evidence showing a benefit from any advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) medication in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA), despite animal data to the contrary. One explanation may be a difference in the time to first drug administration. Our previous work has shown the mean time to first drug administration in clinical trials is 19.4 minutes. We hypothesized that the average time to drug administration in large animal experiments occurs earlier than in OOHCA clinical trials. Methods We conducted a literature review between 1990 and 2006 in MEDLINE using the following MeSH headings: swine, dogs, resuscitation, heart arrest, EMS, EMT, ambulance, ventricular fibrillation, drug therapy, epinephrine, vasopressin, amiodarone, lidocaine, magnesium, and sodium bicarbonate. We reviewed the abstracts of 331 studies and 197 full manuscripts. Exclusion criteria included: non-peer reviewed, all without primary animal data, and traumatic models. From these, we identified 119 papers that contained unique information on time to medication administration. The data are reported as mean, ranges, and 95% confidence intervals. Mean time to first drug administration in animal laboratory studies and clinical trials was compared with a t-test. Regression analysis was performed to determine if time to drug predicted ROSC. Results Mean time to first drug administration in 2378 animals was 9.5 minutes (range 3.0–28.0; 95% CI around mean 2.78, 16.22). This is less than the time reported in clinical trials (19.4 min, p<0.001). Time to drug predicted ROSC (Odds Ratio 0.844; 95% CI 0.738, 0.966). Conclusion Shorter drug delivery time in animal models of cardiac arrest may be one reason for the failure of animal studies to translate successfully into the clinical arena. PMID:17360097

  3. Parental reflective functioning in fathers who use intimate partner violence: Findings from a Norwegian clinical sample

    PubMed Central

    Mohaupt, Henning; Duckert, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have examined fathering in an intimate partner violence (IPV) context outside the US. The present study included 36 Norwegian men who were voluntarily participating in therapy after perpetrating acts of IPV. They were interviewed with the revised Parent Development Interview, which is designed to assess parental reflective functioning (parental RF), and screened for alcohol- and substance-use habits and trauma history. At the group level, participants exhibited poor parental RF, high relational trauma scores, and elevated alcohol intake. Parental RF did not correlate with education level, alcohol or substance use, or compound measures of trauma history. There was a moderate negative relationship between having experienced physical abuse in childhood and parental RF. PMID:28163804

  4. The application of critical psychology to facilitate reflective clinical practice in orthotics/prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Grobler, Ilzé; Van Schalkwyk, Gertina J; Wagner, Claire

    2006-12-01

    The co-construction of a psychology module for a postgraduate training course in orthotics/prosthetics is socially constructed for the first time in Southern African history. This paper elucidates the integration of theory and practice in a model for the development of a professional identity as orthotist/prosthetist. In creating a context where trainees can learn to develop their practice while also enabling them to deconstruct notions of 'expert knowledge', orthotist/prosthetists move from a position of scientist-practitioner to negotiating an alternative position of reflective practitioner. In the process of co-constructing knowledge, an alternative story of teaching and learning evolves. The result is a celebration of life as it is really lived by health professionals.

  5. Quality management: patients reflections on health care at outpatient clinic of internal medicine department.

    PubMed

    Ljubičić, Neven; Boban, Marko; Gaćina, Petar; Adzija, Jasminka; Benceković, Zeljka; Rajković, Ana

    2009-06-01

    Middle and older age group relative share in the community permanently grows. Those are commonly burdened with several chronic health conditions or elevated incidence of acute ones and in more frequent need for consulting health services. In the era of modern technical medicine, it is important to increase quality of services particularly patients orientated. Department of Internal Medicine developed questionnaire to assess reflections on medical care from the receiver of medical services point of view. Sample was formed from individuals that visited outpatient triage Unit (OTU) and voluntary enrolled, during period April 1-August 31, 2008 for any medical reason. Study population structure had similarly equally of both genders, socio-economical background, and was in age range 18-87. Questionnaire was developed by team of experienced personnel covering satisfaction on received medical care. There were 279 returned formulary in a sample of 6700 patients (4.18%). Patients visited OTU chiefly on behalf medical condition secondary to address of residency, followed by personal choice, on advice given by general practitioner, by emergency transportation services, or just due to earlier experiences. Regarding provided medical care extent, 4/5 of patients were examined in lesser than 2 hours, while total workup lasted mostly for 2-4, followed by over four. Over half of patients were moderate toward highly satisfied with provided medical information, personnel communication style and general reflection on all services while being in the Department premises. Astonishing proportion of patients (93%) was satisfied with positive personnel communication. Integration of patients' self-perceived reports about medical services in organizing process is inevitable for augmenting content and at the same time valuable for developing overall quality of treatment. Communication excellence is of premier importance and unavoidable for giving additional positive effect to remain health

  6. Development, implementation and evaluation of a clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building program in a large Australian health care service.

    PubMed

    Misso, Marie L; Ilic, Dragan; Haines, Terry P; Hutchinson, Alison M; East, Christine E; Teede, Helena J

    2016-01-14

    Health professionals need to be integrated more effectively in clinical research to ensure that research addresses clinical needs and provides practical solutions at the coal face of care. In light of limited evidence on how best to achieve this, evaluation of strategies to introduce, adapt and sustain evidence-based practices across different populations and settings is required. This project aims to address this gap through the co-design, development, implementation, evaluation, refinement and ultimately scale-up of a clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building program in a clinical setting with little to no co-ordinated approach to clinical research engagement and education. The protocol is based on principles of research capacity building and on a six-step framework, which have previously led to successful implementation and long-term sustainability. A mixed methods study design will be used. Methods will include: (1) a review of the literature about strategies that engage health professionals in research through capacity building and/or education in research methods; (2) a review of existing local research education and support elements; (3) a needs assessment in the local clinical setting, including an online cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews; (4) co-design and development of an educational and support program; (5) implementation of the program in the clinical environment; and (6) pre- and post-implementation evaluation and ultimately program scale-up. The evaluation focuses on research activity and knowledge, attitudes and preferences about clinical research, evidence-based practice and leadership and post implementation, about their satisfaction with the program. The investigators will evaluate the feasibility and effect of the program according to capacity building measures and will revise where appropriate prior to scale-up. It is anticipated that this clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building

  7. Reflective Prompts to Guide Termination of the Psychiatric Clinical Student Nursing Experience.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Grace B

    2016-04-01

    The average length of stay on psychiatric inpatient units has decreased in the past 40 years from 24.9 to 7.2 days. Inpatient psychiatric nurses are challenged to meet the standards and scope of practice despite the changing circumstances of their work environment. The amount of time student nurses spend with a given patient has been affected by changes in acute psychiatric inpatient care and decreased length of stay; however, opportunities exist for effective termination of the nurse-client relationship. Facilitation of students' awareness and understanding of the dynamics inherent in the termination process is an important teaching task for psychiatric nursing clinical instructors. In the current article, a clinically focused learning activity using structured prompts to guide and promote psychiatric nursing students' experiences with the process of termination is described and teaching strategies are discussed.

  8. The Flipped Classroom for pre-clinical dental skills teaching - a reflective commentary.

    PubMed

    Crothers, A J; Bagg, J; McKenzie, R

    2017-05-12

    A Flipped Classroom method for teaching of adult practical pre-clinical dental skills was introduced to the BDS curriculum in Glasgow during the 2015/2016 academic session. This report provides a commentary of the first year of employing this method - from the identification of the need to optimise teaching resources, through the planning, implementation and development of the method, with an early indication of performance.

  9. Child Rights and Clinical Bioethics: Historical Reflections on Modern Medicine and Ethics.

    PubMed

    Brosco, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Why might pediatric bioethicists in the United States reject the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) as a framework for resolving ethical issues? The essays in this issue present arguments and counterarguments regarding the usefulness of the CRC in various clinical and research cases. But underlying this debate are two historical factors that help explain the seeming paradox of pediatric bioethicists' arguing against child's rights. First, the profession of clinical bioethics emerged in the 1970s as one component of modern medicine's focus on improving health through the application of technologically sophisticated treatments. The everyday work of U.S. bioethicists thus usually involves emerging technologies or practices in clinical or laboratory settings; the articles of the CRC, in contrast, seem better suited to addressing broad policy issues that affect the social determinants of health. Second, U.S. child health policy veered away from a more communitarian approach in the early 20th century for reasons of demography that were reinforced by ideology and concerns about immigration. The divide between clinical medicine and public health in the United States, as well as the relatively meager social safety net, are not based on a failure to recognize the rights of children. Indeed, there is some historical evidence to suggest that "rights language" has hindered progress on child health and well-being in the United States. In today's political climate, efforts to ensure that governments pledge to treat children in accordance with their status as human beings (a child right's perspective) are less likely to improve child health than robust advocacy on behalf of children's unique needs, especially as novel models of health-care financing emerge.

  10. Bridging the reductive and the synthetic: some reflections on the clinical implications of synchronicity.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Angela

    2015-04-01

    When Jung introduced the concepts of synchronicity and the psychoid unconscious, he expanded analytical psychology into decidedly uncanny territory. Despite the early interest shown by Freud, anomalous phenomena such as telepathy have become a taboo subject in psychoanalysis. Today, however, there is an increasing interest in thought transference and synchronicity, thus opening the way for a fruitful exchange between different psychoanalytical schools on their clinical implications. I propose to examine some of the ambiguities of Jung's thinking, to clarify how we define synchronicity, the relationship between synchronicities and parapsychological events, and their clinical significance. At the present moment, we are still unsure if such events should be considered as normal and a way of facilitating individuation, or as an indication of psychopathology in the patient or in the analyst, just as we are uncertain about the particular characteristics of the intersubjective field that can lead to synchronicities. Making use of the typology of mind-matter correlations presented by Atmanspacher and Fach, and the distinction they draw between acategorial and non-categorial states of mind, I will use two clinical vignettes to illustrate the different states of mind in analyst and analysand that can lead to synchronicities. In particular I will focus on the relationship between analytical reverie and synchronicity. © 2015, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  11. The experiences of undergraduate nursing students and self-reflective accounts of first clinical rotation in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Mirlashari, Jila; Warnock, Fay; Jahanbani, Jahanfar

    2017-07-01

    The clinical practicum is one of the most anticipated components of the nursing program for nursing students. However, the practicum can be anxiety producing for students, especially when it is their first placement in an emotional demanding setting like pediatric oncology unit. Taking care of children with cancer and who are facing the death trajectory is complex and demanding not only for students but also for the experienced nurse. In this qualitative research, the purpose was to explore senior student perceptions and self-reflective accounts of what it was like to care for children with cancer and their family throughout the course of their first practicum on a pediatric oncology unit that also provided children palliative care as needed. Data from the self-reflective journals and interviews were analyzed together using conventional content analysis. The three resultant categories that emerged: state of shock and getting lost, walking in to a mind shaking world and finding the way provided in-depth novel insight on the perceptions of senior undergraduate nursing students as they journey through their first time practicum on a pediatric oncology unit. The findings also confirmed the importance and benefit of reflective journaling to student integrated learning and adjustment in nursing practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gold nanorods based diffusion reflection measurements: current status and perspectives for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankri, Rinat; Fixler, Dror

    2017-07-01

    Optical imaging is a powerful tool for investigating the structure and function of tissues. Tissue optical imaging technologies are generally discussed under two broad regimes: microscopic and macroscopic, while the latter is widely investigated in the field of light-tissue interaction. Among the developed optical technologies for tissue investigation, the diffusion reflectance (DR) method is a simple and safe technology. However, this method suffers from low specificity and low signal-to-noise ratio, so the extraction of the tissue properties is not an easy task. In this review, we describe the use of gold nanorods (GNRs) in DR spectroscopy. The GNRs present unique optical properties which enhance the scattering and absorption properties of a tissue. The GNRs can be easily targeted toward abnormal sites in order to improve the DR signal and to distinguish between the healthy and the abnormal sites in the tissue, with high specificity. This article describes the use of the DR-GNRs method for the detection of cancer and atherosclerosis, from light transfer theory, through the extraction of the tissue properties using the diffusion theory and up to DR in vivo measurements.

  13. Finding the Words: Medical Students' Reflections on Communication Challenges in Clinic.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Genna; Bereknyei Merrell, Sylvia; Bruce, Janine S; Makoul, Gregory; Schillinger, Erika

    2016-11-01

    Interpersonal communication is essential to providing excellent patient care and requires ongoing development. Although aspects of medical student interpersonal communication may degrade throughout career progression, it is unknown what specific elements pose challenges. We aimed to characterize clerkship students' perspectives on communication challenges in the outpatient setting to help inform curricular development. Third-year medical students in a required family medicine clerkship were asked to describe a communication challenge they encountered. Open-ended written responses were collected through a mandatory post-clerkship survey. Responses were qualitatively coded using an a priori framework for teaching and assessing communication skills (The SEGUE Framework for Teaching and Assessing Communication Skills) with data-derived additions to the framework, followed by a team-based thematic analysis. We collected 799 reflections written by 518 students from 2007-2014. Three dominant themes emerged from the analysis: challenges with (1) effectively exchanging information with patients, (2) managing emotional aspects of the patient encounter, and (3) negotiating terms of the encounter. Communication curricula focus on content and process of the medical interview, but insufficient time and energy are devoted to psychosocial factors, including aspects of the encounter that are emotionally charged or conflicting. While gaps in students' communication skillsets may be anticipated or observed by educators, this study offers an analysis of students' own perceptions of the challenges they face.

  14. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights, deinstitutionalization, and disability rights movements. Because of these forces, capacity issues now permeate the fabric of everyday life, whether in the form of guardianship petitions, questions of capacity to consent to treatment, the ability to make a new will, or participation in human research. In seeking to resolve these issues, families, clinicians, and legal professionals increasingly turn to psychologists to assess a capacity and to provide empirically supported judgments that properly balance autonomy and protection for the individual. Psychologists have taken a leading role in the development of functional assessment instruments that measure important aspects of the capacity construct. In addition, psychology has been a major contributor to the scientific study of capacity. In collaboration with colleagues from medicine and law, psychologists have articulated crucial theoretical frameworks that integrate legal, clinical, and ethical dimensions of the capacity problem. This article focuses on the evolution of theory, law, science, and practice in the evaluation of capacity in older adults and its recent culmination in a series of interdisciplinary handbooks sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the American Bar Association. PMID:23586491

  15. Assessment of capacity in an aging society.

    PubMed

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights, deinstitutionalization, and disability rights movements. Because of these forces, capacity issues now permeate the fabric of everyday life, whether in the form of guardianship petitions, questions of capacity to consent to treatment, the ability to make a new will, or participation in human research. In seeking to resolve these issues, families, clinicians, and legal professionals increasingly turn to psychologists to assess a capacity and to provide empirically supported judgments that properly balance autonomy and protection for the individual. Psychologists have taken a leading role in the development of functional assessment instruments that measure important aspects of the capacity construct. In addition, psychology has been a major contributor to the scientific study of capacity. In collaboration with colleagues from medicine and law, psychologists have articulated crucial theoretical frameworks that integrate legal, clinical, and ethical dimensions of the capacity problem. This article focuses on the evolution of theory, law, science, and practice in the evaluation of capacity in older adults and its recent culmination in a series of interdisciplinary handbooks sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the American Bar Association.

  16. A Method to Calculate Adherence to Inhaled Therapy that Reflects the Changes in Clinical Features of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Imran; Seheult, Jansen; MacHale, Elaine; Boland, Fiona; O'Dwyer, Susan M; Rapcan, Viliam; D'Arcy, Shona; Cushen, Breda; Mokoka, Matshediso; Killane, Isabelle; Ryder, Sheila A; Reilly, Richard B; Costello, Richard W

    2016-11-01

    Currently, studies on adherence to inhaled medications report average adherence over time. This measure does not account for variations in the interval between doses, nor for errors in inhaler use. To investigate whether adherence calculated as a single area under the (concentration-time) curve (AUC) measure, incorporating the interval between doses and inhaler technique, was more reflective of patient outcomes than were current methods of assessing adherence. We attached a digital audio device (INhaler Compliance Assessment) to a dry powder inhaler. This recorded when the inhaler was used, and analysis of the audio data indicated if the inhaler had been used correctly. These aspects of inhaler use were combined to calculate adherence over time, as an AUC measure. Over a 3-month period, a cohort of patients with asthma was studied. Adherence to a twice-daily inhaler preventer therapy using this device and clinical measures were assessed. Recordings from 239 patients with severe asthma were analyzed. Average adherence that was based on the dose counter was 84.4%, whereas the ratio of expected to observed accumulated AUC, actual adherence, was 61.8% (P < 0.01). Of all the adherence measures, only adherence calculated as AUC reflected changes in asthma quality of life, β-agonist reliever use, and peak expiratory flow over the 3 months (P < 0.05 compared with other measures of adherence). Adherence that incorporates the interval between doses and inhaler technique, and calculated as AUC, is more reflective of changes in quality of life and lung function than are the currently used measures of adherence. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01529697).

  17. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation During Hemodialysis on Peripheral Muscle Strength and Exercise Capacity: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Ana Karla; Mello, Carolina Luana; Dal Pont, Tarcila; Hizume Kunzler, Deborah; Martins, Daniel Fernandes; Bobinski, Franciane; Pereira Yamaguti, Wellington; Paulin, Elaine

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of high and low frequency and intensity, performed during hemodialysis, on physical function and inflammation markers in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Randomized clinical trial. Hemodialysis clinic. Patients with CKD (N=51) were randomized into blocks of 4 using opaque sealed envelopes. They were divided into a group of high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation and a group of low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation. The high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group was submitted to neuromuscular electrical stimulation at a frequency of 50Hz and a medium intensity of 72.90mA, and the low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group used a frequency of 5Hz and a medium intensity of 13.85mA, 3 times per week for 1 hour, during 12 sessions. Peripheral muscle strength, exercise capacity, levels of muscle trophism marker (insulin growth factor 1) and levels of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor α) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin 10) cytokines. The high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group showed a significant increase in right peripheral muscle strength (155.35±65.32Nm initial vs 161.60±68.73Nm final; P=.01) and left peripheral muscle strength (156.60±66.51Nm initial vs 164.10±69.76Nm final; P=.02) after the training, which did not occur in the low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group for both right muscle strength (109.40±32.08Nm initial vs 112.65±38.44Nm final; P=.50) and left muscle strength (113.65±37.79Nm initial vs 116.15±43.01Nm final; P=.61). The 6-minute walk test distance (6MWTD) increased in both groups: high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group (435.55±95.81m initial vs 457.25±90.64m final; P=.02) and low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group (403.80

  18. Quality of written narrative feedback and reflection in a modified mini-clinical evaluation exercise: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Pelgrim, Elisabeth A M; Kramer, Anneke W M; Mokkink, Henk G A; Van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2012-10-18

    Research has shown that narrative feedback, (self) reflections and a plan to undertake and evaluate improvements are key factors for effective feedback on clinical performance. We investigated the quantity of narrative comments comprising feedback (by trainers), self-reflections (by trainees) and action plans (by trainer and trainee) entered on a mini-CEX form that was modified for use in general practice training and to encourage trainers and trainees to provide narrative comments. In view of the importance of specificity as an indicator of feedback quality, we additionally examined the specificity of the comments. We collected and analysed modified mini-CEX forms completed by GP trainers and trainees. Since each trainee has the same trainer for the duration of one year, we used trainer-trainee pairs as the unit of analysis. We determined for all forms the frequency of the different types of narrative comments and rated their specificity on a three-point scale: specific, moderately specific, not specific. Specificity was compared between trainee-trainer pairs. We collected 485 completed modified mini-CEX forms from 54 trainees (mean of 8.8 forms per trainee; range 1-23; SD 5.6). Trainer feedback was more frequently provided than trainee self-reflections, and action plans were very rare. The comments were generally specific, but showed large differences between trainee-trainer pairs. The frequency of self-reflection and action plans varied, all comments were generally specific and there were substantial and consistent differences between trainee-trainer pairs in the specificity of comments. We therefore conclude that feedback is not so much determined by the instrument as by the users. Interventions to improve the educational effects of the feedback procedure should therefore focus more on the users than on the instruments.

  19. [Mobbing, coping and narcisism: reflections in the light of a clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Ziliotto, G

    2008-01-01

    The term "mobbing" has today erroneously come to be a huge general recepticle for all the conflicts and interpersonal problems breaking out in the work environment. The author, who collaborates as clinical psychologist in an anti-mobbing network, shows that frequently events at work and personality structures are closely connected. In particular, attention to the modes of coping becomes a fundamental aspect for the diagnosis of mobbing. If psychic distress has gradually moved from a neurotic basis to a more preponderantly narcissistic pathology, the author underlines that precisely narcissistic pathologies may be correlated to the vast container of mobbing.

  20. Global medical education partnerships to expand specialty expertise: a case report on building neurology clinical and research capacity.

    PubMed

    Kaddumukasa, Mark; Katabira, Elly; Salata, Robert A; Costa, Marco A; Ddumba, Edward; Furlan, Anthony; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Kamya, Moses R; Kayima, James; Longenecker, Chris T; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mondo, Charles; Moore, Shirley; Pundik, Svetlana; Sewankambo, Nelson; Simon, Daniel I; Smyth, Kathleen A; Sajatovic, Martha

    2014-12-30

    Neurological disorders are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan African, but resources for their management are scarce. Collaborations between training institutions in developed and resource-limited countries can be a successful model for supporting specialty medical education and increasing clinical and research capacity. This report describes a US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) to enhance expertise in neurology, developed between Makerere University College of Health Sciences in Kampala, Uganda, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, OH, USA. This collaborative model is based on a successful medical education and research model that has been developed over the past two decades. The Ugandan and US teams have accumulated knowledge and 'lessons learned' that facilitate specialty expertise in neurological conditions, which are widespread and associated with substantial disability in resource-limited countries. Strengths of the model include a focus on community health care settings and a strong research component. Key elements include strong local leadership; use of remote technology, templates to standardize performance; shared exchanges; mechanisms to optimize sustainability and of dissemination activities that expand impact of the original initiative. Efficient collaborations are further enhanced by external and institutional support, and can be sequentially refined. Models such as the Makerere University College of Health Sciences - Case Western Reserve University partnership may help other groups initiate collaborative education programmes and establish successful partnerships that may provide the opportunity to expand to other chronic diseases. A benefit of collaboration is that learning is two-directional, and interaction with other international medical education collaborators is likely to be of benefit to the larger global health community.

  1. [Reflections on the clinical reports «minimum data set»].

    PubMed

    Prieto de Paula, J M; Franco Hidalgo, S

    2012-02-01

    Royal Decree 1093/2010 (3 September 2010) establishes the minimum data set that the clinical reports of discharges and outpatient visits elaborated in the facilities of the National Health System should contain, among others. Until then, the Ministerial Order 221/1984, that only required the drawing up of a discharge report for patients seen in a hospital-regime health care establishment, was in force. In spite of the importance of these documents, their quality is far from that desired, especially that of the reports on visits, which, among other things, are not performed in a high percentage of the cases. Recently the Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI) (Spanish Society of Internal Medicine), in collaboration with other scientific societies, issued some recommendations for the drawing up of the discharge reports. In this present work, a series of thoughts are made on the implications of the new decree, especially in the case of the reports of the outpatient clinics.

  2. Perspectives in medical education: 6 reflections on the state of clinical training for residents in Japan.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Harsha

    2007-12-01

    The Muribushi Project in Okinawa, Japan, is breaking new ground for residency training in Japan by explicitly emphasizing clinical skills training and primary care. The core philosophy of the Project is defined by seven "concepts" that commit to (i) establishing cooperation between several hospitals to educate good clinicians; (ii) providing the best learning environment at multiple training sites; (iii) following global standards of practice; (iv) focusing on primary and emergency care of common diseases; (v) emphasizing faculty development through international exchange; (vi) providing residents with opportunities to obtain training abroad; and (vii) improving the quality of medical care through residents. Observations by the author during two week-long visits, one year apart, reveal that the Muribushi Project is fulfilling conceptual goals (iv), (v) and (vi) by emphasizing primary care and encouraging international exchange for faculty and students. The opportunity exists to fulfill goals (i) and (ii), but it is not being exploited because programs at member hospitals are not integrated, so that residents spend the duration of their residency at one location, and there is no formal system of rotations that would broaden their clinical experience. The Project is failing to meet a sixth goal of following global standards of care (goal #iii) and it is too early to say if it's pioneering approach to residency training is having an impact on healthcare in Japan (goal #vii). On balance, the Project's success in implementing elements of its core philosophy for residency training in the tradition-bound environment of Japan is particularly laudable.

  3. Pentosidine, an Advanced Glycation End-Product, May Reflect Clinical and Morphological Features of Hand Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Martin; Hulejová, Hana; Gatterová, Jindřiška; Filková, Mária; Pavelková, Andrea; Šléglová, Olga; Kaspříková, Nikola; Vencovský, Jiří; Pavelka, Karel; Šenolt, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates pentosidine levels, an advanced glycation end-product, in patients with erosive and non-erosive hand osteoarthritis (HOA) and determine its potential association with clinical findings and imaging-defined joint damage. Pentosidine was measured by HPLC in serum and urine of 53 females with HOA (31 erosive and 22 non-erosive HOA) and normalised to the total serum protein or urinary creatinine, respectively. Pain, joint stiffness and disability were assessed by the Australian/Canadian OA hand index (AUSCAN). The hand radiographs scored according to the Kallman grading scale were assessed to determine a baseline value and reassessed after two years. The levels of urine pentosidine, but not of serum pentosidine, were higher in patients with erosive HOA than in non-erosive HOA (p=0.039). Urinary pentosidine correlated with CRP (r=0.302, p=0.031), ESR (r=0.288, p=0.041) and AUSCAN (r=0.408, p=0.003). Serum pentosidine, but not in urine, significantly correlated with the Kallman radiographic score in erosive HOA at the baseline (r=0.409, p=0.022) and after 2 years (r=0.385, p=0.032). However, when corrected for age and disease duration, only correlation between urine pentosidine and AUSCAN remained significant (r=0.397, p=0.004). Our data suggest that serum and urine pentosidine levels may relate to the distinctive clinical and morphological features of HOA. PMID:22715350

  4. Portable (handheld) clinical device for quantitative spectroscopy of skin, utilizing spatial frequency domain reflectance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saager, Rolf B.; Dang, An N.; Huang, Samantha S.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2017-09-01

    Spatial Frequency Domain Spectroscopy (SFDS) is a technique for quantifying in-vivo tissue optical properties. SFDS employs structured light patterns that are projected onto tissues using a spatial light modulator, such as a digital micromirror device. In combination with appropriate models of light propagation, this technique can be used to quantify tissue optical properties (absorption, μa, and scattering, μs', coefficients) and chromophore concentrations. Here we present a handheld implementation of an SFDS device that employs line (one dimensional) imaging. This instrument can measure 1088 spatial locations that span a 3 cm line as opposed to our original benchtop SFDS system that only collects a single 1 mm diameter spot. This imager, however, retains the spectral resolution (˜1 nm) and range (450-1000 nm) of our original benchtop SFDS device. In the context of homogeneous turbid media, we demonstrate that this new system matches the spectral response of our original system to within 1% across a typical range of spatial frequencies (0-0.35 mm-1). With the new form factor, the device has tremendously improved mobility and portability, allowing for greater ease of use in a clinical setting. A smaller size also enables access to different tissue locations, which increases the flexibility of the device. The design of this portable system not only enables SFDS to be used in clinical settings but also enables visualization of properties of layered tissues such as skin.

  5. The invisible basal cell carcinoma: how reflectance confocal microscopy improves the diagnostic accuracy of clinically unclear facial macules and papules.

    PubMed

    Ruini, C; Hartmann, D; Saral, S; Krammer, S; Ruzicka, T; von Braunmühl, T

    2016-11-01

    Difficult to diagnose and early non-melanoma skin cancer lesions are frequently seen in daily clinical practice. Besides precancerous lesions such as actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) score the highest frequency in skin tumors. While infiltrative and nodular BCCs require a surgical treatment with a significant impact on the patients' quality of life, early and superficial BCCs might benefit from numerous conservative treatments, such as topical immune-modulators or photodynamic therapy. Dermoscopy has shown a high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of early BCCs, and non-invasive imaging techniques like reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) have proven to be helpful. The aim of our study was to investigate the importance of RCM in the diagnosis of BCCs with indistinct clinical and dermoscopic features. We retrospectively examined 27 histologically proven BCCs in which diagnosis was not possible based on naked eye examination; we separately reviewed clinical, dermoscopic, and confocal microscopy features and evaluated the lesions meeting the common diagnostic criteria for BCCs, and our diagnostic confidence. All lesions were clinically unclear, with no characteristic features suggestive for BCC; dermoscopy showed in most cases unspecific teleangiectasias (74 %) and micro-erosions (52 %). Confocal microscopy revealed in most of the cases the presence of specific criteria: peripheral palisading of the nuclei (89 %), clefting (70 %), stromal reaction (70 %), dark silhouettes (70 %), inflammatory particles (70 %), and tumor islands (67 %). In the absence of significant diagnostic clinical signs and with unclear dermoscopic features, specific confocal patterns were present in most of the lesions and enabled a correct diagnosis. In the absence of significant clinical features of BCC and in the case of uncertain dermoscopy, striking confocal features are detectable and easy to recognize in most cases. Confocal microscopy can therefore be

  6. Effects of overnight captivity on antioxidant capacity and clinical chemistry of wild southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons).

    PubMed

    Debrincat, Steven; Taggart, David; Rich, Brian; Beveridge, Ian; Boardman, Wayne; Dibben, Ron

    2014-09-01

    An animal's antioxidant capacity is measured by its ability to quench reactive oxygen species (ROS). During everyday metabolism, antioxidants and ROS are in equilibrium with one another. In times of stress, an animal produces more ROS and therefore uses its antioxidant capacity more readily in order to maintain this equilibrium. When the production of ROS exceeds the antioxidant capacity, an animal will experience extensive oxidative stress, which can ultimately affect that animal's health. During experimental study of wild animals, it is often necessary to capture them for a short period of time. In order to obtain a measurement of the effects of short-term captivity on oxidative capacity in wild animals, a population of southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) in Swan Reach, South Australia (34.57 degrees S, 139.60 degrees E), was studied. To assess the variation in antioxidant capacity, two assays, the ferric reducing ability of plasma and the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, were performed. A third assay, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, was used to measure the effects of ROS. Measurements of the specific antioxidants uric acid, ascorbic acid, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, and superoxide dismutase were also performed. The biochemical parameters albumin, total protein, cholinesterase, creatinine, and urea were measured as indicators for health. Results showed a significant reduction in antioxidant capacity during the overnight period of captivity.

  7. Shouting through bullet-proof glass: some reflections on pharmacotherapy provision in one Australian clinic.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sione

    2013-11-01

    The Opioid Substitution Treatment Program in New South Wales and Australia has a serious impact on the day to day lives of many people. The program and those consumers who rely upon it are seen with ambivalence by many in the wider community, and many consumers are discriminated against. It seems, to those of us who are engaged in it, that the system itself is confusing and sometimes arbitrary, and that a range of priorities other than clinical need dominate our experience of treatment. These pressures can manifest for us consumers as a punitive and unresponsive treatment experience that, rather than assisting us to live our lives, actually places barriers in our way and ties us up in knots that will take a long time to unravel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reflections on clinical applications of yoga in voice therapy with MTD.

    PubMed

    Moore, Carmelle

    2012-12-01

    This paper explores the application of modified yoga techniques, as an adjunct to voice therapy, by a speech pathologist who is also a yoga teacher. Yoga practices, with effects that may be short-term, are not considered a substitute for comprehensive and integrated somatic retraining systems (such as the Alexander Technique or Feldenkrais ATM). However, when yoga is conducted emphasizing kinaesthetic and proprioceptive awareness, the client may achieve an 'awareness state' that facilitates the learning of vocal remediation techniques (for example, by more easily 'tuning in' to the subtle sensations of supralaryngeal deconstriction). Core yoga elements and clinical applications are identified. The potential benefits and considerations when using yoga as an adjunct to the treatment of muscle tension dysphonia (MTD) are explored.

  9. Clinical neurological examination vs electrophysiological studies: Reflections from experiences in occupational medicine.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2015-06-26

    Seventy-five percent of upper limb disorders that are related to work are regarded as diagnostically unclassifiable and therefore challenging to the clinician. Therefore it has been generally less successfully to prevent and treat these common and frequently disabling disorders. To reach a diagnosis requires the identification of the responsible pathology and the involved tissues and structures. Consequently, improved diagnostic approaches are needed. This editorial discusses the potentials of using the clinical neurologic examination in patients with upper limb complaints related to work. It is argued that a simple but systematic physical approach permits the examiner to frequently identify patterns of neurological findings that suggest nerve afflictions and their locations, and that electrophysiological studies are less likely to identify pathology. A diagnostic algorithm for the physical assessment is provided to assist the clinician. Failure to include representative neurological items in the physical examination may result in patients being misinterpreted, misdiagnosed and mistreated.

  10. Moral professional personhood: ethical reflections during initial clinical encounters in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Lemonidou, Chryssoula; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Papadatou, Danai

    2004-03-01

    Moral agency is an important constituent of the nursing role. We explored issues of ethical development in Greek nursing students during clinical practice at the beginning of their studies. Specifically, we aimed to explore students' lived experience of ethics, and their perceptions and understanding of encountered ethical conflicts through phenomenological analysis of written narratives. The process of developing an awareness of personal values through empathizing with patients was identified as the core theme of the students' experience. Six more common themes were identified. Development of the students' moral awareness was conceptualized as a set of stages, commencing with empathizing with patients and nurses, moving on to taking a moral stand and, finally, concluding by becoming aware of their personal values and showing evidence of an emerging professional moral personhood. The notions of empathy, caring and emotion were in evidence throughout the students' experience. Implications for practice and nurse education are discussed.

  11. Skeletal muscle MRI magnetisation transfer ratio reflects clinical severity in peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C D J; Morrow, J M; Miranda, M A; Davagnanam, I; Cowley, P C; Mehta, H; Hanna, M G; Koltzenburg, M; Yousry, T A; Reilly, M M; Thornton, J S

    2012-01-01

    MRI may provide treatment outcome measures in neuromuscular conditions. The authors assessed MRI magnetisation transfer ratios (MTRs) in lower-limb musculature as markers of pathology in peripheral neuropathies and compared the findings with associated clinical data. Ten patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) and nine patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) were compared with 10 healthy subjects. The MTR in the calf muscles was significantly lower than controls in the two patient groups (both p<0.001). The median MTRs (IQR) were 50.5(1.6) percentage units (p.u.) (control), 41.5(10.6) p.u. (CMT1A) and 39.3(8.7) p.u. (CIDP). Moreover, anterior lower leg MTR correlated strongly with strength of ankle dorsiflexion, measured with the Medical Research Council scale, in CIDP (ρ=0.88, p<0.001) and also in CMT1A (ρ=0.50, p<0.05), where MTR also showed an association with disease duration (ρ=-0.86, p<0.001). Short tau inversion recovery MRI of the same muscles showed abnormalities associated with regions of reduced MTR (p<0.001), and MTR was also reduced in other muscles otherwise deemed normal appearing (p<0.001), indicating that MTR may be more sensitive to muscle damaged by denervation than conventional MRI. The significant reductions in muscle MTR in peripheral neuropathies and the associated correlations with clinical measures indicate that MTR has potential as an imaging outcome measure in future therapeutic trials.

  12. Serum TNF-α levels reflect the clinical severity of envenomation following a Hemiscorpius lepturus sting.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Amir; Pipelzadeh, Mohammad H; Taraz, Mohammad; Khodadadi, Ali; Makvandi, Manocher; Rowan, Edward G

    2011-03-01

    Hemiscorpius lepturus (H. lepturus), found in south-western areas of Iran and south of Iraq, is considered to be the most dangerous scorpion in the region, and poses a significant risk to the health of the indigenous population due to the unique, clinical manifestations associated with its sting.. In the present study, 36 patients from the Khuzestan province in the southwest of Iran, displaying varying degrees of envenomation following an H. lepturus scorpion sting, were admitted to hospital. Serum levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured using double-ligand, enzyme-linked, immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, and were compared with 30 healthy controls and ten age-matched patients stung by the Mesobuthus eupeus (M. eupeus) scorpion, a less dangerous species that produces primarily neurotoxic manifestations. Blood samples from M. eupeus and H. lepturus victims were taken on admission, and from H. lepturus-stung patients six hours after serotherapy with multivalent anti-venom. When compared to healthy volunteers, with the exception of TNF-α, significantly higher serum cytokine levels were measured in patients following M. eupeus envenomation. However, all three groups of H. lepturus-stung patients showed significantly, and in a severity-related manner, higher mean values for all the interleukins that were measured, including TNF-α, when compared with M. eupeus-stung cases. Six hours after serotherapy, there was a greater reduction in cytokine and TNF-α levels in patients classed as having mild symptoms, in comparison with patients classed as having moderate to severe symptoms. The results of the present study suggest that, unlike M. eupeus, the toxic manifestations observed following being stung by H. lepturus are associated with increased serum TNF-α levels and correlate positively with the clinical severity of the symptoms. Furthermore, serotherapy is only effective when

  13. Integrated clinical and quality improvement coaching in Son La Province, Vietnam: a model of building public sector capacity for sustainable HIV care delivery.

    PubMed

    Cosimi, Lisa A; Dam, Huong V; Nguyen, Thai Q; Ho, Huyen T; Do, Phuong T; Duc, Duat N; Nguyen, Huong T; Gardner, Bridget; Libman, Howard; Pollack, Todd; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2015-07-17

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy included extensive training and onsite support to build the capacity of HIV health care workers. However, traditional efforts aimed at strengthening knowledge and skills often are not successful at improving gaps in the key health systems required for sustaining high quality care. We trained and mentored existing staff of the Son La provincial health department and provincial HIV clinic to work as a provincial coaching team (PCT) to provide integrated coaching in clinical HIV skills and quality improvement (QI) to the HIV clinics in the province. Nine core indicators were measured through chart extraction by clinic and provincial staff at baseline and at 6 month intervals thereafter. Coaching from the team to each of the clinics, in both QI and clinical skills, was guided by results of performance measurements, gap analyses, and resulting QI plans. After 18 months, the PCT had successfully spread QI activities, and was independently providing regular coaching to the provincial general hospital clinic and six of the eight district clinics in the province. The frequency and type of coaching was determined by performance measurement results. Clinics completed a mean of five QI projects. Quality of HIV care was improved throughout all clinics with significant increases in seven of the indicators. Overall both the PCT activities and clinic performance were sustained after integration of the model into the Vietnam National QI Program. We successfully built capacity of a team of public sector health care workers to provide integrated coaching in both clinical skills and QI across a province. The PCT is a feasible and effective model to spread and sustain quality activities and improve HIV care services in a decentralized rural setting.

  14. Topical anesthesia in preterm neonate: a reflection on the underutilization in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Marcatto, Juliana de Oliveira; Tavares, Eduardo Carlos; Silva, Yerkes Pereira E

    2010-03-01

    Premature neonates are customarily submitted to invasive painful procedures during their stay in NICUs that are necessary to maintain their clinically stability. Topical anesthesia is a good option to be considered in the treatment of interventions that lead to mild to moderate pain and has the advantage of no systemic effects. In Brazil the most known topical anesthetic available for use is the eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA® cream). Its efficacy in the treatment of cutaneous painful procedures is well established for children and adults. Its utilization in neonates has been investigated also due to the risk to develop methemoglobinemia. The procedures in which topical anesthesia would be well indicated are those related to mild to moderate pain like: arterial and venous punction, hell lance puncture, lumbar puncture and percutaneous central catheter installation. The studies in the literature have so far lead to different conclusions, mainly depending on the type of the procedure and also due to the use of very different methodologies. The possibility of a direct pain evaluation may decrease the methodological bias leading to a more accurate evaluation of the efficacy of the topical anesthesia and also allowing comparisons among the indirect pain measures used so far.

  15. [Ethical reflections and recommendations for making clinical decisions in the care of the healthy newborn].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Escartín, M C; López de Heredia Goya, J; Aguayo Maldonado, M J; Blanco Bravo, D; Molina Morales, V

    2012-12-01

    The care of healthy newborn during their stay in health centres is not usually a problem and there are few conflicts in the relationship with the family. Conflicts may arise because the parents do not accept the care or care routines that health professionals provide. They believe that the newborn does not require testing or prophylactic measures, such as administration of vitamin K, or puncture to obtain a blood sample for newborn screening. This is because the information they have is not adequate, or because they reject some measures as they are invasive and that from their point of view, do not correspond to the care of a healthy newborn. This document seeks to reconcile the values of family and participation in the care of their child, the rights of the newborn, and the values of health professionals. It is based on adequate information, a good clinical relationship, and discussion in case of discrepancies that can lead to changes in some procedures that are not essential in the care of the newborn.

  16. Application of Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transformed Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy To Determine the Chlorogenic Acid Isomer Profile and Antioxidant Capacity of Coffee Beans.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ningjian; Lu, Xiaonan; Hu, Yaxi; Kitts, David D

    2016-01-27

    The chlorogenic acid isomer profile and antioxidant activity of both green and roasted coffee beans are reported herein using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy combined with chemometric analyses. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) quantified different chlorogenic acid isomer contents for reference, whereas ORAC, ABTS, and DPPH were used to determine the antioxidant activity of the same coffee bean extracts. FTIR spectral data and reference data of 42 coffee bean samples were processed to build optimized PLSR models, and 18 samples were used for external validation of constructed PLSR models. In total, six PLSR models were constructed for six chlorogenic acid isomers to predict content, with three PLSR models constructed to forecast the free radical scavenging activities, obtained using different chemical assays. In conclusion, FTIR spectroscopy, coupled with PLSR, serves as a reliable, nondestructive, and rapid analytical method to quantify chlorogenic acids and to assess different free radical-scavenging capacities in coffee beans.

  17. Can procedural and substantive elements of decision-making be reconciled in assessments of mental capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Banner, Natalie F.

    2016-01-01

    Capacity legislation aims to protect individual autonomy and avoid undue paternalism as far as possible, partly through ensuring patients are not deemed to lack capacity because they make an unwise decision. To this end, the law employs a procedural test of capacity that excludes substantive judgments about patients’ decisions. However, clinical intuitions about patients’ capacity to make decisions about their treatment often conflict with a strict reading of the legal criteria for assessing capacity, particularly in psychiatry. In this article I argue that this tension arises because the procedural conception of capacity is inadequate and does not reflect the clinical or legal realities of assessing capacity. I propose that conceptualising capacity as having ‘recognisable reasons’ for a treatment decision provides a practical way of legitimately incorporating both procedural and substantive elements of decision-making into assessments of capacity. PMID:27891169

  18. Making clinical case-based learning in veterinary medicine visible: analysis of collaborative concept-mapping processes and reflections.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Deep K; Volet, Simone E; Bolton, John R

    2014-01-01

    The value of collaborative concept mapping in assisting students to develop an understanding of complex concepts across a broad range of basic and applied science subjects is well documented. Less is known about students' learning processes that occur during the construction of a concept map, especially in the context of clinical cases in veterinary medicine. This study investigated the unfolding collaborative learning processes that took place in real-time concept mapping of a clinical case by veterinary medical students and explored students' and their teacher's reflections on the value of this activity. This study had two parts. The first part investigated the cognitive and metacognitive learning processes of two groups of students who displayed divergent learning outcomes in a concept mapping task. Meaningful group differences were found in their level of learning engagement in terms of the extent to which they spent time understanding and co-constructing knowledge along with completing the task at hand. The second part explored students' and their teacher's views on the value of concept mapping as a learning and teaching tool. The students' and their teacher's perceptions revealed congruent and contrasting notions about the usefulness of concept mapping. The relevance of concept mapping to clinical case-based learning in veterinary medicine is discussed, along with directions for future research.

  19. Portable handheld diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system for clinical evaluation of skin: a pilot study in psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Guo, Jean-Yan; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Huang, Hung Ji; Chou, Shih-Jie; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been utilized to study biological tissues for a variety of applications. However, many DRS systems are not designed for handheld use and/or relatively expensive which limit the extensive clinical use of this technique. In this paper, we report a handheld, low-cost DRS system consisting of a light source, optical switch, and a spectrometer, that can precisely quantify the optical properties of tissue samples in the clinical setting. The handheld DRS system was employed to determine the skin chromophore concentrations, absorption and scattering properties of 11 patients with psoriasis. The measurement results were compared to the clinical severity of psoriasis as evaluated by dermatologist using PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) scores. Our statistical analyses indicated that the handheld DRS system could be a useful non-invasive tool for objective evaluation of the severity of psoriasis. It is expected that the handheld system can be used for the objective evaluation and monitoring of various skin diseases such as keloid and psoriasis.

  20. Reflections on Ethics and Humanity in Pediatric Neurology: the Value of Recognizing Ethical Issues in Common Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Gabriel M; Rosenbaum, Peter L

    2017-05-01

    Our goals in this reflection are to (i) identify the ethical dimensions inherent in any clinical encounter and (ii) bring to the forefront of our pediatric neurology practice the myriad of opportunities to explore and learn from these ethical questions. We highlight specifically Beauchamp and Childress's principles of biomedical ethics. We use the terms ethics in common clinical practice and an ethical lens to remind people of the ubiquity of ethical situations and the usefulness of using existing ethical principles to analyze and resolve difficult situations in clinical practice. We start with a few common situations with which many of us tend to struggle. We describe what we understand as ethics and how and why developments in technology, novel potential interventions, policies, and societal perspectives challenge us to think about and debate ethical issues. Individual patients are not a singular population; each patient has their own unique life situations, culture, goals, and expectations that need to be considered with a good dose of humanity and humility. We believe that using an ethical lens-by which we mean making an explicit effort to identify and consider these issues openly-will help us to achieve this goal in practice, education, and research.

  1. Portable handheld diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system for clinical evaluation of skin: a pilot study in psoriasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Guo, Jean-Yan; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Huang, Hung Ji; Chou, Shih-Jie; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been utilized to study biological tissues for a variety of applications. However, many DRS systems are not designed for handheld use and/or relatively expensive which limit the extensive clinical use of this technique. In this paper, we report a handheld, low-cost DRS system consisting of a light source, optical switch, and a spectrometer, that can precisely quantify the optical properties of tissue samples in the clinical setting. The handheld DRS system was employed to determine the skin chromophore concentrations, absorption and scattering properties of 11 patients with psoriasis. The measurement results were compared to the clinical severity of psoriasis as evaluated by dermatologist using PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) scores. Our statistical analyses indicated that the handheld DRS system could be a useful non-invasive tool for objective evaluation of the severity of psoriasis. It is expected that the handheld system can be used for the objective evaluation and monitoring of various skin diseases such as keloid and psoriasis. PMID:26977366

  2. [Passive euthanasia in clinical practice--the medical decision reflected in the legal position].

    PubMed

    Möller, T; Grabensee, B; Frister, H

    2008-05-01

    Doctors are often confronted with end-of-life decisions. When deciding on the withdrawal of medical treatment physicians have to consider the legal position. This study was done to evaluated how far doctors at the university medical center in Düsseldorf had acted in conformity with the established case law in Germany. Between April and August 2006 doctors at the university medical center in Düsseldorf filled in a standardized questionnaire about the decisions they had taken to withdraw life-support treatment. 128 of a total of 512 doctors questioned replied (25 %; 32,8 % females and 67,2 % males) . The survey showed that the judicial decision (that it is not necessary to provide treatment if life-support measures are not indicated) is largely determined by non-medical criteria. The clinical decision by doctors depended mainly on his personal opinion. Furthermore the survey showed that only a few doctors made use of the - lawful - option to withdraw medical treatment when this was not indicated. Finally the survey revealed that, in case of conflict between indication and perceived patients' wishes, the vast majority of doctors behaved in contravention of the decisions established by case law. There is the need to discuss what non-medical issues should be taken into account when determining the indication of withdrawal of life-support measures. The results also highlighted the uncertainties that exist regarding a doctor's decisions about it. Not only should legislation clarify whether "passive euthanasia" is allowed, but it would also be useful to delegate end-of-life decisions to a review board.

  3. Early Chimerism After Liver Transplantation Reflects the Clinical Course of Recurrent Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Masashi; Takaki, Akinobu; Umeda, Yuzo; Koike, Kazuko; Napier, Stephanie C; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Shinoura, Susumu; Yoshida, Ryuichi; Nobuoka, Daisuke; Yasunaka, Tetsuya; Oto, Takahiro; Araki, Motoo; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Yagi, Takahito

    2017-03-24

    BACKGROUND Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch is a characteristic feature of post-orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) hepatitis C. To investigate the importance of donor HLA-restricted immune cells in post-OLT hepatitis C recurrence, we analyzed the frequency of donor chimerism and the clinical course of post-OLT hepatitis C. MATERIAL AND METHODS We analyzed peripheral blood chimerism in 11 HCV-reinfected patients with post-HLA mismatched OLT. Patients were divided into 2 groups: the OLT chronic hepatitis C (CHC) group (n=8), exhibiting active hepatitis C recurrence; and the OLT-persistently normal ALT (PNALT) group (n=3), without active hepatitis. Chimerism was analyzed by flow cytometry using donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1-100 days after OLT. Kidney (n=7) and lung (n=7) transplant recipients were also analyzed for comparison. As immune cells from the donor liver might contribute to post-OLT chimerism, the characteristics of perfusates from donor livers (n=10) were analyzed and defined. RESULTS Donor-derived cells were frequently observed in liver and lung transplant recipients. The frequency of donor-derived cells from the B cell subset was significantly higher in peripheral blood from OLT-CHC group than in that of the OLT-PNALT group. B cells, however, were not the predominant subset in the perfusates, indicating that inflow of donor-derived cells alone did not cause the chimerism. CONCLUSIONS Chimerism of B cells is frequent in liver transplant patients with early recurrence of hepatitis C. We propose that monitoring of early chimerism could facilitate early detection of chronic hepatitis C recurrence, although we need more cases to investigate.

  4. Using videoed simulated clinical interaction to promote communication skills and reflective practice for overseas-born medical students.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kathryn; Hamilton, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a teaching intervention designed to promote the clinical communications skills of overseas-born medical students through critical reflection on the practice of others. Using a staged process and a video recording of a simulated medical interaction it investigated the extent to which the participants were able to anticipate, identify and resolve the targeted communication issues, and demonstrate selected skills in a simulated interaction. Data comprised worksheet notes, transcriptions (group discussions) and completed questionnaires (ratings and comments). Analysis was thematic (worksheet notes, transcription, questionnaire feedback) and quantitative (questionnaire ratings). The results suggest the notion of reflective practice could be productively extended to take account of current developments in pedagogy and learning. This includes providing opportunities for students to share ideas, resolve differences and ambiguities, and address gaps in their communication skills as well as to apply learned concepts and receive targeted feedback. While the intervention specifically targeted overseas-born medical students, the approach described in the paper has potential for developing the communication skills of 'local' medical students and healthcare professionals more generally.

  5. [In vivo reflectance-mode confocal laser microscopy: basic principles and clinical and research employments in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Levi, Assi; Ingber, Arieh; Enk, David Claes

    2012-10-01

    Reflectance-mode confocal scanning laser microscopy is a novel, non-invasive imaging technique which permits real time visualization of cellular components in the skin at a resolution close to that of conventional histology. It has been widely used in the diagnosis of both benign and malignant tumors of the skin. In recent years it was also employed in the investigation of a variety of inflammatory and infectious skin conditions. The non-invasive nature of the procedure allows examination of multiple lesions and/ or repetitive sampling of one lesion over time, making it an excellent tool for followup and for monitoring treatment outcome in medical and cosmetic dermatology. This review summarizes the main indications for the use of this novel technique in clinical and experimental dermatology.

  6. From Cases to Capacity? A Critical Reflection on the Role of ‘Ethical Dilemmas’ in the Development of Dual-Use Governance

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Brett; Revill, James; Bezuidenhout, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The dual-use issue is often framed as a series of paralyzing ‘dilemmas’ facing the scientific community as well as institutions which support innovation. While this conceptualization of the dual-use issue can be useful in certain contexts (such as in awareness-raising and as part of educational activities directed at the scientific community) its usefulness is more limited when reflecting on the governance and politics of the dual-use issue. Within this paper, key shortcomings of the dilemma framing are outlined. It is argued that many of the issues raised in the most recent debates about ‘dual-use’ bird flu research remain unresolved. This includes questions about the trajectories of certain lines of research, as well as broader trends in the practice and governance of science. This leads to difficult questions about current approaches to the dual-use issue within the US, as well as internationally. PMID:23703451

  7. From cases to capacity? A critical reflection on the role of 'ethical dilemmas' in the development of dual-use governance.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brett; Revill, James; Bezuidenhout, Louise

    2014-06-01

    The dual-use issue is often framed as a series of paralyzing 'dilemmas' facing the scientific community as well as institutions which support innovation. While this conceptualization of the dual-use issue can be useful in certain contexts (such as in awareness-raising and as part of educational activities directed at the scientific community) its usefulness is more limited when reflecting on the governance and politics of the dual-use issue. Within this paper, key shortcomings of the dilemma framing are outlined. It is argued that many of the issues raised in the most recent debates about 'dual-use' bird flu research remain unresolved. This includes questions about the trajectories of certain lines of research, as well as broader trends in the practice and governance of science. This leads to difficult questions about current approaches to the dual-use issue within the US, as well as internationally.

  8. The CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score reflects clinical outcomes in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients with an initial cardioembolic stroke.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ichiro; Hayashi, Takeshi; Ohe, Yasuko; Kato, Yuji; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Fukuoka, Takuya; Maruyama, Hajime; Horiuchi, Yohsuke; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-11-01

    Whether the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score reflects severity or clinical outcomes in patients with an initial cardioembolic stroke associated with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NAVF) was investigated. This study included 327 patients hospitalized between April 2007 and March 2012 for an initial cardioembolic stroke associated with NVAF with no history of stroke. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on admission and clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score after 90 days) were retrospectively evaluated according to the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score. CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc scores were 0, 3.1%; 1, 9.1%; 2, 24.5%; 3, 26%; 4, 20.8%; 5, 14.4%; and 6, 2.1%. The median NIHSS scores for CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc scores of 0-6 were 4.5, 8, 8, 10, 11, 17, and 23, respectively. Severity differed according to the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score. The clinical outcomes according to the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc scores were as follows: score 0, mRS scores of 0-2 (80%) and 3-6 (20%); score 1, mRS scores of 0-2 (80%) and 3-6 (20%); score 2, mRS scores of 0-2 (64%) and 3-6 (36%); score 3, mRS scores of 0-2 (48%) and 3-6 (52%); score 4, mRS scores of 0-2 (28%) and 3-6 (72%); score 5, mRS scores of 0-2 (26%) and 3-6 (74%); and score 6, mRS scores of 0-2 (29%) and 3-6 (71%). The clinical outcome worsened as the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score increased. On logistic regression analysis, age, NIHSS score on admission, and thrombolytic therapy were related to a clinical outcome. The severity of NVAF-induced initial cardioembolic stroke increased with higher CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc scores, and the outcomes were poor. The present study suggests that the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score may be useful not only for the evaluation of stroke risk but also for the prediction of clinical outcomes after stroke. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Real-time In Vivo Tissue Characterization with Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy during Transthoracic Lung Biopsy: A Clinical Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Spliethoff, Jarich W; Prevoo, Warner; Meier, Mark A J; de Jong, Jeroen; Klomp, Houke M; Evers, Daniel J; Sterenborg, Hendricus J C M; Lucassen, Gerald W; Hendriks, Benno H W; Ruers, Theodoor J M

    2016-01-15

    This study presents the first in vivo real-time tissue characterization during image-guided percutaneous lung biopsies using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) sensing at the tip of a biopsy needle with integrated optical fibers. Tissues from 21 consented patients undergoing lung cancer surgery were measured intraoperatively using the fiber-optic platform capable of assessing various physical tissue properties highly correlated to tissue architecture and composition. In addition, the method was tested for clinical use by performing DRS tissue sensing during 11 routine biopsy procedures in patients with suspected lung cancer. We found that water content and scattering amplitude are the primary discriminators for the transition from healthy lung tissue to tumor tissue and that the reliability of these parameters is not affected by the amount of blood at the needle tip. In the 21 patients measured intraoperatively, the water-to-scattering ratio yielded a 56% to 81% contrast difference between tumor and surrounding tissue. Analysis of the 11 image-guided lung biopsy procedures showed that the tissue diagnosis derived from DRS was diagnostically discriminant in each clinical case. DRS tissue sensing integrated into a biopsy needle may be a powerful new tool for biopsy guidance that can be readily used in routine diagnostic lung biopsy procedures. This approach may not only help to increase the successful biopsy yield for histopathologic analysis, but may also allow specific sampling of vital tumor tissue for genetic profiling. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. The Leishmaniasis East Africa Platform (LEAP): strengthening clinical trial capacity in resource-limited countries to deliver new treatments for visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Wasunna, Monique; Musa, Ahmed; Hailu, Asrat; Khalil, Eltahir A. G.; Olobo, Joseph; Juma, Rashid; Wells, Susan; Alvar, Jorge; Balasegaram, Manica

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease endemic in East Africa where improved patient-adapted treatments are needed. The Leishmaniasis East Africa Platform (LEAP) was created in 2003 to strengthen clinical research capacity, serve as a base for training, and evaluate and facilitate implementation of new treatments. Major infrastructure upgrades and personnel training have been carried out. A short course of Sodium Stibogluconate and Paramomycin (SSG&PM) was evaluated and is now first-line treatment in the region; alternative treatments have also been assessed. LEAP can serve as a successful model of collaboration between different partners and countries when conducting clinical research in endemic countries to international standards. PMID:27268714

  11. Context Impact of Clinical Scenario on Knowledge Transfer and Reasoning Capacity in a Medical Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collard, A.; Brédart, S.; Bourguignon, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, the faculty of Medicine at the University of Liège has integrated problem-based learning (PBL) seminars from year two to seven in its seven-year curriculum. The PBL approach has been developed to facilitate students' acquisition of reasoning capacity. This contextualized learning raises the question of the de- and re-contextualization…

  12. Context Impact of Clinical Scenario on Knowledge Transfer and Reasoning Capacity in a Medical Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collard, A.; Brédart, S.; Bourguignon, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, the faculty of Medicine at the University of Liège has integrated problem-based learning (PBL) seminars from year two to seven in its seven-year curriculum. The PBL approach has been developed to facilitate students' acquisition of reasoning capacity. This contextualized learning raises the question of the de- and re-contextualization…

  13. Experiential learning in women's health: medical student reflections.

    PubMed

    Carr, Sandra; Carmody, Dianne

    2006-08-01

    Reflection on clinical experience is used by medical students to enhance the development of clinical practice skills and professional behaviours in the area of obstetrics and gynaecology. It is applied through small-group reflective tutorials, writing reflective summaries and one-to-one discussion of reflections with staff. To identify the levels of critical reflection achieved and explore the emergent themes in students' written reflections. Thematic analysis was undertaken to document the recurring emergent themes on which students chose to reflect and the depth of reflection students achieved. Most students reflected on clinical, communication and reasoning skills, lack of medical knowledge, and the development of their own and others' professional practice. The 4 levels of reflection students demonstrated were: listing, where students only state the clinical experience; describing, where students describe the clinical experience, including what they did well and what they did not; applying, where students discuss what they need to change and how to develop, and integrating, where students apply reflection to future clinical practice. Few respondents demonstrated the ability to reflect to the level of integration except with facilitated discussion. The range of experiences on which students reflected was appropriate. The information obtained from the emergent themes has been useful for programme development. At the end of the process students were still not reflecting at the level of integration. This affirms that reflectivity is a skill that develops throughout life. Evaluating the level of reflection achieved and discussing this explicitly with the student may be instrumental in helping the student develop his or her reflective capacity further.

  14. Reflecting Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galea, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of…

  15. Reflecting Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galea, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of…

  16. Identifying Organizational Capacities and Incentives for Clinical Data-sharing: The Case of a Regional Perinatal Information System

    PubMed Central

    Korst, Lisa M.; Signer, Jordana M.K.; Aydin, Carolyn E.; Fink, Arlene

    2008-01-01

    The development of regional data-sharing among healthcare organizations is viewed as an important step in the development of health information technology (HIT), but little is known about this complex task. This is a case study of a regional perinatal data system that involved four hospitals, together responsible for over 10,000 births annually. Using standard qualitative methods, we chronicled project milestones, and identified 31 “critical incidents” that delayed or prevented their achievement. We then used these critical incidents to articulate six organizational capacity domains associated with the achievement of project milestones, and a seventh domain consisting of organizational incentives. Finally, we analyzed the relationship of milestone achievement to the presence of these capacities and incentives. This data center case suggests four requirements for sharing data across organizations: 1) a readiness assessment; 2) a perceived mandate; 3) a formal governance structure; and 4) a third party IT component. PMID:18096916

  17. 1987 Volvo award in clinical sciences. The perception of back pain and the role of psychophysical tests of lifting capacity.

    PubMed

    Troup, J D; Foreman, T K; Baxter, C E; Brown, D

    1987-09-01

    In order to study the predictive value of pre-employment screening tests, a volunteer population of 1,741 men and 1,150 women was questioned about their experience of low-back pain (LBP) and their perception of physical exertion at work. They undertook a battery of tests, including psychophysical assessments of lifting capacity, and they were followed up by postal questionnaire after 1 year. The response rate was 88.7%. The psychophysical tests have proved to be simple and inexpensive to administer; in good hands, they are repeatable. Although psychophysical lifting capacity was less in those with previous LBP, the psychophysical strength tests were poor predictors of future LBP. But when the previous history of LBP was known, then the test results significantly enhanced the prediction.

  18. Falls and their association with physical tests, functional capacity, clinical and demographic factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Mariana de Almeida; Roma, Izabela; Assis, Marcos Renato de

    2016-09-22

    To evaluate the occurrence of falls reported by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and its relation to disease activity, functional capacity and physical fitness. A cross-sectional study constituted by a sample of 97 RA patients from the city of Marília (SP) from 2012 to 2013, were assessed for disease activity. Instruments validated for Brazilian population in order to evaluate physical and functional capacity were used. Data analysis was carried out with descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, considering p<0.05. 88.7% were female subjects with a mean age of 56 (±11.7) years. The median duration of RA was 10 years (P25=6 e P75=17) and the mean of disease activity was 3.6 (±1.3), what was considered a moderate activity. In the last 12 months 37.1% of patients experienced at least one fall, with a total of 52 episodes, and fear of falling was reported by 74.2% of them, but this was not associated to the occurrence of a fall (χ(2)=1.19, p=0.27). Gender, number of medications, age, disease activity, duration of RA, functional capacity, and physical tests showed no associations with history of falls in the past year. It was observed that the occurrence of falls and the fear of falling are quite common in this population. The occurrence of falls in this sample of RA patients bears no relation to disease activity, functional capacity, or physical fitness tests. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  19. Falls and their association with physical tests, functional capacity, clinical and demographic factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Mariana de Almeida; Roma, Izabela; Assis, Marcos Renato de

    To evaluate the occurrence of falls reported by rheumatoid arthritis patients and its relation to disease activity, functional capacity and physical fitness. A cross-sectional study constituted by a sample of 97 rheumatoid arthritis patients from the city of Marília (SP) from 2012 to 2013, were assessed for disease activity. Instruments validated for Brazilian population in order to evaluate physical and functional capacity were used. Data analysis was carried out with descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, considering p<0.05. 88.7% were female subjects with a mean age of 56 (±11.7) years. The median duration of rheumatoid arthritis was 10 years (P25=6 and P75=17) and the mean of disease activity was 3.6 (±1.3), what was considered a moderate activity. In the last 12 months 37.1% of patients experienced at least one fall, with a total of 52 episodes, and fear of falling was reported by 74.2% of them, but this was not associated to the occurrence of a fall (χ(2)=1.19, p=0.27). Gender, number of medications, age, disease activity, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, functional capacity, and physical tests showed no associations with history of falls in the past year. It was observed that the occurrence of falls and the fear of falling are quite common in this population. The occurrence of falls in this sample of rheumatoid arthritis patients bears no relation to disease activity, functional capacity, or physical fitness tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. 'Singing for the brain': reflections on the human capacity for music arising from a pilot study of group singing with Alzheimer's patients.

    PubMed

    Bannan, Nicholas; Montgomery-Smith, Chreanne

    2008-03-01

    The paper reports the activities of a pilot study of group singing for people with Alzheimer's and their carers, and presents data arising from the study. The project aimed to answer the following questions: Would people with Alzheimer's be able to participate in group singing? Would progress be identifiable in participants' singing? Would responses to the activity be positive? Would participating carers find the activity worthwhile? Additionally, the following question was posed: Within the supportive environment of group singing, might people with Alzheimer's be able to participate in a song that they had to learn? Songs were selected that would be familiar to participants aged over 40 years, and one original song was introduced by the group leader following a successful session. The group leader did not know which of the participants were patients with Alzheimer's and which were carers. Participants sat in a circle in a resonant hall. Sessions were filmed and a separate audio recording made and subsequently analysed, and questionnaires were completed by carers after sessions. Nine hours of video recording, three hours of audio recording and three collated questionnaires (one for each session) were collected. Confidence grew over the three sessions, with a traceable development in the alertness of many of the people with Alzheimer's. It proved possible to divide the group so as to sing two songs simultaneously, and also so as to perform three- and four-part rounds. It proved possible to teach an unknown song. Carers generally felt that the sessions were of value. People with Alzheimer's are able to participate in group singing and some longer-term benefits are perceived by their carers. In a group activity such as Singing for the Brain it is difficult to be certain how the overall effect arises from the interaction of individuals. The data assembled is difficult to submit to clinical testing, relying as it does on the judgement of participants regarding reported

  1. How can students' diagnostic competence benefit most from practice with clinical cases? The effects of structured reflection on future diagnosis of the same and novel diseases.

    PubMed

    Mamede, Sílvia; van Gog, Tamara; Sampaio, Alexandre Moura; de Faria, Rosa Malena Delbone; Maria, José Peixoto; Schmidt, Henk G

    2014-01-01

    To develop diagnostic competence, students should practice with many examples of clinical problems to build rich mental representations of diseases. How to enhance learning from practice remains unknown. This study investigated the effects of reflection on cases compared with generating a single or differential diagnosis. In 2012, during the learning phase, 110 fourth-year medical students diagnosed four cases of two criterion diseases under three different experimental conditions: structured reflection, single-diagnosis, or differential-diagnosis. One week later, they diagnosed two novel exemplars of each criterion disease and four cases of new diseases that were not among the cases of the learning phase but were plausible alternative diagnoses. Diagnostic performance did not differ among the groups in the learning phase. One week later, the reflection group obtained higher mean diagnostic accuracy scores (range: 0-1) than the other groups when diagnosing new exemplars of criterion diseases (reflection: 0.67; single-diagnosis: 0.36, P < .001; differential-diagnosis: 0.51, P = .014) and cases of new diseases (reflection: 0.44; single-diagnosis: 0.32, P = .010; differential-diagnosis: 0.33, P = .015). No difference was found between the single-diagnosis and the differential-diagnosis conditions. Structured reflection while practicing with cases enhanced learning of diagnosis both of the diseases practiced and of their alternative diagnoses, suggesting that reflection not only enriched mental representations of diseases practiced relative to more conventional approaches to clinical learning but also influenced the representations of adjacent but different diseases. Structured reflection seems a useful addition to the existing clinical teaching methods.

  2. Research Capacity Building Program for Clinicians and Staff at a Community-Based HIV/AIDS Clinic in Uganda: A Pre/Post Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kalenge, Sheila; Kelley, Jack; Wilson, Amy; Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Nabirye, Rose Chalo; Glass, Nancy; Bollinger, Robert; Alamo-Talisuna, Stella; Chang, Larry William

    2013-01-01

    Developing capacity for HIV research and clinical practice is critically needed in resource-limited countries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a research capacity building program for community-based participants in preparation and conduct of mHealth interventions. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. Participants completed self-report surveys at three time points. Thirty-three participated in the situational analysis and all (100%) felt that the research training was needed. For the interim evaluation, over 96.8% (n=30) reported increased knowledge and confidence and attributed this to the training. Fourteen participants completed the final evaluation. Dedicated time from work was an important factor to facilitate recruitment and data collection followed by financial incentives to commute to data collection sites. Expertise through supervision and mentorship for participants and sustained funding for research projects are critical to innovation for improved HIV prevention and care outcomes. PMID:22265671

  3. A clinical education program for speech-language pathologists applying reflective practice, evidence-based practice and case-based learning.

    PubMed

    Meilijson, Sara; Katzenberger, Irit

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive clinical education program for speech-language pathology students while considering the learning process and gradual acquisition of knowledge and skills for becoming a practicing speech-language pathologist. It describes the clinical speech and language education program for speech-language pathology students at Hadassah Academic College Jerusalem (HAC) based on three facets of learning: reflective practice, evidence-based practice and case-based learning. Also described are the choice of the model of learning and its implementation. The clinical education program presented reflects the professional development of the faculty at HAC as well as recent trends in clinical education methods. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Design and clinical evaluation of a high-capacity digital image archival library and high-speed network for the replacement of cinefilm in the cardiac angiography environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusma, Jack T.; Spero, Laurence A.; Groshong, Bennett R.; Cho, Teddy; Bashore, Thomas M.

    1993-09-01

    An economical and practical digital solution for the replacement of 35 mm cine film as the archive media in the cardiac x-ray imaging environment has remained lacking to date due to the demanding requirements of high capacity, high acquisition rate, high transfer rate, and a need for application in a distributed environment. A clinical digital image library and network based on the D2 digital video format has been installed in the Duke University Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. The system architecture includes a central image library with digital video recorders and robotic tape retrieval, three acquisition stations, and remote review stations connected via a serial image network. The library has a capacity for over 20,000 Gigabytes of uncompressed image data, equivalent to records for approximately 20,000 patients. Image acquisition in the clinical laboratories is via a real-time digital interface between the digital angiography system and a local digital recorder. Images are transferred to the library over the serial network at a rate of 14.3 Mbytes/sec and permanently stored for later review. The image library and network are currently undergoing a clinical comparison with cine film for visual and quantitative assessment of coronary artery disease. At the conclusion of the evaluation, the configuration will be expanded to include four additional catheterization laboratories and remote review stations throughout the hospital.

  5. Serum sPD-L1, Upregulated in Sepsis, May Reflect Disease Severity and Clinical Outcomes in Septic Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Zhang, X; Chen, H; Wang, G; Zhang, J; Dong, P; Liu, Y; An, S; Wang, L

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to find the correlation between serum sPD-L1 (soluble programmed cell death L-1 ligand) and sepsis. Totally 91 consecutive patients with sepsis were performed in a 15-bed medical intensive care unit (ICU) of the second affiliated hospital, Xi'an Jiaotong University in Xi'an, China, between February 2015 and May 2016. Healthy controls (HC) consisted of 29 healthy volunteer. Baseline demographic data were recorded. Blood samples were collected through an indwelling central venous or by peripheral venipuncture. Serum sPD-L1 and sPD-1 levels were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits (Elabscience Biotechnology Co. Ltd, Wuhan, China). SPSS19.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for statistical analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were also performed. Serum sPD-L1 levels and sPD-1 levels were significantly increased in septic patients compared with HC (P = 0.000). Serum sPD-L1 levels were significantly increased in non-survivors compared with survivors (P < 0.05), but there was no statistically difference on serum sPD-1 levels between non-survivors and survivors (P > 0.05). Serum sPD-L1 levels were correlated with absolute lymphocyte (ALC), platelets and SOFA scores. Serum sPD-L1/sPD-1 levels were negatively correlated with ALC and platelets, and SOFA scores. The prognostic accuracy of the sPD-L1 level to predict 28-day mortality was similar to that of the APACHE-II scores and SOFA scores. Cox regression analysis showed that sPD-L1 was an independent prognostic factor. Serum sPD-L1 is upregulated in sepsis and may reflect disease severity and clinical outcomes in patients. Serum sPD-L1 may be an independent prognostic factor for sepsis.

  6. Evaluation of the capacity of inpatients with chronic schizophrenia to provide informed consent for participation in clinical trials; use of the Hebrew version of the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research (MacCAT-CR).

    PubMed

    Linder, Mull; Lev-Ari, Lilac; Kurs, Rena; Melamed, Yuval

    2012-08-01

    Patient protection requires the provision of informed consent for participation in medical research. The MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research (MacCAT-CR) is frequently used for screening the capacity of research subjects to consent to participate in research. To evaluate the utility of the Hebrew translation of the MacCAT-CR for assessing the capacity of patients with chronic schizophrenia to provide informed consent to participate in clinical trials. We evaluated the translated MacCAT-CR by comparingthe capacity of patients with chronic schizophrenia to provide informed consent to participate in clinical trials. The following standardized neurocognitive assessment tools were used: Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE) and Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), as well as the attending doctor's assessment. Twenty-one patients participated. Mean MacCAT-CR score was 12 +/- 10.57 (range 0-32), mean FAB score 9.9 +/- 4.77 (range 1-18), mean ACE 59.14 +/- 16.6 (range 27-86) and mean doctor's assessment 5.24 +/- 1.18 (range 3-7). The Hebrew version of the MacCAT-CR helped identify patients with the capacity to provide informed consent for participation in research. Patients with FAB scores > or = 12 tended to score higher on the Hebrew version of the MacCAT-CR, thus confirming the utility of the Hebrew version of the MacCAT-CR. During the screening process for clinical trials it may be practical to administer the concise FAB questionnaire, and then administer the MacCAT-CR only to those who scored > or = 12 on the FAB.

  7. The Therapeutic Relationship in the Brief Treatment of Depression: Contributions to Clinical Improvement and Enhanced Adaptive Capacities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuroff, David C.; Blatt, Sidney J.

    2006-01-01

    Using data from the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment for Depression Collaborative Research Program, the authors examined the impact on treatment outcome of the patient's perception of the quality of the therapeutic relationship and contribution to the therapeutic alliance. Shared variance with early clinical improvement was removed…

  8. Development and psychometric properties of the DCDDaily: a new test for clinical assessment of capacity in activities of daily living in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Berdien W; van Netten, Jaap J; Otten, Bert E; Postema, Klaas; Geuze, Reint H; Schoemaker, Marina M

    2013-09-01

    To develop the DCDDaily, an instrument for objective and standardized clinical assessment of capacity in activities of daily living (ADL) in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), and to investigate its usability, reliability, and validity. Five to eight-year-old children with and without DCD. The DCDDaily was developed based on thorough review of the literature and extensive expert involvement. To investigate the usability (assessment time and feasibility), reliability (internal consistency and repeatability), and validity (concurrent and discriminant validity) of the DCDDaily, children were assessed with the DCDDaily and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 Test, and their parents filled in the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 Checklist and Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire. 459 children were assessed (DCD group, n = 55; normative reference group, n = 404). Assessment was possible within 30 minutes and in any clinical setting. For internal consistency, Cronbach's α = 0.83. Intraclass correlation = 0.87 for test-retest reliability and 0.89 for inter-rater reliability. Concurrent correlations with Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 Test and questionnaires were ρ = -0.494, 0.239, and -0.284, p < 0.001. Discriminant validity measures showed significantly worse performance in the DCD group than in the control group (mean (SD) score 33 (5.6) versus 26 (4.3), p < 0.001). The area under curve characteristic = 0.872, sensitivity and specificity were 80%. The DCDDaily is a valid and reliable instrument for clinical assessment of capacity in ADL, that is feasible for use in clinical practice.

  9. How Current Clinical Practice Guidelines for Low Back Pain Reflect Traditional Medicine in East Asian Countries: A Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines and Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Lim, Byungmook; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Liu, Jian-Ping; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Lee, Myeong Soo; Shin, Byung-Cheul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to investigate whether there is a gap between evidence of traditional medicine (TM) interventions in East-Asian countries from the current Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) and evidence from current systematic reviews and meta-analyses (SR-MAs) and to analyze the impact of this gap on present CPGs. Methods We examined 5 representative TM interventions in the health care systems of East-Asian countries. We searched seven relevant databases for CPGs to identify whether core CPGs included evidence of TM interventions, and we searched 11 databases for SR-MAs to re-evaluate current evidence on TM interventions. We then compared the gap between the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs. Results Thirteen CPGs and 22 SR-MAs met our inclusion criteria. Of the 13 CPGs, 7 CPGs (54%) mentioned TM interventions, and all were for acupuncture (only one was for both acupuncture and acupressure). However, the CPGs did not recommend acupuncture (or acupressure). Of 22 SR-MAs, 16 were for acupuncture, 5 for manual therapy, 1 for cupping, and none for moxibustion and herbal medicine. Comparing the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs, an underestimation or omission of evidence for acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy in current CPGs was detected. Thus, applying the results from the SR-MAs, we moderately recommend acupuncture for chronic LBP, but we inconclusively recommend acupuncture for (sub)acute LBP due to the limited current evidence. Furthermore, we weakly recommend cupping and manual therapy for both (sub)acute and chronic LBP. We cannot provide recommendations for moxibustion and herbal medicine due to a lack of evidence. Conclusions The current CPGs did not fully reflect the evidence for TM interventions. As relevant studies such as SR-MAs are conducted and evidence increases, the current evidence on acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy should be rigorously considered in the process of developing or updating the CPG system. PMID:24505363

  10. Benefits of maltodextrin intake 2 hours before cholecystectomy by laparotomy in respiratory function and functional capacity: a prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zani, Fabiana Vieira Breijão; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Diana Borges Dock; da Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido; Caporossi, Fernanda Stephan; Caporossi, Cervantes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the change in respiratory function and functional capacity according to the type of preoperative fasting. Methods: Randomized prospective clinical trial, with 92 female patients undergoing cholecystectomy by laparotomy with conventional or 2 hours shortened fasting. The variables measured were the peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, dominant handgrip strength, and non-dominant handgrip strength. Evaluations were performed 2 hours before induction of anesthesia and 24 hours after the operation. Results: The two groups were similar in preoperative evaluations regarding demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as for all variables. However, postoperatively the group with shortened fasting had higher values than the group with conventional fasting for lung function tests peak expiratory flow (128.7±62.5 versus 115.7±59.9; p=0.040), forced expiratory volume in the first second (1.5±0.6 versus 1.2±0.5; p=0.040), forced vital capacity (2.3±1.1 versus 1.8±0.9; p=0.021), and for muscle function tests dominant handgrip strength (24.9±6.8 versus 18.4±7.7; p=0.001) and non-dominant handgrip strength (22.9±6.3 versus 17.0±7.8; p=0.0002). In the intragroup evaluation, there was a decrease in preoperative compared with postoperative values, except for dominant handgrip strength (25.2±6.7 versus 24.9±6.8; p=0.692), in the shortened fasting group. Conclusion: Abbreviation of preoperative fasting time with ingestion of maltodextrin solution is beneficial to pulmonary function and preserves dominant handgrip strength. PMID:26154547

  11. Benefits of maltodextrin intake 2 hours before cholecystectomy by laparotomy in respiratory function and functional capacity: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zani, Fabiana Vieira Breijão; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Diana Borges Dock; Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido da; Caporossi, Fernanda Stephan; Caporossi, Cervantes

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the change in respiratory function and functional capacity according to the type of preoperative fasting. Randomized prospective clinical trial, with 92 female patients undergoing cholecystectomy by laparotomy with conventional or 2 hours shortened fasting. The variables measured were the peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, dominant handgrip strength, and non-dominant handgrip strength. Evaluations were performed 2 hours before induction of anesthesia and 24 hours after the operation. The two groups were similar in preoperative evaluations regarding demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as for all variables. However, postoperatively the group with shortened fasting had higher values than the group with conventional fasting for lung function tests peak expiratory flow (128.7±62.5 versus 115.7±59.9; p=0.040), forced expiratory volume in the first second (1.5±0.6 versus 1.2±0.5; p=0.040), forced vital capacity (2.3±1.1 versus 1.8±0.9; p=0.021), and for muscle function tests dominant handgrip strength (24.9±6.8 versus 18.4±7.7; p=0.001) and non-dominant handgrip strength (22.9±6.3 versus 17.0±7.8; p=0.0002). In the intragroup evaluation, there was a decrease in preoperative compared with postoperative values, except for dominant handgrip strength (25.2±6.7 versus 24.9±6.8; p=0.692), in the shortened fasting group. Abbreviation of preoperative fasting time with ingestion of maltodextrin solution is beneficial to pulmonary function and preserves dominant handgrip strength.

  12. Adaptive capacity of the Adjusted Clinical Groups Case-Mix System to the cost of primary healthcare in Catalonia (Spain): a observational study

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velasco, Soledad; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth; Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Bolibar-Ribas, Buenaventura; Violan-Fors, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the adaptive capacity of the Adjusted Clinical Groups (ACG) system to the cost of care in primary healthcare centres in Catalonia (Spain). Design Retrospective study (multicentres) conducted using computerised medical records. Setting 13 primary care teams in 2008 were included. Participants All patients registered in the study centres who required care between 1 January and 31 December 2008 were finally studied. Patients not registered in the study centres during the study period were excluded. Outcome measures Demographic (age and sex), dependent (cost of care) and case-mix variables were studied. The cost model for each patient was established by differentiating the fixed and variable costs. To evaluate the adaptive capacity of the ACG system, Pearson's coefficient of variation and the percentage of outliers were calculated. To evaluate the explanatory power of the ACG system, the authors used the coefficient of determination (R2). Results The number of patients studied was 227 235 (frequency: 5.9 visits per person per year), with a mean of 4.5 (3.2) episodes and 8.1 (8.2) visits per patient per year. The mean total cost was €654.2. The explanatory power of the ACG system was 36.9% for costs (56.5% without outliers). 10 ACG categories accounted for 60.1% of all cases and 19 for 80.9%. 5 categories represented 71% of poor performance (N=78 887, 34.7%), particularly category 0300-Acute Minor, Age 6+ (N=26 909, 11.8%), which had a coefficient of variation =139% and 6.6% of outliers. Conclusions The ACG system is an appropriate manner of classifying patients in routine clinical practice in primary healthcare centres in Catalonia, although improvements to the adaptive capacity through disaggregation of some categories according to age groups and, especially, the number of acute episodes in paediatric patients would be necessary to reduce intra-group variation. PMID:22734115

  13. Impact of exercise on the functional capacity and pain of patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline Mizusaki Imoto de; Peccin, Maria Stella; Silva, Kelson Nonato Gomes da; Teixeira, Lucas Emmanuel Pedro de Paiva; Trevisani, Virgínia Fernandes Moça

    2012-12-01

    Muscle weakness, especially of the quadriceps muscle, is one of the major musculoskeletal effects of knee osteoarthritis. Exercises are considered one of the main interventions in the conservative treatment of those patients. To assess the effectiveness of quadriceps strengthening exercises on functional capacity and symptoms related of knee osteoarthritis by use of the Timed Up and Go test (TUG), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Lequesne Index. One hundred patients were randomized into two groups: 1) Exercise Group (n = 50), which included stationary bicycle, hamstrings stretching, and quadriceps strengthening; 2) Instruction Group (n = 50), which received a manual with information about knee osteoarthritis and instructions on how to deal with knee symptoms in daily activities. The manual did not include exercise instructions. The Exercise Group showed statistically significant improvement regarding the TUG test, the WOMAC aspects of pain, function, and stiffness, and the Lequesne Index, as compared with the Instruction Group. Quadriceps strengthening exercises for eight weeks are effective to improve pain, function, and stiffness in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  14. Does living and working in a hot environment induce clinically relevant changes in immune function and voluntary force production capacity?

    PubMed

    Knez, Wade; Girard, Olivier; Racinais, Sebastien; Walsh, Andrew; Gaoua, Nadia; Grantham, Justin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of living (summer vs. winter) and working (morning vs. afternoon) in a hot environment on markers of immune function and forearm strength. Thirty-one healthy male gas field employees were screened before (between 05:30 and 07:00) and after their working day (between 15:30 and 17:00) during both seasons. Body core temperature and physical activity were recorded throughout the working days. The hot condition (i.e. summer) led a higher (p≤0.05) average body core temperature (~37.2 vs. ~37.4 °C) but reduced physical activity (-14.8%) during the work-shift. Our data showed an increase (p≤0.05) in lymphocyte and monocyte counts in the summer. Additionally, work-shift resulted in significant (p≤0.001) changes in leukocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes independently of the environment. Handgrip (p=0.069) and pinch (p=0.077) forces tended to be reduced from pre-to post-work, while only force produced during handgrip manoeuvres was significantly reduced (p≤0.05) during the hot compared to the temperate season. No interactions were observed between the environment and work-shift for any marker of immune function or forearm strength. In summary, working and living in hot conditions impact on markers of immune function and work capacity; however by self-regulating energy expenditure, immune markers remained in a healthy reference range.

  15. Oscillatory whole-body vibration improves exercise capacity and physical performance in pulmonary arterial hypertension: a randomised clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Felix; Dumitrescu, Daniel; Gärtner, Carina; Beccard, Ralf; Viethen, Thomas; Kramer, Tilmann; Baldus, Stephan; Hellmich, Martin; Schönau, Eckhard; Rosenkranz, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    In patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), supportive therapies may be beneficial in addition to targeted medical treatment. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness and safety of oscillatory whole-body vibration (WBV) in patients on stable PAH therapy. Twenty-two patients with PAH (mean PAP≥25 mm Hg and pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP)≤15 mm Hg) who were in world health organization (WHO)-Functional Class II or III and on stable PAH therapy for≥3 months, were randomised to receive WBV (16 sessions of 1-hour duration within 4 weeks) or to a control group, that subsequently received WBV. Follow-up measures included the 6-min walking distance (6MWD), cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), echocardiography, muscle-power, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL; SF-36 and LPH questionnaires). When compared to the control group, patients receiving WBV exhibited a significant improvement in the primary endpoint, the 6MWD (+35.4±10.9 vs -4.4±7.6 m), resulting in a net benefit of 39.7±7.8 m (p=0.004). WBV was also associated with substantial improvements in CPET variables, muscle power, and HRQoL. The combined analysis of all patients (n=22) indicated significant net improvements versus baseline in the 6MWD (+38.6 m), peakVO2 (+65.7 mL/min), anaerobic threshold (+40.9 mL VO2/min), muscle power (+4.4%), and HRQoL (SF-36 +9.7, LPH -11.5 points) (all p<0.05). WBV was well tolerated in all patients, and no procedure-related severe adverse events (SAEs) occurred. WBV substantially improves exercise capacity, physical performance, and HRQoL in patients with PAH who are on stable targeted therapy. This methodology may be utilised in structured training programmes, and may be feasible for continuous long-term physical exercise in these patients. NCT01763112; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Oscillatory whole-body vibration improves exercise capacity and physical performance in pulmonary arterial hypertension: a randomised clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Felix; Dumitrescu, Daniel; Gärtner, Carina; Beccard, Ralf; Viethen, Thomas; Kramer, Tilmann; Baldus, Stephan; Hellmich, Martin; Schönau, Eckhard; Rosenkranz, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Objective In patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), supportive therapies may be beneficial in addition to targeted medical treatment. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness and safety of oscillatory whole-body vibration (WBV) in patients on stable PAH therapy. Methods Twenty-two patients with PAH (mean PAP≥25 mm Hg and pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP)≤15 mm Hg) who were in world health organization (WHO)-Functional Class II or III and on stable PAH therapy for≥3 months, were randomised to receive WBV (16 sessions of 1-hour duration within 4 weeks) or to a control group, that subsequently received WBV. Follow-up measures included the 6-min walking distance (6MWD), cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), echocardiography, muscle-power, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL; SF-36 and LPH questionnaires). Results When compared to the control group, patients receiving WBV exhibited a significant improvement in the primary endpoint, the 6MWD (+35.4±10.9 vs −4.4±7.6 m), resulting in a net benefit of 39.7±7.8 m (p=0.004). WBV was also associated with substantial improvements in CPET variables, muscle power, and HRQoL. The combined analysis of all patients (n=22) indicated significant net improvements versus baseline in the 6MWD (+38.6 m), peakVO2 (+65.7 mL/min), anaerobic threshold (+40.9 mL VO2/min), muscle power (+4.4%), and HRQoL (SF-36 +9.7, LPH −11.5 points) (all p<0.05). WBV was well tolerated in all patients, and no procedure-related severe adverse events (SAEs) occurred. Conclusions WBV substantially improves exercise capacity, physical performance, and HRQoL in patients with PAH who are on stable targeted therapy. This methodology may be utilised in structured training programmes, and may be feasible for continuous long-term physical exercise in these patients. Trial registration number NCT01763112; Results. PMID:28100544

  17. How legislation on decisional capacity can negatively affect the feasibility of clinical trials in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Francesca; Vanacore, Nicola; Gainotti, Sabina; Izzicupo, Fabio; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Petrini, Carlo; Chiarotti, Flavia; Chattat, Rabih; Raschetti, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are widely used to treat behavioural and psychological disturbances associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), although only modest evidence from randomized controlled trials supports their efficacy, and increasing evidence from post-marketing surveillance shows serious adverse events associated with their use, including increased mortality. The AdCare study, a non-profit, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicentre, pragmatic trial coordinated by the Italian National Institute of Health, aimed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy profiles of three atypical antipsychotic drugs (risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine) and one conventional antipsychotic drug (haloperidol) in treating psychosis, aggression and agitation in outpatients with AD. The study was planned to be carried out in 19 clinical centres and to enrol 1000 outpatients. According to Italian law, in the case where a patient is considered unable to give informed consent, a legal representative designated by the court has to provide it. Because of difficulties in the informed consent procedure, the study had to be prematurely interrupted. From February 2009 to April 2010, 83 patients gave informed consent to participate in the trial. Fifty-six patients (68%) were included with consent given by a legal representative, while 27 patients (32%) were considered to provide personal informed consent on the basis of the results from a specifically built procedure. Patients and caregivers were offered the opportunity to participate in the trial before the occurrence of behavioural disturbances, in order to provide them with enough time to consider their participation in the study. Twenty-three patients experienced behavioural, clinically relevant symptoms and were randomized to the study drug; all randomized patients except one had consent for inclusion in the study given by legal representatives. After trial interruption, all patients taking an active drug continued

  18. Addiction treatment provider attitudes on staff capacity and evidence-based clinical training: results from a national study.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Krull, Ivy; Chassler, Deborah; Weidenfeld, Rachel; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Gowler, Rebekah; Lederer, Jaime; Cohen, Alexander; Beltrame, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    This national study of addiction-treatment organizations' implementation of evidence-based practices examines: (1) organizational/leadership factors associated with director (n = 212) attitudes regarding staff resistance to organizational change, and (2) organizational/staff factors associated with staff (n = 312) attitudes regarding evidence-based clinical training. Linear regression analyses, controlling for type of treatment unit, leadership/staff characteristics and organizational readiness to change, identified that directors who perceived their organization needed more guidance and had less staff cohesion and autonomy rated staff resistance to organizational change significantly higher. Staff with higher levels of education and greater agreement that their organization supported change had greater preference for evidence-based trainings. Federal addiction treatment policy should both promote education and training of treatment staff and organizational development of treatment CBOs.  © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  19. Evaluating the capacity of theories of justice to serve as a justice framework for international clinical research.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Loff, Bebe

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates whether or not theories of justice from political philosophy, first, support the position that health research should contribute to justice in global health, and second, provide guidance about what is owed by international clinical research (ICR) actors to parties in low- and middle-income countries. Four theories-John Rawls's theory of justice, the rights-based cosmopolitan theories of Thomas Pogge and Henry Shue, and Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm-are evaluated. The article shows that three of the four theories require the conduct of health research for justice in global health. The theories help identify the ends of justice to which ICR is to contribute, but they cannot tell us how to organize ICR to promote these ends. Aside from Ruger's health capability paradigm, the theories also lack an allocative principle for assigning specific duties to specific actors. This creates difficulties for establishing obligations for certain types of ICR actors.

  20. The mediating effect of self-reflection and learning effectiveness on clinical nursing performance in nursing students: A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu; Ko, Hui-Ling; Eng, Cheng-Joo; Yen, Wen-Jiuan

    The effectiveness of simulation learning and the effects of anxiety in the simulated situation have been understudied. In addition, research on the association between learning effectiveness and students' clinical care performance in the hospital setting is very limited in Taiwan. The aim of this study is to examine the mediating effect of self-reflection and simulation learning effectiveness on the clinical nursing performance of nursing students. A Prospective, longitudinal, and correlational design was used. The study was conducted from December 2014 to July 2015. Participants were 293 nursing students in southern Taiwan. A structural model was specified and tested using partial least squares structural equation modeling to examine the relationships between the variables. The results revealed that the model was robust in terms of its measurement quality (reliability, validity, and goodness of fit), with the data's explaining 38.3% of variance in nursing competence. As self-reflection and learning effectiveness were added into the structural model, the effect of anxiety on nursing competence was still significant, but the regression coefficient (β) estimate of -0.41 (p<0.05) changed to β=-0.15 (p<0.050),indicating that self-reflection and learning effectiveness mediated the relationship between anxiety and nursing competence. Nursing competence was negatively affected by anxiety and positively affected by self-reflection (β=0.49, p<0.05) and simulation learning effectiveness (β=0.10, p<0.05). The teacher's encouraging learning can have a positive influence on students' self-reflection and learning effectiveness, which then decreases the effect of anxiety on nursing competence and further promotes students' clinical care ability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of an Exercise Programme on Functional Capacity, Body Composition and Risk of Falls in Patients with Cirrhosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Román, Eva; García-Galcerán, Cristina; Torrades, Teresa; Herrera, Silvia; Marín, Ana; Doñate, Maite; Alvarado-Tapias, Edilmar; Malouf, Jorge; Nácher, Laura; Serra-Grima, Ricard; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, German

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often have functional limitations, decreased muscle mass, and a high risk of falls. These variables could improve with exercise. The aim was to study the effects of moderate exercise on functional capacity, body composition and risk of falls in patients with cirrhosis. Twenty-three cirrhotic patients were randomized to an exercise programme (n = 14) or to a relaxation programme (n = 9). Both programmes consisted of a one-hour session 3 days a week for 12 weeks. At the beginning and end of the study, we measured functional capacity using the cardiopulmonary exercise test, evaluated body composition using anthropometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and estimated risk of falls using the Timed Up&Go test. In the exercise group, cardiopulmonary exercise test showed an increase in total effort time (p<0.001) and ventilatory anaerobic threshold time (p = 0.009). Upper thigh circumference increased and mid-arm and mid-thigh skinfold thickness decreased. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry showed a decrease in fat body mass (-0.94 kg, 95%CI -0.48 to -1.41, p = 0.003) and an increase in lean body mass (1.05 kg, 95%CI 0.27 to 1.82, p = 0.01), lean appendicular mass (0.38 kg, 95%CI 0.06 to 0.69, p = 0.03) and lean leg mass (0.34 kg, 95%CI 0.10 to 0.57, p = 0.02). The Timed Up&Go test decreased at the end of the study compared to baseline (p = 0.02). No changes were observed in the relaxation group. We conclude that a moderate exercise programme in patients with cirrhosis improves functional capacity, increases muscle mass, and decreases body fat and the Timed Up&Go time. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01447537 PMID:27011355

  2. Measurement of dental implant stability by resonance frequency analysis and damping capacity assessment: comparison of both techniques in a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zix, Jürgen; Hug, Stefan; Kessler-Liechti, Gerda; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2008-01-01

    Two noninvasive methods to measure dental implant stability are damping capacity assessment (Periotest) and resonance frequency analysis (Osstell). The objective of the present study was to assess the correlation of these 2 techniques in clinical use. Implant stability of 213 clinically stable loaded and unloaded 1-stage implants in 65 patients was measured in triplicate by means of resonance frequency analysis and Periotest. Descriptive statistics as well as Pearson's, Spearman's, and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated with SPSS 11.0.2. The mean values were 57.66 +/- 8.19 implant stability quotient for the resonance frequency analysis and -5.08 +/- 2.02 for the Periotest. The correlation of both measuring techniques was -0.64 (Pearson) and -0.65 (Spearman). The single-measure intraclass correlation coefficients for the ISQ and Periotest values were 0.99 and 0.88, respectively (95% CI). No significant correlation of implant length with either resonance frequency analysis or Periotest could be found. However, a significant correlation of implant diameter with both techniques was found (P < .005). The correlation of both measuring systems is moderate to good. It seems that the Periotest is more susceptible to clinical measurement variables than the Osstell device. The intraclass correlation indicated lower measurement precision for the Periotest technique. Additionally, the Periotest values differed more from the normal (Gaussian) curve of distribution than the ISQs. Both measurement techniques show a significant correlation to the implant diameter. Resonance frequency analysis appeared to be the more precise technique.

  3. The use of reflective journaling as a learning strategy during the clinical rotations of students from the faculty of health sciences: An action-research study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, Montserrat; Rodriguez-García, Marta; Villanueva, Purificación-González; Márquez-Cava, Montserrat; García-Mateos, Mónica; Ruiz-Ruiz, Beatriz; Herrera-Sánchez, Esteban

    2015-10-01

    Reflective practice contributes significantly to the assimilation of knowledge in undergraduate health students. Reflective journals constitute a learning strategy that promotes student reflection during clinical practice. The overall aim of the study was to explore teachers' perceptions and experiences regarding the use of reflective clinical journals as a learning tool for students in order to improve the implementation of clinical journal writing in all the Health Science degrees offered by our University. A qualitative research study was performed using the Action-Research method. Students studying various degrees at our Health Faculty were considered for this study (Nursing Physiotherapy, and Physiotherapy and Physical Activity and Sport Science). Data were collected using triangulation of document analysis (102 student journals and 12 teacher journals, together with the teachers' responses to the student's journals) and transcripts from 2 discussion groups (1 student discussion group and 1 teacher discussion group). Data analysis was performed based on the constant comparative method using ATLAS.ti version 6.2 software. Four qualitative themes emerged from the data: the journal as a teaching strategy; building a relationship of trust between the tutor and the student; the role of the teacher and the world of emotions. Several recommendations for supporting clinical journal writing were identified: an informative meeting should be arranged with students; written guidelines should be provided; a personal interview with the student is recommended at the start of the activity; feedback should be offered over short time periods; teachers should provide constructive feedback; and students should adopt a free writing approach, or be guided by very open questions. Finally, it is important that students be familiarized with the assessment criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nursing students' evaluation of a new feedback and reflection tool for use in high-fidelity simulation - Formative assessment of clinical skills. A descriptive quantitative research design.

    PubMed

    Solheim, Elisabeth; Plathe, Hilde Syvertsen; Eide, Hilde

    2017-09-04

    Clinical skills training is an important part of nurses' education programmes. Clinical skills are complex. A common understanding of what characterizes clinical skills and learning outcomes needs to be established. The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate a new reflection and feedback tool for formative assessment. The study has a descriptive quantitative design. 129 students participated who were at the end of the first year of a Bachelor degree in nursing. After highfidelity simulation, data were collected using a questionnaire with 19 closed-ended and 2 open-ended questions. The tool stimulated peer assessment, and enabled students to be more thorough in what to assess as an observer in clinical skills. The tool provided a structure for selfassessment and made visible items that are important to be aware of in clinical skills. This article adds to simulation literature and provides a tool that is useful in enhancing peer learning, which is essential for nurses in practice. The tool has potential for enabling students to learn about reflection and developing skills for guiding others in practice after they have graduated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Logistic regression analyses for predicting clinically important differences in motor capacity, motor performance, and functional independence after constraint-induced therapy in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Shieh, Jeng-yi; Lu, Lu; Lin, Keh-chung

    2013-03-01

    Given the growing evidence for the effects of constraint-induced therapy (CIT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP), there is a need for investigating the characteristics of potential participants who may benefit most from this intervention. This study aimed to establish predictive models for the effects of pediatric CIT on motor and functional outcomes. Therapists administered CIT to 49 children (aged 3-11 years) with CP. Sessions were 1-3.5h a day, twice a week, for 3-4 weeks. Parents were asked to document the number of restraint hours outside of the therapy sessions. Domains of treatment outcomes included motor capacity (measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales II), motor performance (measured by the Pediatric Motor Activity Log), and functional independence (measured by the Pediatric Functional Independence Measure). Potential predictors included age, affected side, compliance (measured by time of restraint), and the initial level of motor impairment severity. Tests were administered before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Logistic regression analyses showed that total amount of restraint time was the only significant predictor for improved motor capacity immediately after CIT. Younger children who restrained the less affected arm for a longer time had a greater chance to achieve clinically significant improvements in motor performance. For outcomes of functional independence in daily life, younger age was associated with clinically meaningful improvement in the self-care domain. Baseline motor abilities were significantly predictive of better improvement in mobility and cognition. Significant predictors varied according to the aspects of motor outcomes after 3 months of follow-up. The potential predictors identified in this study allow clinicians to target those children who may benefit most from CIT.

  6. Clinical system model for monitoring the physiological status of jaundice by extracting bilirubin components from skin diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alla S.; Clark, Joseph; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a medical condition which occurs in newborns as a result of an imbalance between the production and elimination of bilirubin. The excess bilirubin in the blood stream diffuses into the surrounding tissue leading to a yellowing of the skin. As the bilirubin levels rise in the blood stream, there is a continuous exchange between the extra vascular bilirubin and bilirubin in the blood stream. Exposure to phototherapy alters the concentration of bilirubin in the vascular and extra vascular regions by causing bilirubin in the skin layers to be broken down. Thus, the relative concentration of extra vascular bilirubin is reduced leading to a diffusion of bilirubin out of the vascular region. Diffuse reflectance spectra from human skin contains physiological and structural information of the skin and nearby tissue. A diffuse reflectance spectrum must be captured before and after blanching in order to isolate the intravascular and extra vascular bilirubin. A new mathematical model is proposed with extra vascular bilirubin concentration taken into consideration along with other optical parameters in defining the diffuse reflectance spectrum from human skin. A nonlinear optimization algorithm has been adopted to extract the optical properties (including bilirubin concentration) from the skin reflectance spectrum. The new system model and nonlinear algorithm have been combined to enable extraction of Bilirubin concentrations within an average error of 10%.

  7. A case study on building capacity to improve clinical mentoring and maternal child health in rural Tanzania: the path to implementation.

    PubMed

    Ojemeni, Melissa T; Niles, Paulomi; Mfaume, Salum; Kapologwe, Ntuli A; Deng, Linda; Stafford, Renae; Voeten, Marie Jose; Theonestina, Kokusiima; Budin, Wendy; Chhun, Nok; Squires, Allison

    2017-01-01

    Tanzania is a low income, East African country with a severe shortage of human resources for health or health workers. This shortage threatens any gains the country is making in improving maternal health outcomes. This paper describes a partnership between Touch Foundation and NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing - Global, aimed at improving clinical mentorship and capacity among nurses and midwives at two rural hospitals in the Tanzanian Lake Zone Region. Clinical mentoring capacity building and supportive supervision of staff has been shown to be a facilitator of retaining nurses and would be possible to acquire and implement quickly, even in a context of low resources and limited technology. A case study approach structures this program implementation analysis. The NYU Meyers team conducted a 6-day needs assessment at the two selected hospitals. A SWOT analysis was performed to identify needs and potential areas for improvement. After the assessment, a weeklong training, tailored to each hospitals' specific needs, was designed and facilitated by two NYU Meyers nursing and midwifery education specialists. The program was created to build on the clinical skills of expert nurse and midwife clinicians and suggested strategies for incorporating mentoring and preceptorship as a means to enhance clinical safety and promote professional communication, problem solving and crisis management. Nineteen participants from both hospitals attended the training. Fourteen of 19 participants completed a post training, open ended questionnaire for a 74% response rate. Fifty-seven percent of participants were able to demonstrate and provide examples of the concepts of mentorship and supervision 4 and 11 months' post training. Participants indicated that while confidence in skills was not lacking, barriers to quality care lay mostly in understaffing. Implementation also offered multiple insights into contextual factors affecting sustainable program implementation. Three

  8. Reflective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thomas Farrell's "Reflective Teaching" outlines four principles that take teachers from just doing reflection to making it a way of being. Using the four principles, Reflective Practice Is Evidence Based, Reflective Practice Involves Dialogue, Reflective Practice Links Beliefs and Practices, and Reflective Practice Is a Way of Life,…

  9. Reflecting on reflections: enhancement of medical education curriculum with structured field notes and guided feedback.

    PubMed

    Wald, Hedy S; Davis, Stephen W; Reis, Shmuel P; Monroe, Alicia D; Borkan, Jeffrey M

    2009-07-01

    The promotion of reflective capacity within the teaching of clinical skills and professionalism is posited as fostering the development of competent health practitioners. An innovative approach combines structured reflective writing by medical students and individualized faculty feedback to those students to augment instruction on reflective practice. A course for preclinical students at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, entitled "Doctoring," combined reflective writing assignments (field notes) with instruction in clinical skills and professionalism and early clinical exposure in a small-group format. Students generated multiple e-mail field notes in response to structured questions on course topics. Individualized feedback from a physician-behavioral scientist dyad supported the students' reflective process by fostering critical-thinking skills, highlighting appreciation of the affective domain, and providing concrete recommendations. The development and implementation of this innovation are presented, as is an analysis of the written evaluative comments of students taking the Doctoring course. Theoretical and clinical rationales for features of the innovation and supporting evidence of their effectiveness are presented. Qualitative analyses of students' evaluations yielded four themes of beneficial contributions to their learning experience: promoting deeper and more purposeful reflection, the value of (interdisciplinary) feedback, the enhancement of group process, and personal and professional development. Evaluation of the innovation was the fifth theme; some limitations are described, and suggestions for improvement are provided. Issues of the quality of the educational paradigm, generalizability, and sustainability are addressed.

  10. The Practicum Script Concordance Test: An Online Continuing Professional Development Format to Foster Reflection on Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornos, Eduardo H.; Pleguezuelos, Eduardo M.; Brailovsky, Carlos A.; Harillo, Leandro D.; Dory, Valerie; Charlin, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Judgment in the face of uncertainty is an important dimension of expertise and clinical competence. However, it is challenging to conceive continuing professional development (CPD) initiatives aimed at helping physicians enhance their clinical judgment skills in ill-defined situations. We present an online script concordance-based…

  11. The Practicum Script Concordance Test: An Online Continuing Professional Development Format to Foster Reflection on Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornos, Eduardo H.; Pleguezuelos, Eduardo M.; Brailovsky, Carlos A.; Harillo, Leandro D.; Dory, Valerie; Charlin, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Judgment in the face of uncertainty is an important dimension of expertise and clinical competence. However, it is challenging to conceive continuing professional development (CPD) initiatives aimed at helping physicians enhance their clinical judgment skills in ill-defined situations. We present an online script concordance-based…

  12. Facing uncertainty as a medical student--a qualitative study of their reflective learning diaries and writings on specific themes during the first clinical year.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, M K; Mantyranta, T; Pitkala, K H

    2010-02-01

    Tolerance of uncertainty related to the complex work is a major dimension of general practitioner's (GP) profession. Strategies for managing uncertainty have been studied among GPs but less is known about how medical students develop tolerance of uncertainty during their studies. The aim of this study was to investigate how the medical students experience uncertainty during their first clinical years and how their feelings develop with time as they progress from the 3rd year to the 4th year. The material consisted of 22 students' reflective learning diaries and writings on specific themes collected during the 3rd and 4th year of their medical studies. The analysis was performed using thematic content analysis. In this article we present the results related to the theme of uncertainty. Uncertainty is a major cause of mental strain for medical students, particularly fear of making mistakes. Main themes related to facing uncertainty and found in the diaries and writings were insecurity of professional skills, own credibility, facing with the inexactness of medicine, fear of making mistakes, coping with responsibility, and tolerating oneself as incomplete and accepting oneself as a good-enough doctor-to-be. Common steps of development towards tolerance of uncertainty were found in diaries over a one-year time period as the students progressed in their clinical studies. Reflective writing showed to be an effective means for the students of both expressing and dealing with uncertainty, both with the difficult and the pleasant feelings and the experiences the students had with their first patient contacts. It also gave some of them the means of self-reflection which they afterwards found worthwhile. Reflective writing is powerful tool which medical students could use to facilitate their maturation process what comes to uncertainty during their first clinical year. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Limitations to the capacity to love.

    PubMed

    Kernberg, Otto F

    2011-12-01

    This paper is a meditation on the potential and problems of establishing and maintaining loving and passionate relationships, drawn from a lifetime of struggling with these issues in the course of doing analysis. It describes interferences with the capacity for mature sexual love as reflecting various psychopathological conditions. These limitations include a variety of psychological restrictions determined most frequently by masochistic, narcissistic and paranoid personality features. Clinical case material illustrates both mature and disturbed capability for love relations. Copyright © 2011 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  14. Nurses' perceptions of the impact of Team-Based Learning participation on learning style, team behaviours and clinical performance: An exploration of written reflections.

    PubMed

    Oldland, Elizabeth; Currey, Judy; Considine, Julie; Allen, Josh

    2017-05-01

    Team-Based Learning (TBL) is a teaching strategy designed to promote problem solving, critical thinking and effective teamwork and communication skills; attributes essential for safe healthcare. The aim was to explore postgraduate student perceptions of the role of TBL in shaping learning style, team skills, and professional and clinical behaviours. An exploratory descriptive approach was selected. Critical care students were invited to provide consent for the use for research purposes of written reflections submitted for course work requirements. Reflections of whether and how TBL influenced their learning style, teamwork skills and professional behaviours during classroom learning and clinical practice were analysed for content and themes. Of 174 students, 159 participated. Analysis revealed three themes: Deep Learning, the adaptations students made to their learning that resulted in mastery of specialist knowledge; Confidence, in knowledge, problem solving and rationales for practice decisions; and Professional and Clinical Behaviours, including positive changes in their interactions with colleagues and patients described as patient advocacy, multidisciplinary communication skills and peer mentorship. TBL facilitated a virtuous cycle of feedback encouraging deep learning that increased confidence. Increased confidence improved deep learning that, in turn, led to the development of professional and clinical behaviours characteristic of high quality practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The American Thoracic Society methods in epidemiologic, clinical, and operations research program. A research capacity-building program in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Buist, A Sonia; Parry, Vivienne

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The greatest impact of many of these diseases is felt in low- and middle-income countries, but their control and management is hampered by lack of accurate estimates of their prevalence, risk factors, and distribution, and knowledge of the social and cultural setting in which they occur. Providing enough information for cost-effective response to respiratory diseases requires research by trained investigators and public health personnel. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) Methods in Epidemiologic, Clinical, and Operations Research (MECOR) Program was launched in 1994 to provide a sustainable means of increasing local and national research capacity aimed at addressing this need. As of March 2013, approximately 1,015 students have completed at least one level of the training program. Post-MECOR, 64% of participants have published a medical paper, 79% have presented at a scientific or academic meeting, 51% have submitted a research protocol for funding, and 42% have had one funded. One-quarter have been awarded an academic or clinical fellowship, and 78% reported that MECOR had made a significant or extremely important contribution to their professional life and accomplishments. Future challenges include funding, recruitment of local faculty, helping to build the research infrastructure in MECOR countries, and providing ongoing mentoring for research.

  16. More than meets the eye: clinical reflection and evidence-based practice in an unusual case of adolescent chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed; Wong, Christopher Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Adolescents who have chronic pain after common orthopedic injuries such as ankle sprains may present a multidimensional clinical problem stemming from both physical and psychological issues. A traumatic incident such as a motor vehicle accident can produce clinical issues ranging from a specific tissue injury to multisystem complications such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The purpose of this retrospective case report on an adolescent with chronic ankle pain stemming from a motor vehicle accident is to demonstrate how reflection and the evidence base influenced the modification of the plan of care. Description of the screening methods, clinical findings, interventions, and outcomes of the case may help physical therapists identify and improve the quality of care in cases of suspected CRPS and PTSD. The patient was a 12-year-old girl with a medical diagnosis of recurrent right ankle sprain and with signs of potential CRPS and PTSD. Poor initial response to ankle sprain management led to reflective reconsideration of the diagnosis and plan of care. The revised plan of care supported by the evidence base emphasized empathetic consideration of the traumatic motor vehicle accident and focused on CRPS prevention and management of potential non-physical pain via mirror therapy and motor imagery therapy. Pain was relieved, behavior improved, and functional movement began to normalize after 3 sessions of mirror therapy and motor imagery therapy. Patient symptoms were inconsistent with the medical diagnosis, and the clinical outcome of the original plan of care was unsuccessful. Reflection inspired a more-detailed history and systems review, which led to greater understanding and more-effective care.

  17. Exploring the personal and professional impact of reflective practice groups: a survey of 18 cohorts from a UK clinical psychology training course.

    PubMed

    Knight, Katherine; Sperlinger, David; Maltby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Given the importance of reflective practice within clinical psychology and a lack of empirical research, this study aimed to investigate the personal and professional impact of reflective practice groups (RPGs) for former trainees. This study followed an analytic survey design utilizing a convenience sample of qualified clinical psychologists from a UK training programme. A RPG questionnaire (RPGQ) was developed for the purposes of the study. Following initial pilot work, 297 qualified psychologists were invited to complete the RPGQ. One hundred and twenty-four psychologists (42%) completed the RPGQ. Factor analysis yielded two underlying constructs labelled 'value' and 'distress'. The RPGQ demonstrated significant internal and test-retest reliability. The majority rated the RPGs as valuable for personal and professional development and learning about group processes. Just under half however reported distress as a result of the groups. Whilst some trainees, who reported distress, were able to view the challenges positively, one-sixth were not. Potency of facilitation and group size significantly predicted levels of perceived value and distress. In view of the ethical issues raised by compulsory RPGs, recommendations were made to keep group sizes within an average of 10-13, utilize facilitators with sufficient training in group processes and ensure additional methods of reflective practice development are available. Further suggestions and recommendations for future research in relation to coping and personal learning style were also made.  © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Bone-Forming Capacity and Biodistribution of Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells Directly Loaded Into Scaffolds: A Novel and Easy Approach for Clinical Application of Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Léotot, Julie; Lebouvier, Angélique; Hernigou, Philippe; Bierling, Philippe; Rouard, Hélène; Chevallier, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    In the context of clinical applications of bone regeneration, cell seeding into scaffolds needs to be safe and easy. Moreover, cell density also plays a crucial role in the development of efficient bone tissue engineering constructs. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a simple and rapid cell seeding procedure on hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/βTCP), as well as define optimal cell density and control the biodistribution of grafted cells. To this end, human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) were seeded on HA/βTCP scaffolds, and we have compared bone formation using an ectopic model. Our results demonstrated a significantly higher bone-forming capacity of hBMSCs directly loaded on HA/βTCP during surgery compared to hBMSCs preseeded for 7 days in vitro on HA/βTCP before ectopic implantation. The extent of new bone formation increases with increasing hBMSC densities quantitatively, qualitatively, and in frequency. Also, this study showed that grafted hBMSCs remained confined to the implantation site and did not spread toward other tissues, such as liver, spleen, lungs, heart, and kidneys. In conclusion, direct cell loading into a scaffold during surgery is more efficient for bone regeneration, as well as quick and safe. Therefore direct cell loading is suitable for clinical requirements and cell production control, making it a promising approach for orthopedic applications. Moreover, our results have provided evidence that the formation of a mature bone organ containing hematopoietic islets needs a sufficiently high local density of grafted hBMSCs, which should guide the optimal dose of cells for clinical use.

  19. Infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells maintain their chondrogenic capacity in disease and can be used to engineer cartilaginous grafts of clinically relevant dimensions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yurong; Buckley, Conor Timothy; Almeida, Henrique V; Mulhall, Kevin J; Kelly, Daniel John

    2014-11-01

    A therapy for regenerating large cartilaginous lesions within the articular surface of osteoarthritic joints remains elusive. While tissue engineering strategies such as matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation can be used in the repair of focal cartilage defects, extending such approaches to the treatment of osteoarthritis will require a number of scientific and technical challenges to be overcome. These include the identification of an abundant source of chondroprogenitor cells that maintain their chondrogenic capacity in disease, as well as the development of novel approaches to engineer scalable cartilaginous grafts that could be used to resurface large areas of damaged joints. In this study, it is first demonstrated that infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs) isolated from osteoarthritic (OA) donors possess a comparable chondrogenic capacity to FPSCs isolated from patients undergoing ligament reconstruction. In a further validation of their functionality, we also demonstrate that FPSCs from OA donors respond to the application of physiological levels of cyclic hydrostatic pressure by increasing aggrecan gene expression and the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. We next explored whether cartilaginous grafts could be engineered with diseased human FPSCs using a self-assembly or scaffold-free approach. After examining a range of culture conditions, it was found that continuous supplementation with both transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) and bone morphogenic protein-6 (BMP-6) promoted the development of tissues rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen. The final phase of the study sought to scale-up this approach to engineer cartilaginous grafts of clinically relevant dimensions (≥2 cm in diameter) by assembling FPSCs onto electrospun PLLA fiber membranes. Over 6 weeks in culture, it was possible to generate robust, flexible cartilage-like grafts of scale, opening up the possibility that tissues engineered using FPSCs

  20. Infrapatellar Fat Pad-Derived Stem Cells Maintain Their Chondrogenic Capacity in Disease and Can be Used to Engineer Cartilaginous Grafts of Clinically Relevant Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yurong; Buckley, Conor Timothy; Almeida, Henrique V.; Mulhall, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    A therapy for regenerating large cartilaginous lesions within the articular surface of osteoarthritic joints remains elusive. While tissue engineering strategies such as matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation can be used in the repair of focal cartilage defects, extending such approaches to the treatment of osteoarthritis will require a number of scientific and technical challenges to be overcome. These include the identification of an abundant source of chondroprogenitor cells that maintain their chondrogenic capacity in disease, as well as the development of novel approaches to engineer scalable cartilaginous grafts that could be used to resurface large areas of damaged joints. In this study, it is first demonstrated that infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs) isolated from osteoarthritic (OA) donors possess a comparable chondrogenic capacity to FPSCs isolated from patients undergoing ligament reconstruction. In a further validation of their functionality, we also demonstrate that FPSCs from OA donors respond to the application of physiological levels of cyclic hydrostatic pressure by increasing aggrecan gene expression and the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. We next explored whether cartilaginous grafts could be engineered with diseased human FPSCs using a self-assembly or scaffold-free approach. After examining a range of culture conditions, it was found that continuous supplementation with both transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) and bone morphogenic protein-6 (BMP-6) promoted the development of tissues rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen. The final phase of the study sought to scale-up this approach to engineer cartilaginous grafts of clinically relevant dimensions (≥2 cm in diameter) by assembling FPSCs onto electrospun PLLA fiber membranes. Over 6 weeks in culture, it was possible to generate robust, flexible cartilage-like grafts of scale, opening up the possibility that tissues engineered using FPSCs

  1. Academicians and Neurologic Physical Therapy Residents Partner to Expand Clinical Reflection Using the SOLO Taxonomy: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Pinto Zipp, Genevieve; Maher, Catherine; Donnelly, Erin; Fritz, Brian; Snowdon, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Creating curriculums that develop physical therapy (PT) students into evidenced-based, critically reflective, entry-level practitioners is one of the primary goals for PT programs. Academic faculty partnering with neurologic residency programs to design learning environments that capitalize upon the strengths of both can create insightful educational experiences for students during their didactic training. These partnerships support the development of critical thinking skills and provide mentorship for residents transitioning from their role as a clinician to that of an educator. Using the SOLO (structure of observed learning outcomes) taxonomy as a framework for developing learning experiences, Seton Hall University neurologic academic faculty and program directors from the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation Residency in Neurologic Physical Therapy have built a partnership that seeks to develop critical reflection skills in both the neurologic resident and entry-level PT students. While integration of residents into entry-level PT curriculum may not be novel, we believe that utilizing the SOLO model within this partnership is unique. This paper describes the partnership and learning experiences rooted in the SOLO taxonomy theoretical framework and discusses perceived benefits of this learning experience across professional health science programs.

  2. Reflection Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses and provides an example of reflectivity approximation to determine whether reflection will occur. Provides a method to show thin-film interference on a projection screen. Also applies the reflectivity concepts to electromagnetic wave systems. (MVL)

  3. Reflection Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses and provides an example of reflectivity approximation to determine whether reflection will occur. Provides a method to show thin-film interference on a projection screen. Also applies the reflectivity concepts to electromagnetic wave systems. (MVL)

  4. The heterogeneity of clinical ethics: the state of the field as reflected in the Encyclopedia of Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Koczwara, B; Madigan, T J

    1997-02-01

    The 1995 Encyclopedia of Bioethics is an almost complete reworking of the original 1978 edition, due to the expanding nature of the field. The following article focuses on how the second edition of the Encyclopedia deals with the topic of "clinical ethics" and three related topics: "nursing ethics", "trust", and "conflict of interest". We assess their relevance to the current developments in these fields and the Encyclopedia's usefulness as a resource to ethics consultants, researchers and clinicians. We emphasize the heterogeneity of clinical ethics as a still new and evolving field.

  5. Expanding the "Ports of Entry" for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Relational and Reflective Model for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Elaine; Foley, Gilbert M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To outline an expanded framework for clinical practice in speech-language pathology. This framework broadens the focus on discipline-specific knowledge and infuses mental health constructs within the study of communication sciences and disorders, with the objective of expanding the potential "ports or points of entry" (D. Stern, 1995) for…

  6. Host Immune Transcriptional Profiles Reflect the Variability in Clinical Disease Manifestations in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Banchereau, Romain; Jordan-Villegas, Alejandro; Ardura, Monica; Mejias, Asuncion; Baldwin, Nicole; Xu, Hui; Saye, Elizabeth; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Nguyen, Phuong; Blankenship, Derek; Creech, Clarence B.; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Ramilo, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are associated with diverse clinical manifestations leading to significant morbidity and mortality. To define the role of the host response in the clinical manifestations of the disease, we characterized whole blood transcriptional profiles of children hospitalized with community-acquired S. aureus infection and phenotyped the bacterial strains isolated. The overall transcriptional response to S. aureus infection was characterized by over-expression of innate immunity and hematopoiesis related genes and under-expression of genes related to adaptive immunity. We assessed individual profiles using modular fingerprints combined with the molecular distance to health (MDTH), a numerical score of transcriptional perturbation as compared to healthy controls. We observed significant heterogeneity in the host signatures and MDTH, as they were influenced by the type of clinical presentation, the extent of bacterial dissemination, and time of blood sampling in the course of the infection, but not by the bacterial isolate. System analysis approaches provide a new understanding of disease pathogenesis and the relation/interaction between host response and clinical disease manifestations. PMID:22496797

  7. Effect of baseline exercise capacity on outcomes in patients with stable coronary heart disease (a post hoc analysis of the clinical outcomes utilizing revascularization and aggressive drug evaluation trial).

    PubMed

    Padala, Santosh K; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Hartigan, Pamela M; Maron, David J; Teo, Koon K; Spertus, John A; Mancini, G B John; Sedlis, Steven P; Chaitman, Bernard R; Heller, Gary V; Weintraub, William S; Boden, William E

    2015-11-15

    The impact of baseline exercise capacity on clinical outcomes in patients with stable ischemic heart disease randomized to an initial strategy of optimal medical therapy (OMT) with or without percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation (COURAGE) trial has not been studied. A post hoc analysis was performed in 1,052 patients of COURAGE (PCI + OMT: n = 527, OMT: n = 525) who underwent exercise treadmill testing at baseline. Patients were categorized into 2 exercise capacity groups based on metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved during baseline exercise treadmill testing (<7 METs: n = 464, ≥7 METs: n = 588) and were followed for a median of 4.6 years. The primary composite end point of death or myocardial infarction was similar in the PCI + OMT group and the OMT group for patients with exercise capacity <7 METs (19.1% vs 16.1%, p = 0.31) and ≥7 METs (13.3% vs 10.3%, p = 0.27). After adjusting for baseline covariates, the hazard ratio (99% confidence interval) for the primary end point for the PCI + OMT group versus the OMT group was 1.42 (0.90 to 2.23, p = 0.05) and for the exercise capacity subgroups of ≥7 METs and <7 METs was 0.75 (0.46 to 1.22, p = 0.13). There was no statistically significant interaction between the original treatment arm allocation (PCI + OMT vs OMT) and baseline exercise capacity. In conclusion, there was no difference in the long-term clinical outcomes in patients with exercise capacity <7 METs compared with ≥7 METs, irrespective of whether they were assigned to initial PCI. Patients with exercise capacity <7 METs did not derive a proportionately greater clinical benefit from PCI + OMT compared with those patients who received OMT alone. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. “Twin lesions”: Which one is the bad one? Improvement of clinical diagnosis with reflectance confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saral, Secil; Hartmann, Daniela; Letulè, Valerie; Ruzicka, Thomas; Ruini, Cristel; von Braunmühl, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Background In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a novel non-invasive diagnostic tool, which is used to differentiate skin lesions. Even in lesions with similar dermatoscopic images, RCM may improve diagnostic accuracy. Methods Three sets of false “twin lesions” with similar macroscopic and dermatoscopic images are matched. All lesions are evaluated with RCM and lesions are excised for further evaluation. Corresponding features in confocal images, dermatoscopy and histopathology are discussed. Results In all matched pairs, one of the lesions was diagnosed as melanoma with the observation of melanoma findings such as: epidermal disarray, pagetoid cells in epidermis and cellular atypia at the junction. Benign lesions were differentiated easily with RCM imaging. Conclusion Examining dermatoscopically difficult and/or similar lesions with RCM facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. Using RCM in daily practice may contribute to a decrease in unnecessary excisions. PMID:28243488

  9. A "safe space" for learning and reflection: one school's design for continuity with a peer group across clinical clerkships.

    PubMed

    Chou, Calvin L; Johnston, C Bree; Singh, Bobby; Garber, Jonathan D; Kaplan, Elizabeth; Lee, Kewchang; Teherani, Arianne

    2011-12-01

    The value of continuity in medical education, particularly during clerkships, is increasingly recognized. Previous clerkship-based models have described changes that emphasize continuity in patient care, learner supervision, and curriculum. The creation of continuous student peer groups can foster interactions that enhance mutual support through uncomfortable professional transitions during the clerkship years. Here, the authors describe a third-year clerkship model based at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center called VA Longitudinal Rotations (VALOR), designed explicitly to establish a supportive learning environment for small peer groups.Seven groups of medical students (42 total) completed VALOR across three academic years between 2007 and 2009. On clerkships during VALOR, one hour per week was designated for faculty-facilitated sessions amongst peer groups. Students' perceptions of peer group support and overall program satisfaction were determined with immediate post surveys and focus groups at the end of VALOR, and with follow-up surveys 5 to 27 months after completing VALOR. Students strongly valued several elements of VALOR peer groups, including support through clerkship challenges, meeting for facilitated reflection, and appreciating patient experiences across the continuum of care. Students' appreciation for their peer group experiences persisted well after the conclusion of VALOR. VALOR students performed the same as or better than traditional clerkship students on knowledge and skill-based outcomes. The authors demonstrate that their third-year clerkship program using peer groups has built supportive learning networks and facilitated reflection, allowing students to develop critical professional skills. Student communication around patient care was also feasible and highly valued.

  10. The effects of electrical stimulation combined with continuous passive motion versus isometric exercise on symptoms, functional capacity, quality of life and balance in knee osteoarthritis: randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tok, Fatih; Aydemir, Koray; Peker, Fatma; Safaz, Ismail; Taşkaynatan, Mehmet Ali; Ozgül, Ahmet

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of electrical stimulation combined with continuous passive motion (CPM-ES) versus isometric exercise on symptoms, functional capacity, quality of life, muscle strength, knee and thigh circle measurements, and balance in knee osteoarthritis (OA). This is a randomized clinical trial. The study was done in Gulhane Military Medical Academy (GMMA) Rehabilitation Center. Forty patients with knee OA were included in this study. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups: 20 patients placed in Group 1 were treated with conventional physical therapy and CPM-ES combination; 20 patients in Group 2 were treated with conventional physical therapy and isometric exercise. Therapies were applied 3 weeks, 5 days per week. The following main outcome measures were done: values of pain (VAS was used), WOMAC, SF-36, knee and thigh circle measurements, isokinetic tests, dynamic and static balance tests were determined at baseline and after the treatment. There were no statistically significant differences in the tested variables between the groups for post-treatment values. Dynamic and static balance test improved statistically strongly significantly in both groups. The findings of this study demonstrate that knee OA patients could improve their balance function in both static and dynamic conditions after CPM-ES combination or isometric exercise therapy. The improvement might prevent knee OA patients from falling down and increase their sense of security during physical activities.

  11. Building clinical practice in the Palestine Red Crescent operation theatres in Lebanon: reflections from the perspective of an expatriate nurse.

    PubMed

    Tjoflåt, I; Karlsen, B

    2013-12-01

    This paper, based on the experience of the first author as an expatriate nurse, aims to describe and discuss some aspects of collaboration that contributed to the building of clinical practice when implementing an operating theatre programme in the Palestine Red Crescent Society (PRCS) hospitals in Lebanon. The operation theatre programme lasted for 8 months: 6 months in 2008 and 2 months in 2009. The programme was part of the partnership project 'Quality of care in the five PRCS hospitals in Lebanon' between the International Committee of the Red Cross and the PRCS Lebanon (PRCS-L) branch. The essential aspects that may have contributed to the building of clinical practice in the operation theatre programme included the expatriate nurse and the Palestine Red Crescent operating theatre nurses working together over time as colleagues, the socio-cultural pedagogic perspective selected for the implementation and the collaboration with the management of the hospitals and counterparts in the PRCS-L branch. One should also note the human and structural issues that seemed to influence the implementation of the programme in a more negative way. This experience may provide insight for other nurses into the importance of working as colleagues, selecting an appropriate pedagogic perspective and establishing productive collaboration with all partners when building clinical practice during a humanitarian mission. © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  12. Health promotion practices in two chiropractic teaching clinics: does a review of patient files reflect advice on health promotion?

    PubMed

    Ndetan, Harrison; Evans, Marion Willard; Lo, Kaming; Walters, David; Ramcharan, Michael; Brandon, Patricia; Evans, Cathy; Rupert, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    To retrospectively review patient files in two teaching clinics in the United States and to assess the documented attempts to deliver health promotion messages when a chart indicated a need for health promotion or a red-flag condition that could be helped with positive behavioral changes. Approximately 100 patient files were randomly selected from each of two separate chiropractic teaching clinics, for patients seen after January 2007. Files were assessed for pertinent family history of diseases, personal medical history, and red-flag conditions of patients that would warrant intervention with health promotion. Health promotion advice on at least one occasion was noted in 108 (53.7%) patient charts. Only 7 of 98 overweight or obese patients and none of those with family history of obesity were advised on weight management. Among 23 hypertensive patients, only 5 were advised and 17 of the 97 patients with risk of cardiovascular disease were advised. Chiropractic teaching clinics should assess what they are doing to help Americans reach their health goals. There is an opportunity to shape future practitioners so they include primary prevention as a part of what they do if the profession cares to move in that direction. Future research should look at mechanisms of delivery for health promotion, including better tracking of patients who need it and how staff doctors are trained to deliver oversight to interns in the area of primary prevention.

  13. Diet-induced mouse model of fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis reflecting clinical disease progression and methods of assessment.

    PubMed

    Clapper, Jason R; Hendricks, Michelle D; Gu, Guibao; Wittmer, Carrie; Dolman, Carrie S; Herich, John; Athanacio, Jennifer; Villescaz, Christiane; Ghosh, Soumitra S; Heilig, Joseph S; Lowe, Carolyn; Roth, Jonathan D

    2013-10-01

    Shortcomings of previously reported preclinical models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) include inadequate methods used to induce disease and assess liver pathology. We have developed a dietary model of NASH displaying features observed clinically and methods for objectively assessing disease progression. Mice fed a diet containing 40% fat (of which ∼18% was trans fat), 22% fructose, and 2% cholesterol developed three stages of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (steatosis, steatohepatitis with fibrosis, and cirrhosis) as assessed by histological and biochemical methods. Using digital pathology to reconstruct the left lateral and right medial lobes of the liver, we made comparisons between and within lobes to determine the uniformity of collagen deposition, which in turn informed experimental sampling methods for histological, biochemical, and gene expression analyses. Gene expression analyses conducted with animals stratified by disease severity led to the identification of several genes for which expression highly correlated with the histological assessment of fibrosis. Importantly, we have established a biopsy method allowing assessment of disease progression. Mice subjected to liver biopsy recovered well from the procedure compared with sham-operated controls with no apparent effect on liver function. Tissue obtained by biopsy was sufficient for gene and protein expression analyses, providing the opportunity to establish an objective method of assessing liver pathology before subjecting animals to treatment. The improved assessment techniques and the observation that mice fed the high-fat diet exhibit many clinically relevant characteristics of NASH establish a preclinical model for identifying pharmacological interventions with greater likelihood of translating to the clinic.

  14. The Ulcerative Colitis Endoscopic Index of Severity More Accurately Reflects Clinical Outcomes and Long-term Prognosis than the Mayo Endoscopic Score

    PubMed Central

    Ikeya, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Ken; Osawa, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Iida, Takayuki; Maruyama, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The Ulcerative Colitis Endoscopic Index of Severity (UCEIS) and the Mayo endoscopic score (Mayo ES) are used to evaluate ulcerative colitis (UC) severity. This study compared UCEIS and the Mayo ES for evaluating UC severity and outcomes in patients undergoing remission induction during routine clinical practice with the aim of predicting medium- to long-term prognosis. Methods: Forty-one UC patients who received colonoscopy before and after tacrolimus remission induction therapy were included. An index of clinical activity and endoscopic findings scored by both the UCEIS and the Mayo ES were determined. Changes in UCEIS and Mayo ES before and after induction therapy were compared. Results: The mean UCEIS improved from 6.2±0.9 to 3.4±2.1 (p < 0.001). Based on the UCEIS, a significant reduction was reached in both the response and the remission groups. In contrast, the Mayo ES did not reflect a significant change in the response group. The discrepancy appeared to be due to ulcers becoming smaller and shallower during the early stages of mucosal healing; the Mayo ES seems to miss these early changes. In other words, whereas the UCEIS indicates improvements when ulcers shrink, the Mayo ES does not distinguish deep ulcers from shallow ulcers and is 3 (severe UC) for both deep and shallow ulcers. Additionally, better UCEIS strata after induction therapy were associated with lower incidences of colectomy (p = 0.0001) or relapse (p = 0.0008). Conclusions: The UCEIS accurately reflects clinical outcomes and predicts the medium- to long-term prognosis in UC patients undergoing induction therapy. These findings should support decision-making in clinical practice settings. PMID:26581895

  15. Reflectance confocal microscope for imaging oral tissues in vivo, potentially with line scanning as a low-cost approach for clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Gary; Abeytunge, Sanjeewa; Eastman, Zachary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy with a line scanning approach potentially offers a smaller, simpler and less expensive approach than traditional methods of point scanning for imaging in living tissues. With one moving mechanical element (galvanometric scanner), a linear array detector and off-the-shelf optics, we designed a compact (102x102x76mm) line scanning confocal reflectance microscope (LSCRM) for imaging human tissues in vivo in a clinical setting. Custom-designed electronics, based on field programmable gate array (FPGA) logic has been developed. With 405 nm illumination and a custom objective lens of numerical aperture 0.5, lateral resolution was measured to be 0.8 um (calculated 0.64 um). The calculated optical sectioning is 3.2 um. Preliminary imaging shows nuclear and cellular detail in human skin and oral epithelium in vivo. Blood flow is also visualized in the deeper connective tissue (lamina propria) in oral mucosa. Since a line is confocal only in one dimension (parallel) but not in the other, the detection is more sensitive to multiply scattered out of focus background noise than in the traditional point scanning configuration. Based on the results of our translational studies thus far, a simpler, smaller and lower-cost approach based on a LSCRM appears to be promising for clinical imaging.

  16. The use of rituximab in newly diagnosed patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: long-term steroid saving capacity and clinical effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gracia-Tello, Borja; Ezeonyeji, Amara; Isenberg, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate that treating patients with lupus (SLE) at or close to the time of diagnosis successfully without using any, or minimal, corticosteroids by using B-cell depletion (BCD) is possible in the short-term. It is not however known whether using BCD is as effective or reduces corticosteroid use in the long-term. We report the long-term (up to 7 years) use of BCD with respect to its steroid-saving capacity and clinical effectiveness in newly diagnosed SLE. Methods Sixteen female patients with SLE were treated at, or shortly after diagnosis, with BCD therapy (BCDT) minimising the routine use of oral steroids. Post-treatment, most patients were given hydroxychloroquine (n=14) and azathioprine (n=10). The British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) disease activity index was used for clinical assessment. Serum antidouble-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies, complement (C3), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), circulating B lymphocytes (CD19+) and total inmmunoglobulins were tested every 2–6 months (average of 4.5 years) (SD 2) post-treatment. Disease activity and steroid requirement were compared with three patients with SLE treated conventionally, each matched for ethnicity, sex, age, clinical features, disease duration at diagnosis and follow-up period. Results All patients given rituximab achieved BCD. The mean number of flares during follow-up (new BILAG A or B) was 2.63 (SD 3) in the BCDT group and 4 (SD 3.6) in the controls (NS, p=0.14). Post-BCDT, mean anti-dsDNA antibody level fell from 1114 U/mL (SD 1699.3) to 194 (SD 346.7) at 18 months (p=0.043), mean serum ESR fell by >70% at 6 months maintained during follow-up and serum C3 level normalised in 8 patients. The mean cumulative prednisolone dose at 60 months for the patients who underwent BCDT (n=11) was 4745.67 mg (SD 6090 mg) vs 12 553.92 mg (SD 12 672 mg) for the controls (p=0.01). Conclusions Early treatment of patients with SLE with BCDT is safe

  17. Detection of precancerous lesions in the oral cavity using oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Maria J.; Verma, Nishant; Fradkin, Leonid; Lam, Sylvia; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine; Markey, Mia K.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2017-06-01

    We developed a multifiber optical probe for oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) in vivo and evaluated its performance in detection of dysplasia in the oral cavity. The probe design allows the implementation of a number of methods to enable depth resolved spectroscopic measurements including polarization gating, source-detector separation, and differential spectroscopy; this combination was evaluated in carrying out binary classification tasks between four major diagnostic categories: normal, benign, mild dysplasia (MD), and severe dysplasia (SD). Multifiber OPRS showed excellent performance in the discrimination of normal from benign, MD, SD, and MD plus SD yielding sensitivity/specificity values of 100%/93%, 96%/95%, 100%/98%, and 100%/100%, respectively. The classification of benign versus dysplastic lesions was more challenging with sensitivity and specificity values of 80%/93%, 71%/93%, and 74%/80% in discriminating benign from SD, MD, and SD plus MD categories, respectively; this challenge is most likely associated with a strong and highly variable scattering from a keratin layer that was found in these sites. Classification based on multiple fibers was significantly better than that based on any single detection pair for tasks dealing with benign versus dysplastic sites. This result indicates that the multifiber probe can perform better in the detection of dysplasia in keratinized tissues.

  18. Reflections on the role of a traveling wave along the basilar membrane in view of clinical and experimental findings.

    PubMed

    Sohmer, Haim

    2015-03-01

    Air conduction (AC) is accompanied by displacements of the two cochlear windows, bulk fluid flow between them, a pressure difference across the basilar membrane, leading to a passive traveling wave along the membrane, which activates the cochlear amplifier and enhances the displacements. AC interacts with bone conduction (BC) stimulation, so that it has been assumed that BC stimulation also involves a passive traveling wave. However, several clinical conditions and experimental manipulations provide evidence that a passive traveling wave may not be involved in BC stimulation at low intensities. Soft tissue conduction (STC) (also called non-osseous bone conduction) involves applying the bone vibrator to soft tissues on the head, neck and thorax, eliciting auditory sensation. STC stimulation probably does not involve a passive traveling wave. This review presents clinical conditions and experimental manipulations which assess the contributions of AC, BC and STC stimulation to the passive traveling wave. Evidence from the clinic (otosclerosis, round window atresia) and from the laboratory (holes in the wall of the inner ear, immobilization of the ossicular chain and the windows, discontinuity of the chain, measurement of basilar membrane displacements in the absence of the cochlear amplifier) lead to the conclusion that a passive basilar membrane traveling wave may not be involved in stimulation at low sound intensities. It is suggested that at low sound levels, the outer hair cell cochlear amplifier may not be activated by a passive traveling wave, but may be directly activated by the fast cochlear fluid pressures induced by AC, BC and STC stimulation. On the other hand, at high intensities, the cochlea is activated by the slow passive traveling wave.

  19. [Assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity].

    PubMed

    Dreßing, H; Foerster, K; Leygraf, J; Schneider, F

    2014-11-01

    The assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity require thorough knowledge of the legal framework and the relevant case law. This paper explains the concept of the legal capacity to contract and the concept of testamentary capacity with respect to German civil law. The relevance of major mental disorders for the assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity is discussed.

  20. Clinical practice placements in the community: a survey to determine if they reflect the shift in healthcare delivery from secondary to primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Betony, Karen

    2012-01-01

    With the worldwide strategic shift of health care delivery from secondary to primary care settings, more newly qualified nurses are working in primary care, making exposure to the variety of roles available to nurses essential for future workforce development. The aim of this small research project was to explore whether English universities' programmes are providing clinical practice placement experiences which reflect the breadth and complexity of nursing roles available in primary care. A survey of academic staff highlighted that universities designed curricula based on local placement and mentor availability and while a variety of primary care teams are being used, district nursing teams continue to be used the most, particularly for substantive placements. The need for specified staff to work across university and placement settings was deemed essential for identifying and supporting community based clinical placements. Recommendations from the project include: an increasingly collaborative approach amongst clinical, academic and managerial staff to create a learning culture for all health professional students' practice experience; robust strategic systems to ensure clinical placements are offered by services on the periphery of a national health service; and focussing of resources on students with a desire to pursue a primary care career.

  1. Effect of reflective practice education on self-reflection, insight, and reflective thinking among experienced nurses: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Marilyn E; Fain, James A

    2013-01-01

    A mixed-method study was conducted to determine whether nurses' participation in a reflective practice continuing education program using a structured reflection model makes a difference in nurses' self-reflection, insight, and reflective thinking about clinical practice situations. Findings suggested that use of structured reflection using question cues, written narratives, and peer-facilitated reflection increased nurses' engagement in self-reflection and enhanced reflective thinking in practice. Including reflective practice education in novice orientation and preceptor training may be beneficial.

  2. Novel Biomarkers of Human GM1 Gangliosidosis Reflect the Clinical Efficacy of Gene Therapy in a Feline Model.

    PubMed

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Regier, Debra S; Shirley, Jamie L; Randle, Ashley N; Salibi, Nouha; Thomas, Sarah E; Latour, Yvonne L; Johnston, Jean; Golas, Gretchen; Maguire, Annie S; Taylor, Amanda R; Sorjonen, Donald C; McCurdy, Victoria J; Christopherson, Peter W; Bradbury, Allison M; Beyers, Ronald J; Johnson, Aime K; Brunson, Brandon L; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Denney, Thomas S; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Tifft, Cynthia J; Martin, Douglas R

    2017-04-05

    GM1 gangliosidosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects individuals of all ages. Favorable outcomes using adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene therapy in GM1 mice and cats have prompted consideration of human clinical trials, yet there remains a paucity of objective biomarkers to track disease status. We developed a panel of biomarkers using blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), electrodiagnostics, 7 T MRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in GM1 cats-either untreated or AAV treated for more than 5 years-and compared them to markers in human GM1 patients where possible. Significant alterations were noted in CSF and blood of GM1 humans and cats, with partial or full normalization after gene therapy in cats. Gene therapy improved the rhythmic slowing of electroencephalograms (EEGs) in GM1 cats, a phenomenon present also in GM1 patients, but nonetheless the epileptiform activity persisted. After gene therapy, MR-based analyses revealed remarkable preservation of brain architecture and correction of brain metabolites associated with microgliosis, neuroaxonal loss, and demyelination. Therapeutic benefit of AAV gene therapy in GM1 cats, many of which maintain near-normal function >5 years post-treatment, supports the strong consideration of human clinical trials, for which the biomarkers described herein will be essential for outcome assessment. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Network Modules of the Cross-Species Genotype-Phenotype Map Reflect the Clinical Severity of Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Inhae; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing techniques have improved our understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship between genetic variants and human diseases. However, genetic variations uncovered from patient populations do not provide enough information to understand the mechanisms underlying the progression and clinical severity of human diseases. Moreover, building a high-resolution genotype-phenotype map is difficult due to the diverse genetic backgrounds of the human population. We built a cross-species genotype-phenotype map to explain the clinical severity of human genetic diseases. We developed a data-integrative framework to investigate network modules composed of human diseases mapped with gene essentiality measured from a model organism. Essential and nonessential genes connect diseases of different types which form clusters in the human disease network. In a large patient population study, we found that disease classes enriched with essential genes tended to show a higher mortality rate than disease classes enriched with nonessential genes. Moreover, high disease mortality rates are explained by the multiple comorbid relationships and the high pleiotropy of disease genes found in the essential gene-enriched diseases. Our results reveal that the genotype-phenotype map of a model organism can facilitate the identification of human disease-gene associations and predict human disease progression. PMID:26301634

  4. Globalisation as we enter the 21st century: reflections and directions for nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; Meleis, Afaf; Daly, John; Douglas, Marilyn Marty

    2003-10-01

    The events of September 11th, 2001 in the United States and the Bali bombings of October 2002 are chastening examples of the entangled web of the religious, political, health, cultural and economic forces we experience living in a global community. To view these forces as independent, singular, linearly deterministic entities of globalisation is irrational and illogical. Understanding the concept of globalisation has significant implications not only for world health and international politics, but also the health of individuals. Depending on an individual's political stance and world-view, globalisation may be perceived as an emancipatory force, having the potential to bridge the chasm between rich and poor or, in stark contrast, the very essence of the divide. It is important that nurses appreciate that globalisation does not pertain solely to the realms of economic theory and world politics, but also that it impacts on our daily nursing practice and the welfare of our patients. Globalisation and the closer interactions of human activity that result, have implications for international governance, policy and theory development as well as nursing education, research and clinical practice. Nurses, individually and collectively, have the political power and social consciousness to influence the forces of globalisation to improve health for all. This paper defines and discusses globalisation in today's world and its implications for contemporary nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

  5. Mental capacity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ruth

    2010-02-03

    Three short videos exploring some of the different principles in the Mental Capacity Act 2009 are available on Social Care TV, an online channel intended mainly for the social care sector, although the films are relevant to any professionals whose work is affected by the act. The dramas, which are set in a residential home, a person's own home and a residential school for young people with learning difficulties, concern thedecision-making process and can be viewed at www.scie.org.uk/socialcaretv/topic.asp?guid=377dbe1b-de0c-4d66-bb87-22a243542db2.

  6. Assessing quality of life in a clinical study on heart rehabilitation patients: how well do value sets based on given or experienced health states reflect patients' valuations?

    PubMed

    Leidl, Reiner; Schweikert, Bernd; Hahmann, Harry; Steinacker, Juergen M; Reitmeir, Peter

    2016-03-22

    Quality of life as an endpoint in a clinical study may be sensitive to the value set used to derive a single score. Focusing on patients' actual valuations in a clinical study, we compare different value sets for the EQ-5D-3L and assess how well they reproduce patients' reported results. A clinical study comparing inpatient (n = 98) and outpatient (n = 47) rehabilitation of patients after an acute coronary event is re-analyzed. Value sets include: 1. Given health states and time-trade-off valuation (GHS-TTO) rendering economic utilities; 2. Experienced health states and valuation by visual analog scale (EHS-VAS). Valuations are compared with patient-reported VAS rating. Accuracy is assessed by mean absolute error (MAE) and by Pearson's correlation ρ. External validity is tested by correlation with established MacNew global scores. Drivers of differences between value sets and VAS are analyzed using repeated measures regression. EHS-VAS had smaller MAEs and higher ρ in all patients and in the inpatient group, and correlated best with MacNew global score. Quality-adjusted survival was more accurately reflected by EHS-VAS. Younger, better educated patients reported lower VAS at admission than the EHS-based value set. EHS-based estimates were mostly able to reproduce patient-reported valuation. Economic utility measurement is conceptually different, produced results less strongly related to patients' reports, and resulted in about 20 % longer quality-adjusted survival. Decision makers should take into account the impact of choosing value sets on effectiveness results. For transferring the results of heart rehabilitation patients from another country or from another valuation method, the EHS-based value set offers a promising estimation option for those decision makers who prioritize patient-reported valuation. Yet, EHS-based estimates may not fully reflect patient-reported VAS in all situations.

  7. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  8. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  9. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30–35 fractions within 4–7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect. PMID:23497687

  10. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Neda; Moslemi, Dariush; Khalilpour, Mohammad; Vejdani, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Bijani, Ali; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalilpour, Asieh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2013-03-07

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30-35 fractions within 4-7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001) and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031). Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect.

  11. 'The Loss of My Elderly Patient:' Interactive reflective writing to support medical students' rites of passage.

    PubMed

    Wald, Hedy S; Reis, Shmuel P; Monroe, Alicia D; Borkan, Jeffrey M

    2010-01-01

    The fostering of reflective capacity within medical education helps develop critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills and enhances professionalism. Use of reflective narratives to augment reflective practice instruction is well documented. At Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (Alpert Med), a narrative medicine curriculum innovation of students' reflective writing (field notes) with individualized feedback from an interdisciplinary faculty team (in pre-clinical years) has been implemented in a Doctoring course to cultivate reflective capacity, empathy, and humanism. Interactive reflective writing (student writer/faculty feedback provider dyad), we propose, can additionally support students with rites of passage at critical educational junctures. At Alpert Med, we have devised a tool to guide faculty in crafting quality feedback, i.e. the Brown Educational Guide to Analysis of Narrative (BEGAN) which includes identifying students' salient quotes, utilizing reflection-inviting questions and close reading, highlighting derived lessons/key concepts, extracting clinical patterns, and providing concrete recommendations as relevant. We provide an example of a student's narrative describing an emotionally powerful and meaningful event - the loss of his first patient - and faculty responses using BEGAN. The provision of quality feedback to students' reflective writing - supported by BEGAN - can facilitate the transformation of student to professional through reflection within medical education.

  12. Clinical features reflect exon sites of EGFR mutations in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Na, Im Il; Rho, Jin Kyung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Koh, Jae Soo; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Yang, Sung Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the clinical significance according to the subtypes of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and presence of KRAS mutations in operable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We sequenced exons 18-21 of the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain and examined mutations in codons 12 and 13 of KRAS in tissues of patients with NSCLC who had undergone surgical resection. EGFR mutations were more frequent in never-smokers than smokers (33% vs. 14%, respectively; p=0.009) and in females than in males (31% vs. 16%, respectively; p=0.036). Mutations in exon 18-19 and 20-21 were found in 10 and 22 patients, respectively. Never-smokers and broncho-alveolar cell carcinoma features were positively associated with a mutation in exon 18-19 (p=0.027 and 0.016, respectively). The five-year survival rate in patients with a mutation in exons 18-19 (100%) was higher than that in patients without such mutation (47%; p=0.021). KRAS mutations were found in 16 patients (12%) and were not related to the overall survival (p=0.742). Patients with an EGFR mutation in exons 18-19 had better survival than patients without such mutation. Subtypes of EGFR mutations may be prognostic factors in patients undergoing curative resection.

  13. The reported clinical utility of taurine in ischemic disorders may reflect a down-regulation of neutrophil activation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-10-01

    The first publications regarding clinical use of taurine were Italian reports claiming therapeutic efficacy in angina, intermittent claudication and symptomatic cerebral arteriosclerosis. A down-regulation of neutrophil activation and endothelial adhesion might plausibly account for these observations. Endothelial platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a crucial stimulus to neutrophil adhesion and activation, whereas endothelial nitric oxide (NO) suppresses PAF production and acts in various other ways to antagonize binding and activation of neutrophils. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a neutrophil product which avidly oxidizes many sulfhydryl-dependent proteins, can be expected to inhibit NO synthase while up-regulating PAF generation; thus, a vicious circle can be postulated whereby HOCl released by marginating neutrophils acts on capillary or venular endothelium to promote further neutrophil adhesion and activation. Taurine is the natural detoxicant of HOCl, and thus has the potential to intervene in this vicious circle, promoting a less adhesive endothelium and restraining excessive neutrophil activation. Agents which inhibit the action of PAF on neutrophils, such as ginkgolides and pentoxifylline, have documented utility in ischemic disorders and presumably would complement the efficacy of taurine in this regard. Fish oil, which inhibits endothelial expression of various adhesion factors and probably PAF as well, and which suppresses neutrophil leukotriene production, may likewise be useful in ischemia. These agents may additionally constitute a non-toxic strategy for treating inflammatory disorders in which activated neutrophils play a prominent pathogenic role. Double-blind studies to confirm the efficacy of taurine in symptomatic chronic ischemia are needed.

  14. Working with chronic and relentless self-hatred, self-harm and existential shame: a clinical study and reflections.

    PubMed

    Austin, Sue

    2016-02-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part series which explores some of the theoretical and experiential reference points that have emerged in my work with people whose relationship to their body and/or sense of self is dominated by self-hatred and (what Hultberg describes as) existential shame. The first paper focuses on self-hatred and the second paper focuses on shame. This first paper is structured around vignettes taken from a 14-year analysis with a woman who was bulimic, self-harmed and repeatedly described herself as 'feeling like a piece of shit'. It draws together elements of Jung's concepts of the complex and symbol, and Laplanche's enigmatic signifier to focus on experiences of 'inner otherness' around which we are unconsciously organized. It also brings Jung's understanding that emotion is the chief source of consciousness into conversation with Laplanche's approach to the transference which is that by being aware that they do not 'know', the analyst provides a 'hollow' in which the patient's analytic process can evolve. These combinations of ideas are linked speculatively to emerging understandings of the neuroscience of perception and throughout the paper clinical material is used to illustrate these discussions.

  15. Students' reflections on the relationships between safe learning environments, learning challenge and positive experiences of learning in a simulated GP clinic.

    PubMed

    Young, J E; Williamson, M I; Egan, T G

    2016-03-01

    Learning environments are a significant determinant of student behaviour, achievement and satisfaction. In this article we use students' reflective essays to identify key features of the learning environment that contributed to positive and transformative learning experiences. We explore the relationships between these features, the students' sense of safety in the learning environment (LE), the resulting learning challenge with which they could cope and their positive reports of the experience itself. Our students worked in a unique simulation of General Practice, the Safe and Effective Clinical Outcomes clinic, where they consistently reported positive experiences of learning. We analysed 77 essays from 2011 and 2012 using an immersion/crystallisation framework. Half of the students referred to the safety of the learning environment spontaneously. Students described deep learning experiences in their simulated consultations. Students valued features of the LE which contributed to a psychologically safe environment. Together with the provision of constructive support and immediate, individualised feedback this feeling of safety assisted students to find their own way through clinical dilemmas. These factors combine to make students feel relaxed and able to take on challenges that otherwise would have been overwhelming. Errors became learning opportunities and students could practice purposefully. We draw on literature from medical education, educational psychology and sociology to interpret our findings. Our results demonstrate relationships between safe learning environments, learning challenge and powerful learning experiences, justifying close attention to the construction of learning environments to promote student learning, confidence and motivation.

  16. Submerged Reflectance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    at 450 and viewed at 0* (i.e., viewed nor1al to the surface). Instruments for performing this particular bi-directional reflectance measurement are...are described below. 3.1 THEORY OF ABSOLUTE SUBMERGED REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENT An absolute measurement of the reflectance of a surface can be obtained by...relative reflectance measurement is shown in Figure 2. The irradiance across the target will vary within the field of view of the photometer because

  17. Objective evaluation by reflectance spectrophotometry can be of clinical value for the verification of blanching/non blanching erythema in the sacral area.

    PubMed

    Sterner, Eila; Fossum, Bjöörn; Berg, Elisabeth; Lindholm, Christina; Stark, André

    2014-08-01

    Early detection of non blanching erythema (pressure ulcer category I) is necessary to prevent any further skin damage. An objective method to discriminate between blanching/non blanching erythema is presently not available. The purpose of this investigation was to explore if a non invasive objective method could differentiate between blanching/non blanching erythema in the sacral area of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. Seventy-eight patients were included. The sacral area of all patients was assessed using (i) conventional finger-press test and (ii) digital reading of the erythema index assessed with reflectance spectrophotometry. The patients were examined at admission and during 5 days postsurgery. Reflectance spectrophotometry measurements proved able to discriminate between blanching/non blanching erythema. The reliability, quantified by the intra-class correlation coefficient, was excellent between repeated measurements over the measurement period, varying between 0·82 and 0·96, and a significant change was recorded in the areas from day 1 to day 5 (P < 0·0001). The value from the reference point did not show any significant changes over the same period (P = 0·32). An objective method proven to identify early pressure damage to tissue can be a valuable tool in clinical practice.

  18. EFFICACY OF THE 20-WEEK CIRCLE OF SECURITY INTERVENTION: CHANGES IN CAREGIVER REFLECTIVE FUNCTIONING, REPRESENTATIONS, AND CHILD ATTACHMENT IN AN AUSTRALIAN CLINICAL SAMPLE.

    PubMed

    Huber, Anna; McMahon, Catherine A; Sweller, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Circle of Security is an attachment theory based intervention that aims to promote secure parent-child attachment relationships. Despite extensive uptake of the approach, there is limited empirical evidence regarding efficacy. The current study examined whether participation in the 20-week Circle of Security intervention resulted in positive caregiver-child relationship change in four domains: caregiver reflective functioning; caregiver representations of the child and the relationship with the child; child attachment security, and attachment disorganization. Archived pre- and postintervention data were analyzed from 83 clinically referred caregiver-child dyads (child age: 13-88 months) who completed the Circle of Security intervention in sequential cohorts and gave permission for their data to be included in the study. Caregivers completed the Circle of Security Interview, and dyads were filmed in the Strange Situation Procedure before and after the intervention. Results supported all four hypotheses: Caregiver reflective functioning, caregiving representations, and level of child attachment security increased after the intervention, and level of attachment disorganization decreased for those with high baseline levels. Those whose scores were least optimal prior to intervention showed the greatest change in all domains. This study adds to the evidence suggesting that the 20-week Circle of Security intervention results in significant relationship improvements for caregivers and their children. © 2015 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  19. Long-wave infrared radiation reflected by compression stockings in the treatment of cellulite: a clinical double-blind, randomized and controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bagatin, E; Miot, H A; Soares, J L M; Sanudo, A; Afonso, J P J M; de Barros Junior, N; Talarico, S

    2013-10-01

    Cellulite refers to changes in skin relief on the thighs and buttocks of women, with a prevalence of 80-90%, causing dissatisfaction and search for treatment. Etiopathogenesis is multifactorial, as follows: herniation of the hypodermis towards the dermis, facilitated by perpendicular fibrous septa, changes in the dermal extracellular matrix, decreased adiponectin, genetic polymorphism, microcirculation alterations and inflammatory process. There are numerous therapeutic approaches, with little evidence of effectiveness. The long-wave infrared (LWIR) radiation interacts with water, improves microcirculation and stimulates metabolic processes. To date, the use of tissues with potential reflection of LWIR radiation has not been systematically investigated as adjuvant treatment for cellulite. To investigate the efficacy and safety of the treatment of cellulite through the use of compression stockings made with thread reflecting LWIR radiation. Clinical study of therapeutic intervention, controlled and double-blind, including 30 women, aging from 25 to 40 years, with cellulite of grades II and III on the thighs and buttocks who used compression stockings, "pantyhose" model, made with reflector thread of LWIR radiation, on only one randomized side. Women under other treatments for cellulite and with venous and/or blood insufficiencies were excluded. Evaluation of efficacy by clinical parameters, photographs, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), cutometry and high frequency ultrasonography and security by observation of adverse events and venous EcoDoppler recordings. DLQI scores showed significant reduction; the two-dimensional high-frequency ultrasonography showed an insignificant increase in dermal echogenicity as well as other efficacy parameters demonstrated no or slight improvement, with no differences between the sides exposed or not to LWIR; and there were no severe adverse events. Compression stockings, with or without thread reflector of LWIR, showed slight

  20. Withdrawal and withholding of medical treatment for patients lacking capacity who are in a critical condition--reflections on the judgment of the Supreme Court in Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust v James.

    PubMed

    Wise, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Consideration of recent judgment of the Supreme Court in leading case concerning the withdrawal and withholding of medical treatment for a patient lacking capacity who was in a critical condition. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Caring for demented people in their homes or in sheltered accommodation as reflected on by home-care staff during clinical supervision sessions.

    PubMed

    Olsson, A; Hallberg, I R

    1998-02-01

    This study aimed to illuminate both the content of and the care given to demented people and the reflections of home care staff about it as revealed in two clinical group supervision sessions (n = 36). Verbatim transcriptions were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach and the following were found to be reflected on: the pensioners' personal situation--disease-related behaviour, ADL-functions, social network and self-esteem; the pensioners' environment--their relationships to significant others, adequate level of housing/care, access to activities, and satisfactory personal space; pensioner/staff interaction--their relations to each other, the staffs' relation to the pensioners' family, and the balance between reality-orientation vs. validation; the staff's situation--co-operation with other professionals, in primary health care, hospital, and within the social services; job satisfaction, lack of knowledge and sharing of knowledge, and lack of resources, especially time. The reasoning of the participants under supervision was found to be based on medical, historical, psychological, and environmental explanations, or personal beliefs. Feelings explored during supervision were directed towards the pensioners or the pensioners' families, towards themselves or towards the management. The findings were interpreted within a nursing model based on the four central concepts of nursing; person, environment, nursing intervention and health. The reasoning about nursing care revealed in the supervision sessions reflected a holistic approach and the relationship between the staff and the demented person stood out as central for care quality. Thus focusing on what promotes or, respectively, obstructs this relationship is likely to be one important focus in clinical supervision not only to achieve improvement and high quality in home care but also to develop and enhance the quality of the working life of the staff. Since the results could be understood within a

  2. Commentary: "I hope i'll continue to grow": rubrics and reflective writing in medical education.

    PubMed

    Coulehan, Jack; Granek, Iris A

    2012-01-01

    One respected tradition in medical education holds that physicians should struggle to maintain sensibility, openness, and compassion in the face of strong contravening tendencies. However, today's medical education is structured around a more recent tradition, which maintains that physicians should struggle to develop emotional detachment as a prerequisite for objectivity. In this model, sensibility and reflective capacity are potentially subversive. Reflective writing is one component of a revisionist approach to medical education that explicitly addresses reflective "habits of the mind" as core competencies and builds on existential concerns voiced by medical students. In response to Wald and colleagues' study, the authors reflect on the role of repeated formative feedback in developing reflective capacity. Formative feedback is as critical in this process as it is in traditional clinical learning. The authors emphasize that well-designed rubrics can assist learners in delineating desired outcomes and teachers in providing appropriate guidance.

  3. Bioethics for clinicians: 3. Capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Etchells, E; Sharpe, G; Elliott, C; Singer, P A

    1996-01-01

    In the context of patient consent, "capacity" refers to the patient's ability to understand information relevant to a treatment decision and to appreciate the reasonably foreseeable consequences of a decision or lack of decision. A person may be "capable" with respect to one decision but not with respect to another. Clinicians can usually identify patients who are clearly capable or incapable, but in some cases a clinical capacity assessment is required. Such assessment may consist of cognitive status testing, general impressions of capacity or specific capacity assessment. Specific capacity assessment, in which the clinician evaluates the patient's ability to understand pertinent information and appreciate its implications, is probably the optimal method. When conducting a specific capacity assessment, the clinician must ensure that the disclosure of information is effective and must evaluate the patient's reason for his or her decision. If the assessment suggests that the patient is incapable, further assessment is generally recommended. PMID:8823211

  4. Attachment and Reflective Functioning in Women With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Badoud, Deborah; Prada, Paco; Nicastro, Rosetta; Germond, Charlotte; Luyten, Patrick; Perroud, Nader; Debbané, Martin

    2017-03-06

    Insecure attachment and impairments in reflective functioning (RF) are thought to play a critical role in borderline personality disorder (BPD). In particular, the mentalization-based model argues that insecure attachment indirectly accounts for increased BPD features, notably via disruption of RF capacities. Although the mediation relationship between attachment, RF, and BPD is supported by previous evidence, it remains to be directly tested in adults with BPD. In the current study, a sample of 55 female adult BPD patients and 105 female healthy controls completed a battery of self-report measures to investigate the interplay between attachment, RF capacities, and BPD clinical status. Overall, the results showed that BPD patients predominantly reported insecure attachment, characterized by negative internal working models of the self as unlovable and unimportant to others, and decreased RF abilities. Our findings further indicated that actual RF capacities mediated the relationships between adult insecure attachment and BPD clinical status.

  5. The measurement of reflective function in adolescents with and without borderline traits.

    PubMed

    Ha, Carolyn; Sharp, Carla; Ensink, Karin; Fonagy, Peter; Cirino, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Reflective function refers to the capacity to reflect on the mind of self and others in the context of the attachment relationship. Reflective function (and its conceptual neighbor, mentalizing) has been shown to be an important correlate of a variety of disorders, including borderline personality disorder (BPD). The current study examined the construct validity of the Reflective Function Questionnaire for Youths (RFQY) in an inpatient sample of adolescents. Adequate internal consistency was established for the RFQY. Significant positive associations with an interview-based measure of reflective function and an experimental-based assessment of mentalization were found for the RFQY. Strong negative relations with BPD features were found and adolescent patients who scored above clinical cut-off for BPD symptoms demonstrated significantly poorer reflective function compared to patients without the disorder. These findings provide preliminary support for the notion that reflective function can be validly and reliably assessed in adolescent populations.

  6. Contemporaneous assessment of testamentary capacity.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Kenneth I; Peisah, Carmelle; Jacoby, Robin; Heinik, Jeremia; Finkel, Sanford

    2009-06-01

    Challenges to wills on the basis of lack of testamentary capacity and/or undue influence are likely to increase over the next generation. Since contemporaneous assessment of testamentary capacity can be a powerful influence on the outcome of such challenges, there will be an associated increase in requests for expert assessment of testamentary capacity. There is a need to provide such potential experts with the knowledge and guidelines necessary to conduct assessments that will be helpful to the judicial system. A subcommittee of the International Psychogeriatric Association (IPA) task force on "Testamentary Capacity and Undue Influence" was formed to establish guidelines for contemporaneous assessment of testamentary capacity. The task-specific criteria for testamentary capacity as outlined by Lord Chief Justice Cockburn in the well-known Banks v. Goodfellow case are described. Additional issues are identified for probing and documentation. This is designed to determine whether the testator can formulate a coherent, rational testamentary plan that connects his/her beliefs, values and relationships with the proposed disposition of assets. Rules of engagement by the expert assessor are defined as well as an approach to the clinical examination for testamentary capacity resulting in a clear and relevant report. Guidelines for experts who are asked to provide a contemporaneous opinion on testamentary capacity should help to inform disputes resulting from challenges to wills. A consistent clinical approach will help the courts to make their determinations.

  7. Clinical Measures Are Feasible and Sensitive to Assess Balance and Gait Capacities in Older Persons with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; Lantman-de Valk, Henny van Schrojenstein; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mobility limitations are common in persons with Intellectual Disabilities (ID). Differences in balance and gait capacities between persons with ID and controls have mainly been demonstrated by instrumented assessments (e.g. posturography and gait analysis), which require sophisticated and expensive equipment such as force plates or a 3D motion…

  8. Effect of whole body vibration training on quadriceps strength, bone mineral density, and functional capacity in children with hemophilia: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    El-Shamy, S

    2017-06-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of whole body vibration training on quadriceps strength, bone mineral density, and functional capacity in children with hemophilia. Thirty children with hemophilia with age ranging from 9 to 13 years were selected and randomly assigned to either the study group that received whole body vibration training (30-40 Hz, 2-4 mm of peak-to-peak vertical plate displacement for 15 minutes/day, 3 days/week/ 12 weeks) plus the conventional physical therapy program or the control group that performed a conventional physical therapy program only. Outcomes included quadriceps strength, bone mineral density, and the functional capacity. Children in the study group showed a significant improvement in all outcomes compared with the control group. The quadriceps peak torque after treatment was 70.26 and 56.46 Nm for the study and control group, respectively (p⟨0.001). The lumbar spine bone mineral density after treatment was 0.85 and 0.72 g/cm(2) for the study and control group, respectively (p⟨0.001). The functional capacity after treatment was 325 and 290 m for the study and control group, respectively (p=0.006). Whole body vibration training is an effective modality in increasing quadriceps strength, bone mineral density, and functional capacity in children with hemophilia.

  9. Clinical Measures Are Feasible and Sensitive to Assess Balance and Gait Capacities in Older Persons with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; Lantman-de Valk, Henny van Schrojenstein; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mobility limitations are common in persons with Intellectual Disabilities (ID). Differences in balance and gait capacities between persons with ID and controls have mainly been demonstrated by instrumented assessments (e.g. posturography and gait analysis), which require sophisticated and expensive equipment such as force plates or a 3D motion…

  10. The Value of Reflective: Functioning within an Academic Therapeutic Nursery.

    PubMed

    LaLonde, Mary M; Dreier, Mona; Aaronson, Gayle; O'Brien, John

    2015-01-01

    The self begins as a social self and is dependent on the other and the self-other relationship. Furthermore, shortly after birth, the intersubjective self is nurtured and sustained by the reciprocal interactions with the significant other. Recent research suggests that the significant other's reciprocity depends on his or her capacity for mentalization, and this reflective functioning capacity influences not only the child's developing sense of I, other, and we, but also his or her developing attachment pattern. Several studies have demonstrated that parental reflective functioning can be improved with intervention, and enhancing parental reflective functioning can lead to a more secure attachment pattern and better outcomes for the child and parent. Therefore, intervention with toddlers and their families requires us to consider this dynamic two-person psychology. In this paper, we describe an academic parent-child nursery program aimed at enhancing parental reflective functioning. A clinical example from the collaborative treatment of a mother and her two-year-old will demonstrate how reflective functioning can be enhanced in the parent-child dyad and lead to a more secure parent-child relationship. We will also discuss the value of reflective functioning to the interdisciplinary team and how we dealt with countertransference issues that arose during the treatment.

  11. Reflecting on Reflecting on Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses three broad themes--reflection, power, and negotiation--that are evidenced in all of the articles in this issue. In this article, the author tries to transgress the articles at some middling altitude to seek some broader thematics. His observations about reflection, power, and negotiation do transcend individual efforts,…

  12. Reflections From the Intersection of Health Professions Education and Clinical Practice: The State of the Science of Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice.

    PubMed

    Lutfiyya, M Nawal; Brandt, Barbara F; Cerra, Frank

    2016-06-01

    This informed reflection, from the intersection of health professions education and clinical practice, takes stock of the state of the field of interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice (CP) (together IPECP) by answering the following three questions: (1) As a field of study, where is IPECP? (2) As a research enterprise, what are the current analytical gaps? (3) Scientifically, what needs to be done going forward? While IPE and CP, as well as IPECP, have been areas of scholarly inquiry for nearly 50 years, they have collectively and individually had a limited sphere of influence. Analytical gaps identified include little research dealing with big picture health-related outcomes; mixed results on the effectiveness of health care teams; increasing recognition that additional IPECP competencies might be needed; a gap between the identification and application of educational best practices; and the need for sound, reliable, and validated tools for measuring IPECP. The authors outline the work of the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education at the University of Minnesota, which is focused on filling the identified analytical gaps by way of strategic actions organized around three domains-(1) developing an IPECP research agenda, (2) nurturing IPECP intervention research grounded in comparative effectiveness research study designs and the assumptions of critical realism, and (3) the creation of a sound informatics platform. The authors argue that filling these gaps is important because if the effectiveness of IPE on CP and of CP on health outcomes is ever to be ascertained, generalizable findings are paramount.

  13. Reflection and Learning: Characteristics, Obstacles, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, David

    2011-01-01

    Reflection represents an important form of human thought; from ancient to modern times, the human capacity for reflective thinking has held the imagination of various philosophers and educational theorists. Despite this interest, researchers define reflection in different ways. One of the purposes of this article is to explore the activity of…

  14. Reflection and Learning: Characteristics, Obstacles, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, David

    2011-01-01

    Reflection represents an important form of human thought; from ancient to modern times, the human capacity for reflective thinking has held the imagination of various philosophers and educational theorists. Despite this interest, researchers define reflection in different ways. One of the purposes of this article is to explore the activity of…

  15. "Having a Baby Changes Everything" Reflective Functioning in Pregnant Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Lois S; Novick, Gina; Meadows-Oliver, Mikki

    2016-01-01

    Reflective functioning (RF), the capacity to envision thoughts, feelings, needs and intentions within the self and others, is thought to be central to sensitive parenting, yet this capacity has been unexamined among pregnant adolescents. We explored how RF was related to the emotional experience of adolescent pregnancy. This qualitative study was guided by interpretive description. Participants were 30 Latina and African-American adolescents (mean age 17.7+1.5years) residing in a low-income urban community. All adolescents were interviewed with the Pregnancy Interview (a 22 question semi-structured interview) in their third trimester of pregnancy. Interview transcripts had been previously coded for levels of RF (1-9 with higher levels denoting higher reflectiveness), and this secondary analysis focused on the teens' experience of pregnancy and their emerging reflective capacities. We used a priori and inductive coding with all interviews and developed patterns and themes. These interviews provided an in-depth understanding of the complex adolescent emotional experiences of pregnancy. We identified five themes that create a picture of how the participants reflected upon their pregnancies, unborn babies, emerging parental roles, and complicated relationships with family and partners. Adolescent developmental issues and harsh family and neighborhood environments permeated the teens' experience of pregnancy and limited capacity for RF. Understanding distinctive features of RF in pregnant adolescents may contribute to developing conceptual models and tailored clinical approaches for enhancing parental reflectiveness and sensitivity in these vulnerable young women as they enter into the transition to parenthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical, biophysical, immunohistochemical, and in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy evaluation of the response of subjects with sensitive skin to home-use fractional non-ablative photothermolysis device.

    PubMed

    Richters, Renée J H; Hoogedoorn, Lisa; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E; Janssen, Lisanne D; Tom Nuijs, A M; van Erp, Piet E J; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M

    2016-07-01

    Fractional photothermolysis using professional devices is a well-accepted and a widely used technique for skin rejuvenation. Recently, the technology has also been implemented in devices for home-use. Yet, a subpopulation of consumers exists that reacts excessively to this stimulation and reports "sensitive skin" (SS). The goal of this study was to evaluate the response of subjects with SS and NSS to fractional non-ablative photothermolysis to provide additional insights in the pathophysiology of SS. Subjects with SS and non-sensitive skin (NSS), selected using a proprietary questionnaire were stimulated by applying a home-use fractional non-ablative photothermolysis device. Self-reported perceptions and objective effects were evaluated after 0.5, 8, 24, and 72 hours by clinical, biophysical and immunohistochemical assessment, and in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). Significantly fewer mast cells were found in SS compared to NSS subjects, 0.5 and 72 hours after stimulus based on tryptase staining, and SS subjects report discomfort more frequently. Immunohistochemical biomarkers revealed new insights in the effects of fractional non-ablative photothermolysis, which were supported by RCM: peri- and interlesional epidermal proliferation, and changes in keratinocyte differentiation. Previously, we have already reported that SS could be elicited by mechanical and chemical stimuli. Thus, mild yet excessive self-reported perceptions described here supports the hypothesis about existence of generalized skin sensitivity. Furthermore, it supports a view point suggesting involvement of TRPV1 receptors in this phenomenon. While histological evaluation, in line with our previous results points to the role of mast cells in SS, overall, however, fractional non-ablative photothermolysis causes only mild damage, nearly equal in SS and NSS and could be used as an in vivo model for skin regeneration without manipulating the skin barrier. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:474-482, 2016

  17. The Intersection of Care Seeking and Clinical Capacity for Patients With Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus in Indonesia: Knowledge and Treatment Practices of the Public and Physicians.

    PubMed

    Kreslake, Jennifer M; Wahyuningrum, Yunita; Iuliano, Angela D; Storms, Aaron D; Lafond, Kathryn E; Mangiri, Amalya; Praptiningsih, Catharina Y; Safi, Basil; Uyeki, Timothy M; Storey, J Douglas

    2016-12-01

    Indonesia has the highest human mortality from highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N1) virus infection in the world. A survey of households (N=2520) measured treatment sources and beliefs among symptomatic household members. A survey of physicians (N=554) in various types of health care facilities measured knowledge, assessment and testing behaviors, and perceived clinical capacity. Households reported confidence in health care system capacity but infrequently sought treatment for potential HPAI H5N1 signs/symptoms. More clinicians were confident in their knowledge of diagnosis and treatment than in the adequacy of related equipment and resources at their facilities. Physicians expressed awareness of the HPAI H5N1 suspect case definition, yet expressed only moderate knowledge in questioning symptomatic patients about exposures. Self-reported likelihood of testing for HPAI H5N1 virus was high after learning of certain exposures. Knowledge of antiviral treatment was moderate, but it was higher among clinicians in puskesmas. Physicians in private outpatient clinics, the most heavily used facilities, reported the lowest confidence in their diagnostic and treatment capabilities. Educational campaigns can encourage recall of possible poultry exposure when patients are experiencing signs/symptoms and can raise awareness of the effectiveness of antivirals to drive people to seek health care. Clinicians may benefit from training regarding exposure assessment and referral procedures, particularly in private clinics. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:838-847).

  18. Reflectance Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The overall goal of this work has been to develop a set of computational tools and media abstractions for the terrain bidirectional reflectance problem. The modeling of soil and vegetation surfaces has been emphasized with a gradual increase in the complexity of the media geometries treated. Pragmatic problems involved in the combined modeling of soil, vegetation, and atmospheric effects have been of interest and one of the objectives has been to describe the canopy reflectance problem in a classical radiative transfer sense permitting easier inclusion of our work by other workers in the radiative transfer field.

  19. Differences between Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a clinical sample and in a colony isolated from it: comparison of virulence capacity and susceptibility of biofilm to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A N; Peral, M C; Valdez, J C

    2010-05-01

    We study the differences between Pseudomonas aeruginosa from an infected wound (clinical strain) and a colony isolated from it. We assessed the in vitro inhibition of these P. aeruginosa biofilms by DNase and filtrate of Lactobacillus plantarum cultures (acid=AF and neutralize=NF) with crystal violet technique. Inhibition by AF was greatest than DNase for clinical and isolated strain (p<0.001) and greatest than NF for clinical (p<0.05) and isolated strain (p<0.001). Using a burn model in mice, we compared the infection producing by clinical and isolated strains in planktonic and biofilm form. Deaths were quantified and the infection was assessed by determining CFU/g of tissue in the lesion, spleen and liver. The infections with planktonic bacteria tended to become systemic and more deadly than biofilm infections. All infected wounds required the same healing period (30 days). These findings were independent of the origin of the bacteria (clinical or colony isolated strain).

  20. Considerations in the use of reflective writing for student assessment: issues of reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Moniz, Tracy; Arntfield, Shannon; Miller, Kristina; Lingard, Lorelei; Watling, Chris; Regehr, Glenn

    2015-09-01

    Reflective writing is a popular tool to support the growth of reflective capacity in undergraduate medical learners. Its popularity stems from research suggesting that reflective capacity may lead to improvements in skills such as empathy, communication, collaboration and professionalism. This has led to assumptions that reflective writing can also serve as a tool for student assessment. However, evidence to support the reliability and validity of reflective writing as a meaningful assessment strategy is lacking. Using a published instrument for measuring 'reflective capacity' (the Reflection Evaluation for Learners' Enhanced Competencies Tool [REFLECT]), four trained raters independently scored four samples of writing from each of 107 undergraduate medical students to determine the reliability of reflective writing scores. REFLECT scores were then correlated with scores on a Year 4 objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and Year 2 multiple-choice question (MCQ) examinations to examine, respectively, convergent and divergent validity. Across four writing samples, four-rater Cronbach's α-values ranged from 0.72 to 0.82, demonstrating reasonable inter-rater reliability with four raters using the REFLECT rubric. However, inter-sample reliability was fairly low (four-sample Cronbach's α = 0.54, single-sample intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.23), which suggests that performance on one reflective writing sample was not strongly indicative of performance on the next. Approximately 14 writing samples are required to achieve reasonable inter-sample reliability. The study found weak, non-significant correlations between reflective writing scores and both OSCE global scores (r = 0.13) and MCQ examination scores (r = 0.10), demonstrating a lack of relationship between reflective writing and these measures of performance. Our findings suggest that to draw meaningful conclusions about reflective capacity as a stable construct in individuals requires 14 writing

  1. Comparison of Biofilm Formation Capacities of Two Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus Epidermidis with and without icaA and icaD Genes on Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Kıvanç, Sertaç Argun; Kıvanç, Merih; Kılıç, Volkan; Güllülü, Gülay; Özmen, Ahmet Tuncer

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare biofilm formations of two Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) isolates with known biofilm formation capacities on four different intraocular lenses (IOL) that have not been studied before. Materials and Methods: Two isolates obtained from ocular surfaces and identified in previous studies and stored at -86 °C in 15% glycerol in the microbiology laboratory of the Anadolu University Department of Biology were purified and used in the study. The isolates were S. epidermidis KA 15.8 (ICA+), a known biofilm producer isolate positive for icaA, icaD and bap genes, and S. epidermidis KA 14.5 (ICA-), known as a non-biofilm producer isolate negative for icaA, icaD and bap genes. The biofilm formation capacities of the 2 isolates on 4 different IOLs were compared. Two of the IOLs were acrylic (UD613 [IOL A], Turkey; SA60AT [IOL B], USA), and the other two were polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) (B60130C [IOL C], India; B55125C [IOL D], India). Bacterial enumeration and optical density measurements were done from biofilms that formed on the IOLs. Biofilms were imaged using scanning electron microscopy. Results: Mean bacterial counts on the IOLs were 7.1±0.4 log10 CFU/mL with the ICA+ isolate, and 6.7±0.8 log10 CFU/mL with the ICA- isolate; there were no statistically significant differences. Biofilm formation was lower with acrylic lenses than PMMA lenses with both isolates (p=0.009 and p=0.013). The highest biofilm production was obtained on IOL C (PMMA) (p<0.001) and the lowest was obtained on IOL A (hydrophilic acrylic) (p<0.001). Conclusion: Bacterial counts after biofilm formation were lower on acrylic lenses, especially hydrophilic acrylic with hydrophobic properties. Further animal and in vivo studies are required to support the findings of this study. PMID:28405479

  2. Are American College of Rheumatology 50% response criteria superior to 20% criteria in distinguishing active aggressive treatment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials reported since 1997? A meta‐analysis of discriminant capacities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, C P; Thompson, J L; Koch, G G; Amara, I; Strand, V; Pincus, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To carry out a meta‐analysis designed to compare the discriminant capacities of American College of Rheumatology 50% (ACR50) with 20% (ACR20) responses in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported after 1997 and to analyse whether ACR50 can be as informative as ACR20 in distinguishing active from control treatments in more recent trials. Methods Clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997 were identified, which included aggressive combinations of disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, as well as powerful new agents—leflunomide, etanercept, infliximab, anakinra, adalimumab, abatacept, tacrolimus and rituximab. A meta‐analysis of ACR20 compared with ACR50 responses for 21 clinical trials was carried out on differences in proportions of responders for active and control treatments and corresponding odds ratios (ORs). Results In all but one clinical trial on rheumatoid arthritis published since 1997 with data available on ACR20 and ACR50, more than 50% of patients who were ACR20 responders among those randomised to active treatment were also ACR50 responders. This phenomenon was seen for control groups in 38% of trials, many of which included treatment with methotrexate. A meta‐analysis of the clinical trials indicated a slight advantage to ACR50 for quantifying treatment comparisons, not significant for differences in proportions but significant for ORs. Conclusion ACR20 and ACR50 seem to be similar in distinguishing active from control treatments in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997. As ACR50 represents a considerably stronger clinical response, ACR50 may be a preferred end point for contemporary clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:16504992

  3. Building Research Capacity of Medical Students and Health Professionals in Rural Communities: Leveraging a Rural Clinical School's Resources to Conduct Research Skills Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasserre, Kaye E.; Moffatt, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports on a project where the objective was for the Rural Clinical School, The University of Queensland, Australia, to design an acceptable model of research skills workshops for medical students and rural health professionals. Eight, interactive research skills workshops focused on skill development were conducted in rural Queensland,…

  4. Psychological effects of patient surge in large-scale emergencies: a quality improvement tool for hospital and clinic capacity planning and response.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Lisa S; Zazzali, James L; Shields, Sandra; Eisenman, David P; Alsabagh, Halla

    2010-01-01

    Although information is available to guide hospitals and clinics on the medical aspects of disaster surge, there is little guidance on how to manage the expected surge of persons needing psychological assessment and response after a catastrophic event. This neglected area of disaster medicine is addressed by presenting a novel and practical quality improvement tool for hospitals and clinics to use in planning for and responding to the psychological consequences of catastrophic events that create a surge of psychological casualties presenting for health care. Industrial quality improvement processes, already widely adopted in the healthcare sector, translate well when applied to disaster medicine and public health preparedness. This paper describes the development of the tool, presents data on facility preparedness from 31 hospitals and clinics in Los Angeles County, and discusses how the tool can be used as a benchmark for targeting improvement. The tool can serve to increase facility awareness of which components of disaster preparedness and response must be addressed through hospitals' and clinics' existing quality improvement programs. It also can provide information for periodic assessment and evaluation of progress over time.

  5. Testamentary capacity of the schizophrenic patient.

    PubMed

    Bergman-Levy, Tal; Heinik, Jeremia; Melamed, Yuval

    2014-03-01

    Testamentary capacity refers to an individual's capability to write his or her own will. Psychiatrists are required occasionally to give expert opinions regarding the testamentary capacity of individuals with a medical history or suspected diagnosis of a mental illness. This may stem from the patient/lawyer/ family initiative to explore the current capacity to testate in anticipation of a possible challenge, or may be sought when testamentary capacity of a deceased has been challenged. In this article we examine the medico-legal construct of testamentary capacity of the schizophrenic patient, and discuss the various clinical situations specific to schizophrenic patients, highlighting their impact on the medical opinion regarding testamentary capacity through examining the rulings of Israel's Supreme Court in a specific case where the testamentary capacity of a mentally ill individual who was challenged postmortem, and provide a workable framework for the physician to evaluate the capacity of a schizophrenic patient to write a will..

  6. Neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice; Menelle, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples) and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  7. Comparison of Deep Tissue Massage and Therapeutic Massage for Lower Back Pain, Disease Activity, and Functional Capacity of Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Špiritović, Maja; Dudek, Adrian; Samborski, Włodzimierz; Straburzyńska-Lupa, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to compare the effectiveness of deep tissue massage (DTM) and therapeutic massage (TM) in the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Materials and Methods This was a small, randomized clinical pilot study. Subjects were 27 men with diagnosed AS, randomly assigned to DTM group or TM group. Subjects in each group had 10 sessions of massage. Outcomes included the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Modified Schober Test, Finger to Floor Test, chest expansion, and pain intensity of lower back. Results There are no statistical significant differences between groups, except for BASDAI and pain intensity of lower back. Conclusions This study suggests that massage may have clinical benefits for treating ankylosing spondylitis patients. Additional scientific research in this area is warranted. PMID:28845185

  8. Crows Rival Monkeys in Cognitive Capacity.

    PubMed

    Balakhonov, Dmitry; Rose, Jonas

    2017-08-18

    The present study compares the 'bandwidth of cognition' between crows and primates. Working memory is the ability to maintain and manipulate information over short periods of time - a core component of cognition. The capacity of working memory is tightly limited, in humans correlated with individual intelligence and commonly used synonymously with cognitive capacity. Crows have remarkable cognitive skills and while birds and mammals share neural principles of working memory, its capacity has not been tested in crows. Here we report the performance of two carrion crows on a working memory paradigm adapted from a recent experiment in rhesus monkeys. Capacity of crows is remarkably similar to monkeys and estimated at about four items. In both species, the visual hemifields show largely independent capacity. These results show that crows, like primates evolved a high-capacity working memory that reflects the result of convergent evolution of higher cognitive abilities in both species.

  9. Enabling honest reflection: a review.

    PubMed

    Gostelow, Naomi; Gishen, Faye

    2017-09-20

    Reflective practice provides a backbone to professionalism, a commitment to lifelong learning and competency-based education in the form of reflective portfolios. Changes in health care culture have promoted a move towards openness and reflection on challenging clinical encounters. Engagement with reflection has historically proved challenging to clinical educators. This Faculty Development Review examines this using a case study from the UK in which a postgraduate trainee was asked to disclose their reflective portfolio by a patient's legal representation. Critics have consequently questioned whether the educational benefit of reflection warrants these potential legal implications. In the context of pressure from accrediting bodies to demonstrate evidence of reflection, how can learners face this potential conflict of professional versus legal repercussions? We combine professional guidance from the UK and educational rationale from international settings to produce a guide for good practice. We offer guidance on facilitating reflection for learners in an open and honest way without diluting educationally effective critical reflection. Themes of anonymity, taking a balanced approach, seeking senior advice, focusing on learning outcomes and role-modelling are discussed. How can learners face this potential conflict of professional versus legal repercussions? Integrating reflection within the curriculum improves engagement and is key to experiential learning. Clinical educators should be aware of legal and professional guidance applicable to their own context. Both educators and learners should be aware that written reflection is an educational not a clinical tool, and so requires little or no patient-identifiable data, thereby ensuring safer reflective practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  10. Reflective Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The aluminized polymer film used in spacecraft as a radiation barrier to protect both astronauts and delicate instruments has led to a number of spinoff applications. Among them are aluminized shipping bags, food cart covers and medical bags. Radiant Technologies purchases component materials and assembles a barrier made of layers of aluminized foil. The packaging reflects outside heat away from the product inside the container. The company is developing new aluminized lines, express mailers, large shipping bags, gel packs and insulated panels for the building industry.

  11. Students' Reflections on the Relationships between Safe Learning Environments, Learning Challenge and Positive Experiences of Learning in a Simulated GP Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. E.; Williamson, M. I.; Egan, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    Learning environments are a significant determinant of student behaviour, achievement and satisfaction. In this article we use students' reflective essays to identify key features of the learning environment that contributed to positive and transformative learning experiences. We explore the relationships between these features, the students'…

  12. Students' Reflections on the Relationships between Safe Learning Environments, Learning Challenge and Positive Experiences of Learning in a Simulated GP Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. E.; Williamson, M. I.; Egan, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    Learning environments are a significant determinant of student behaviour, achievement and satisfaction. In this article we use students' reflective essays to identify key features of the learning environment that contributed to positive and transformative learning experiences. We explore the relationships between these features, the students'…

  13. [Creating a good relationship between hospital and clinic for the support of end-of-life home care patients-usefulness of questionnaires to indicate the capacity of home care-supporting clinics for palliative care].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Osamu; Kato, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Kazuko; Chiba, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Motoko; Iwadare, Midori

    2012-12-01

    We have been practicing palliative care for terminal cancer patients at outpatient sections, patient wards, by home care, and by visiting nursing stations for the last 4 years. After the establishment of our palliative care unit in June 2011, it became difficult for us to provide sufficient home care support by ourselves, because of the increasing number of the patients and their widespread locations. It is therefore necessary to cooperate with regional medical clinics in order to support the patients who need home care even after their condition deteriorates. To determine the extent to which the home care-supporting clinics perform palliative care, we used an original questionnaire. Twenty-five clinics agreed to the publication of their names as our cooperating clinics. The number of patients who received palliative care at home from home care clinics after visiting our hospital increased from 8% to 14%, and the rate of patients who died at home also increased from 10% to 13%. Information about cooperating with home care clinics is very important and the improvement of palliative care skills necessary for home care doctors to continue their support for End-Of-Life cancer patients. Furthermore, the hospital should offer a strict and timely backup when the condition of patients treated at home suddenly deteriorates.

  14. Primary human osteoblasts with reduced alkaline phosphatase and matrix mineralization baseline capacity are responsive to extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field exposure - Clinical implication possible.

    PubMed

    Ehnert, Sabrina; Falldorf, Karsten; Fentz, Anne-Kristin; Ziegler, Patrick; Schröter, Steffen; Freude, Thomas; Ochs, Björn G; Stacke, Christina; Ronniger, Michael; Sachtleben, Jens; Nussler, Andreas K

    2015-12-01

    For many years electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have been used clinically with various settings as an exogenous stimulation method to promote fracture healing. However, underlying mechanisms of action and EMF parameters responsible for certain effects remain unclear. Our aim was to investigate the influence of defined EMFs on human osteoblasts' and osteoclasts' viability and function. Primary human osteoblasts and osteoclasts were treated 3 times weekly for 21 days during their maturation process using the Somagen® device (Sachtleben GmbH, Hamburg, Germany), generating defined extremely low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMFs). Certain ELF-PEMF treatment significantly increased the total protein content (up to 66%), mitochondrial activity (up to 91.1%) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity (up to 129.9%) of human osteoblasts during the entire differentiation process. Furthermore, ELF-PEMF treatment enhanced formation of mineralized matrix (up to 276%). Interestingly, ELF-PEMF dependent induction of AP activity and matrix mineralization was strongly donor dependent - only osteoblasts with a poor initial osteoblast function responded to the ELF-PEMF treatment. As a possible regulatory mechanism, activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway was identified. Maturation of osteoclasts from human monocytes was not affected by the ELF-PEMF treatment. In summary the results indicate that a specific ELF-PEMF treatment with the Somagen® device improves viability and maturation of osteoblasts, while osteoclast viability and maturation was not affected. Hence, ELF-PEMF might represent an interesting adjunct to conventional therapy supporting bone formation during fracture healing or even for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  15. Teaching Critical Reflection to Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Gavan Peter Longley; Kenny, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Critical reflection is a highly valued and widely applied learning approach in higher education. There are many benefits associated with engaging in critical reflection, and it is often integrated into the design of graduate level courses on university teaching as a life-long learning strategy to help ensure that learners build their capacity as…

  16. Reflective Communication: Cultivating Mindsight through Nurturing Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Daniel J.; Shahmoon-Shanok, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This article integrates ideas about mindsight, developed by Daniel Siegel, with those of reflective supervision in the zero-to-three field. The authors explore how the flow of energy and information in the context of nurturing relationships through reflective supervision supports the capacity to develop mindsight. Mindsight is the ability to have…

  17. Multicultural Training Applied in Clinical Practice: Reflections from a Euro-American Female Counselor-in-Training Working with Mexican Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paynter, Clara K.; Estrada, Diane

    2009-01-01

    The clinical experience of a Euro-American female counselor-in-training providing bilingual family therapy services to Mexican immigrants is described. Cultural themes encountered when applying academic discourse to clinical work are raised in the context of case studies in which the student therapist works from a postmodern client-as-expert…

  18. Reflected Glory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  19. Building capacity for education research among clinical educators in the health professions: A BEME (Best Evidence Medical Education) Systematic Review of the outcomes of interventions: BEME Guide No. 34.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rabia; Farooq, Ameer; Storie, Dale; Hartling, Lisa; Oswald, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing desire for health professions educators to generate high-quality education research; yet, few of them encounter the training to do so. In response, health professions faculties have increasingly been devoting resources to provide members with the skills necessary for education research. The form and impact of these efforts have not been reviewed, though such a synthesis could be useful for practice. The objectives of this systematic review were to (1) identify interventions aimed at building capacity for education research among health professions clinical educators and (2) review the outcomes of these interventions. We developed a systematic review protocol based on our pilot scoping search. This protocol underwent peer review and was prospectively registered with the Best Evidence Medical Education Collaboration. Based on this protocol, we conducted a comprehensive search of health professions' databases and related grey literature. Systematic methods were applied: two independent reviewers completed title screening and full text review for inclusion, data extraction, and methodological quality assessment. Studies were included if they reported outcomes for interventions designed to increase capacity for health professions clinical educators to conduct education research. We conducted a qualitative synthesis of the evidence which included detailed reporting of intervention characteristics and outcomes. Our search returned 14, 149 results, 241 of which were retained after title and abstract screening, and 30 of which met inclusion criteria after full text review. Seven groups of interventions were identified, the most frequent being teaching scholars programs (n = 10), health professions education fellowships (n = 3) or master's programs (n = 4). The most commonly measured outcome was change related to enhanced scholarly outputs (grants, papers, abstracts, and presentations) post-intervention. Unfortunately, most of the included

  20. Safety profile, efficacy, and biodistribution of a bicistronic high-capacity adenovirus vector encoding a combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy as a prelude to a phase I clinical trial for glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Puntel, Mariana; Ghulam, Muhammad A.K.M.; Farrokhi, Catherine; VanderVeen, Nathan; Paran, Christopher; Appelhans, Ashley; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Salem, Alireza; Lacayo, Liliana; Pechnick, Robert N.; Kelson, Kyle R.; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Kennedy, Sean; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; and others

    2013-05-01

    Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their high transduction efficiency; however, their clinical usefulness has been hampered by their immunogenicity and the presence of anti-Ad immunity in humans. We reported the efficacy of a gene therapy approach for glioma consisting of intratumoral injection of Ads encoding conditionally cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase (Ad-TK) and the immunostimulatory cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand 3 (Ad-Flt3L). Herein, we report the biodistribution, efficacy, and neurological and systemic effects of a bicistronic high-capacity Ad, i.e., HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L. HC-Ads elicit sustained transgene expression, even in the presence of anti-Ad immunity, and can encode large therapeutic cassettes, including regulatory elements to enable turning gene expression “on” or “off” according to clinical need. The inclusion of two therapeutic transgenes within a single vector enables a reduction of the total vector load without adversely impacting efficacy. Because clinically the vectors will be delivered into the surgical cavity, normal regions of the brain parenchyma are likely to be transduced. Thus, we assessed any potential toxicities elicited by escalating doses of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L (1 × 10{sup 8}, 1 × 10{sup 9}, or 1 × 10{sup 10} viral particles [vp]) delivered into the rat brain parenchyma. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points. The results indicate that doses up to 1 × 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered into the normal rat brain and underpin further developments for its implementation in a phase I clinical trial for glioma. - Highlights: ► High capacity Ad vectors elicit sustained therapeutic gene expression in the brain. ► HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L encodes two therapeutic genes and a transcriptional switch. ► We performed a dose escalation study at

  1. Ten myths about decision-making capacity.

    PubMed

    Ganzini, Linda; Volicer, Ladislav; Nelson, William A; Fox, Ellen; Derse, Arthur R

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of practical reality, what role patients will play in decisions about their health care is determined by whether their clinicians judge them to have decision-making capacity. Because so much hinges on assessments of capacity, clinicians who work with patients have an ethical obligation to understand this concept. This article, based on a report prepared by the National Ethics Committee (NEC) of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), seeks to provide clinicians with practical information about decision-making capacity and how it is assessed. A study of clinicians and ethics committee chairs carried out under the auspices of the NEC identified the following 10 common myths clinicians hold about decision-making capacity: (1) decision-making capacity and competency are the same; (2) lack of decision-making capacity can be presumed when patients go against medical advice; (3) there is no need to assess decision-making capacity unless patients go against medical advice; (4) decision-making capacity is an "all or nothing" phenomenon; (5) cognitive impairment equals lack of decision-making capacity; (6) lack of decision-making capacity is a permanent condition; (7) patients who have not been given relevant and consistent information about their treatment lack decision-making capacity; (8) all patients with certain psychiatric disorders lack decision-making capacity; (9) patients who are involuntarily committed lack decision-making capacity; and (10) only mental health experts can assess decision-making capacity. By describing and debunking these common misconceptions, this article attempts to prevent potential errors in the clinical assessment of decision-making capacity, thereby supporting patients' right to make choices about their own health care.

  2. Ten myths about decision-making capacity.

    PubMed

    Ganzini, Linda; Volicer, Ladislav; Nelson, William A; Fox, Ellen; Derse, Arthur R

    2004-01-01

    As a matter of practical reality, what role patients will play in decisions about their health care is determined by whether their clinicians judge them to have decision-making capacity. Because so much hinges on assessments of capacity, clinicians who work with patients have an ethical obligation to understand this concept. This article, based on a report prepared by the National Ethics Committee (NEC) of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), seeks to provide clinicians with practical information about decision-making capacity and how it is assessed. A study of clinicians and ethics committee chairs carried out under the auspices of the NEC identified the following 10 common myths clinicians hold about decision-making capacity: (1) decision-making capacity and competency are the same; (2) lack of decision-making capacity can be presumed when patients go against medical advice; (3) there is no need to assess decision-making capacity unless patients go against medical advice; (4) decision-making capacity is an "all or nothing" phenomenon; (5) cognitive impairment equals lack of decision-making capacity; (6) lack of decision-making capacity is a permanent condition; (7) patients who have not been given relevant and consistent information about their treatment lack decision-making capacity; (8) all patients with certain psychiatric disorders lack decision-making capacity; (9) patients who are involuntarily committed lack decision-making capacity; and (10) only mental health experts can assess decision-making capacity. By describing and debunking these common misconceptions, this article attempts to prevent potential errors in the clinical assessment of decision-making capacity, thereby supporting patients' right to make choices about their own health care.

  3. Measures of Financial Capacity: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ghesquiere, Angela R; McAfee, Caitlin; Burnett, Jason

    2017-05-23

    Capacity to manage finances and make financial decisions can affect risk for financial exploitation and is often the basis for legal determinations of conservatorship/guardianship. Several structured assessments of financial capacity have been developed, but have not been compared regarding their focus, validity, or reliability. Therefore, we conducted a review of financial capacity measures to examine these factors. We searched electronic databases, reference lists in identified articles, conference proceedings and other grey literature for measures of financial capacity. We then extracted data on the length and domains of each measure, the population for which they were intended, and their validity and reliability. We identified 10 structured measures of financial capacity. Most measures could be completed in 25-30 min, and were designed to be administered to older adults with some level of cognitive impairment. Reliability and validity were high for most. Measurement of financial capacity is complex and multidimensional. When selecting a measure of financial capacity, consideration should be made of the population of focus and the domains of capacity to be assessed. More work is needed on the cultural sensitivity of financial capacity measures, their acceptability, and their use in clinical work. Better understanding of when, and to whom, to administer different financial capacity measures could enhance the ability to accurately detect those suffering from impaired financial capacity, and prevent related negative outcomes like financial exploitation.

  4. Theatre fleet's vital additional capacity.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Vanguard Healthcare's fleet of mobile surgical facilities has been deployed to healthcare sites throughout Europe and beyond for over a decade, providing vital additional clinical capacity when existing buildings are refurbished or upgraded, in the event of flood or fire, or simply to help hospitals cater for rising demand. It is a combination of careful planning, teamwork, and the specialist expertise of Vanguard's personnel--many with a clinical background--that ensures not only each unit's successful installation, but equally its subsequent running, servicing, and maintenance, the company explains.

  5. REFLECTING TOGETHER: REFLECTIVE FUNCTIONING AS A FOCUS FOR DEEPENING GROUP SUPERVISION.

    PubMed

    Heffron, Mary Claire; Reynolds, Diane; Talbot, Bronwyn

    2016-11-01

    This article proposes how group reflective supervision, informed by the theory of reflective functioning, may provide a powerful method for developing reflective capacity of staff serving families, infants, and young children in multidisciplinary settings. An explanation of reflective functioning, related research, and its relevance to relational treatment and preventive intervention are discussed. Other approaches to reflective practice are referenced. We describe the necessary tension and encounters with distressing affect that mark reflective supervision groups using this focus. In addition, we identify areas of heightened difficulty in infant family work and describe how a group supervision process that enables use of self alongside perspectives of others may address these challenges while leading to increased reflective capacity among participants. Finally, we touch on relevant research on group supervision and parameters of size and focus, and highlight facilitation skills needed to create group safety and coherence. Areas for further study are proposed. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  6. Pathways to Reflection: Exploring the Reflective Analytical Practices of Novice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, H. Emily

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods study explores reflective analytical practices of novice teachers who taught in a University Reading Clinic just prior to student teaching. Novices' reflective practices are compared to reflective practices of experienced teachers in a pilot study in the same setting. A theoretical model of novices' reflective analytical…

  7. Pathways to Reflection: Exploring the Reflective Analytical Practices of Novice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, H. Emily

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods study explores reflective analytical practices of novice teachers who taught in a University Reading Clinic just prior to student teaching. Novices' reflective practices are compared to reflective practices of experienced teachers in a pilot study in the same setting. A theoretical model of novices' reflective analytical…

  8. From Whining to Wondering: Reflective Journaling with Preservice Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Reflective journaling is frequently employed to help preservice educators make sense of fieldwork experiences. Analyzing the weekly journals of eight preservice educators, I offer conceptual language to describe how journal writing provides a window into students' capacity for reflection. This capacity is described in terms of three continua:…

  9. From Whining to Wondering: Reflective Journaling with Preservice Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Reflective journaling is frequently employed to help preservice educators make sense of fieldwork experiences. Analyzing the weekly journals of eight preservice educators, I offer conceptual language to describe how journal writing provides a window into students' capacity for reflection. This capacity is described in terms of three continua:…

  10. Event-related brain potentials reflect increased concentration ability after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bostanov, Vladimir; Keune, Philipp M; Kotchoubey, Boris; Hautzinger, Martin

    2012-10-30

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) effectively prevents relapse/recurrence in major depression. The ability to deploy and maintain attention on a particular focus is considered as a prerequisite for 'mindful', 'metacognitive' awareness, and hence crucial for therapy success. Accordingly, sustained concentration is the skill most extensively taught in MBCT. The goal of the present study was to test whether this ability increases after MBCT, as assumed. The late component of the contingent negative variation (CNV), an event-related brain potential (ERP), known to reflect the allocation of attentional resources, was used as the measure of concentration ability. In the main phase of the study, 91 recurrently depressed patients in remission were randomly assigned to eight-week treatment by either MBCT or waiting (WAIT for delayed MBCT). The CNV response to an auditory test stimulus was measured pre- and post-treatment in a 'mindfulness task', in which patients were instructed to focus on their breath, as taught in MBCT. The late CNV (LCNV) was increased only after MBCT (and not after WAIT). This result reflects patients' improved ability to shift their attention toward current moment experience and away from potentially depressogenic thinking or rumination during mild dysphoric states-a known risk factor for depressive relapse/recurrence.

  11. [Impact of plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide amino-terminal and galectin-3 levels on the predictive capacity of the LIPID Clinical Risk Scale in stable coronary disease].

    PubMed

    Higueras, Javier; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Cristóbal, Carmen; Tarín, Nieves; Huelmos, Ana; Alonso, Joaquín; Pello, Ana; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Lorenzo, Óscar; Mahíllo-Fernández, Ignacio; Asensio, Dolores; Almeida, Pedro; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Farré, Jerónimo; López Bescós, Lorenzo; Egido, Jesús; Tuñón, José

    2015-01-01

    At present, there is no tool validated by scientific societies for risk stratification of patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD). It has been shown that plasma levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), galectin-3 and pro-B-type natriuretic peptide amino-terminal (NT-proBNP) have prognostic value in this population. To analyze the prognostic value of a clinical risk scale published in Long-term Intervention with Pravastatin in Ischemic Disease (LIPID) study and determining its predictive capacity when combined with plasma levels of MCP-1, galectin-3 and NT-proBNP in patients with SCAD. A total of 706 patients with SCAD and a history of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were analyzed over a follow up period of 2.2 ± 0.99 years. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of an ischemic event (any SCA, stroke or transient ischemic attack), heart failure, or death. A clinical risk scale derived from the LIPID study significantly predicted the development of the primary endpoint, with an area under the ROC curve (Receiver Operating Characteristic) of 0.642 (0.579 to 0.705); P<0.001. A composite score was developed by adding the scores of the LIPID and scale decile levels of MCP -1, galectin -3 and NT-proBNP. The predictive value improved with an area under the curve of 0.744 (0.684 to 0.805); P<0.001 (P=0.022 for comparison). A score greater than 21.5 had a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 61% for the development of the primary endpoint (P<0.001, log -rank test). Plasma levels of MCP-1, galectin -3 and NT-proBNP improve the ability of the LIPID clinical scale to predict the prognosis of patients with SCAD. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. A Reflective Look at Reflecting Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pender, Rebecca L.; Stinchfield, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed existing literature and research on the reflecting team process. There is a dearth of empirical research that explores the reflecting team process and the outcome of counseling that uses reflecting teams. Implications of using reflecting teams for counselors, counselor educators, and clients will be discussed. A call for…

  13. On Gaussian feedback capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir

    1989-01-01

    Pinsker and Ebert (1970) proved that in channels with additive Gaussian noise, feedback at most doubles the capacity. Cover and Pombra (1989) proved that feedback at most adds half a bit per transmission. Following their approach, the author proves that in the limit as signal power approaches either zero (very low SNR) or infinity (very high SNR), feedback does not increase the finite block-length capacity (which for nonstationary Gaussian channels replaces the standard notion of capacity that may not exist). Tighter upper bounds on the capacity are obtained in the process. Specializing these results to stationary channels, the author recovers some of the bounds recently obtained by Ozarow.

  14. On Gaussian feedback capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir

    1989-01-01

    Pinsker and Ebert (1970) proved that in channels with additive Gaussian noise, feedback at most doubles the capacity. Cover and Pombra (1989) proved that feedback at most adds half a bit per transmission. Following their approach, the author proves that in the limit as signal power approaches either zero (very low SNR) or infinity (very high SNR), feedback does not increase the finite block-length capacity (which for nonstationary Gaussian channels replaces the standard notion of capacity that may not exist). Tighter upper bounds on the capacity are obtained in the process. Specializing these results to stationary channels, the author recovers some of the bounds recently obtained by Ozarow.

  15. Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2009; Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2009; Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2010 - Gilpin's Falls Covered Bridge, Spanning North East Creek at Former (Bypassed) Section of North East Road (SR 272), North East, Cecil County, MD

  16. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. Findikakis

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  17. Reflecting on imagery: a clinical perspective and overview of the special issue of memory on mental imagery and memory in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Ann; Holmes, Emily A

    2004-07-01

    The authors provide an overview of the papers in the special issue of Memory on mental imagery and memory in psychopathology. The papers address emotional, intrusive mental imagery across a range of psychological disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), agoraphobia, body dysmorphic disorder, mood disorders, and psychosis. They include work on information processing issues including modelling cravings, conditioning, and aversions, as well as imagery qualities such as vividness and emotionality. The overview aims to place the articles in a broader context and draw out some exciting implications of this novel work. It provides a clinical context to the recent growth in this area from a cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) perspective. We begin with PTSD, and consider links to imagery in other disorders. The clinical implications stemming from this empirical work and from autobiographical memory theory are discussed. These include consideration of a variety of techniques for eliminating troublesome imagery, and creating healthy, realistic alternatives.

  18. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  19. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  20. Problems of Excess Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, G.

    1972-01-01

    The problems of excess capacity in the airline industry are discussed with focus on the following topics: load factors; fair rate of return on investment; service-quality rivalry among airlines; pricing (fare) policies; aircraft production; and the impacts of excess capacity on operating costs. Also included is a discussion of the interrelationships among these topics.

  1. Nanofluid heat capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anne K.; Gomez, Judith C.; Wang, Jun; Pradhan, Sulolit; Glatzmaier, Greg C.

    2011-12-01

    Significant increases in the heat capacity of heat transfer fluids are needed not only to reduce the costs of liquid heating and cooling processes, but also to bring clean energy producing technologies like concentrating solar power (CSP) to price parity with conventional energy generation. It has been postulated that nanofluids could have higher heat capacities than conventional fluids. In this work, nano- and micron-sized particles were added to five base fluids (poly-α olefin, mineral oil, ethylene glycol, a mixture of water and ethylene glycol, and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate), and the resulting heat capacities were measured and compared with those of the neat base fluids and the weighted average of the heat capacities of the components. The particles used were inert metals and metal oxides that did not undergo any phase transitions over the temperature range studied. In the nanofluids studied here, we found no increase in heat capacity upon the addition of the particles larger than the experimental error.

  2. [Protective effect of GnRH analogues on the reproductive capacity of women with neoplasia or autoimmune disease who require chemotherapy. Final results of a phase ii clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Gris-Martínez, José M; Trillo-Urrutia, Lourdes; Gómez-Cabeza, Juan José; Encabo-Duró, Gloria

    2016-02-05

    In order to avoid the toxic effect of chemotherapy, it has been proposed to use GnRH agonist analogues (GnRHa) to inhibit the depletion of ovarian follicles. Nevertheless, there is controversy about its effectiveness. This clinical trial has been conducted with the aim to assess the protective effect of GnRH analogues on the reproductive capacity of women with malignancies or autoimmune diseases, which require chemotherapy. Open phase ii single-center clinical trial. During chemotherapy, a total of 5 doses of GnRH antagonist analogue at a dose interval of 3 days and/or a monthly dose of GnRHa were administered. Hormonal determinations prior to the start of the CT treatment were conducted during treatment and at the end of it. The inclusion of patients was prematurely concluded when incorporating the determination of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) as a parameter for assessing the ovarian reserve. Out of 38 patients, 23 (60.5%, 95%CI 43.4-76.0) had AMH values below normal following completion of treatment. An intermediate analysis was carried out observing that while most patients were recovering the menstrual cycle (86.6% 95%CI 71.9-95.6), they had reduced levels of AMH. Although most patients recovered their menstrual cycles, the ovarian reserve, assessed by the concentration of AMH, decreased in many patients. Therefore, we can conclude that the concomitant treatment of chemotherapy and GnRH analogues does not preserve the loss of follicular ovarian reserve. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.