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Sample records for refraction ocular

  1. Influence of refractive correction on ocular dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Nanami; Kawamorita, Takushi; Uozato, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the effects of refractive correction and refractive defocus on the assessment of sensory ocular dominance. In 25 healthy subjects (4 males and 21 females) aged between 20 and 31 years, a quantitative measurement of sensory ocular dominance was performed with refractive correction and the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye. Sensory ocular dominance was measured with a chart using binocular rivalry targets. The reversal point changed after the addition of a +1.00 D lens on the dominant eye in all subjects. However, sighting ocular dominance and stereopsis did not change after the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye ( P > 0:05, Wilcoxon test). These results suggest that refractive correction affects sensory ocular dominance, indicating the possible development of a new type of occlusion for amblyopia in the future.

  2. Heritability of refractive value and ocular biometrics.

    PubMed

    Paget, Sandrine; Vitezica, Zulma G; Malecaze, François; Calvas, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse genetic influences on ocular refractive value and axial length using the hypothesis of a polygenic control. The genealogical records of 55 families were used in the analyses. The cohort included 723 individuals and clinical data were collected for 445 individuals with a mean age of 37.86 years. Ocular refraction was determined by standard autorefractometry. Axial length was evaluated by scan ultrasonography. Gender, age and ethnic origin were included as covariates in the statistical analyses. Using variance component analysis via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we estimated the heritability of refractive value and axial length in the pedigree. We then performed a segregation analysis, using Loki, a (MCMC) linkage analysis program for multilocus inheritance models, examining different inheritance models with polygenic components. Polygenic control was modelled under an additive infinitesimal model (which assumes infinite loci with small effects, with additive actions) and under a finite locus model (i.e. several causal loci). The estimates of heritability were 0.20 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.36) for refractive value and 0.20 (95% CI 0.03-0.43) for axial length. Segregation analyses suggested that ocular refraction and axial length are under a polygenic control. A finite number of genes were identified with or without a polygenic, infinitesimal component. Ocular refraction is mildly-moderately heritable in the studied population.

  3. Refractive error and ocular motility in plagiocephaly.

    PubMed

    Denis, D; Genitori, L; Bolufer, A; Lena, G; Saracco, J B; Choux, M

    1994-05-01

    Plagiocephaly, which is caused by premature closure of one of the coronal sutures, leads to fronto-orbital asymmetry. The aim of this work was to study the repercussions of orbital deformation on the visual system. Twenty-one patients presenting with plagiocephaly at birth and operated on by the same craniofacial technique (bilateral approach with translation and advancement of the entire involved orbits) were included in the study. All of the patients were examined by clinical anthropometry with three-dimensional reconstruction and underwent complete eye examination by the same observer. Follow-up after craniofacial surgery ranged from 15 months to 4 years. In the last few years, three-dimensional reconstruction has shown that the anatomic region affected by the deformation is the frontozygomatic region and has thus made it possible to advance to another theory on the origins of ocular problems. The severe effect of orbital anomalies on the development of the visual system (binocular vision, strabismus with amblyopia, refractive errors) has been emphasized in the literature. The present study shows that the scheduling of reconstructive surgery is fundamental and must not exceed 6 months, given the immaturity of the visual system up until this time. This means that the ophthalmologist must be able to recognize the various craniostenoses in order to schedule reconstructive surgery as soon as possible. Cooperation between the neurosurgeon and the ophthalmologist is of paramount importance if the pathogenic effects of this bone deformation are to be stopped and proper visual development preserved.

  4. Detection system for ocular refractive error measurement.

    PubMed

    Ventura, L; de Faria e Sousa, S J; de Castro, J C

    1998-05-01

    An automatic and objective system for measuring ocular refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism) was developed. The system consists of projecting a light target (a ring), using a diode laser (lambda = 850 nm), at the fundus of the patient's eye. The light beams scattered from the retina are submitted to an optical system and are analysed with regard to their vergence by a CCD detector (matrix). This system uses the same basic principle for the projection of beams into the tested eye as some commercial refractors, but it is innovative regarding the ring-shaped measuring target for the projection system and the detection system where a matrix detector provides a wider range of measurement and a less complex system for the optical alignment. Also a dedicated electronic circuit was not necessary for treating the electronic signals from the detector (as the usual refractors do); instead a commercial frame grabber was used and software based on the heuristic search technique was developed. All the guiding equations that describe the system as well as the image processing procedure are presented in detail. Measurements in model eyes and in human eyes are in good agreement with retinoscopic measurements and they are also as precise as these kinds of measurements require (0.125D and 5 degrees).

  5. Association between Ocular Sensory Dominance and Refractive Error Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hua; Ekure, Edgar; Su, Binbin; Wu, Haoran; Huang, Yifei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between ocular sensory dominance and interocular refractive error difference (IRED). Methods A total of 219 subjects were recruited. The refractive errors were determined by objective refraction with a fixation target located 6 meters away. 176 subjects were myopic, with 83 being anisometropic (IRED ≥ 0.75 D). 43 subjects were hyperopic, with 22 being anisometropic. Sensory dominance was measured with a continuous flashing technique with the tested eye viewing a Gabor increasing in contrast and the fellow eye viewing a Mondrian noise decreasing in contrast. The log ratio of Mondrian to Gabor’s contrasts was recorded when a subject just detected the tilting direction of the Gabor during each trial. T-test was used to compare the 50 values collected from each eye, and the t-value was used as a subject’s ocular dominance index (ODI) to quantify the degree of ocular dominance. A subject with ODI ≥ 2 (p < 0.05) had clear dominance and the eye with larger mean ratio was the dominant one. Otherwise, a subject had an unclear dominance. Results The anisometropic subjects had stronger ocular dominance in comparison to non-anisometropic subjects (rank-sum test, p < 0.01 for both myopic and hyperopic subjects). In anisometropic subjects with clear dominance, the amplitude of the anisometropia was correlated with ODI values (R = 0.42, p < 0.01 in myopic anisometropic subjects; R = 0.62, p < 0.01 in hyperopic anisometropic subjects). Moreover, the dominant eyes were more myopic in myopic anisometropic subjects (sign-test, p < 0.05) and less hyperopic in hyperopic anisometropic subjects (sign-test, p < 0.05). Conclusion The degree of ocular sensory dominance is associated with interocular refractive error difference. PMID:26295803

  6. Ocular Changes during Pregnancy and Their Effects on Refraction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    pregnancy and menstrual cycle effects, or from studies dealing with ocular changes produced by the use of oral contraceptives which mimic many of the...for refractive error to change towards myopia (less than 0.25 D I 6 by static retinoscopy) during the menstrual cycle , and three studies of 72 women...also reported that corneal thickness and corneal curvatures did not change significantly during the menstrual cycle , but they cautioned 10,11 that

  7. LASIK for spherical refractive myopia: effect of topographic astigmatism (ocular residual astigmatism, ORA) on refractive outcome.

    PubMed

    Frings, Andreas; Richard, Gisbert; Steinberg, Johannes; Skevas, Christos; Druchkiv, Vasyl; Katz, Toam; Linke, Stephan J

    2015-01-01

    In eyes with a preoperative plano refractive cylinder, it would appear that there is no rationale for astigmatic treatment. The aim of this retrospective, cross-sectional data analysis was to determine the amount of topographic astigmatism in refractive plano eyes that results in reduced efficacy after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). This study included 267 eyes from 267 consecutive myopic patients with a refractive plano cylinder. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to find the cut-off values of preoperative ocular residual astigmatism (= topographic astigmatism) that can best discriminate between groups of efficacy and safety indices in preoperative plano refractive cylinder eyes. Preoperative ocular residual astigmatism (ORA) (or topographic astigmatism) of ≤0.9 diopters (D) resulted in an efficacy index of at least 0.8 statistically significantly more frequently than eyes with a preoperative ORA of >0.9 D. Eyes with a high ORA preoperatively also had a high ORA postoperatively. Regression analysis showed that each diopter of preoperative ORA reduced efficacy by 0.07. A preoperative corneal astigmatism of ≥0.9 D could (partially) be taken into account in the LASIK design, even if the subjective refractive astigmatism is neutral.

  8. Modeling of mouse eye and errors in ocular parameters affecting refractive state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawa, Gurinder

    Rodents eye are particularly used to study refractive error state of an eye and development of refractive eye. Genetic organization of rodents is similar to that of humans, which makes them interesting candidates to be researched upon. From rodents family mice models are encouraged over rats because of availability of genetically engineered models. Despite of extensive work that has been performed on mice and rat models, still no one is able to quantify an optical model, due to variability in the reported ocular parameters. In this Dissertation, we have extracted ocular parameters and generated schematics of eye from the raw data from School of Medicine, Detroit. In order to see how the rays would travel through an eye and the defects associated with an eye; ray tracing has been performed using ocular parameters. Finally we have systematically evaluated the contribution of various ocular parameters, such as radii of curvature of ocular surfaces, thicknesses of ocular components, and refractive indices of ocular refractive media, using variational analysis and a computational model of the rodent eye. Variational analysis revealed that variation in all the ocular parameters does affect the refractive status of the eye, but depending upon the magnitude of the impact those parameters are listed as critical or non critical. Variation in the depth of the vitreous chamber, thickness of the lens, radius of the anterior surface of the cornea, radius of the anterior surface of the lens, as well as refractive indices for the lens and vitreous, appears to have the largest impact on the refractive error and thus are categorized as critical ocular parameters. The radii of the posterior surfaces of the cornea and lens have much smaller contributions to the refractive state, while the radii of the anterior and posterior surfaces of the retina have no effect on the refractive error. These data provide the framework for further refinement of the optical models of the rat and mouse

  9. Customized schematic eye model for refraction correction design based on ocular wavefront and corneal topography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatu, Eugene O.; Pettit, George H.; Campin, John A.

    2002-06-01

    The subject of this paper relates to the ocular optical design and vision analysis of refractive correction of the eye. After the purpose statement and the assumption list, the concept of the schematic eye matching a particular (measured) wavefront is introduced. This concept is based on the fact that the ocular wavefront, together with the corneal topography, can be seen as the mathematical global representation of the eye working in monochromatic light and having a foveal vision. The discussed design technique, including an iterative optimization method, could be applied in any ocular correction that utilizes cornea topography and/or ocular wavefront, e.g. contact lens or intra-corneal implant. However, the application this paper refers to is the ocular refractive correction by a procedure using the LADARVISION. It consists of surgical removal and subsequent replacement of a corneal flap on a stromal surface whose shape has been changed by laser ablation of the tissue. Subsequent sections of this paper are dedicated to establishing the limits of possible refractive correction, the influences of the flap and corneal topography into the refractive correction calculation. Finally a realistic evaluation of the results and a list of possible developments of this new optical design method are discussed.

  10. Heritability of refractive error and ocular biometrics: the Genes in Myopia (GEM) twin study.

    PubMed

    Dirani, Mohamed; Chamberlain, Matthew; Shekar, Sri N; Islam, Amirul F M; Garoufalis, Pam; Chen, Christine Y; Guymer, Robyn H; Baird, Paul N

    2006-11-01

    A classic twin study was undertaken to assess the contribution of genes and environment to the development of refractive errors and ocular biometrics in a twin population. A total of 1224 twins (345 monozygotic [MZ] and 267 dizygotic [DZ] twin pairs) aged between 18 and 88 years were examined. All twins completed a questionnaire consisting of a medical history, education, and zygosity. Objective refraction was measured in all twins, and biometric measurements were obtained using partial coherence interferometry. Intrapair correlations for spherical equivalent and ocular biometrics were significantly higher in the MZ than in the DZ twin pairs (P < 0.05), when refraction was considered as a continuous variable. A significant gender difference in the variation of spherical equivalent and ocular biometrics was found (P < 0.05). A genetic model specifying an additive, dominant, and unique environmental factor that was sex limited was the best fit for all measured variables. Heritability of spherical equivalents of 88% and 75% were found in the men and women, respectively, whereas, that of axial length was 94% and 92%, respectively. Additive genetic effects accounted for a greater proportion of the variance in spherical equivalent, whereas the variance in ocular biometrics, particularly axial length was explained mostly by dominant genetic effects. Genetic factors, both additive and dominant, play a significant role in refractive error (myopia and hypermetropia) as well as in ocular biometrics, particularly axial length. The sex limitation ADE model (additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, and environmental components) provided the best-fit genetic model for all parameters.

  11. Relationship between refractive error and ocular biometrics in twin children: the Guangzhou Twin Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Decai; Liu, Bin; Huang, Shengsong; Huang, Wenyong; He, Mingguang

    2014-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to explore the relationship between refractive error and ocular biometrics in children from the Guangzhou twin eye study. Twin participants aged 7-15 years were selected from Guangzhou Twin Eye Study. Ocular examinations included visual acuity measurement, ocular motility evaluation, autorefraction under cycloplegia, and anterior segment, media, and fundus examination. Axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and corneal curvature radius were measured using partial coherence laser interferometry. A multivariate linear regression model was used for statistical analysis. Twin children from Guangzhou city showed a decreased spherical equivalent with age, whereas both AL and ACD were increased and corneal curvature radius remained unchanged. When adjusted by age and gender, the data from 77% of twins presenting with spherical equivalent changes indicated that these were caused by predictable variables (R2 = 0.77, P < 0.001). Primary factors affecting children's refraction included axial length (β = -0.97,P < 0.001), ACD (β = 0.33, P < 0.001), and curvature radius (β = 2.10, P < 0.001). Girls had a higher tendency for myopic status than did boys (β = -0.26, P < 0.001). Age exerted no effect upon the changes in refraction (β = -0.01, P = 0.25). Refraction is correlated with ocular biometrics. Refractive status is largely determined by axial length as the major factor.

  12. Impact of laser refractive surgery on ocular alignment in myopic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S A; Kim, W K; Moon, J W; Yang, H; Kim, J K; Lee, S B; Lee, J B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of myopic keratorefractive surgery on ocular alignment. Methods This prospective study included 194 eyes of 97 myopic patients undergoing laser refractive surgery. All patients received a complete ophthalmic examination with particular attention to ocular alignment before and 3 months after surgery. Results Patients with a mean age of 26.6 years and a mean refractive error of −4.83 diopters (D) myopia were treated. Asymptomatic ocular misalignment was present preoperatively in 46 (47%) patients: a small-angle heterophoria (1–8 prism diopters, PD) in 36% and a large-angle heterophoria (>8 PD)/heterotropia in 11%. Postoperatively, the change in angles of 10 PD or greater occurred in 3% for distance and 6% for near fixation: in 7% of the patients with orthophoria, in 3% of those with a small-angle heterophoria, and in 18% of those with a large-angle heterophoria/heterotropia. No patient developed diplopia. The preoperative magnitude of myopia or postoperative refractive status was not related to the change in ocular alignment. The higher anisometropia was associated with a decrease in deviation (P=0.041 for distance and P=0.002 for near fixation), whereas the further near point of convergence tended to be related with an increase in near deviation (P=0.055). Conclusions Myopic refractive surgery may cause a change in ocular alignment, especially in cases with a large-angle heterophoria/heterotropia. There is also a chance of improvement of misalignment in patients with anisometropia. PMID:25190533

  13. Prevalence of asymptomatic ocular conditions in subjects with refractive-based symptoms.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Langis; Forcier, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the overall prevalence of ocular conditions in a population from 19 to 64 years old, presenting with refractive-based symptoms only. Results could impact clinical standard of eye care on a similar population. This is a retrospective study on patients seen for an eye examination at the Clinique Universitaire de la Vision (CUV), between January 2007 and 2009. Files of individuals who presented with refractive symptoms were only selected and classified by file number. Then, every third file from the beginning was kept and reviewed by a reader. A second reader did the same with every third file from the end. Both readers were trained to use the same analysis grid to classify the diagnosed ocular conditions. In the case of multiple findings, the most severe condition was considered. The overall prevalence of ocular conditions was determined by calculating their occurrence divided by the number of files analyzed. A total of 860 charts were analyzed. In 26.1% of the cases an ocular condition was diagnosed. This work establishes a higher prevalence of ocular conditions compared to another study conducted in Canada in the past. This difference can be explained by a different analytical methodology and by the fact that all examinations, in this study, were made under pupillary dilation. The presence of ocular conditions in 26% of asymptomatic patients supports the need to assess ocular health under pupil dilation as part of any eye examination. However, further cost-to-benefit analysis is required before establishing such a recommendation. Copyright © 2013 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Wavefront-guided correction of ocular aberrations: Are phase plate and refractive surgery solutions equal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda E.; Munger, Rejean; Priest, David

    2005-08-01

    Wavefront-guided laser eye surgery has been recently introduced and holds the promise of correcting not only defocus and astigmatism in patients but also higher-order aberrations. Research is just beginning on the implementation of wavefront-guided methods in optical solutions, such as phase-plate-based spectacles, as alternatives to surgery. We investigate the theoretical differences between the implementation of wavefront-guided surgical and phase plate corrections. The residual aberrations of 43 model eyes are calculated after simulated refractive surgery and also after a phase plate is placed in front of the untreated eye. In each case, the current wavefront-guided paradigm that applies a direct map of the ocular aberrations to the correction zone is used. The simulation results demonstrate that an ablation map that is a Zernike fit of a direct transform of the ocular wavefront phase error is not as efficient in correcting refractive errors of sphere, cylinder, spherical aberration, and coma as when the same Zernike coefficients are applied to a phase plate, with statistically significant improvements from 2% to 6%.

  15. First Demonstration of Ocular Refractive Change Using Blue-IRIS in Live Cats

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Daniel E.; Brooks, Daniel R.; DeMagistris, Margaret; Xu, Lisen; MacRae, Scott; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Knox, Wayne H.; Huxlin, Krystel R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of intratissue refractive index shaping (IRIS) using 400-nm femtosecond laser pulses (blue light) for writing refractive structures directly into live cat corneas in vivo, and to assess the longevity of these structures in the eyes of living cats. Methods. Four eyes from two adult cats underwent Blue-IRIS. Light at 400 nm with 100-femtosecond (fs) pulses were tightly focused into the corneal stroma of each eye at an 80-MHz repetition rate. These pulses locally increased the refractive index of the corneal stroma via an endogenous, two-photon absorption process and were used to inscribe three-layered, gradient index patterns into the cat corneas. The optical effects of the patterns were then tracked using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing. Results. Blue-IRIS patterns locally changed ocular cylinder by −1.4 ± 0.3 diopters (D), defocus by −2.0 ± 0.5 D, and higher-order root mean square (HORMS) by 0.31 ± 0.04 μm at 1 month post-IRIS, without significant changes in corneal thickness or curvature. Refractive changes were maintained for the duration they were tracked, 12 months post-IRIS in one eye, and just more than 3 months in the remaining three eyes. Conclusions. Blue-IRIS can be used to inscribe refractive structures into live cat cornea in vivo that are stable for at least 12 months, and are not associated with significant alterations in corneal thicknesses or radii of curvature. This result is a critical step toward establishing Blue-IRIS as a promising technique for noninvasive vision correction. PMID:24985471

  16. Recovery of Peripheral Refractive Errors and Ocular Shape in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Experimentally Induced Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Juan; Hung, Li-Fang; Smith, Earl L.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in ocular shape and relative peripheral refraction during the recovery from myopia produced by form deprivation (FD) and hyperopic defocus. FD was imposed in 6 monkeys by securing a diffuser lens over one eye; hyperopic defocus was produced in another 6 monkeys by fitting one eye with -3D spectacle. When unrestricted vision was re-established, the treated eyes recovered from the vision-induced central and peripheral refractive errors. The recovery of peripheral refractive errors was associated with corresponding changes in the shape of the posterior globe. The results suggest that vision can actively regulate ocular shape and the development of central and peripheral refractions in infant primates. PMID:23026012

  17. Effect of Ramadan fasting in tropical summer months on ocular refractive and biometric characteristics.

    PubMed

    Nowroozzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Mirhosseini, Amirhossein; Meshkibaf, Mohammad Hassan; Roshannejad, Javad

    2012-03-01

    Islamic Ramadan is the month of fasting, in which intake of food and drink is restricted from sunrise until sunset. The objective of the present study was to find out the effect of altered eating habits during Ramadan fasting on ocular refractive and biometric properties. In this prospective case series, 40 eyes of 22 healthy volunteers with a mean age of 60.55 ± 12.20 years were enrolled. Patients with any systemic disorder and eyes with pathology or previous surgery were excluded. One month before Ramadan (at 8.00 am), during Ramadan fasting (at 8.00 am and 4.00 pm) and one month later during the non-fasting period (at 8.00 am), ocular refractive and biometric characteristics were measured using an autokeratorefractometer (Auto-Kerato-Refractometer KR-8900; Topcon Co, Tokyo, Japan) and contact ultrasonic biometry (Nidek Echoscan US 800; Nidek Co, Tokyo, Japan). Anterior chamber depth was significantly increased during fasting compared with baseline measurements and returned to baseline one month after Ramadan (3.22 ± 0.07 mm and 4.33 ± 0.17 mm for non-fasting and fasting, respectively; p < 0.001). The anterior chamber depth measurements were significantly larger at 8.00 am during fasting compared with 4.00 pm (p = 0.01). Axial length was significantly decreased during fasting and returned to baseline one month after Ramadan (23.09 ± 0.14 mm and 22.65 ± 0.18 mm, for non-fasting and fasting, respectively; p < 0.001). Intraocular lens power calculations were significantly increased during fasting and returned to baseline one month after Ramadan (SRK-T formula: 21.46 ± 0.27 D and 22.92 ± 0.46 D, for non-fasting and fasting, respectively; p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in spherical equivalent, corneal astigmatism, mean keratometry and flatter and steeper corneal radii of curvature between time intervals. Ramadan fasting is associated with statistically significant alterations in anterior chamber depth and axial length that result in both

  18. The effect of continuous light on refractive error and the ocular components of the rat.

    PubMed

    Mutti, D O; Zadnik, K; Murphy, C J

    1998-12-01

    Phototoxic induced degeneration of the rat retina is a well-documented phenomenon resulting in losses of photoreceptors and their cell bodies, and an overall retinal thinning. This process may serve as a test of the hypothesis that the retinoscopic reflex originates from the inner limiting membrane of the retina. Retinal thinning should produce myopia in the absence of any other ocular component changes in a stable, mature eye if the inner limiting membrane model is correct. Phototoxic retinal degeneration was induced in 10 albino rats by exposure to 19 days of continuous light (1,800 cd m-2). Another 10 albino rats exposed to 12-hr on/12-hr off cycled light served as controls. Before and after the exposure to constant light, measures were made of refractive state by cycloplegic retinoscopy, corneal curvature and lens curvature by Purkinje image photography, and axial length of the globe by A-scan ultrasonography. Comparing pre- to post-exposure values, phototoxic degeneration resulted in a mean (+/- S.D.) myopic shift of -5.10 +/- 2.12 D (P < 0.002). The corneal curvature also steepened significantly (0.17 +/- 0.11 mm, equivalent to -6.0 D; P < 0.004), while the posterior curvature of the crystalline lens flattened by 0.21 +/- 0.22 equivalent mm (P < 0.027), and the axial length shortened by 0.11 +/- 0.11 equivalent mm (all tests Wilcoxon signed-rank; P < 0.025). Phototoxic rats underwent a mean retinal thinning of 49.6 mu compared to controls (Kruskal-Wallis test; P < 0.0008). No refractive or ocular parameters changed significantly in the controls. Phototoxic degeneration in the rat has optical consequences beyond simple retinal thinning. The size of the eye and the curvature of refractive surfaces can be altered in a mature eye well after the completion of development. The multiple changes which occur prevent phototoxic retinal thinning from serving as a test of the inner limiting membrane model for retinoscopic reflections.

  19. [Setting the individual file of ocular refractive development of children is the primary procedure in the prevention of myopia].

    PubMed

    Chu, Ren-Yuan; Qu, Xiao-Mei

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of setting the file of ocular refractive development is to record the process of eye development in children with plan. Set the individual file and begins at 3 years old till 12. Examination is done every 6 months. Parameters are recorded including power of cycloplegic refraction, visual acuity, keratometer, anterior chamber depth, axial length, intraocular pressure, body height and weight. In this way, can provide very important information as to the prompt intervening in myopia control. It is also the effective and practical way in myopia prevention.

  20. Comparison of Ocular Monochromatic Higher-order Aberrations in Normal Refractive Surgery Candidates of Arab and South Asian Origin.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Gaurav; Srivastava, Dhruv; Choudhuri, Sounak; Bacero, Ruthchel

    2016-01-01

    To compare the ocular monochromatic higher-order aberration. (HOA) profile in normal refractive surgery candidates of Arab and South Asian origin. This cross-sectional, observational, comparative study was performed in the cornea department of a specialty hospital. Normal refractive surgery candidates with no ocular morbidity except refractive error were recruited. Refractive surgery candidates underwent a preoperative evaluation, including wavefront aberrometry with the iDesign aberrometer (AMO, Inc., Santa Ana, California, United States). The HOA from right eyes were analyzed for HOA signed, absolute, and polar Zernike coefficients. Two hundred Arab participants (group 1) and 200 participants of South-Asian origin (group 2) comprised the study sample. The age and refractive status were comparable between groups. The mean of the HOA root mean square (RMS) was 0.36 ± 17 μ and 0.38 ± 18 μ for Arab and South-Asian eyes, respectively (P < 0.05, rank sum test [RST]). Of the 22 higher order signed Zernike modes, only Z3 (-3), Z3 (-1),3 (1), Z4 (-4), Z4 (-2), Z4 (0), Z4 (4), and Z5 (-5) were significantly different from zero (one sample t-test, P < 0.002, with a Bonferroni correction of 0.05/22). All the signed and absolute Zernike terms were comparable between groups (RST, P > 0.002 [0.05/22]). The polar coefficients for coma, trefoil, spherical aberration, and tetrafoil were comparable between groups (P > 0.05, RST). Combined RMS values of third, fourth, fifth, and sixth order also were comparable between groups (P > 0.05, RST). Preoperative whole eye HOA were similar for refractive surgery candidates of Arab and South-Asian origin. The values were comparable to historical data for Caucasian eyes and were lower than Asian (Chinese) eyes. These findings may aid in refining refractive nomograms for wavefront ablations.

  1. The albino chick as a model for studying ocular developmental anomalies, including refractive errors, associated with albinism.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Jodi; Choh, Vivian; Bharadwaj, Shrikant; Padmanabhan, Varuna; Modilevsky, Laura; Jovanovich, Elizabeth; Yeh, Brenda; Zhang, Zhan; Guan, Huanxian; Payne, W; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2007-10-01

    Albinism is associated with a variety of ocular anomalies including refractive errors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ocular development of an albino chick line. The ocular development of both albino and normally pigmented chicks was monitored using retinoscopy to measure refractive errors and high frequency A-scan ultrasonography to measure axial ocular dimensions. Functional tests included an optokinetic nystagmus paradigm to assess visual acuity, and flash ERGs to assess retinal function. The underlying genetic abnormality was characterized using a gene microarray, PCR and a tyrosinase assay. The ultrastructure of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was examined using transmission electron microscopy. PCR confirmed that the genetic abnormality in this line is a deletion in exon 1 of the tyrosinase gene. Tyrosinase gene expression in isolated RPE cells was minimally detectable, and there was minimal enzyme activity in albino feather bulbs. The albino chicks had pink eyes and their eyes transilluminated, reflecting the lack of melanin in all ocular tissues. All three main components, anterior chamber, crystalline lens and vitreous chamber, showed axial expansion over time in both normal and albino animals, but the anterior chambers of albino chicks were consistently shallower than those of normal chicks, while in contrast, their vitreous chambers were longer. Albino chicks remained relatively myopic, with higher astigmatism than the normally pigmented chicks, even though both groups underwent developmental emmetropization. Albino chicks had reduced visual acuity yet the ERG a- and b-wave components had larger amplitudes and shorter than normal implicit times. Developmental emmetropization occurs in the albino chick but is impaired, likely because of functional abnormalities in the RPE and/or retina as well as optical factors. In very young chicks the underlying genetic mutation may also contribute to refractive error and eye shape abnormalities.

  2. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Wilson, James F.; Pennell, Craig E.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Delcourt, Cécile; Maubaret, Cecilia; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; MacGregor, Stuart; Lu, Yi; Jonas, Jost B.; Xu, Liang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.; Rochtchina, Elena; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Jonas, Jost B.; Nangia, Vinay; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Young, Terri L.; Feng, Sheng; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Metspalu, Andres; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Wojciechowski, Robert; Baird, Paul N.; Schache, Maria; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Höhn, René; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Peng; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Wegner, Aharon; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Pärssinen, Olavi; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W.H.; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Biino, Genevra; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Vitart, Veronique; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Hewitt, Alex W.; Ang, Wei; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Hammond, Christopher J.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Reinhart, William; Belin, Michael W.; Schultze, Robert L.; Morason, Todd; Sugar, Alan; Mian, Shahzad; Soong, Hunson Kaz; Colby, Kathryn; Jurkunas, Ula; Yee, Richard; Vital, Mark; Alfonso, Eduardo; Karp, Carol; Lee, Yunhee; Yoo, Sonia; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cohen, Elisabeth; Laibson, Peter; Rapuano, Christopher; Ayres, Brandon; Croasdale, Christopher; Caudill, James; Patel, Sanjay; Baratz, Keith; Bourne, William; Maguire, Leo; Sugar, Joel; Tu, Elmer; Djalilian, Ali; Mootha, Vinod; McCulley, James; Bowman, Wayne; Cavanaugh, H. Dwight; Verity, Steven; Verdier, David; Renucci, Ann; Oliva, Matt; Rotkis, Walter; Hardten, David R.; Fahmy, Ahmad; Brown, Marlene; Reeves, Sherman; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Lindstrom, Richard; Hauswirth, Scott; Hamilton, Stephen; Lee, W. Barry; Price, Francis; Price, Marianne; Kelly, Kathleen; Peters, Faye; Shaughnessy, Michael; Steinemann, Thomas; Dupps, B.J.; Meisler, David M.; Mifflin, Mark; Olson, Randal; Aldave, Anthony; Holland, Gary; Mondino, Bartly J.; Rosenwasser, George; Gorovoy, Mark; Dunn, Steven P.; Heidemann, David G.; Terry, Mark; Shamie, Neda; Rosenfeld, Steven I.; Suedekum, Brandon; Hwang, David; Stone, Donald; Chodosh, James; Galentine, Paul G.; Bardenstein, David; Goddard, Katrina; Chin, Hemin; Mannis, Mark; Varma, Rohit; Borecki, Ingrid; Chew, Emily Y.; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J.; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Donnelly, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Corvin, Aiden; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D.; Genuth, S.; Nathan, D.M.; Zinman, B.; Crofford, O.; Crandall, J.; Reid, M.; Brown-Friday, J.; Engel, S.; Sheindlin, J.; Martinez, H.; Shamoon, H.; Engel, H.; Phillips, M.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Mayer, L.; Pendegast, S.; Zegarra, H.; Miller, D.; Singerman, L.; Smith-Brewer, S.; Novak, M.; Quin, J.; Dahms, W.; Genuth, Saul; Palmert, M.; Brillon, D.; Lackaye, M.E.; Kiss, S.; Chan, R.; Reppucci, V.; Lee, T.; Heinemann, M.; Whitehouse, F.; Kruger, D.; Jones, J.K.; McLellan, M.; Carey, J.D.; Angus, E.; Thomas, A.; Galprin, A.; Bergenstal, R.; Johnson, M.; Spencer, M.; Morgan, K.; Etzwiler, D.; Kendall, D.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Golden, E.; Jacobson, A.; Beaser, R.; Ganda, O.; Hamdy, O.; Wolpert, H.; Sharuk, G.; Arrigg, P.; Schlossman, D.; Rosenzwieg, J.; Rand, L.; Nathan, D.M.; Larkin, M.; Ong, M.; Godine, J.; Cagliero, E.; Lou, P.; Folino, K.; Fritz, S.; Crowell, S.; Hansen, K.; Gauthier-Kelly, C.; Service, J.; Ziegler, G.; Luttrell, L.; Caulder, S.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Colwell, J.; Soule, J.; Fernandes, J.; Hermayer, K.; Kwon, S.; Brabham, M.; Blevins, A.; Parker, J.; Lee, D.; Patel, N.; Pittman, C.; Lindsey, P.; Bracey, M.; Lee, K.; Nutaitis, M.; Farr, A.; Elsing, S.; Thompson, T.; Selby, J.; Lyons, T.; Yacoub-Wasef, S.; Szpiech, M.; Wood, D.; Mayfield, R.; Molitch, M.; Schaefer, B.; Jampol, L.; Lyon, A.; Gill, M.; Strugula, Z.; Kaminski, L.; Mirza, R.; Simjanoski, E.; Ryan, D.; Kolterman, O.; Lorenzi, G.; Goldbaum, M.; Sivitz, W.; Bayless, M.; Counts, D.; Johnsonbaugh, S.; Hebdon, M.; Salemi, P.; Liss, R.; Donner, T.; Gordon, J.; Hemady, R.; Kowarski, A.; Ostrowski, D.; Steidl, S.; Jones, B.; Herman, W.H.; Martin, C.L.; Pop-Busui, R.; Sarma, A.; Albers, J.; Feldman, E.; Kim, K.; Elner, S.; Comer, G.; Gardner, T.; Hackel, R.; Prusak, R.; Goings, L.; Smith, A.; Gothrup, J.; Titus, P.; Lee, J.; Brandle, M.; Prosser, L.; Greene, D.A.; Stevens, M.J.; Vine, A.K.; Bantle, J.; Wimmergren, N.; Cochrane, A.; Olsen, T.; Steuer, E.; Rath, P.; Rogness, B.; Hainsworth, D.; Goldstein, D.; Hitt, S.; Giangiacomo, J.; Schade, D.S.; Canady, J.L.; Chapin, J.E.; Ketai, L.H.; Braunstein, C.S.; Bourne, P.A.; Schwartz, S.; Brucker, A.; Maschak-Carey, B.J.; Baker, L.; Orchard, T.; Silvers, N.; Ryan, C.; Songer, T.; Doft, B.; Olson, S.; Bergren, R.L.; Lobes, L.; Rath, P. Paczan; Becker, D.; Rubinstein, D.; Conrad, P.W.; Yalamanchi, S.; Drash, A.; Morrison, A.; Bernal, M.L.; Vaccaro-Kish, J.; Malone, J.; Pavan, P.R.; Grove, N.; Iyer, M.N.; Burrows, A.F.; Tanaka, E.A.; Gstalder, R.; Dagogo-Jack, S.; Wigley, C.; Ricks, H.; Kitabchi, A.; Murphy, M.B.; Moser, S.; Meyer, D.; Iannacone, A.; Chaum, E.; Yoser, S.; Bryer-Ash, M.; Schussler, S.; Lambeth, H.; Raskin, P.; Strowig, S.; Zinman, B.; Barnie, A.; Devenyi, R.; Mandelcorn, M.; Brent, M.; Rogers, S.; Gordon, A.; Palmer, J.; Catton, S.; Brunzell, J.; Wessells, H.; de Boer, I.H.; Hokanson, J.; Purnell, J.; Ginsberg, J.; Kinyoun, J.; Deeb, S.; Weiss, M.; Meekins, G.; Distad, J.; Van Ottingham, L.; Dupre, J.; Harth, J.; Nicolle, D.; Driscoll, M.; Mahon, J.; Canny, C.; May, M.; Lipps, J.; Agarwal, A.; Adkins, T.; Survant, L.; Pate, R.L.; Munn, G.E.; Lorenz, R.; Feman, S.; White, N.; Levandoski, L.; Boniuk, I.; Grand, G.; Thomas, M.; Joseph, D.D.; Blinder, K.; Shah, G.; Boniuk; Burgess; Santiago, J.; Tamborlane, W.; Gatcomb, P.; Stoessel, K.; Taylor, K.; Goldstein, J.; Novella, S.; Mojibian, H.; Cornfeld, D.; Lima, J.; Bluemke, D.; Turkbey, E.; van der Geest, R.J.; Liu, C.; Malayeri, A.; Jain, A.; Miao, C.; Chahal, H.; Jarboe, R.; Maynard, J.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Quin, J.; Gaston, P.; Palmert, M.; Trail, R.; Dahms, W.; Lachin, J.; Cleary, P.; Backlund, J.; Sun, W.; Braffett, B.; Klumpp, K.; Chan, K.; Diminick, L.; Rosenberg, D.; Petty, B.; Determan, A.; Kenny, D.; Rutledge, B.; Younes, Naji; Dews, L.; Hawkins, M.; Cowie, C.; Fradkin, J.; Siebert, C.; Eastman, R.; Danis, R.; Gangaputra, S.; Neill, S.; Davis, M.; Hubbard, L.; Wabers, H.; Burger, M.; Dingledine, J.; Gama, V.; Sussman, R.; Steffes, M.; Bucksa, J.; Nowicki, M.; Chavers, B.; O’Leary, D.; Polak, J.; Harrington, A.; Funk, L.; Crow, R.; Gloeb, B.; Thomas, S.; O’Donnell, C.; Soliman, E.; Zhang, Z.M.; Prineas, R.; Campbell, C.; Ryan, C.; Sandstrom, D.; Williams, T.; Geckle, M.; Cupelli, E.; Thoma, F.; Burzuk, B.; Woodfill, T.; Low, P.; Sommer, C.; Nickander, K.; Budoff, M.; Detrano, R.; Wong, N.; Fox, M.; Kim, L.; Oudiz, R.; Weir, G.; Espeland, M.; Manolio, T.; Rand, L.; Singer, D.; Stern, M.; Boulton, A.E.; Clark, C.; D’Agostino, R.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Garvey, W.T.; Lyons, T.J.; Jenkins, A.; Virella, G.; Jaffa, A.; Carter, Rickey; Lackland, D.; Brabham, M.; McGee, D.; Zheng, D.; Mayfield, R.K.; Boright, A.; Bull, S.; Sun, L.; Scherer, S.; Zinman, B.; Natarajan, R.; Miao, F.; Zhang, L.; Chen;, Z.; Nathan, D.M.; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W.; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  3. Nine loci for ocular axial length identified through genome-wide association studies, including shared loci with refractive error.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M Kamran; Young, Terri L; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; St Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Montgomery, Grant W; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Wilson, James F; Pennell, Craig E; van Duijn, Cornelia M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Iyengar, Sudha K; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily Y; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N

    2013-08-08

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways.

  4. Normal development of refractive state and ocular dimensions in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Xie, Ruozhong; Wang, Ruiqing; Jiang, Liqin; Zhao, Hailan; Wen, Jiquan; Lu, Fan

    2006-09-01

    This study investigated changes in refraction, corneal curvature, axial components and weight of posterior sclera in guinea pig eyes during the normal development from birth. Sixty-four guinea pigs were assigned to eight groups (n=8 each). Each group underwent a series of ocular measurements at one of the eight time-points (0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 weeks), including refraction (streak retinoscopy), corneal radius of curvature (CRC; keratometry), anterior segment length (AS: corneal thickness and depth of the anterior chamber), thickness of the crystalline lens (CL), vitreous chamber length (VC; all A-scan ultrasonography) and dry weight of a circular 6mm diameter punch in the posterior sclera (electronic balance). Results of all the measurements were statistically compared between right eye and left eye, male and female and among different age groups. Artifacts of retinoscopy due to small eye artifact were also estimated at different ages. The refraction in guinea pig eyes was +5.22+/-0.23 D (Mean, SE) at birth. This value decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks followed by a slow decline. The overall decrease in refraction was highly significant from birth to 11 weeks (p<0.001 one way ANOVA). The small eye artifact was approximately 4.00 D at birth, which reduced to 2.76 D at 11 weeks. The guinea pig eyes were emmetropic by 3 weeks of age when the small eye artifact was taken into account. The CRC (3.24+/-0.01 mm at birth), AS (1.20+/-0.01 mm at birth), CL (2.72+/-0.03 mm at birth) and VC (3.28+/-0.01 mm at birth) increased within the first 3 weeks despite a transient decrease in the CRC within the first week. The increase in CRC, CL and VC continued after 3 weeks, however, the AS remained constant after this age. The increase in VC was better correlated to the decline of hyperopia (R(2)=0.70) than the other components (R(2)=0.33-0.39). Dry weight of the posterior sclera increased linearly from birth (p<0.001 between any two close time-points from 3 to 9

  5. Corneal refractive power and its associations with ocular and general parameters: the Central India Eye and Medical Study.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jost B; Nangia, Vinay; Sinha, Ajit; Gupta, Rajesh

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the normal distribution of corneal refractive power (CRP) and its associations with other ocular and systemic parameters in the Central Indian population. Population-based study. The Central India Eye and Medical Study is a population-based study performed in a rural region of Central India. The study comprised 4711 subjects aged 30+ years. A detailed ophthalmic and medical examination was performed. Horizontal and vertical CRP were measured using a non-automatic keratometer. Corneal refractive power. After excluding pseudophakic or aphakic eyes, keratometric measurements were available on 9024 eyes of 4617 study participants (98.0%) with a mean age of 49.1±13.2 years (range, 30-100 years) and a mean refractive error of -0.20±1.52 diopters (D). Mean horizontal CRP was 44.60±1.68 D (mean ± standard deviation; range, 36.5-52.0 D), and vertical CRP was 44.62±1.74 D (range, 37.75-52.0 D) with no significant difference between both parameters (P=0.27). In multivariate analysis, CRP was significantly (P < 0.001) associated with the systemic parameters of increasing age (P < 0.001), lower level of education (P=0.02), and lower body height (P < 0.001), and with the ocular parameters of thinner central corneal thickness (P < 0.001), deeper anterior chamber (P < 0.001), shorter axial length (P < 0.001), and myopic refractive error (P < 0.001). The results remained unchanged if eyes with CRP ≥48 D were excluded. Horizontal CRP increased with higher age, lower level of education, lower body height, thinner central cornea, deeper anterior chamber, shorter axial length, and myopic refractive error. The association with age may be of importance for refractive surgery. The association of a steeper cornea with a shorter body stature and a shorter axial length parallels an association between shorter body length and shorter axial length without association with refractive error. The association among steeper cornea, shorter body length, and lower educational

  6. Genomewide scan in Ashkenazi Jewish families demonstrates evidence of linkage of ocular refraction to a QTL on chromosome 1p36.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Robert; Moy, Chris; Ciner, Elise; Ibay, Grace; Reider, Lauren; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight

    2006-05-01

    The development of refractive error is mediated by both environmental and genetic factors. We performed regression-based quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage analysis on Ashkenazi Jewish families to identify regions in the genome responsible for ocular refraction. We measured refractive error on individuals in 49 multi-generational American families of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. The average family size was 11.1 individuals and was composed of 2.7 generations. Recruitment criteria specified that each family contain at least two myopic members. The mean spherical equivalent refractive error in the sample was -3.46D (SD=3.29) and 87% of individuals were myopic. Microsatellite genotyping with 387 markers was performed on 411 individuals. We performed multipoint regression-based linkage analysis for ocular refraction and a log transformation of the trait using the statistical package Merlin-Regress. Empirical genomewide significance levels were estimated through gene-dropping simulations by generating random genotypes at each of the 387 markers in 200 replicates of our pedigrees. Maximum LOD scores of 9.5 for ocular refraction and 8.7 for log-transformed refraction (LTR) were observed at 49.1 cM on chromosome 1p36 between markers D1S552 and D1S1622. The empirical genomewide significance levels were P=0.065 for ocular refraction and P<0.005 for LTR, providing strong evidence for linkage of refraction to this locus. The inter-marker region containing the peak spans 11 Mb and contains approximately 189 genes. We found genomewide significant evidence for linkage of refractive error to a novel QTL on chromosome 1p36 in an Ashkenazi Jewish population.

  7. Ocular refraction: heritability and genome-wide search for eye morphometry traits in an isolated Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Biino, Ginevra; Palmas, Maria Antonietta; Corona, Carla; Prodi, Dionigio; Fanciulli, Manuela; Sulis, Roberta; Serra, Antonina; Fossarello, Maurizio; Pirastu, Mario

    2005-02-01

    No genes influencing oculometric phenotypes have yet been identified, despite it being well known that eye morphometry is involved in refraction and that genetics may play an important role. We have therefore performed a heritability analysis and genome-wide search (GWS) of biometric ocular traits in an isolated Sardinian population, assessing the genetic contribution and identifying the associated genetic loci. A complete eye examination including refraction and ocular biometry measurements such as axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and corneal curvature (CC), was performed on 789 subjects. Heritability analysis was carried out by means of parent-offspring regression and variance component models. Univariate and bivariate linkage analysis was performed by using 654 microsatellite markers spanning the genome. CC showed a mean heritability of 57%. AL and ACD were found to have significantly different variances (P<0.01) in males and females, so that heritability was calculated separately for each sex. AL had an estimated heritability in females of 31% and in males of 60%, whereas ACD had an estimated heritability of 47% in females and of 44% in males. In the GWS, the most suggestive evidence of linkage was identified on chromosome 2 for AL (LOD 2.64), on chromosome 1 for ACD (LOD 2.32) and on chromosomes 7, 2 and 3 for CC (LOD 2.50, 2.44 and 2.34, respectively). High heritability of eye morphometry traits was thus revealed. The identified loci are the first linkage signals available in ocular biometry. Notably, the observed significant differences in parental transmission deserve further study.

  8. The effect of pirenzepine on positive- and negative-lens-induced refractive error and ocular growth in chicks.

    PubMed

    Metlapally, Sangeetha; McBrien, Neville A

    2010-11-01

    The selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine inhibits experimentally induced myopia in avian and mammalian species, including nonhuman primates and adolescent humans. Transient positive lens defocus has a potent inhibitory effect on negative-lens-induced myopia in avian and mammalian models. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of daily treatment with pirenzepine on ocular growth and refractive error in chicks wearing positive lenses. The chicks were allocated to one of eight groups (n = 6 each group) on the basis of whether they wore +10 or -10 D lenses monocularly and whether they received daily intravitreal injections of pirenzepine (700 μg) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) in the lens-defocused eye. In vivo refractive and biometric data were collected, and glycosaminoglycan synthesis in the sclera was assessed. Pirenzepine did not alter the level of positive-lens-induced hyperopia in chicks wearing +10 D lenses compared with that in the vehicle control group (+8.1 ± 0.6 D vs. +8.9 ± 2.4 D, mean ± SEM; P = 0.76). In contrast, pirenzepine caused significant inhibition of negative-lens-induced myopia compared with that in the vehicle group (-1.1 ± 1.5 D vs. -8.8 ± 1.1 D; P = 0.001). Glycosaminoglycan synthesis in the posterior sclera was significantly increased in the negative-lens-treated groups and showed small decreases in the positive-lens-treated groups. The influence of pirenzepine on ocular growth in chicks differed by sign of lens defocus, with pirenzepine blocking negative-lens effects on ocular growth, but not positive-lens effects. The most likely reason that hyperopia was not enhanced by pirenzepine treatment was that the rapid compensatory eye growth associated with positive lenses eliminated the imposed myopic defocus, and the clear retinal image prevented any additional hyperopia from developing.

  9. A Comparison of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery post-myopic LASI K/PRK Intraocular Lens (IOL) calculator and the Ocular MD IOL calculator

    PubMed Central

    DeMill, David L; Moshirfar, Majid; Neuffer, Marcus C; Hsu, Maylon; Sikder, Shameema

    2011-01-01

    Background To compare the average values of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) and Ocular MD intraocular lens (IOL) calculators to assess their accuracy in predicting IOL power in patients with prior laser-in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or photorefractive keratectomy. Methods In this retrospective study, data from 21 eyes with previous LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy for myopia and subsequent cataract surgery was used in an IOL calculator comparison. The predicted IOL powers of the Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS averages were compared. The Ocular MD average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis) and the all calculator average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS) were also compared. Primary outcome measures were mean arithmetic and absolute IOL prediction error, variance in mean arithmetic IOL prediction error, and the percentage of eyes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D. Results The Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages produced mean arithmetic IOL prediction errors of 0.57 and −0.61 diopters (D), respectively, which were significantly larger than errors from the ASCRS, Ocular MD, and all calculator averages (0.11, −0.02, and 0.02 D, respectively, all P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the methods in absolute IOL prediction error, variance, or the percentage of eyes with outcomes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D. Conclusion The ASCRS average was more accurate in predicting IOL power than the Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages alone. Our methods using combinations of these averages which, when compared with the individual averages, showed a trend of decreased mean arithmetic IOL prediction error, mean absolute upper limit of IOL prediction error, and variance, while increasing the percentage of outcomes within ±0.50 D. PMID:22034561

  10. A comparison of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery post-myopic LASI K/PRK intraocular lens (IOL) calculator and the Ocular MD IOL calculator.

    PubMed

    Demill, David L; Moshirfar, Majid; Neuffer, Marcus C; Hsu, Maylon; Sikder, Shameema

    2011-01-01

    To compare the average values of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) and Ocular MD intraocular lens (IOL) calculators to assess their accuracy in predicting IOL power in patients with prior laser-in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or photorefractive keratectomy. In this retrospective study, data from 21 eyes with previous LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy for myopia and subsequent cataract surgery was used in an IOL calculator comparison. The predicted IOL powers of the Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS averages were compared. The Ocular MD average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis) and the all calculator average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS) were also compared. Primary outcome measures were mean arithmetic and absolute IOL prediction error, variance in mean arithmetic IOL prediction error, and the percentage of eyes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D. The Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages produced mean arithmetic IOL prediction errors of 0.57 and -0.61 diopters (D), respectively, which were significantly larger than errors from the ASCRS, Ocular MD, and all calculator averages (0.11, -0.02, and 0.02 D, respectively, all P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the methods in absolute IOL prediction error, variance, or the percentage of eyes with outcomes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D. The ASCRS average was more accurate in predicting IOL power than the Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages alone. Our methods using combinations of these averages which, when compared with the individual averages, showed a trend of decreased mean arithmetic IOL prediction error, mean absolute upper limit of IOL prediction error, and variance, while increasing the percentage of outcomes within ±0.50 D.

  11. EFFECTS OF CORNEAL CROSSLINKING ON OCULAR RESPONSE ANALYZER WAVEFORM-DERIVED VARIABLES IN KERATOCONUS AND POST-REFRACTIVE SURGERY ECTASIA

    PubMed Central

    Hallahan, Katie M.; Rocha, Karolinne; Sinha Roy, Abhijit; Randleman, J. Bradley; Stulting, R. Doyle; Dupps, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess changes in Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) waveforms after UVA/riboflavin corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) using investigator-derived and manufacturer-supplied morphometric variables in keratoconus (KC) and post-refractive surgery ectasia patients. Design Prospective, randomized trial of a standard, epithelium-off CXL protocol Participants Patients with progressive KC (24 eyes of 21 patients) or post-refractive surgery ectasia (27 eyes of 23 patients) were enrolled. Methods Replicate ORA measurements were obtained prior to and 3 months after CXL. Pre-treatment and post-treatment waveform variables were analyzed for differences by paired student’s t-tests using measurements with the highest waveform scores. Main Outcome Measures Corneal Hysteresis, Corneal Resistance Factor, 37 second-generation manufacturer-supplied ORA variables, 15 investigator-derived ORA variables Results No variables were significantly different 3 months after CXL in the KC group, and no manufacturer–supplied variables changed significantly in the post-refractive surgery ectasia group. Four custom variables (ApplanationOnsetTime, P1P2avg, Impulse, and Pmax) increased by small but statistically significant margins after CXL in the post-refractive surgery ectasia group. Conclusions Changes in a small subset of investigator-derived variables suggested an increase in corneal bending resistance after CXL. However, the magnitudes of these changes were low and not commensurate with the degree of clinical improvement or prior computational estimates of corneal stiffening in the same cohort over the same period. Available air-puff derived measures of the corneal deformation response underestimate the biomechanical changes produced by CXL. PMID:25365551

  12. Ocular biometry and determinants of refractive error in a founder population of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Hilkert, Sarah M; Parness-Yossifon, Reut; Mets-Halgrimson, Rebecca; Mets, Marilyn B

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of myopia is increasing worldwide. Previous studies have found a positive association between myopia, education, and near activities, while others have noted a negative association with outdoor exposure. This study reports refractive error and biometry in a founder population of European ancestry, the Hutterites, and discusses risk factors contributing to myopia. Cross-sectional study, including complete eye exams with retinoscopy and biometry. 939 study participants, ages 6 to 89, were examined. Females were significantly more myopic than males (SE -0.87 ± 2.07 and -0.40 ± 1.49 in females and males, respectively, p < 0.0001). Males had significantly longer axial lengths. Females had steeper corneas. This is the first epidemiological report of refractive error among the Hutterites. As a genetically isolated population with a communal lifestyle, the Hutterites present a unique opportunity to study risk factors for myopia. Hutterite females are more myopic than males, a finding which has only been reported in a few other populations. Hutterite children complete compulsory education through the 8th grade, after which women and men assume gender-specific occupational tasks. Men often work outside on the farm, while women engage in more domestic activities inside. These occupational differences likely contribute to the increased myopia comparing females to males, and their uniform lifestyle reduces the impact of potential confounding factors, such as education and income. The Hutterites are more myopic than most other North American and European populations. Greater time spent doing near work and less time spent outdoors likely explain the increased myopia comparing females to males.

  13. Ocular wavefront aberrations in the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus: effects of age and refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Coletta, Nancy J.; Marcos, Susana; Troilo, David

    2012-01-01

    The common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus, is a primate model for emmetropization studies. The refractive development of the marmoset eye depends on visual experience, so knowledge of the optical quality of the eye is valuable. We report on the wavefront aberrations of the marmoset eye, measured with a clinical Hartmann-Shack aberrometer (COAS, AMO Wavefront Sciences). Aberrations were measured on both eyes of 23 marmosets whose ages ranged from 18 to 452 days. Twenty-one of the subjects were members of studies of emmetropization and accommodation, and two were untreated normal subjects. Eleven of the 21 experimental subjects had worn monocular diffusers or occluders and ten had worn binocular spectacle lenses of equal power. Monocular deprivation or lens rearing began at about 45 days of age and ended at about 108 days of age. All refractions and aberration measures were performed while the eyes were cyclopleged; most aberration measures were made while subjects were awake, but some control measurements were performed under anesthesia. Wavefront error was expressed as a seventh-order Zernike polynomial expansion, using the Optical Society of America’s naming convention. Aberrations in young marmosets decreased up to about 100 days of age, after which the higher-order RMS aberration leveled off to about 0.10 micron over a 3 mm diameter pupil. Higher-order aberrations were 1.8 times greater when the subjects were under general anesthesia than when they were awake. Young marmoset eyes were characterized by negative spherical aberration. Visually deprived eyes of the monocular deprivation animals had greater wavefront aberrations than their fellow untreated eyes, particularly for asymmetric aberrations in the odd-numbered Zernike orders. Both lens-treated and deprived eyes showed similar significant increases in Z3-3 trefoil aberration, suggesting the increase in trefoil may be related to factors that do not involve visual feedback. PMID:20800078

  14. Ocular wavefront aberrations in the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus: effects of age and refractive error.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Nancy J; Marcos, Susana; Troilo, David

    2010-11-23

    The common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus, is a primate model for emmetropization studies. The refractive development of the marmoset eye depends on visual experience, so knowledge of the optical quality of the eye is valuable. We report on the wavefront aberrations of the marmoset eye, measured with a clinical Hartmann-Shack aberrometer (COAS, AMO Wavefront Sciences). Aberrations were measured on both eyes of 23 marmosets whose ages ranged from 18 to 452 days. Twenty-one of the subjects were members of studies of emmetropization and accommodation, and two were untreated normal subjects. Eleven of the 21 experimental subjects had worn monocular diffusers and 10 had worn binocular spectacle lenses of equal power. Monocular deprivation or lens rearing began at about 45 days of age and ended at about 108 days of age. All refractions and aberration measures were performed while the eyes were cyclopleged; most aberration measures were made while subjects were awake, but some control measurements were performed under anesthesia. Wavefront error was expressed as a seventh-order Zernike polynomial expansion, using the Optical Society of America's naming convention. Aberrations in young marmosets decreased up to about 100 days of age, after which the higher-order RMS aberration leveled off to about 0.10 μm over a 3 mm diameter pupil. Higher-order aberrations were 1.8 times greater when the subjects were under general anesthesia than when they were awake. Young marmoset eyes were characterized by negative spherical aberration. Form-deprived eyes of the monocular deprivation animals had greater wavefront aberrations than their fellow untreated eyes, particularly for asymmetric aberrations in the odd-numbered Zernike orders. Both lens-treated and form-deprived eyes showed similar significant increases in Z3(-3) trefoil aberration, suggesting the increase in trefoil may be related to factors that do not involve visual feedback.

  15. Transfer from blue light or green light to white light partially reverses changes in ocular refraction and anatomy of developing guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi-Feng; Liu, Rui; Dai, Jin-Hui; Chen, Min-Jie; Zhou, Xing-Tao; Chu, Ren-Yuan

    2013-09-26

    Relative to the broadband white light (BL), postnatal guinea pigs develop myopia in a monochromic middle-wavelength light (ML, 530 nm) environment and develop hyperopia in a monochromic short-wavelength light (SL, 430 nm) environment. We investigated whether transfer from SL or ML to BL leads to recuperation of ocular refraction and anatomy of developing guinea pigs. Two-week-old guinea pigs were given (a) SL for 20 weeks, (b) SL recuperation (SLR, SL for 10 weeks then BL for 10 weeks), (c) ML for 20 weeks, (d) ML recuperation (MLR, ML for 10 weeks then BL for 10 weeks), or (e) BL for 20 weeks. Two weeks after transfer from ML to BL (MLR group), ocular refraction increased from 1.95 ± 0.35 D to 2.58 ± 0.24 D, and vitreous length decreased from 3.48 ± 0.06 mm to 3.41 ± 0.06 mm. Two weeks after transfer from SL to BL (SLR group), ocular refraction decreased from 5.65 ± 0.61 D to 4.33 ± 0.49 D, and vitreous length increased from 3.18 ± 0.07 mm to 3.26 ± 0.11 mm. The MLR and SLR groups had final ocular refractions that were significantly different from those of the ML and SL groups at 20 weeks (ML vs. MLR: p < 0.0001; SL vs. SLR: p < 0.0001) but were still significantly different from the BL group (BL vs. MLR: p = 0.0120; BL vs. SLR: p = 0.0010). These results suggest that recuperation was not complete after return to BL for 10 weeks.

  16. Implantation of refractive multifocal intraocular lens with a surface-embedded near section for cataract eyes complicated with a coexisting ocular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, M; Kinoshita, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the postoperative outcomes of cataract eyes complicated with coexisting ocular pathologies that underwent implantation of a refractive multifocal intraocular lens (MIOL) with a surface-embedded near section. Methods LENTIS MPlus (Oculentis GmbH) refractive MIOLs were implanted in 15 eyes with ocular pathologies other than cataract (ie, six high-myopia eyes with an axial length longer than 28 mm, two fundus albipunctatus eyes, two branch retinal-vein occlusion eyes, four glaucoma eyes (one with high myopia), and two keratoconus eyes). Uncorrected or corrected distance and near visual acuity (VA) (UDVA, UNVA, CDVA, and CNVA), contrast sensitivity, and defocus curve were measured at 1 day and 6 months postoperatively, and each patient completed a 6-month postoperative questionnaire regarding vision quality and eyeglass use. Results Thirteen eyes (87%) registered 0 or better in CDVA and 12 eyes (73%) registered better than 0 in CNVA. Contrast sensitivity in the eyes of all patients was comparable to that of normal healthy subjects. No patient required eyeglasses for distance vision, but three patients (20%) required them for near vision. No patient reported poor or very poor vision quality. Conclusion With careful case selection, sectorial refractive MIOL implantation is effective for treating cataract eyes complicated with ocular pathologies. PMID:25744442

  17. Comparison of the predictability of refractive cylinder correction by laser in situ keratomileusis in eyes with low or high ocular residual astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Archer, Timothy J; Reinstein, Dan Z; Piñero, David P; Gobbe, Marine; Carp, Glenn I

    2015-07-01

    To compare the manifest refractive cylinder (MRC) predictability of myopic astigmatism laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) between eyes with low and high ocular residual astigmatism (ORA). London Vision Clinic, London, United Kingdom. Retrospective case study. The ORA was considered the vector difference between the MRC and the corneal astigmatism. The index of success (IoS), difference vector ÷ MRC, was analyzed for different groups as follows: stage 1, low ORA (ORA ÷ MRC <1), high ORA (ORA ÷ MRC ≥1); stage 2, low ORA group reduced to match the high ORA group for MRC; stage 3, grouped by ORA magnitude with low ORA (<0.50 diopters [D]), mid ORA (0.50 to 1.24 D), and high ORA (≥1.25 D); stage 4, high ORA group subdivided into low (<0.75 D) and high (≥0.75 D) corneal astigmatism. For stage 1, the mean preoperative MRC and mean IoS were -1.32 D ± 0.65 (SD) (range -0.55 to -3.77 D) and 0.27, respectively, for low ORA and -0.79 ± 0.20 D (range -0.56 to -2.05 D) and 0.37, respectively, for high ORA. For stage 2, the mean IoS increased to 0.32 for low ORA. For stage 3, the mean IoS was 0.28, 0.29, and 0.31 for low ORA, mid ORA, and high ORA, respectively. For stage 4, the mean IoS was 0.20 for high ORA/low corneal astigmatism and 0.35 for high ORA/high corneal astigmatism. The MRC predictability was slightly worse in eyes with high ORA when grouped by the ORA ÷ MRC. Matching for the MRC and grouping by ORA magnitude resulted in similar predictability; however, eyes with high ORA and high corneal astigmatism were less predictable. Dr. Reinstein is a consultant to Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, has a proprietary interest in the Artemis technology (Arcscan, Inc.), and is an author of patents related to very-high-frequency digital ultrasound administered by the Center for Technology Licensing at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. No other author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS

  18. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  19. Responses of the Ocular Anterior Segment and Refraction to 0.5% Tropicamide in Chinese School-Aged Children of Myopia, Emmetropia, and Hyperopia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhu, Jianfeng; He, Xiangui; Du, Ergang; Jiang, Kelimu; Zheng, Wenjing; Ke, Bilian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the changes of anterior segment after cycloplegia and estimate the association of such changes with the changes of refraction in Chinese school-aged children of myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia. Methods. 309 children were recruited and eligible subjects were assigned to three groups: hyperopia, emmetropia, or myopia. Cycloplegia was achieved with five cycles of 0.5% tropicamide. The Pentacam system was used to measure the parameters of interest before and after cycloplegia. Results. In the myopic group, the lenses were thinner and the lens position was significantly more posterior than that of the emmetropic and hyperopic groups in the cycloplegic status. The correlations between refraction and lens thickness (age adjusted; r = 0.26, P < 0.01), and lens position (age adjusted; r = -0.31, P < 0.01) were found. After cycloplegia, ACD and ACV significantly increased, while ACA significantly decreased. Changes in refraction, ACD, ACV, and ACA were significantly different among the three groups (P < 0.05, all). Changes of refraction were correlated with changes of ACD (r = 0.41, P < 0.01). Conclusions. Myopia presented thinner lenses and smaller changes of anterior segment and refraction after cycloplegia when compared to emmetropia and hyperopia. Changes of anterior chamber depth were correlated with refraction changes. This may contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between anterior segment and myopia.

  20. Five-year change in refraction and its ocular components in the 40- to 64-year-old population of the Shahroud eye cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Hassan; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Iribarren, Rafael; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2016-11-01

    To assess 5-year refractive changes and their related factors in the 40- to 64-year-old population of Shahroud, Iran. Prospective cohort study. Of the 5190 participants of Phase I, 4737 participated in Phase II (response rate = 91.3%). Participants were tested by refraction, visual acuity, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and biometry. Myopia was defined as a spherical equivalent more negative than -0.5 dioptre (D) and hyperopia as a spherical equivalent more positive than +0.5 D. Mean 5-year change in spherical equivalent refraction. The mean 5-year change in spherical equivalent refraction was +0.24 D (95% CI: +0.22 to +0.25). After 5 years, 4.77% (95% CI: 4.08 to 5.46) of subjects developed at least 0.5 D of myopia and 22.27% (95% CI: 20.97 to 23.57) developed at least 0.5 D of hyperopia. Five-year changes in refraction included a hyperopic shift in all age groups. The greatest hyperopic shift was seen in middle-aged women. The greatest loss of lens power was observed in hyperopic women and the least in myopic men. Nuclear cataract was associated with a myopic shift in refraction. The axial length and the corneal power had very small changes during this period. Myopes showed the greatest increase in axial length. Corneal power increased by a very small amount in all refractive groups. The most important biometric index related to hyperopic shifts, which were greater in magnitude in women, was loss of lens power, whereas nuclear cataract was associated with myopic shifts. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  1. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kawali, Ankush A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620) was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis). Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH) and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated “ocular thermographic” camera is today's need of the hour. PMID:24347863

  2. Coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from ocular wound infections after laser refractive surgery: attachment to and accumulation on soft contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Faghri, Jamshid; Razavi, Mohamad Reza

    2009-03-01

    Disposable soft contact lenses that are commonly used after laser refractive surgery are known to be colonized by bacteria and play a key role in Bacterial Keraitis (BK) pathogenesis. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have been found to be the most common pathogen involved in this postoperative infection. In this study a rapid and a simple assay was developed for studying attachment and accumulation of CoNS on soft contact lenses in vitro using [3H] thymidine. Thirty-five isolates of CoNS were obtained from 27 laser refractive surgery patients. Twenty-five of these thirty-five CoNS were isolated in multiple cultures. Ten CoNS were isolated in cultures from patients who underwent reoperation. The assay was optimized using a biofilm-producing strain, S. epidermidis RP62A, which was subcultured overnight at 37 degrees C on blood agar medium. Quantitative determination of biofilm production was tested. Presence of the genes icaADB and icaD was determined in all isolates. All isolates were biochemically analyzed using the Phene Plate (PhP) system modified for typing of CoNS. The CoNS isolates were further characterized to species level using ID32Staph.Mann-Whitney rank sum test and chi-square test were used to identify statistical differences in adherence, index, antibiotic susceptibility patterns, and biofilm production or presence of the ica operon between clinically significant isolates and non-postoperative BK isolates. No differences in attachment and accumulation were found between isolates causing BK after laser refractive surgery and contaminant isolates. In addition, there were no differences in the distribution of the ica operon between the two groups, as determined by polymerase chain reaction. Nevertheless, the ability to produce biofilm was found to be present significantly more frequently among BK isolates than among non-postoperative BK isolates. This study shows that the method using radioactive thymidine to analyze adherence of CoNS to soft

  3. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and lens of your eye helps you focus. Refractive errors are vision problems that happen when the shape ... cornea, or aging of the lens. Four common refractive errors are Myopia, or nearsightedness - clear vision close up ...

  4. Refractive keratoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, I.R. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the titles are: Perspectives on refractive surgery; Radial keratotomy; The refractive aspects of corneal transplantation; Wedge resection and relating incisions; Laser surgery of the cornea; and All plastic corneal lenses.

  5. Ocular Rosacea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staff Ocular rosacea is inflammation that causes redness, burning and itching of the eyes. It often develops ... symptoms of ocular rosacea may include: Dry eyes Burning or stinging in the eyes Itchy eyes Grittiness ...

  6. Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, Keith

    2000-01-01

    The concept of surgically altering the eye to correct refractive errors has been considered for hundreds of years, but only in the past 60 years has interest grown considerably due to the development of modern refractive surgery techniques such as astigmatic keratotomies to correct astigmatism induced by cataract surgery and future technologies currently being investigated. Modern refractive surgery is more involved than setting the correct parameters on the laser. Patient selection and examination, proper technique, and postoperative follow-up for potential complications are essential for a successful refractive procedure. Critical evaluation of new techniques is vital to avoid the pitfall of overly exuberant enthusiasm for new and unproven methods of refractive surgery. Kellum K. Refractive surgery. The Ochsner Journal 2000; 2:164-167. PMID:21765686

  7. Ocular disorder in children with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajesh Subhash; Somani, Abhishek Arun Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Ocular problems are common in mentally retarded children. Due to population growth these problems are increasing. Prevalence rate is variable from region to region. Data on ocular problems in mentally retarded school children is lacking in this region. The aim of the present study was to identify the ocular disorders in children with mental retardation attending special schools in a district and to study their relationship with the degree of retardation. A total of 241 mentally retarded school children in the age group of 6-16 years attending special schools for the mentally retarded children in a district in central India were examined by a team of ophthalmologist, psychiatrist, and a resident in ophthalmology department of a medical college. Complete ocular examination was done. Ocular problems were identified and categorized according to the intelligent quotient. One hundred and twenty four children (51.45%) had ocular problems. Strabismus (10.37%) and refractive error (20.75%) were the common ocular problems seen in this study. An association was found between the severity of mental retardation and ocular problems (P<0.005). However, no association was seen between the severity of mental retardation and strabismus and refractive error. A high prevalence of ocular problems was seen in mentally retarded school children. Children with mental retardation should undergo annual ophthalmological check up. Early detection and correction of ocular problems will prevent visual impairment in future.

  8. Atmospheric microwave refractivity and refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, E.; Hodge, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric refractivity can be expressed as a function of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, and operating frequency. Based on twenty-year meteorological data, statistics of the atmospheric refractivity were obtained. These statistics were used to estimate the variation of dispersion, attenuation, and refraction effects on microwave and millimeter wave signals propagating along atmospheric paths. Bending angle, elevation angle error, and range error were also developed for an exponentially tapered, spherical atmosphere.

  9. [Ocular allergies].

    PubMed

    Messmer, E M

    2005-05-01

    Recent developments indicate that ocular allergy is more than an IgE-mediated allergic conjunctivitis. Ocular allergy is a disease affecting the entire ocular surface including conjunctiva, lids, cornea, lacrimal gland and tear film. Besides an IgE-mediated reaction, a complex chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of many ocular allergies. According to their pathogenesis and clinical picture, ocular allergies are classified into mild forms, such as seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis as well as giant papillary conjunctivitis, and chronic, potentially blinding forms such as atopic keratoconjunctivitis and vernal keratoconjunctivitis. New therapeutics act on the entire inflammatory process or try to modulate the allergic reaction early and specifically. The association with non-ocular allergic symptoms requires an interdisciplinary approach.

  10. Crystalline lens and refractive development.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Rafael

    2015-07-01

    Individual refractive errors usually change along lifespan. Most children are hyperopic in early life. This hyperopia is usually lost during growth years, leading to emmetropia in adults, but myopia also develops in children during school years or during early adult life. Those subjects who remain emmetropic are prone to have hyperopic shifts in middle life. And even later, at older ages, myopic shifts are developed with nuclear cataract. The eye grows from 15 mm in premature newborns to approximately 24 mm in early adult years, but, in most cases, refractions are maintained stable in a clustered distribution. This growth in axial length would represent a refractive change of more than 40 diopters, which is compensated by changes in corneal and lens powers. The process which maintains the balance between the ocular components of refraction during growth is still under study. As the lens power cannot be measured in vivo, but can only be calculated based on the other ocular components, there have not been many studies of lens power in humans. Yet, recent studies have confirmed that the lens loses power during growth in children, and that hyperopic and myopic shifts in adulthood may be also produced by changes in the lens. These studies in children and adults give a picture of the changing power of the lens along lifespan. Other recent studies about the growth of the lens and the complexity of its internal structure give clues about how these changes in lens power are produced along life.

  11. Ocular Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasadhika, Sirichai; Rosenbaum, James T

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is one of the leading causes of inflammatory eye disease. Ocular sarcoidosis can involve any part of the eye and its adnexal tissues, and may cause uveitis, episcleritis/scleritis, eyelid abnormalities, conjunctival granuloma, optic neuropathy, lacrimal gland enlargement and orbital inflammation. Glaucoma and cataract can be complications from inflammation itself or adverse effects from therapy. Ophthalmic manifestations can be isolated, or associated with other organ involvement. Patients with ocular sarcoidosis can present with a wide range of clinical presentations and severity. Multi-disciplinary approaches are required to achieve the best treatment outcomes for both ocular and systemic manifestations. PMID:26593141

  12. Ocular toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, J Fernando; Espinoza, Juan V; Arevalo, Fernando A

    2013-01-01

    Ocular toxocariasis is an uncommon worldwide parasitic infection that affects mostly children and is found in both rural and metropolitan areas. In many parts of the world, parasitic infections of the eye are a major cause of blindness. The diagnosis of toxocariasis is essentially clinical, based on the lesion morphology and supportive laboratory data such as serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titers and ELISA Toxocara titers on aqueous humor; other diagnostic methods are imaging studies including optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, computed tomography, and ocular ultrasound. Treatment is directed at complications arising from intraocular inflammation and vitreous membrane traction. Early vitrectomy may be of value both diagnostically and therapeutically.

  13. Ocular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Bianca S

    2015-08-01

    Although not comprehensive of all ocular conditions in the equine species, this article concentrates on various ophthalmic conditions observed in the horse where laboratory diagnostics are recommended. The importance of laboratory diagnostic testing cannot be underestimated with equine ophthalmic disease. In many cases, laboratory diagnostics can aid in obtaining an early diagnosis and determining appropriate therapy, which in turn, can provide a better prognosis. In unfortunate cases where ocular disease results in a blind, painful eye necessitating enucleation, light microscopic evaluation is imperative to determine or confirm the cause of the blindness and provide a prognosis for the contralateral eye.

  14. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Used to detect eye problems in children through analysis of retinal reflexes, the system incorporates image processing techniques. VISISCREEN's photorefractor is basically a 35 millimeter camera with a telephoto lens and an electronic flash. By making a color photograph, the system can test the human eye for refractive error and obstruction in the cornea or lens. Ocular alignment problems are detected by imaging both eyes simultaneously. Electronic flash sends light into the eyes and the light is reflected from the retina back to the camera lens. Photorefractor analyzes the retinal reflexes generated by the subject's response to the flash and produces an image of the subject's eyes in which the pupils are variously colored. The nature of a defect, where such exists, is identifiable by atrained observer's visual examination.

  15. Photorefractor ocular screening system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John R. (Inventor); Kerr, Joseph H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting human eye defects, particularly detection of refractive error is presented. Eye reflex is recorded on color film when the eyes are exposed to a flash of light. The photographs are compared with predetermined standards to detect eye defects. The base structure of the ocular screening system is a folding interconnect structure, comprising hinged sections. Attached to one end of the structure is a head positioning station which comprises vertical support, a head positioning bracket having one end attached to the top of the support, and two head positioning lamps to verify precise head positioning. At the opposite end of the interconnect structure is a camera station with camera, electronic flash unit, and blinking fixation lamp, for photographing the eyes of persons being evaluated.

  16. Ocular phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, A D

    2013-02-01

    Phototherapy can be translated to mean 'light or radiant energy-induced treatment.' Lasers have become the exclusive source of light or radiant energy for all applications of phototherapy. Depending on the wavelength, intensity, and duration of exposure, tissues can either absorb the energy (photocoagulation, thermotherapy, and photodynamic therapy (PDT)) or undergo ionization (photodisruption). For phototherapy to be effective, the energy has to be absorbed by tissues or more specifically by naturally occurring pigment (xanthophyll, haemoglobin, and melanin) within them. In tissues or tumours that lack natural pigment, dyes (verteporphin, Visudyne) with narrow absorption spectrum can be injected intravenously that act as focal absorbent of laser energy after they have preferentially localized within the tumour. Ocular phototherapy has broad applications in treatment of ocular tumours. Laser photocoagulation, thermotherapy, and PDT can be delivered with low rates of complications and with ease in the outpatient setting. Review of the current literature suggests excellent results when these treatments are applied for benign tumours, particularly for vascular tumours such as circumscribed choroidal haemangioma. For primary malignant tumours, such as choroidal melanoma, thermotherapy, and PDT do not offer local tumour control rates that are equivalent or higher than those achieved with plaque or proton radiation therapy. However, for secondary malignant tumours (choroidal metastases), thermotherapy and PDT can be applied as a palliative treatment. Greater experience is necessary to fully comprehend risks, comparative benefits, and complication of ocular phototherapy of ocular tumours.

  17. Refractive Surgery in Systemic and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    AlKharashi, Majed; Bower, Kraig S.; Stark, Walter J.; Daoud, Yassine J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with underlying systemic disease represent challenging treatment dilemma to the refractive surgeon. The refractive error in this patient population is accompanied by a systemic disease that may have an ocular or even a corneal component. The literature is rather sparse about the use of laser refractive surgery (LRS) and such procedure is not approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in this patient population. Patients with collagen vascular disease, diabetes mellitus (DM), allergic and atopic disease, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are never ideal for LRS. Patients with uncontrolled systemic disease or ocular involvement of the disease should not undergo LRS. However, a patient with well-controlled and mild disease, no ocular involvement, and not on multidrug regimen may be a suitable candidate if they meet stringent criteria. There is a need for a large, multicenter, controlled trial to address the safety and efficacy of LRS in patients with systemic disease before such technology can be widely adopted by the refractive surgery community. PMID:24669141

  18. Ocular metastases

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, V M L

    2013-01-01

    The eye is a rare site for disseminated malignancy because of the absence of a lymphatic system. Metastases to the ocular structures occur by haematogenous spread and therefore the parts of the eye with the best vascular supply are most likely to be affected. Many patients with Stage 4 carcinomatosis (distal metastatic spread) already have a history of a previous primary cancer. However, this is not always the case for lung cancer as this can metastasise early to the uveal tract and therefore the ophthalmologist may be the first to discover the presence of terminal metastatic disease. Broadly speaking, treatment options are focused on improving the patients' quality of life if visual acuity is threatened. Long-term side effects of treatment need to be considered as systemic cancer treatments and therefore patient life expectancy is improving. In this manuscript, presented at the Cambridge symposium 2012, the diagnosis and challenges involved in the management of ocular metastases are presented. PMID:23222564

  19. Ocular onchocerciasis

    PubMed Central

    Thylefors, B.

    1978-01-01

    Well over 20 million people in the world are infected with Onchocerca volvulus and it is probable that 200 000-500 000 people are blind as a result of this infection, which is the most important cause of blindness in certain areas of Africa and Latin America. Treatment of the disease is difficult and often produces serious adverse reactions in the patient. Combined use of diethylcarbamazine citrate and suramin is still the most suitable form of treatment. Screening for the early detection of cases at high risk of ocular manifestations must be organized, and their treatment undertaken, if blindness is to be avoided. Prevention of ocular onchocerciasis is feasible, using vector control methods to reduce transmission, but the procedures are costly and may have to be maintained for many years. Research is needed to improve treatment and to find a chemoprophylactic agent or a preventive vaccine. PMID:307448

  20. Correlation of major components of ocular astigmatism in myopic patients.

    PubMed

    Mohammadpour, Mehrdad; Heidari, Zahra; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Amouzegar, Afsaneh; Hashemi, Hassan

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the correlation of major components of ocular astigmatism in myopic patients in an academic hospital. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 376 eyes of 188 patients who were referred to Farabi Eye Hospital for refractive surgery. Preoperative examinations including refraction and corneal topography were performed for all candidates to measure refractive and corneal astigmatism. Ocular residual astigmatism was calculated using vector analysis. Pearson's correlation and ANOVA analysis were used to evaluate the strength of the association between different types of astigmatism. Both eyes were defined as cluster and the Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) analysis were performed. Mean age of 119 women (63.3%) and 69 men (36.7%) was 27.8 ± 5.7 years. Mean refractive error based on spherical equivalent was -3.59 ± 1.95D (range, -0.54 to -10.22D). Mean refractive and corneal astigmatism was 1.97 ± 1.3D and 1.85 ± 1.01D, respectively. Mean amount of ORA was 0.65 ± 0.36D.There was a significant correlation between ORA and refractive astigmatism(r=0.23, p<0.001), corneal and refractive astigmatism (r=0.91, p<0.001) and a weak correlation between ORA and corneal astigmatism (r=0.13, p=0.014). There was a significant correlation between J0 and J45 values of ORA and corneal astigmatism (p<0.001). There is a significant correlation between ORA and refractive astigmatism, refractive and corneal astigmatism and a weak correlation between ORA and corneal astigmatism in refractive surgery candidates. Identifying the type of astigmatism and preoperative measurement of ocular residual astigmatism is highly recommended prior to any refractive surgery, especially in cases with significant astigmatism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of Ocular Anomalies among Schoolchildren in Ashaiman, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Nartey, Emmanuel T; van Staden, Diane B; Amedo, Angel O

    2016-06-01

    Information on ocular anomalies can help in developing specific interventions to prevent visual impairment especially among children. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the prevalence, the causes of ocular anomalies, and their impact on vision of schoolchildren in Ghana. A cluster random sampling technique was used to select four government primary schools in Ashaiman Municipal for this study. Each pupil underwent ocular examination involving visual acuity, external examination, anterior and posterior segment examination, and objective and subjective refraction. They also answered questions relating to ocular problems affecting them. A total of 811 pupils were sampled, with ages ranging from 6 to 16 years. The mean age of the sampled population was 10.6 years (95% confidence interval, 10.4 to 10.8). Prevalence of ocular anomalies was 27.3% (95% confidence interval, 24.2 to 30.5). Allergic conjunctivitis (17.3%) and refractive errors (6.8%) were the main causes of ocular anomalies. Others include pinguecula (1.2%), pterygia (0.9%), infectious conjunctivitis (0.3%), corneal opacity (0.1%), lens opacity (0.1%), and retinal degeneration (0.1%). Ocular anomalies and refractive errors were significantly associated with sex (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively). Presenting visual acuity in the better eye 20/40 or worse was identified in 5.3% of schoolchildren, and 0.5% had moderate visual impairment. Only 11.8% of schoolchildren with ocular anomalies had been treated for their ocular problems before the study. The prevalence and causes of ocular anomalies found in this study suggest a need for more targeted eye health interventions such as school eye screening for early diagnosis and treatment of any presenting conditions among schoolchildren.

  2. The heritability of ocular traits.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Paul G; Hewitt, Alex W; Hammond, Chris J; Mackey, David A

    2010-01-01

    Heritability is the proportion of phenotypic variation in a population that is attributable to genetic variation among individuals. Many ophthalmic disorders and biometric traits are known to have a genetic basis and consequently much work has been published in the literature estimating the heritability of various ocular parameters. We collated and summarized the findings of heritability studies conducted in the field of ophthalmology. We grouped the various studies broadly by phenotype as follows: refraction, primary open-angle glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, diabetic retinopathy, and others. A total of 82 articles were retrieved from the literature relating to estimation of heritability for an ocular disease or biometric trait; of these, 37 papers were concerned with glaucoma, 28 with refraction, 4 with AMD, 5 with diabetic retinopathy, and 4 with cataract. The highest reported heritability for an ophthalmic trait is 0.99 for the phenotype ≥ 20 small hard drusen, indicating that observed variation in this parameter is largely governed by genetic factors. Over 60% of the studies employed a twin study design and a similar percentage utilized variance components methods and structural equation modeling (SEM) to derive their heritability values. Using modern SEM techniques, heritability estimates derived from twin subjects were generally higher than those from family data. Many of the estimates are in the moderate to high range, but to date the majority of genetic variants accounting for these findings have not been uncovered, hence much work remains to be undertaken to elucidate fully their molecular etiology.

  3. Ocular morbidity among primary school children of Dhulikhel, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Sherpa, D; Panta, C R; Joshi, N

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of disease pattern in children can help design preventive and curative strategies. To study the pattern of ocular morbidity among the primary school children. All the children of randomly-selected five government primary schools of Dhulikhel were included in this study. A complete eye examination was done in all children including color vision, loupe examination, refraction and Schiotz tonometry. Funduscopy and automated perimetry were done in selected children. A total of 466 primary school children were included in the study, of which 466 children 47 (10.08 %) had ocular morbidity. Refractive error was the commonest type of ocular morbidity in 11 (2.36 %). Hypermetropia was the commonest type of refractive error (0.84 %) in contrast to myopia (0.64 %). Conjunctivitis was the second common type of ocular morbidity (1.71 %). Glaucoma suspects accounted for 1.28 %, xexophthalmia 1.07 %, blephatitis 0.85 %, amblyopia 0.43 %, color blindness 0.43 %, conjunctival nevus 0.43 %, glaucoma 0.43 %, and strabismus 0.43 %, while congenital abnormalities were less common. Refractive error is the commonest form of ocular morbidity in primary school children. © NEPjOPH.

  4. Developments in Ocular Genetics: 2013 Annual Review

    PubMed Central

    Aboobakar, Inas F.; Allingham, R. Rand

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To highlight major advancements in ocular genetics from the year 2013. Design Literature review. Methods A literature search was conducted on PubMed to identify articles pertaining to genetic influences on human eye diseases. This review focuses on manuscripts published in print or online in the English language between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013. A total of 120 papers from 2013 were included in this review. Results Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the genetic basis of a broad group of ocular disorders, including glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, keratoconus, Fuchs’ endothelial dystrophy, and refractive error. Conclusions The latest next-generation sequencing technologies have become extremely effective tools for identifying gene mutations associated with ocular disease. These technological advancements have also paved the way for utilization of genetic information in clinical practice, including disease diagnosis, prediction of treatment response and molecular interventions guided by gene-based knowledge. PMID:25097799

  5. Nature of the Refractive Errors in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Experimentally Induced Ametropias

    PubMed Central

    Qiao-Grider, Ying; Hung, Li-Fang; Kee, Chea-su; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Smith, Earl L.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the contribution of individual ocular components to vision-induced ametropias in 210 rhesus monkeys. The primary contribution to refractive-error development came from vitreous chamber depth; a minor contribution from corneal power was also detected. However, there was no systematic relationship between refractive error and anterior chamber depth or between refractive error and any crystalline lens parameter. Our results are in good agreement with previous studies in humans, suggesting that the refractive errors commonly observed in humans are created by vision-dependent mechanisms that are similar to those operating in monkeys. This concordance emphasizes the applicability of rhesus monkeys in refractive-error studies. PMID:20600237

  6. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects mild-to-moderate nearsightedness, ...

  7. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  8. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  9. Refractive error blindness.

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, R.; Dandona, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent data suggest that a large number of people are blind in different parts of the world due to high refractive error because they are not using appropriate refractive correction. Refractive error as a cause of blindness has been recognized only recently with the increasing use of presenting visual acuity for defining blindness. In addition to blindness due to naturally occurring high refractive error, inadequate refractive correction of aphakia after cataract surgery is also a significant cause of blindness in developing countries. Blindness due to refractive error in any population suggests that eye care services in general in that population are inadequate since treatment of refractive error is perhaps the simplest and most effective form of eye care. Strategies such as vision screening programmes need to be implemented on a large scale to detect individuals suffering from refractive error blindness. Sufficient numbers of personnel to perform reasonable quality refraction need to be trained in developing countries. Also adequate infrastructure has to be developed in underserved areas of the world to facilitate the logistics of providing affordable reasonable-quality spectacles to individuals suffering from refractive error blindness. Long-term success in reducing refractive error blindness worldwide will require attention to these issues within the context of comprehensive approaches to reduce all causes of avoidable blindness. PMID:11285669

  10. Unbiased Estimation of Refractive State of Aberrated Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jesson; Vasudevan, Balamurali; Himebaugh, Nikole; Bradley, Arthur; Thibos, Larry

    2011-01-01

    To identify unbiased methods for estimating the target vergence required to maximize visual acuity based on wavefront aberration measurements. Experiments were designed to minimize the impact of confounding factors that have hampered previous research. Objective wavefront refractions and subjective acuity refractions were obtained for the same monochromatic wavelength. Accommodation and pupil fluctuations were eliminated by cycloplegia. Unbiased subjective refractions that maximize visual acuity for high contrast letters were performed with a computer controlled forced choice staircase procedure, using 0.125 diopter steps of defocus. All experiments were performed for two pupil diameters (3mm and 6mm). As reported in the literature, subjective refractive error does not change appreciably when the pupil dilates. For 3 mm pupils most metrics yielded objective refractions that were about 0.1D more hyperopic than subjective acuity refractions. When pupil diameter increased to 6 mm, this bias changed in the myopic direction and the variability between metrics also increased. These inaccuracies were small compared to the precision of the measurements, which implies that most metrics provided unbiased estimates of refractive state for medium and large pupils. A variety of image quality metrics may be used to determine ocular refractive state for monochromatic (635nm) light, thereby achieving accurate results without the need for empirical correction factors. PMID:21777601

  11. Refractive properties of the healthy human eye during acute hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Nanouk G M; Eekhoff, Elisabeth M W; Simsek, Suat; Heine, Robert J; Ringens, Peter J; Polak, Bettine C P; Dubbelman, Michiel

    2008-07-01

    To measure the refractive properties of the healthy human eye during acute hyperglycemia by means of Scheimpflug imaging and Hartmann-Shack aberrometry. Acute hyperglycemia was induced in five healthy subjects (two males, three females, mean age +/-SD 24.8 years +/- 4.6) by means of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after subcutaneous somatostatin injection. Before and every 30 minutes after the OGTT, measurements with Scheimpflug imaging and Hartmann-Shack aberrometry were performed. The main outcome measures were the thickness and shape of the lens, and the ocular refractive error and higher order aberrations. The equivalent refractive index of the lens was calculated from these parameters. Measurements at baseline and during hyperglycemia were analyzed by means of Wilcoxon signed rank sum tests. During hyperglycemia (mean blood glucose level at baseline: 4.0 mmol/l; mean maximal blood glucose level: 18.4 mmol/l) no changes could be found in the refractive properties within the group. In one subject, a hyperopic shift (0.4 D) was observed, together with a more convex shape of the anterior lens surface and a decrease in the equivalent refractive index of the lens. This study shows that hyperglycemia generally does not cause changes in the refractive properties of the healthy eye. Nevertheless, in one subject a hyperopic shift accompanied by a change in shape and refractive index of the lens was measured. This finding could provide an explanation for the mechanism underlying the refractive changes that are often observed during hyperglycemia.

  12. Monochromatic ocular wave aberrations in young monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Kee, Chea-su; Hung, Li-Fang; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Roorda, Austin; Smith, Earl L.

    2006-01-01

    High-order monochromatic aberrations could potentially influence vision-dependent refractive development in a variety of ways. As a first step in understanding the effects of wave aberration on refractive development, we characterized the maturational changes that take place in the high-order aberrations of infant rhesus monkey eyes. Specifically, we compared the monochromatic wave aberrations of infant and adolescent animals and measured the longitudinal changes in the high-order aberrations of infant monkeys during the early period when emmetropization takes place. Our main findings were that (1) adolescent monkey eyes have excellent optical quality, exhibiting total RMS errors that were slightly better than those for adult human eyes that have the same numerical aperture and (2) shortly after birth, infant rhesus monkeys exhibited relatively larger magnitudes of high-order aberrations predominately spherical aberration, coma, and trefoil, which decreased rapidly to assume adolescent values by about 200 days of age. The results demonstrate that rhesus monkey eyes are a good model for studying the contribution of individual ocular components to the eye’s overall aberration structure, the mechanisms responsible for the improvements in optical quality that occur during early ocular development, and the effects of high-order aberrations on ocular growth and emmetropization. PMID:16750549

  13. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  14. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  15. Littoral Refractivity Prognostic Advancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    refractivity profiles to the surface at each COAMPS® grid point. Compared COAMPS® . / AREPS modeled propagation to measured propagation from Wallops...Test Range, and Wallops Island, VA. COAMPS® refractivity fields combined with AREPS radar performance models will be used in an FY11-13 program to

  16. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  17. Ocular disease and driving.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alex A

    2016-09-01

    As the driving population ages, the number of drivers with visual impairment resulting from ocular disease will increase given the age-related prevalence of ocular disease. The increase in visual impairment in the driving population has a number of implications for driving outcomes. This review summarises current research regarding the impact of common ocular diseases on driving ability and safety, with particular focus on cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, hemianopia and diabetic retinopathy. The evidence considered includes self-reported driving outcomes, driving performance (on-road and simulator-based) and various motor vehicle crash indices. Collectively, this review demonstrates that driving ability and safety are negatively affected by ocular disease; however, further research is needed in this area. Older drivers with ocular disease need to be aware of the negative consequences of their ocular condition and in the case where treatment options are available, encouraged to seek these earlier for optimum driving safety and quality of life benefits.

  18. Heritability of myopic refractive errors in identical and fraternal twins.

    PubMed

    Angi, M R; Clementi, M; Sardei, C; Piattelli, E; Bisantis, C

    1993-10-01

    The existence of a visual feedback control of eye growth in humans is controversial, as the contributions of genetic and environmental factors are still unknown. To evaluate the heritability of refractive defects, we measured ocular refraction in 19 monozygote and 20 dizygote twin pairs (mean age 5 years). Monozygosity was ascertained by a common chorion, similarity of somatic traits, and identical dermatogliphes and was confirmed in myopes by blood marker diagnosis. Ocular refractive defects and axial length were evaluated by cycloplegic autorefractometry and biometry. By comparing identical and fraternal twins heritability of refractive defects was estimated to be 0.08-0.14; this low value indicates that the observed variability in refractive errors is nongenetic in origin. Three monozygote pairs were anisomyopic; differences between eyes in identical twins were related to the increased axial length of myopic eyes. In one eye, myopia was attributed to visual deprivation induced by a congenital cataract, while in five eyes it was correlated directly to the degree of astigmatic defects. The discordant axial length observed in monozygote twins is nongenetic. In agreement with previous findings reported in the literature, it is proposed that visual impoverishment of retinal images may play an early regulatory role in postnatal eye growth.

  19. Ocular Surface as Barrier of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Navas, Alejandro; López-Lizárraga, Erika Paulina; de Ribot, Francesc March; Peña, Alexandra; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O; Garfias, Yonathan

    2015-01-01

    Sight is one of the most important senses that human beings possess. The ocular system is a complex structure equipped with mechanisms that prevent or limit damage caused by physical, chemical, infectious and environmental factors. These mechanisms include a series of anatomical, cellular and humoral factors that have been a matter of study. The cornea is not only the most powerful and important lens of the optical system, but also, it has been involved in many other physiological and pathological processes apart from its refractive nature; the morphological and histological properties of the cornea have been thoroughly studied for the last fifty years; drawing attention in its molecular characteristics of immune response. This paper will review the anatomical and physiological aspects of the cornea, conjunctiva and lacrimal apparatus, as well as the innate immunity at the ocular surface. PMID:26161163

  20. Ocular Surface as Barrier of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Navas, Alejandro; López-Lizárraga, Erika Paulina; de Ribot, Francesc March; Peña, Alexandra; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O; Garfias, Yonathan

    2015-01-01

    Sight is one of the most important senses that human beings possess. The ocular system is a complex structure equipped with mechanisms that prevent or limit damage caused by physical, chemical, infectious and environmental factors. These mechanisms include a series of anatomical, cellular and humoral factors that have been a matter of study. The cornea is not only the most powerful and important lens of the optical system, but also, it has been involved in many other physiological and pathological processes apart from its refractive nature; the morphological and histological properties of the cornea have been thoroughly studied for the last fifty years; drawing attention in its molecular characteristics of immune response. This paper will review the anatomical and physiological aspects of the cornea, conjunctiva and lacrimal apparatus, as well as the innate immunity at the ocular surface.

  1. Ocular complications in children with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Geloneck, Megan M.; Forbes, Brian J.; Shaffer, James; Ying, Gui-shuang; Binenbaum, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Objective The effectiveness of annual diabetic eye exams in children is unclear. We sought to determine the prevalence and onset of ocular pathology in children with diabetes mellitus (DM), identify risk factors for ocular disease, and recommend a screening regimen for asymptomatic children. Design Retrospective consecutive cohort study. Subjects Children less than age 18 years with type 1 or 2 DM examined over a 4 year period. Methods All children underwent a complete eye exam, including dilated fundoscopy and cycloplegic refraction. A literature review was performed, identifying the youngest reported age and shortest reported duration of DM prior to the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. Main outcome measures Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, cataract, high refractive error, and strabismus. Results 370 children (mean age 11.2 years, range 1–17.5) had 693 examinations, with mean DM duration 5.2 years (range 0.1–16.2), mean HbA1c 8.6 (range 5 to ≥14). No children had diabetic retinopathy. 12 had cataract; 5 required extraction but were identified by decreased vision, not diabetic screening. 19 had strabismus; only one was microvascular paralytic strabismus. 41 had high refractive error. There were no associations between these conditions and duration or control of DM. In the literature, the youngest age at diagnosis of severe diabetic retinopathy was 15 years and the shortest duration of disease was 5 years. Conclusion Diabetic retinopathy is rare in children regardless of duration and control of DM. Based upon our study and literature review, screening examinations for type 1 diabetics could begin at age 15 years or at 5 years after the diagnosis of DM, whichever occurs later, unless the child is judged by the endocrinologist as being at unusally high risk. Other ocular complications are identifiable through existing amblyopia screening methods. PMID:26341461

  2. Cluster bomb ocular injuries.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Hamade, Haya; Ghaddar, Ayman; Mokadem, Ahmad Samih; El Hajj Ali, Mohamad; Awwad, Shady

    2012-01-01

    To present the visual outcomes and ocular sequelae of victims of cluster bombs. This retrospective, multicenter case series of ocular injury due to cluster bombs was conducted for 3 years after the war in South Lebanon (July 2006). Data were gathered from the reports to the Information Management System for Mine Action. There were 308 victims of clusters bombs; 36 individuals were killed, of which 2 received ocular lacerations and; 272 individuals were injured with 18 receiving ocular injury. These 18 surviving individuals were assessed by the authors. Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% (20/308) of cluster bomb victims. Trauma to multiple organs occurred in 12 of 18 cases (67%) with ocular injury. Ocular findings included corneal or scleral lacerations (16 eyes), corneal foreign bodies (9 eyes), corneal decompensation (2 eyes), ruptured cataract (6 eyes), and intravitreal foreign bodies (10 eyes). The corneas of one patient had extreme attenuation of the endothelium. Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% of cluster bomb victims and 67% of the patients with ocular injury sustained trauma to multiple organs. Visual morbidity in civilians is an additional reason for a global ban on the use of cluster bombs.

  3. Cluster Bomb Ocular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Hamade, Haya; Ghaddar, Ayman; Mokadem, Ahmad Samih; El Hajj Ali, Mohamad; Awwad, Shady

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present the visual outcomes and ocular sequelae of victims of cluster bombs. Materials and Methods: This retrospective, multicenter case series of ocular injury due to cluster bombs was conducted for 3 years after the war in South Lebanon (July 2006). Data were gathered from the reports to the Information Management System for Mine Action. Results: There were 308 victims of clusters bombs; 36 individuals were killed, of which 2 received ocular lacerations and; 272 individuals were injured with 18 receiving ocular injury. These 18 surviving individuals were assessed by the authors. Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% (20/308) of cluster bomb victims. Trauma to multiple organs occurred in 12 of 18 cases (67%) with ocular injury. Ocular findings included corneal or scleral lacerations (16 eyes), corneal foreign bodies (9 eyes), corneal decompensation (2 eyes), ruptured cataract (6 eyes), and intravitreal foreign bodies (10 eyes). The corneas of one patient had extreme attenuation of the endothelium. Conclusions: Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% of cluster bomb victims and 67% of the patients with ocular injury sustained trauma to multiple organs. Visual morbidity in civilians is an additional reason for a global ban on the use of cluster bombs. PMID:22346132

  4. Ocular health assessment of cocoa farmers in a rural community in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Hansraj, Rekha; Kumi-Kyereme, Akwasi; Mashige, Khathutshelo Percy; Awusabo-Asare, Kofi; Ocansey, Stephen; Kyei, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Cocoa farming provides employment for over 800,000 households in rural Ghana, with the country currently touted as the second largest producer of cocoa worldwide. Agriculture is one of the riskiest occupations for the eyes due to the numerous ocular hazards on farms. The authors conducted an ocular health assessment among cocoa farmers at Mfuom, a rural community in the Central Region of Ghana, to examine the ocular health status and the ocular safety measures used by cocoa farmers. A structured questionnaire was used to evaluate demographic characteristics, ocular injuries, and utilization of eye care services and ocular protection, and a clinical examination was used to evaluate their ocular status. Cocoa farmers were at high risk for ocular injuries and farm-related vision disorders and utilized eye care services and ocular protection poorly. Ocular condition identified were mainly refractive error (28.6%), cataract (20.0%), glaucoma (11.7%), conjunctivitis (13%), pterygium (2.7%), and cornea opacity (2.2%). There is a need for the introduction of an interventional eye care program to help address the ocular health challenges identified among the farmers. This can be done through collaborative efforts by educational institutions, government, and other role players in the agricultural industry to improve the quality of life of the vulnerable cocoa farmers in rural Ghana.

  5. Ocular Disorders in Turkish Children with Sensorineural Hearıng Loss: A Cross-Sectional Study and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Pinar Altiaylik; Kabatas, Emrah Utku; Ertugrul, Gokce Tasdemir; Kurtul, Bengi Ece; Kaygusuz, Umut; Ozgursoy, Selmin Karatayli

    2016-09-14

    To investigate types and frequencies of ocular disorders in children with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and to emphasize the importance of ophthalmological examination in these children. A retrospective analysis of the examination records of children examined in our instutititon between January 2011 and September 2014 was performed. Ocular disorders of children with SHNL were selectively reviewed. Among 55340 patients, SNHL was present in 110 (0.2%). SNHL was bilateral in 104 patients (94.5%) and unilateral in 6 (5.5%). Ninety-one cases had congenital hearing loss (83%), and 19 (17%) had acquired SNHL. Forty cases (36%) had an ocular disorder, either refractive or non-refractive or both. Seventy cases (64%) had normal ocular examination. No difference was found between congenital or acquired SNHL cases in terms of possessing an ocular disorder (p=0.0962). The most common ocular abnormality was refractive error, mainly hypermetropia (21%). There was no significant difference between the prevalences of ocular abnormalities among cases with different lateralites or severities of SNHL (p=0.051, p=0.874, respectively). Twenty-six cases (23.6%) had SNHL as a component of a genetically defined syndrome. All of them had coexisting refractive or non-refractive ocular abnormalities. Some genetic, non-syndromic abnormalities, including Achondroplasia, Celiac disease, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, were diagnosed in four cases, among whom refractive errors and/or strabismus were detected. Due to the common coexistence of ocular problems and SNHL in children, ophthalmological screening is crucial. Families and healthcare providers should be informed about the critical role of ophthalmic assesment in these children for their future quality of life.

  6. Uncorrected refractive errors

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  7. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  8. Refractive errors and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Asaf; Vishne, Tali; Reichenberg, Abraham; Weiser, Mark; Dishon, Ayelet; Lubin, Gadi; Shmushkevitz, Motti; Mandel, Yossi; Noy, Shlomo; Davidson, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia and amblyopia), like schizophrenia, have a strong genetic cause, and dopamine has been proposed as a potential mediator in their pathophysiology. The present study explored the association between refractive errors in adolescence and schizophrenia, and the potential familiality of this association. The Israeli Draft Board carries a mandatory standardized visual accuracy assessment. 678,674 males consecutively assessed by the Draft Board and found to be psychiatrically healthy at age 17 were followed for psychiatric hospitalization with schizophrenia using the Israeli National Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry. Sib-ships were also identified within the cohort. There was a negative association between refractive errors and later hospitalization for schizophrenia. Future male schizophrenia patients were two times less likely to have refractive errors compared with never-hospitalized individuals, controlling for intelligence, years of education and socioeconomic status [adjusted Hazard Ratio=.55; 95% confidence interval .35-.85]. The non-schizophrenic male siblings of schizophrenia patients also had lower prevalence of refractive errors compared to never-hospitalized individuals. Presence of refractive errors in adolescence is related to lower risk for schizophrenia. The familiality of this association suggests that refractive errors may be associated with the genetic liability to schizophrenia.

  9. Refractive Surgery Survey 2004.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Helga P; de Castro, Luis E Fernández; Vroman, David T; Solomon, Kerry D

    2005-01-01

    To determine the refractive surgery (RS) preferences of ophthalmologists worldwide, questionnaires were sent to 8897 members of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. A total of 1053 questionnaires were returned by the deadline. The practice distribution included 29.5% cataract surgeons, 48.8% comprehensive ophthalmologists, 11.6% RS specialists, 5.1% cornea and external disease specialists, 1.9% glaucoma specialists, 1.1% retina specialists, and <1.0% oculoplastics/pediatrics/researchers/retired. Results were compared with those in the 2003 survey and demonstrate that refractive surgery continues to develop and change.

  10. Diagnosis of Ocular Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ang, Marcus; Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel V; Sharma, Kusum; Accorinti, Massimo; Sharma, Aman; Gupta, Amod; Rao, Narsing A; Chee, Soon-Phaik

    2016-07-05

    Ocular tuberculosis remains a presumptive clinical diagnosis, as the gold standard tests for diagnosing ocular tuberculosis are often not useful: Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures require weeks to process on Lowenstein-Jenson media and have low yield from ocular samples; while acid-fast bacilli smears or polymerase chain reaction detection of M. tuberculosis DNA have low sensitivities. Thus, diagnosis is often based on suggestive clinical signs, which are supported by positive investigations: tuberculin skin test or interferon-gamma release assays; chest X-ray findings suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis, and/or evidence of associated systemic tuberculosis infections in the absence of other underlying disease. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the methods of diagnosing ocular tuberculosis, and discuss the challenges of its diagnosis. We also suggest a step-ladder approach to a more accurate diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis by combining the available diagnostic tests.

  11. Influence of Vision on Ocular Comfort Ratings.

    PubMed

    Rao, Subam Basuthkar Sundar; Simpson, Trefford L

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of blur on ocular comfort while systematically manipulating vision using habitual refractive correction, induced spatial blur, dioptric defocus, and under the absence of visual structure. Twenty emmetropic subjects rated vision, ocular comfort, and other sensations (burning, itching, and warmth) under clear viewing condition, spatial blur, and dioptric defocus, each lasting for 5 min. During each condition, subjects viewed digital targets projected from a distance of 3 m, and vision and ocular sensations were rated using magnitude estimation. Dioptric defocus was induced using +6.00DS contact lens, and equivalent spatial blur was produced by spatially filtering the targets. In a separate study, 15 participants rated vision and comfort while viewing a ganzfeld and behind an occluding patch (each of which provided an absence of visual structure) in addition to the above experimental conditions. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare the ratings of vision and comfort under the different experimental conditions. Vision under blurred conditions (both spatial blur and dioptric defocus) was rated significantly different (p < 0.001) from clear viewing condition. Vision was significantly different when targets were dioptrically defocused than when they were spatially blurred (p < 0.001). Ratings of comfort showed significant differences between clear and blurred conditions (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in comfort ratings between dioptric defocus and spatial blur (p value at least 0.28). There were also no differences in comfort (p value at least 0.99) between clear vision, ganzfeld viewing, and occlusion despite the lack of visual structure in the latter two conditions. There does seem to be an association between clarity of vision and ocular comfort. Although the pathways for ocular surface pain and vision are perhaps exclusive, complex psychological influences such as nocebo or Hawthorne effects can

  12. Eye laterality: a comprehensive analysis in refractive surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Linke, Stephan J; Druchkiv, Vasyl; Steinberg, Johannes; Richard, Gisbert; Katz, Toam

    2013-08-01

    To explore eye laterality (higher refractive error in one eye) and its association with refractive state, spherical/astigmatic anisometropia, age and sex in refractive surgery candidates. Medical records of 12 493 consecutive refractive surgery candidates were filtered. Refractive error (subjective and cycloplegic) was measured in each subject and correlated with eye laterality. Only subjects with corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) of >20/22 in each eye were enrolled to exclude amblyopia. Associations between eye laterality and refractive state were analysed by means of t-test, chi-squared test, Spearman's correlation and multivariate logistic regression analysis, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in spherical equivalent between right (-3.47 ± 2.76 D) and left eyes (-3.47 ± 2.76 D, p = 0.510; Pearson's r = 0.948, p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis revealed (I) right eye laterality for anisometropia >2.5 D in myopic (-5.64 ± 2.5 D versus -4.92 ± 2.6 D; p = 0.001) and in hyperopic (4.44 ± 1.69 D versus 3.04 ± 1.79 D; p = 0.025) subjects, (II) a tendency for left eye cylindrical laterality in myopic subjects, and (III) myopic male subjects had a higher prevalence of left eye laterality. (IV) Age did not show any significant impact on laterality. Over the full refractive spectrum, this study confirmed previously described strong interocular refractive correlation but revealed a statistically significant higher rate of right eye laterality for anisometropia >2.5 D. In general, our results support the use of data from one eye only in studies of ocular refraction. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  13. Ocular Emergencies: Red Eye.

    PubMed

    Tarff, Andreina; Behrens, Ashley

    2017-05-01

    "Red eye" is used as a general term to describe irritated or bloodshot eyes. It is a recognizable sign of an acute/chronic, localized/systemic underlying inflammatory condition. Conjunctival injection is most commonly caused by dryness, allergy, visual fatigue, contact lens overwear, and local infections. In some instances, red eye can represent a true ocular emergency that should be treated by an ophthalmologist. A comprehensive assessment of red eye conditions is required to preserve the patients visual function. Severe ocular pain, significant photophobia, decreased vision, and history of ocular trauma are warning signs demanding immediate ophthalmological consultation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ocular morbidity among children attending government and private schools of Kathmandu valley.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, R K; Joshi, M R; Ghising, R; Rizyal, A

    2011-01-01

    Children from the developing world are more prone to going blind from avoidable and preventable causes. In Nepal, children in private schools are reported to have a higher ocular morbidity than those in government schools, with myopia being the major cause of the morbidity. This study was designed to evaluate ocular morbidity in students from both types of school. This was a cross-sectional, comparative study among students from government and private schools of Kathmandu. Eye examination was carried out evaluating visual acuity, color vision, refractive status, binocular vision status, and anterior and posterior segment findings. A total of 4,228 students from government and private schools were evaluated. The prevalence of ocular morbidity was 19.56 % with refractive error (11.9 %) being the major cause of the morbidity, followed by strabismus and infective disorders. No significant difference in the prevalence of ocular morbidity and refractive status was found in the students from government and private schools. A significant number of children of school-going age have ocular morbidity with no significant difference in the prevalence in the students from government and private schools. Research exploring the effect of various risk factors in the progression of myopia would be helpful to investigate the refractive status in children from these different types of schools.

  15. Study of ocular aberrations with age.

    PubMed

    Athaide, Helaine Vinche Zampar; Campos, Mauro; Costa, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Aging has various effects on visual system. Vision deteriorate, contrast sensitivity decreases and ocular aberrations apparently make the optical quality worse across the years. To prospective evaluate ocular aberrations along the ages. Three hundred and fifteen patients were examined, 155 were male (39.36%) and 160 were female (60.63%). Ages ranged from 5 to 64 year-old, the study was performed from February to November, 2004. Patients were divided into 4 age-groups according to IBGE (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística) classification: 68 patients from 5 to 14 year-old, 55 patients from 15 to 24 year-old, 116 from 25 to 44 year-old and 76 from 45 to 67 year-old. All patients had the following characteristics: best corrected visual acuity > 20/25, emmetropia or spherical equivalent < 3.50 SD, refractive astigmatism < 1.75 CD on cycloplegic refraction, normal ophthalmologic exam and no previous ocular surgeries. This protocol was approved by Federal University of São Paulo Institutional Review Board. Total optical aberrations were measured by H-S sensor LadarWave Custom Cornea Wavefront System (Alcon Laboratories Inc, Orlando, FLA, USA) and were statistically analysed. Corneal aberrations were calculated using CT-View software Version 6.89 (Sarver and Associates, Celebration, FL, USA). Lens aberrations were calculated by subtraction. High-order (0.32 e 0.48 microm) and ocular spherical aberrations (0.02 e 0.26 microm) increased respectively in child and middle age groups. High order (0.27 microm) and corneal spherical aberrations (0.05 microm) did not show changes with age. Lens showed a statistically significant spherical aberration increase (from -0.02 to 0.22 microm). Vertical (from 0.10 to -0.07 microm) and horizontal coma (from 0.01 to -0.12 microm) presented progressively negative values with aging. High-order and spherical aberrations increased with age due to lens contribution. The cornea did not affect significantly changes observed on ocular

  16. Ocular changes in pregnant Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, J A; Ebeigbe, P N; Ighoroje, Ada

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy results in a lot of hormonal changes in the body and the eyes are no exception. These ocular changes could be physiologic, pathologic or a modification of a pre-existing condition. The aim of this study was to determine physiologic ocular changes that are associated with pregnancy in healthy Nigerian women. A total of 100 women were followed longitudinally through out the course of their pregnancy and 6 weeks postpartum. The women were recruited at 8 weeks of pregnancy at the anti-natal clinic in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. The women were aged between 20 and 35 years. Tests carried out included visual acuity, ophthalmoscopy, retinoscopy, and tonometry. The tests were carried out in each of the three trimesters of pregnancy and 6 weeks postpartum. There was a fall in intraocular pressure across the trimesters and this was very significant (P<0.0001). Postpartum, the intraocular pressure began to rise. The difference between the third trimester and post-partum values was also statistically significant (P< 0.0001). The difference in visual acuity through out the pregnancy was not significant (P= 0.8477). Although, there was a fall in refractive error across the different trimesters, it was not statistically significant (P=0.3). There was also no difference in the third trimester and the 6 weeks postpartum values of both visual acuity and refractive error. Ocular changes associated with pregnancy are transient and most tend to resolve postpartum, with values returning to near pre-pregnant state.

  17. Ocular bobbing with survival

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Charles; Stern, Richard

    1976-01-01

    A case is described of prolonged ocular bobbing with survival after subarachnoid haemorrhage from a pontine arteriovenous malformation. Hitherto, this sign has usually been associated with a rapidly fatal outcome. Images PMID:1255213

  18. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  19. Excimer laser refractive surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Manche, E E; Carr, J D; Haw, W W; Hersh, P S

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy and excimer laser in situ keratomileusis are relatively new treatment modalities that can be used to correct refractive errors of the eye. They are most commonly used to correct myopia (nearsightedness) but can also be used to correct hyperopia (farsightedness) and astigmatism. The excimer laser alters the refractive state of the eye by removing tissue from the anterior cornea through a process known as photoablative decomposition. This process uses ultraviolet energy from the excimer laser to disrupt chemical bonds in the cornea without causing any thermal damage to surrounding tissue. The modified anterior corneal surface enables light to be focused on the retina, thereby reducing or eliminating the dependence on glasses and contact lenses. We discuss in detail all aspects of excimer laser refractive surgery--techniques, indications and contraindications, clinical outcomes, and complications. PMID:9682628

  20. Effect of breast feeding on ocular morbidity.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Adnan; Ozdemir, Murat; Aslan, Lokman; Aslankurt, Murat; Gul, Ozlem

    2014-01-09

    To evaluate the effect of human milk on ocular morbidity in infants who did not breast feed during the first 6 months of life. This retrospective randomized study included 154 subjects who were first or second grade elementary school students, 66-84 month of age. These children were randomly selected from 2080 students during health screenings. All of them were born at term and were normal birth weight. The study was composed of 3 age- and sex-matched groups. Group 1 included 52 subjects who had never been breast fed. Group 2 included 42 subjects who were breast fed and also received additional food (infant formula). Group 3 included 60 subjects who were only breast fed until 6 months old (no formula) except for the first month of life. All subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination and any morbidity was recorded. Frequencies of ocular morbidity were compared among the groups by using the chi-squared test. We found significant refractive errors in 12 (23%) subjects in Group 1 (no breast feeding). There was no significant refractive error in Group 2 (breast feeding and formula) and Group 3 (breast feeding only). The difference among the groups was statistically significant (p=0.014, chi-squared test). Allergic conjunctivitis was found in 5 subjects in Group 1, 3 in Group 2, and 2 in Group 3. There was no significant difference among the groups (p=0.395). Refractive errors were more frequent in Group 1 (no breast feeding) than in Group 2 (breast feeding and formula) or Group 3 (breast feeding only). There is a need to confirm this finding by performing studies with larger sample sizes.

  1. Space Flight-Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew G; Mader, Thomas H; Gibson, C Robert; Tarver, William

    2017-09-01

    New and unique physiologic and pathologic systemic and neuro-ocular responses have been documented in astronauts during and after long-duration space flight. Although the precise cause remains unknown, space flight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome (SANS) has been adopted as an appropriate descriptive term. The Space Medicine Operations Division of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has documented the variable occurrence of SANS in astronauts returning from long-duration space flight on the International Space Station. These clinical findings have included unilateral and bilateral optic disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal and retinal folds, hyperopic refractive error shifts, and nerve fiber layer infarcts. The clinical findings of SANS have been correlated with structural changes on intraorbital and intracranial magnetic resonance imaging and in-flight and terrestrial ultrasonographic studies and ocular optical coherence tomography. Further study of SANS is ongoing for consideration of future manned missions to space, including a return trip to the moon or Mars.

  2. Three-year follow-up of biomicroscopy signs and refractive status in patients wearing lotrafilcon A lenses.

    PubMed

    Long, Bill; Malet, Florence; Lejeune, Marie; George-Vicariot, Marie-Noëlle; Pagot, Roland; Peyre, Catherine; Subirana, Xavier

    2005-11-01

    To report the wearer experience, biomicroscopy signs, and stability of refractive error after 3 years' use of lotrafilcon A lenses. Seventy-four subjects from a multicenter clinical trial with lotrafilcon A lenses were queried on aspects of lens wear. Biomicroscopy signs and refractive error were compared to baseline measurements. A total of 66% of subjects reported continuing to wear lotrafilcon A lenses, usually for more than 21 nights, with high satisfaction. Signs of limbal, palpebral, and bulbar redness improved significantly. Average refractive error remained stable. Long-term use of lotrafilcon A lenses resulted in high wearer satisfaction, reduction of ocular redness, and stable refractive error.

  3. Ultrasonography in ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Dastevska-Djosevska, Emilija

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a non-invasive, simple and effective diagnostic method which enables visualization and evaluation of intraocular injury degree in cloudy eye media. The basic aim of this investigation was to find out the frequency of various types of ocular injuries using ultrasonography and to make an analysis of their frequency in relation to gender and age. This retrospective study included 182 patients hospitalized at the Clinic of Ophthalmology in Skopje due to mechanical eye trauma. The patients underwent ultrasonography on the Alcon Ultrascan Imagining System apparatus and Sonomed EZ Scan AB 5500+. B scan technique was used primarily, while the A scan had a positive and correlative role. Ocular trauma was more present in males (85.2%) compared to females (14.8%). 49.5% of the patients had open, and 50.5% had closed globe injuries. The most represented age group in ocular injuries was the age ranged from 51 to 60 years. There was no significant difference between the type of mechanical injury and the age (Chi-Squares=5.52 p=0.47895025). Ultrasonography showed that the most frequent pathologic result, both in open and closed globe injuries, was vitreous hemorrhage. Ultrasonography has an irreplaceable role in the clinical evaluation and management of ocular trauma. It showed that the most frequent finding in ocular trauma was vitreous haemorrhage, and the male gender was more frequently exposed to ocular trauma.

  4. Automated detection of ocular focus.

    PubMed

    Hunter, David G; Nusz, Kevin J; Gandhi, Nainesh K; Quraishi, Imran H; Gramatikov, Boris I; Guyton, David L

    2004-01-01

    We characterize objectively the state of focus of the human eye, utilizing a bull's eye photodetector to detect the double-pass blur produced from a point source of light. A point fixation source of light illuminates the eye. Fundus-reflected light is focused by the optical system of the eye onto a bull's eye photodetector [consisting of an annulus (A) and a center (C) of approximately equal active area]. To generate focus curves, C/A is measured with a range of trial lenses in the light path. Three human eyes and a model eye are studied. In the model eye, the focus curve showed a sharp peak with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of +/-0.25 D. In human eyes, the ratio C/A was >4 at best focus in all cases, with a FWHM of +/-1 D. The optical apparatus detects ocular focus (as opposed to refractive error) in real time. A device that can assess focus rapidly and objectively will make it possible to perform low-cost, mass screening for focusing problems such as may exist in children at risk for amblyopia.

  5. Sighting versus sensory ocular dominance

    PubMed Central

    Pointer, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose An indication of the laterality of ocular dominance (OD) informs the clinical decision making process when considering certain ophthalmic refractive and surgical interventions. Can predictive reliance be assured regardless of OD technique or is the indication of a dominant eye method-dependent? Methods Two alternative OD test formats were administered to a group of 72 emmetropic healthy young adult subjects: the ‘hole-in-card’ test for sighting dominance and the ‘+1.50D blur’ test for sensory dominance. Both techniques were chosen as being likely familiar to the majority of ophthalmic clinicians; to promote and expedite application during the examination routine neither test required specialist training nor equipment. Results Right eye dominance was indicated in 71% of cases by the sighting test but in only 54% of subjects using the sensory test. The laterality of OD indicated for the individual subject by each technique was in agreement on only 50% of occasions. Conclusions Reasons are considered for the poor intra-individual agreement between OD tests, along with an item of procedural advice for the clinician.

  6. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angle are distorted by the earth's atmosphere. High precision refraction correction equations are presented which are ideally suited for surveying because their inputs are optically measured range and optically measured elevation angle. The outputs are true straight line range and true geometric elevation angle. The 'short distances' used in surveying allow the calculations of true range and true elevation angle to be quickly made using a programmable pocket calculator. Topics covered include the spherical form of Snell's Law; ray path equations; and integrating the equations. Short-, medium-, and long-range refraction corrections are presented in tables.

  7. Ocular disorders among schoolchildren in Khartoum State, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Rushood, A A; Azmat, S; Shariq, M; Khamis, A; Lakho, K A; Jadoon, M Z; Sial, N; Rushood, A A; Kamil, E A

    2013-03-01

    From December 2005 to June 2007, a total screening of all 1418 government primary schools in Khartoum State, Sudan, was performed to estimate ocular problems among children aged 6-15 years. We screened 671,119 children (56.7% males) for significant refractive error and other eye ailments. Ocular problems were found in 20,321 (3.03%) children. The 3 localities with highest ocular pathology were Karary (26.2%), Ummbada (21.0%) and Jabal Awlia (15.7%). The overall prevalence of refractive error was 2.19%. Myopia was found in 10,064 (1.50%) children while 4661 (0.70%) were hyperopic. Other ocular problems included vernal keratoconjunctivitis, vitamin A deficiency, microbial conjunctivitis, strabismus and corneal opacity. Only 288 (0.04%) children were diagnosed with active trachoma: 86.5% of these were from Ummbada locality, on the periphery ofthe State, where transportation facilities are poor and poverty is widespread. Overall, 99% of the eye ailments identified are either treatable or preventable. To reduce these and to achieve the goals of Vision 2020, an effective and efficient school health programme is needed.

  8. Refractive error among urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Dan; Feng, Ruifang; Zhao, Huashuo; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of refractive errors in urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China remains unknown. Children attending twelve randomly selected kindergartens participated in this study. Visual acuity, ocular alignment, cover-uncover test, cycloplegic refraction, slit-lamp and funduscopy were performed under a standardized testing environment. Cycloplegic streak retinoscopy was performed for all subjects. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error was the main outcome measure. Emmetropia was defined as refractive status between +1.75 diopters (D) and -0.75D. Myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and anisometropia were defined as SE < -0.50D, SE > +2.0 D, cylindrical error > 1.0 D and SE difference ≥ 1 D between fellow eyes, respectively. Out of 2349 eligible children, 2255 (96%) children completed a refractive examination. Of the 2255 children, the mean SE of right eyes was +1.14 ± 0.95 diopters (D). Mean SE of the right eyes did not decline with age (r = -0.01; P = 0.56). The majority (86.6%) of children were emmetropia. The prevalence of myopia and hyperopia was 0.9% and 14.3%, respectively. The mean astigmatism for the right eyes was 0.87 ± 0.62 D. The prevalence of With-the-rule, against the rule and oblique astigmatism was 93.8%, 4.7% and 1.5%, respectively. The mean anisometropia between two eyes was 0.14 ± 0.38 D. The most common type of refractive error was hyperopia (14.3%), followed by astigmatism (8.8%), anisometropia (3.2%), and myopia (0.9%). The refractive status in this population of urban Xuzhou preschool children was stable and there was no evidence of a myopic refractive shift over this age range in our cross-sectional study.

  9. Refractive error among urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Dan; Feng, Ruifang; Zhao, Huashuo; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of refractive errors in urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China remains unknown. Children attending twelve randomly selected kindergartens participated in this study. Visual acuity, ocular alignment, cover-uncover test, cycloplegic refraction, slit-lamp and funduscopy were performed under a standardized testing environment. Cycloplegic streak retinoscopy was performed for all subjects. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error was the main outcome measure. Emmetropia was defined as refractive status between +1.75 diopters (D) and -0.75D. Myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and anisometropia were defined as SE < -0.50D, SE > +2.0 D, cylindrical error > 1.0 D and SE difference ≥ 1 D between fellow eyes, respectively. Out of 2349 eligible children, 2255 (96%) children completed a refractive examination. Of the 2255 children, the mean SE of right eyes was +1.14 ± 0.95 diopters (D). Mean SE of the right eyes did not decline with age (r = -0.01; P = 0.56). The majority (86.6%) of children were emmetropia. The prevalence of myopia and hyperopia was 0.9% and 14.3%, respectively. The mean astigmatism for the right eyes was 0.87 ± 0.62 D. The prevalence of With-the-rule, against the rule and oblique astigmatism was 93.8%, 4.7% and 1.5%, respectively. The mean anisometropia between two eyes was 0.14 ± 0.38 D. The most common type of refractive error was hyperopia (14.3%), followed by astigmatism (8.8%), anisometropia (3.2%), and myopia (0.9%). The refractive status in this population of urban Xuzhou preschool children was stable and there was no evidence of a myopic refractive shift over this age range in our cross-sectional study. PMID:25674266

  10. Vision Profile and Ocular Characteristics of Special Olympics Athletes: Report from India.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Vijaya K; Sumalini, Rebecca; Narasaiah, Asa; Panda, Soumya

    2017-08-01

    Previous reports, albeit isolated, of vision and ocular screening of athletes with intellectual disability participating in the Special Olympics, UK, indicated high rates of refractive error and ocular morbidity; however, there have been no reports of similar sports events for this population from India. This study set out to evaluate the vision profile and ocular characteristics of athletes with intellectual disability attending the Special Olympics Lions Club International Opening Eyes (SOLCIOE) event in 2012 in India. A cross-sectional study was conducted, where a protocol-based ophthalmological assessment was performed by trained optometrists at a tertiary eye care center. Overall, 172 athletes (mean age 18.6 years, 70% male) with intellectual disability participated, and 138 (80%) were able to cooperate for complete or nearly complete vision and ocular assessment. A total of 56 (32%) had never had a previous vision or ocular health status examination. A total of 46 (32%) presented with low vision (World Health Organization definition <6/18 to 3/60 in the better eye), 21% needed a first or updated spectacle prescription, and 28% had significant ocular pathology as the cause of visual loss. The proportions of refractive errors and ocular disorders in athletes with intellectual disability attending the SOLCIOE program in South India are similar to those reported for able-bodied school-aged children in urban and rural India. Like that of their able-bodied peers, the visual needs of children with intellectual disability are also not adequately being met.

  11. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  12. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  13. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  14. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  15. Ocular residual astigmatism's effect on high myopic astigmatism LASIK surgery

    PubMed Central

    Teus, M A; Arruabarrena, C; Hernández-Verdejo, J L; Cañones, R; Mikropoulos, D G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the effect of ocular residual astigmatism (ORA) on the effectiveness of LASIK for treating high myopic astigmatism. Methods This is an observational, cross-sectional study. We studied 116 consecutive myopic eyes with −3 diopters (D) or more of astigmatism that underwent LASIK surgery. The magnitude of uncorrected residual refractive astigmatism 3 months postoperatively was measured. Results The mean preoperative cylinder was −4.0±0.83 D (range, −7.5 to −3 D) and the mean preoperative ORA was 0.82±0.5 D. The mean residual refractive cylinder 3 months postoperatively was −0.78±0.83 D (range, −3 to 0 D). No correlation was found between ORA and the refractive cylinder 3 months postoperatively (P=0.6). Conclusion In eyes with high myopic astigmatism undergoing LASIK, ORA was not correlated with the residual postoperative cylinder. PMID:24971989

  16. Refractive errors and visual anomalies in school children in the Kavrepalanchowk District.

    PubMed

    Marasini, S; Sharma, R; Sthapit, P R; Sharma, D; Koju, U; Thapa, G; Nepal, B P

    2010-01-01

    Schoolchildren form an important target group for a nation, as any ocular morbidity in this age group has huge physical, psychological and socio-economical implications. Childhood eye disorders can contribute to the burden of blindness in any society. This study aims to highlight the prevalence of ocular morbidity in governmental schools in a sub-urbanised area of Nepal, in relation to ethnic variation. A descriptive study, and the study population used were schoolchildren who were examined in their schools and afterwards referred to the hospital if required. Presenting and best corrected visual acuity, refraction, binocularity assessment, anterior and posterior segment evaluation was carried out. Data was analysed statistically using SPSS software, version 14. We examined 1,802 school children. The mean age was 10.78 ± 3.61 years. Ocular abnormality was detected in 11.7%. Low vision and blindness was rare (0.11% and 0.05%). Ocular morbidities were more common in Newar communities (3.71%) followed by Brahamans (3.38%). Lid abnormalities were the most common (3.55%), and morbidities in each ethnicity were followed by refractive errors (3%), conjunctival abnormalities (1.10%), strabismus (0.88%) and amblyopia (0.33%). Refractive errors were most common among Newar communities (1.16%) at almost twice as many Brahamans (0.61%) followed by Mongolians (0.49%). Convergence insufficiency was detected in 2.49% (p less than 0.01). Ocular morbidities are common in children in Kavhrepalanchowk District with lid abnormalities being the most common issue, probably due to a lack of hygienic practice. Ethnic variation of ocular morbidities is an important observation mostly for refractive error and strabismus.

  17. Presumed ocular histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Thuruthumaly, Catherine; Yee, David Chin; Rao, Prabakar Kumar

    2014-11-01

    To update the knowledge on the risk factors and treatment options for choroidal neovascular membrane due to ocular histoplasmosis and to provide a treatment algorithm. Smoking has been shown to be a strong risk factor in the development of choroidal neovascularization. Alleles that have been identified as a risk factor for the development of choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration have not shown to be associated with Presumed Ocular Histoplasmosis Syndrome-related choroidal neovascularization. Treatment has largely moved away from submacular surgery and macular photocoagulation to antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy. This review highlights the devastating vision loss that may occur in ocular histoplasmosis from the development of an atrophic scar at the fovea or following choroidal neovascularization. Many therapies have been tried with varied amounts of success. Antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy appears to be the gold-standard treatment with the possibility of combined photodynamic therapy in refractory cases.

  18. What Is an Ocular Migraine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... When to seek help What is an ocular migraine? Is it a sign of something serious? Answers ... the other which might have more–serious complications. Migraine aura involving your vision In some cases, ocular ...

  19. Ocular complications of boxing.

    PubMed

    Bianco, M; Vaiano, A S; Colella, F; Coccimiglio, F; Moscetti, M; Palmieri, V; Focosi, F; Zeppilli, P; Vinger, P F

    2005-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence of ocular injuries in a large population of boxers over a period of 16 years, in particular, the most severe lesions that may be vision threatening. Clinical records of the medical archive of the Italian Boxing Federation were analysed. A total of 1032 boxers were examined from February 1982 to October 1998. A complete ophthalmological history was available for 956, who formed the study population (a total of 10 697 examinations). The following data were collected: age when started boxing; duration of competitive boxing career (from the date of the first bout); weight category; a thorough ocular history. The following investigations were carried out: measurement of visual acuity and visual fields, anterior segment inspection, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, and examination of ocular fundus. Eighty age matched healthy subjects, who had never boxed, formed the control group. Of the 956 boxers examined, 428 were amateur (44.8%) and 528 professional (55.2%). The median age at first examination was 23.1 (4.3) years (range 15-36). The prevalence of conjunctival, corneal, lenticular, vitreal, ocular papilla, and retinal alterations in the study population was 40.9% compared with 3.1% in the control group (p< or =0.0001). The prevalence of serious ocular findings (angle, lens, macula, and peripheral retina alterations) was 5.6% in boxers and 3.1% in controls (NS). Boxing does not result in a higher prevalence of severe ocular lesions than in the general population. However, the prevalence of milder lesions (in particular with regard to the conjunctiva and cornea) is noteworthy, justifying the need for adequate ophthalmological surveillance.

  20. Ocular complications of boxing

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, M; Vaiano, A; Colella, F; Coccimiglio, F; Moscetti, M; Palmieri, V; Focosi, F; Zeppilli, P; Vinger, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of ocular injuries in a large population of boxers over a period of 16 years, in particular, the most severe lesions that may be vision threatening. Methods: Clinical records of the medical archive of the Italian Boxing Federation were analysed. A total of 1032 boxers were examined from February 1982 to October 1998. A complete ophthalmological history was available for 956, who formed the study population (a total of 10 697 examinations). The following data were collected: age when started boxing; duration of competitive boxing career (from the date of the first bout); weight category; a thorough ocular history. The following investigations were carried out: measurement of visual acuity and visual fields, anterior segment inspection, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, and examination of ocular fundus. Eighty age matched healthy subjects, who had never boxed, formed the control group. Results: Of the 956 boxers examined, 428 were amateur (44.8%) and 528 professional (55.2%). The median age at first examination was 23.1 (4.3) years (range 15–36). The prevalence of conjunctival, corneal, lenticular, vitreal, ocular papilla, and retinal alterations in the study population was 40.9% compared with 3.1% in the control group (p⩽0.0001). The prevalence of serious ocular findings (angle, lens, macula, and peripheral retina alterations) was 5.6% in boxers and 3.1% in controls (NS). Conclusions: Boxing does not result in a higher prevalence of severe ocular lesions than in the general population. However, the prevalence of milder lesions (in particular with regard to the conjunctiva and cornea) is noteworthy, justifying the need for adequate ophthalmological surveillance. PMID:15665199

  1. Immunogenetics of ocular inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Levinson, R D

    2007-02-01

    Ocular inflammatory disease comprises of a diverse group of clinical entities that may result from autoimmune processes, infections, or both. While many individual ocular inflammatory diseases are quite rare, ocular inflammation is one of the more common causes of visual disability, including blindness, in the developed world. Better understanding of ocular inflammatory disease is an important step in designing more sophisticated therapies that may help prevent loss of visual function for these patients.

  2. Ocular involvement of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Bazzazi, Nooshin; Yavarikia, Alireza; Keramat, Fariba

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old male diagnosed with brucellosis a week earlier was referred to the ophthalmology clinic with visual complaints. On examination, visual acuity was 20/25, he had conjunctival injection on slit lamp examination. There was also bilateral optic disk swelling plus retinal hyperemia (optic disc hyperemia and vascular tortuosity) and intraretinal hemorrhage on funduscopy. The patient was admitted and treated with cotrimoxazole, rifampin, doxycycline and prednisolone for 2 months. Ocular manifestations subsided gradually within 6 months after treatment. Brucellosis can affect the eye and lead to serious ocular complications. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment should be considered in endemic areas.

  3. Correction of ocular dystopia.

    PubMed

    Janecka, I P

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine results with elective surgical correction of enophthalmos. The study was a retrospective assessment in a university-based referral practice. A consecutive sample of 10 patients who developed ocular dystopia following orbital trauma was examined. The main outcome measures were a subjective evaluation by patients and objective measurements of patients' eye position. The intervention was three-dimensional orbital reconstruction with titanium plates. It is concluded that satisfactory correction of enophthalmos and ocular dystopia can be achieved with elective surgery using titanium plates. In addition, intraoperative measurements of eye position in three planes increases the precision of surgery.

  4. Surveillance of Vision and Ocular Disorders in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Elma; Dickson, Jennifer; Kindley, A. David; Scott, Christopher C.; Charleton, Patricia M.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome have a high prevalence of ocular disorders. The UK Down's Syndrome Medical Interest Group (DSMIG) guidelines for ophthalmic screening were locally implemented into a protocol that included neonatal eye examination by an opthalmologist and a comprehensive ophthalmological examination (cycloplegic refraction,…

  5. Surveillance of Vision and Ocular Disorders in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Elma; Dickson, Jennifer; Kindley, A. David; Scott, Christopher C.; Charleton, Patricia M.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome have a high prevalence of ocular disorders. The UK Down's Syndrome Medical Interest Group (DSMIG) guidelines for ophthalmic screening were locally implemented into a protocol that included neonatal eye examination by an opthalmologist and a comprehensive ophthalmological examination (cycloplegic refraction,…

  6. Ocular rosacea: a dermatologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Webster, Guy; Schaller, Martin

    2013-12-01

    As many as 50% of patients given the diagnosis of cutaneous rosacea also have ocular rosacea. Conservative figures indicate that approximately 10 million patients are affected by ocular rosacea in the United States alone. Despite this prevalence, ocular symptoms of rosacea are often improperly diagnosed, particularly when they occur in the absence of skin involvement.

  7. Ocular abnormalities in multi-transfused beta-thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Reza; Heydarian, Samira; Karami, Hosein; Shektaei, Mohammad Momeni; Dailami, Kiumars Noruzpour; Amiri, Ahmad Ahmadzadeh; Rezaee, Majid Reza Sheikh; Far, Asad Allah Farrokh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to assess ocular changes in thalassemia patients who have received multiple transfusions and chelate binding therapy in order to avoid iron accumulation. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: A total of 54 thalassemia major patients were selected as case group, and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were regarded as a control group. Ocular examination included visual acuity, refraction testing, slit lamp examination, funduscopy, tonometry, perimetry, tear break-up time test, and color vision testing were performed for all the participants. We computed the frequency and duration of blood transfusion, the mean serum ferritin level, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and type, duration, and daily dose of chelation therapy for thalassemia patients based on their records. Statistical Analysis Used: All data analysis was performed using SPSS, version 19. Results: All the thalassemic patients were asymptomatic, but abnormal ocular findings (dry eye (33.3%), cataract (10.2%), retinal pigment epithelium degeneration (16.7%), color vision deficiency (3.7%), and visual field defects (33.7%)) were seen in 68.5% of thalassemic group. The prevalence of ocular abnormalities in normal group was 19.4%, which was significantly lower than that in thalassemia patients (P = 0.000). No significant correlation was found between ocular abnormalities and mean serum ferritin level (P = 0.627) and mean hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.143). Correlation of number of blood transfusion with the presence of ocular abnormalities was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.005). Conclusions: As life expectancy for beta-thalassemia patients extends, regular ophthalmological evaluation to detect early changes in their ocular system is recommended. PMID:26632126

  8. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The NASA imaging processing technology, an advanced computer technique to enhance images sent to Earth in digital form by distant spacecraft, helped develop a new vision screening process. The Ocular Vision Screening system, an important step in preventing vision impairment, is a portable device designed especially to detect eye problems in children through the analysis of retinal reflexes.

  9. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An ocular screening system designed for safe, convenient screening of large groups was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, leading to the formation of Medical Sciences Corporation. The system identifies visual defects accurately and inexpensively, and includes a photorefractor telephoto lens and an electronic flash. Medical Sciences Corporation is using the device to test at schools, industrial plants, etc.

  10. Instrument Measures Ocular Counterrolling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitan, Barry M.; Reschke, Millard F.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, battery-powered, noninvasive unit replaces several pieces of equipment and operator. Instrument that looks like pair of goggles with small extension box measures ocular counterrotation. Called "otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation" (OTTR) goggles, used in studies of space motion sickness. Also adapted to use on Earth and determine extent of impairment in patients who have impaired otolith functions.

  11. Robotic ocular surgery.

    PubMed

    Tsirbas, A; Mango, C; Dutson, E

    2007-01-01

    Bimanual, three-dimensional robotic surgery has proved valuable for a variety of surgical procedures. To examine the use of a commercially available surgical robot for ocular microsurgery. Using a da Vinci surgical robot, ocular microsurgery was performed with repair of a corneal laceration in a porcine model. The experiments were performed on harvested porcine eyes placed in an anatomical position using a foam head on a standard operating room table. A video scope and two, 360 degrees -rotating, 8-mm, wrested-end effector instruments were placed over the eye with three robotic arms. The surgeon performed the actual procedures while positioned at a robotic system console that was located across the operating room suite. Each surgeon placed three 10-0 sutures, and this was documented with still and video photography. Ocular microsurgery was successfully performed using the da Vinci surgical robot. The robotic system provided excellent visualisation, as well as controlled and delicate placement of the sutures at the corneal level. Robotic ocular microsurgery is technically feasible in the porcine model and warrants consideration for evaluation in controlled human trials to deploy functioning remote surgical centres in areas without access to state-of-the-art surgical skill and technology.

  12. Pattern of ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M M; Mohiuddin, A A; Akhanda, A H; Hossain, M I; Islam, M F; Akonjee, A R; Ali, M

    2011-07-01

    This prospective observational study was conducted in the department of Ophthalmology Mymensingh Medical College Hospital during the period of November, 2009 to October, 2010. Two hundred & fifty (250) patients of both sexes and all ages with ocular trauma were selected randomly for this study. A detailed history of patients, duration of trauma, relation of trauma with work, visual status prior to injury, any surgery prior to injury & patients were alcoholic or not were taken. Male patients were 190(76%) and female patients were 60(24%). Majority of patients were 11-20 years group (39.2%). Most of patients (40%) attended into hospital within 60 hours of ocular trauma. Accidental occupational trauma were more common (51.2%) and assault injury were less common (12.8%). Greater number of ocular trauma was caused by sharp objects (59.2%) and less number of ocular trauma was caused by chemical injuries (2.4%). Open globe injuries were more common (62%) than closed globe injury (38%). Visual acuity on admission between 6/60 to PL comprises highest number (64%) and also on discharge between 6/60 to PL comprises highest number of cases (50%). Most of the patients came from poor socioeconomic group (60%).

  13. [Ocular syphilis: 9 cases].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, A S; Tea, S; Hustache Mathieu, L; Schwartz, C; Saleh, M; Delbosc, B

    2016-11-01

    Syphilis is a disease with ocular involvement may be opening and cover all ocular structures. The objective of the study was to retrospectively identify and describe all cases of ocular syphilis diagnosed in the ophthalmology department of Besançon University Hospital from March 2004 to April 2014. Between March 2004 and April 2014, we diagnosed and monitored 9 male patients (13 eyes) with ocular syphilis (1 interstitial keratitis, chorioretinitis associated with a 1 hyalite, 3 panuvéites, 1 chorioretinitis after placoid, 3 bilateral papillary edema). Patients had a mean age of 52.6 years (32-77 years) at diagnosis and the inaugural symptoms were in 100% of cases decreased visual acuity. The follow-up period ranged from 1 month to 5 years. The curative treatment included intravenous antibiotics penicillin G for 3 weeks. All patients had an improvement in their AV (AV initial range "counting fingers" and 0.6 versus AV final between 0.5 and 1 in decimal scale). Syphilis is a disease currently on the rise. It must be systematically sought before any inflammatory disease of the eye or papilledema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. [Ocular Manifestations in Sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Walscheid, K; Tappeiner, C; Heiligenhaus, A

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory multi-organ disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterised by non-necrotising granulomata. Sarcoidosis predominantly manifests in the lung, but any other organ may be affected. Ocular involvement is present in about 25 to 50 % of patients. The most common ocular manifestation is uveitis, especially of the anterior eye segment. If ocular sarcoidosis is suspected, interdisciplinary assessment of the patient is mandatory, including laboratory tests, chest X-ray, assessment by a specialist in internal medicine and, ideally, histological evidence of granuloma formation in a tissue specimen. Other (infectious) causes of granulomatous inflammation need to be excluded, especially tuberculosis or syphilis. For the ophthalmological assessment, detection of granulomatous lesions is of particular importance, especially by visualising chorioretinal granuloma by fluorescein and indocyanin green angiography. Cystoid macular oedema and glaucoma are the most frequent complications limiting visual acuity. Corticosteroids, which can be administered either locally or systemically, are the mainstay of therapy. Depending on the clinical course and the development of ocular complications, systemic steroid-sparing immunosuppressive medication may be indicated.

  15. Robotic ocular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tsirbas, A; Mango, C; Dutson, E

    2007-01-01

    Background Bimanual, three‐dimensional robotic surgery has proved valuable for a variety of surgical procedures. Aims To examine the use of a commercially available surgical robot for ocular microsurgery. Methods Using a da Vinci surgical robot, ocular microsurgery was performed with repair of a corneal laceration in a porcine model. The experiments were performed on harvested porcine eyes placed in an anatomical position using a foam head on a standard operating room table. A video scope and two, 360°‐rotating, 8‐mm, wrested‐end effector instruments were placed over the eye with three robotic arms. The surgeon performed the actual procedures while positioned at a robotic system console that was located across the operating room suite. Each surgeon placed three 10‐0 sutures, and this was documented with still and video photography. Results Ocular microsurgery was successfully performed using the da Vinci surgical robot. The robotic system provided excellent visualisation, as well as controlled and delicate placement of the sutures at the corneal level. Conclusions Robotic ocular microsurgery is technically feasible in the porcine model and warrants consideration for evaluation in controlled human trials to deploy functioning remote surgical centres in areas without access to state‐of‐the‐art surgical skill and technology. PMID:17020903

  16. Ocular morbidity among refugees in Southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gelaw, Yeshigeta; Abateneh, Aemero

    2014-07-01

    Low vision and blindness are recognized as one of the major public health problems worldwide, especially in developing countries. The prevalence and cause of blindness and low vision vary from region to region, among different age and population groups in a country or geographical region. The objective of this study is thus to determine the causes of blindness and ocular morbidity among refugees in Southwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional clinic based study was conducted on 1,054 refugees in Southwest Ethiopia. A basic anterior and posterior segment examination was done by ophthalmologists with Magnifying Loupe 2.5X and Direct Ophthalmoscope. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. The most common causes of ocular morbidity identified were trachoma 547(21.2%), cataract 501(19.4%), refractive error 353(13.7%), conjunctivitis 240(9.3%), glaucoma 130(5.1%) and climatic droplet keratopathy 112(4.4%). The overall prevalence of blindness was 26.2% and the prevalence of childhood blindness was 0.7%. The prevalence was higher among females (16.9%) than males (9.3%) and age groups 60 years and above (15.9%) than other age groups (10.3%) (P<0.05). The overall prevalence of low vision was 25.8% and the prevalence of low vision in pediatric age group was 0.9%. The leading causes of blindness were cataract 112(40.6%), trachomatous corneal opacity 58(21.0%) and glaucoma 49(17.8%). The commonest cause of low vision was cataract 102(37.6%) followed by trachomatous corneal opacity 49(18.1%) and refractive error 35(12.9%). There is a very high burden of blinding eye diseases among refugees. Integrated multidisciplinary intervention strategies for the prevention and control of blindness and low vision in the study settings should be initiated.

  17. Refraction in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Klein, Barbara E K; Lee, Kristine E; Klein, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    To examine refraction, change in refraction, and risk factors for change in refraction in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Population-based study. Modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study refractions and a standard history were obtained for all participants. Baseline and 10-year follow-up data were available. Age and education were significantly associated with refraction in persons with younger-onset diabetes (T1D) and in those with older-onset diabetes (T2D); refractions were similar for both groups. Persons of similar age with T1D were likely to be more myopic than were those with T2D (P < .01). In those with T1D, on average, there was a -0.28-diopter (D) change in refraction in 10 years. Those with longer duration of diabetes and proliferative retinopathy were more likely to have hyperopic shifts in refraction. In persons with T2D, there was, on average, a +0.48-D change in refraction during the 10 years, but there was little consistency in the amount of change by age at baseline. In persons of similar age, those with T1D were likely to be slightly more myopic than were those with T2D. Overall, mean refraction and the important risk factors of age and education were similar to those reported in nondiabetic populations.

  18. Ocular Dominance and Visual Function Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Ferreira, D.; Neves, H.; Queiros, A.; Faria-Ribeiro, M.; Peixoto-de-Matos, S. C.; González-Méijome, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To show the distribution of ocular dominance as measured with sensory and eye sighting methods and its potential relationship with high and low contrast LogMAR visual acuity in presbyopic subjects. Method. Forty-four presbyopes (48.5 ± 3.5 years) participated in this study. Ocular dominance was determined by eye sighting (hole-in-card) and sensorial (+1.50 D lens induced blur) methods. According to the dominance detected with each method (RE: right eye or LE: left eye), patients were classified in dominance type 1 (RE/RE), type 2 (RE/LE), type 3 (LE/RE) and type 4 (LE/LE). Results. Baseline refractive error (MSE) was RE:−0.36 ± 1.67 D and LE:−0.35 ± 1.85 D (P = 0.930). RE was the dominant eye in 61.4% and 70.5% of times as obtained from sensorial and sighting methods, respectively. Most frequent dominance was of type 1 (52.3%), in this case the RE showed statistically significant better distance low contrast LogMAR VA (0.04 LogMAR units) compared to the LE (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The dominance was more frequent in RE in this sample. The eye sighting and sensorial methods to define ocular dominance agreed in more than half of cases. Amount of MSE was not significantly different between dominant and non-dominant eye. But in case of right dominance, the RE presented better distance low contrast VA compared to the LE. PMID:24319677

  19. Correction of refractive errors in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) involved in visual research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jude F; Boisvert, Chantal J; Reuter, Jon D; Reynolds, John H; Leblanc, Mathias

    2014-08-01

    Macaques are the most common animal model for studies in vision research, and due to their high value as research subjects, often continue to participate in studies well into old age. As is true in humans, visual acuity in macaques is susceptible to refractive errors. Here we report a case study in which an aged macaque demonstrated clear impairment in visual acuity according to performance on a demanding behavioral task. Refraction demonstrated bilateral myopia that significantly affected behavioral and visual tasks. Using corrective lenses, we were able to restore visual acuity. After correction of myopia, the macaque's performance on behavioral tasks was comparable to that of a healthy control. We screened 20 other male macaques to assess the incidence of refractive errors and ocular pathologies in a larger population. Hyperopia was the most frequent ametropia but was mild in all cases. A second macaque had mild myopia and astigmatism in one eye. There were no other pathologies observed on ocular examination. We developed a simple behavioral task that visual research laboratories could use to test visual acuity in macaques. The test was reliable and easily learned by the animals in 1 d. This case study stresses the importance of screening macaques involved in visual science for refractive errors and ocular pathologies to ensure the quality of research; we also provide simple methodology for screening visual acuity in these animals.

  20. Correction of Refractive Errors in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Involved in Visual Research

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jude F; Boisvert, Chantal J; Reuter, Jon D; Reynolds, John H; Leblanc, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Macaques are the most common animal model for studies in vision research, and due to their high value as research subjects, often continue to participate in studies well into old age. As is true in humans, visual acuity in macaques is susceptible to refractive errors. Here we report a case study in which an aged macaque demonstrated clear impairment in visual acuity according to performance on a demanding behavioral task. Refraction demonstrated bilateral myopia that significantly affected behavioral and visual tasks. Using corrective lenses, we were able to restore visual acuity. After correction of myopia, the macaque's performance on behavioral tasks was comparable to that of a healthy control. We screened 20 other male macaques to assess the incidence of refractive errors and ocular pathologies in a larger population. Hyperopia was the most frequent ametropia but was mild in all cases. A second macaque had mild myopia and astigmatism in one eye. There were no other pathologies observed on ocular examination. We developed a simple behavioral task that visual research laboratories could use to test visual acuity in macaques. The test was reliable and easily learned by the animals in 1 d. This case study stresses the importance of screening macaques involved in visual science for refractive errors and ocular pathologies to ensure the quality of research; we also provide simple methodology for screening visual acuity in these animals. PMID:25427343

  1. Peripheral Refraction with and without Contact Lens Correction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Clark, Christopher A.; Soni, P. Sarita; Thibos, Larry N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral refractive error degrades the quality of retinal images and has been hypothesized to be a stimulus for the development of refractive error. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in refractive error across the horizontal visual field produced by contact lenses (CLs) and to quantify the effect of CLs on peripheral image blur. Methods A commercial Shack-Hartmann aberrometer measured ocular wavefront aberrations in 5° steps across the central 60° of visual field along the horizontal meridian before and after CLs correction. Wavefront refractions for peripheral lines-of-sight were based on the full elliptical pupil encountered in peripheral measurements. Curvature of field is the change in peripheral spherical equivalent relative to the eye’s optical axis. Results Hyperopic curvature of field in the naked eye increases with increasing amounts central myopic refractive error as predicted by Atchison (2006). For an eccentricity of E degrees, field curvature is approximately E percent of foveal refractive error. Rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses changed field curvature in the myopic direction twice as much as soft contact lenses (SCLs). Both of these effects varied with CLs power. For all lens powers, SCL cut the degree of hyperopic field curvature in half whereas RGP lenses nearly eliminated field curvature. The benefit of reduced field curvature was partially offset by increased oblique astigmatism. The net reduction of retinal blur due to CLs is approximately constant across the visual field. Conclusions Both SCL and RGP lenses reduced the degree of hyperopic field curvature present in myopic eyes, with RGP lenses having greater effect. The tradeoff between field curvature and off-axis astigmatism with RGP lenses may limit their effectiveness for control of myopia progression. These results suggest that axial growth mechanisms that depend on retinal image quality will be affected more by RGP than by SCL lenses. PMID:20601913

  2. Peripheral refraction and retinal contour in stable and progressive myopia.

    PubMed

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Queirós, António; Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela; Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    To compare the patterns of relative peripheral astigmatic refraction (tangential and sagittal power errors) and eccentric eye length between progressing and stable young-adult myopes. Sixty-two right eyes of 62 white patients participated in the study, of which 30 were nonprogressing myopes (NP group) for the last 2 years and 32 were progressing myopes (P group). Groups were matched for mean spherical refraction, axial length, and age. Peripheral refraction and eye length were measured along the horizontal meridian up to 35 and 30 degrees of eccentricity, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between groups (p < 0.001) in the nasal retina for the astigmatic components of peripheral refraction. The P group presented a hyperopic relative sagittal focus at 35 degrees in the nasal retina of +1.00 ± 0.83 diopters, as per comparison with a myopic relative sagittal focus of -0.10 ± 0.98 diopters observed in the NP group (p < 0.001). Retinal contour in the P group had a steeper shape in the nasal region than that in the NP group (t test, p = 0.001). An inverse correlation was found (r = -0.775; p < 0.001) between retinal contour and peripheral refraction. Thus, steeper retinas presented a more hyperopic trend in the periphery. Stable and progressing myopes of matched age, axial length, and central refraction showed significantly different characteristics in their peripheral retinal shape and astigmatic components of tangential and sagittal power errors. The present findings may help explain the mechanisms that regulate ocular growth in humans.

  3. Refraction in Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Barbara E. K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Klein, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Objective(s) Examine refraction, change in refraction, and risk factors for change in refraction in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Methods Population based study. Modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study refractions and a standard history were obtained for all participants. Baseline and ten-year follow-up data were available. Results Age was significantly associated with refraction in persons with younger-onset diabetes (T1D) and those with older-onset diabetes (T2D); refractions were similar for both groups. Persons of similar age with T1D were likely to be more myopic than those with T2D (P<.01). Years of education were significantly associated with more myopic refraction (P<.0001). In those with T1D on average there was a −.35 diopter (D) change in refraction over 10 years. However, there was a systematic decrease in myopic shift with increasing age at baseline. Those with longer duration of diabetes and with proliferative retinopathy were more likely to have hyperopic shifts in refraction. In those with T2D there was, on average, a +.25D change in refraction over the 10 years but there was little consistency in the amount of change by age at baseline. There were no other significant effects on change in refraction in this group. Conclusions In persons of similar age, those with T1D are likely to be slightly more myopic than those with T2D. Overall, mean refractions and the important risk factors of age and education are similar to those reported in non-diabetic populations. PMID:21220629

  4. Ocular growth in infant aphakia. Bilateral versus unilateral congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Wörle, J; Friedl, N; Hasenfratz, G

    1993-12-01

    In a prospective study the changes in the ocular axial lengths and in the overall refractions were examined in cases of unilateral and bilateral congenital cataract requiring surgery during the first year of life. Measurements were taken on 18 children with unilateral and on 20 children with bilateral congenital cataract at the time of surgery and up to eight years postoperatively. Surgery was performed via a pars plana/plicata approach, and all infants were fitted with contact lenses. In cases of unilateral cataract, the ocular axial length tended to be superior to the age-matched values already prior to surgery. After four to eight years, one third of the eyes were clearly above normal. In cases of bilateral cataract, the axial lengths were reduced at the age of surgery in the majority of cases, and particularly in eyes that required surgery during the first six months of life. The curvatures of the contact lenses tended to remain unchanged in bilateral cataract, and decreased by about 0.7 mm in unilateral cases. This also reflects the high degree of microphthalmia in bilateral cases. After four to eight years, the degree of microphthalmia had usually increased. The overall refraction decreased significantly in unilateral and bilateral cataract during the first four years of life. The mean values were higher in bilateral than in unilateral cataract at all ages. The mean decrease was 15 diopters in unilateral cataract (SD +/- 5.5 dpt), and 10 diopters in bilateral cataract (SD +/- 6 dpt). When correlating the age-matched differences in the ocular axial lengths at the time of surgery with the overall refractions after four to eight years, a good correlation was found in the unilateral cases (eight eyes), and a poor correlation in the bilateral cases (24 eyes). The data indicate that intraocular implants should not be used in bilateral cataract requiring surgery during the first year of life as long as there is no possibility to change their refraction while in

  5. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  6. Causality, Nonlocality, and Negative Refraction.

    PubMed

    Forcella, Davide; Prada, Claire; Carminati, Rémi

    2017-03-31

    The importance of spatial nonlocality in the description of negative refraction in electromagnetic materials has been put forward recently. We develop a theory of negative refraction in homogeneous and isotropic media, based on first principles, and that includes nonlocality in its full generality. The theory shows that both dissipation and spatial nonlocality are necessary conditions for the existence of negative refraction. It also provides a sufficient condition in materials with weak spatial nonlocality. These fundamental results should have broad implications in the theoretical and practical analyses of negative refraction of electromagnetic and other kinds of waves.

  7. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  8. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  9. Ocular sparganosis from Assam

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Reema; Gogoi, Rajendra Nath

    2015-01-01

    Sparganosis is caused by plerocercoid larvae of the Pseudophyllidea tapeworms of the genus Spirometra. Though prevalent in East Asian and south east Asian countries like China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand; yet very few cases are reported from India. We report a case of migrating sub-conjunctival ocular sparganosis mimicking scleritis which later on developed into orbital cellulitis from Dibrugarh, Assam, North-eastern part of India. This case is reported for its rarity. PMID:25709957

  10. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes.

  11. Education, socioeconomic status, and ocular dimensions in Chinese adults: the Tanjong Pagar Survey.

    PubMed

    Wong, T Y; Foster, P J; Johnson, G J; Seah, S K L

    2002-09-01

    To relate indices of education, occupation, and socioeconomic status to ocular dimensions and refraction in an adult population. A population based, cross sectional survey of adult Chinese aged 40-81 years residing in the Tanjong Pagar district in Singapore. Ocular dimensions, including axial length, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, and vitreous chamber depth, were measured using an A-mode ultrasound device. Corneal radius of curvature and refraction were determined with an autorefractor, with refraction further refined subjectively, and lens nuclear opacity was graded clinically using the modified Lens Opacity Classification System III score. Data on education, occupation, income, and housing type were obtained from a standardised interview. Biometric data were available on 951 phakic subjects. After controlling for age, sex, occupation, income and housing type, higher education was associated with longer axial lengths (0.60 mm; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.34, 0.85, for every 10 years of education), longer vitreous chambers (0.53 mm; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.77), and more myopic refractions (-1.50 dioptres, 95% CI: -2.08, -0.92). Adjustment for axial length attenuated the refractive association of education (-0.68 dioptre, 95% CI: -1.14, -0.21). Similarly, near work related occupations (managers, professionals, and office workers) and higher income were independently associated with longer axial lengths, longer vitreous chambers, and more myopic refractions, and adjustment for axial length attenuated the refractive associations. Adults with greater education, near work related occupations, and higher income are more likely to have longer axial lengths and vitreous chambers, and more myopic refractions. The refractive associations of education, occupation, and income are largely explained by variations in axial length.

  12. Design, validation and application of an ocular Shack-Hartmann aberrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jochen

    The design and testing of an ocular Shack-Hartmann aberrometer is presented. The aberrometer objectively measures optical aberrations in the human eye in vivo. The sensor was successfully tested for measurements of refractive error (sphere and cylinder) and spherical aberration. Vignetting limits the measurement range of the wavefront to a range of -10 D to +15 D. Large refractive errors and decentration of the measurement induce aberrations in the test wavefront. Analytical tools to correct for these systematic errors were developed. A clinical study was conducted assessing visual performance in 158 eyes of 89 subjects before and after LARK refractive surgery. The main results of the study were that refractive surgery corrects refractive errors very accurately. A slight regression in refraction during the 12 months after surgery was noted. Measurements of ocular aberrations using the Shack-Hartmann aberrometer revealed that refractive surgery introduced large amounts of higher order aberrations, mainly spherical aberration and coma. The amount of aberrations changed significantly during the 12 months wound healing period. The dark adapted pupil diameter of the eye increased significantly during the first 6 months after surgery. The changes in ocular aberrations and pupil diameter were correlated to changes in contrast sensitivity in the human eye. The analysis of corneal topography showed that while the anterior corneal curvature changed due to surgery, we also saw a change in the posterior corneal curvature as a biomechanical response to surgery. A Customized Eye Model was designed and tested based on the clinical measurements. The model used conic surfaces and modeled defocus and spherical aberration. This computer eye model was then used in optical lens design software to calculate an optimal Customized Ablation Pattern for individual eyes.

  13. Ocular injuries in automobile crashes.

    PubMed

    Huelke, D F; O'Day, J; Barhydt, W H

    1982-01-01

    Tempered windshields commonly used in Europe have been shown to be related to the relatively high incidence of ocular injuries. Although windshields of the High Penetration Resistant (HPR) type in cars in North America are not at all significantly involved in ocular injuries, still about 50 % of the injuries of the eye area are caused by glass. The HPR windshield probably is the main reason for the relatively low occurrence of ocular injuries in United States crashes compared to these injuries reported from countries with tempered windshields. No ocular injuries were observed among belted occupants in this study. It appears that the increased use of lap-shoulder belts would decrease the likelihood of occupant contact with the windshield, mirrors, roof support, steering wheel, and instrument panel- about two thirds of the occupant contacts related to ocular injury- and thus reduce the incidence of ocular injuries leading to decreased vision.

  14. The effects of Qi-Qong ocular exercise on accommodation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Y F; Lin, L L; Hwang, C Y; Huang, J K; Hung, P T; Hou, P K

    1995-01-01

    Visual-training methods in management of myopia are suggested as possibly leading to normal vision or an improvement in the refractive state. The purpose of this work was to investigate the hypothesis that a Qi-Qong ocular exercise improves visual function by training the accommodation bias. Variations of pupil size, accommodative amplitude, latency and speed of accommodative response and accommodative adaptation were evaluated objectively. The accommodative state was monitored with an objective infrared refractometer (Nidek AA-2000). Subjects were divided into two groups: experimental (n = 9), and control (n = 8). Subjects of the experimental group undertook the Qi-Qong ocular exercise for at least three years, and were able to perform the exercise smoothly and gently. Subjects of the control group had no knowledge of the Qi-Qong ocular exercise, but were given the same testing procedures as the experimental group. Results showed that Qi-Qong ocular exercise can improve the accommodative amplitude and accelerate the accommodative response slightly, but there was no effect on the latency of accommodative response. Furthermore, the level of accommodative adaptation was elevated, and the pupil became slight miotic. Therefore, the mechanism of visual improvement may undergo a great accommodative adaptation and produce a pinhole effect by miosis of the pupil. Methods of visual training can produce a false image of visual improvement from an enhanced parasympathetic response to a task, but this effect may be a factor that induces progression of myopia.

  15. Ocular neuropathy in peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Evliyaoglu, Ferhat; Karadag, Remzi; Burakgazi, Ahmet Z

    2012-11-01

    Ocular movements and coordination require complex and integrated functions of somatic and autonomic nervous systems. Neurological disorders affecting these nervous systems may cause ocular dysfunction involving extraocular muscles and pupils. In this article, the prevalence, clinical presentations, and management of ocular neuropathy related to certain peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory neuropathies, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neuropathy, and hereditary neuropathies, are examined in detail. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The refractive group.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C

    1997-06-01

    Spherocylindrical optical elements can be decomposed into a sphere-equivalent component and two cross-cylinder components, oriented at 45 degrees to one another. These components in turn can be represented with a simple matrix formalism. This matrix formalism allows it to be seen that the components also form members of an eight element group, designated the refractive group. The structure of this group is developed including its algebra and its representation with Cayley diagrams. The group is identified as the eight element dihedral group, D4, and is compared to another well-known eight element group, the quaternion group. An example is given using the group formal algebra to develop the transfer equations for spherocylindrical wavefronts. Certain properties of propagating spherocylindrical wavefronts, such as nonrotation of cylinder axes, are seen to come directly as consequences of the group properties.

  17. Refraction, including prisms.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, R L

    1991-02-01

    The literature in the past year on refraction is replete with several isolated but very important topics that have been of interest to strabismologists and refractionists for many decades. The refractive changes in scleral buckling procedures include an increase in axial length as well as an increase in myopia, as would be expected. Tinted lenses in dyslexia show little positive effect in the nonasthmatic patients in one study. The use of spectacles or bifocals as a way to control increase in myopia is refuted in another report. It has been shown that in accommodative esotropia not all patients will be able to escape the use of bifocals in the teenage years, even though surgery might be performed. The hope that disposable contact lenses would cut down on the instance of giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis has been given some credence, and the conventional theory that sclerosis alone is the cause of presbyopia is attacked. Also, gas permeable bifocal contact lenses are reviewed and the difficulties of correcting presbyopia by this method outlined. The practice of giving an aphakic less bifocal addition instead of a nonaphakic, based on the presumption of increased effective power, is challenged. In the review of prisms, the majority of articles concern prism adaption. The most significant report is that of the Prism Adaptation Study Research Group (Arch Ophthalmol 1990, 108:1248-1256), showing that acquired esotropia in particular has an increased incidence of stable and full corrections surgically in the prism adaptation group versus the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. GRAVSAT/GEOPAUSE refraction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llewellyn, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A ground station network tracked a high altitude spacecraft which in turn tracked a low orbiting satellite. Orbit data are relayed back to the ground stations. A refraction study was performed on this configuration to compute ionospheric and tropospheric refraction effects along the satellite and ground links.

  19. Binocular vision and refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Alison L

    2007-05-01

    Binocular status can have an effect on the outcome of refractive surgery. Some accommodative deviations and anisometropia can be managed effectively. Fully accommodative esotropia has been successfully treated in young patients but the outcome can be less predictable in older patients. High anisometropes are usually unaffected by the change in aniseikonia following refractive surgery but there are exceptions. Failure to recognise and appropriately classify a binocular vision anomaly pre-surgically can result in symptoms that are difficult to manage post-operatively. Refractive surgery producing a binocular vision anomaly where there was none pre-operatively is less common. I present a review of the literature discussing the relationship between binocular vision anomalies and refractive surgery, illustrating the findings with published reports of successful and unsuccessful binocular postoperative outcomes. I argue that predicting the binocular outcome should be considered pre-operatively for every refractive surgery patient.

  20. Ocular medications in children.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D K; Steinkuller, P G

    1998-11-01

    Many ocular medications are used by pediatricians or ophthalmologists caring for pediatric patients. Topical antibiotics are commonly prescribed for bacterial conjunctivitis, nasolacrimal duct obstructions, and ophthalmia neonatorum. Many new antiallergy eye drops are now available for the treatment of seasonal (hay fever) conjunctivitis. Dilating eye drops and antiglaucoma medications are generally used or prescribed by ophthalmologists, but pediatricians must be aware of their potentially serious systemic side effects. Before initiating treatment, physicians should evaluate the risks and benefits of ophthalmic medications, establish minimum dosages necessary to achieve a therapeutic benefit, and monitor children for local and systemic side effects.

  1. [Ocular biometry using Orbscan].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, O; Allouch, C; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2005-06-01

    Orbscan is a recent optical device that combines the Placido disk of the videokeratoscope and a scanning slit. The scanning slit measures the elevation of both the corneal surface (anterior and posterior) and the anterior iris-lens surface. Biometric measures of the anterior segment such as corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth, corneal diameter, and iridocorneal angle are obtained using spatial coordinates of various ocular surfaces. Orbscan is not only a corneal topograph but a versatile device capable of measuring the biometry of the anterior segment of the eye.

  2. Ocular surface tumors

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ihab Saad

    2009-01-01

    Tumors of the conjunctiva and cornea comprise a large and varied spectrum of conditions. These tumors are grouped into two major categories of congenital and acquired lesions. The acquired lesions are further subdivided based on origin of the mass into surface epithelial, mucoepidermoid, melanocytic, vascular, fibrous, neural, histiocytic, myxoid, myogenic, lipomatous, lymphoid, leukemic, metastatic and secondary tumors. Ocular surface tumors include a variety of neoplasms originating from squamous epithelium, melanocytic tumors and lymphocytic resident cells of the conjunctival stroma. In this review, we highlight clinical features of these lesions, important diagnostic and investigative tools and standard care of management. PMID:21234217

  3. Effect of watching 3-dimensional television on refractive error in children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Suh, Young-Woo; Choi, Yong-Min; Han, Ji-Yoon; Nam, Gi-Tae; You, Eun-Joo; Cho, Yoonae A

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effect of watching 3-dimensional (3D) television (TV) on refractive error in children. Sixty healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 12 years, without any ocular abnormalities other than refractive error were recruited for this study. They watched 3D TV for 50 minutes at a viewing distance of 2.8 meters. The image disparity of the 3D contents was from -1 to 1 degree. Refractive errors were measured both before and immediately after watching TV and were rechecked after a 10-minute rest period. The refractive errors before and after watching TV were compared. The amount of refractive change was also compared between myopes and controls. The refractive error of the participants who showed a myopic shift immediately after watching TV were compared across each time point to assure that the myopic shift persisted after a 10-minute rest. The mean age of the participants was 9.23 ± 1.75 years. The baseline manifest refractive error was -1.70 ± 1.79 (-5.50 to +1.25) diopters. The refractive errors immediately after watching and after a 10-minute rest were -1.75 ± 1.85 and -1.69 ± 1.80 diopters, respectively, which were not different from the baseline values. Myopic participants (34 participants), whose spherical equivalent was worse than -0.75 diopters, also did not show any significant refractive change after watching 3D TV. A myopic shift was observed in 31 participants with a mean score of 0.29 ± 0.23 diopters, which resolved after a 10-minute rest. Watching properly made 3D content on a 3D TV for 50 minutes with a 10-minute intermission at more than 2.8 meters of viewing distance did not affect the refractive error of children.

  4. Trial frame refraction versus autorefraction among new patients in a low-vision clinic.

    PubMed

    DeCarlo, Dawn K; McGwin, Gerald; Searcey, Karen; Gao, Liyan; Snow, Marsha; Waterbor, John; Owsley, Cynthia

    2013-01-02

    To determine the relationship between refractive error as measured by autorefraction and that measured by trial frame refraction among a sample of adults with vision impairment seen in a university-based low-vision clinic and to determine if autorefraction might be a suitable replacement for trial frame refraction. A retrospective chart review of all new patients 19 years or older seen over an 18-month period was conducted and the following data collected: age, sex, primary ocular diagnosis, entering distance visual acuity, habitual correction, trial frame refraction, autorefraction, and distance visual acuity measured after trial frame refraction. Trial frame refraction and autorefraction were compared using paired t-tests, intraclass correlations, and Bland-Altman plots. Final analyses included 440 patients for whom both trial frame refraction and autorefraction data were available for the better eye. Participants were mostly female (59%) with a mean age of 68 years (SD = 20). Age-related macular degeneration was the most common etiology for vision impairment (44%). Values for autorefraction and trial frame refraction were statistically different, but highly correlated for the spherical equivalent power (r = 0.92), the cylinder power (r = 0.80) and overall blurring strength (0.89). Although the values of the cross-cylinders J(0) and J(45) were similar, they were poorly correlated (0.08 and 0.15, respectively). The range of differences in spherical equivalent power was large (-8.6 to 4.9). Autorefraction is highly correlated with trial frame refraction. Differences are sometimes substantial, making autorefraction an unsuitable substitute for trial frame refraction.

  5. Trial Frame Refraction versus Autorefraction among New Patients in a Low-Vision Clinic

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Dawn K.; McGwin, Gerald; Searcey, Karen; Gao, Liyan; Snow, Marsha; Waterbor, John; Owsley, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the relationship between refractive error as measured by autorefraction and that measured by trial frame refraction among a sample of adults with vision impairment seen in a university-based low-vision clinic and to determine if autorefraction might be a suitable replacement for trial frame refraction. Methods. A retrospective chart review of all new patients 19 years or older seen over an 18-month period was conducted and the following data collected: age, sex, primary ocular diagnosis, entering distance visual acuity, habitual correction, trial frame refraction, autorefraction, and distance visual acuity measured after trial frame refraction. Trial frame refraction and autorefraction were compared using paired t-tests, intraclass correlations, and Bland-Altman plots. Results. Final analyses included 440 patients for whom both trial frame refraction and autorefraction data were available for the better eye. Participants were mostly female (59%) with a mean age of 68 years (SD = 20). Age-related macular degeneration was the most common etiology for vision impairment (44%). Values for autorefraction and trial frame refraction were statistically different, but highly correlated for the spherical equivalent power (r = 0.92), the cylinder power (r = 0.80) and overall blurring strength (0.89). Although the values of the cross-cylinders J0 and J45 were similar, they were poorly correlated (0.08 and 0.15, respectively). The range of differences in spherical equivalent power was large (−8.6 to 4.9). Conclusions. Autorefraction is highly correlated with trial frame refraction. Differences are sometimes substantial, making autorefraction an unsuitable substitute for trial frame refraction. PMID:23188726

  6. Eye dryness sensations after refractive surgery: impaired tear secretion or "phantom" cornea?

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Carlos

    2007-06-01

    The cornea is richly innervated by various functional types of sensory nerve fibers. When stimulated, these fibers evoke conscious sensations of different quality including ocular dryness, discomfort, and pain. Refractive surgery involves a variable degree of damage to corneal nerves. This leads to an altered expression of membrane ion channels at the injured and regenerating nerve fibers, giving rise to aberrant spontaneous and stimulus-evoked nerve impulse firing. It is speculated that these abnormal sensory discharges are read by the brain as ocular surface dryness. This would explain the high incidence of eye dryness sensations after photorefractive surgery, which are experienced by a large number of patients despite the often modest disturbance of tear secretion. Therefore, drugs that reduce abnormal activity in injured nerves may represent a therapeutic alternative for eye dryness sensations after refractive surgery.

  7. MRI in ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, S Kevin; Lizak, Martin J; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-11-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed.

  8. Fetal ocular measurements by MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Bing; Kasprian, Gregor; Hodge, Jacqueline C; Jiang, Xiao Li; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    To present fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ocular measurement ranges by gestational age (GA) in normal and growth-restricted fetuses. A total of 298 pregnant women from the 18th to the 39th week of gestation were imaged using MRI. Ocular measurements including binocular distance (BOD), interocular distance (IOD), transverse ocular diameter (OD) and anterior-posterior (AP) OD were measured. The curve estimation analyses for linear, logarithmic and quadratic models were performed. The ocular measurements of the fetuses with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were compared with that of the normal fetuses. The fetal eye resembles an ellipsoid with significantly longer OD and shorter AP (t = - 22.07, p < 0.001). The quadratic model was the best model in predicting growth of the fetal BOD, IOD, OD and AP. The ocular measurements of the fetuses with IUGR were significantly different from that of the normal fetuses (BOD: t = 3.58, p < 0.001; IOD: t = 5.73, p < 0.001; OD: t = 3.52, p < 0.001; AP: t = 2.19, p < 0.05). Fetal ocular growth can be readily assessed by fetal MRI. Using the normative data provided in this study, fetal ocular anomalies may be detected. Ocular size is frequently reduced in the condition of IUGR, with potential pathologic impact on postnatal vision.

  9. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed. PMID:18186077

  10. Constructal approach to bio-engineering: the ocular anterior chamber temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lucia, Umberto; Grisolia, Giulia; Dolcino, Daniela; Astori, Maria Rosa; Massa, Eugenio; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the pressure inside the eyes anterior chamber, namedintraocular pressure (IOP), in relation to the biomechanical properties of corneas. The approach used was based on the constructal law, recently introduced in vision analysis. Results were expressed as the relation between the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber and the biomechanical properties of the cornea. The IOP, the elastic properties of the cornea, and the related refractive properties of the eye were demonstrated to be dependent on the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber. These results could lead to new perspectives for experimental analysis of the IOP in relation to the properties of the cornea. PMID:27492652

  11. Constructal approach to bio-engineering: the ocular anterior chamber temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto; Grisolia, Giulia; Dolcino, Daniela; Astori, Maria Rosa; Massa, Eugenio; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the pressure inside the eyes anterior chamber, namedintraocular pressure (IOP), in relation to the biomechanical properties of corneas. The approach used was based on the constructal law, recently introduced in vision analysis. Results were expressed as the relation between the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber and the biomechanical properties of the cornea. The IOP, the elastic properties of the cornea, and the related refractive properties of the eye were demonstrated to be dependent on the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber. These results could lead to new perspectives for experimental analysis of the IOP in relation to the properties of the cornea.

  12. Psychophysical experiments on visual performance with an ocular adaptive optics system - Oral Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalimier, E.; Dainty, J. C.; Barbur, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    An ocular adaptive optics system was used to investigate the effects of higher-order ocular aberrations on everyday functional vision. The system comprised a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a Badal optometer and cylindrical lenses to statically pre-correct refractive errors, and a 35 element bimorph mirror from AOptix to dynamically compensate for higher-order aberrations. Measurements of contrast acuity with and without correction of higher-order aberrations were performed in a large range of light levels and pupil sizes. The results showed that the visual benefit is limited at all light levels due to the combined effects of light level on pupil size and neural sensitivity.

  13. Refractive index modulation in photo-thermo-refractive fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotari, Eugeniu; Glebova, Larissa; Glebov, Leonid

    2005-04-01

    Refractive index decrement was discovered in a fiber made from photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass. PTR glass is a fluorosilicate glass doped with cerium and silver which demonstrates refractive index change after UV exposure and thermal development due to precipitation of NaF nanocrystals in the irradiated areas. This glass is widely used for volume holographic optical elements recording. Photosensitivity in PTR optical fibers has been shown after exposure to radiation at 325 nm for about 1 J/cm2 followed by thermal development at 520°C. Refractive index difference between exposed and unexposed areas was about 1000 ppm. A Bragg mirror at 1088 nm was recorded in such fiber which showed narrow band reflection within 1 nm.

  14. Nonlinear refractive index of photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santran, Stephane; Martinez-Rosas, Miguel; Canioni, Lionel; Sarger, Laurent; Glebova, Larissa N.; Tirpak, Alan; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2006-03-01

    Nonlinear properties of a photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass are studied and compared with those in fused silica and a conventional optical glass. PTR glass is a new photosensitive medium for high-efficiency phase volume hologram recording which manifests a linear refractive index modulation after exposure to UV radiation followed by thermal treatment. Nonlinear optical properties of PTR glass exposed to femtosecond laser pulses are studied. Diffraction patterns in a propagated laser beam focused in the sample were detected by a CCD, while a nonlinear refractive index was measured by a collinear-orthogonal-polarization-pump-probe (COP3) method. It was found that nonlinear refractive index of PTRG is n2 = 3.3 × 10-20 m2/W (0.33 ppm cm2/GW) which is about the same as for the fused silica. It is important that n2 in PTR glass does not vary after UV exposure and thermal development.

  15. Nonhuman Primate Ocular Biometry

    PubMed Central

    Augusteyn, Robert C.; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine ocular growth in nonhuman primates (NHPs) from measurements on ex vivo eyes. Methods We obtained NHP eyes from animals that had been killed as part of other studies or because of health-related issues. Digital calipers were used to measure the horizontal, vertical, and anteroposterior globe diameters as well as corneal horizontal and vertical diameters of excised globes from 98 hamadryas baboons, 551 cynomolgus monkeys, and 112 rhesus monkeys, at ages ranging from 23 to 360 months. Isolated lens sagittal thickness and equatorial diameter were measured by shadowphotogrammetry. Wet and fixed dry weights were obtained for lenses. Results Nonhuman primate globe growth continues throughout life, slowing toward an asymptotic maximum. The final globe size scales with negative allometry to adult body size. Corneal growth ceases at around 20 months. Lens diameter increases but thickness decreases with increasing age. Nonhuman primate lens wet and dry weight accumulation is monophasic, continuing throughout life toward asymptotic maxima. The dry/wet weight ratio reaches a maximum of 0.33. Conclusions Nonhuman primate ocular globe and lens growth differ in several respects from those in humans. Although age-related losses of lens power and accommodative amplitude are similar, lens growth and properties are different indicating care should be taken in extrapolating NHP observations to the study of human accommodation. PMID:26780314

  16. Ocular surface reconstruction update.

    PubMed

    Shimmura, Shigeto; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2002-08-01

    Ocular surface reconstruction (OSR) is now a standard procedure in the treatment of severe ocular surface disorders. The past few years have revealed the long-term results of patients who were operated on during the early stages of OSR development, and we now have a more realistic view of the benefits and limits of the procedure. On the other hand, further understanding of the physiologic role played by the amniotic membrane (AM) has opened doors to further refined techniques in treating these patients. This review will introduce some of the major contributions made during the past years in the advancement of OSR. Clinically, we are at a stage of reviewing the pros and cons of the various transplantation techniques. Identification of factors crucial for a successful OSR procedure will further improve surgical results. Basic researchers are on the verge of identifying the so-called limbal stem cells, and further understanding of AM physiology will lead the way to tissue engineering techniques as another alternative in OSR surgery.

  17. Ocular surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Efron, N; Young, G; Brennan, N A

    1989-09-01

    A wide-field color-coded infra-red imaging device was applied to the measurement of i) the temperature profile across the ocular surface and ii) the temporal stability of central corneal temperature, on 21 subjects. The thermographs showed a pattern of ellipsoidal isotherms (major axis horizontal) approximately concentric about a temperature apex (coldest point) which was slightly inferior to the geometric center of the cornea (GCC). The GCC had a mean temperature (+/- SD) of 34.3 +/- 0.7 degrees C (range 32.8 to 35.4 degrees C). Temperature increased towards the periphery of the cornea with the limbus being 0.45 degrees C warmer than the GCC (p less than 0.0001). Following a blink, the GCC cooled at a mean (+/- SD) rate of 0.033 +/- 0.024 degrees C/s (p less than 0.0001) over the first 15s. Subjects whose corneas cooled more slowly following a blink demonstrated a greater capacity to avoid blinking for a prolonged period (p less than 0.05). This improved method of measuring ocular surface temperature has important applications in modeling corneal physiology and pathology.

  18. Recent advances in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E Y; Jackson, W B

    1999-01-01

    Refractive errors are some of the most common ophthalmic abnormalities world-wide and are associated with significant morbidity. Tremendous advances in treating refractive errors have occurred over the past 20 years. The arrival of the excimer laser has allowed a level of accuracy in modifying the cornea that was unattainable before. Although refractive surgery is generally safe and effective, it does carry some risks. Careful patient selection, meticulous surgical technique and frequent follow-up can avoid most complications. The experience of a surgical team can also affect the outcome and the incidence of complications. The future should bring continued improvement in outcomes, fewer complications and exciting new options for treating refractive errors. PMID:10333840

  19. Negative Refraction in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoufie Ukhtary, Muhammad; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically propose that Weyl semimetals may exhibit negative refraction at some frequencies close to the plasmon frequency, allowing transverse magnetic (TM) electromagnetic waves with frequencies smaller than the plasmon frequency to propagate in the Weyl semimetals. The idea is justified by the calculation of reflection spectra, in which negative refractive index at such frequencies gives physically correct spectra. In this case, a TM electromagnetic wave incident to the surface of the Weyl semimetal will be bent with a negative angle of refraction. We argue that the negative refractive index at the specified frequencies of the electromagnetic wave is required to conserve the energy of the wave, in which the incident energy should propagate away from the point of incidence.

  20. Diplopia associated with refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Burton J

    2012-01-01

    When diplopia occurs after refractive surgery, a systematized approach to diagnosis and treatment is useful. First, determine if the problem is monocular or binocular. Monocular diplopia usually is caused by anterior segment complications and should be referred to an anterior segment surgeon. If the problem is binocular, determine if there is iatrogenic monovision. If monovision was created by the refractive surgery, determine if the double vision is due to fixation switch diplopia. If so, the monovision state needs to be reversed. If fixation switch is not the cause of the symptoms, try "optical rescue". If monovision is not present, check old refraction and motility records, and correct any residual refractive error. Strabismus may need to be treated with surgery, orthoptic exercises, or prisms.

  1. Refraction characteristics of phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2015-08-01

    Some of the most interesting refraction properties of phononic crystals are revealed by examining the anti-plane shear waves in doubly periodic elastic composites with unit cells containing rectangular and/or elliptical multi-inclusions. The corresponding band structure, group velocity, and energy-flux vector are calculated using a powerful mixed variational method that accurately and efficiently yields all the field quantities over multiple frequency pass-bands. The background matrix and the inclusions can be anisotropic, each having distinct elastic moduli and mass densities. Equifrequency contours and energy-flux vectors are readily calculated as functions of the wave-vector components. By superimposing the energy-flux vectors on equifrequency contours in the plane of the wave-vector components, and supplementing this with a three-dimensional graph of the corresponding frequency surface, a wealth of information is extracted essentially at a glance. This way it is shown that a composite with even a simple square unit cell containing a central circular inclusion can display negative or positive energy and phase velocity refractions, or simply performs a harmonic vibration (standing wave), depending on the frequency and the wave-vector. Moreover, that the same composite when interfaced with a suitable homogeneous solid can display: (1) negative refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (2) negative refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; (3) positive refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (4) positive refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; or even (5) complete reflection with no energy transmission, depending on the frequency, and direction and the wavelength of the plane-wave that is incident from the homogeneous solid to the interface. For elliptical and rectangular inclusion geometries, analytical expressions are given for the key calculation quantities. Expressions for displacement, velocity, linear momentum

  2. Foldable antibacterial acrylic intraocular lenses of high refractive index.

    PubMed

    Parra, F; Vázquez, B; Benito, L; Barcenilla, J; San Román, J

    2009-11-09

    Hydrophilic copolymers with high refractive index and bactericide properties based on quaternary ammonium salts monomers and methacrylates bearing benzothiazole moieties have been developed for application as foldable intraocular lenses. Composition of the systems was adjusted to get materials with optimized flexibility, wettability, and refractive properties. All the materials have been characterized in terms of optical properties, glass transition temperature, water content, and wettability. Water contact values oscillated between 37 and 15% and refractive index values in the wet state between 1.49 and 1.53, depending on composition. Glass transition temperature interval was 63-77 degrees C. Values of surface free energy of the solid ranged from 49 to 54 mN/m, characteristic of IOL hydrogel materials. Bactericide properties of the quaternary ammonium salts methacrylates were higher than that of the benzothiazole derivative, showing inhibition halos as high as 23-25 mm in antibiogram tests against S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa , strains found in the ocular cavity and responsible for most postsurgical endolphthalmitis. Biocompatibility of the systems was evaluated in cell cultures using human fibroblasts. Cellular viability was higher than 90%, and close to 100% in many cases, for the extracts of selected formulations collected at different periods of time.

  3. [Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement].

    PubMed

    Grein, H-J; Schmidt, O; Ritsche, A

    2014-11-01

    Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement is limited by various factors. The main factors affecting reproducibility include the characteristics of the measurement method and of the subject and the examiner. This article presents the results of a study on this topic, focusing on the reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes. The results of previous studies are not all presented in the same way by the respective authors and cannot be fully standardized without consulting the original scientific data. To the extent that they are comparable, the results of our study largely correspond largely with those of previous investigations: During repeated subjective refraction measurement, 95% of the deviation from the mean value was approximately ±0.2 D to ±0.65 D for the spherical equivalent and cylindrical power. The reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes is limited, even under ideal conditions. Correct assessment of refraction results is only feasible after identifying individual variability. Several measurements are required. Refraction cannot be measured without a tolerance range. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under supplemental).

  4. Inhibition of 5-fluorouracil-induced ocular irritation by ocular ice packs.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, C L; Wender, D B; Veeder, M H; O'Fallon, J R; Vaught, N L; Dose, A M; Ghosh, C; Bartel, J; Leitch, J M

    1994-08-01

    This clinical trial was developed to determine whether ocular ice pack therapy would decrease 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced ocular toxicity. Sixty-two patients who suffered from 5-FU-induced ocular toxicity, and were scheduled to receive another cycle of the chemotherapy that caused the ocular toxicity, were entered in this clinical trial. A randomized, crossover design was used, with patients documenting their ocular toxicity by the use of daily diaries. The results from the first cycle of treatment suggested that ocular ice pack therapy decreased 5-FU-induced ocular toxicity (P = 0.056). The 38 evaluable patients in the crossover analyses demonstrated decreased ocular toxicity with ocular ice pack therapy (p = .001). The ocular ice pack therapy was well tolerated by most of the study participants. Ocular ice pack therapy appears to lessen 5-FU-induced ocular toxicity to a clinically moderate degree. Better methods for decreasing 5-FU-induced ocular toxicity are necessary.

  5. Ocular involvement in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Akhyani, Maryam; Keshtkar-Jafari, Alireza; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda; Lajevardi, Vahide; Beigi, Sara; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Rayati Damavandi, Maede; Arami, Shabnam

    2014-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disorder affecting the skin and mucous membranes. Ocular involvement in PV has been reported but its prevalence and clinical characteristics are not well defined. This prospective cross-sectional study of 103 PV patients was designed to determine the prevalence, clinical types and epidemiological trends of ocular involvement in a population of Iranian patients with PV. Ocular involvement was present in 17 (16.5%) patients. Conjunctivitis was the most prevalent type of ocular involvement (9/17, 52.9%), followed by erosion of the palpebral conjunctiva (7/17, 41.2%). Erosion of the bulbar conjunctiva was noted in only one patient (5.9%). The most commonly reported symptoms were eye irritation (76.5%) and redness (76.5%). No significant relation was found between ocular involvement and disease activity (partial remission or relapse). Mucoid discharge was significantly more common in patients with conjunctival erosions as compared to patients with conjunctivitis (P = 0.038). We conclude that ocular involvement is not rare in PV; 16.5% of PV patients develop ocular disease independent of the disease activity and extension. Conjunctivitis is the most common type of involvement, however, palpebral conjunctival erosion is more frequent than previously realized.

  6. Sports related ocular injuries.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Avinash; Verma, Ashok K

    2012-07-01

    Every year > 600,000 sports and recreation related eye injuries occur, out of which roughly 13,500 of these result in permanent loss of sight. Up to 90% of these sports related eye injuries are preventable by using adequate eye protection equipment. Protective eyewear is made of polycarbonate, a highly impact-resistant plastic which is now easily available as prescription and non-prescription eyewear and all players should be encouraged to use them. The medical officers by educating their patients regarding the risks of eye injuries in various sports and the confirmed benefits of using protective equipment have the potential to prevent injury to over thousands of eyes every year. The medical fraternity can also play a very important role in educating the coaches, parents, and children and thus put an end to unnecessary blindness and vision loss from sports related ocular injuries, therefore ensuring a lifetime of healthy vision.

  7. Ocular leech infestation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Chang; Chiu, Cheng-Jen

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes a female toddler with manifestations of ocular leech infestation. A 2-year-old girl was brought to our outpatient clinic with a complaint of irritable crying after being taken to a stream in Hualien 1 day previous, where she played in the water. The parents noticed that she rubbed her right eye a lot. Upon examination, the girl had good fix and follow in either eye. Slit-lamp examination showed conjunctival injection with a moving dark black–brown foreign body partly attached in the lower conjunctiva. After applying topical anesthetics, the leech, measuring 1 cm in length, was extracted under a microscope. The patient began using topical antibiotic and corticosteroid agents. By 1 week after extraction, the patient had no obvious symptoms or signs, except for a limited subconjunctival hemorrhage, and no corneal/scleral involvement was observed. PMID:25784786

  8. Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Rocio I; Sigler, Eric J; Rafieetary, Mohammad R; Calzada, Jorge I

    2015-01-01

    Ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (OHS) is a chorioretinal disorder with a distinct fundus appearance that is commonly found in regions endemic for Histoplasma capsulatum. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to OHS is considered one of the principal causes of central vision loss among young adults in endemic areas. Although there is no consensus regarding its pathogenesis, evidence points to Histoplasma capsulatum as the most probable etiology. Once considered an intractable hemorrhagic maculopathy, CNVs are now treatable. Extrafoveal CNVs are successfully treated with laser photocoagulation. Subfoveal and juxtafoveal CNVs are managed with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, photodynamic therapy, or a combination of both. Modern imaging technologies such as spectral-domain optical coherence tomography have improved our diagnostic abilities, making it easier to monitor disease activity and CNV regression. We review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis, and current treatment of this disease.

  9. Corticosteroids for ocular toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Smitha; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; John, Sheeja S; Horo, Saban; Sepah, Yasir J; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Background Ocular infestation with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite, may result in inflammation in the retina, choroid, and uvea and consequently lead to complications such as glaucoma, cataract, and posterior synechiae. Objectives The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effects of adjunctive use of corticosteroids for ocular toxoplasmosis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We searched the reference lists of included studies for any additional studies not identified by the electronic searches. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 11 October 2012. Selection criteria We planned to include randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Eligible trials would have enrolled participants of any age who were immunocompetent and were diagnosed with active ocular toxoplasmosis. Included trials would have compared anti-parasitic therapy plus corticosteroids versus anti-parasitic therapy alone, or different doses or times of initiation of corticosteroids. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts retrieved from the electronic searches. We retrieved full-text articles of studies categorized as ‘unsure’ or ‘include’ after review of the abstracts. Two authors independently reviewed each full-text article. Discrepancies were

  10. Cornea: Window to Ocular Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2011-01-01

    The ocular surface is continuously exposed to environmental agents such as allergens, pollutants, and microorganisms, which could provoke inflammation. However, an array of anatomical, physiological, and immunological features of the ocular surface conspire to limit corneal inflammation and endow the eye with immune privilege. A remarkable example of ocular immune privilege is the success of corneal allografts, which unlike all other forms of organ transplantation, survive without the use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs or MHC matching. This review describes the anatomical, physiological, and dynamic immunoregulatory processes that contribute to immune privilege. PMID:21789035

  11. Ocular manifestations of feline herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Andrew, S E

    2001-03-01

    Feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) infection is ubiquitous in the domestic cat population worldwide. The most common clinical ocular manifestations of infection with FHV-1 are conjunctivitis and keratitis. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of feline herpesvirus-1 and discusses the various clinical ocular manifestations, diagnostic techniques and treatment of FHV-1-induced diseases. Ocular manifestations include: conjunctivitis, keratitis, stromal keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, ophthalmia neonatorium, symblepharon, corneal sequestrum, eosinophilic keratitis and anterior uveitis. Diagnostic techniques discussed include: virus isolation, fluorescent antibody testing, serum neutralising titers, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction. Various therapies are also discussed.

  12. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  13. Ocular myasthenia gravis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Venkatramani, Devendra V; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disease that affects the neuro-muscular junction resulting in classical symptoms of variable muscle weakness and fatigability. It is called the great masquerader owing to its varied clinical presentations. Very often, a patient of MG may present to the ophthalmologist given that a large proportion of patients with systemic myasthenia have ocular involvement either at presentation or during the later course of the disease. The treatment of ocular MG involves both the neurologist and ophthalmologist. Thus, the aim of this review was to highlight the current diagnosis, investigations, and treatment of ocular MG. PMID:25449931

  14. X-Linked ocular albinism; Nettleship-Falls ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Booth, Alexandria V; Soldano, Anthony C; Levine, Jonathan; Pomeranz, Miriam

    2008-05-15

    A 39-year-old man with foveal hypoplasia, nystagmus, and decreased visual acuity was found to have multiple, cutaneous, hypopigmented macules. Macromelanosomes were demonstrated in normal skin on histopathologic examination. The patient's constellation of findings along with a strong X-linked inheritance pattern in family members led to the diagnosis of X-linked ocular albinism, which is an uncommon condition that is characterized by congenital nystagmus, iris translucency, hypopigmentation of the ocular fundus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, photophobia, and impaired vision.

  15. In vivo measurements of thermal load during ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    de Ortueta, Diego; Magnago, Thomas; Triefenbach, Nico; Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Sauer, Udo; Brunsmann, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the thermal load of ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery with the AMARIS excimer laser (SCHWIND eye-tech-solutions). Thermal load from refractive corrections on human corneas using a 500-Hz laser system with a fluence of 500 mJ/cm(2) and aspheric ablation profiles was recorded with an infrared thermography camera. Each single in vivo measurement was analyzed and temperature values were evaluated. Overall, the maximum temperature change of the ocular surface induced by the refractive ablations was ≤4°C. The increase in the peak temperature of the ocular surface never exceeded 35°C in any case. This low thermal load was independent of the amount of correction the eye achieved. The thermal load of the ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery was minimized using a computer algorithm to control the peak temperature to avoid corneal collagen denaturation with minimal compromise on treatment duration. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Correlations in refractive errors between siblings in the Singapore Cohort Study of Risk factors for Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Pong‐Wong, Ricardo; Haley, Chris S; Gazzard, Gus; Saw, Seang Mei

    2007-01-01

    Background The prevalence of myopia in parts of South East Asia has risen dramatically over the past 1–2 generations, suggesting that environmental factors may be particularly important determinants of refractive development in these populations. Aim To assess the contribution of familial factors (shared genes and/or shared family environment) to refractive error and ocular component dimensions of school‐aged children in Singapore. Methods Data were available for 315 children who had one or more siblings also participating in the Singapore Cohort Study of the Risk factors for Myopia (SCORM). Refractive error and ocular biometric parameters were measured under cycloplegia at baseline when children were 7–9 years, and at yearly follow‐up sessions for the next 3 years, using consistent clinical procedures. The time children spent performing a variety of nearwork‐related tasks was obtained from questionnaires. Familial influences were assessed by calculating between‐sibling correlations. Results After adjusting for age and sex, the between‐sibling correlation in refractive error was 0.447 (95% CI 0.314 to 0.564), suggesting that familial factors account for 63–100% of the variation in the cohort. The between‐sibling correlation for 1‐year change in refractive error was similarly high, at 0.420 (95% CI 0.282 to 0.543). All ocular component dimensions were correlated significantly between siblings, especially for corneal curvature and vitreous chamber depth—the major structural determinants of refraction. The amount of time siblings spent engaged in nearwork tasks (reading, watching TV, playing video games, computing) and in outdoor activities was also highly correlated between siblings (p<0.001). Conclusion Shared genes and/or shared environment are important factors in the refractive development of children in Singapore. Because the time spent in nearwork tasks is highly correlated between siblings, epidemiological studies will benefit from

  17. Comparable change in stromal refractive index of cat and human corneas following blue-IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Kaitlin T.; Gearhart, Sara M.; Savage, Daniel E.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Knox, Wayne H.; Huxlin, Krystel R.

    2017-05-01

    Blue intratissue refractive index shaping (blue-IRIS) is a method with potential to correct ocular refraction noninvasively in humans. To date, blue-IRIS has only ever been applied to cat corneas and hydrogels. To test the comparability of refractive index change achievable in cat and human tissues, we used blue-IRIS to write identical phase gratings in ex vivo feline and human corneas. Femtosecond pulses (400 nm) were focused ˜300 μm below the epithelial surface of excised cat and human corneas and scanned to write phase gratings with lines ˜1 μm wide, spaced 5 μm apart, using a scan speed of 5 mm/s. Additional cat corneas were used to test writing at 3 and 7 mm/s in order to document speed dependence of the refractive index change magnitude. The first-order diffraction efficiency was immediately measured and used to calculate the refractive index change attained. Our data show that blue-IRIS induces comparable refractive index changes in feline and human corneas, an essential requirement for further developing its use as a clinical vision correction technique.

  18. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  19. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  20. Ocular Health (OH) Fundoscope Exam

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-05

    Astronaut Karen Nyberg and Astronaut Chris Cassidy (partially visible), both Expedition 37 flight engineers, perform an Ocular Health (OH) Fundoscope Exam in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station

  1. Peripheral refraction and the development of refractive error: a review.

    PubMed

    Charman, W Neil; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2010-07-01

    It has been suggested that emmetropic and low-hyperopic eyes in which the refractive error in the periphery of the visual field is relatively hyperopic with respect to the axial refraction may be at greater risk of developing myopia than eyes with similar refractions but relatively myopic peripheral refractive errors. The animal and human evidence to support this hypothesis is reviewed. The most persuasive studies are those in which emmetropization has been shown to occur in infant rhesus monkeys with ablated foveas but intact peripheral fields, and the demonstration that, in similar animals, lens-induced relative peripheral hyperopia produces central axial myopia. Evidence for emmetropization in animals with severed optic nerves suggests that emmetropization is primarily controlled at the retinal level but that the higher levels of the visual system play a significant role in refining the process: there appear to be no directly equivalent human studies. Since any contribution of the higher centres to the control of refractive development must depend upon the sensitivity to defocus, the results of human studies of the changes in depth-of-focus across the field and of the contribution of the retinal periphery to the accommodation response are discussed. Although peripheral resolution is relatively insensitive to focus, this is not the case for detection. Moreover accommodation occurs to peripheral stimuli out to a field angle of at least 10 deg, and the presence of a peripheral stimulus can influence the accommodation to a central target. Although the basic hypothesis that a relatively hyperopic peripheral refractive error can drive the development of human myopia remains unproven, the available data support the possibility of an interaction between the states of focus on axis and in the periphery.

  2. Refraction data survey: 2nd generation correlation of myopia.

    PubMed

    Greene, Peter R; Medina, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The objective herein is to provide refraction data, myopia progression rate, prevalence, and 1st and 2nd generation correlations, relevant to whether myopia is random or inherited. First- and second-generation ocular refraction data are assembled from N = 34 families, average of 2.8 children per family. From this group, data are available from N = 165 subjects. Inter-generation regressions are performed on all the data sets, including correlation coefficient r, and myopia prevalence [%]. Prevalence of myopia is [M] = 38.5 %. Prevalence of high myopes with |R| >6 D is [M-] = 20.5 %. Average refraction is  = -1.84 D ± 3.22 (N = 165). For the high myopes, |R| >6 D, prevalence for the parents is [M-] = 25 %, for the 2nd generation [M-] = 16.5 %. Average myopia level for the high myopes, both generations, is  = -7.52 D ± 1.31 D (N = 33). Regression parameters are calculated for all the data sets, yielding correlation coefficients in the range r = 0.48-0.72 for some groups of myopes and high myopes, fathers to daughters, and mothers to sons. Also of interest, some categories show essentially no correlation, -0.20 < r < 0.20, indicating that the refractive errors occur randomly. Time series results show myopia diopter rates = -0.50 D/year.

  3. [Ocular changes in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Popa, M; Nicoară, S

    2000-01-01

    The study analyzes the ocular aspects in patients receiving hemodialysis, in order to define the importance of the ophthalmological exam as prognosis and follow-up parameter. The prospective study includes 84 patients with renal insufficiency who received hemodialysis between 1994-1998. The ocular aspects and their connection with the dialysis and the basic disease are described and analyzed. The most important were the retinal vascular complications: hypertensive retinopathy, anterior optic ischaemic neuropathy, central retinal artery occlusion, diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Cicatricial changes in ocular pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Chirinos-Saldaña, P; Zuñiga-Gonzalez, I; Hernandez-Camarena, J C; Navas, A; Ramirez-Luquin, T; Robles-Contreras, A; Jimenez-Martinez, M C; Ramirez-Miranda, A; Bautista-de Lucio, V M; Graue-Hernandez, E O

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical characteristics of ocular involvement in patients with pemphigus at an ophthalmological referral center. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on patients with the immunopathological diagnosis of pemphigus examined between 1 January 2000 and 1 April 2010. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), best corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA), ocular symptoms, and ocular surface inflammatory and scarring changes were assessed. Results A total of 15 patients were identified, with a mean age of 68.27±14.35 years, and 80% (n=12) were female. Extraocular involvement was reported in one patient. All of the eyes showed cicatricial changes in the conjunctiva. In all, 6 eyes (20%) were classified as stage I; 12 eyes (40%) as stage II; 10 eyes (33%) as stage III; and 2 eyes (7%) as stage IV. A statistically significant association was found between BCVA and the severity of ocular involvement. The mean BCVA logMAR was 1.66 (20/914), with a range from logMAR 0 (20/20) to logMAR 4 (NLP). Other ocular diseases were found in 8 (53.3%), systemic diseases in 10 (66.7%), and the use of pemphigus-inducing drugs in 10 patients (66.7%). Conclusions The present report represents the largest series of ocular involvement in pemphigus confirmed by immunopathology. The clinical manifestations varied from conjunctival hyperemia to corneal scarring and perforation. There was a strong association between scarring changes and low BCVA. Ocular and systemic diseases as well as the use of pemphigus-inducing drugs may predispose to ocular cicatricial changes observed in this series. PMID:24480839

  5. Indication of advanced orthokeratology as an additional treatment after refractive surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Iwane; Yamada, Yoshida

    2005-04-01

    Ortho-K was indicated for twenty-three eyes of thirteen patients after refractive surgeries such as RK(1) ,PRK(2), and LASIK(3). The average of their Uncorrective Visual Acuity (UCVA) after surgeries was 20/30 or worse, and mean spherical equivalent (SE) was -2.42D. They were followed at least two years wearing of Advanced Ortho-K lenses during night. The following studies were examined on their auto-refraction, auto-keratometry, uncorrected and corrected visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure, corneal endothelium, corneal thickness, corneal curvature, and corneal shape for more than two years. 95% of the patients improved in UCVA up to 20/20 or better, 86% of them improved up to 20/15 or better, and 76% of them improved up to 20/10. The mean SEs improved to -1.20+/-1.02D during six months, - 1.03+/-0.83D during one year, and -0.73+/-0.64D during two years. Astigmatism also slightly decreased. Ophthalmologic examinations showed no abnormalities including flap formation, intra-ocular pressure, and endothelium. Among the refractive surgeries as well as RK and PRK, LASIK has been most popularly spread all over the world. However, patient's quality of vision is not always satisfied during and/or after refractive surgeries, because of several complications such as instability of flap formation, unexpected keratoectasia, diffuse lamellar keratitis, epithelial ingrowth, irregularity of corneal surface which caused myopia regression. In such cases, additional surgical procedures should not be indicated easily. However, Ortho-K is safe and effective enough to correct refractive errors still remained or re-appeared after refractive surgeries. It enables to restore the corneal irregularity to the ideal shape.

  6. Photonic crystal negative refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Asatsuma, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are multi-dimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the PC. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell's law, can be tailored using photonic band theory. The negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because PCs usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at absorption-free frequencies, affording significant design flexibility for free-space optics. The PC slab, a high-index membrane with a two-dimensional airhole array, must be carefully designed to avoid reflection and diffraction losses. Light focusing based on negative refraction forms a parallel image of a light source, facilitating optical couplers and condenser lenses for wavelength demultiplexing. A compact wavelength demultiplexer can be designed by combining the prism and lens effects. The collimation effect is obtainable not only inside but also outside of the PC by optimizing negative refractive condition.

  7. A Prospective Study of Anterior Segment Ocular Parameters in Anisometropia

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Jolly; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in anterior segment ocular parameters in anisometropia >1 D. Methods This study included 202 eyes of 101 subjects ranging from 10 to 40 years of age with anisometropia of 1 D or more. The subjects were divided into groups according to anisomyopia, anisoastigmatism, and anisohypermetropia. After providing informed consent, each patient underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination including cycloplegic refraction, best-corrected visual acuity, cover test, axial length (AL) measurement using A-scan ultrasound biometer, keratometry, anterior chamber depth, and central corneal thickness measurement. For each participant, the eye with greater refractive error was compared to the fellow eye via paired t-tests. Correlations between parameters were studied using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The average age of subjects was 21.7 ± 9.3 years. Of 101 subjects, 31 had anisomyopia; 42 had anisohypermetropia; and 28 had anisoastigmatism. A predisposition toward greater myopia in right eyes was noted in anisomyopia (24 of 31 subjects, 77%). The inter-ocular acuity difference was significant in all three groups (p < 0.01). As the degree of anisometropia increased, there was significant positive correlation in the difference in AL in myopes (r = 0.863, p < 0.01) and hypermetropes (r = 0.669, p < 0.01) and the difference in corneal curvature in anisoastigmatism (r = 0.564, p = 0.002) and hypermetropes (r = 0.376, p = 0.014). A significant positive correlation was also present between the anterior chamber depth difference and refractive difference in hypermetropes (r = 0.359, p = 0.020). Conclusions This study showed that anisomyopia is correlated only with anterior chamber differences. Anisohypermetropia is correlated with AL differences as well as corneal curvature difference and anterior chamber depth difference. The amount of anisoastigmatism correlates only with corneal curvature difference

  8. Visual Function and Ocular Status in Children with Disabilities in Special Schools of Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Satish; Jindal, Mahesh; Bhatti, SM

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Children with disabilities (other than visual impairment) are at a higher risk of visual impairment as compared to normal population. Majority of the ocular disorders, like refractive errors and strabismus, are easily treatable. As these children depend on their visual inputs for social and academic activities, an early detection and prompt treatment of even a minor visual problem is of utmost importance for them. Aim To assess the visual function and ocular status of children with disabilities other than visual impairment and to identify the preventable and treatable causes of visual impairment. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on children aged 3-16 years who were studying in special schools/ rehabilitation centers in Ludhiana. After prior permission, detailed ocular examination of all the children was done using standard examination techniques. Cycloplegic retinoscopy and refraction was also done and spectacles were prescribed. Children requiring further evaluation were referred to base hospital. Results A total of 404 children with disabilities (other than visual disabilities) studying in 7 rehabilitation centers/ special schools were enrolled. These included children with Cerebral palsy (12.1%), with Hearing impairment (35.3%), with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) (3.7%), with Autism (8.6%), with Down syndrome (12.8%) and with Mental retardation (27.2%). Ocular disorders were seen in 174(43%) children. The most common ocular disorders seen in these children were refractive errors (23%) and strabismus (18.1%). A total of 93(23%) children were prescribed spectacles and 37(9.2%) children were referred for further evaluation. Conclusion Ocular problems are common in children with other disabilities. Delay in the detection and treatment of these disorders compounds the already existing disability in these children. Lack of awareness and sensitization among the parents and teachers is a matter of great concern. Therefore

  9. A slide rule for calculating the ocular accommodation of an ametrope corrected with a spectacle lens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Ji

    2007-07-01

    A slide rule has been designed to calculate the ocular accommodation of an ametrope corrected with a spectacle lens. The slide rule makes the calculation itself easier to perform than with traditional methods and is easily applicable in a clinical setting. In the slide rule, there are 3 scales indicating the power of the spectacle lens, the viewing distance, and the ocular accommodation. The most accurate accommodative unit was used to design the slide rule. The ocular accommodation is the product of the accommodative unit and the dioptric viewing distance. The calculating results are accurate from +21 diopters to all minus powers of the spectacle lens. In a clinical setting, the patients can be advised how much accommodation they exert before and after the refractive surgeries.

  10. Ocular toxicity of targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Daniel J; Velazquez-Martin, Juan P; Simpson, Rand; Siu, Lillian L; Bedard, Philippe L

    2012-09-10

    Molecularly targeted agents are commonly used in oncology practice, and many new targeted agents are currently being tested in clinical trials. Although these agents are thought to be more specific and less toxic then traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, they are associated with a variety of toxicities, including ocular toxicity. Many of the molecules targeted by anticancer agents are also expressed in ocular tissues. We reviewed the literature for described ocular toxicities associated with both approved and investigational molecularly targeted agents. Ocular toxicity has been described with numerous approved targeted agents and also seems to be associated with several classes of agents currently being tested in early-phase clinical trials. We discuss the proposed pathogenesis, monitoring guidelines, and management recommendations. It is important for oncologists to be aware of the potential for ocular toxicity, with prompt recognition of symptoms that require referral to an ophthalmologist. Ongoing collaboration between oncologists and ocular disease specialists is critical as the use of molecularly targeted agents continues to expand and novel targeted drug combinations are developed.

  11. Ocular findings in patients with alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Esmer, Oktay; Karadag, Remzi; Cakici, Ozgur; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Demircan, Yuhanize Tas; Bayramlar, Huseyin; Karadag, Ayse S

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated ocular findings in patients with alopecia. A total of 42 patients with alopecia (31 male, 11 female; 84 eyes) and 45 healthy individuals (28 male, 17 female; 90 eyes) were enrolled in the study. Of the patients with alopecia, 34 had alopecia areata, seven had alopecia universalis, and one had ophiasis alopecia. Seven patients had eyebrow involvement and seven had eyelash involvement. Autorefractometry, keratometry, visual acuity, central corneal thickness and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements, bilateral anterior and posterior segment examinations, Schirmer's tests, and visual field examinations were performed in both groups. The mean ± standard deviation age of the subjects was 25.21 ± 10.88 years in the alopecia group and 28.24 ± 9.31 years in the control group. Lens abnormalities were observed in 35 eyes in the alopecia group and in 11 eyes in the control group (P < 0.05). Posterior segment abnormalities were seen in 29 eyes in the alopecia group and four eyes in the control group (P < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in age, sex, visual acuity, refractive error, keratometric findings, IOP, central corneal thickness, perimetry, or Schirmer's test results between the alopecia and control groups (P > 0.05). Patients with alopecia may have more lenticular and retinal findings than normal individuals, but those findings do not interfere with visual acuity. Close surveillance for the early onset of cataract formation is important in patients with alopecia. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. The Correlation of Differences in the Ocular Component Values with the Degree of Myopic Anisometropia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Young; Cho, Soon Young; Yang, Ji Wook; Kim, Chan Su

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between the differences in the ocular component values with the degree of anisomyopia. Methods Refraction, corneal power (CP), and biometry were examined in 50 myopic adults with refractive differences (RD) over 1.50 diopters (D). Ocular components were measured by ultrasound biometry and keratometry. The correlation between the differences in the ocular component values with the degree of anisomyopia was analyzed by linear regression analysis. Results Among 50 adults with anisomyopia, 5 had RD from 1.50 to 2.99 D, 11 had RD from 3.00 to 3.99 D, 9 had RD from 4.00 to 5.99 D, 12 had RD from 6.00 to 7.99 D, 7 had RD from 8.00 to 11.99 D, and 6 had ≥12.00 D. There was no significant correlation between the ocular components (CP, crystalline lens thickness [LT], and anterior chamber depth [ACD], and the length from the cornea to the posterior surface of the lens [ACD + LT]) and the RD (p > 0.05). The RD showed a significantly positive correlation with vitreous chamber depth (VCD), and axial length (r = 0.963, p < 0.0001). Conclusions The severity of anisomyopia was not correlated with the between-eye differences in the anterior chamber values of the eye (CP, ACD, LT, ACD + LT). The severity of anisomyopia was significantly correlated with the between-eye differences in VCD. PMID:23372379

  13. Prevalence of undetected ocular conditions in a pilot sample of school children.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kathryn; Younan, Christine; Morgan, Ian; Mitchell, Paul

    2003-06-01

    Parents of 134 children (age 5-18 years; 84% participation) attending a private school gave informed consent for their child's participation in a pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility and estimate sample size for a larger study of myopia prevalence, the Sydney Myopia Study. LogMAR visual acuity and other ocular assessments, including cycloplegic autorefraction (tropicamide 1%) and examination of the media and fundus, were performed. The prevalence of significant ocular conditions was 28.2%. Eleven children (8.4%) wore glasses. Five were referred for a change in their correction. Previously undetected ocular conditions (19.8%) included one child with ocular pathology and four children with strabismus. Uncorrected refractive error (16.8%) was the most common reason for referral and was more predominant in the senior students (25%), corresponding with an age-related shift in mean spherical equivalent refraction towards myopia (less than 7 years: +0.40 +/- 0.60 D; more than 15 years: -1.15 +/- 1.18 D). Three senior students were classified as having socially significant correctable vision impairment. These findings suggest that reliance on ad hoc referrals could result in delayed referral and that vision screening in both early and later school years may be desirable.

  14. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  15. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  16. Ocular morbidity prevalence among school children in Shimla, Himachal, North India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhu; Gupta, Bhupinder P; Chauhan, Anil; Bhardwaj, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    Background Data on eye diseases among school children is not readily available. Considering the fact that one-third of India's blind lose their eyesight before the age of 20 years and many of them are under five when they become blind, early detection and treatment of ocular morbidity among children is important. Aim To estimate the prevalence of ocular morbidity among school children of age 6-16 years. Settings Government and private coeducational schools in urban area of Shimla. Design Cross-sectional Materials and Methods Government and private coeducational schools selected by stratified random sampling. About 1561 school children, studying in elementary through secondary class in these schools were examined from August 2001 to January 2002 in Shimla. A doctor did visual acuity and detailed ophthalmic examination. Statistical analysis The Chi-square test was used to test differences in proportions. Differences were considered to be statistically significant at the 5% level. Results Prevalence of ocular morbidity was 31.6% (CI=29.9-32.1%), refractive errors 22% (CI=21.1-22.8%), squint 2.5% (CI=2.4-2.6%), color blindness 2.3% (CI=2.2-2.4%), vitamin A deficiency 1.8 % (CI=1.7-1.9%), conjunctivitis 0.8% (CI=0.79-0.81%). Overall prevalence of ocular morbidity in government and private schools did not show any statistical significant difference. Prevalence of conjunctivitis was significantly (P<0.5) more in government schools. Conclusion A high prevalence of ocular morbidity among high-school children was observed. Refractive errors were the most common ocular disorders. PMID:19237787

  17. Ocular disorders in children with learning disabilities in special education schools of Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parikshit; Soneji, Freya Rao; Kharat, Jitesh; Dulera, Hemant; Deshpande, Madan; Gilbert, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to study and treat ocular disorders in children with learning disabilities (cLDs) and explore associations with their perinatal history. cLDs attending 11 special schools were examined by a team consisting of an ophthalmologist, optometrist, and a social worker in 2007 and followed up in 2008. The students' intelligence quotient (IQ) and their medical histories were noted. Distant visual acuities were measured using Kay pictures or Snellen's tumbling E chart and complete ocular examination was performed. Students were assessed at the pediatric ophthalmology unit and low vision center, if needed. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS and the Chi-square test for ordinal data. A total of 664 students were examined, 526 of whom were <16 years of age; 323 (61.4%) were male. A total of 326 (60%) had moderate-to-severe learning disabilities (IQs <50), and the mean IQ was 45.4. Two hundred and thirty-eight (45.3%) had ocular disorder; 143 (27.3%) had an uncorrected refractive error, followed by strabismus in 83 (15.8%), nystagmus in 36 (6.8%), optic atrophy in 34 (6.5%), and congenital anomalies in 13 (2.5%), 103 children had more than one abnormality. Only 12 of the 143 students with refractive errors were using spectacles. A total of 132 (48.7%) children with a history of perinatal insult had ocular problems. Ocular disorders were also common in those with a history of epilepsy, Down's syndrome, and cerebral palsy. Nearly half the cLDs in this study had ocular disorders and one-fourth had their vision improved.

  18. Variability in Objective Refraction for Persons with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marsack, Jason D; Ravikumar, Ayeswarya; Benoit, Julia S; Anderson, Heather A

    2017-05-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is associated with ocular and cognitive sequelae, which both have the potential to influence clinical measures of refractive error. This study compares variability of autorefraction among subjects with and without DS. Grand Seiko autorefraction was performed on 139 subjects with DS (age: 8-55, mean: 25 ± 9 yrs) and 138 controls (age: 7-59, mean: 25 ± 10 yrs). Subjects with three refraction measures per eye (DS: 113, control: 136) were included for analysis. Each refraction was converted to power vector notation (M, J0, J45) and a difference in each component (ΔM, ΔJ0, ΔJ45) was calculated for each refraction pairing. From these quantities, average dioptric strength ((Equation is included in full-text article.): square root of the sum of the squares of M, J0, and J45) and average dioptric difference ((Equation is included in full-text article.): square root of the sum of the squares of ΔM, ΔJ0, and ΔJ45) were calculated. The DS group exhibited a greater median (Equation is included in full-text article.)(1Q: 1.38D M: 2.38D 3Q: 3.41D) than control eyes (1Q: 0.47D M: 0.96D 3Q: 2.75D) (P < .001). Likewise, the DS group exhibited a greater median (Equation is included in full-text article.)in refraction (1Q: 0.27D M: 0.42D 3Q: 0.78D) than control eyes (1Q: 0.11D M: 0.15D 3Q: 0.23D) (P < .001) with 97.1% of control eyes exhibiting (Equation is included in full-text article.)≤0.50D, compared to 59.3% of DS eyes. An effect of (Equation is included in full-text article.)on (Equation is included in full-text article.)was not detected (P = .3009) nor was a significant interaction between (Equation is included in full-text article.)and group detected (P = .49). In the current study, comparing three autorefraction readings, median total dioptric difference with autorefraction in DS was 2.8 times the levels observed in controls, indicating greater potential uncertainty in objective measures of refraction for this population. The analysis demonstrates

  19. Rabies: ocular pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Haltia, M; Tarkkanen, A; Kivelä, T

    1989-01-01

    Ocular pathology in the first European case of human bat-borne rabies is described. The patient was a 30-year-old bat scientist who seven weeks after bat bite developed neurological symptoms and died 23 days later. Rabies virus antigens were detected in brain smears. After extensive virological studies the virus turned out to be a rabies-related virus, closely resembling the Duvenhage virus isolated from bats in South Africa in 1980. By light microscopy focal chronic inflammatory infiltration of the ciliary body and of the choroid was found. PAS-positive exudate was seen in the subretinal and in the outer plexiform layers of the retina, and retinal veins showed endothelial damage and perivascular inflammation. Many of the retinal ganglion cells were destroyed. The presence of rabies-related viral antigen in the retinal ganglion cells was shown by positive cytoplasmic immunofluorescence, though electron microscopy failed to identify definite viral structures in the retina. By immunohistochemistry glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the Müller's cells, which are normally negative for this antigen but express it as a reactive change when the retina is damaged. Synaptophysin, a constituent of presynaptic vesicles of normal retinal neurons, was not detected in the retina. Images PMID:2920157

  20. Human ocular biometry☆

    PubMed Central

    Augusteyn, Robert C.; Nankivil, Derek; Mohamed, Ashik; Maceo, Bianca; Pierre, Faradia; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine growth of the human eye globe and cornea from early in gestation to late in adult life. Globe antero-posterior length, horizontal and vertical diameters, corneal horizontal and vertical (white to white) diameters and posterior pole to limbus distances were measured using digital calipers (±0.01 mm) in 541 postmortem eyes. Additional pre- and postnatal data for some of the dimensions were obtained from the literature. All dimensions examined increase rapidly during prenatal development but postnatal growth differs. Growth of globe antero-posterior length, vertical and horizontal diameters as well as corneal vertical and horizontal diameters stops within 1 year after birth. Logistic analysis is consistent with an asymptotic prenatal growth mode and no further growth after its completion around 1 year after birth. Horizontal and vertical globe diameters are the same at all ages but the corneal horizontal diameter is always larger than the vertical diameter. No differences could be detected between males and females in any of the ocular dimensions. Globe and corneal growth take place primarily during the prenatal growth mode and dimensions reach their maxima, shortly after birth. It is suggested that cessation of a growth stimulating signal at birth marks the end of the prenatal growth mode and that the small increases over the next year are due to cells already stimulated. Male and female eyes of the same age have the same globe and cornea dimensions. PMID:22819768

  1. Ocular Biometrics of Myopic Eyes With Narrow Angles.

    PubMed

    Chong, Gabriel T; Wen, Joanne C; Su, Daniel Hsien-Wen; Stinnett, Sandra; Asrani, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ocular biometrics between myopic patients with and without narrow angles. Patients with a stable myopic refraction (myopia worse than -1.00 D spherical equivalent) were prospectively recruited. Angle status was assessed using gonioscopy and biometric measurements were performed using an anterior segment optical coherence tomography and an IOLMaster. A total of 29 patients (58 eyes) were enrolled with 13 patients (26 eyes) classified as having narrow angles and 16 patients (32 eyes) classified as having open angles. Baseline demographics of age, sex, and ethnicity did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. The patients with narrow angles were on average older than those with open angles but the difference did not reach statistical significance (P=0.12). The central anterior chamber depth was significantly less in the eyes with narrow angles (P=0.05). However, the average lens thickness, although greater in the eyes with narrow angles, did not reach statistical significance (P=0.10). Refractive error, axial lengths, and iris thicknesses did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (P=0.32, 0.47, 0.15). Narrow angles can occur in myopic eyes. Routine gonioscopy is therefore recommended for all patients regardless of refractive error.

  2. Short-Term Stability in Refractive Status Despite Large Fluctuations in Glucose Levels in Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Huntjens, Byki; Charman, W. Neil; Workman, Helena; Hosking, Sarah L.; O’Donnell, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This work investigates how short-term changes in blood glucose concentration affect the refractive components of the diabetic eye in patients with long-term Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Methods Blood glucose concentration, refractive error components (mean spherical equivalent MSE, J0, J45), central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth (ACD), crystalline lens thickness (LT), axial length (AL) and ocular aberrations were monitored at two-hourly intervals over a 12-hour period in: 20 T1DM patients (mean age ± SD) 38±14 years, baseline HbA1c 8.6±1.9%; 21 T2DM patients (mean age ± SD) 56±11 years, HbA1c 7.5±1.8%; and in 20 control subjects (mean age ± SD) 49±23 years, HbA1c 5.5±0.5%. The refractive and biometric results were compared with the corresponding changes in blood glucose concentration. Results Blood glucose concentration at different times was found to vary significantly within (p<0.0005) and between groups (p<0.0005). However, the refractive error components and ocular aberrations were not found to alter significantly over the day in either the diabetic patients or the control subjects (p>0.05). Minor changes of marginal statistical or optical significance were observed in some biometric parameters. Similarly there were some marginally significant differences between the baseline biometric parameters of well-controlled and poorly-controlled diabetic subjects. Conclusion This work suggests that normal, short-term fluctuations (of up to about 6 mM/l on a timescale of a few hours) in the blood glucose levels of diabetics are not usually associated with acute changes in refractive error or ocular wavefront aberrations. It is therefore possible that factors other than refractive error fluctuations are sometimes responsible for the transient visual problems often reported by diabetic patients. PMID:23285232

  3. Ray-tracing approach to model the refractive properties of interfaces due to the use of vitreous substitutes in vitreo-retinal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docchio, Franco; Azzolini, Claudio; Brancato, Rosario

    1995-05-01

    A ray-tracing method has been used to investigate the refractive properties of interfaces between different ocular media and vitreous substitutes, in relation to transpupillary laser beam delivery during photocoagulative procedures. The study outlines the role of these interfaces in focusing or defocusing the laser beam along the light path within the eye.

  4. [Steroid induced ocular hypertension and glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Călugăru, D; Călugăru, M

    2009-01-01

    Steroid induced ocular hypertension and glaucoma represent iatrogenic changes of pharmacogenic nature. They are mainly due to exogenous steroids following ocular periocular, intravitreal and systemic administration. Elevated ocular pressure is brought about by structural trabecular changes as well as obstruction of the outflow ways of the aqueous humor localized within the trabecular juxtacanalicular area. Although mostly raised ocular pressure spontaneously descends to basal values after ceasing the steroid therapy, progressive optic nerve damages and glaucomatous visual field defects may occur. Therapy of steroid induced ocular hypertension and glaucoma is similar to that of ocular hypertension and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  5. Refractive errors survey in primary school children (6-12 year old) in 2 provinces: Bangkok and Nakhonpathom (one year result).

    PubMed

    Yingyong, Penpimol

    2010-10-01

    Refractive error is an important cause of preventable visual impairment and blindness worldwide. Population-based studies will continue to be a key part in identification ofthe magnitude and the importance of this common eye disease. To assess the prevalence of the refractive error in primary school-aged children in Bangkok and Nakhonpathom together with the provision of the appropriately free of charge spectacles. A Population-based cross-sectional analytic study was conducted between October 2008 and September 2009. Random selection of geographically defined clusters was used to identify the study sample. The examination included visual acuity (VA) by Snellen chart and pinhole correction, autorefraction under cycloplegic refraction, ocular motility evaluation, examination of the external eye, anterior segment, media, and fundus. Ophthalmologists screened for ocular abnormalities. Among 2340 children, 1100 in Bangkok and 1240 in Nakhonpathom were examined The prevalence of refractive error in Bangkok and Nakhornpathom were 12.7% and 5.7% respectively. Refractive error was the cause in 97.6% of eyes with reduced vision, amblyopia in 0.5%, other causes in 0.8%, and unexplained causes in 1.1%. The present study showed a relative high prevalence of uncorrected refractive error in the central part of Thailand especially in Bangkok. Eye health education and screening is recommended to evaluate the need for refractive correction with appropriate prescription of spectacles.

  6. Prevalence of ocular surface disease symptoms and risk factors in group of university students in Monterrey, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garza-León, Manuel; Valencia-Garza, Miguel; Martínez-Leal, Bernardo; Villarreal-Peña, Pablo; Marcos-Abdala, Hernán Gerardo; Cortéz-Guajardo, Ana Lucía; Jasso-Banda, Arturo

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptoms of ocular surface disease and its relationship with associated risk factors in students from the University of Monterrey using Ocular Surface Disease (OSDI) questionnaire. A cross-sectional survey was conducted between October and December 2014 to assess the prevalence and risk factors for ocular surface disease in a group of students from Universidad de Monterrey in Monterrey, Mexico. The severity of the disease was measured via the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire. The OSDI average value was 26.85 ± 20.79 points, with 70.4% of students (579) had OSDI score higher than 12 points. Women had ocular surface disease 1.63 times more than men (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.13,1.48). Students who used ophthalmic drops have an OR 2.00 (95% CI 1.65,2.40), and students who smoke have an OR 1.24 (95% CI 1.06,1.46). Use of contact lenses, hours in front of computer or history of refractive surgery has low-estimated effect on the probability of presenting an ocular disease. University students have a prevalence of 70.4% of ocular surface disease (OSD). OSD was associated with gender (women have a higher prevalence), smoking and the use of eye drops. A program to modify these risk factors to reduce the prevalence is needed.

  7. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  8. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  9. Index of Refraction without Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several activities that permit students to determine the index of refraction of transparent solids and liquids using simple equipment without the need for geometrical relationships, special lighting or optical instruments. Graphical analysis of the measured data is shown to be a useful method for determining the index of…

  10. Refractive Index Enhancement in Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    experimentally demonstrated the key ingredients of this approach in Rubidium vapor where we have observe enhanced refractive index with vanishing absorption...beam, Ep. We have recently experimentally demonstrated this effect in a 1-mm-long Rubidium (Rb) vapor cell at high vapor densities. Here, we utilize

  11. Index of Refraction without Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several activities that permit students to determine the index of refraction of transparent solids and liquids using simple equipment without the need for geometrical relationships, special lighting or optical instruments. Graphical analysis of the measured data is shown to be a useful method for determining the index of…

  12. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  13. Presumed ocular bartonellosis

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, F; Ossewaarde, J; de Loos, W S; Rothova, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The spectrum of diseases caused by Bartonella henselae continues to expand and ocular involvement during this infection is being diagnosed with increasing frequency.
METHODS—The clinical features and visual prognosis for 13 patients with intraocular inflammatory disease and laboratory evidence of bartonellosis were investigated. There were nine patients with neuroretinitis and four with panuveitis with positive antibody titres against B henselae determined by an enzyme immunoassay (IgG exceding 1:900 and/or IgM exceeding 1:250).
RESULTS—Positive IgG levels were found for eight patients and positive IgM levels for five. Despite animal exposure of 10 patients, only two (IgG positive) cases had systemic symptoms consistent with the diagnosis of cat scratch disease. Pathological fluorescein leakage of the optic disc was observed in all affected eyes. At 6 months' follow up, 3/18 (17%) affected eyes had a visual acuity of less than 20/100, owing to optic disc atrophy and cystoid macular oedema. 12 patients (17 eyes) were treated with antibiotics; visual acuity improved two or more Snellen lines for 9/17 (53%) eyes.
CONCLUSIONS—The possibility of B henselae infection should be considered in patients with neuroretinitis and panuveitis (especially in cases with associated optic nerve involvement) even in the absence of systemic symptoms typical for cat scratch disease.

 Keywords: bartonellosis; Bartonella henselae; intraocular inflammatory disease; cat scratch disease PMID:10365031

  14. [Airbag-associated ocular trauma].

    PubMed

    Muallem, M; Garzozi, H

    1997-12-15

    Airbags have received widespread recognition as an effective means of enhancing automobile safety. They are particularly effective in frontal and front angle collisions which otherwise would be fatal or cause serious injuries. Inflation of the bag helps protect the driver and front-seat-passenger from hitting the steering wheel, dashboard or windshield. In frontal crashes airbags have reduced driver deaths, hospital admission rates, and incidence of brain injury. On the other hand, an increasing variety of airbag-associated organ injuries has been reported, including blunt ocular and chemical trauma, 2 cases of ocular trauma due to airbags which resulted in choroidal rupture with disastrous outcome in terms of visual acuity are presented. Since the very first report in May 1991 of airbag-associated ocular trauma until June 1996, there has apparently been only 1 case of choroidal rupture due to airbag-associated trauma, presented in 1 sentence of a brief report. Although airbag-related eye trauma may be relatively infrequent, the severity of the injuries incurred, especially when the posterior segment of the eye was involved, warrants research on new airbag design that minimizes the risk of ocular injury. Meanwhile all cases of airbag-associated ocular trauma should be reported, so that medical staff, the general population and car manufacturers will become more aware of this medical issue.

  15. Purinergic receptors in ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly "tuned," can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P(1),P(4)-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P(1),P(5)-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  16. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  17. Comparison of Ocular Lubricant Osmolalities.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Etty; Perugino, Carolyn; Charette, Stéphanie

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osmolality of commercially available ocular tear lubricants. Thirty-seven (n = 37) ocular lubricants, measured three times each, were evaluated for osmolality using a vapor pressure osmometer (Wescor VAPRO 5520). The osmometer was calibrated before each use, and the order of the lubricants was randomized. Ambient temperature and humidity were monitored for stability. Of the 37 ocular lubricants tested, 35 (94.6%) had an osmolality of less than 295 mmol/kg, one (2.7%) had between 295 and 308 mmol/kg, and one (2.7%) had more than 308 mmol/kg. The ambient room temperature was stable and ranged from 21.9°C to 22.0°C, and the relative humidity ranged from 21.2% to 25.6% during experimentation. When ocular lubricants were grouped by ingredient (carboxymethylcellulose and hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose, hyaluronic acid, and hydroxypropyl guar), no significant difference in osmolality was noted between groups (Mann-Whitney U test, P > .05). The majority of the ocular lubricants tested had low osmolalities, mimicking the osmolarity of newly formed tears (295 to 300 mOsm/L). Several factors need to be considered when choosing a tear lubricant, which have more complex formulations than ever. Knowledge of their osmolality may be an added parameter to consider when choosing therapeutic options for dry eye.

  18. Commensal ocular bacteria degrade mucins.

    PubMed

    Berry, M; Harris, A; Lumb, R; Powell, K

    2002-12-01

    Antimicrobial activity in tears prevents infection while maintaining a commensal bacterial population. The relation between mucin and commensal bacteria was assessed to determine whether commensals possess mucinolytic activity, how degradation depends on mucin integrity, and whether mucins affect bacterial replication. Bacteria were sampled from healthy eyes and contact lenses from asymptomatic wearers. Intracellular mucins were extracted and purified from cadaver conjunctivas, and surface mucins from extended wear contact lenses. After exposure to bacteria, changes in mucin hydrodynamic volume (proteolytic cleavage) and subunit charge (oligosaccharide degradation) were assayed by size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. The effect of mucin on bacterial replication was followed for up to 24 hours from the end of incubation with purified ocular mucins. Ocular bacteria decreased the hydrodynamic volume of intracellular and contact lens adherent mucins, irrespective of glycosylation density. A decrease in mucin sialylation was observed after exposure to commensal bacteria. Subunit charge distributions were generally shifted to lesser negative charge, consistent with loss of charged epitopes. Subunits with high negative charge, observed after digesting lightly adhering contact lens mucins with bacteria, suggest preferential cleavage sites in the mucin molecule. The presence of purified ocular mucin in the medium inhibited bacterial growth. Bacteria in the healthy ocular surface possess mucinolytic activity on both intact and surface processed mucins, targeted to discrete sites in the mucin molecule. Inhibition of bacterial growth by ocular mucins can be seen as part of the mucosal control of microbiota.

  19. [Clinical analyses of sarcoidosis with ocular involvement].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofang; Sun, Yongchang; Dai, Honglei; Jin, Jianmin; Liu, Yong

    2014-11-04

    To explore the clinical characteristics and systemic manifestations of sarcoidosis with ocular involvement. The clinical data of 19 cases of sarcoidosis with ocular involvement confirmed by pathology at Beijing Tongren Hospital from March 2004 to February 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. The ocular manifestations, chest imaging findings, laboratory tests and pathological diagnosis were reviewed. And the clinical features of sarcoidosis with ocular involvement were summarized. Among them, there were 6 males and 13 females with an average age of (47 ± 14) (16-76) years. The ocular symptoms were the initial presenting manifestations of sarcoidosis in 12 cases while 2 cases presented ocular symptoms during the course of disease. And aother 5 cases without ocular symptoms were confirmed to have ocular involvement by eye examination. The main manifestations of ocular sarcoidosis were uveitis (n = 16), chorioretinitis (n = 3), retinal vasculitis (n = 2), optic neuritis (n = 1) and orbital mass (n = 3). The key feature of sarcoidosis was bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy (BHL) (14/16) on chest film. The diagnosis in 17 cases was confirmed by biopsy of extra-ocular organs. The positive diagnostic rate of bronchial biopsy was 8/9. Ocular involvement in sarcoidosis is relatively common due to a variety of ocular manifestations and serious vision impairment in some patients. Ophthalmologic examination is essential in the clinical management of sarcoidosis. Chest imaging and bronchial biopsy are important for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis with initial ocular manifestations.

  20. The ocular surface: from physiology to the ocular allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Galicia-Carreón, Jorge; Santacruz, Concepción; Hong, Enrique; Jiménez-Martínez, María C

    2013-01-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is an inflammation of the conjunctiva secondary to an immune response to exogenous antigens, usually called allergens. In fact, AC is a syndrome that involves the entire ocular surface, including conjunctiva, lids, cornea, and tear film. The signs and symptoms of AC have a meaningful effect on comfort and patient health, and could be influenced by environment, genetics and immune regulation mechanisms, all of which work together in a complex immunological homeostasis. Dysregulation in such immune responses could turn into a variety of ocular allergic diseases (OAD). This review describes some of the current understanding of cellular and molecular pathways involved in different OAD.

  1. Emmetropisation and the aetiology of refractive errors

    PubMed Central

    Flitcroft, D I

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of human refractive errors displays features that are not commonly seen in other biological variables. Compared with the more typical Gaussian distribution, adult refraction within a population typically has a negative skew and increased kurtosis (ie is leptokurtotic). This distribution arises from two apparently conflicting tendencies, first, the existence of a mechanism to control eye growth during infancy so as to bring refraction towards emmetropia/low hyperopia (ie emmetropisation) and second, the tendency of many human populations to develop myopia during later childhood and into adulthood. The distribution of refraction therefore changes significantly with age. Analysis of the processes involved in shaping refractive development allows for the creation of a life course model of refractive development. Monte Carlo simulations based on such a model can recreate the variation of refractive distributions seen from birth to adulthood and the impact of increasing myopia prevalence on refractive error distributions in Asia. PMID:24406411

  2. Clinical Outcomes of an Optimized Prolate Ablation Procedure for Correcting Residual Refractive Errors Following Laser Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byunghoon; Lee, Hun; Choi, Bong Joon; Seo, Kyung Ryul; Kim, Eung Kwon; Kim, Dae Yune; Kim, Tae-Im

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of an optimized prolate ablation procedure for correcting residual refractive errors following laser surgery. We analyzed 24 eyes of 15 patients who underwent an optimized prolate ablation procedure for the correction of residual refractive errors following laser in situ keratomileusis, laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy, or photorefractive keratectomy surgeries. Preoperative ophthalmic examinations were performed, and uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, manifest refraction values (sphere, cylinder, and spherical equivalent), point spread function, modulation transfer function, corneal asphericity (Q value), ocular aberrations, and corneal haze measurements were obtained postoperatively at 1, 3, and 6 months. Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved and refractive errors decreased significantly at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Total coma aberration increased at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, while changes in all other aberrations were not statistically significant. Similarly, no significant changes in point spread function were detected, but modulation transfer function increased significantly at the postoperative time points measured. The optimized prolate ablation procedure was effective in terms of improving visual acuity and objective visual performance for the correction of persistent refractive errors following laser surgery.

  3. Clinical Outcomes of an Optimized Prolate Ablation Procedure for Correcting Residual Refractive Errors Following Laser Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byunghoon; Lee, Hun; Choi, Bong Joon; Seo, Kyung Ryul; Kim, Eung Kwon; Kim, Dae Yune

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of an optimized prolate ablation procedure for correcting residual refractive errors following laser surgery. Methods We analyzed 24 eyes of 15 patients who underwent an optimized prolate ablation procedure for the correction of residual refractive errors following laser in situ keratomileusis, laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy, or photorefractive keratectomy surgeries. Preoperative ophthalmic examinations were performed, and uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, manifest refraction values (sphere, cylinder, and spherical equivalent), point spread function, modulation transfer function, corneal asphericity (Q value), ocular aberrations, and corneal haze measurements were obtained postoperatively at 1, 3, and 6 months. Results Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved and refractive errors decreased significantly at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Total coma aberration increased at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, while changes in all other aberrations were not statistically significant. Similarly, no significant changes in point spread function were detected, but modulation transfer function increased significantly at the postoperative time points measured. Conclusions The optimized prolate ablation procedure was effective in terms of improving visual acuity and objective visual performance for the correction of persistent refractive errors following laser surgery. PMID:28243019

  4. Ocular parasitoses: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Tapas Ranjan; Das, Sujata; Sharma, Savitri; Rath, Soveeta; Rath, Suryasnata; Tripathy, Devjyoti; Panda, Krushna Gopal; Basu, Soumyava; Besirli, Cagri G

    Parasitic infections of the eyes are a major cause of ocular diseases across the globe. The causative agents range from simple organisms such as unicellular protozoans to complex metazoan helminths. The disease spectrum varies depending on the geographic location, prevailing hygiene, living and eating habits of the inhabitants, and the type of animals that surround them. They cause enormous ocular morbidity and mortality not because they are untreatable, but largely due to late or misdiagnosis, often from unfamiliarity with the diseases produced. We provide an up-to-date comprehensive overview of the ophthalmic parasitoses. Each section describes the causative agent, mode of transmission, geographic distribution, ocular pathologies, and their management for common parasites with brief mention of the ones that are rare. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ivermectin treatment of ocular onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H R

    1990-01-01

    Ivermectin, a recently developed macrocyclic lactone with broad antiparasitic activity, has been shown by a series of clinical trials to be safe and effective in the treatment of human infection with Onchocerca volvulus. Although it is rapidly microfilaricidal, it does not cause a severe reaction as is seen with diethylcarbamazine treatment. In patients with onchocerciasis, a single oral dose of ivermectin (150 micrograms/Kg) repeated once a year leads to a marked reduction in skin microfilaria counts and ocular involvement, although ivermectin has no known long-lasting effects on the adult worms. With treatment there is no significant exacerbation of either anterior or posterior segment eye disease even in those with severe ocular disease. Treatment leads to a marked and prolonged improvement in ocular status. Because of its safety and efficacy, ivermectin can be used on a mass scale and promises to revolutionize the treatment of onchocerciasis.

  6. Ocular hemodynamics during isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Kiss, B; Dallinger, S; Polak, K; Findl, O; Eichler, H G; Schmetterer, L

    2001-01-01

    The autoregulatory capacity of the human retina is well documented, but the pressure-flow relationship of the human choroid is still a matter of controversy. Recent data, using laser Doppler flowmetry to measure choroidal blood flow, indicate that the choroid has some autoregulatory potential, whereas most data using other techniques for the assessment of choroidal hemodynamics indicate that the choroidal pressure-flow curve is linear. We used a new laser interferometric technique to characterize choroidal blood flow during isometric exercise. Twenty healthy subjects performed squatting for 6 min during normocapnia and during inhalation of 5% CO2 and 95% air. Ocular fundus pulsation amplitude, flow velocities in the ophthalmic artery, intraocular pressure, and systemic hemodynamics were measured in 2-min intervals. To gain information on choroidal blood flow fundus pulsation amplitude was corrected for changes in flow pulsatility using data from the ophthalmic artery and for changes in pulse rate. Ocular perfusion pressure was calculated from mean arterial pressure and intraocular pressure. The ocular pressure-flow relationship was calculated by sorting data according to ascending ocular perfusion pressure values. In a pilot study in 6 healthy subjects comparable ocular pressure flow relationships were obtained when choroidal blood flow was assessed with the method described above and with laser Doppler flowmetry. In the main study isometric exercise caused a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (56%, P < 0.001), pulse rate (84%, P < 0.001), and intraocular pressure (37%, P 0.004), but decreased fundus pulsation amplitude (-36%, P < 0.001). Significant deviations from baseline choroidal blood flow were observed only at ocular perfusion pressures >69% during normocapnia and 70% during hypercapnia. Our data indicate that during isometric exercise the choroid has a high capacity to keep blood flow constant despite changes in perfusion pressure and that this

  7. Air bags and ocular injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, J D; Jaeger, E A; Jeffers, J B

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: This investigation retrospectively examined ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment to gain a better appreciation of potential risk factors in motor vehicle accidents. National statistics regarding the efficacy of air bags were reviewed. METHODS: Review of the literature from 1991 to 1998 identified 44 articles describing 97 patients with air-bag-induced ocular injuries. Variables extracted from each case were age, sex, height, position in the car, eye wear, vehicle impact speed, visual acuity, and specific ocular injuries. RESULTS: Corneal abrasions occurred in 49% of occupants, hyphemas in 43%, vitreous or retinal hemorrhages in 25%, and retinal tears or detachments in 15%. The globe was ruptured in 10 patients. Patients involved in higher-speed accidents (over 30 mph) sustained a greater percentage of vitreous or retinal hemorrhages and traumatic cataracts, while those at slower speeds were more prone to retinal tears or detachments. In a subset of 14 patients with serious ocular injuries, the impact speed of 11 patients was recorded at 30 mph or less. Slower speed may be a risk factor for some ocular injuries. Occupant height was not a significant factor. National statistics confirm that air bags reduce fatalities in motor vehicle accidents. However, children sitting in the front seat without a seat belt and infants in passenger-side rear-facing car seats are at risk for fatal injury. CONCLUSION: Air bags combined with seat belts are an effective means of reducing injury and death in adults during motor vehicle accidents. However, this study has documented a wide variety of ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment. It is hoped that researchers can develop modifications that continue to save lives while minimizing additional harm. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 2C FIGURE 2D FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:10703118

  8. Air bags and ocular injuries.

    PubMed

    Stein, J D; Jaeger, E A; Jeffers, J B

    1999-01-01

    This investigation retrospectively examined ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment to gain a better appreciation of potential risk factors in motor vehicle accidents. National statistics regarding the efficacy of air bags were reviewed. Review of the literature from 1991 to 1998 identified 44 articles describing 97 patients with air-bag-induced ocular injuries. Variables extracted from each case were age, sex, height, position in the car, eye wear, vehicle impact speed, visual acuity, and specific ocular injuries. Corneal abrasions occurred in 49% of occupants, hyphemas in 43%, vitreous or retinal hemorrhages in 25%, and retinal tears or detachments in 15%. The globe was ruptured in 10 patients. Patients involved in higher-speed accidents (over 30 mph) sustained a greater percentage of vitreous or retinal hemorrhages and traumatic cataracts, while those at slower speeds were more prone to retinal tears or detachments. In a subset of 14 patients with serious ocular injuries, the impact speed of 11 patients was recorded at 30 mph or less. Slower speed may be a risk factor for some ocular injuries. Occupant height was not a significant factor. National statistics confirm that air bags reduce fatalities in motor vehicle accidents. However, children sitting in the front seat without a seat belt and infants in passenger-side rear-facing car seats are at risk for fatal injury. Air bags combined with seat belts are an effective means of reducing injury and death in adults during motor vehicle accidents. However, this study has documented a wide variety of ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment. It is hoped that researchers can develop modifications that continue to save lives while minimizing additional harm.

  9. Ocular rigidity, ocular pulse amplitude, and pulsatile ocular blood flow: the effect of intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Dastiridou, Anna I; Ginis, Harilaos S; De Brouwere, Dirk; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the pressure-volume relation in the living human eye, measure the ocular pulse amplitude (OPA), and calculate the corresponding pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) in a range of clinically relevant IOP levels. Fifty patients with cataract (50 eyes) were enrolled in the study. After cannulation of the anterior chamber, a computer-controlled device for the intraoperative measurement and control of IOP was used to artificially increase the IOP in a stepping procedure from 15 to 40 mm Hg. The IOP was continuously recorded for 2 seconds after each infusion step. The pressure-volume relation was approximated with an exponential fit, and the ocular rigidity coefficient was computed. OPA, pulse volume (PV), and POBF were measured from the continuous IOP recordings. The average rigidity coefficient was 0.0224 microL(-1) (SD 0.0049). OPA increased by 91% and PV and POBF decreased by 29% and 30%, respectively, when increasing the IOP from 15 to 40 mm Hg. The OPA is positively correlated with the coefficient of ocular rigidity (r = 0.65, P < 0.01). The present results suggest a nonlinear pressure-volume relation in the living human eye characterized by an increase in rigidity at higher IOP levels. The increased OPA and decreased pulse volume relate to the decreased POBF and the increased mechanical resistance of the ocular wall at high IOP levels.

  10. Medial medullary infarction: abnormal ocular motor findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Soo; Choi, K-D; Oh, S-Y; Park, S-H; Han, M-K; Yoon, B-W; Roh, J-K

    2005-10-25

    In 20 consecutive patients with isolated medial medullary infarction, abnormal ocular motor findings included nystagmus (n = 8), ocular contrapulsion (n = 5), and contralesional ocular tilt reaction (n = 2). The nystagmus was ipsilesional (n = 4), gaze-evoked (n = 5), upbeating (n = 4), and hemiseesaw (n = 1). The ocular motor abnormalities may be explained by involvements of the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, medial longitudinal fasciculus or efferent fibers from the vestibular nuclei, climbing fibers, and cells of the paramedian tracts.

  11. Iris mammillations in ocular melanocytosis.

    PubMed

    Swann, Peter G

    2001-01-01

    Hyperpigmentation of the ocular tissues and of the skin around the eye is uncommon. In ocular melanosis, the episclera, uveal tract and the angle of the anterior chamber may be involved. Heterochromia iridis may be present, if the iris is affected. In oculodermal melanocytosis or the naevus of Ota, hyperpigmentation of the skin follows the distribution of the first and second divisions of the fifth cranial nerve. This report documents a patient with episcleral pigment, heterochromia iridis and numerous tiny pigmented nodules on the iris (mammillations). The possible significance of these findings is discussed.

  12. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  13. Ocular complications of orbital venography.

    PubMed

    Safer, J N; Guibor, P

    1975-03-01

    Three ocular complications directly related to orbital venography are described, one resulting in permanent loss of vision,. The patient had lymphangioma of the orbit which evidently had bled secondary to increased venous pressure and injection of contrast bolus. Both of the 2 patients with transient visual disturbances had diabetic retinopathy. The common factor is felt to be an imparied vascular bed which cannot meet the stress of increased venous pressure and contrast medium injection. Conditions which predispose to ocular-orbital stasis and/or hemorrhage are discussed.

  14. Overview of ocular allergy treatment.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, M

    2001-07-01

    A plethora of drugs is available for the treatment of ocular allergy. Traditional treatment includes antihistamine and antihistamine/vasoconstrictor combination eyedrops. These drugs are useful, safe, and readily available. Mast cell stabilizers are safe, effective, and an important component of antiallergic therapy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs also have antiallergic effects. In recent years, drugs with multiple mechanisms of action have proven to be effective antiallergics. These drugs often have mast cell stabilizing, antihistaminic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Corticosteroids are considered to be more potent than other antiallergic drugs, and modifications in their molecular structures have made certain corticosteroids suitable for the treatment of ocular allergy.

  15. Light-weight ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Brito Edias, R; Rezende, J R; Carvalho, J C

    1994-01-01

    The authors propose a variation of the technique for making ocular protheses for large ophthalmic cavities introducing an expanded polystyrene (styrofoam) to the acrylic resin at the time of making the prosthetic sclera, aiming at reducing the weight of the prosthesis and thus improving mobility and aesthetics. This study compares the differences in weight, absorption of water and resistance to rupture by hydrostatic pressure of the pieces made of acrylic resin, chemically activated, heat activated and cross-linked by the proposed technique and by the technique for hollow ocular prothesis. The proposed technique presents advantages in manufacturing time and handling of the material.

  16. Surveillance of vision and ocular disorders in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Elma; Dickson, Jennifer; Kindley, A David; Scott, Christopher C; Charleton, Patricia M

    2007-07-01

    Children with Down syndrome have a high prevalence of ocular disorders. The UK Down's Syndrome Medical Interest Group (DSMIG) guidelines for ophthalmic screening were locally implemented into a protocol that included neonatal eye examination by an ophthalmologist and a comprehensive ophthalmological examination (cycloplegic refraction, ophthalmoscopy, and orthoptic assessment) by at least the age of 3 years, followed by preschool follow-up as indicated. We audited retrospectively surveillance for ocular disorders before and after the DSMIG-based guidelines were locally adopted in 1995. Results were compared for children born before and after the implementation of screening guidelines. A total of 81 children (43 females, 38 males) with Down syndrome were identified. After the DSMIG protocol, 34/36 children received a full ophthalmological examination in the neonatal period, compared with 9/27 children before 1995 (p<0.001). Neonatal screening resulted in the detection of cataracts in three infants. Mean age of first comprehensive ophthalmic screening outside the neonatal period was similar in the two groups (1y 6mo before guidelines vs 1y 9mo after), as were the proportion of children receiving preschool eye checks (27/30 before; 17/18 after). Overall, 65.7% children were screened in accordance with the guidelines, improving to 100% in recent years. At school age, 43% of the study population had significant refractive errors, with 27% having hypermetropia and astigmatism. Earlier prescription of glasses for refractive errors was seen (mean age 5y 6mo before guidelines; 3y 6mo after; p<0.001). Prevalence of other ocular disorders included strabismus (34/72, 47%), nasolacrimal duct obstruction (26/73, 35.6%), cataracts (5/64, 7.8%), and nystagmus (12/72, 16%). Establishment of the DSMIG-based local protocol has streamlined ocular surveillance. It is anticipated that this will improve developmental and functional outcomes in Down syndrome.

  17. Matrix metalloproteinases and educational attainment in refractive error: evidence of gene-environment interactions in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Robert; Yee, Stephanie S; Simpson, Claire L; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight

    2013-02-01

    A previous study of Old Order Amish families showed an association of ocular refraction with markers proximal to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) genes MMP1 and MMP10 and intragenic to MMP2. A candidate gene replication study of association between refraction and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genomic regions was conducted. Candidate gene genetic association study. Two thousand participants drawn from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) were chosen for genotyping. After quality-control filtering, 1912 individuals were available for analysis. Microarray genotyping was performed using the HumanOmni 2.5 bead array (Illumina, Inc., San Diego, CA). Single nucleotide polymorphisms originally typed in the previous Amish association study were extracted for analysis. In addition, haplotype tagging SNPs were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Quantitative trait association analyses of mean spherical equivalent refraction were performed on 30 markers using linear regression models and an additive genetic risk model while adjusting for age, sex, education, and population substructure. Post hoc analyses were performed after stratifying on a dichotomous education variable. Pointwise (P(emp)) and multiple-test study-wise (P(multi)) significance levels were calculated empirically through permutation. Mean spherical equivalent refraction was used as a quantitative measure of ocular refraction. The mean age and ocular refraction were 68 years (standard deviation [SD], 4.7 years) and +0.55 diopters (D; SD, 2.14 D), respectively. Pointwise statistical significance was obtained for rs1939008 (P(emp) = 0.0326). No SNP attained statistical significance after correcting for multiple testing. In stratified analyses, multiple SNPs reached pointwise significance in the lower-education group: 2 of these were statistically significant after multiple testing correction. The 2 highest-ranking SNPs in Amish families (rs1939008 and rs9928731) showed pointwise P(emp)<0.01 in

  18. Non-cycloplegic spherical equivalent refraction in adults: comparison of the double-pass system, retinoscopy, subjective refraction and a table-mounted autorefractor.

    PubMed

    Vilaseca, Meritxell; Arjona, Montserrat; Pujol, Jaume; Peris, Elvira; Martínez, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of spherical equivalent (SE) estimates of a double-pass system and to compare it with retinoscopy, subjective refraction and a table-mounted autorefractor. Non-cycloplegic refraction was performed on 125 eyes of 65 healthy adults (age 23.5±3.0 years) from October 2010 to January 2011 using retinoscopy, subjective refraction, autorefraction (Auto kerato-refractometer TOPCON KR-8100, Japan) and a double-pass system (Optical Quality Analysis System, OQAS, Visiometrics S.L., Spain). Nine consecutive measurements with the double-pass system were performed on a subgroup of 22 eyes to assess repeatability. To evaluate the trueness of the OQAS instrument, the SE laboratory bias between the double-pass system and the other techniques was calculated. The SE mean coefficient of repeatability obtained was 0.22D. Significant correlations could be established between the OQAS and the SE obtained with retinoscopy (r=0.956, P<0.001), subjective refraction (r=0.955, P<0.001) and autorefraction (r=0.957, P<0.001). The differences in SE between the double-pass system and the other techniques were significant (P<0.001), but lacked clinical relevance except for retinoscopy; Retinoscopy gave more hyperopic values than the double-pass system -0.51±0.50D as well as the subjective refraction -0.23±0.50D; More myopic values were achieved by means of autorefraction 0.24±0.49D. The double-pass system provides accurate and reliable estimates of the SE that can be used for clinical studies. This technique can determine the correct focus position to assess the ocular optical quality. However, it has a relatively small measuring range in comparison with autorefractors (-8.00 to +5.00D), and requires prior information on the refractive state of the patient.

  19. Non-cycloplegic spherical equivalent refraction in adults: comparison of the double-pass system, retinoscopy, subjective refraction and a table-mounted autorefractor

    PubMed Central

    Vilaseca, Meritxell; Arjona, Montserrat; Pujol, Jaume; Peris, Elvira; Martínez, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the accuracy of spherical equivalent (SE) estimates of a double-pass system and to compare it with retinoscopy, subjective refraction and a table-mounted autorefractor. METHODS Non-cycloplegic refraction was performed on 125 eyes of 65 healthy adults (age 23.5±3.0 years) from October 2010 to January 2011 using retinoscopy, subjective refraction, autorefraction (Auto kerato-refractometer TOPCON KR-8100, Japan) and a double-pass system (Optical Quality Analysis System, OQAS, Visiometrics S.L., Spain). Nine consecutive measurements with the double-pass system were performed on a subgroup of 22 eyes to assess repeatability. To evaluate the trueness of the OQAS instrument, the SE laboratory bias between the double-pass system and the other techniques was calculated. RESULTS The SE mean coefficient of repeatability obtained was 0.22D. Significant correlations could be established between the OQAS and the SE obtained with retinoscopy (r=0.956, P<0.001), subjective refraction (r=0.955, P<0.001) and autorefraction (r=0.957, P<0.001). The differences in SE between the double-pass system and the other techniques were significant (P<0.001), but lacked clinical relevance except for retinoscopy; Retinoscopy gave more hyperopic values than the double-pass system -0.51±0.50D as well as the subjective refraction -0.23±0.50D; More myopic values were achieved by means of autorefraction 0.24±0.49D. CONCLUSION The double-pass system provides accurate and reliable estimates of the SE that can be used for clinical studies. This technique can determine the correct focus position to assess the ocular optical quality. However, it has a relatively small measuring range in comparison with autorefractors (-8.00 to +5.00D), and requires prior information on the refractive state of the patient. PMID:24195036

  20. Association of matrix metalloproteinase gene polymorphisms with refractive error in Amish and Ashkenazi families.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Robert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight

    2010-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are involved in scleral extracellular matrix remodeling and have shown differential expression in experimental myopia. The genetic association of refractive error and polymorphisms in MMP and TIMP genes in Old Order Amish (AMISH) and Ashkenazi Jewish (ASHK) families was investigated. Individuals from 55 AMISH and 63 ASHK families participated in the study. Ascertainment was designed to enrich the families for myopia; the mean spherical equivalent (MSE) refractive error (SD) was -1.61 (2.72) D in the AMISH, and -3.56 (3.32) D in the ASHK. One hundred forty-six common haplotype tagging SNPs covering 14 MMP and 4 TIMP genes were genotyped in 358 AMISH and 535 ASHK participants. Association analyses of MSE and the spherical component of refraction (SPH) were performed separately for the AMISH and the ASHK. Bonferroni-corrected significance thresholds and local false discovery rates were used to account for multiple testing. After they were filtered for quality-control, 127 SNPs were included in the analyses. No polymorphisms showed statistically significant association to refraction in the ASHK (minimum P = 0.0132). In AMISH, two SNPs showed evidence of association with refractive phenotypes: rs1939008 (P = 0.00016 for SPH); and rs9928731 (P = 0.00026 for SPH). These markers were each estimated to explain <5% of the variance of SPH in the AMISH sample. Statistically significant genetic associations of ocular refraction to polymorphisms near MMP1 and within MMP2 were identified in the AMISH but not among the ASHK families. The results suggest that the MMP1 and MMP2 genes are involved in refractive variation in the AMISH. Genetic and/or environmental heterogeneity most likely contribute to differences in association results between ethnic groups.

  1. Parental smoking and childhood refractive error: the STARS study.

    PubMed

    Iyer, J V; Low, W C J; Dirani, M; Saw, S-M

    2012-10-01

    To assess the relationship between parental smoking and childhood refractive errors in Singapore Chinese children aged 6-72 months recruited through the STrabismus, Amblyopia, and Refractive errors in Singaporean children study. A total of 4164 children were recruited, with a positive response rate of 72.3% (n=3009). Cycloplegic refraction measurements were obtained from all children by trained eye professionals. Parents underwent an interviewer-administered questionnaire with information on demographics, lifestyle, and parental smoking history being obtained. Spherical equivalent readings were obtained for 87.7% of the children. In all, 52.1% were male (n=1375). The overall prevalence of myopia (at least -0.5 D) was 11.0%. Overall, 37.1% of the fathers interviewed gave a history of smoking. Among the mothers interviewed, 9.2% gave a history of smoking, 6.6% had smoked during the child's life, and 2.2% had smoked during the pregnancy. Maternal history of ever smoking, smoking during child's life, and smoking during pregnancy were associated with decreased odds ratio (OR) of childhood myopia (OR 0.50 (P=0.01), OR 0.39 (P=0.01), and OR 0.3 (P=0.14), respectively). Paternal history of smoking was associated with decreased OR of childhood myopia (OR of 0.72 (P=0.02)). In light of this finding of an inverse association between parental smoking and childhood myopia, further studies are suggested to better understand the role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor pharmacology in ocular development. This may pave the way for the development of targeted treatment strategies for prevention of myopia.

  2. Wavefront Derived Refraction and Full Eye Biometry in Pseudophakic Eyes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinjie; Banta, James T; Ke, Bilian; Jiang, Hong; He, Jichang; Liu, Che; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    To assess wavefront derived refraction and full eye biometry including ciliary muscle dimension and full eye axial geometry in pseudophakic eyes using spectral domain OCT equipped with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Twenty-eight adult subjects (32 pseudophakic eyes) having recently undergone cataract surgery were enrolled in this study. A custom system combining two optical coherence tomography systems with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was constructed to image and monitor changes in whole eye biometry, the ciliary muscle and ocular aberration in the pseudophakic eye. A Badal optical channel and a visual target aligning with the wavefront sensor were incorporated into the system for measuring the wavefront-derived refraction. The imaging acquisition was performed twice. The coefficients of repeatability (CoR) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated. Images were acquired and processed successfully in all patients. No significant difference was detected between repeated measurements of ciliary muscle dimension, full-eye biometry or defocus aberration. The CoR of full-eye biometry ranged from 0.36% to 3.04% and the ICC ranged from 0.981 to 0.999. The CoR for ciliary muscle dimensions ranged from 12.2% to 41.6% and the ICC ranged from 0.767 to 0.919. The defocus aberrations of the two measurements were 0.443 ± 0.534 D and 0.447 ± 0.586 D and the ICC was 0.951. The combined system is capable of measuring full eye biometry and refraction with good repeatability. The system is suitable for future investigation of pseudoaccommodation in the pseudophakic eye.

  3. Wavefront Derived Refraction and Full Eye Biometry in Pseudophakic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinjie; Banta, James T.; Ke, Bilian; Jiang, Hong; He, Jichang; Liu, Che; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess wavefront derived refraction and full eye biometry including ciliary muscle dimension and full eye axial geometry in pseudophakic eyes using spectral domain OCT equipped with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Methods Twenty-eight adult subjects (32 pseudophakic eyes) having recently undergone cataract surgery were enrolled in this study. A custom system combining two optical coherence tomography systems with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was constructed to image and monitor changes in whole eye biometry, the ciliary muscle and ocular aberration in the pseudophakic eye. A Badal optical channel and a visual target aligning with the wavefront sensor were incorporated into the system for measuring the wavefront-derived refraction. The imaging acquisition was performed twice. The coefficients of repeatability (CoR) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated. Results Images were acquired and processed successfully in all patients. No significant difference was detected between repeated measurements of ciliary muscle dimension, full-eye biometry or defocus aberration. The CoR of full-eye biometry ranged from 0.36% to 3.04% and the ICC ranged from 0.981 to 0.999. The CoR for ciliary muscle dimensions ranged from 12.2% to 41.6% and the ICC ranged from 0.767 to 0.919. The defocus aberrations of the two measurements were 0.443 ± 0.534 D and 0.447 ± 0.586 D and the ICC was 0.951. Conclusions The combined system is capable of measuring full eye biometry and refraction with good repeatability. The system is suitable for future investigation of pseudoaccommodation in the pseudophakic eye. PMID:27010674

  4. [Refractive surgery and flight safety].

    PubMed

    Draeger, J

    1998-09-01

    For both VFR and as IFR flight, visual assessment is the major source of information for the pilot. The new possibilities for change of refraction by means of corneal refractive surgery have led to an increasing demand from pilots for these new methods. Can these methods successfully be applied for aviation purposes? The valid regulations for medical standards of pilots, as well as the future international regulations such as JAR and ICAO, are explained in this respect. A report is given on the work of the Advisory Board of the German Federal Government Air Traffic Authority and on the cases treated so far and their outcome, and recommendations are expressed. Concerning the legal situation and clinical experience, advice for pilots, aviation medical examiners and ophthalmologists is given.

  5. Refractive keratoplasty. Keratophakia and keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Troutman, R C; Swinger, C

    1982-01-01

    Early experience with the refractive keratoplasty techniques of José Barraquer--keratophakia and hypermetropic keratomileusis is presented. In contradistinction to the alloplastic lens substitutes currently being employed for the integral correction of aphakia, Barraquer's techniques would seem to offer a more permanent, more physiologic, full-time optical correction of the aphakic state. Their use is limited only by the condition of the patient's cornea and, in fact, may be applied not only in aphakia but also in phakic eyes with higher degrees of hyperopia or myopia. In the opinion of the authors, the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Barraquer can be performed by any well-instructed ophthalmic surgeon. These techniques offer to many patients a satisfactory, and potentially a physiologically superior alternative to alloplastic lens substitute for aphakic correction.

  6. Refractive keratoplasty: keratophakia and keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Troutman, R C; Swinger, C

    1978-01-01

    We have presented our early experience with the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Doctor Jose Barraquer--keratophakia and hypermetropic keratomileusis. In contradistinction to the alloplastic lens substitutes currently being employed for the integral correction of aphakia, his techniques would seem to offer a more permanent, more physiologic, full-time optical correction of the aphakic state. Their use is limited only by the condition of the patient's corneaa and, in fact, may be applied not only in aphakia but also in phakic eyes with higher degrees of hyperopia or myopia. In the opinion of the authors, the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Barraquer can be perfored by any well-instructed ophthalmic surgeon. These techniques offer to many patients a satisfactory and potentially a physiologically superior alternative to alloplastic lens substitute for aphakic correction.

  7. Triangulation in Random Refractive Distortions.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Swirski, Yohay

    2017-03-01

    Random refraction occurs in turbulence and through a wavy water-air interface. It creates distortion that changes in space, time and with viewpoint. Localizing objects in three dimensions (3D) despite this random distortion is important to some predators and also to submariners avoiding the salient use of periscopes. We take a multiview approach to this task. Refracted distortion statistics induce a probabilistic relation between any pixel location and a line of sight in space. Measurements of an object's random projection from multiple views and times lead to a likelihood function of the object's 3D location. The likelihood leads to estimates of the 3D location and its uncertainty. Furthermore, multiview images acquired simultaneously in a wide stereo baseline have uncorrelated distortions. This helps reduce the acquisition time needed for localization. The method is demonstrated in stereoscopic video sequences, both in a lab and a swimming pool.

  8. Electro-refractive photonic device

    SciTech Connect

    Zortman, William A.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-06-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to phase shifting light to facilitate any of light switching, modulation, amplification, etc. Structures are presented where a second layer is juxtaposed between a first layer and a third layer with respective doping facilitating formation of p-n junctions at the interface between the first layer and the second layer, and between the second layer and the third layer. Application of a bias causes a carrier concentration change to occur at the p-n junctions which causes a shift in the effective refractive index per incremental change in an applied bias voltage. The effective refractive index enhancement can occur in both reverse bias and forward bias. The structure can be incorporated into a waveguide, an optical resonator, a vertical junction device, a horizontal junction device, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a tuneable optical filter, etc.

  9. Ocular rigidity, ocular pulse amplitude, and pulsatile ocular blood flow: the effect of axial length.

    PubMed

    Dastiridou, Anna I; Ginis, Harilaos; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Karyotakis, Nikos; Detorakis, Efstathios; Siganos, Charalambos; Cholevas, Pierros; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown a negative correlation between axial length (AL) and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF). This relation has been questioned because of the possible confounding effect of ocular volume on ocular rigidity (OR). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between AL, as a surrogate parameter for ocular volume, and OR, ocular pulse amplitude (OPA), and POBF. Eighty-eight cataract patients were enrolled in this study. A computer-controlled device comprising a microdosimetric pump and a pressure sensor was used intraoperatively. The system was connected to the anterior chamber and used to raise the intraocular pressure (IOP) from 15 to 40 mm Hg, by infusing the eye with a saline solution. After each infusion step, the IOP was continuously recorded for 2 seconds. Blood pressure and pulse rate were measured during the procedure. The OR coefficient was calculated from the pressure volume data. OPA and POBF were measured from pressure recordings. Median AL was 23.69 (interquartile range 3.53) mm. OR coefficient was 0.0218 (0.0053) μL(-1). A negative correlation between the OR coefficient and AL (ρ = -0.641, P < 0.001) was documented. Increasing AL was associated with decreased OPA (ρ = -0.637, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.690, P < 0.001) and POBF (ρ = -0.207, P = 0.053 and ρ = -0.238, P = 0.028) at baseline and elevated IOP, respectively. Based on manometric data, increasing AL is associated with decreased OR, OPA, and POBF. These results suggest decreased pulsatility in high myopia and may have implications on ocular pulse studies and the pathophysiology of myopia.

  10. Interpolation of refractive index data.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, B W; Powell, C J

    1973-07-01

    A comparison of the interpolation of index of refraction data for Czochralski sapphire, cyclohexane, and polystyrene dissolved in cyclohexane using a three-term Sellmeier equation, the Lorentz-Lorenz equation with six terms, third and fifth order polynomials, and a cubic-spline technique indicates that the cubic spline method is extremely valuable for simple interpolation. Not only were the magnitudes of the rms and average absolute residuals the smallest, but the fits showed no systematic errors.

  11. Therapeutical Management for Ocular Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    López-Valverde, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Larrosa-Povés, José Manuel; Polo-Llorens, Vicente; Pablo-Júlvez, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe a case of ocular rosacea with a very complex evolution. Rosacea is a chronic dermatological disease that may affect the ocular structures up to 6-72% of all cases. This form is often misdiagnosed, which may lead to long inflammatory processes with important visual consequences for affected patients. Therefore, an early diagnosis and an adequate treatment are important. Methods We report the case of a 43-year-old patient who had several relapses of what seemed an episode of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. Two weeks later, he developed a corneal ulcer with a torpid evolution including abundant intrastromal infiltrators and calcium deposits. He was diagnosed with ocular rosacea and treated with systemic doxycycline and topical protopic. Results A coating with amniotic membrane was placed in order to heal the ulcer, but a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty to restore the patient's vision because of the corneal transparency loss was necessary. Conclusions Ocular rosacea includes multiple ophthalmic manifestations ranging from inflammation of the eyelid margin and blepharitis to serious corneal affectations. A delayed diagnosis can result in chronic inflammatory conditions including keratinization and loss of corneal transparency, which lead to important visual sequelae for affected patients. PMID:27462249

  12. Ocular Toxoplasmosis: Lessons from Brazil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    • A new attention to post-natally acquired infections. Previously, most attention was focused on infection during pregnancy, and the risk of congenital disease, with the feeling that infection in older individuals was benign, without a substantial risk of disease morbidity, such as ocular involvemen...

  13. Ultraviolet light and ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yam, Jason C S; Kwok, Alvin K H

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to review the association between ultraviolet (UV) light and ocular diseases. The data are sourced from the literature search of Medline up to Nov 2012, and the extracted data from original articles, review papers, and book chapters were reviewed. There is a strong evidence that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is associated with the formation of eyelid malignancies [basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)], photokeratitis, climatic droplet keratopathy (CDK), pterygium, and cortical cataract. However, the evidence of the association between UV exposure and development of pinguecula, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract, ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN), and ocular melanoma remained limited. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is related to UV exposure. It is now suggested that AMD is probably related to visible radiation especially blue light, rather than UV exposure. From the results, it was concluded that eyelid malignancies (BCC and SCC), photokeratitis, CDK, pterygium, and cortical cataract are strongly associated with UVR exposure. Evidence of the association between UV exposure and development of pinguecula, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract, OSSN, and ocular melanoma remained limited. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether AMD is related to UV exposure. Simple behaviural changes, appropriate clothing, wearing hats, and UV blocking spectacles, sunglasses or contact lens are effective measures for UV protection.

  14. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  15. The ocular complications of boxing.

    PubMed

    Giovinazzo, V J; Yannuzzi, L A; Sorenson, J A; Delrowe, D J; Cambell, E A

    1987-06-01

    In cooperation with the New York State Athletic Commission, 74 boxers applying for a new or yearly renewal license were sequentially referred over a 2-year period for a complete dilated ocular examination at the Sports Vision Institute of the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital. At least one ocular injury was found in 66% of boxers. Vision-threatening injuries, defined as significant damage to the angle, lens, macula, or peripheral retina occurred in 58% of boxers. Nineteen percent of boxers had angle abnormalities. Nineteen percent of boxers had pathologic cataracts, over 70% of these were posterior subcapsular. Six boxers had macular lesions. A total of 24% of boxers had retinal tears. Standardized photographs were used to distinguish pathologic cataracts from congenital opacities and pathologic retinal tears from atrophic holes. Attempts were made to identify risk factors in boxing that might be predictive for ocular injury. Variables included age, weight division, left- or right-handedness, total number of losses, and total number of bouts. Significant correlations were found between the total number of bouts and the total number of losses, and the presence of retinal tears. College varsity athletes were selected as controls. Significant differences were found between boxers and controls for the total number of injuries, total vision-threatening injuries, and the number of retinal tears. A series of recommendations are proposed to aide in the early detection and prevention of serious ocular injuries.

  16. Laser refractive tomography of phase objects

    SciTech Connect

    Raskovskaya, I L

    2013-06-30

    The principles are outlined of laser refractive tomography - a method for reconstructing the values of the refractive index in the cross sections of phase objects, which involves the use of three-dimensional refractive images (3D refractograms) of structured laser radiation. A simulation algorithm is realised and examples are provided of characteristic 3D refractograms obtained by solving the direct problem of refraction of structured radiation. A method was developed for reconstructing the values of refractive index under conditions of strong refraction, which is based on the visualisation of ray trajectories inside an optically inhomogeneous medium. A classification is made of possible approaches to the solution of the inverse problem of refraction based on the visualisation of ray trajectories. Examples are given of cross section reconstruction and quantitative diagnostics of phase objects. (laser imaging)

  17. Topical ocular delivery of fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Pravin; Katara, Rajesh; Mishra, Sushil; Majumdar, Dipak K

    2013-05-01

    Topical fluoroquinolones are used in ophthalmology to treat ocular infections. They are bactericidal and inhibit bacterial DNA replication by inhibiting DNA gyrase and topoisomerase. Fluoroquinolones possess two ionizable groups: a carboxylic group (pKa1 = 5.5 - 6.34) and a heterocyclic group (pKa2 = 7.6 - 9.3), in the nucleus, which acquire charge at pH above and below the isoelectric point (pI = 6.75 - 7.78). At isoelectric point, fluoroquinolones remain unionized and show enhanced corneal penetration but exhibit reduced aqueous solubility and the drug may precipitate from aqueous solution. Aqueous ophthalmic solutions of fluoroquinolones are obtained by using hydrochloride or mesylate salt which is acidic and irritating to the eyes. Hence, pH of the solution is kept between 5 and 7 to ensure aqueous solubility and minimum ocular irritation. This review gives an overview of various physicochemical and formulation factors affecting the ocular delivery of fluoroquinolones and strategies for getting higher ocular bioavailability for ocular delivery of fluoroquinolones. These strategies could be employed to improve efficacy of fluoroquinolones in eye preparation. Broad-spectrum antibacterials, such as the ophthalmic fluoroquinolones, are powerful weapons for treating and preventing potentially sight-threatening infections. The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones have quickly assumed an outstanding place in the ophthalmic applications. Especially valuable for their broad-spectrum coverage against Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, these agents have become the anti-infective of preference for many ophthalmologists. Moxifloxacin seems to be a promising powerful molecule among all fluoroquinolones for treatment of bacterial infections.

  18. Ocular blood flow measurements in healthy human myopic eyes.

    PubMed

    Benavente-Pérez, Alexandra; Hosking, Sarah L; Logan, Nicola S; Broadway, David C

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the haemodynamic features of young healthy myopes and emmetropes, in order to ascertain the perfusion profile of human myopia and its relationship with axial length prior to reaching a degenerative state. The retrobulbar, microretinal and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) of one eye of each of twenty-two high myopes (N = 22, mean spherical equivalent (MSE) ≤-5.00D), low myopes (N = 22, MSE-1.00 to-4.50D) and emmetropes (N = 22, MSE ± 0.50D) was analyzed using color Doppler Imaging, Heidelberg retinal flowmetry and ocular blood flow analyser (OBF) respectively. Intraocular pressure, axial length (AL), systemic blood pressure, and body mass index were measured. When compared to the emmetropes and low myopes, the AL was greater in high myopia (p < 0.0001). High myopes showed higher central retinal artery resistance index (CRA RI) (p = 0.004), higher peak systolic to end diastolic velocities ratio (CRA ratio) and lower end diastolic velocity (CRA EDv) compared to low myopes (p = 0.014, p = 0.037). Compared to emmetropes, high myopes showed lower OBFamplitude (OBFa) (p = 0.016). The POBF correlated significantly with the systolic and diastolic blood velocities of the CRA (p = 0.016, p = 0.036). MSE and AL correlated negatively with OBFa (p = 0.03, p = 0.003), OBF volume (p = 0.02, p < 0.001), POBF (p = 0.01, p < 0.001) and positively with CRA RI (p = 0.007, p = 0.05). High myopes exhibited significantly reduced pulse amplitude and CRA blood velocity, the first of which may be due to an OBF measurement artefact or real decreased ocular blood flow pulsatility. Axial length and refractive error correlated moderately with the ocular pulse and with the resistance index of the CRA, which in turn correlated amongst themselves. It is hypothesized that the compromised pulsatile and CRA haemodynamics observed in young healthy myopes is an early feature of the decrease in ocular blood flow

  19. Changes in tear film, corneal topography, and refractive status in premenopausal women during menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Cavdar, Ercument; Ozkaya, Abdullah; Alkin, Zeynep; Ozkaya, Hande Mefkure; Babayigit, Mustafa Alparslan

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the changes in a questionnaire based subjective symptomatology, tear film break-up time, tear volume, corneal topography, and refractive status in premenopausal women during menstrual cycle. Seventeen premenopausal females and 15 healthy males were enrolled in this prospective study. After routine ophthalmologic examination, an ocular surface disease index questionnaire was administered, tear film break-up time (TBUT), and Schirmer I tests were performed. Keratometry readings and refractive status were also obtained. All examinations were repeated at day 21, day 12 and day 2. OSDI score in day 21 was significantly lower than that in day 12 (p=0.004) and day 2 (p=0.01) in the female patients; however, no significant change was found in the male subjects (p>0.05). No statistically significant difference was found in TBUT and Schirmer I tests, keratometry, and refraction results in both of the female and male subjects at all of the test points (p>0.05). There was a significant correlation between OSDI score and TBUT (p=0.02, p=0.03, respectively), and Schirmer I test at day 12 (p=0.004, p=0.008, respectively). A significant negative correlation was found between oestrogen level and horizontal keratometry values at day 21 (r=-0.5, p=0.03; r=-0.4, p=0.04, respectively) for the right and left eyes in the female subjects. Our study confirms that fluctuations in the blood levels of oestrogen produce alterations in ocular surface equilibrium during the menstrual cycle and consequently affect the subjective dry eye symptoms in female patients. However, no ocular surface parameter changes were observed. Copyright © 2013 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of ocular complications and the clinical outcomes of these complications in patients with various stages of HIV infection. METHODS: Retrospective review of all HIV-infected patients seen in an AIDS ophthalmology clinic from November 1983 through December 31, 1992. RESULTS: Eleven-hundred sixty-three patients were seen for ophthalmologic evaluation. Of these, 781 had the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), 226 had symptomatic HIV infection (AIDs-related complex [ARC]), and 156 had asymptomatic HIV infection. Non-infectious HIV retinopathy was the most common ocular complication, affecting 50% of the patients with AIDS, 34% of the patients with ARC, and 3% of the patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis was the most common opportunistic ocular infection, affecting 37% of the patients with AIDS. Other opportunistic ocular infections, including ocular toxoplasmosis, varicella zoster virus retinitis, and Pneumocystis choroidopathy were all much less common, each occurring in < or = 1% of the patients with AIDS. Treatment of CMV retinitis with either foscarnet or ganciclovir was successful in initially controlling the retinitis. However, relapse represented a significant problem and required frequent re-inductions. As a consequence of the retinal damage associated with relapse, loss of visual acuity occurred. The median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse for all eyes with CMV retinitis was 13.4 months, and the median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse in the better eye was 21.1 months. At last follow-up, 75% of the patients had a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better in at least one eye. Retinal detachments were a frequent ophthalmologic complication of CMV retinitis with a cumulative probability of a retinal detachment in at least one eye of 57% at 12 months after the diagnosis of CMV retinitis. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed in 3% of the overall series and was seen in

  1. Effects of Ocular Optics on Perceived Visual Direction and Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ming

    Most studies of human retinal image quality have specifically addressed the issues of image contrast, few have examined the problem of image location. However, one of the most impressive properties of human vision involves the location of objects. We are able to identify object location with great accuracy (less than 5 arcsec). The sensitivity we exhibit for image location indicates that any optical errors, such as refractive error, ocular aberrations, pupil decentration, etc., may have noticeable effects on perceived visual direction and distance of objects. The most easily observed effects of these optical factors is a binocular depth illusion called chromostereopsis in which equidistance colored objects appear to lie at the different distances. This dissertation covers a series of theoretical and experimental studies that examined the effects of ocular optics on perceived monocular visual direction and binocular chromostereopsis. Theoretical studies included development of an adequate eye model for predicting chromatic aberration, a major ocular aberration, using geometric optics. Also, a wave optical analysis is used to model the effects of defocus, optical aberrations, Stiles-Crawford effect (SCE) and pupil location on retinal image profiles. Experimental studies used psychophysical methods such as monocular vernier alignment tests, binocular stereoscopic tests, etc. This dissertation concludes: (1) With a decentered large pupil, the SCE reduces defocused image shifts compare to an eye without the SCE. (2) The blurred image location can be predicted by the centroid of the image profile. (3) Chromostereopsis with small pupils can be precisely accounted for by the interocular difference in monocular transverse chromatic aberration. (4) The SCE also plays an important role in the effect of pupil size on chromostereopsis. The reduction of chromostereopsis with large pupils can be accurately predicted by the interocular difference in monocular chromatic diplopia

  2. Axial Length, Anterior Chamber Depth-A Study in Different Age Groups and Refractive Errors

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Veena; Rajeshbhai, Gandhi Parth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Axial length and anterior chamber depth play an important role in refractive status of the eye in different age groups. Material and Methods: The present study has been done on 240 patients (480 eyes) who attended eye OPD of Department of Ophthalmology at NIMS Medical College & Hospital Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. The patients attending eye OPD between July 2011 to December 2012 of different ages groups were without significant history of any ocular disease. The axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured and compared. Conclusion: Hypermetropic eyes have shallow anterior chamber depth and shorter axial length as compared to myopic and emmtropic eyes. PMID:24298478

  3. Test and evaluation of the 2.4-micron photorefractor ocular screening system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    An improved 2.4-m photorefractor ocular screening system was tested and evaluated. The photorefractor system works on the principal of obtaining a colored photograph of both human eyes; and, by analysis of the retinal reflex images, certain ocular defects can be detected such a refractive error, strabismus, and lens obstructions. The 2.4-m photorefractory system uses a 35-mm camera with a telephoto lens and an electronic flash attachment. Retinal reflex images obtained from the new 2.4-m system are significantly improved over earlier systems in image quality. Other features were also improved, notably portability and reduction in mass. A total of 706 school age children were photorefracted, 211 learning disabled and 495 middle school students. The total students having abnormal retinal reflexes were 156 or 22 percent, and 133 or 85 percent of the abnormal had refractive error indicated. Ophthalmological examination was performed on 60 of these students and refractive error was verified in 57 or 95 percent of those examined. The new 2.4-m system has a NASA patent pending and is authorized by the FDA. It provides a reliable means of rapidly screening the eyes of children and young adults for vision problems. It is especially useful for infants and other non-communicative children who cannot be screened by the more conventional methods such as the familiar E chart.

  4. Burden of ocular and visual disorders among pupils in special schools in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Puri, Sudan; Bhattarai, Dipesh; Adhikari, Prakash; Shrestha, Jyoti Baba; Paudel, Nabin

    2015-09-01

    To determine detailed oculo-visual characteristics of children with intellectual disability studying in special schools and explore the burden of visual impairment. Detailed ophthalmic examination was carried out in all pupils studying at the seven special needs schools of Kathmandu valley, Nepal. Ophthalmic examination included case history, presenting distance visual acuity, cycloplegic refraction, binocular vision examination, contrast sensitivity and anterior and posterior segment evaluation. Ocular and visual status of children. Refractive errors (40%) and strabismus (17%) were the commonest visual disorders in our study children. Ninety-five per cent of the children who had clinically significant refractive errors presented without any correction. Visual impairment was present in 25% of the children. Severe visual impairment or worse was present in 3% of the children. Other common ocular findings were conjunctivitis, blepharitis, chalazion and ectropion. High prevalence of preventable visual impairment in this population requires immediate attention. It is hoped that the formulation of proper vision care guidelines at a national level may help in early detection and management of visual disorders in this special population and enhance their quality of life. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Negative refraction in a laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    This work is concerned with the reflection and transmission of waves at a plane interface between a homogeneous elastic half-space and a half-space of elastic material that is periodically laminated. The lamination is always in the direction of the x1-coordinate axis and the displacement is always longitudinal shear, so that the only non-zero displacement component is u3(x1 ,x2 , t). After an initial discussion of Floquet-Bloch waves in the laminated material, brief consideration is given to the reflection-transmission problem, when the interface between the two media is the plane x1 = 0. Nothing unusual emerges: there are just a single reflected wave and a single transmitted wave, undergoing positive group-velocity refraction. Then, the problem is considered when the interface between the two media is the plane x2 = 0. The periodic structure of the interface induces an infinite set of reflected waves and an infinite set of transmitted waves. All need to be taken into account, but most decay exponentially away from the interface. It had previously been recognized that, if the incident wave had appropriate frequency and angle of incidence, a propagating transmitted wave would be generated that would undergo negative group-velocity refraction - behaviour usually associated with a metamaterial. It is established by an example in this work that there is, in addition, a propagating transmitted wave with smaller wavelength but larger group velocity that undergoes positive group-velocity refraction. The work concludes with a brief discussion of this finding, including its implications for the utility (or not) of "effective medium" theory.

  6. Reduced vision in highly myopic eyes without ocular pathology: the ZOC-BHVI high myopia study.

    PubMed

    Jong, Monica; Sankaridurg, Padmaja; Li, Wayne; Resnikoff, Serge; Naidoo, Kovin; He, Mingguang

    2017-07-11

    The aim was to investigate the relationship of the magnitude of myopia with visual acuity in highly myopic eyes without ocular pathology. Twelve hundred and ninety-two highly myopic eyes (up to -6.00 DS both eyes, no astigmatic cut-off) with no ocular pathology from the ZOC-BHVI high myopia study in China, had cycloplegic refraction, followed by subjective refraction and visual acuities and axial length measurement. Two logistic regression models were undertaken to test the association of age, gender, refractive error, axial length and parental myopia with reduced vision. Mean group age was 19.0 ± 8.6 years; subjective spherical equivalent refractive error was -9.03 ± 2.73 D; objective spherical equivalent refractive error was -8.90 ± 2.60 D and axial length was 27.0 ± 1.3 mm. Using visual acuity, 82.4 per cent had normal vision, 16.0 per cent had mildly reduced vision, 1.2 per cent had moderately reduced vision, 0.3 per cent had severely reduced vision and no subjects were blind. The percentage with reduced vision increased with spherical equivalent to 74.5 per cent from -15.00 to -39.99 D, axial length to 67.7 per cent of eyes from 30.01 to 32.00 mm and age to 22.9 per cent of those 41 years and over. Spherical equivalent and axial length were significantly associated with reduced vision (p < 0.0001). Age and parental myopia were not significantly associated with reduced vision. Gender was significant for one model (p = 0.04). Mildly reduced vision is common in high myopia without ocular pathology and is strongly correlated with greater magnitudes of refractive error and axial length. Better understanding is required to minimise reduced vision in high myopes. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  7. Ocular effects of radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Elder, J A

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) energy has been reported to cause a variety of ocular effects, primarily cataracts but also effects on the retina, cornea, and other ocular systems. Cataracts have been observed in experimental animals when one eye was exposed to a localized, very high RF field and the other eye was the unexposed control. The results show that 2450 MHz exposures for >or=30 min at power densities causing extremely high dose rates (>or=150 W/kg) and temperatures (>or=41 degrees C) in or near the lens caused cataracts in the rabbit eye. However, cataracts were not observed in the monkey eye exposed to similar exposure conditions, reflecting the different patterns of energy absorption (SAR, specific absorption rate) distribution, due to their different facial structure. Since the monkey head is similar in structure to the human head, the nonhuman primate study showed that the incident power density levels causing cataracts in rabbits and other laboratory animals cannot be directly extrapolated to primates, including human beings. It is reasonable to assume that an SAR that would induce temperatures >or=41 degrees C in or near the lens in the human eye would produce cataracts by the same mechanism (heating) that caused cataracts in the rabbit lens; however, such an exposure would greatly exceed the currently allowable limits for human exposure and would be expected to cause unacceptable effects in other parts of the eye and face. Other ocular effects including corneal lesions, retinal effects, and changes in vascular permeability, have been observed after localized exposure of the eye of laboratory animals to both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed wave (PW) exposures, but the inconsistencies in these results, the failure to independently confirm corneal lesions after CW exposure, the failure to independently confirm retinal effects after PW exposure, and the absence of functional changes in vision are reasons why these ocular effects are not useful in defining an

  8. Psychoneuroimmunology: application to ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Lori M

    2009-06-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is a relatively new discipline within the field of neuroscience which researches the relationship between emotional states, the central and peripheral nervous systems, and the endocrine and immune systems. Negative psychological states, such as stress, anxiety, and depression, may alter immune system regulation and modulation of peripheral cytokines. A plethora of PNI studies have shown that increased psychological stress and depression are associated with an alteration of immune functioning and worsened health outcomes for many conditions. To date, application of PNI methodology has not been reported for ocular diseases. This article provides an historical perspective on the origins of the rift between the emotional and spiritual from physical aspects of disease. A review of how stress is mediated through sympathetic adrenomedullary and hypothalamic pituitary axis activation with shifts in immunity is provided. The literature which supports spirituality in healing is presented. Finally, ocular diseases which would be most amenable to a PNI approach are discussed.

  9. [Ocular toxocariasis--case report].

    PubMed

    Moraru, Andreea; Panfil, Madălina; Totolici, Geanina; Brănişteanu, Daniel; Costin, Dănut; Schmitzer, Speranţa

    2014-01-01

    Ocular Toxocariasis is a parasitosis caused by Toxocara catis/canis larvae localized in the eye. The most frequent clinical manifestations are the central retinal granuloma, peripheral retinal granuloma and chronic endophthalmitis. Secondary complications due to the presence of parasite in the posterior segment of the eye may have significant consequences on visual function. We present the case of a 23 years old patient, admitted for progressive decrease of the right eye BCVA during the last 6 months. After performing clinical examination and serological tests we established the diagnosis of ocular Toxocariasis. The patient presented a particular form of the disease consisting in the presence of both a central retinal granuloma and a peripheral one. We performed 23G pars plana vitrectomy and membrane peeling. VA improved as soon as the first month after surgery.

  10. Potential applications of ocular thermography.

    PubMed

    Morgan, P B; Soh, M P; Efron, N; Tullo, A B

    1993-07-01

    Thermography is an investigative technique which allows rapid color-coded display of the temperature across a wide surface by means of infrared detection. We describe an ocular thermographic study of a normal population and present case studies describing the application of this technique for patients with ocular disease. We found that 95% of the normal population have an interocular temperature difference (temperature of center of right cornea minus temperature of center of left cornea) of 0.60 degrees or less. There appears to be a greater difference in temperature between the limbus and the center of the cornea in patients with dry eyes. This technique has potential for evaluating tear film disorders and inflammatory conditions, for monitoring the progress of such conditions, and for evaluating the efficacy of various treatments.

  11. The Relationship between Crystalline Lens Power and Refractive Error in Older Chinese Adults: The Shanghai Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiangnan; Lu, Lina; He, Xiangui; Xu, Xian; Du, Xuan; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Huijuan; Sha, Jida; Zhu, Jianfeng; Zou, Haidong; Xu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report calculated crystalline lens power and describe the distribution of ocular biometry and its association with refractive error in older Chinese adults. Methods Random clustering sampling was used to identify adults aged 50 years and above in Xuhui and Baoshan districts of Shanghai. Refraction was determined by subjective refraction that achieved the best corrected vision based on monocular measurement. Ocular biometry was measured by IOL Master. The crystalline lens power of right eyes was calculated using modified Bennett-Rabbetts formula. Results We analyzed 6099 normal phakic right eyes. The mean crystalline lens power was 20.34 ± 2.24D (range: 13.40–36.08). Lens power, spherical equivalent, and anterior chamber depth changed linearly with age; however, axial length, corneal power and AL/CR ratio did not vary with age. The overall prevalence of hyperopia, myopia, and high myopia was 48.48% (95% CI: 47.23%–49.74%), 22.82% (95% CI: 21.77%–23.88%), and 4.57% (95% CI: 4.05–5.10), respectively. The prevalence of hyperopia increased linearly with age while lens power decreased with age. In multivariate models, refractive error was strongly correlated with axial length, lens power, corneal power, and anterior chamber depth; refractive error was slightly correlated with best corrected visual acuity, age and sex. Conclusion Lens power, hyperopia, and spherical equivalent changed linearly with age; Moreover, the continuous loss of lens power produced hyperopic shifts in refraction in subjects aged more than 50 years. PMID:28114313

  12. The influence of diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2 on the thickness, shape, and equivalent refractive index of the human crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Nanouk G M; Dubbelman, Michiel; Kostense, Piet J; Ringens, Peter J; Polak, Bettine C P

    2008-10-01

    To study the influence of diabetes mellitus (DM) types 1 and 2 on the thickness, radius of curvature, equivalent refractive index, and power of the lens. Observational cross-sectional study. One hundred fourteen patients with DM type 1, 112 patients with DM type 2, and 75 control subjects. Lens thickness and the anterior and posterior radius of the lens were measured by means of corrected Scheimpflug imaging. Ocular refraction was determined with Hartmann-Shack aberrometry. The equivalent refractive index and the power of the lens were calculated from these parameters. Several systemic parameters (e.g., duration of DM, glycated hemoglobin, and type of medication) and ocular comorbidity (e.g., level of diabetic retinopathy) were recorded. The thickness, anterior and posterior radii, equivalent refractive index, and power of the lens. The lenses of the patients with DM type 1 were significantly thicker and more convex, compared with those of the control group (P<0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the equivalent refractive index of their lenses compared with the control group. No difference in lens parameters was found between the patients with DM type 2 and the control group. In the DM type 1 group, the duration of DM was an important determinant of lens biometry; the independent effects of the duration of DM per year on lens thickness, anterior radius, posterior radius, and equivalent refractive index were respectively 95%, 88%, 207%, and 45% of the effect of age per year. Lens power and ocular refraction were not affected by DM types 1 or 2. The results of the present study show that DM type 1 has a major impact on lens biometry. Furthermore, the difference in effect of DM types 1 and 2 on lens biometry may indicate a fundamental difference in pathogenesis. The decrease in equivalent refractive index of the lens seemed to compensate for the profound increase in lens convexity in patients with DM type 1, resulting in no significant change in

  13. Ocular dirofilariasis in Dubai, UAE.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Mamta; Sathish, K R; Bhatia, Prashant G; Chidamber, B S

    2008-01-01

    A rare occurrence of ocular subconjunctival dirofilariasis in a 53-year-old healthy Indian male working in Dubai, UAE presenting with an acute red eye is reported. Surgical excision under topical anesthesia was carried out uneventfully in the outpatient clinic. The live worm removed from the subconjunctival space was identified as Dirofilaria repens on the basis of microscopic examination and histopathology. Surgical excision of subconjunctival dirofilariasis is safe in an outpatient setting and curative precluding the need for further systemic antihelminthics.

  14. Topical ocular delivery of NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Munish; Dhake, Avinash S; Sharma, Surendra K; Majumdar, Dipak K

    2008-06-01

    In ocular tissue, arachidonic acid is metabolized by cyclooxygenase to prostaglandins which are the most important lipid derived mediators of inflammation. Presently nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which are cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors are being used for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. NSAIDs used in ophthalmology, topically, are salicylic-, indole acetic-, aryl acetic-, aryl propionic- and enolic acid derivatives. NSAIDs are weak acids with pKa mostly between 3.5 and 4.5, and are poorly soluble in water. Aqueous ophthalmic solutions of NSAIDs have been made using sodium, potassium, tromethamine and lysine salts or complexing with cyclodextrins/solubilizer. Ocular penetration of NSAID demands an acidic ophthalmic solution where cyclodextrin could prevent precipitation of drug and minimize its ocular irritation potential. The incompatibility of NSAID with benzalkonium chloride is avoided by using polysorbate 80, cyclodextrins or tromethamine. Lysine salts and alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate disrupt corneal integrity, and their use requires caution. Thus a nonirritating ophthalmic solution of NSAID could be formulated by dissolving an appropriate water-soluble salt, in the presence of cyclodextrin or tromethamine (if needed) in mildly acidified purified water (if stability permits) with or without benzalkonium chloride and polyvinyl alcohol. Amide prodrugs met with mixed success due to incomplete intraocular hydrolysis. Suspension and ocular inserts appear irritating to the inflamed eye. Oil drop may be a suitable option for insoluble drugs and ointment may be used for sustained effect. Recent studies showed that the use of colloidal nanoparticle formulations and the potent COX 2 inhibitor bromfenac may enhance NSAID efficacy in eye preparations.

  15. Ocular Health (OH) Fundoscope Exam

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-05

    ISS036-E-006520 (5 June 2013) --- NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, conducts an ocular health exam on herself in the Destiny laboratory of the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, flight engineer, nearby but out of frame, assisted in the testing, part of a suite of eye exams carried out over a two-day period on various crew members to gather information on intraocular pressure and eye anatomy.

  16. Nominal Ocular Dazzle Distance (NODD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-23

    release; distribution unlimited. PA Case No: TSRL-PA-14-0076. Date cleared: Aug. 20 , 2014 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. Abstract A simple model...and Nominal Ocular Dazzle Distance (NODD). A validated intraocular scatter model has been combined with a contrast threshold target detection model to...target can be detected , and the NODD, the minimum distance for the visual detection of a target in the presence of laser dazzle. The model is suitable

  17. Spherical subjective refraction with a novel 3D virtual reality based system.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Jaume; Ondategui-Parra, Juan Carlos; Badiella, Llorenç; Otero, Carles; Vilaseca, Meritxell; Aldaba, Mikel

    To conduct a clinical validation of a virtual reality-based experimental system that is able to assess the spherical subjective refraction simplifying the methodology of ocular refraction. For the agreement assessment, spherical refraction measurements were obtained from 104 eyes of 52 subjects using three different methods: subjectively with the experimental prototype (Subj.E) and the classical subjective refraction (Subj.C); and objectively with the WAM-5500 autorefractor (WAM). To evaluate precision (intra- and inter-observer variability) of each refractive tool independently, 26 eyes were measured in four occasions. With regard to agreement, the mean difference (±SD) for the spherical equivalent (M) between the new experimental subjective method (Subj.E) and the classical subjective refraction (Subj.C) was -0.034D (±0.454D). The corresponding 95% Limits of Agreement (LoA) were (-0.856D, 0.924D). In relation to precision, intra-observer mean difference for the M component was 0.034±0.195D for the Subj.C, 0.015±0.177D for the WAM and 0.072±0.197D for the Subj.E. Inter-observer variability showed worse precision values, although still clinically valid (below 0.25D) in all instruments. The spherical equivalent obtained with the new experimental system was precise and in good agreement with the classical subjective routine. The algorithm implemented in this new system and its optical configuration has been shown to be a first valid step for spherical error correction in a semiautomated way. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The prevalence of refractive conditions in Puerto Rican adults attending an eye clinic system

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Neisha M.; Romero, Angel. F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of refractive conditions in the adult population that visited primary care optometry clinics in Puerto Rico. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study of patients examined at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry Eye Institute Clinics between 2004 and 2010. Subjects considered had best corrected visual acuity by standardized subjective refraction of 20/40 or better. The refractive errors were classified by the spherical equivalent (SE): sphere+½ cylinder. Myopia was classified as a SE>−0.50 D, hyperopia as a SE>+0.50  D, and emmetropia as a SE between −0.50 and +0.50, both included. Astigmatism equal or higher than 0.25 D in minus cylinder form was used. Patients with documented history of cataract extraction (pseudophakia or aphakia), amblyopia, refractive surgery or other corneal/ocular surgery were excluded from the study. Results A total of 784 randomly selected subjects older than 40 years of age were selected. The estimated prevalence (95%, confidence interval) among all subjects was hyperopia 51.5% (48.0–55.0), emmetropia 33.8% (30.5–37.2), myopia 14.7% (12.1–17.2) and astigmatism 69.6% (68.8–73.3). Hyperopia was more common in females than males although the difference was not statistically significant. The mean spherical equivalent values was hyperopic until 70 y/o and decreased slightly as the population ages. Conclusion Hyperopia is the most common refractive error and its prevalence and seems to increase among the aging population who visited the clinics. Further programs and studies must be developed to address the refractive errors needs of the adult Puerto Rican population. PMID:25000872

  19. The prevalence of refractive conditions in Puerto Rican adults attending an eye clinic system.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Neisha M; Romero, Angel F

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of refractive conditions in the adult population that visited primary care optometry clinics in Puerto Rico. A retrospective cross-sectional study of patients examined at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry Eye Institute Clinics between 2004 and 2010. Subjects considered had best corrected visual acuity by standardized subjective refraction of 20/40 or better. The refractive errors were classified by the spherical equivalent (SE): sphere+½ cylinder. Myopia was classified as a SE>-0.50D, hyperopia as a SE>+0.50 D, and emmetropia as a SE between -0.50 and +0.50, both included. Astigmatism equal or higher than 0.25 D in minus cylinder form was used. Patients with documented history of cataract extraction (pseudophakia or aphakia), amblyopia, refractive surgery or other corneal/ocular surgery were excluded from the study. A total of 784 randomly selected subjects older than 40 years of age were selected. The estimated prevalence (95%, confidence interval) among all subjects was hyperopia 51.5% (48.0-55.0), emmetropia 33.8% (30.5-37.2), myopia 14.7% (12.1-17.2) and astigmatism 69.6% (68.8-73.3). Hyperopia was more common in females than males although the difference was not statistically significant. The mean spherical equivalent values was hyperopic until 70 y/o and decreased slightly as the population ages. Hyperopia is the most common refractive error and its prevalence and seems to increase among the aging population who visited the clinics. Further programs and studies must be developed to address the refractive errors needs of the adult Puerto Rican population. Copyright © 2012 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Refraction during incipient presbyopia: The Aston Longitudinal Assessment of Presbyopia (ALAP) study.

    PubMed

    Laughton, Deborah S; Sheppard, Amy L; Davies, Leon N

    2017-06-06

    To investigate non-cycloplegic changes in refractive error prior to the onset of presbyopia. The Aston Longitudinal Assessment of Presbyopia (ALAP) study is a prospective 2.5 year longitudinal study, measuring objective refractive error using a binocular open-field WAM-5500 autorefractor at 6-month intervals in participants aged between 33 and 45 years. From the 58 participants recruited, 51 participants (88%) completed the final visit. At baseline, 21 participants were myopic (MSE -3.25±2.28 DS; baseline age 38.6±3.1 years) and 30 were emmetropic (MSE -0.17±0.32 DS; baseline age 39.0±2.9 years). After 2.5 years, 10% of the myopic group experienced a hypermetropic shift (≥0.50 D), 5% a myopic shift (≥0.50 D) and 85% had no significant change in refraction (<0.50 D). From the emmetropic group, 10% experienced a hypermetropic shift (≥0.50 D), 3% a myopic shift (≥0.50 D) and 87% had no significant change in refraction (<0.50 D). In terms of astigmatism vectors, other than J45 (p<0.001), all measures remained invariant over the study period. The incidence of a myopic shift in refraction during incipient presbyopia does not appear to be as large as previously indicated by retrospective research. The changes in axis indicate ocular astigmatism tends towards the against-the-rule direction with age. The structural origin(s) of the reported myopic shift in refraction during incipient presbyopia warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of refracting flows for acoustic suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, D.; Purves, R. B.; Farquhar, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation to determine the possibility of using refracting flows for the suppression of aircraft inlet noise is described. Observations of wave refraction in duct flows and measurements of the increase in effectiveness of acoustic linings due to refraction have suggested methods for the design of engine inlet ducts which can either suppress noise internally or direct it to where it causes less annoyance.

  2. Peripheral refraction in normal infant rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Huang, Juan; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Smith, Earl L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize peripheral refractions in infant monkeys. Methods Cross-sectional data for horizontal refractions were obtained from 58 normal rhesus monkeys at 3 weeks of age. Longitudinal data were obtained for both the vertical and horizontal meridians from 17 monkeys. Refractive errors were measured by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at eccentricities of 15, 30, and 45 degrees. Axial dimensions and corneal power were measured by ultrasonography and keratometry, respectively. Results In infant monkeys, the degree of radial astigmatism increased symmetrically with eccentricity in all meridians. There were, however, initial nasal-temporal and superior-inferior asymmetries in the spherical-equivalent refractive errors. Specifically, the refractions in the temporal and superior fields were similar to the central ametropia, but the refractions in the nasal and inferior fields were more myopic than the central ametropia and the relative nasal field myopia increased with the degree of central hyperopia. With age, the degree of radial astigmatism decreased in all meridians and the refractions became more symmetrical along both the horizontal and vertical meridians; small degrees of relative myopia were evident in all fields. Conclusions As in adult humans, refractive error varied as a function of eccentricity in infant monkeys and the pattern of peripheral refraction varied with the central refractive error. With age, emmetropization occurred for both central and peripheral refractive errors resulting in similar refractions across the central 45 degrees of the visual field, which may reflect the actions of vision-dependent, growth-control mechanisms operating over a wide area of the posterior globe. PMID:18487366

  3. Investigation of refracting flows for acoustic suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, D.; Purves, R. B.; Farquhar, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the possibility of using refracting flows for the suppression of aircraft inlet noise has been completed. Observations of wave behavior in accelerating duct flows have suggested that acoustic wave refraction could be used to direct inlet noise away from the ground upward to where it causes less annoyance. Measurements have also shown that acoustic wave refraction can cause large improvements in the effectiveness of acoustic lining material.

  4. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Virtual Subjective Refraction.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    To establish the repeatability and reproducibility of a virtual refraction process using simulated retinal images. With simulation software, aberrated images corresponding with each step of the refraction process were calculated following the typical protocol of conventional subjective refraction. Fifty external examiners judged simulated retinal images until the best sphero-cylindrical refraction and the best visual acuity were achieved starting from the aberrometry data of three patients. Data analyses were performed to assess repeatability and reproducibility of the virtual refraction as a function of pupil size and aberrometric profile of different patients. SD values achieved in three components of refraction (M, J0, and J45) are lower than 0.25D in repeatability analysis. Regarding reproducibility, we found SD values lower than 0.25D in the most cases. When the results of virtual refraction with different pupil diameters (4 and 6 mm) were compared, the mean of differences (MoD) obtained were not clinically significant (less than 0.25D). Only one of the aberrometry profiles with high uncorrected astigmatism shows poor results for the M component in reproducibility and pupil size dependence analysis. In all cases, vision achieved was better than 0 logMAR. A comparison between the compensation obtained with virtual and conventional subjective refraction was made as an example of this application, showing good quality retinal images in both processes. The present study shows that virtual refraction has similar levels of precision as conventional subjective refraction. Moreover, virtual refraction has also shown that when high low order astigmatism is present, the refraction result is less precise and highly dependent on pupil size.

  5. Optical Negative Refraction in Ferrofluids with Magnetocontrollability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-22

    Optical Negative Refraction in Ferrofluids with Magnetocontrollability Y. Gao,1,2 J. P. Huang,1,* Y.M. Liu,3 L. Gao,4 K.W. Yu,2 and X. Zhang3...China (Received 5 October 2009; published 20 January 2010) We numerically demonstrate optical negative refraction in ferrofluids containing isotropic...certain soft materials. As a result, we reveal, for the first time, a new class of all-angle broadband optical nega- tive refraction in ferrofluids with

  6. Clinical Applications of Wavefront Refraction

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Adrian S.; Catania, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To determine normative reference ranges for higher-order wavefront error (HO-WFE), compare these values with those in common ocular pathologies, and evaluate treatments. Methods A review of 17 major studies on HO-WFE was made, involving data for a total of 31,605 subjects. The upper limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for HO-WFE was calculated from the most comprehensive of these studies using normal healthy patients aged 20 to 80 years. There were no studies identified using the natural pupil size for subjects, and for this reason, the HO-WFE was tabulated for pupil diameters of 3 to 7 mm. Effects of keratoconus, pterygium, cataract, and dry eye on HO-WFE were reviewed and treatment efficacy was considered. Results The calculated upper limit of the 95% CI for HO-WFE in a healthy normal 35-year-old patient with a mesopic pupil diameter of 6 mm would be 0.471 μm (471 nm) root-mean-square or less. Although the normal HO-WFE increases with age for a given pupil size, it is not yet completely clear how the concurrent influence of age-related pupillary miosis affects these findings. Abnormal ocular conditions such as keratoconus can induce a large HO-WFE, often in excess of 3.0 μm, particularly attributed to coma. For pterygium or cortical cataract, a combination of coma and trefoil was more commonly induced. Nuclear cataract can induce a negative spherical HO-WFE, usually in excess of 1.0 μm. Conclusions The upper limit of the 95% CI for HO-WFE root-mean-square is about 0.5 μm with normal physiological pupil sizes. With ocular pathologies, HO-WFE can be in excess of 1.0 μm, although many devices and therapeutic and surgical treatments are reported to be highly effective at minimizing HO-WFE. More accurate normative reference ranges for HO-WFE will require future studies using the subjects’ natural pupil size. PMID:25216319

  7. Scanning laser retinoscopy: a new technique for evaluating optical properties of the cornea after refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Velde, Frans J.; Tassignon, Marie J.; Trau, Rene

    1997-12-01

    We present a new technique, scanning laser retinoscopy, to spatially resolve in two dimensions the optical aberrations and refractive power of the ocular media. For this purpose, the Maxwellian view of a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) is configured to scan simultaneously the posterior and the anterior segment of the eye at different levels of prefocussing. This set-up allows retinal imaging and psychophysics through different optical zones of the cornea and lens. In addition, the size of the anatomical pupil can be dynamically controlled by adjusting the colinear infrared and visible light intensities of the illuminating system. In retinoscopic images we can see a part of the retina superimposed by distinctive patterns of shadows in the pupillary area. The variable patterns of shadows in the retinoscopic images change with the level of prefocussing of the SLO. The patterns are the result of local variations in refraction or wavefront aberrations within the lens and cornea. In cases of excimer laser refractive surgery, for example, scanning laser retinoscopy is able to distinguish between a treated central area, transition zone and peripheral cornea. As a corollary, we can document differences between excimer laser delivery systems and also correlate the retinoscopic images with the subjective complaints of refractive surgery patients. These include monocular diplopia, glare, loss of contrast sensitivity besides reduced visual acuity.

  8. Ocular Manifestations in Infants Resulted from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART).

    PubMed

    Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Kermani, Ramin Mozafari; Mohhamadi, Ali Reza; Nateghi, Mohammad Reza; Fazeli, Abolhasan Shahzade; Kashi, Khashayar Mehdizadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, many infertile couples can have child by assistant reproductive technology (ART). Always the undesirable effects of these methods on newborn are considered and are evaluated. The aim of this study is to describe the impact of ART on ocular and visual performances of infants born by these methods. In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 479 infants aged three-nine months presented to an optometry clinic of Child Health and Development Research Department (CHDRD), Tehran, Iran. Static retinoscopy, qualitative fixation evaluation, Hirschberg test, red reflex assessment and external eye examination were carried out. Other information such as birth weight and maturity of the infants was recorded. It was possible to assess only 320 out of 479 infants due to general condition of some participants. Comparison of mean refractive error in infants' right and left eyes did not show any significant difference. Our findings confirmed that 20.3% had poor fixation, while 2.9% revealed manifest strabismus. The results also revealed the prevalences of myopia, hyperopia and emmetropia are 2.9%, 87%, and 10.1%, respectively. Red reflex abnormalities were significantly found in boys and in preterm infants (p < 0.05). Failure of fixation control was seen more frequently with increasing refractive error, which significantly developed in preterm infants (p < 0.001). These results reflect the necessity of more comprehensive assessments and further follow-up of infants born by ART, especially for premature male ART infants. These results also suggest the probability of fixation condition and visual deficiencies in these infants. It is recommended to pay close attention to this preliminary report about the refractive and fixation condition of the infants born after ART.

  9. The combination of vestibular impairment and congenital sensorineural hearing loss predisposes patients to ocular anomalies, including Usher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kletke, S; Batmanabane, V; Dai, T; Vincent, A; Li, S; Gordon, K A; Papsin, B C; Cushing, S L; Héon, E

    2016-10-15

    The co-occurrence of hearing impairment and visual dysfunction is devastating. Most deaf-blind etiologies are genetically determined, the commonest being Usher syndrome (USH). While studies of the congenitally deaf population reveal a variable degree of visual problems, there are no effective ophthalmic screening guidelines. We hypothesized that children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and vestibular impairment were at an increased risk of having USH. A retrospective chart review of 33 cochlear implants recipients for severe to profound SNHL and measured vestibular dysfunction was performed to determine the ocular phenotype. All the cases had undergone ocular examination and electroretinogram (ERG). Patients with an abnormal ERG underwent genetic testing for USH. We found an underlying ocular abnormality in 81.81% (27/33) of cases; of which 75% had refractive errors, and 50% of those patients showed visual improvement with refractive correction. A total of 14 cases (42.42%; 14/33) had generalized rod-cone dysfunction on ERG suggestive of Usher syndrome type 1, confirmed by mutational analysis. This work shows that adding vestibular impairment as a criterion for requesting an eye exam and adding the ERG to detect USH increases the chances of detecting ocular anomalies, when compared with previous literature focusing only on congenital SNHL.

  10. Findings of perinatal ocular examination performed on 3573, healthy full-term newborns.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Hong; Li, Na; Zhao, Jun-Yang; Fei, Ping; Zhang, Guo-ming; Mao, Jian-bo; Rychwalski, Paul J

    2013-05-01

    To document the findings of a newborn eye examination programme for detecting ocular pathology in the healthy full-term newborn. This is a cross-sectional study of the majority of newborns born in the Kunming Maternal and Child Healthcare Hospital, China, between May 2010 and June 2011. Infants underwent ocular examination within 42 days after birth using a flashlight, retinoscope, hand-held slit lamp microscope and wide-angle digital retinal image acquisition system. The retinal fundus examination utilised the RetCam wide-field digital imaging system (Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, California, USA). The external eye, pupillary light reflex, red reflex, opacity of refractive media, anterior chamber and posterior segments were also examined. A total of 3573 healthy full-term newborns were enrolled and examined in the programme. There was detection of 871 abnormal cases (24.4%). The majority of abnormal exams were 769 (21.52%) retinal haemorrhages. Of these, there were 215 cases of significant retinal haemorrhage, possible sight threatening or amblyogenic, representing 6.02% of the total. In addition, 67 cases (1.88%) involved macular haemorrhage. The other 107 cases (2.99%) with abnormal ocular findings included subconjunctival haemorrhage, congenital microphthalmos, congenital corneal leukoma, posterior synechia, persistent pupillary membrane, congenital cataract, enlarged C/D ratio, retinal hamartoma versus retinoblastoma, optic nerve defects, macular pigment disorder and non-specific peripheral retinopathy. Ocular examination of healthy newborns leads to the detection of a significant number of ocular pathologies. The most commonly discovered ocular abnormality during examination of the newborns in this study is retinal haemorrhage. The long-term impact of these findings is unknown. Although presumed by some to benign, neonatal retinal haemorrhages due to birth trauma could be involved in altering visual development. Further work, including prospective

  11. Factors associated with the direction of ocular deviation in sensory horizontal strabismus and unilateral organic ocular problems.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Geun; Park, Jung Min; Lee, Soo Jung

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate factors associated with the direction of horizontal deviation in the sensory strabismus of patients with unilateral organic amblyopia. The medical charts of 53 patients who had been diagnosed with sensory strabismus between 2000 and 2009 were reviewed retrospectively. The underlying ocular disease, time of onset and the duration of vision impairment, refractive error and axial length of the fixing eye, and the direction and angle of deviation were analyzed to determine the distribution of underlying diseases and any factors relevant to determining the direction of the horizontal deviation. Congenital cataracts were the most common underlying disease, found in 33 patients, followed by acquired cataracts, optic nerve disorders, retinal detachment, glaucoma and lens subluxation. Among the 50 patients with horizontal strabismus, 11 had esotropia and 39 had exotropia. The incidence of esotropia was significantly higher when the fixing eye had hyperopia or emmetropia, than when the eye was myopic. Age of onset of vision deterioration and at diagnosis of sensory strabismus, and the axial length of the fixing eye had no relationship to the direction of horizontal deviation. In addition, the duration of visual impairment had no significant relationship with the direction or extent of horizontal deviation. The most common cause of sensory strabismus was congenital cataracts and the most frequent type of strabismus was exotropia. With respect to the direction of horizontal strabismus, esotropia occurred significantly more often when the refractive error of the fixing eye was hyperopia or emmetropia than when the fixing eye was myopic.

  12. Emerging drugs for ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anne J; Goldberg, Ivan

    2011-03-01

    Glaucoma is a prevalent ocular disease with characteristic optic disc and visual field changes. Globally, it is the second most common cause of visual disability, and the most common cause of irreversible and preventable blindness. Ocular hypertension (OH) occurs where intraocular pressure elevation occurs in the absence of glaucomatous disc and visual field changes. OH is a strong risk factor for glaucoma. Ocular hypotensive medications are the mainstay of glaucoma and OH treatment, and their use modifies the course of the disease by preventing onset and progression of damage. Prostaglandin analogs, β-blockers, α-agonists, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and parasympathomimetics are available in our glaucoma armamentarium and are reviewed. Novel agents have evolved as our understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in aqueous humor production and obstacles to aqueous outflow increases. Potential future candidates appear to act on enhancing trabecular meshwork outflow: the Rho-kinase inhibitors, ion-channel modulators and chelating agents. Further work is needed on other promising agents: serotonergics, melatonins, cannabinoids, adenosine agonists, components of the actomyosin system, nucleotide analogs and gene silencing. Methods to improve side effect profiles or efficacy of currently available therapies are also being developed. As glaucoma treatment adherence is poor, novel drug delivery methods might address this challenge. Although there are good intraocular pressure-lowering medications available, novel mechanisms and drug delivery modes may provide more effective glaucoma control in future.

  13. Negative refraction in semiconductor metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Anthony J; Alekseyev, Leonid; Howard, Scott S; Franz, Kale J; Wasserman, Dan; Podolskiy, Viktor A; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Sivco, Deborah L; Gmachl, Claire

    2007-12-01

    An optical metamaterial is a composite in which subwavelength features, rather than the constituent materials, control the macroscopic electromagnetic properties of the material. Recently, properly designed metamaterials have garnered much interest because of their unusual interaction with electromagnetic waves. Whereas nature seems to have limits on the type of materials that exist, newly invented metamaterials are not bound by such constraints. These newly accessible electromagnetic properties make these materials an excellent platform for demonstrating unusual optical phenomena and unique applications such as subwavelength imaging and planar lens design. 'Negative-index materials', as first proposed, required the permittivity, epsilon, and permeability, mu, to be simultaneously less than zero, but such materials face limitations. Here, we demonstrate a comparatively low-loss, three-dimensional, all-semiconductor metamaterial that exhibits negative refraction for all incidence angles in the long-wave infrared region and requires only an anisotropic dielectric function with a single resonance. Using reflection and transmission measurements and a comprehensive model of the material, we demonstrate that our material exhibits negative refraction. This is furthermore confirmed through a straightforward beam optics experiment. This work will influence future metamaterial designs and their incorporation into optical semiconductor devices.

  14. Femtosecond laser corneal refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Ron M.; Spooner, Greg J. R.; Sletten, Karin R.; Yen, Kimberly G.; Sayegh, Samir I.; Loesel, Frieder H.; Horvath, Christopher; Liu, HsiaoHua; Elner, Victor; Cabrera, Delia; Muenier, Marie-Helene; Sacks, Zachary S.; Juhasz, Tibor

    1999-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy, safety, and stability of femtosecond laser intrastromal refractive procedures in ex vivo and in vivo models. When compared with longer pulsewidth nanosecond or picosecond laser pulses, femtosecond laser-tissue interactions are characterized by significantly smaller and more deterministic photodisruptive energy thresholds, as well as reduced shock waves and smaller cavitation bubbles. We utilized a highly reliable, all-solid-state femtosecond laser system for all studies to demonstrate clinical practicality. Contiguous tissue effects were achieved by scanning a 5 μm focused laser spot below the corneal surface at pulse energies of approximately 2 - 4 microjoules. A variety of scanning patterns was used to perform three prototype procedures in animal eyes; corneal flap cutting, keratomileusis, and intrastromal vision correction. Superior dissection and surface quality results were obtained for lamellar procedures (corneal flap cutting and keratomileusis). Preliminary in vivo evaluation of intrastromal vision correction in a rabbit model revealed consistent and stable pachymetry changes, without significant inflammation or loss of corneal transparency. We conclude that femtosecond laser technology may be able to perform a variety of corneal refractive procedures with high precision, offering advantages over current mechanical and laser devices and techniques.

  15. Detecting motion through dynamic refraction.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Perona, Pietro; Shamir, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Refraction causes random dynamic distortions in atmospheric turbulence and in views across a water interface. The latter scenario is experienced by submerged animals seeking to detect prey or avoid predators, which may be airborne or on land. Man encounters this when surveying a scene by a submarine or divers while wishing to avoid the use of an attention-drawing periscope. The problem of inverting random refracted dynamic distortions is difficult, particularly when some of the objects in the field of view (FOV) are moving. On the other hand, in many cases, just those moving objects are of interest, as they reveal animal, human, or machine activity. Furthermore, detecting and tracking these objects does not necessitate handling the difficult task of complete recovery of the scene. We show that moving objects can be detected very simply, with low false-positive rates, even when the distortions are very strong and dominate the object motion. Moreover, the moving object can be detected even if it has zero mean motion. While the object and distortion motions are random and unknown, they are mutually independent. This is expressed by a simple motion feature which enables discrimination of moving object points versus the background.

  16. Statistical Analysis of Refractivity in UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ansari, Kifah; Al-Mal, Abdulhadi Abu; Kamel, Rami

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the refractivity statistics in the UAE (United Arab Emirates) for a period of 14 years (1990-2003). Six sites have been considered using meteorological surface data (Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Al-Ain, Ras Al-Kaimah, and Al-Fujairah). Upper air (radiosonde) data were available at one site only, Abu Dhabi airport, which has been considered for the refractivity gradient statistics. Monthly and yearly averages are obtained for the two parameters, refractivity and refractivity gradient. Cumulative distributions are also provided.

  17. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  18. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  19. Transplant related ocular surface disorders: Advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation after ocular complications secondary to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Erin D; Mahomed, Faheem; Hans, Amneet K; Dalal, Jignesh D

    2016-05-01

    HSCT has been linked to the development of an assortment of ocular surface complications with the potential to lead to permanent visual impairment if left untreated or if not treated early in the course of disease. Strategies for therapy include maintenance of lubrication and tear preservation, prevention of evaporation, decreasing inflammation, and providing epithelial support. The ultimate aim of treatment is to prevent permanent ocular sequelae through prompt ophthalmology consultation and the use of advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation. We describe several rehabilitation options of ocular surface complications occurring secondarily during the post-HSCT course. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Refraction changes during elevation of intraocular pressure by suction cup, their reflection in the pattern visual evoked cortical potential and their compensation.

    PubMed

    Bernd, A; Ulrich, W D; Teubel, H; Rohrwacher, F; Barth, T

    1993-01-01

    Visual evoked cortical potential studies using pattern stimuli with the intraocular pressure raised artificially by the suction cup method have been reported. Possible changes in the refraction of the eye due to the method employed and their influence on the pattern visual evoked cortical potential have not been considered. Changes in the refraction of the eye during artificial intraocular pressure elevation and the influence of such changes on pattern visual evoked cortical potentials were studied. The refraction changes were found to depend on the shape of the suction cup. They could be compensated for by employing properly shaped suction cups and contact lenses. The behavior of amplitude and latency of the pattern visual evoked cortical potential at artificially elevated intraocular pressure with compensation for refraction changes has been studied and found to depend in a characteristic manner on ocular perfusion pressure.

  1. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  2. Prodrug Strategies in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Megha; Bagui, Mahuya; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Poor bioavailability of topically instilled drug is the major concern in the field of ocular drug delivery. Efflux transporters, static and dynamic ocular barriers often possess rate limiting factors for ocular drug therapy. Different formulation strategies like suspension, ointment, gels, nanoparticles, implants, dendrimers and liposomes have been employed in order to improve drug permeation and retention by evading rate limiting factors at the site of absorption. Chemical modification such as prodrug targeting various nutrient transporters (amino acids, peptide and vitamin) has evolved a great deal ofintereSt to improve ocular drug delivery. In this review, we have discussed various prodrug strategies which have been widely applied for enhancing therapeutic efficacy of ophthalmic drugs. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the utilization of prodrug concept in ocular drug delivery. In addition, this review will highlight ongoing academic and industrial research and development in terms of ocular prodrug design and delivery. PMID:22530907

  3. Impact of Microbiome on Ocular Health

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Gadjeva, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The ocular surface is continuously exposed to the environment and, therefore, it is surprising that it harbors only few commensals with low degree of diversity. This unique aspect of the ocular surface physiology prompts the question whether there are core ocular commensal communities and how they affect ocular immunity. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is known about the ocular surface commensals in health and disease and what we would like to learn in the near future. In addition, we discuss how microbiota at sites other than the eye may influence ocular immune responses. The information discussed in the review has been gathered using PubMed searches for literature published from January 1982 to December 2015. PMID:27189865

  4. Impact of Microbiome on Ocular Health.

    PubMed

    Kugadas, Abirami; Gadjeva, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    The ocular surface is continuously exposed to the environment and, therefore, it is surprising that it harbors only few commensals with low degree of diversity. This unique aspect of the ocular surface physiology prompts the question whether there are core ocular commensal communities and how they affect ocular immunity. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is known about the ocular surface commensals in health and disease and what we would like to learn in the near future. In addition, we discuss how microbiota at sites other than the eye may influence ocular immune responses. The information discussed in the review has been gathered using PubMed searches for literature published from January 1982 to December 2015. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of refraction index strength on the light propagation in dielectrics material with periodic refraction index

    SciTech Connect

    Hidayat, Arif Latifah, Eny; Kurniati, Diana; Wisodo, Hari

    2016-04-19

    This study investigated the influence of refraction index strength on the light propagation in refraction index-varied dielectric material. This dielectric material served as photonic lattice. The behavior of light propagation influenced by variation of refraction index in photonic lattice was investigated. Modes of the guiding light were determined numerically using squared-operator iteration method. It was found that the greater the strength of refraction index, the smaller the guiding modes.

  6. Update on twice-daily bromfenac sodium sesquihydrate to treat postoperative ocular inflammation following cataract extraction

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Ester; Portero, Alejandro; Galarreta, David J; Herreras, José M

    2012-01-01

    Ophthalmic bromfenac sodium sesquihydrate is a topically applied selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor. It is similar to amfenac, except for a bromine atom at the C4 of the benzoyl ring position, which markedly affects its in vitro and in vivo potency, extends the duration of anti-inflammatory activity, and enhances its inhibitory effect on COX-2 absorption across the cornea and penetration into ocular tissues. The United States Food and Drug Administration approved bromfenac in 2005 for the treatment of postoperative inflammation and the reduction of ocular pain in patients who have undergone cataract surgery. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and among them bromfenac, could be even more effective than steroids at reestablishing the blood–aqueous barrier, as revealed by flare on slit-lamp examination and as quantitatively measured using ocular fluorophotometry. Similar to other NSAIDs, it has a role in inhibiting intraoperative miosis during cataract surgery. However, bromfenac also seems to be useful in other situations, such as refractive surgery, allergic conjunctivitis (not useful in dry eye), choroidal neovascularization, and even ocular oncology. No reports of systemic toxicity have been published and bromfenac has good topical tolerance with a low incidence of adverse effects. PMID:22570544

  7. Surveillance of Ocular Parameters and Visual Function in Bed Rest Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent visual changes in astronauts have raised concern about ocular health during long duration spaceflight. Seven cases have been documented in astronauts who spent 6 months aboard the International Space Station. These astronauts were male ranging in age from 45 to 55 years old. All astronauts exhibited pre- to post flight refractive changes. Decreased intraocular pressure (IOP) post flight was observed in 3 cases. Fundoscopic exams revealed post flight findings of choroidal folds in 4 cases, optic disc edema in 5 cases and the presence of cotton wool spots in 3 cases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed findings of choroidal folds and disc edema, and also documented retinal nerve fiber layer thickening (5 cases). Findings from MRI examinations showed posterior globe flattening (5 cases), optic nerve sheath distention (6 cases) and torturous optic nerves (2 cases). Of the 7 cases, intracranial pressure was measured on 4 astronauts. These 4 showed elevated ICP post-flight that remained elevated for as long as 19 months in one case. While the etiology remains unknown, hypotheses speculate that venous insufficiency or hypertension in the brain caused by cephalad fluid shifts during spaceflight are possible mechanisms for ocular changes seen in astronauts. Head-down tilt bed rest is a spaceflight analog that induces cephalad fluid shifts. This study is designed to provide ocular monitoring of bed rest subjects and determine whether clinically relevant changes are found. Ocular Changes

  8. Eclectic Ocular Comorbidities and Systemic Diseases with Eye Involvement: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zanón-Moreno, Vicente; García-Medina, José J.; Arévalo, J. Fernando; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Nucci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Coexistence of several ocular diseases is more frequent than suspected. In spite of the refractive errors, one or more of the following can be detected simultaneously: glaucoma, cataracts, uveitis, age-related macular degeneration, and dry eyes. In addition, as people age, ocular comorbidities are much more usually seen. Specific diseases are openly acknowledged to affect the eyes and vision, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension blood pressure, arthritis, hyperthyroidism, neurodegenerative disorders, hematologic malignancies, and/or systemic infections. Recent advances in early diagnosis and therapy of the ophthalmic pathologies have reinforced patient options to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Because of this, it is essential not to overlook sight-threatening conditions such as the ocular comorbidities and/or the eye involvement in the context of systemic disorders. Moreover, the important role of the multidisciplinary cooperation to improve and sustain management of patients affected with eclectic ocular comorbidities and/or systemic disorders with eye repercussion is specifically addressed. This review intends to shed light on these topics to help in making opportune diagnosis and appropriately managing the affected patients. PMID:27051666

  9. Corneal Biomechanical Properties in Different Ocular Conditions and New Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Porta, Nery; Salgado-Borges, Jose; Parafita-Mato, Manuel; González-Méijome, Jose Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Several refractive and therapeutic treatments as well as several ocular or systemic diseases might induce changes in the mechanical resistance of the cornea. Furthermore, intraocular pressure measurement, one of the most used clinical tools, is also highly dependent on this characteristic. Corneal biomechanical properties can be measured now in the clinical setting with different instruments. In the present work, we review the potential role of the biomechanical properties of the cornea in different fields of ophthalmology and visual science in light of the definitions of the fundamental properties of matter and the results obtained from the different instruments available. The body of literature published so far provides an insight into how the corneal mechanical properties change in different sight-threatening ocular conditions and after different surgical procedures. The future in this field is very promising with several new technologies being applied to the analysis of the corneal biomechanical properties. PMID:24729900

  10. Ocular leprosy in Hawaii: the past.

    PubMed

    Brown, D H

    1975-08-01

    Leprosy in Hawaii dates back to about 1840. The first recorded ocular leprosy is from the 1880s. Robert Louis Stevenson and Jack London both wrote descriptions of the ocular signs of leprosy. Pinkerton in 1927 and Van Poole in 1934 reported large series of patients with ocular leprosy. In 1973 there were about 2,168 cases of leprosy in the 50 states. Most ophthalmologists practice in areas where there are leprosy patients.

  11. Tumors of the ocular surface: A review

    PubMed Central

    Honavar, Santosh G; Manjandavida, Fairooz P

    2015-01-01

    Tumors of the Ocular Surface clinically manifest with a very wide spectrum and include several forms of epithelial, stromal, caruncular, and secondary tumors. As a group, these tumors are seen commonly in the clinical practice of a comprehensive ophthalmologist, cornea specialist, and an ocular oncologist. This review is aimed to discuss the common tumors of the ocular surface and emphasize on their clinical diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:25971163

  12. Ocular lesions and experimental choline deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossani, Georgina P; Pelayes, David; Diaz, María L; Lago, Nestor R; Fariña, Silvia L; Monserrat, Alberto J; Zarate, Jorge O

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown ocular haemorrhages in choline-deficient rats. The aim of this paper is to study further the relationship between ocular and renal lesions and biochemical alterations in rats fed a choline-deficient diet. Fifty one weanling male Wistar rats, were divided into two groups. Thirty one of them were fed a choline-deficient diet and the rest was fed a choline-supplemented diet ad libitum. Animals from both groups were killed between the fifth and the eighth day. Urea, creatinine and homocysteine concentrations in blood were determined. Eyes were used for light microscopy study; high resolution light microscopy and the study of the retina as "rétine a plat". Kidneys were studied by light microscopy. Choline-supplemented rats did not show ocular or renal lesion. Choline-deficient rats that showed renal lesions, tubular or cortical necrosis, did not always have ocular changes. There were no ocular changes in the only choline-deficient rat without renal lesion. The ocular changes consisted mainly in haemorrhage in both cameras and ciliary and vitreous bodies. Correlations between ocular and renal lesion (r = 0.72, p < 0.0001, CI 95%: 0.48-0.86); ocular lesion and creatinine (r = 0.86, p < 0.0001, Cl 95%: 0.72-0.93) and ocular lesion and urea (r = 0.70, p < 0.0001, Cl 95%: 0.44-0.85) were positive. Choline-deficiency induces ocular haemorrhagic lesions after the development of renal necrosis. The ocular pathology could be due to the immaturity of the ocular vasculature at this age. The hyaloid, choroid and retinal system are involved.

  13. Carotid Stenosis and Ocular Blood Pressure Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Jullian, M.; Kinsner, W.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the human carotid vascular system was developed to study the effects of carotid stenosis on ocular blood pressure and ocular pulse waveform. The model incorporates a non-linear element representing a stenosis. A state variable representation of a reduced model is used in a computer simulation. Results show that carotid stenosis as low as 20% are detectable in the ocular blood pressure waveform.

  14. Innate immunity of the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Mayumi; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2010-02-15

    The ocular surface epithelium serves a critical function as the defensive front line of the innate immune system. While the detection of microbes is arguably its most important task, an exaggerated host defense reaction to endogenous bacterial flora may initiate and perpetuate inflammatory mucosal responses. The ability of cells to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) mainly depends on the expression of a family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). A healthy ocular surface is not inflammatory, even though ocular surface epithelium is in constant contact with bacteria and bacterial products. In this study, we show that human ocular surface epithelial cells, both corneal and conjuctival epithelial cells, respond to viral double-stranded RNA mimic polyI:C to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines through TLR3, while they fail to respond functionally to lipopolysaccharide, a TLR4 ligand. Moreover, human ocular surface epithelium responds to flagellins from ocular pathogenic, but not ocular non-pathogenic bacteria, to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines through TLR5. Thus, ocular surface epithelial cells selectively respond to microbial components and induce limited inflammation; immune-competent cells can recognize microbial components through TLRs and induce the inflammation. The unique innate immune response of the ocular surface epithelium may contribute to its coexistence with commensal bacteria. Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to result from an abnormal response to the gut microbiota. Thus, we also considered the possibility of an association between ocular surface inflammation and a disordered innate immune response. IkappaBzeta is important for TLR signaling, in mice, its knock-out produced severe, spontaneous ocular surface inflammation, the eventual loss of goblet cells, and spontaneous perioral inflammation, suggesting that dysfunction/abnormality of innate immunity can lead to ocular surface inflammation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All

  15. Accuracy of the WASCA aberrometer refraction compared to manifest refraction in myopia.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Archer, Timothy J; Couch, Darren

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of myopic refraction by a single measurement using the Wavefront Supported Custom Ablation (WASCA) aberrometer (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany). We retrospectively compared the refractive errors obtained by manifest refraction and wavefront refraction (WASCA) in 50 eyes of 25 consecutive myopic patients undergoing laser refractive surgery. The sphere ranged from -1.00 to -8.25 diopters (D) and cylinder from 0 to -3.75 D. WASCA measurements under cycloplegia were made and WASCA refractions calculated for a 6-mm analysis zone using the Seidel method within the WASCA. We used the manifest refraction as our best estimate of the true refractive error, therefore accuracy was defined as the difference between manifest refraction and that of the WASCA. Correlation coefficients and mean vector errors between manifest and WASCA refraction were calculated. High correlation was shown between manifest and WASCA refractions, with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.97, 0.85, and 0.79 for M, J180, and J45, respectively. Mean power vector error (standard deviation) was 0.22 D (0.39), +0.03 D (0.21), and +0.03 D (0.13) for M, J180, and J45, respectively. Total dioptric power vector error was 0.43 D with 74% eyes within 0.50 D. When measuring normal myopic eyes, the concordance between manifest and WASCA refractions was found on average to be high; however, outlier measurements occurred.

  16. Development of microemulsions for ocular delivery.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Nivedita; Kesavan, Karthikeyan

    2017-03-01

    Microemulsions (MEs) are thermodynamic stable dispersion of oily phase and aqueous phase stabilized by surfactants and co-surfactants, and are a small droplet size of less than 100 nm. MEs are appropriate systems for ocular drug delivery because they improve ocular drug retention, extended duration of action, high ocular absorption, permeation of loaded drugs and effortlessness of preparation and administration. This review is an effort to summarize the recent development in the area of MEs, self-emulsifying drug delivery systems, which are examined in relation to their uses in ocular drug delivery. The noteworthy patent, toxicity and stability issues related to these ME systems are also explored here.

  17. Ocular involvement in patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bacchiega, Ana Beatriz Santos; Balbi, Gustavo Guimarães Moreira; Ochtrop, Manuella Lima Gomes; de Andrade, Francisco Assis; Levy, Roger Abramino; Baraliakos, Xenofon

    2017-03-18

    Ocular inflammatory diseases can present as isolated conditions but also as part of systemic inflammatory diseases. Anterior uveitis is closely related to SpA and shares the common genetic background of HLA-B27. Other ocular manifestations, such as episcleritis and scleritis, may also occur, although less frequently. Therefore, ocular involvement has been included as one of the important clinical features of SpA in the recently published classification criteria for axial and peripheral disease. However, there are a wide variety of aetiologies for ocular diseases and this must be considered in assessment of SpA.

  18. Ocular Motor Manifestations of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nerrant, Elodie; Tilikete, Caroline

    2017-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system leading to disability, especially in young patients. Acute or chronic lesions of MS within the brainstem and the cerebellum frequently result in ocular motor disorders. This review encompasses the spectrum of ocular motor disorders in patients with MS emphasizing prevalence, examination findings, diagnostic features, functional consequences, classification of MS course, and management of these disturbances of ocular motility. Ocular motor manifestations of MS can occur acutely in relapse or chronically, the latter as a consequence of previous relapses or as a chronic course of the disease. The most frequent and specific acute ocular motor manifestation is uni- or bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO). The most frequent chronic manifestations include INO and cerebellar ocular motor disorders such as gaze-evoked nystagmus, saccadic hypermetria, and lack of vestibulo-ocular reflex inhibition. The most disabling syndrome is pendular nystagmus. The high prevalence of ocular motor manifestations emphasizes the importance of neuro-ophthalmological examination among patients with MS. Because chronic manifestations may cause minimal or no symptoms, a systematic investigation of the most common manifestations should be performed in daily practice. Appropriate treatment may improve visual outcome in some of these ocular motor disorders.

  19. Ocular sarcoidosis: new diagnostic modalities and treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung J; Salek, Sherveen; Rosenbaum, James T

    2017-09-01

    Ocular involvement in sarcoidosis is present in up to 80% of patients and is frequently manifested before diagnosis of the underlying systemic disease. Considering the therapeutic consequences, early diagnosis of the underlying disease is advantageous in patients presenting with ocular inflammation. There are several ocular findings suggestive of underlying sarcoidosis, such as granulomatous keratic precipitates, iris nodules, cells in the vitreous humor known as snowballs and snowbanks, and retinal periphlebitis. High suspicion is crucial for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This review on ocular sarcoidosis will mainly focus on new diagnostic and treatment modalities. Recent studies found possible new diagnostic indicators for the diagnosis of ocular sarcoidosis which include not only serum profiles but also vitreous sample analysis. Ophthalmologic imaging techniques have improved to investigate the ocular structure in detail. Results from recent uveitis clinical trials have included sarcoidosis as an underlying cause and have reported positive results. The diagnosis of ocular sarcoidosis can be challenging in some cases. High suspicion is important to diagnose ocular sarcoidosis with various laboratory and ophthalmic tools. There are many possible options for the treatment of ocular sarcoidosis including various biologic agents.

  20. An assessment of ocular morbidities of children born prematurely in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Goktas, Altan; Sener, Emin Cumhur; Sanac, Ali Sefik

    2012-01-01

    To assess the ocular morbidities of premature children in early childhood. One hundred seventeen children with a history of gestational age of less than 37 weeks at birth underwent ophthalmic examination including visual acuity testing with Lea symbols, anterior and posterior segment examination, refraction, orthoptic examination for strabismus, and ocular biometry. They were subdivided into three groups according to gestational age (28 or less, 29 to 32, and 33 to 36 weeks). The prevalence of ocular morbidities and mean value of refractive errors were studied. The mean age of the subjects at examination was 37.6 ± 1.1 months (range: 20 to 65 months). Only 62.4% of the eyes had visual acuity better than 20/32. The prevalence of high myopia (above -5.0 diopters [D]), myopia (below -5.0 D), and strabismus was 12.5%, 22.5% and 33.3% in the 28 weeks or less group and 3.6%, 18.9%, and 24.1% in the 29 to 32 weeks group, respectively, whereas 7.9% of the 33 to 36 weeks group had myopia and 13.2% had strabismus. Spherical equivalent in eyes that received cryotherapy and with macular heterotopia was -2.7 ± 3.9 and - 4.4 ± 3.4 D, respectively. Biometric measurements showed that high myopic eyes had statistically significantly thicker lenses compared to myopic and hyperopic eyes (P = .01). This study confirms that children born prematurely are at increased risk of ocular morbidities such as defective visual acuity, myopia, and strabismus. High myopic eyes have thicker lenses compared to myopic and hyperopic eyes, and eyes with macular heterotropia and treated with cryotherapy are more prone to development of high myopia. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Quantitative Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Ocular Anterior Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, Ryan Palmer

    Clinical imaging within ophthalmology has had transformative effects on ocular health over the last century. Imaging has guided clinicians in their pharmaceutical and surgical treatments of macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts and numerous other pathologies. Many of the imaging techniques currently used are photography based and are limited to imaging the surface of ocular structures. This limitation forces clinicians to make assumptions about the underlying tissue which may reduce the efficacy of their diagnoses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that has been widely adopted within the field of ophthalmology in the last 15 years. As an optical imaging technique, OCT utilizes low-coherence interferometry to produce micron-scale three-dimensional datasets of a tissue's structure. Much of the human body consists of tissues that significantly scatter and attenuate optical signals limiting the imaging depth of OCT in those tissues to only 1-2mm. However, the ocular anterior segment is unique among human tissue in that it is primarily transparent or translucent. This allows for relatively deep imaging of tissue structure with OCT and is no longer limited by the optical scattering properties of the tissue. This goal of this work is to develop methods utilizing OCT that offer the potential to reduce the assumptions made by clinicians in their evaluations of their patients' ocular anterior segments. We achieved this by first developing a method to reduce the effects of patient motion during OCT volume acquisitions allowing for accurate, three dimensional measurements of corneal shape. Having accurate corneal shape measurements then allowed us to determine corneal spherical and astigmatic refractive contribution in a given individual. This was then validated in a clinical study that showed OCT better measured refractive change due to surgery than other clinical devices. Additionally, a method was developed to combine

  2. The effects of methylphenidate on refraction and anterior segment parameters in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Larrañaga-Fragoso, Paula; Noval, Susana; Rivero, José C; Boto-de-los-Bueis, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Methylphenidate hydrochloride is used as first-line treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, there is concern that this treatment may be associated with increased risk of angle closure glaucoma and disturbance of ocular refraction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methylphenidate treatment on refraction, intraocular pressure, and the anterior chamber in children with ADHD. In this prospective pilot study, children diagnosed with ADHD were examined before the start of methylphenidate treatment and again 3 and 9 months after the start of treatment. Ocular examination before and after cycloplegia was performed at each visit, including Pentacam imaging of the anterior chamber. A total of 14 patients (mean age, 11 years) were recruited. The mean visual acuity, sphere, spherical equivalent refraction, intraocular pressure, and cup:disk ratio did not change significantly after the start of treatment. The anterior chamber depth after cycloplegia decreased significantly between baseline and 9 months, from 3.26 ± 0.22 mm to 3.24 ± 0.23 mm in the right eye (P = 0.037) and from 3.28 ± 0.22 mm to 3.25 ± 0.24 mm in the left eye (P = 0.001). Methylphenidate does not seem to affect refraction in most children with ADHD. After 9 months of treatment, however, there was a reduction in the anterior chamber depth, which has been described as a powerful predictor of angle closure glaucoma. Further investigation of the potential ocular side effects of methylphenidate treatment is warranted. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clues in the eye: ocular signs of metabolic and nutritional disorders.

    PubMed

    Berman, E L

    1995-07-01

    Ocular signs and symptoms provide clinical clues to many of the more common metabolic and nutritional disorders seen in older adults. Diabetes mellitus can affect all parts of the eye and orbit. Complications include refractive visual loss, macular edema, retinopathy, increased risk of fungal infection, and diplopia. In patients with gout, urate crystals may precipitate in the eye and cause conjunctivitis, uveitis, or scleritis. Other problems are seen with Wilson's disease, hyperlipidemia, and albinism. Nutritional disorders usually arise from malabsorption, gastrointestinal surgery, and alcohol abuse. Deficiencies in vitamins A, B1 (thiamine), B12, and C may be manifest in the eye.

  4. Visual performance and ocular abnormalities in deaf children and young adults: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Richard; Ludlow, Amanda K; Wilkins, Arnold; Calver, Richard; Allen, Peter M

    2014-06-01

    Visual defects are common in deaf individuals. Refractive error and ocular motor abnormalities are frequently reported, with hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism and anomalies of binocular vision, all showing a greater prevalence in deaf individuals compared with the general population. Near visual function in deaf individuals has been relatively neglected in the literature to date. Comparisons between studies are problematic due to differences in methodology and population characteristics. Any untreated visual defect has the potential to impair the development of language, with consequences for education more generally, and there is a need to improve screening and treatments of deaf children.

  5. Myopia in Young Adults Is Inversely Related to an Objective Marker of Ocular Sun Exposure: The Western Australian Raine Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    MCKNIGHT, CHARLOTTE M.; SHERWIN, JUSTIN C.; YAZAR, SEYHAN; FORWARD, HANNAH; TAN, ALEX X.; HEWITT, ALEX W.; PENNELL, CRAIG E.; MCALLISTER, IAN L.; YOUNG, TERRI L.; CORONEO, MINAS T.; MACKEY, DAVID A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the association between ocular sun exposure measured by conjunctival ultraviolet (UV) autofluorescence and myopic refractive error in young adults. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. METHODS SETTING Population-based cohort in Western Australia. STUDY POPULATION Total of 1344 mostly white subjects aged 19–22 years in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Eye Health Study. OBSERVATION PROCEDURES Cycloplegic autorefraction, conjunctival ultraviolet autofluorescence photography, participant questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Prevalence of myopic refractive error (spherical equivalent less than −0.50 diopters) and area of conjunctival ultraviolet autofluorescence in mm2. RESULTS There was an inverse relationship between myopic refractive error and ocular sun exposure, with more than double the prevalence of myopia in the lowest quartile of conjunctival autofluorescence than the highest quartile (33.0% vs 15.6%). Median area of autofluorescence was significantly lower in myopic than in nonmyopic subjects (31.9 mm2 vs 47.9 mm2, P < .001). These differences remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, parental history of myopia, and subject level of education. The use of corrective lenses did not explain the lower conjunctival autofluorescence observed in myopic subjects. CONCLUSIONS In this young adult population, myopic refractive error was inversely associated with objectively measured ocular sun exposure, even after adjustment for potential confounders. This further supports the inverse association between outdoor activity and myopia. PMID:25072831

  6. Myopia in young adults is inversely related to an objective marker of ocular sun exposure: the Western Australian Raine cohort study.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Charlotte M; Sherwin, Justin C; Yazar, Seyhan; Forward, Hannah; Tan, Alex X; Hewitt, Alex W; Pennell, Craig E; McAllister, Ian L; Young, Terri L; Coroneo, Minas T; Mackey, David A

    2014-11-01

    To determine the association between ocular sun exposure measured by conjunctival ultraviolet (UV) autofluorescence and myopic refractive error in young adults. Cross-sectional study. setting: Population-based cohort in Western Australia. study population: Total of 1344 mostly white subjects aged 19-22 years in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Eye Health Study. observation procedures: Cycloplegic autorefraction, conjunctival ultraviolet autofluorescence photography, participant questionnaire. main outcome measures: Prevalence of myopic refractive error (spherical equivalent less than -0.50 diopters) and area of conjunctival ultraviolet autofluorescence in mm(2). There was an inverse relationship between myopic refractive error and ocular sun exposure, with more than double the prevalence of myopia in the lowest quartile of conjunctival autofluorescence than the highest quartile (33.0% vs 15.6%). Median area of autofluorescence was significantly lower in myopic than in nonmyopic subjects (31.9 mm(2) vs 47.9 mm(2), P < .001). These differences remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, parental history of myopia, and subject level of education. The use of corrective lenses did not explain the lower conjunctival autofluorescence observed in myopic subjects. In this young adult population, myopic refractive error was inversely associated with objectively measured ocular sun exposure, even after adjustment for potential confounders. This further supports the inverse association between outdoor activity and myopia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Headache and refractive errors in children.

    PubMed

    Roth, Zachary; Pandolfo, Katie R; Simon, John; Zobal-Ratner, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between uncorrected or miscorrected refractive errors in children and headache, and to determine whether correction of refractive errors contributes to headache resolution. Results of ophthalmic examination, including refractive error, were recorded at initial visit for headache. If resolution of headache on subsequent visits was not documented, a telephone call was placed to their caregivers to inquire whether headache had resolved. Of the 158 patients, 75.3% had normal or unchanged eye examinations, including refractions.Follow-up data were available for 110 patients. Among those, 32 received new or changed spectacle correction and 78 did not require a change in refraction.Headaches improved in 76.4% of all patients, whether with (71.9%) or without (78.2%) a change in refractive correction. The difference between these two groups was not statistically significant (P = .38). Headaches in children usually do not appear to be caused by ophthalmic disease, including refractive error. The prognosis for improvement is favorable, regardless of whether refractive correction is required. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Measuring Variable Refractive Indices Using Digital Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Testa, I.; Sassi, E.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure for performing quantitative measurements in teaching optics is presented. Application of the procedure to accurately measure the rate of change of the variable refractive index of a water-denatured alcohol mixture is described. The procedure can also be usefully exploited for measuring the constant refractive index of distilled…

  9. Measuring Variable Refractive Indices Using Digital Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Testa, I.; Sassi, E.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure for performing quantitative measurements in teaching optics is presented. Application of the procedure to accurately measure the rate of change of the variable refractive index of a water-denatured alcohol mixture is described. The procedure can also be usefully exploited for measuring the constant refractive index of distilled…

  10. Achieving target refraction after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Simon, Shira S; Chee, Yewlin E; Haddadin, Ramez I; Veldman, Peter B; Borboli-Gerogiannis, Sheila; Brauner, Stacey C; Chang, Kenneth K; Chen, Sherleen H; Gardiner, Matthew F; Greenstein, Scott H; Kloek, Carolyn E; Chen, Teresa C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the difference between target and actual refraction after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation at an academic teaching institution's Comprehensive Ophthalmology Service. Retrospective study. We examined 1275 eye surgeries for this study. All consecutive cataract surgeries were included if they were performed by an attending or resident surgeon from January through December 2010. Postoperative refractions were compared with preoperative target refractions. Patients were excluded if they did not have a preoperative target refraction documented or if they did not have a recorded postoperative manifest refraction within 90 days. The main outcome measure was percentage of cases achieving a postoperative spherical equivalent ± 1.0 diopter (D) of target spherical equivalent. We performed 1368 cataract surgeries from January through December of 2010. Of these, 1275 (93%) had sufficient information for analysis. Of the included cases, 94% (1196 of 1275) achieved ± 1.0 D of target refraction by 90 days after cataract surgery. This paper establishes a new benchmark for a teaching hospital, where 94% of patients achieved within 1.0 D of target refraction after cataract surgery. The refractive outcomes after cataract surgery at this academic teaching institution were higher than average international benchmarks. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening for keratoconus suspects among candidates for refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    McMonnies, Charles W

    2014-11-01

    This review examines methods for estimating the risk of post-surgical ectasia in candidates for refractive surgery by establishing a diagnosis of keratoconus suspect as a contraindication for proceeding with surgery. Notwithstanding the desirability of achieving 100 per cent sensitivity, any associated reduction in specificity and increased numbers of false positives might deny some candidates the opportunity to proceed with refractive surgery. The introduction of a model for the risk of ectasia involving both pre- and post-surgical findings has been followed by a plethora of attempts to achieve the same purpose based on topographic and/or tomographic evaluation before surgery. The desirability of being able to depend on objective assessment using one type of instrument needs to be weighed against the possibility that subjective assessments may contribute significantly to screening success. For example, consideration of ethnicity, family history of keratoconus, a history of atopy or ocular allergies in particular, a history of significant exposure to corneal trauma associated with abnormal rubbing habits or with vocational, leisure or geographically increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation or with contact lens wear trauma or a history of significant exposure to activities which elevate intraocular pressure may improve screening success. To the extent that these factors could contribute to increased risk of the development of keratoconus, they may be useful in estimating the risk of post-surgical ectasia. If any combination of these factors helps to explain the development of keratoconus in normal or even thicker than normal corneas, they may have more significance for those corneas, which have been thinned surgically. © 2014 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometrists Association Australia.

  12. Blue Light Protects Against Temporal Frequency Sensitive Refractive Changes

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, Frances; Britton, Stephanie; Spatcher, Molly; Hanowsky, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Time spent outdoors is protective against myopia. The outdoors allows exposure to short-wavelength (blue light) rich sunlight, while indoor illuminants can be deficient at short-wavelengths. In the current experiment, we investigate the role of blue light, and temporal sensitivity, in the emmetropization response. Methods Five-day-old chicks were exposed to sinusoidal luminance modulation of white light (with blue; N = 82) or yellow light (without blue; N = 83) at 80% contrast, at one of six temporal frequencies: 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz daily for 3 days. Mean illumination was 680 lux. Changes in ocular components and corneal curvature were measured. Results Refraction, eye length, and choroidal changes were dependent on the presence of blue light (P < 0.03, all) and on temporal frequency (P < 0.03, all). In the presence of blue light, refraction did not change across frequencies (mean change −0.24 [diopters] D), while in the absence of blue light, we observed a hyperopic shift (>1 D) at high frequencies, and a myopic shift (>−0.6 D) at low frequencies. With blue light there was little difference in eye growth across frequencies (77 μm), while in the absence of blue light, eyes grew more at low temporal frequencies and less at high temporal frequencies (10 vs. 0.2 Hz: 145 μm; P < 0.003). Overall, neonatal astigmatism was reduced with blue light. Conclusions Illuminants rich in blue light can protect against myopic eye growth when the eye is exposed to slow changes in luminance contrast as might occur with near work. PMID:26393671

  13. Blue Light Protects Against Temporal Frequency Sensitive Refractive Changes.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Frances; Britton, Stephanie; Spatcher, Molly; Hanowsky, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    Time spent outdoors is protective against myopia. The outdoors allows exposure to short-wavelength (blue light) rich sunlight, while indoor illuminants can be deficient at short-wavelengths. In the current experiment, we investigate the role of blue light, and temporal sensitivity, in the emmetropization response. Five-day-old chicks were exposed to sinusoidal luminance modulation of white light (with blue; N = 82) or yellow light (without blue; N = 83) at 80% contrast, at one of six temporal frequencies: 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz daily for 3 days. Mean illumination was 680 lux. Changes in ocular components and corneal curvature were measured. Refraction, eye length, and choroidal changes were dependent on the presence of blue light (P < 0.03, all) and on temporal frequency (P < 0.03, all). In the presence of blue light, refraction did not change across frequencies (mean change -0.24 [diopters] D), while in the absence of blue light, we observed a hyperopic shift (>1 D) at high frequencies, and a myopic shift (>-0.6 D) at low frequencies. With blue light there was little difference in eye growth across frequencies (77 μm), while in the absence of blue light, eyes grew more at low temporal frequencies and less at high temporal frequencies (10 vs. 0.2 Hz: 145 μm; P < 0.003). Overall, neonatal astigmatism was reduced with blue light. Illuminants rich in blue light can protect against myopic eye growth when the eye is exposed to slow changes in luminance contrast as might occur with near work.

  14. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  15. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  16. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Radko, Ilya P; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2008-03-17

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive index increases inside the array by a factor of approximately 1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase deduced from the SPP refraction by triangular arrays. The SPP refractive index is found to decrease slightly for longer wavelengths within the wavelength range of 700-860 nm. Modeling based on the Green's tensor formalism is in a good agreement with the experimental results, opening the possibility to design nanoparticle arrays for specific applications requiring in-plane SPP manipulation.

  17. Optical Evaluation of a Refractive Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Wong, Wayne A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Refractive secondary concentrators are being considered for solar thermal applications because of their ability to archive maximum efficiency through the use of total internal reflection for the concentration and distribution of solar energy. A prototype refractive secondary concentrator was built based on ray tracing analysis to demonstrate this collection and distribution concept. The design included a conical secondary concentrator and a faceted extractor. The objective of this effort was to functionally evaluate the performance of the refractive secondary concentrator/extractor prototype and to compare the results with modeling. Most of the light was found to exit the refractive secondary concentrator through the extractor. In addition, the degree of attenuation encountered by the light as it passed through the refractive secondary concentrator was of interest. Quantifying optical output and validating the modeling will provide further understanding of the efficiency of the prototype and will provide insight for additional design and materials selection activities.

  18. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  19. Ocular perfusion pressure and ocular blood flow in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cherecheanu, A Popa; Garhofer, G; Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Schmetterer, L

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy of unknown origin. It has been hypothesized that a vascular component is involved in glaucoma pathophysiology. This hypothesis has gained support from studies showing that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is a risk factor for the disease. The exact nature of the involvement is, however, still a matter of debate. Based on recent evidence we propose a model including primary and secondary insults in glaucoma. The primary insult appears to happen at the optic nerve head. Increased intraocular pressure and ischemia at the post-laminar optic nerve head affects retinal ganglion cell axons. Modulating factors are the biomechanical properties of the tissues and cerebrospinal fluid pressure. After this primary insult retinal ganglion cells function at a reduced energy level and are sensitive to secondary insults. These secondary insults may happen if ocular perfusion pressure falls below the lower limit of autoregulation or if neurovascular coupling fails. Evidence for both faulty autoregulation and reduced hyperemic response to neuronal stimulation has been provided in glaucoma patients. The mechanisms appear to involve vascular endothelial dysfunction and impaired astrocyte-vessel signaling. A more detailed understanding of these pathways is required to direct neuroprotective strategies via the neurovascular pathway. PMID:23009741

  20. The correlation between headache and refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Akinci, Arsen; Güven, Alev; Degerliyurt, Aydan; Kibar, Esin; Mutlu, Murad; Citirik, Mehmet

    2008-06-01

    To compare the prevalence of refractive errors in patients with headache and a control population. Three hundred ten patients with headache and 843 controls were retrospectively evaluated. Complete ophthalmologic examination was performed in the headache group. Autorefraction was performed in all participants (with cycloplegia under 10 years of age). Myopia was defined as the spherical equivalent refraction of at least -0.50 D, hyperopia as the spherical equivalent refraction of at least +2.0 D, and astigmatism as the cylinder of at least 1.0 D. Main outcome measures were refractive error, anisometropia, and previous miscorrection of refractive error. Chi-square and Student's t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Total prevalence of refractive errors was higher in the headache group (p = 0.002). The rate of astigmatism was higher in the headache group (p < 0.0001), while that of myopia and hyperopia were similar in both groups (p = 0.74, p = 0.79, respectively). The rates of compound and mixed astigmatism were higher in the headache group (p = 0.026, p < 0.001, respectively). The rates of anisometropia and previous miscorrection of refractive error were higher in the headache group (p < 0.0001 for both). Children with headache have a statistically significant increased risk of total refractive errors (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.18-2.07), anisometropia (OR = 9.59, 95% CI: 5.72-16.1), and miscorrection of refractive error (OR = 9.57, 95% CI: 5.43-16.9). Compound and mixed types of astigmatism, anisometropia, and miscorrection of refractive error were found more often in patients with headache than in control subjects.

  1. The Refractive Error of Professional Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Laby, Daniel M; Kirschen, David G

    2017-05-01

    High levels of visual acuity are required to hit a baseball effectively. Research has shown that any decrease in vision is likely caused by low-order optical aberrations. This study is designed to validate the SVOne autorefractor, and describe the amount and type, of low-order optical aberrations present in a large cohort of professional baseball players. A retrospective chart review on the 608 Major League Baseball players evaluated during the 2016 Spring Training Season was performed. Results for a subset of players who had both manifest refraction as well as autorefraction were calculated. Subsequently, after determining the accuracy of the autorefraction system in this population, refractive results for the entire population were determined. There was a borderline statistically significant difference in mean spherical refractive error (M) between the manifest refraction and the SVOne auto refraction (-0.273D in the manifest refraction method vs. -0.503D in the SVOne method, P = .06) in the subset of athletes who underwent both tests. Additionally, there was no difference in the J0 or J45 cylindrical component vectors for each method. For the entire eligible population, the SVOne autorefraction system found a mean spherical refractive error (M) of -0.228D, a J0 value of -0.013D, and a J45 value of -0.040D. These data suggest that the SVOne autorefraction system is generally able to measure the refractive error in the baseball population. The system was slightly biased, often reporting more myopia in myopic subjects. Thus, careful evaluation of the refractive status of these athletes coupled with careful subjective refractive correction for those with less than average vision for baseball is strongly suggested.

  2. Ocular injuries from automobile batteries.

    PubMed

    Holekamp, T L

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of eye injuries related to automobile batteries has sharply increased, currently comprising nearly 1% of all unscheduled eye visits to one medical center. A series of 93 cases obtained over 81/2 years was reviewed and follow-up information obtained. While two thirds of the injuries were relatively minor, 10% (9) of the patients sustained permanent ocular damage or required hospitalization. All of the severe injuries and the majority of the other injuries were caused by battery explosions. Not only should the inherent danger of the lead-acid storage battery be reduced, but the public must be alerted to the hazard.

  3. Ocular abnormality in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, J; Hamblet, J; Menefee, M

    1978-08-01

    A 61-year-old white woman with terminal myotonic dystrophy exhibited advanced peripheral and central retinopathy. Retinal lesions were characterized by hyperpigmentation, common, though nonspecific, in myotonic dystrophy. They resemble both heredo (tapetoretinal) and idiopathic involutional degenerations but rarely cause severe visual impairment. Neither the type nor degree of retinopathy appears to correlate with other ocular features or with the stage of the underlying disease. Our histologic observations confirm and extend those previously described. Electron microscopy suggests a primary disorder of mitochondria which may also affect smooth muscle and the myocardium.

  4. Ocular complications of bungee jumping

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, H Mohammed J; Mariatos, Georgios; Papanikolaou, Theocharis; Ranganath, Akshatha; Hassan, Hala

    2012-01-01

    Aim In this paper, we will try to highlight the importance of various investigations and their crucial role in identifying whether the defect is structural or functional. Case history A 24-year-old woman presented with ocular complications after bungee jumping. Subsequently, although all ophthalmic signs resolved, she complained of decreased vision in her left eye. Conclusion Initial ophthalmic injury was detected by optical coherence tomography scan showing a neurosensory detachment of the fovea. This was not initially detected on slit-lamp examination or fluorescein angiography. On later examination, although the optical coherence tomography scan showed no structural damage, electrodiagnostic tests showed a functional defect at the fovea. PMID:23055687

  5. Ocular Dirofilariasis, a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, MR Fallah; Hajilary, A; Siatiri, H; Rokni, MB; Mobedi, I; Mowlavi, Gh

    2010-01-01

    Accidental infection with animal filarial worms in humans is a dilemma for clinicians and parasitologists throughout the world. To date a variety of such rare parasitoses have been reported mostly in tropics and subtropics. Human dirofilariasis is among those unusual zoonotic infections that occasionally have been observed in the eye and in subcutaneous areas exhibiting with nodule formation. Filarial worms are transmitted to humans through invertebrate biological vectors such as certain species of mosquitoes. The present report describes a peculiar case of ocular dirofilariasis in a 49-year-old man resident in Iran. PMID:22347257

  6. Ocular cysticercosis with intermittent blindness.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajaram; Dey, Amit Kumar; Joshi, Kapil; Thakkar, Hemangini

    2015-01-01

    We report this peculiar case of ocular cysticercosis with intermittent blindness which is never reported to our knowledge. This case highlights use of Ultrasound for examination of the posterior segment of eye globe. In limited facilities Ultrasound is the main modality to reach the diagnosis. We also wish to enforce the point that in endemic regions and in young population primary cysticercosis and its complications must be kept in differentials of cystic mass or calcified mass, as in this case, we have seen both the stages of cysticercosis progression.

  7. Cyclosporine for Ocular Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kaçmaz, R. Oktay; Kempen, John H.; Newcomb, Craig; Daniel, Ebenezer; Gangaputra, Sapna; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Suhler, Eric B.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Foster, C. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcomes of cyclosporine treatment for non-infectious ocular inflammation Design Retrospective cohort study Participants Three hundred seventy-three patients with non-infectious ocular inflammation managed at four tertiary ocular inflammation clinics in the United States observed to use cyclosporine as a single non-corticosteroid immunosuppressive agent to their treatment regimen, between 1979-2007 inclusive. Methods Participants were identified from the Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases Cohort Study. Demographic and clinical characteristics, including dosage of cyclosporine and main outcome measures were obtained for every eye of every patient at every visit via medical record review by trained expert reviewers. Main Outcome Measures: Control of inflammation, sustained control after reducing corticosteroid dosages, and discontinuation of therapy because of toxicity. Results Of the 373 patients (681 eyes) initiating cyclosporine monotherapy, 33.4% by six months and 51.9% by one year gained sustained, complete control of inflammation over at least two visits spanning at least 28 days. Approximately 25% more improved to a level of slight inflammatory activity by each of these time points. Corticosteroid-sparing success (completely controlled inflammation for at least 28 days with prednisone 10 mg/day or less) was achieved by 22.1% by six months and 36.1% within one year. Toxicity led to discontinuation of therapy within one year by 10.7% of the population. Patients over 55 years of age were over 3-fold more likely to discontinue therapy because of toxicity than patients ages 18-39 years. Doses of 151-250 mg/day tended to be more successful than lower doses, and were not associated with a higher discontinuation for toxicity rate; higher doses did not appear to offer a therapeutic advantage. Conclusion Cyclosporine, with corticosteroid therapy as indicated, was modestly effective for controlling ocular inflammation

  8. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  9. Is LASIK for Me? A Patient's Guide to Refractive Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... reading or driving at night. The greater your refractive error (that is, the greater your nearsightedness, farsighted- ness ... thickness of your cornea before surgery. • degree of refractive error . Very high levels of refractive error (nearsighted- ness, ...

  10. Reproducibility of manifest refraction between surgeons and optometrists in a clinical refractive surgery practice.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Yap, Timothy E; Carp, Glenn I; Archer, Timothy J; Gobbe, Marine

    2014-03-01

    To measure and compare the interobserver reproducibility of manifest refraction according to a standardized protocol for normal preoperative patients in a refractive surgery practice. Private clinic, London, United Kingdom. Retrospective case series. This retrospective study comprised patients attending 2 preoperative refractions before laser vision correction. The first manifest refraction was performed by 1 of 7 optometrists and the second manifest refraction by 1 of 2 surgeons, all trained using a standard manifest refraction protocol. Spherocylindrical data were converted into power vectors for analysis. The dioptric power differences between observers were calculated and analyzed. One thousand nine hundred twenty-two consecutive eyes were stratified into a myopia group and a hyperopia group and then further stratified by each surgeon-optometrist combination. The mean surgeon-optometrist dioptric power difference was 0.21 diopter (D) (range 0.15 to 0.32 D). The mean difference in spherical equivalent refraction was 0.03 D, with 95% of all refractions within ±0.44 D for all optometrist-surgeon combinations. The severity of myopic or hyperopic ametropia did not affect the interobserver reproducibility of the manifest refraction. There was close agreement in refraction between surgeons and optometrists using a standard manifest refraction protocol of less than 0.25 D. This degree of interobserver repeatability is similar to that in intraobserver repeatability studies published to date and may represent the value of training and the use of a standard manifest refraction protocol between refraction observers in a refractive surgery practice involving co-management between surgeons and optometrists. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  12. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  13. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ocular esthesiometer. 886.1040 Section 886.1040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea to...

  14. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ocular esthesiometer. 886.1040 Section 886.1040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea to...

  15. Ocular Manifestations of Candidemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Fierro, Julie L.; Prasad, Priya A.; Fisher, Brian T.; Gerber, Jeffrey S.; Coffin, Susan E.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.

    2012-01-01

    Among 254 patients with candidemia who had a dilated retinal examination, 8 patients (3.2%) were diagnosed with ocular disease resulting in retinal detachment in two patients and globe rupture in one patient. This study found that ocular candidiasis is an uncommon but serious sight-threatening complication in pediatric patients with candidemia. PMID:23241990

  16. A comprehensive insight on ocular pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mandal, Abhirup; Agrahari, Vivek; Trinh, Hoang M; Joseph, Mary; Ray, Animikh; Hadji, Hicheme; Mitra, Ranjana; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2016-12-01

    The eye is a distinctive organ with protective anatomy and physiology. Several pharmacokinetics compartment models of ocular drug delivery have been developed for describing the absorption, distribution, and elimination of ocular drugs in the eye. Determining pharmacokinetics parameters in ocular tissues is a major challenge because of the complex anatomy and dynamic physiological barrier of the eye. In this review, pharmacokinetics of these compartments exploring different drugs, delivery systems, and routes of administration is discussed including factors affecting intraocular bioavailability. Factors such as precorneal fluid drainage, drug binding to tear proteins, systemic drug absorption, corneal factors, melanin binding, and drug metabolism render ocular delivery challenging and are elaborated in this manuscript. Several compartment models are discussed; these are developed in ocular drug delivery to study the pharmacokinetics parameters. There are several transporters present in both anterior and posterior segments of the eye which play a significant role in ocular pharmacokinetics and are summarized briefly. Moreover, several ocular pharmacokinetics animal models and relevant studies are reviewed and discussed in addition to the pharmacokinetics of various ocular formulations.

  17. 21 CFR 882.1790 - Ocular plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ocular plethysmograph. 882.1790 Section 882.1790 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Drug Administration on or before September 21, 2004, for any ocular plethysmograph that was...

  18. 21 CFR 882.1790 - Ocular plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ocular plethysmograph. 882.1790 Section 882.1790 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Drug Administration on or before September 21, 2004, for any ocular plethysmograph that was...

  19. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ocular esthesiometer. 886.1040 Section 886.1040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea...

  20. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ocular esthesiometer. 886.1040 Section 886.1040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea...

  1. 21 CFR 886.1040 - Ocular esthesiometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ocular esthesiometer. 886.1040 Section 886.1040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... An ocular esthesiometer is a device, such as a single-hair brush, intended to touch the cornea...

  2. Refractive index measurement of the mouse crystalline lens using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Ranjay; Lacy, Kip D.; Tan, Christopher C.; Park, Han na; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest for using mouse models in refractive development and myopia research. The crystalline lens is a critical optical component of the mouse eye that occupies greater than 50% of the ocular space, and significant increases in thickness with age. However, changes in refractive index of the mouse crystalline lens are less known. In this study, we examined the changes in thickness and refractive index of the mouse crystalline lens for two different strains, wild-type (WT) and a nyx mutant (nob) over the course of normal visual development or after form deprivation. Refractive index and lens thickness measurements were made on ex vivo lens using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Comparison of refractive index measurements on 5 standard ball lenses using the SD-OCT and their known refractive indices (manufacturer provided) indicated good precision (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0.998 and Bland-Altman coefficient of repeatability, 0.116) of the SD-OCT to calculate mouse lens refractive index ex vivo. During normal visual development, lens thickness increased significantly with age for three different cohorts of mice, aged 4 (average thickness from both eyes; WT: 1.78 ± 0.03, nob: 1.79 ± 0.08 mm), 10 (WT: 2.02 ± 0.05, nob: 2.01 ± 0.04 mm) and 16 weeks (WT: 2.12 ± 0.06, nob: 2.09 ± 0.06 mm, p<0.001). Lens thickness was not significantly different between the two strains at any age (p=0.557). For mice with normal vision, refractive index for isolated crystalline lenses in nob mice was significantly greater than WT mice (mean for all ages; WT: 1.42 ± 0.01, nob: 1.44 ± 0.001, p<0.001). After 4 weeks of form deprivation to the right eye using a skull-mounted goggling apparatus, a thinning of the crystalline lens was observed in both right and left eyes of goggled animals compared to their naïve controls (average from both the right and the left eye) for both strains (p=0.052). In form deprived

  3. Negative refraction in anisotropic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, S. T.

    2004-03-01

    Left-handed materials (LHM) are materials in which the direction of wave propagation S is opposite to the wave vector k . S <0 .[1,2,3] LHM exhibit nagative refraction. Experiments have been carried out on a medium consisting of arrays of metallic rings and wrires.[3] An example of a different class of anisotropic left-handed materials are metallic magnetic granular composites. Based on the effective medium approximation, we show that by incorporating metallic magnetic nanoparticles into an appropriate insulating matrix, it may be possible to prepare a composite medium of low eddy current loss which is left-handed for electromagnetic waves propagating in some special direction and polarization in a frequency region near the ferromagnetic resonance frequency.[4,5] This composite may be easier to make on an industrial scale. In addition, its physical properties may be easily tuned by rotating the magnetization locally. The physics involved seems to be different from the original argument.[1,2] In our argument[5], the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of the metal is much larger than the real part, opposite to the original argument. In anisotropic materials so that some of the susceptibilities are negative, the criterion for LHM may not be the same as that for negative refraction.[6] Ansiotropic materials exhibit a richer manifold of anomlous behaviour[6,7,8] and offers more flexibility in apllications.[8] More recently it was found that negative refraction can occur in anisotropic materials where all the susceptibilities are positive.[9] We found that the range of applicability of this effect is much larger than originally thought.[10] S. T. Chui was supported in part by the Office of Naval Research, by the Army Research Laboratory through the Center of Composite Materials at the University of Delaware, by DARPA and by the NSF. [1] J.B.Pendry, A.J.Holden, W.J.Stewart, and I.Youngs, Phys. Rev. Lett 76, 4773 (1996). [2] V.G.Veselago, Sov. Phys. Usp. 10, 509

  4. Clinical and Immunological Responses in Ocular Demodecosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Chun, Yeoun Sook

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and immunological responses to Demodex on the ocular surface. Thirteen eyes in 10 patients with Demodex blepharitis and chronic ocular surface disorders were included in this study and treated by lid scrubbing with tea tree oil for the eradication of Demodex. We evaluated ocular surface manifestations and Demodex counts, and analyzed IL-1β, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in tear samples before and after the treatment. All patients exhibited ocular surface manifestations including corneal nodular opacity, peripheral corneal vascularization, refractory corneal erosion and infiltration, or chronic conjunctival inflammatory signs before treatment. After treatment, Demodex was nearly eradicated, tear concentrations of IL-1β and IL-17 were significantly reduced and substantial clinical improvement was observed in all patients. In conclusion, we believe that Demodex plays an aggravating role in inflammatory ocular surface disorders. PMID:21935281

  5. Clinical and immunological responses in ocular demodecosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Chun, Yeoun Sook; Kim, Jae Chan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and immunological responses to Demodex on the ocular surface. Thirteen eyes in 10 patients with Demodex blepharitis and chronic ocular surface disorders were included in this study and treated by lid scrubbing with tea tree oil for the eradication of Demodex. We evaluated ocular surface manifestations and Demodex counts, and analyzed IL-1β, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in tear samples before and after the treatment. All patients exhibited ocular surface manifestations including corneal nodular opacity, peripheral corneal vascularization, refractory corneal erosion and infiltration, or chronic conjunctival inflammatory signs before treatment. After treatment, Demodex was nearly eradicated, tear concentrations of IL-1β and IL-17 were significantly reduced and substantial clinical improvement was observed in all patients. In conclusion, we believe that Demodex plays an aggravating role in inflammatory ocular surface disorders.

  6. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management.
. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using CINAHL®, PubMed, and Cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity.
. Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems.
. Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity.

  7. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Huang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yu-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation. PMID:27275439

  8. Ocular biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heaton, George R; Davis, Benjamin M; Turner, Lisa A; Cordeiro, Maria F

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterised clinically by a progressive decline in executive functions, memory and cognition. Classic neuropathological hallmarks of AD include intracellular hyper-phosphorylated tau protein which forms neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), and extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) protein, the primary constituent of senile plaques (SP). The gradual process of pathogenic amyloid accumulation is thought to occur 10-20 years prior to symptomatic manifestation. Advance detection of these deposits therefore offers a highly promising avenue for prodromal AD diagnosis. Currently, the most sophisticated method of 'probable AD' diagnosis is via neuroimaging or cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) biomarker analysis. Whilst these methods have reported a high degree of diagnostic specificity and accuracy, they fall significantly short in terms of practicality; they are often highly invasive, expensive or unsuitable for large-scale population screening. In recent years, ocular screening has received substantial attention from the scientific community due to its potential for non-invasive and inexpensive central nervous system (CNS) imaging. In this appraisal we build upon our previous reviews detailing ocular structural and functional changes in AD (Retinal manifestations of Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Retinal Neurodegeneration) and consider their use as biomarkers. In addition, we present an overview of current advances in the use of fluorescent reporters to detect AD pathology through non-invasive retinal imaging.

  9. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Teresa; Verbist, Berit; van Buchem, Mark; van Osch, Thijs; Webb, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  10. Lens opacity and refractive influences on the measurement of retinal vascular fractal dimension.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Mitchell, Paul; Liew, Gerald; Rochtchina, Elena; Kifley, Annette; Wong, Tien Y; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong L; Zhang, Yong P; Wang, Jie J

    2010-09-01

    To examine the influence of lens opacity and refraction on the measurement of retinal vascular fractal dimension (Df).   Optic disc photographs (right eyes) of 3654 baseline Blue Mountains Eye Study participants (aged 49-97) were digitized. Retinal vascular Df was quantified using a computer-based program. Summated severity scores for nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataract were assessed from lens photographs. Refraction data were converted to spherical equivalent refraction (SER), as sum spherical plus 0.5 cylinder power. Axial length was measured at 10-year follow-up examinations using an IOL master.   Mean Df of the retinal vasculature was 1.444±0.023 for 2859 eligible participants. Increasing lens opacity scores were associated with significant reduction in Df (β=-0.0030, p<0.0001). Both cortical and PSC cataract involving central lens area were associated with reduced Df, after controlling for confounding factors (p(trend) ≤0.0105). Increasing myopia severity was associated with reduced Df after adjusting for lens opacity scores and other confounders (p(trend) <0.0001). The slope of Df decrease per SER reduction was 0.0040 in eyes with SER≤-4D, compared to -0.0016 in eyes with SER>-4D. For axial length quintiles, there were no significant differences in mean Df in all groups except a reduction in the fifth quintile (axial length ≥24.15mm) (all p<0.05).   Ocular media opacity independently influenced retinal vascular Df measurement, but we found no evidence supporting any refractive axial magnification effect on this measure. Myopic refraction ≤-4D was associated with a reduction in Df, suggesting rarefaction of retinal vasculature associated with high myopia. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Acta Ophthalmol.

  11. Refraction and the axial length of the eyeball in patients with the optic disc drusen.

    PubMed

    Obuchowska, Iwona; Mariak, Zofia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the relationship between the optic disc drusen (ODD) and the axial length of the eyeball as well as refractive error. We examined prospectively 40 patients with ODD, 18 men and 22 women, age range from 34 to 69 years. All subjects underwent full ophthalmic examination, visual field testing and color-coded duplex sonography of the ocular vessels. Refraction was determined with an autorefractometer (Topcon RM-8000B) and further refined subjectively. Spherical equivalent refraction was calculated as the spherical dioptre plus one half of the cylindrical dioptre. Axial lengths were measured with a Sonomed ultrasound scanner model E-Z Scan AB5500. Clinical signs were observed in 65% of the eyes with drusen, among them, 38% had symptoms of visual acuity loss and all had visual fields defects. There were 21 eyes (18 eyes with and 3 without drusen), with a recorded refractive error. Significant differences in hyperopia were observed between the eyes with and without drusen (p = 0.048). The rate of occurrence of myopia did not differ significantly between affected and unaffected eyes (p = 0.06). The mean spherical equivalent refraction and axial dimensions of the eye differed significantly among the groups of eyes with and without drusen (p < 0.05). Significant differences in mean values of peak-systolic and end-diastolic velocities (p < 0.001) as well as in the resistivity index (p = 0.047) were observed between eyes with and without drusen. The optic disc drusen are often associated with shorter and hyperopic eyes. This anatomical conditions and vascular factors may contribute to pathogenesis of drusen.

  12. [Does refractive surgery really make eyeglasses superfluous?].

    PubMed

    Seiler, T

    2001-06-14

    Spectacles have become a problem of life-style in some societies. In the USA, in 1999 approximately 1 million LASIK operations have been performed to correct myopia and astigmatism and in Europe the frequency of refractive surgery stead by increases. However, only 3 to 5% of these operations are medically indicated. Refractive surgery is evaluated regarding safety and efficacy. Modern laser techniques demonstrate excellent refractive results: photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) achieved refractive success rates of 90% and more with complication rates of 0.5% and less. PRK is, therefore, a valuable technique for corrections of myopia up to -6.0 D. Similar efficacy is obtained with LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) in corrections up to -10 D, however, the complication rate is somewhat higher. Laser correction of hyperopia is equally successful regarding the refractive success but shows an even higher complication rate and the patient satisfaction is lower. Modern refractive laser surgery may replace spectacles in the majority of the cases, however, none of the techniques is free of complications. Therefore, we understand refractive surgery still to be inferior to the correction of ametropia by means of spectacles and any such operation should be attempted only after thorough discussion.

  13. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Results Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the patients with posterior versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. The most common ocular manifestation was retinal microvasculopathy (15.0%), followed by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (14.2%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (9.4%), cytomegalovirus retinitis (3.1%), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (2.4%), and blepharitis (1.6%). Retinal microvasculopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis were common in patients with CD4+ counts <200 cells/µL, while keratoconjunctivitis sicca and conjunctival microvasculopathy were common in patients with CD4+ counts of 200 to 499 cells/µL. There was a significant (p < 0.05) association between ocular manifestation and CD4+ count or age. Conclusions The introduction of HAART has changed the landscape of ocular presentations in patients with AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations

  14. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong; Lee, Sung Jin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the patients with posterior versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. The most common ocular manifestation was retinal microvasculopathy (15.0%), followed by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (14.2%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (9.4%), cytomegalovirus retinitis (3.1%), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (2.4%), and blepharitis (1.6%). Retinal microvasculopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis were common in patients with CD4+ counts <200 cells/µL, while keratoconjunctivitis sicca and conjunctival microvasculopathy were common in patients with CD4+ counts of 200 to 499 cells/µL. There was a significant (p < 0.05) association between ocular manifestation and CD4+ count or age. The introduction of HAART has changed the landscape of ocular presentations in patients with AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations versus anterior segment ocular

  15. J. B. Biot and Refraction Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. T.

    2000-12-01

    The Auer-Standish (AJ 119, 2472, 2000) algorithm, recommended in the revised Explanatory Supplement for calculating refraction in an arbitrary model atmosphere, was derived and used by J. B. Biot (Conn. des Tems pour l'An 1839) a century and a half earlier, using Newton's (wrong) emission theory, and the clumsy notation of Laplace's Mécanique Céleste, which Biot had proof-read. Newton, Laplace, and Biot all describe refraction in terms of the trajectories of ``luminous molecules'' attracted by a central force exerted by the atmosphere; this explains why Laplace considered refraction a topic in celestial mechanics. Fortunately for these authors, the only optics required is Snel's law of refraction, which was discovered before Newton's birth, and which Newton's corpuscular optics was rigged to reproduce. Thus Biot's ``derivation'' of the refractive invariant nr sin z by Laplace's method is a circular and unnecessary argument. While Auer & Standish were reinventing Biot's method, the historian D. T. Whiteside (Centaurus 24, 288, 1980) noticed the mathematical similarity of the refraction theories of Newton and Biot to modern ones, and rashly concluded that ``working astronomers still find computational advantage in maintaining the fiction of a Newtonian emission theory'' --- which is absurd nonsense! Despite being an emissionist, Biot understood atmospheric refraction much better than most astronomers do today: he knew why refraction is almost independent of atmospheric structure, except within a few degrees of the horizon, and that refraction at the horizon depends mostly on the local temperature gradient. His work --- together with that of Lord Rayleigh, who derived his eponymous scattering law from the elastic-solid theory of the luminiferous \\ae ther --- reminds us that a theory's correct results do not make it true. This work was supported by NSF grant ATM-9714357.

  16. Corneal Biomechanics in Ectatic Diseases: Refractive Surgery Implications

    PubMed Central

    Ambrósio, Jr, Renato; Correia, Fernando Faria; Lopes, Bernardo; Salomão, Marcella Q.; Luz, Allan; Dawson, Daniel G.; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Vinciguerra, Riccardo; Vinciguerra, Paolo; Roberts, Cynthia J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ectasia development occurs due to a chronic corneal biomechanical decompensation or weakness, resulting in stromal thinning and corneal protrusion. This leads to corneal steepening, increase in astigmatism, and irregularity. In corneal refractive surgery, the detection of mild forms of ectasia pre-operatively is essential to avoid post-operative progressive ectasia, which also depends on the impact of the procedure on the cornea. Method: The advent of 3D tomography is proven as a significant advancement to further characterize corneal shape beyond front surface topography, which is still relevant. While screening tests for ectasia had been limited to corneal shape (geometry) assessment, clinical biomechanical assessment has been possible since the introduction of the Ocular Response Analyzer (Reichert Ophthalmic Instruments, Buffalo, USA) in 2005 and the Corvis ST (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany) in 2010. Direct clinical biomechanical evaluation is recognized as paramount, especially in detection of mild ectatic cases and characterization of the susceptibility for ectasia progression for any cornea. Conclusions: The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of clinical evaluation of corneal biomechanics, focusing on the most recent advances of commercially available instruments and also on future developments, such as Brillouin microscopy. PMID:28932334

  17. Statistical generation of normal and post-refractive surgery wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Schwiegerling, Jim

    2009-05-01

    Wavefront sensors provide detailed information regarding the aberration structure of large populations of patients. Knowledge of the statistical distribution of the aberrations has several applications, including the development of ophthalmic devices. The statistical distribution aids in defining the required performance range of the device. Another application would be customised schematic eye models that incorporate likely patterns of aberrations found in a given subject population. These models can then be used to find the statistical distribution of image quality metrics based on metrics such as MTF and retinal spot size. Myopic and post-refractive surgical patient populations were analysed to determine the statistical properties of their ocular aberrations. A matrix method is developed that can be used to generate aberration coefficients that are consistent with each population. Generated wavefronts have statistical properties similar to the respective populations and incorporate the correlations between aberration coefficients. The matrix techniques illustrated here can be used to generate wavefronts that are consistent with various populations of interest to the ophthalmic community. Generation of wavefronts enables techniques such as Monte Carlo simulations to be performed that aid in the development of ophthalmic instrumentation and visual performance metrics.

  18. [Calculations of mean refraction and variation of refraction using a dioptric space].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, O; Costantini, E; Gaujoux, T; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-11-01

    Polar notations (sphere, cylinder, and axis) of refraction perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis or graphic representation. While the spherical component of refraction can be easily analyzed by the spherical equivalent, statistical analysis of astigmatism requires non-polar expressions of refraction. Indeed, the cylinder and axis of astigmatism are not independent data. In addition, axis is a directional data including a non-trigonometric cycle. Refraction can be written in a non-polar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x, y, z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three coordinates constitute three independent (orthogonal) variables that correspond to a sphere-equivalent component and a pair of Jackson cross-cylinder components, oriented at 0°/90° (WTR/ATR astigmatism) and 45°/135° (oblique astigmatism). Statistical analysis and graphical representation become less complicated when using rectangular coordinates of refraction. Rectangular coordinates of the mean refraction are obtained by average rectangular coordinates. Similarly, rectangular coordinates of refraction change are obtained by a single subtraction of rectangular coordinates between the final and initial refractions. After statistical analysis, the rectangular coordinates obtained can be converted into a polar form for a more easily understood result. Finally, non-polar notations including rectangular coordinates are useful for statistical and graphical analysis, which would be difficult with only conventional polar notations of refraction.

  19. Formation of bulk refractive index structures

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jr., Barrett George; Potter, Kelly Simmons; Wheeler, David R.; Jamison, Gregory M.

    2003-07-15

    A method of making a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure in photosensitive materials using photo-patterning where first determined is the wavelength at which a photosensitive material film exhibits a change in refractive index upon exposure to optical radiation, a portion of the surfaces of the photosensitive material film is optically irradiated, the film is marked to produce a registry mark. Multiple films are produced and aligned using the registry marks to form a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure.

  20. Atmospheric refraction errors in laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging systems were investigated by ray tracing through three dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles were generated by performing a multiple regression on measurements from seven or eight radiosondes, using a refractivity model which provided for both linear and quadratic variations in the horizontal direction. The range correction due to horizontal gradients was found to be an approximately sinusoidal function of azimuth having a minimum near 0 deg azimuth and a maximum near 180 deg azimuth. The peak to peak variation was approximately 5 centimeters at 10 deg elevation and decreased to less than 1 millimeter at 80 deg elevation.

  1. Negative refraction in Möbius molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. N.; Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically show the negative refraction existing in Möbius molecules. The negative refractive index is induced by the nontrivial topology of the molecules. With the Möbius boundary condition, the effective electromagnetic fields felt by the electron in a Möbius ring is spatially inhomogeneous. In this regard, the DN symmetry is broken in Möbius molecules and thus the magnetic response is induced through the effective magnetic field. Our findings provide an alternative architecture for negative refractive index materials based on the nontrivial topology of Möbius molecules.

  2. Altered Refractive Development in Mice With Reduced Levels of Retinal Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Michael A.; Park, Han na; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Landis, Erica G.; Sidhu, Curran; He, Li; Iuvone, P. Michael; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neuromodulator dopamine (DA) has been implicated in the prevention of excessive ocular elongation and myopia in various animal models. This study used retina-specific DA knockout mice to investigate the role of retinal DA in refractive development and susceptibility to experimental myopia. Methods Measurements of refractive error, corneal curvature, and ocular biometrics were obtained as a function of age for both untreated and form-deprived (FD) groups of retina-specific tyrosine hydroxylase knockout (rTHKO) and control (Ctrl) mice. Retinas from each group were analyzed by HPLC for levels of DA and its primary metabolite (DOPAC). Results Under normal visual conditions, rTHKO mice showed significantly myopic refractions (F(1,188) = 7.602, P < 0.001) and steeper corneas (main effect of genotype F(1,180) = 5.1, P < 0.01) at 4 and 6 weeks of age compared with Ctrl mice. Retina-specific THKO mice also had thinner corneas (main effect of genotype F(1,181) = 37.17, P < 0.001), thinner retinas (F(6,181) = 6.07, P < 0.001), and shorter axial lengths (F(6,181) = 3.78, P < 0.01) than Ctrl mice. Retina-specific THKO retinas contained less than 15% of DA and DOPAC compared with Ctrl retinas, and the remaining DA had a significantly higher turnover, as indicated by DOPAC/DA ratios (Student's t-test, P < 0.05). Retina-specific THKO mice showed similar, yet more variable, responses to 6 weeks of FD compared with Ctrl mice. Conclusions Diminished retinal DA induced spontaneous myopia in mice raised under laboratory conditions without form deprivation. The relative myopic shift in rTHKO mice may be explained by steeper corneas, an unexpected finding. The chronic loss of DA did not significantly alter the FD myopia response in rTHKO mice. PMID:27750284

  3. Adjusting a light dispersion model to fit measurements from vertebrate ocular media as well as ray-tracing in fish lenses.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Yakir L; Kröger, Ronald H H; Söderberg, Bo

    2010-04-21

    Color dispersion, i.e., the dependency of refractive index of any transparent material on the wavelength of light, has important consequences for the function of optical instruments and animal eyes. Using a multi-objective goal attainment optimization algorithm, a dispersion model was successfully fitted to measured refractive indices of various ocular media and the longitudinal chromatic aberration determined by laser-scanning in the crystalline lens of the African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni. The model describes the effects of color dispersion in fish lenses and may be applicable to the eyes of other vertebrates as well.

  4. Understanding refraction contrast using a comparison of absorption and refraction computed tomographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, S.; Rhoades, G.; Wei, Z.; Rosenberg, A.; Belev, G.; Chapman, D.

    2013-05-01

    Refraction x-ray contrast is an imaging modality used primarily in a research setting at synchrotron facilities, which have a biomedical imaging research program. The most common method for exploiting refraction contrast is by using a technique called Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). The DEI apparatus allows the detection of refraction between two materials and produces a unique ''edge enhanced'' contrast appearance, very different from the traditional absorption x-ray imaging used in clinical radiology. In this paper we aim to explain the features of x-ray refraction contrast as a typical clinical radiologist would understand. Then a discussion regarding what needs to be considered in the interpretation of the refraction image takes place. Finally we present a discussion about the limitations of planar refraction imaging and the potential of DEI Computed Tomography. This is an original work that has not been submitted to any other source for publication. The authors have no commercial interests or conflicts of interest to disclose.

  5. The refractive state of the eye in Icelandic horses with the Silver mutation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Maria K; Jäderkvist Fegraeus, Kim; Lindgren, Gabriella; Ekesten, Björn

    2017-06-02

    The syndrome Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies (MCOA) is a congenital eye disorder in horses. Both the MCOA syndrome and the Silver coat colour in horses are caused by the same missense mutation in the premelanosome protein (PMEL) gene. Horses homozygous for the Silver mutation (TT) are affected by multiple ocular defects causing visual impairment or blindness. Horses heterozygous for the Silver mutation (CT) have less severe clinical signs, usually cysts arising from the ciliary body iris or retina temporally. It is still unknown if the vision is impaired in horses heterozygous for the Silver mutation. A recent study reported that Comtois horses carrying the Silver mutation had significantly deeper anterior chambers of the eye compared to wild-type horses. This could potentially cause refractive errors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if Icelandic horses with the Silver mutation have refractive errors compared to wild-type horses. One hundred and fifty-two Icelandic horses were included in the study, 71 CT horses and five TT horses. All horses were genotyped for the missense mutation in PMEL. Each CT and TT horse was matched by a wild-type (CC) horse of the same age ± 1 year. Skiascopy and a brief ophthalmic examination were performed in all horses. Association between refraction and age, eye, genotype and sex was tested by linear mixed-effect model analysis. TT horses with controls were not included in the statistical analyses as they were too few. The interaction between age and genotype had a significant impact on the refractive state (P = 0.0001). CT horses older than 16 years were on average more myopic than wild-type horses of the same age. No difference in the refractive state could be observed between genotypes (CT and CC) in horses younger than 16 years. TT horses were myopic (-2 D or more) in one or both eyes regardless of age. Our results indicate that an elderly Icelandic horse (older than 16 years) carrying the Silver

  6. Emerging therapeutics for ocular surface disease.

    PubMed

    Bielory, Brett P; Shah, Steven P; O'Brien, Terrence P; Perez, Victor L; Bielory, Leonard

    2016-10-01

    The present review provides an overview on the potential of different systemic and topical treatments in chronic forms of ocular allergy and dry eye disorder (DED). The impact on anterior surface of ocular inflammatory disorder encompasses an array of conditions, which are frequently underreported. This can contribute to underdiagnoses and ineffective management from healthcare providers such as an allergist and/or ophthalmologist who routinely provide care for these common disorders. Owing to the current limited therapeutic options, healthcare providers are routinely seeking alternative treatments that could facilitate effective management of the conditions. Recent advances in immunopathophysiology of ocular surface disorders has provided new potential targets and therapeutic strategies for the treatment of DED and ocular allergy that may include various immunobiological modulators. These modulators have focused on regulating the Th1 and Th2 immune-mediated inflammatory pathways that inhibit various cytokines (e.g. IL-1, IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13) antibodies (e.g. IgE), and other surface markers of various cell lines (e.g. activated T-lymphocytes, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1). Recent findings about the pathophysiology of DED and ocular allergy have led to the greater understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ocular surface diseases leading to the potential novel targets for immunomodulation of anterior surface ocular disorders. New topical glucocorticoids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, IL-1 antagonists, IL-5, IL-4/IL-13 antagonists, integrin antagonists, and quinolone derivatives appear to be encouraging.

  7. Dynamics of ocular aberrations in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Hema; Jinabhai, Amit; O'Donnell, Clare

    2010-05-01

    The aim was to investigate the fluctuations in monochromatic ocular aberrations with accommodation and tear-film changes in moderate keratoconic eyes. We measured the changes in ocular higher-order aberrations in 10 moderate keratoconic and 10 visually normal eyes to accommodative stimuli ranging from zero to 5.00 DS using a Hartmann-Shack aberrometer. In addition, the changes in ocular higher-order aberrations were measured for up to 15 seconds after a blink in eight keratoconic and eight visually normal eyes. These results show that ocular spherical (p = 0.68) and coma-like (p = 0.71) aberrations did not change significantly with accommodation from zero to 5.00 DS in keratoconic eyes. In contrast to normal eyes, the ocular higher-order RMS error tended to decrease in magnitude after a blink in keratoconic eyes. Vertical coma became less negative with time after a blink in the keratoconic group, therefore, reducing the manifest ocular higher order RMS error by counteracting the negative vertical coma of the cornea. Compared to the manifest monochromatic higher-order aberrations, any dynamic fluctuations in ocular aberrations with accommodation and tear film changes are relatively small in moderate keratoconic eyes. This implies that the correction of monochromatic higher-order aberrations in keratoconus using customised soft contact lenses will not be significantly hindered by such dynamic aberrational changes.

  8. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  9. Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shalaev, Vladimir M; Cai, Wenshan; Chettiar, Uday K; Yuan, Hsiao-Kuan; Sarychev, Andrey K; Drachev, Vladimir P; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2005-12-15

    A double-periodic array of pairs of parallel gold nanorods is shown to have a negative refractive index in the optical range. Such behavior results from the plasmon resonance in the pairs of nanorods for both the electric and the magnetic components of light. The refractive index is retrieved from direct phase and amplitude measurements for transmission and reflection, which are all in excellent agreement with simulations. Both experiments and simulations demonstrate that a negative refractive index n' approximately -0.3 is achieved at the optical communication wavelength of 1.5 microm using the array of nanorods. The retrieved refractive index critically depends on the phase of the transmitted wave, which emphasizes the importance of phase measurements in finding n'.

  10. A fully automated remote refraction system.

    PubMed

    Dyer, A M; Kirk, A H

    2000-01-01

    Traditional methods of performing refractions depend on a trained refractionist being present with the subject and conducting an interactive form of subjective testing. A fully automated refraction system was installed in 13 optical dispensaries and after 15 months the patient and statistical information was gathered. The data from all operators were consistent and suggested a lack of operator effect on the refraction results. The mean of the SD of subjective sphere measurements was 0.2, or slightly less than a quarter dioptre, which would be an acceptable level of accuracy for ordering corrective lenses. The present study suggests an absence of operator influence on the results of the refractions and a degree of consistency and accuracy compatible with the prescription of lenses.

  11. Isaac Newton and the astronomical refraction.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H

    2008-12-01

    In a short interval toward the end of 1694, Isaac Newton developed two mathematical models for the theory of the astronomical refraction and calculated two refraction tables, but did not publish his theory. Much effort has been expended, starting with Biot in 1836, in the attempt to identify the methods and equations that Newton used. In contrast to previous work, a closed form solution is identified for the refraction integral that reproduces the table for his first model (in which density decays linearly with elevation). The parameters of his second model, which includes the exponential variation of pressure in an isothermal atmosphere, have also been identified by reproducing his results. The implication is clear that in each case Newton had derived exactly the correct equations for the astronomical refraction; furthermore, he was the first to do so.

  12. Development of a subjective refraction simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perches, S.; Ares, J.; Collados, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed simulation software by Matlab (MathworksInc.) with a graphical interface designed for non-expert users. This simulator allows you to complete the process of subjective refraction starting from the aberrometry of the patients and analyse the influence of different factors during the exam. In addition to explain the graphical interface and its working, we show two examples about a complete process of subjective refraction with the influence of high order aberrations and without them showing the retinal image obtained in each step of the refraction process. When the Jackson Cross-Cylinder technique is made with this software, it becomes clear the difficulty of chosen between two images when high order aberrations are present. Therefore, the variability of response during the refraction can be a problem when the examiner has to reach an adequate optical prescription.

  13. Nonlinear negative refraction by difference frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jianjun; Shen, Dongyi; Feng, Yaming; Wan, Wenjie

    2016-05-09

    Negative refraction has attracted much interest for its promising capability in imaging applications. Such an effect can be implemented by negative index meta-materials, however, which are usually accompanied by high loss and demanding fabrication processes. Recently, alternative nonlinear approaches like phase conjugation and four wave mixing have shown advantages of low-loss and easy-to-implement, but associated problems like narrow accepting angles can still halt their practical applications. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a scheme to realize negative refraction by nonlinear difference frequency generation with wide tunability, where a thin Beta barium borate slice serves as a negative refraction layer bending the input signal beam to the idler beam at a negative angle. Furthermore, we realize optical focusing effect using such nonlinear negative refraction, which may enable many potential applications in imaging science.

  14. Hybrid high refractive index polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yubao; Flaim, Tony; Mercado, Ramil; Fowler, Shelly; Holmes, Douglas; Planje, Curtis

    2005-04-01

    Thermally curable hybrid high refractive index polymer solutions have been developed. These solutions are stable up to 6 months under room temperature storage conditions and can be easily spin-coated onto a desired substrate. When cured at elevated temperature, the hybrid polymer coating decomposes to form a metal oxide-rich film that has a high refractive index. The resulting films have refractive indices higher than 1.90 in the entire visible region and achieve film thicknesses of 300-900 nm depending on the level of metal oxide loading, cure temperature being used, and number of coatings. The formed films show greater than 90% internal transmission in the visible wavelength (400-700 nm). These hybrid high refractive index films are mechanically robust, are stable upon exposure to both heat and UV radiation, and are currently being investigated for microlithographic patterning potential.

  15. Comparison between refraction measured by Spot Vision ScreeningTM and subjective clinical refractometry

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Daniela Lima; Villela, Flávio Fernandes; Orlandin, Luis Fernando; Eiji, Fernando Naves; Dantas, Daniel Oliveira; Alves, Milton Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Spot Vision ScreeningTM as an autorefractor by comparing refraction measurements to subjective clinical refractometry results in children and adult patients. METHODS: One-hundred and thirty-four eyes of 134 patients were submitted to refractometry by Spot and clinical refractometry under cycloplegia. Patients, students, physicians, staff and children of staff from the Hospital das Clínicas (School of Medicine, University of São Paulo) aged 7-50 years without signs of ocular disease were examined. Only right-eye refraction data were analyzed. The findings were converted in magnitude vectors for analysis. RESULTS: The difference between Spot Vision ScreeningTM and subjective clinical refractometry expressed in spherical equivalents was +0.66±0.56 diopters (D), +0.16±0.27 D for the vector projected on the 90 axis and +0.02±0.15 D for the oblique vector. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the statistical significance of the difference between the two methods, we consider the difference non-relevant in a clinical setting, supporting the use of Spot Vision ScreeningTM as an ancillary method for estimating refraction. PMID:26934234

  16. Comparison between refraction measured by Spot Vision Screening™ and subjective clinical refractometry.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Daniela Lima; Villela, Flávio Fernandes; Orlandin, Luis Fernando; Eiji, Fernando Naves; Dantas, Daniel Oliveira; Alves, Milton Ruiz

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Spot Vision Screening™ as an autorefractor by comparing refraction measurements to subjective clinical refractometry results in children and adult patients. One-hundred and thirty-four eyes of 134 patients were submitted to refractometry by Spot and clinical refractometry under cycloplegia. Patients, students, physicians, staff and children of staff from the Hospital das Clínicas (School of Medicine, University of São Paulo) aged 7-50 years without signs of ocular disease were examined. Only right-eye refraction data were analyzed. The findings were converted in magnitude vectors for analysis. The difference between Spot Vision Screening™ and subjective clinical refractometry expressed in spherical equivalents was +0.66±0.56 diopters (D), +0.16±0.27 D for the vector projected on the 90 axis and +0.02±0.15 D for the oblique vector. Despite the statistical significance of the difference between the two methods, we consider the difference non-relevant in a clinical setting, supporting the use of Spot Vision Screening™ as an ancillary method for estimating refraction.

  17. Neurosurgical applications of ocular pneumoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Bingham, W F

    1981-05-01

    Ocular pneumoplethysmography (OPG), a semiautomated form of suction ophthalmodynamometry, was used to evaluate and follow 15 patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy and two patients in whom gradual carotid artery occlusion was performed for inoperable intracranial aneurysm. Postoperative corrected ophthalmic arterial pressures (COAP's) on the operated side in the carotid endarterectomy patients averaged 12.5 mm Hg higher than before surgery, the standard deviation being 4.9 mm Hg for clinically stable patients. There was no significant change in COAP on the contralateral side. Several problems were encountered in closing down carotid clamps, the most potentially serious being a precipitous fall in COAP with the final adjustment. The current uses of OPG and similar techniques are reviewed, and potential neurosurgical applications are discussed.

  18. Ocular surface sealants and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Subir Singh

    2006-07-01

    Tissue adhesives, both synthetic and biologic, have a long history of use in ophthalmology. Cyanoacrylate-based glues have traditionally been the most widely used glues for various purposes. They have been specially useful for treating corneal perforations and have had significantly improved long-term outcomes. More recently, fibrin-based glues have gained a major role as a suture substitute for attaching biologic tissues and as surface sealants. The literature supports expanded use of fibrin glue in this fashion. Other new agents, such as polyethyelene glycols, have been underutilized and hold promise, especially as surface protectants. Numerous other glues are being developed and show promise as ocular surface sealants and protective membranes. Advances in knowledge about tissue adhesives are leading to more effective and efficient ophthalmic care.

  19. Ocular Dominance and Handedness in Golf Putting.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Kristine; Guillon, Michel; Naroo, Shehzad A

    2015-10-01

    In golf, the impact of eye-hand dominance on putting performance has long been debated. Eye-hand dominance is thought to impact how golfers judge the alignment of the ball with the target and the club with the ball, as well as how golfers visualize the line of the putt when making decisions about the force needed to hit the ball. Previous studies have all measured ocular dominance in primary gaze only, despite golfers spending a significant amount of their time in a putting stance (bent at the hips, head tilted down). Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess ocular dominance in both primary gaze (aligning the ball with the target) and putting gaze (addressing the ball and aligning the club). This study investigated measuring pointing ocular dominance in both primary and putting gaze positions on 31 golfers (14 amateur, 7 club professionals, and 10 top professionals). All players were right-handed golfers, although one reported having no hand dominance and one reported being strongly left hand dominant. The results showed that (1) primary and putting gaze ocular dominances are not equal, nor are they predictive of each other; (2) the magnitude of putting ocular dominance is significantly less than the magnitude of primary gaze ocular dominance; (3) ocular dominance is not correlated with handedness in either primary or putting gaze; and (4) eye-hand dominance is not associated with increased putting skill, although ocular dominance may be associated with increased putting success. It is important that coaches assess golfers' ocular dominance in both primary and putting gaze positions to ensure they have the most accurate information upon which to base their vision strategy decisions.

  20. Ocular allergy in the Asia Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Katelaris, Constance H

    2011-10-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) represents a spectrum of disorders, comprising seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC), perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) and giant papillary conjunctivitis. Of these ocular allergy types, SAC and PAC are the most common.The most striking difference within this group of ocular diseases is that SAC and PAC remain self-limited without ocular surface damage, while AKC and VKC can compromise the cornea, causing ulcers and scarring and can ultimately lead to vision loss. Data on AC in the Asia Pacific is scarce however some understanding of prevalence of the condition has been obtained from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) studies and more recently from the Allergies in Asia Pacific study as well as some information from individual country surveys. Unfortunately none of this data has been collected using validated survey instruments specifically designed for AC. Surveys such as ISAAC have been predominantly concerned with respiratory allergic symptoms with questions added that incorporate some ocular symptoms. These questionnaires do not detect individuals who may have AC in the absence of allergic rhinitis. Using hospital ophthalmology outpatient populations for prevalence studies of ocular allergy immediately introduces a bias towards the more severe, complex forms of the condition as patients with the milder forms of SAR and PAR will rarely present to a hospital outpatient clinic. There is a real need for the development of validated questionnaires specifically addressing ocular allergy. There are no widely accessible studies examining prevalence of the complex forms of ocular allergy (AKC, VKC) in Asia Pacific region. This review will provide an overview of ocular allergy, its classification, clinical presentation and differential diagnosis, and will also discuss what is known about the epidemiology of ocular allergy in the

  1. Intertester agreement in refractive error measurements.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen G; Ciner, Elise; Kulp, Marjean T; Quinn, Graham E; Orel-Bixler, Deborah; Cyert, Lynn A; Moore, Bruce; Ying, Gui-Shuang

    2013-10-01

    To determine the intertester agreement of refractive error measurements between lay and nurse screeners using the Retinomax Autorefractor and the SureSight Vision Screener. Trained lay and nurse screeners measured refractive error in 1452 preschoolers (3 to 5 years old) using the Retinomax and the SureSight in a random order for screeners and instruments. Intertester agreement between lay and nurse screeners was assessed for sphere, cylinder, and spherical equivalent (SE) using the mean difference and the 95% limits of agreement. The mean intertester difference (lay minus nurse) was compared between groups defined based on the child's age, cycloplegic refractive error, and the reading's confidence number using analysis of variance. The limits of agreement were compared between groups using the Brown-Forsythe test. Intereye correlation was accounted for in all analyses. The mean intertester differences (95% limits of agreement) were -0.04 (-1.63, 1.54) diopter (D) sphere, 0.00 (-0.52, 0.51) D cylinder, and -0.04 (1.65, 1.56) D SE for the Retinomax and 0.05 (-1.48, 1.58) D sphere, 0.01 (-0.58, 0.60) D cylinder, and 0.06 (-1.45, 1.57) D SE for the SureSight. For either instrument, the mean intertester differences in sphere and SE did not differ by the child's age, cycloplegic refractive error, or the reading's confidence number. However, for both instruments, the limits of agreement were wider when eyes had significant refractive error or the reading's confidence number was below the manufacturer's recommended value. Among Head Start preschool children, trained lay and nurse screeners agree well in measuring refractive error using the Retinomax or the SureSight. Both instruments had similar intertester agreement in refractive error measurements independent of the child's age. Significant refractive error and a reading with low confidence number were associated with worse intertester agreement.

  2. Indices of refraction for the HITRAN compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.

    1994-01-01

    Indices of refraction of sulfuric acid solutions, water, and ice, which will become part of the HITRAN database, are discussed. Representative calculations are presented for the sulfate aerosol, to illustrate the broadband spectral features of i.r. aerosol extinction spectra. Values of the sulfuric acid mass density are used in an application of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, which is used to estimate the sensitivity of extinction coefficients to temperature dependent refractive indices.

  3. Controlling plasmon hybridization for negative refraction metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanté, B.; Burokur, S. N.; Sellier, A.; de Lustrac, A.; Lourtioz, J.-M.

    2009-02-01

    The hybridization scheme of plasmon modes in cut-wire-based left-handed metamaterials is shown to critically depend on the coupling between paired cut wires. We show that an inverted hybridization scheme obtained with an asymmetric alignment of paired cut wires is the most appropriate to negative refraction. This is validated (numerically and experimentally) by the first demonstration of negative refraction in the microwave domain using only periodic ensembles of cut wires.

  4. [Polar and non polar notations of refraction].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, O; Gaujoux, T; Costantini, E; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-01-01

    Refraction can be expressed by four polar notations which correspond to four different combinations of spherical or cylindrical lenses. Conventional expressions of refraction (plus and minus cylinder notation) are described by sphere, cylinder, and axis. In the plus cylinder notation, the axis visualizes the most powerful meridian. The axis usually corresponds to the bow tie axis in curvature maps. Plus cylinder notation is also valuable for all relaxing procedures (i.e., selective suture ablation, arcuate keratotomy, etc.). In the cross-cylinder notation, two orthogonal cylinders can describe (without the sphere component) the actual refraction of both the principal meridians. This notation must be made before performing the vertex calculation. Using an association of a Jackson cross-cylinder and a spherical equivalent, refraction can be broken down into two pure components: astigmatism and sphere. All polar notations of refraction may perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis, which requires nonpolar expression. After doubling the axis, a rectangular projection breaks down the Jackson cross-cylinder, which has a polar axis, into two Jackson cross-cylinders on the 0 degrees /90 degrees and 45 degrees /135 degrees axis. This procedure results in the loss of the directional nature of the data. Refraction can be written in a nonpolar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x,y,z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three independent (orthogonal) variables have a concrete optical significance: a spherical component, a direct/inverse (WTR/ATR) component, and an oblique component of the astigmatism. Finally, nonpolar notations are useful for statistical analysis and graphical representation of refraction.

  5. Indices of refraction for the HITRAN compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.

    1994-01-01

    Indices of refraction of sulfuric acid solutions, water, and ice, which will become part of the HITRAN database, are discussed. Representative calculations are presented for the sulfate aerosol, to illustrate the broadband spectral features of i.r. aerosol extinction spectra. Values of the sulfuric acid mass density are used in an application of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, which is used to estimate the sensitivity of extinction coefficients to temperature dependent refractive indices.

  6. Delaying Treatment of Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Michael A.; Gordon, Mae O.; Gao, Feng; Heuer, Dale K.; Higginbotham, Eve J.; Johnson, Chris A.; Keltner, John K.; Miller, J. Philip; Parrish, Richard K.; Wilson, M. Roy

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of earlier vs later treatment in preventing primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in individuals with ocular hypertension. Methods One thousand six hundred thirty-six individuals with intraocular pressure (IOP) from 24 to 32 mm Hg in 1 eye and 21 to 32 mm Hg in the fellow eye were randomized to observation or to topical ocular hypotensive medication. Median time of treatment in the medication group was 13.0 years. After a median of 7.5 years without treatment, the observation group received medication for a median of 5.5 years. To determine if there is a penalty for delaying treatment, we compared the cumulative proportions of participants who developed POAG at a median follow-up of 13 years in the original observation group and in the original medication group. Main Outcome Measures Cumulative proportion of participants who developed POAG. Results The cumulative proportion of participants in the original observation group who developed POAG at 13 years was 0.22 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.19–0.25), vs 0.16 (95% CI, 0.13–0.19) in the original medication group (P=.009). Among participants at the highest third of baseline risk of developing POAG, the cumulative proportion who developed POAG was 0.40 (95% CI, 0.33–0.46) in the original observation group and 0.28 (95% CI, 0.22–0.34) in the original medication group. There was little evidence of increased adverse events associated with medication. Application to Clinical Practice Absolute reduction was greatest among participants at the highest baseline risk of developing POAG. Individuals at high risk of developing POAG may benefit from more frequent examinations and early preventive treatment. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000125 PMID:20212196

  7. Ocular Aberrations Across the Visual Field During Accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    Myopia is classically defined as a mismatch between the optical power of the relaxed eye and its dioptric length. This definition is entirely foveocentric without concern for the contributions of peripheral refractive errors to myopia development. Long periods of steady near-work was considered to cause myopia development due to inadequate accommodation. Consequently, not only the on-axis optical features but also off-axis ones should be probed to gain insight about myopia progression. Moreover, these features need to be understood not only for the relaxed eye, but also for the accommodating eye. To acquire complete data set, a custom-built Indiana Scanning Aberrometer for Wavefront (I SAW) was developed to measure wavefront aberration along 37 line-of-sights at 8 different accommodation states in the central 30 degree visual field. We found that ocular refractive state changed uniformly over the central visual field as the eye accommodates up to 6D, and the accuracy of accommodation across the central visual field is similar to that measured in the fovea. No systematic difference between emmetropic and myopic eyes was evident. Then, a linear vector-summation rule for axial and oblique astigmatism was found to account for their interaction over the central visual field. Using this combination rule, our experimental evidence revealed no systematic effect of accommodation on axial or oblique astigmatism for two adult populations. The axial and oblique astigmatism of the whole eye is less than for the cornea alone, indicating a compensatory role for internal optics at all accommodative states. This compensation mechanism was further validated theoretically with schematic eye model. Lastly, we developed a hybrid method yielding customized eye models that accurately reproduce the empirical measurements and reasonably represent the anatomical structure, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the changes in the eye's aberration structure that occur over the central

  8. Origin of crystallization-induced refractive index changes in photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumeau, Julien; Glebova, Larissa; Golubkov, Valerii; Zanotto, Edgar D.; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2009-11-01

    Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is a multi-component silicate that undergoes localized refractive index decrease after UV-exposure and thermal treatment for partial crystallization. Based on this refractive index change, high efficiency volume Bragg gratings have been developed in PTR glass and have been successfully used for laser beam control. However, despite the fact that this type of glass has been widely studied and used over the last 20 years, the origin of the refractive index change upon crystallization is poorly understood. In this paper, we introduce three possible mechanisms (the precipitation of nano-sized NaF crystals and the associated local chemical changes of the glass matrix, the volumetric changes due to relaxation, and the local residual stresses) for the refractive index decrement in PTR glass and estimate the partial refractive index change due to each mechanism. Refractive index measurements are compared with high temperature XRD experiments and a general approach for the simulation of the refractive index change in PTR glass is proposed. We show that among the studied variables the residual stresses surrounding the crystals are the main responsible for the local refractive index decrement in this glass.

  9. Multimeridional refraction: dependence of the measurement accuracy on the number of meridians refracted.

    PubMed

    Oechsner, U; Kusel, R

    1997-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of multimeridional refraction measurements was used to investigate the dependence of the accuracy of the measurement on the number of meridians refracted, N, and on the standard deviation of a measurement in a single meridian, sigma. For the description of the measurement errors, the residual refraction values were used, i.e., the parameters of the refraction remaining after application of the measured correction. The distributions of the residual refraction values were found to be independent of the "true" refraction values; in addition, by means of a factor square root of N/sigma, reduced residual refraction values could be defined which also were independent of N and sigma. A vector space proposed by Lakshminarayanan and Varadharajan (based on Long's power matrix) was used to represent the joint distribution of the residual refraction values in three-dimensional space. It was found to be a three-variate Gaussian distribution with zero mean and diagonal covariance matrix. It could further be shown that the vector space proposed by Harris is identical to the one used, up to a linear transformation. Several criteria, based on the one- and three-dimensional distributions and corresponding to different levels of accuracy, are discussed resulting in a wide range of answers about the number of meridians to be refracted.

  10. Comparison of objective refraction in darkness to cycloplegic refraction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Balamurali; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Meehan, Kelly; Grk, Dejana; Cox, Misty

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to assess non-cycloplegic objective refraction in darkness using an open-field auto-refractor, and furthermore to compare it with distance cycloplegic subjective refraction and distance cycloplegic retinoscopy in the light, in children and young adults. Twenty-three, visually-normal, young-adults (46 eyes) ages 23 to 31 years, and five children (10 eyes) ages five to 12 years, participated in the study. The spherical component of their refraction ranged from -2.25 D to +3.75 D with a mean of +1.80 D, and a mean cylinder of -0.70 D. Three techniques were used to assess refractive error. An objective measure of the non-cycloplegic refractive state was obtained using an open-field autorefractor (WAM-5500) after five minutes in the dark to allow for dissipation of accommodative transients and relaxation of accommodation. In addition, both distance retinoscopy and subjective distance refraction were performed following cycloplegia (Cyclopentolate, 1%) using conventional clinical procedures. All measurements were obtained on the same day within a single session. The spherical component of the refraction was compared among the three techniques in both the children and adults. There was no significant difference in spherical refraction among the three techniques: non-cycloplegic objective refraction in the dark, distance cycloplegic retinoscopy and distance cycloplegic subjective refraction, in either the adults [F(2, 137) = 0.79, p = 0.45] or the children [F(2, 27) = 0.47, p = 0.62]. Mean difference in the spherical component between refraction in the dark and the cycloplegic distance retinoscopy was -0.34 D (r = 0.89) in the adults and +0.14 D (r = 0.96) in the children. The mean difference in spherical component between refraction in the dark and the cycloplegic distance subjective refraction was -0.25 D (r = 0.92) in the adults and -0.05 D (r = 0.95) in the children. Comparison of the spherical refractive component between the three techniques was not

  11. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  12. On the effective refractive index of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmad-Rohen, Alexander; Contreras-Tello, Humberto; Morales-Luna, Gesuri; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index {n}{eff} of blood as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm; we employed van de Hulst’s theory, together with the anomalous diffraction approximation, for the calculation. We modelled blood as a mixture of plasma and erythrocytes. Our results indicate that erythrocyte orientation has a strong effect on {n}{eff}, making blood an optically anisotropic medium except when the erythrocytes are randomly oriented. In the case in which their symmetry axis is perpendicular to the wave vector, {n}{eff} equals the refractive index of plasma at certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the erythrocytes’ shape affects their contribution to {n}{eff} in an important way, implying that studies on the effective refractive index of blood should avoid approximating them as spheres or spheroids. Finally, the effective refractive index of blood predicted by van de Hulst’s theory is different from what would be obtained by averaging the refractive indices of its constituents weighted by volume; such a volume-weighted average is appropriate only for haemolysed blood. We then measured the real part of the refractive index of various blood solutions using two different experimental setups. One of the most important results of our expriment is that {n}{eff} is measurable to a good degree of precision even for undiluted blood, although not all measuring apparatuses are appropriate. The experimental data is self-consistent and in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations.

  13. Reflective and refractive objects for mixed reality.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Martin; Traxler, Christoph; Winklhofer, Christoph; Wimmer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rendering method which integrates reflective or refractive objects into a differential instant radiosity (DIR) framework usable for mixed-reality (MR) applications. This kind of objects are very special from the light interaction point of view, as they reflect and refract incident rays. Therefore they may cause high-frequency lighting effects known as caustics. Using instant-radiosity (IR) methods to approximate these high-frequency lighting effects would require a large amount of virtual point lights (VPLs) and is therefore not desirable due to real-time constraints. Instead, our approach combines differential instant radiosity with three other methods. One method handles more accurate reflections compared to simple cubemaps by using impostors. Another method is able to calculate two refractions in real-time, and the third method uses small quads to create caustic effects. Our proposed method replaces parts in light paths that belong to reflective or refractive objects using these three methods and thus tightly integrates into DIR. In contrast to previous methods which introduce reflective or refractive objects into MR scenarios, our method produces caustics that also emit additional indirect light. The method runs at real-time frame rates, and the results show that reflective and refractive objects with caustics improve the overall impression for MR scenarios.

  14. Immunomodulation on the ocular surface: a review

    PubMed Central

    Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.; Ambroziak, Maciej; Witkiewicz, Jan; Skopiński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The increasing understanding of immune mechanisms changed our perception of the ocular surface, which is now considered a compartment of the common mucosal immune system. It offered the possibility to alter the physiological immune response on the ocular surface and effectively combat inflammation, which impairs stability of the tear film and causes tear hyperosmolarity, causing symptoms of dry eye disease. The paper provides an overview of ocular surface anatomy and physiology, explains the underlying mechanisms of dry eye disease and discusses novel and promising treatment modalities, such as cyclosporine A, biological therapies using autologous serum and various growth factors as well as experimental treatment methods which are currently being investigated. PMID:27536206

  15. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    ROMAO, Elen A.; BOLELLA, Valdes R.; NARDIN, Maria Estela P.; HABIB-SIMAO, Maria Lucia; FURTADO, João Marcelo; MOYSES-NETO, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  16. Gender Disparities in Ocular Inflammatory Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Hatice Nida; Davis, Janet; Ucar, Didar; Fox, Austin; Chan, Chi Chao; Goldstein, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular inflammatory disorders disproportionately affect women, and the majority of affected women are of childbearing age. The role of sex or reproductive hormones has been proposed in many other inflammatory or autoimmune disorders, and findings from non-ocular autoimmune diseases suggest a complex interaction between sex hormones, genetic factors and the immune system. However, despite the age and sex bias, factors that influence this disparity are complicated and unclear. This review aims to evaluate the gender disparities in prevalence, incidence and severity of the most common infectious and non-infectious ocular inflammatory disorders. PMID:24987987

  17. Adverse ocular effects of acetate hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rever, B; Fox, L; Christensen, R; Bar-Khayim, Y; Nissenson, A R

    1983-01-01

    In order to better define ocular dynamics during hemodialysis, we studied intraocular pressure (IOP) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) serially during both acetate and bicarbonate hemodialysis in 10 stable hemodialysis patients. IOP did not change significantly in any patient during dialysis. In contrast, however, ACD decreased significantly during acetate but not bicarbonate dialysis. ACD could be maintained during acetate dialysis by concomitant administration of mannitol. We conclude that acetate dialysis might adversely affect ocular dynamics in susceptible patients with glaucoma or recent ocular surgery. In such individuals administration of mannitol or use of a bicarbonate dialysate should be considered.

  18. Ocular Gnathostomiasis-Update of Earlier Survey.

    PubMed

    Nawa, Yukifumi; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Chotmongkol, Verajit; Figueiras, Sandra Fernández; Benavides, Maria; Diaz Camacho, Sylvia Paz

    2017-06-12

    Ocular gnathostomiasis is rather a rare food-borne zoonosis caused by infection with the larvae of several species of genus Gnathostoma and is a representative ocular larva migrans syndrome. In our previous literature survey, we found 73 cases of ocular gnathostomiasis reported up to and including 2009, though additional sporadic cases have been reported in Asia and the Americas since that report. Here, we review 10 additional cases reported since 2010, and also update current findings regarding epidemiological and clinical features in affected patients.

  19. Segmentation-free ocular detection and recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Andres; Panza, Jeffrey; Vijaya Kumar, B. V. K.

    2011-06-01

    Iris recognition is a well-known technique to identify persons. However this technique requires high resolution images in order to automatically segment the iris. In some scenarios obtaining the required resolution may be difficult. In this paper, we investigate the recognition of ocular regions using correlation filters without segmenting the iris region. This method uses the whole eye region and surrounding areas, i.e., the ocular region, for identification. In our experiments we use the recently developed Quadratic Correlation Filter and show that at low resolutions segmentation-free ocular recognition can succeed while iris segmentation fails.

  20. [Penetrating ocular trauma with intraocular foreign body].

    PubMed

    Musat, O; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Gutu, Tatiana; Cristescu, T R; Coman, Corina

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 65 years old pacient which was admitted for the sudden decrease of visual acuity in the left eye, accompanied by ocular pain and conjunctival hiperemia, simptoms appeared after an ocular trauma. After the clinical and paraclinical examination we determined the diagnosis of OS: Penetrating ocular trauma with retention of a foreign body; posttraumatic cataract. Surgical treatement was warrented and we performed OS : Facoemulsification + PFK implant in sulcus + 23 Ga posterior vitrectomy + peeling of the posterior hyaloid membrane + extraction of the foreign body + LASER endofotocoagulation + transscleral cryotherapy + SF6 gas injection. The post-operatory evolution was favorable.

  1. Evaluation of Ocular Side Effects in the Patients on Topiramate Therapy for Control of Migrainous Headache

    PubMed Central

    Hesami, Omid; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Moghaddam, Nahid Beladi; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Mokhtari, Sara; Fakhraee, Shahrzad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Topiramate, a sulfa-derivative monosaccharide, is an antiepileptic drug which is administered in the control of migraine. It is reported to cause various ocular side effects such as visual field defect and myopic shift. To investigate the alterations in refractive error, properties of the cornea and changes in the anterior chamber in patients that receive Topiramate for migraine control. Materials and Methods This is a hospital-based, non-interventional, observational study that is conducted at Imam Hossein Hospital, affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology, in collaboration with the department of Ophthalmology. Thirty three consecutive patients with the diagnosis of migraine that were candidate for Topiramate therapy were recruited. Patients with history of ocular trauma or surgery, keratoconus, glaucoma, congenital ocular malformations and any history of unexplained visual loss were excluded. After thorough ophthalmic examination, all the patients underwent central corneal thickness (CCT) measurement, and Pentacam imaging (Scheimpflug camera) at the baseline. Various parameters were extracted and used for analysis. Anterior chamber volume (ACV), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and anterior chamber angle (ACA) measurement was performed. These measurements were repeated on day 30th and 90th after the initiation of Topiramate therapy. According to the normality tests, parameters with normal distribution were analysed using the repeated measures test and the remaining parameters (with non-normal distribution) were analysed using the non-parametric k-sample test. A p-value< 0.05 was considered statistically significant, according to Bonferroni post hoc correction. Results There were 66 eyes of 33 patients under the diagnosis of migrainous headache, that Topiramate was initiated for headache control, included in the study. The mean value of refractive error had a statistically significant myopic change, from −0

  2. Predictability of refraction following immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS) performed under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Guber, Ivo; Rémont, Laurent; Bergin, Ciara

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the predictability of refraction following immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS) performed under general anaesthesia. This is a retrospective review of all ISBCS performed at Kantonsspital Winterthur, Switzerland, between April 2000 and September 2013. The case notes of 250 patients were reviewed. Patients having full refraction reported (110 patients/220 eyes) were included. 210 (95 %) eyes had a straight forward phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation, seven eyes had a planned extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE); three eyes had an intracapsular cataract extraction. Both eyes of 110 patients (64 women, 46 men) with a mean age of 79.0 years, standard deviation (SD) ±11.4 (range 26 to 97 years) were included. Median preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.5 LogMAR in the first eye, the interquartile range (IQR) was [0.4, 1.2]; 0.7 LogMAR in the second eye with IQR [0.4, 1.8]. At one month, the median BCVA was 0.2 LogMAR, IQR [0.1, 0.3] in the first eye, median BCVA was 0.1 LogMAR and IQR [0.0, 0.5] in the second eye. There were 3 eyes (3 %) that lost 3 lines or more in BCVA at one month (control vs. pre-operatively). In all three cases, poor visual acuity had been recorded pre-operatively (>1 LogMAR). Achieved refraction was within ±1.0 D of the target in 83 % of eyes. There were only 5 % (n = 6) of cases where if delayed sequential bilateral extraction had been performed could potentially intraocular lens (IOL) choice have been adjusted, in four of these cases, target refraction was within ±1.0 D in the second eye. ISBCS performed under general anaesthesia achieves target refraction in 83 % of eyes after consideration of complications, ocular co-morbidities and systemic restrictions. In the majority of cases where IOL power calculation could be considered, the achieved refraction of the second surgical eye was within ±1.0 D of intended refraction. This undermines the

  3. Visually-Driven Ocular Growth in Mice Requires Functional Rod Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Han na; Jabbar, Seema B.; Tan, Christopher C.; Sidhu, Curran S.; Abey, Jane; Aseem, Fazila; Schmid, Gregor; Iuvone, P. Michael; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Proper refractive eye growth depends on several features of the visual image and requisite retinal pathways. In this study, we determined the contribution of rod pathways to normal refractive development and form deprivation (FD) myopia by testing Gnat1−/− mice, which lack functional rods due to a mutation in rod transducin-α. Methods. Refractive development was measured in Gnat1−/− (n = 30–36) and wild-type (WT) mice (n = 5–9) from 4 to 12 weeks of age. FD was induced monocularly from 4 weeks of age using head-mounted diffuser goggles (Gnat1−/−, n = 9–10; WT, n = 7–8). Refractive state and ocular biometry were obtained weekly using a photorefractor, 1310 nm optical coherence tomography, and partial coherence interferometry. We measured retinal dopamine and its metabolite, DOPAC, using HPLC. Results. During normal development, the refractions of WT mice started at 5.36 ± 0.68 diopters (D) and became more hyperopic before plateauing at 7.78 ± 0.64 D. In contrast, refractions in Gnat1−/− mice were stable at 7.39 ± 1.22 D across all ages. Three weeks of FD induced a 2.54 ± 0.77 D myopic shift in WT mice, while Gnat1−/− mice did not respond to FD at any age. Axial lengths of Gnat1−/− and WT mice increased with age, but differences between genotypes or with goggling did not reach statistical significance and fell within the precision of the instruments. The DOPAC levels were significantly lower in Gnat1−/− mice from 2 to 12 weeks of age with DOPAC/dopamine ratio peaking earlier in Gnat1−/− compared to WT mice. No differences in dopamine were seen in response to FD or between genotypes. Conclusions. Functional rod photoreceptors are critical to normal refractive development and the response to FD in mice. Dopamine levels may not directly modulate the refractive state of the mouse eye, but tonic levels of dopamine during development may determine susceptibility to myopia. PMID:25183765

  4. Electromagnetic waves: Negative refraction by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    2004-03-01

    Recently left-handed materials (LHM) attracted great attention since these materials exhibit negative effective index, which is due to simultaneously negative permeability and permittivity. Pendry proposed that negative effective index in left-handed materials can be used for constructing a perfect lens, which is not limited by diffraction(J. B. Pendry, Negative refraction makes a perfect lens, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 85, 3966 (2000)). Negative refraction is also achievable in a dielectric photonic crystal (PC) that has a periodically modulated positive permittivity and a permeability of unity. Luo et al. has studied negative refraction and subwavelength imaging in photonic crystals(C. Luo, S. G. Johnson, J. D. Joannopoulos, J. B. Pendry, Subwavelength Imaging in Photonic Crystals Phys. Rev. B 68, 045115 (2003)). In this presentation, we report our experimental and theoretical investigation of negative refraction and subwavelength focusing of electromagnetic waves in a 2D PC. Our structure consists of a square array of dielectric rods in air. Transmission measurements are performed for experimentally verifying the predicted negative refraction behavior in our structure. Negative index of refraction determined from the experiment is -1.94 which is very close to the theoretical value of -2.06. Negative refraction is observed for the incidence angles of > 20°(Ertugrul Cubukcu, Koray Aydin, Ekmel Ozbay, S. Foteinopolou, and Costas Soukoulis, Negative Refraction by Photonic Crystals, Nature, vol. 423, 604 (2003)). Since we know the optimum frequency for a broad angle negative refraction, we can use our crystal to test the superlensing effect that was predicted for negative refractive materials. Scanning transmission measurement technique is used to measure the spatial power distribution of the focused electromagnetic waves that radiate from a point source. Full width at half maximum of the focused beam is measured to be 0.21λ, which is in good agreement with the finite

  5. Iris color and associated pathological ocular complications: a review of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong-Peng; Lin, Yi; Pan, Chen-Wei

    2014-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the associations of iris color with major eye diseases. METHODS A systematic search on Medline with coverage up to August 2013 was conducted. Assessment of the quality of studies based on their levels of evidence was in accordance with the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Oxford, United Kingdom. RESULTS A relationship between darker iris color and an increased risk of age-related cataract has been reported from cross-sectional studies and prospective cohort studies. There was no consistent evidence supporting a major role of iris color in the development or progression of age-related macular degeneration. The association of iris color with ocular uveal melanoma has been confirmed by a meta-analysis of observational studies previously. The etiologic synergism between light iris color and environmental exposure such as UV the exposure of UV radiation was found. There were no studies evaluating the refractive associations with iris color but there may be a possible link between iris color and myopia. CONCLUSION Darker iris color is associated with an increased risk of cataract and a reduced risk of ocular uveal melanoma. The association of iris color with age-related macular degeneration is not confirmed. Ophthalmologists should be aware that the risk of ocular disorders appears to vary by differences in iris color. PMID:25349810

  6. Ocular Health and Safety Assessment among Mechanics of the Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Abu, Emmanuel Kwasi; Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Opuni, Prince Quarcoo; Kyei, Samuel; Owusu-Ansah, Andrew; Darko-Takyi, Charles

    2016-01-01

    To conduct an ocular health and safety assessment among mechanics in the Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana. This descriptive cross sectional study included 500 mechanics using multistage sampling. All participants filled a structured questionnaire on demographic data, occupational history and ocular health history. Study participants underwent determination of visual acuity (VA) using LogMAR chart, external eye examination with a handheld slit lamp biomicroscope, dilated fundus examination, applanation tonometry and refraction. Out of 500 mechanics, 433 were examined (response rate, 87%) comprised of 408 (94.2%) male and 25 (5.8%) female subjects. The prevalence of visual impairment (i.e. presenting VA < 6/18) among the respondents was 2.1%. Eye injuries were reported in 171 (39.5%) mechanics probably due to the large number of workers, 314 (72.5%), who did not use eye protective devices. Mechanics in the auto welding category were at the highest risk of sustaining an eye injury (odds ratio [OR], 13.4; P < 0.001). Anterior segment ocular disorders were mostly pterygia while posterior segment eye disorders included glaucoma suspects and retinochoroidal lesions. The development of pterygia was associated with the number of years a mechanic stayed on the job. Eye care seeking behavior among the participants was poor. Eye injuries were prevalent among the mechanics as the use of eye protection was low. Eye safety should be made an integral part of the public health agenda in the Cape Coast Metropolis.

  7. Bilateral symmetry in vision and influence of ocular surgical procedures on binocular vision: A topical review.

    PubMed

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the role of bilateral symmetry in enhancing binocular visual ability in human eyes, and further explore how efficiently bilateral symmetry is preserved in different ocular surgical procedures. The inclusion criterion for this review was strict relevance to the clinical questions under research. Enantiomorphism has been reported in lower order aberrations, higher order aberrations and cone directionality. When contrast differs in the two eyes, binocular acuity is better than monocular acuity of the eye that receives higher contrast. Anisometropia has an uncommon occurrence in large populations. Anisometropia seen in infancy and childhood is transitory and of little consequence for the visual acuity. Binocular summation of contrast signals declines with age, independent of inter-ocular differences. The symmetric associations between the right and left eye could be explained by the symmetry in pupil offset and visual axis which is always nasal in both eyes. Binocular summation mitigates poor visual performance under low luminance conditions and strong inter-ocular disparity detrimentally affects binocular summation. Considerable symmetry of response exists in fellow eyes of patients undergoing myopic PRK and LASIK, however the method to determine whether or not symmetry is maintained consist of comparing individual terms in a variety of ad hoc ways both before and after the refractive surgery, ignoring the fact that retinal image quality for any individual is based on the sum of all terms. The analysis of bilateral symmetry should be related to the patients' binocular vision status. The role of aberrations in monocular and binocular vision needs further investigation.

  8. Ocular Health and Safety Assessment among Mechanics of the Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Abu, Emmanuel Kwasi; Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Opuni, Prince Quarcoo; Kyei, Samuel; Owusu-Ansah, Andrew; Darko-Takyi, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct an ocular health and safety assessment among mechanics in the Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana. Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study included 500 mechanics using multistage sampling. All participants filled a structured questionnaire on demographic data, occupational history and ocular health history. Study participants underwent determination of visual acuity (VA) using LogMAR chart, external eye examination with a handheld slit lamp biomicroscope, dilated fundus examination, applanation tonometry and refraction. Results: Out of 500 mechanics, 433 were examined (response rate, 87%) comprised of 408 (94.2%) male and 25 (5.8%) female subjects. The prevalence of visual impairment (i.e. presenting VA < 6/18) among the respondents was 2.1%. Eye injuries were reported in 171 (39.5%) mechanics probably due to the large number of workers, 314 (72.5%), who did not use eye protective devices. Mechanics in the auto welding category were at the highest risk of sustaining an eye injury (odds ratio [OR], 13.4; P < 0.001). Anterior segment ocular disorders were mostly pterygia while posterior segment eye disorders included glaucoma suspects and retinochoroidal lesions. The development of pterygia was associated with the number of years a mechanic stayed on the job. Eye care seeking behavior among the participants was poor. Conclusion: Eye injuries were prevalent among the mechanics as the use of eye protection was low. Eye safety should be made an integral part of the public health agenda in the Cape Coast Metropolis. PMID:27195090

  9. Is an objective refraction optimised using the visual Strehl ratio better than a subjective refraction?

    PubMed

    Hastings, Gareth D; Marsack, Jason D; Nguyen, Lan Chi; Cheng, Han; Applegate, Raymond A

    2017-05-01

    To prospectively examine whether using the visual image quality metric, visual Strehl (VSX), to optimise objective refraction from wavefront error measurements can provide equivalent or better visual performance than subjective refraction and which refraction is preferred in free viewing. Subjective refractions and wavefront aberrations were measured on 40 visually-normal eyes of 20 subjects, through natural and dilated pupils. For each eye a sphere, cylinder, and axis prescription was also objectively determined that optimised visual image quality (VSX) for the measured wavefront error. High contrast (HC) and low contrast (LC) logMAR visual acuity (VA) and short-term monocular distance vision preference were recorded and compared between the VSX-objective and subjective prescriptions both undilated and dilated. For 36 myopic eyes, clinically equivalent (and not statistically different) HC VA was provided with both the objective and subjective refractions (undilated mean ± S.D. was -0.06 ± 0.04 with both refractions; dilated was -0.05 ± 0.04 with the objective, and -0.05 ± 0.05 with the subjective refraction). LC logMAR VA provided by the objective refraction was also clinically equivalent and not statistically different to that provided by the subjective refraction through both natural and dilated pupils for myopic eyes. In free viewing the objective prescription was preferred over the subjective by 72% of myopic eyes when not dilated. For four habitually undercorrected high hyperopic eyes, the VSX-objective refraction was more positive in spherical power and VA poorer than with the subjective refraction. A method of simultaneously optimising sphere, cylinder, and axis from wavefront error measurements, using the visual image quality metric VSX, is described. In myopic subjects, visual performance, as measured by HC and LC VA, with this VSX-objective refraction was found equivalent to that provided by subjective refraction, and was typically preferred

  10. Linkage Analysis of Quantitative Refraction and Refractive Errors in the Beaver Dam Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Priya; Lee, Kristine E.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Klein, Ronald; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Refraction, as measured by spherical equivalent, is the need for an external lens to focus images on the retina. While genetic factors play an important role in the development of refractive errors, few susceptibility genes have been identified. However, several regions of linkage have been reported for myopia (2q, 4q, 7q, 12q, 17q, 18p, 22q, and Xq) and for quantitative refraction (1p, 3q, 4q, 7p, 8p, and 11p). To replicate previously identified linkage peaks and to identify novel loci that influence quantitative refraction and refractive errors, linkage analysis of spherical equivalent, myopia, and hyperopia in the Beaver Dam Eye Study was performed. Methods. Nonparametric, sibling-pair, genome-wide linkage analyses of refraction (spherical equivalent adjusted for age, education, and nuclear sclerosis), myopia and hyperopia in 834 sibling pairs within 486 extended pedigrees were performed. Results. Suggestive evidence of linkage was found for hyperopia on chromosome 3, region q26 (empiric P = 5.34 × 10−4), a region that had shown significant genome-wide evidence of linkage to refraction and some evidence of linkage to hyperopia. In addition, the analysis replicated previously reported genome-wide significant linkages to 22q11 of adjusted refraction and myopia (empiric P = 4.43 × 10−3 and 1.48 × 10−3, respectively) and to 7p15 of refraction (empiric P = 9.43 × 10−4). Evidence was also found of linkage to refraction on 7q36 (empiric P = 2.32 × 10−3), a region previously linked to high myopia. Conclusions. The findings provide further evidence that genes controlling refractive errors are located on 3q26, 7p15, 7p36, and 22q11. PMID:21571680

  11. Linkage analysis of quantitative refraction and refractive errors in the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Klein, Alison P; Duggal, Priya; Lee, Kristine E; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Klein, Ronald; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Klein, Barbara E K

    2011-07-13

    Refraction, as measured by spherical equivalent, is the need for an external lens to focus images on the retina. While genetic factors play an important role in the development of refractive errors, few susceptibility genes have been identified. However, several regions of linkage have been reported for myopia (2q, 4q, 7q, 12q, 17q, 18p, 22q, and Xq) and for quantitative refraction (1p, 3q, 4q, 7p, 8p, and 11p). To replicate previously identified linkage peaks and to identify novel loci that influence quantitative refraction and refractive errors, linkage analysis of spherical equivalent, myopia, and hyperopia in the Beaver Dam Eye Study was performed. Nonparametric, sibling-pair, genome-wide linkage analyses of refraction (spherical equivalent adjusted for age, education, and nuclear sclerosis), myopia and hyperopia in 834 sibling pairs within 486 extended pedigrees were performed. Suggestive evidence of linkage was found for hyperopia on chromosome 3, region q26 (empiric P = 5.34 × 10(-4)), a region that had shown significant genome-wide evidence of linkage to refraction and some evidence of linkage to hyperopia. In addition, the analysis replicated previously reported genome-wide significant linkages to 22q11 of adjusted refraction and myopia (empiric P = 4.43 × 10(-3) and 1.48 × 10(-3), respectively) and to 7p15 of refraction (empiric P = 9.43 × 10(-4)). Evidence was also found of linkage to refraction on 7q36 (empiric P = 2.32 × 10(-3)), a region previously linked to high myopia. The findings provide further evidence that genes controlling refractive errors are located on 3q26, 7p15, 7p36, and 22q11.

  12. Factors influencing prevalence of vision and ocular abnormalities among Jewish and Arab Israeli schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Ore, Liora; Garozli, Hanna J; Schwartz, Naama; Cohen-Dar, Michal

    2014-09-01

    The detection and correction of refractive errors is one of the priorities of the World Health Organization Initiative Vision 2020. To determine the factors related to ocular abnormalities (poor vision, refractive error or other abnormality) among schoolchildren in northern Israel. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted among 2113 students aged 6-7 and 13-14 years old in 70 schools in northern Israel. Medical examination included vision history, clinical eye examination and vision testing. If a parent's informed consent was available, eye drops (cycloplegia) were delivered for fundus and retinoscopy testing. An ophthalmologist was asked to determine the need for the child's referral for further diagnostic procedures, treatment and/or follow-up. Multivariate analysis was limited to 1708 children, using data pertaining to the ophthalmologist's decision regarding referral, as well as vision and retinoscopy results. Vision and/or ocular abnormality was prevalent in 21.5% (95% confidence interval 17.4-26.6%), predominantly among 13-14 year olds and Jewish children. Abnormal clinical findings were found in 5.7% of the students. Retinoscopy showed a higher prevalence of hypermetropia among 6-7 year olds and a higher prevalence of myopia and astigmatism among the 13-14 year olds. The multivariate analysis suggests an independent effect of retinoscopy abnormality (odds ratio = 3.85), vision abnormality (OR = 2.42), Jewish ethnicity (OR = 1.62) and 13-14 year old age group (OR = 1.26) on the ophthalmologist's referral decision. Vision and/or ocular abnormality is an important health problem among schoolchildren in northern Israel. The independent effect of ethnicity and age on the ophthalmologist's referral decision should be further explored.

  13. Errors Associated with IOLMaster Biometry as a Function of Internal Ocular Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela; López-Gil, Norberto; Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the error in the estimation of axial length (AL) with the IOLMaster partial coherence interferometry (PCI) biometer and obtain a correction factor that varies as a function of AL and crystalline lens thickness (LT). Methods Optical simulations were produced for theoretical eyes using Zemax-EE software. Thirty-three combinations including eleven different AL (from 20 mm to 30 mm in 1 mm steps) and three different LT (3.6 mm, 4.2 mm and 4.8 mm) were used. Errors were obtained comparing the AL measured for a constant equivalent refractive index of 1.3549 and for the actual combinations of indices and intra-ocular dimensions of LT and AL in each model eye. Results In the range from 20 mm to 30 mm AL and 3.6–4.8 mm LT, the instrument measurements yielded an error between −0.043 mm and +0.089 mm. Regression analyses for the three LT condition were combined in order to derive a correction factor as a function of the instrument measured AL for each combination of AL and LT in the theoretical eye. Conclusions The assumption of a single “average” refractive index in the estimation of AL by the IOLMaster PCI biometer only induces very small errors in a wide range of combinations of ocular dimensions. Even so, the accurate estimation of those errors may help to improve accuracy of intra-ocular lens calculations through exact ray tracing, particularly in longer eyes and eyes with thicker or thinner crystalline lenses. PMID:24766863

  14. Measuring wearing times of glasses and ocular patches using a thermosensor device from orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Januschowski, Kai; Bechtold, Till E; Schott, Timm C; Huelber-Januschowski, Maren S; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Besch, Dorothea; Schramm, Charlotte

    2013-12-01

    Amblyopia is one of the most common visual disorders in children. The risk of severe visual impairment on the healthy eye is doubled in patients with amblyopia. If detected early enough, the chances of visual rehabilitation are good. Treatment consists of refractive correction and occlusion of the dominant eye. Patient compliance is an important factor and can be monitored using thermosensors. It was the goal of our study to give proof of the principle that the wearing times of glasses and patches can be measured using a comparatively small and commercially available microsensor. Agreement between wearing times protocols of ocular patching/refractive correction and temperature measurements of thermosensors attached to the patches or glasses of three individuals were analysed using the Bland-Altman method. It was also analysed whether blinded persons could distinguish between temperature curves of patches and glasses, or temperature curves of an incubator or while worn in a pocket. The temperatures picked up by the microsensors indicate the beginning and the end wearing times of either glasses or ocular patches through steep temperature difference and a distinct temperature curve during measurements. Although blinded test persons were able to cleary distinguish between temperature profiles from incubator/pocket measurements compared to glasses/patching, glasses and patching curves could be discriminated correctly in only 50%. Differences between wearing time protocols and temperature measurements were within the limits of agreement as stated by the Bland-Altman plots. The TheraMon(®) microsensor can reliably measure wearing times of glasses and ocular patches without making the wearer uncomfortable, although the data are not unquestionable, especially in higher surrounding temperatures. Further studies on a larger number of individuals with different wearing profiles are needed. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons

  15. Ocular biometry in an urban Indian population: the Singapore Indian Eye Study (SINDI).

    PubMed

    Pan, Chen-Wei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Chang, Lan; Lin, Xiao-Yu; Lavanya, Raghavan; Zheng, Ying-Feng; Kok, Yee-Onn; Wu, Ren-Yi; Aung, Tin; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2011-08-22

    PURPOSE. To describe the distribution and determinants of ocular biometric parameters in adult Singapore Indians. METHODS. A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted on 3400 Indians aged 40 to 83 years residing in Singapore. Ocular components including axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and corneal radius (CR) were measured by partial coherence interferometry. Refraction was recorded in spherical equivalent (SE). RESULTS. After 502 individuals with previous cataract surgery were excluded, ocular biometric data on 2785 adults were analyzed. The mean AL, ACD, and CR were 23.45 ± 1.10, 3.15 ± 0.36, and 7.61 ± 0.26 mm, respectively. The mean AL/CR ratio was 3.08 ± 0.13. The mean AL was 23.53, 23.49, 23.35, and 23.25 mm in 40- to 49-, 50- to 59-, 60- to 69-, and 700 to 83-year age groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Men had significantly longer ALs than women (23.68 mm versus 23.23 mm, P < 0.001). In multivariate linear regression models, AL was found to be longer in adults who were taller (P < 0.001), better educated (University, P < 0.001), and more apt to spend time reading (P < 0.001). Increasing CR was associated with increasing height (P = 0.008). AL was the strongest determinant for refraction in all age groups, whereas lens nuclear opacity was a predictor in adults aged 60 to 83 years. CONCLUSIONS. The AL in Indians living in Singapore was similar to that of Malays in Singapore, but longer than that of Indians living in India. Time spent reading, height, and educational level were the strongest determinants of AL. AL was the strongest predictor of SE in all age groups.

  16. Errors associated with IOLMaster biometry as a function of internal ocular dimensions.

    PubMed

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela; López-Gil, Norberto; Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the error in the estimation of axial length (AL) with the IOLMaster partial coherence interferometry (PCI) biometer and obtain a correction factor that varies as a function of AL and crystalline lens thickness (LT). Optical simulations were produced for theoretical eyes using Zemax-EE software. Thirty-three combinations including eleven different AL (from 20mm to 30mm in 1mm steps) and three different LT (3.6mm, 4.2mm and 4.8mm) were used. Errors were obtained comparing the AL measured for a constant equivalent refractive index of 1.3549 and for the actual combinations of indices and intra-ocular dimensions of LT and AL in each model eye. In the range from 20mm to 30mm AL and 3.6-4.8mm LT, the instrument measurements yielded an error between -0.043mm and +0.089mm. Regression analyses for the three LT condition were combined in order to derive a correction factor as a function of the instrument measured AL for each combination of AL and LT in the theoretical eye. The assumption of a single "average" refractive index in the estimation of AL by the IOLMaster PCI biometer only induces very small errors in a wide range of combinations of ocular dimensions. Even so, the accurate estimation of those errors may help to improve accuracy of intra-ocular lens calculations through exact ray tracing, particularly in longer eyes and eyes with thicker or thinner crystalline lenses. Copyright © 2013 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Ocular manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Silpa-archa, Sukhum; Lee, Joan J; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can involve many parts of the eye, including the eyelid, ocular adnexa, sclera, cornea, uvea, retina and optic nerve. Ocular manifestations of SLE are common and may lead to permanent blindness from the underlying disease or therapeutic side effects. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca is the most common manifestation. However, vision loss may result from involvement of the retina, choroid and optic nerve. Ocular symptoms are correlated to systemic disease activity and can present as an initial manifestation of SLE. The established treatment includes prompt systemic corticosteroids, steroid-sparing immunosuppressive drugs and biological agents. Local ocular therapies are options with promising efficacy. The early recognition of disease and treatment provides reduction of visual morbidity and mortality.

  18. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon.

  19. Clinical Features and Treatment of Ocular Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by the infection with Toxoplasma gondii through congenital or acquired routes. Once the parasite reaches the retina, it proliferates within host cells followed by rupture of the host cells and invasion into neighboring cells to make primary lesions. Sometimes the restricted parasite by the host immunity in the first scar is activated to infect another lesion nearby the scar. Blurred vision is the main complaint of ocular toxoplasmic patients and can be diagnosed by detection of antibodies or parasite DNA. Ocular toxoplasmosis needs therapy with several combinations of drugs to eliminate the parasite and accompanying inflammation; if not treated it sometimes leads to loss of vision. We describe here clinical features and currently available chemotherapy of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:24039281

  20. Ocular Health (OH) Ultrasound 2 Scan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-06

    Astronaut Karen Nyberg,Expedition 37 flight engineer, assisted by astronaut Chris Cassidy, performs an Ocular Health (OH) Ultrasound 2 scan in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  1. Ocular lesions in free-living raptors.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C J; Kern, T J; McKeever, K; McKeever, L; MacCoy, D

    1982-12-01

    In a retrospective study, records of 931 raptors admitted to the Avian Clinic at the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine and to the Owl Rehabilitation Research Foundation were evaluated to determine the prevalence, cause, and distribution of ocular lesions. Some form of ocular lesion was identified in 135 (14.5%) birds. Of these, 90% were the result of physical injury. Collisions accounted for 33% of ocular lesions; gunshot wounds accounted for 11%. Unilateral lesions were more common than bilateral lesions, with the anterior segment being most frequently involved. Hyphema was the most common clinical finding. In a prospective study involving raptors admitted to the Avian Clinic from 1980-1982, it was found that 17 of 61 birds (28%) had some form of ocular lesion. The higher prevalence in this study was attributed to a lower proportion of juvenile cases and to increased detection of subtle lesions, especially those involving the posterior segment.

  2. Ocular morbidity in leprosy patients with lagophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Khandpur, S; Robertson, S J; Rao, P S S

    2009-01-01

    Lagophthalmos is a well known complication in leprosy due to the involvement of seventh cranial nerve resulting in incomplete closure of the eyelids. The real magnitude of ocular morbidity as a consequence of lagophthalmos is unknown, as several ocular complications can occur independently due to involvement of the fifth (trigeminal) nerve or due to secondary infection. Therefore, a study was designed to carefully examine the eyes of 100 consecutive leprosy patients with lagophthalmos seeking treatment at a leprosy referral centre in Delhi. Among the eyes examined, 145 had lagophthalmos. The symptomatology and anterior-posterior chamber morbidity in eyes with lagophthalmos were significantly higher as compared to unaffected eyes. Significantly, higher morbidity was seen regardless of sex or type of leprosy or deformity. Capacity building of the health professionals regarding ocular morbidity and increased emphasis on the importance of self care among patients can significantly reduce ocular morbidity.

  3. [Ocular hypertension after surgery for retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachement, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who develop increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  4. Ocular Complications of Diabetes and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Lee, Darren J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease defined by elevated blood glucose (BG). DM is a global epidemic and the prevalence is anticipated to continue to increase. The ocular complications of DM negatively impact the quality of life and carry an extremely high economic burden. While systemic control of BG can slow the ocular complications they cannot stop them, especially if clinical symptoms are already present. With the advances in biodegradable polymers, implantable ocular devices can slowly release medication to stop, and in some cases reverse, diabetic complications in the eye. In this review we discuss the ocular complications associated with DM, the treatments available with a focus on localized treatments, and what promising treatments are on the horizon. PMID:27119078

  5. Significant Axial Elongation with Minimal Change in Refraction in 3- to 6-Year-Old Chinese Preschoolers: The Shenzhen Kindergarten Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinxing; Fu, Min; Ding, Xiaohu; Morgan, Ian G; Zeng, Yangfa; He, Mingguang

    2017-07-13

    To document the distribution of ocular biometry and to evaluate its associations with refraction in a group of Chinese preschoolers. Population-based cross-sectional study. A total of 1133 preschoolers 3 to 6 years of age from 8 representative kindergartens. Biometric measurements including axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and corneal radius of curvature (CR) were obtained from partial-coherence laser interferometry (IOL Master; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Oberkochen, Germany) before cycloplegia. Lens power (LP) and AL-to-CR ratio were calculated. Cycloplegic refraction (3 drops of 1% cyclopentolate) was measured using an autorefractor (KR8800; Topcon Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and spherical equivalent refraction (SER) was calculated. Biometric and refractive parameters were assessed as a function of age and gender. Multiple regression analysis was performed to explore the associations between refraction and ocular biometry. Ocular biometric distributions and their relationships to refraction. Among the 1127 children (99.5%) with successful cycloplegic refraction, mean SER was 1.37±0.63 diopters (D). Prevalence of myopia increased from 0% at 3 years of age to 3.7% (95% confidence interval, 1.0%-6.5%) at 6 years of age. Biometric parameters followed Gaussian distributions with means of 22.39±0.68 mm for AL, 7.79±0.25 mm for CR, and 24.61±1.42 D for calculated LP; and non-Gaussian distributions with means of 3.34±0.24 mm for ACD and 2.88±0.06 for AL-to-CR ratio. Axial length, ACD, and AL-to-CR ratio increased from 3 to 6 years of age, CR remained stable, whereas LP declined. Overall, SER declined slightly. For the SER variance, AL explained 18.6% and AL-to-CR ratio explained 39.8%, whereas AL, CR, and LP accounted for 80.0% after adjusting for age and gender. Young Chinese children are predominantly mildly hyperopic, with a low prevalence of myopia by the age of 6 years. An increase of 1 mm in AL was associated with only 0.45 D of myopic change. Decreases in

  6. A history of facial and ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Reisberg, D J; Habakuk, S W

    1990-01-01

    This article traces the history of facial and ocular prosthetics. Creative individuals who have made significant contributions are highlighted and the evolution of techniques and materials is presented. In view of the significance placed upon facial beauty in today's society, it becomes incumbent upon us to recognize the ingenuity and skill of those in the past to gain appreciation for the present state of the art and to provide incentive for improving facial and ocular prosthetic restorations in the future.

  7. Some ocular manifestations of systemic drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Urey, J C

    1991-11-01

    Optometrists are increasingly likely to see patients who use illicit drugs, which may cause ocular signs which mimic other problems. This paper reviews pharmacologic effects on the eye of depressants, hallucinogens, inhalants, marijuana, opiates, and stimulants including amphetamines and cocaine. Drug abusers suffer from AIDS, CMV retinitis, fungal and bacterial endophthalmitis, quinine poisoning and talc retinopathy. The ocular signs and symptoms of these diseases are discussed. The most common presenting complaints in an optometric setting are emphasized.

  8. Ocular axial length and its associations in an adult population of central rural India: the Central India Eye and Medical Study.

    PubMed

    Nangia, Vinay; Jonas, Jost B; Sinha, Ajit; Matin, Arshia; Kulkarni, Maithili; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the normal distribution of axial length of the globe, which is a major measurement of the eye, and its associations with other ocular and systemic parameters. Population-based study. The Central India Eye and Medical Study is a population-based study performed in a rural region of central India. The study comprised 4711 subjects (aged 30+ years) of 5885 eligible individuals (response rate, 80.1%). A detailed ophthalmic and medical examination was performed. The axial length was measured sonographically. Axial length. Axial length measurements were available on 4698 study participants (99.7%). Their mean age was 49.4+/-13.4 years (range, 30-100 years), and the mean refractive error was -0.18+/-1.48 diopters (range, -20.0 to +7.25 diopters). Mean axial length was 22.6+/-0.91 mm (range, 18.22-34.20 mm). In multivariate analysis, axial length was significantly (P<0.001) associated with the systemic parameters of increased age, taller body height, greater body mass index, and higher level of education, and with the ocular parameters of lower best-corrected visual acuity, lower corneal refractive power, deeper anterior chamber, thicker lens, and more myopic spherical power and cylindrical refractive power. Within the highly myopic group, as defined by an axial length that exceeded 26.5 mm, none of these associations (except for the association between axial length and spherical refractive power) were statistically significant (P>0.15) in univariate or multivariate analysis. In a rural population of central India, the mean ocular axial length was 22.6+/-0.91 mm, which was shorter than that of other populations. Axial length was associated with the systemic parameters of increased age, taller body height, greater body mass index, and a higher level of education, and with the ocular parameters of lower best-corrected visual acuity, lower corneal refractive power, deeper anterior chamber, thicker lens, and more myopic spherical and cylindrical refractive power

  9. Antibiotic resistance in ocular bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the eye are common and ophthalmologists are spoilt for choice with a variety of antibiotics available in the market. Antibiotics can be administered in the eye by a number of routes; topical, subconjunctival, subtenon and intraocular. Apart from a gamut of eye drops available, ophthalmologists also have the option of preparing fortified eye drops from parenteral formulations, thereby, achieving high concentrations; often much above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of antibiotics in ocular tissues during therapy. Antibiotic resistance among ocular pathogens is increasing in parallel with the increase seen over the years in bacteria associated with systemic infections. Although it is believed that the rise in resistant ocular bacterial isolates is linked to the rise in resistant systemic pathogens, recent evidence has correlated the emergence of resistant bacteria in the eye to prior topical antibiotic therapy. One would like to believe that either of these contributes to the emergence of resistance to antibiotics among ocular pathogens. Until recently, ocular pathogens resistant to fluoroquinolones have been minimal but the pattern is currently alarming. The new 8-fluoroquinolone on the scene-besifloxacin, is developed exclusively for ophthalmic use and it is hoped that it will escape the selective pressure for resistance because of lack of systemic use. In addition to development of new antibacterial agents, the strategies to halt or control further development of resistant ocular pathogens should always include judicious use of antibiotics in the treatment of human, animal or plant diseases.

  10. Ocular injury rates in college sports.

    PubMed

    Youn, James; Sallis, Robert E; Smith, Gary; Jones, Kirk

    2008-03-01

    To determine the rate of eye injury sustained in 12 college sports in order to assess whether there is a high risk of ocular eye injury in some sports. From the fall of 1990 through the spring of 2006 at an NCAA Division III college, all ocular injuries that occurred while participating in a varsity sport and reported to the training room were retrospectively analyzed to obtain an ocular injury rate per sport. This study included 5921 participants during a 16-yr period. During this time, 10 ocular injuries were sustained in five different sports. Five (50%) occurred while playing men's basketball, one (10%) in women's basketball, two (20%) in men's water polo, one (10%) in baseball, and one (10%) while playing women's soccer. The rate of ocular injury as a result of participation in baseball, basketball, cross-country, football, golf, soccer, swimming and diving, track and field, water polo, softball, or volleyball is very low. Hence, any discussion with athletes regarding the utility of eye protection while participating in any of these sports should focus on the athlete's past ocular history instead of the sport to be played.

  11. [Ocular prosthetics. Fitting, daily use and complications].

    PubMed

    Koch, K R; Trester, W; Müller-Uri, N; Trester, M; Cursiefen, C; Heindl, L M

    2016-02-01

    Ocular prosthetics make a decisive contribution to the functional, esthetic and psychosomatic rehabilitation of patients after ocular extirpation. This article provides an overview of the fitting, daily care and complications of ocular prosthetics. The study comprised a PubMed literature review and own clinical results. Ocular prosthetics made from cryolite glass or perspex can be manufactured and fitted 5-8 weeks after removal of the eye. During this period a conformer is placed within the conjunctival sac in order to prevent scar formation and shrinking of the socket. Artificial eyes can be worn continuously, only interrupted by a short but regular cleaning procedure. Artificial tears and lid hygiene improve the comfort of wearing. Glass prostheses have to be renewed every 1-2 years, while perspex prostheses need to be polished once a year. Complications, such as giant papillary conjunctivitis or blepharoconjunctivitis sicca are facilitated by poor fit, increased age and inappropriate care of the prosthetic device. In the case of socket shrinkage or anophthalmic socket syndrome, surgical interventions are needed to re-enable the use of an artificial eye. Adequate fitting, daily care of ocular prosthetics and therapeutic management of associated complications are mandatory for a durable functional, esthetic and psychosomatic rehabilitation after ocular extirpation.

  12. Ocular genetic disease in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif O

    2013-09-01

    Centered on the Arabian Peninsula, the Middle East encompasses Northern Africa to Western Asia. Primarily Arab and historically tribal, populations from this region often practice customary intrafamilial marriage (consanguinity), intratribal marriage (endogamy), and a preference for many offspring. These social factors increase the frequency of homozygosity, including homozygosity for gene mutation and thus for recessive ocular disease. This review highlights recent studies of ocular genetic disease in the Middle East. Among modern molecular genomic/genetic strategies, homozygosity mapping as a method to guide candidate gene analysis has been a powerful technique for the Middle East. Studies from the region have enhanced our understanding of ocular genetic conditions that are more common worldwide (such as pediatric glaucoma, pediatric cataract, and retinal dystrophy/dysfunction), rare worldwide (such as cornea plana, brittle cornea syndrome, and posterior microphthalmos), and currently only reported on the Arabian Peninsula (such as microcornea with myopic chorioretinal degeneration and telecanthus, familial retinal arterial macroaneurysms, and spherophakia with short stature). For some patients diagnosed with non-syndromic cataract or retinal dystrophy, genomic/genetic analysis uncovered recessive mutation in a syndrome gene and phenotypic reassessment confirmed the presence of the undiagnosed syndrome in the tested patients. Recent studies from the Middle East, many of which employed homozygosity mapping, have improved phenotype-genotype correlations for common and rare ocular genetic disease. In some instances genetic diagnosis revealed an undiagnosed syndrome. Reports of ocular genetic conditions thus far unique to the region have suggested novel ocular developmental pathways.

  13. Gender Differences in Ocular Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Schmidl, Doreen; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Gender medicine has been a major focus of research in recent years. The present review focuses on gender differences in the epidemiology of the most frequent ocular diseases that have been found to be associated with impaired ocular blood flow, such as age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Data have accumulated indicating that hormones have an important role in these diseases, since there are major differences in the prevalence and incidence between men and pre- and post-menopausal women. Whether this is related to vascular factors is, however, not entirely clear. Interestingly, the current knowledge about differences in ocular vascular parameters between men and women is sparse. Although little data is available, estrogen, progesterone and testosterone are most likely important regulators of blood flow in the retina and choroid, because they are key regulators of vascular tone in other organs. Estrogen seems to play a protective role since it decreases vascular resistance in large ocular vessels. Some studies indicate that hormone therapy is beneficial for ocular vascular disease in post-menopausal women. This evidence is, however, not sufficient to give any recommendation. Generally, remarkably few data are available on the role of sex hormones on ocular blood flow regulation, a topic that requires more attention in the future. PMID:24892919

  14. Interferometric Methods of Measuring Refractive Indices and Double-Refraction of Fibres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, A. A.; El-Kader, H. I. Abd

    1986-01-01

    Presents two methods used to measure the refractive indices and double-refraction of fibers. Experiments are described, with one involving the use of Pluta microscope in the double-beam interference technique, the other employing the multiple-beam technique. Immersion liquids are discussed that can be used in the experiments. (TW)

  15. Interferometric Methods of Measuring Refractive Indices and Double-Refraction of Fibres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, A. A.; El-Kader, H. I. Abd

    1986-01-01

    Presents two methods used to measure the refractive indices and double-refraction of fibers. Experiments are described, with one involving the use of Pluta microscope in the double-beam interference technique, the other employing the multiple-beam technique. Immersion liquids are discussed that can be used in the experiments. (TW)

  16. High-frequency ultrasonic arrays for ocular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, M. D.; Kline-Schoder, R. J.; Douville, G. M.; Gagne, J. R.; Morrison, K. T.; Audette, W. E.; Kynor, D. B.

    2007-03-01

    High-resolution ultrasound imaging of the anterior portion of the eye has been shown to provide important information for sizing of intraocular lens implants, diagnosis of pathological conditions, and creation of detailed maps of corneal topography to guide refractive surgery. Current ultrasound imaging systems rely on mechanical scanning of a single acoustic element over the surface of the eye to create the three-dimensional information needed by clinicians. This mechanical scanning process is time-consuming and subject to errors caused by eye movement during the scanning period. This paper describes development of linear ultrasound imaging arrays intended to increase the speed of image acquisition and reduce problems associated with ocular motion. The arrays consist of a linear arrangement of high-frequency transducer elements designed to operate in the 50 - 75 MHz frequency range. The arrays are produced using single-crystal lithium niobate piezoelectric material, thin film electrodes, and epoxy-based acoustic layers. The array elements have been used to image steel test structures and bovine cornea.

  17. Small animal ocular biometry using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Kocaoglu, Omer; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Borja, David; Urs, Raksha; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice

    2010-02-01

    A custom-built OCT system was used to obtain images of the whole mouse eye. We developed a semi-automated segmentation method to detect the boundaries of the anterior and posterior corneal, lens and retinal surfaces as well as the anterior surface of the iris. The radii of curvature of the surfaces were calculated using a conic section fit of each boundary. Image distortions due to refraction of the OCT beam at the successive boundaries were corrected using a ray-tracing algorithm. Corrected ocular distances, radii of curvature of the cornea and lens surfaces, and anterior chamber angle were obtained on 3 C57BL/6J mice. In vivo imaging of the whole eye, segmentation, conic function fits and correction were successful in all three animals. The posterior lens surface of one mouse could not be fit accurately with a conic section. Biometric parameters of C57BL/6J mice compared well with previous published data obtained from histological sections. The study demonstrates the feasibility of quantitative in vivo biometry of mouse models.

  18. Hemi-Retinal Form Deprivation: Evidence for Local Control of Eye Growth and Refractive Development in Infant Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Earl L.; Huang, Juan; Hung, Li-Fang; Blasdel, Terry L.; Humbird, T.L.; Bockhorst, K.H.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether refractive development in primates is mediated by local retinal mechanisms, we examined the effects of hemi-retinal form deprivation on ocular growth and the pattern of peripheral refractions in rhesus monkeys. METHODS Beginning at about 3 weeks of age, 9 infant monkeys were reared wearing monocular diffuser lenses that eliminated form vision in the nasal field (nasal field diffusers, NFD). Control data were obtained from the non-treated fellow eyes, 24 normal monkeys, and 19 monkeys treated with full-field diffusers (FFD). Refractive development was assessed by retinoscopy performed along the pupillary axis and at eccentricities of 15, 30 and 45 deg. Central axial dimensions and eye shape were assessed by A-scan ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. RESULTS Hemi-retinal form deprivation altered refractive development in a regionally selective manner, typically producing myopia in the treated hemi-fields. In particular, 6 of the NFD monkeys exhibited substantial amounts (−1.81 to −9.00 D) of relative myopia in the nasal field that were most obvious at the 15 and 30 deg nasal field eccentricities. The other 3 NFD monkeys exhibited small amounts of relative hyperopia in the treated field. The alterations in peripheral refraction were associated with local, region-specific alterations in vitreous chamber depth in the treated hemi-retina. CONCLUSIONS The effects of form deprivation on refractive development and eye growth in primates are mediated by mechanisms, presumably retinal, that integrate visual signals in a spatially restricted manner and exert their influence locally. PMID:19494197

  19. Choroidal and Retinal Thickness in Children With Different Refractive Status Measured by Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peiyao; Zou, Haidong; Zhu, Jianfeng; Xu, Xun; Jin, Jiali; Chang, Ta Chen; Lu, Lina; Yuan, Hong; Sun, Sifei; Yan, Bo; He, Jiangnan; Wang, Mingjin; He, Xiangui

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the choroidal and retinal thickness in myopic, emmetropic, and hyperopic Chinese children by swept-source longer-wavelength optical coherence tomography. Cross-sectional study. Two-hundred and seventy-six schoolchildren aged 7-13 years underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations, including cycloplegic refraction, and swept-source optical coherence tomography measurements. The thickness of the choroid, retina, ganglion cell layer, and nerve fiber layer were compared among children of different refractive status. The topographic variation and factors related to the thickness of the choroid and retinal layers were analyzed. Compared to emmetropic subjects, those with myopia had a significantly thinner choroid in all regions (P < .01), and hyperopic subjects had a thicker choroid in most regions (P < .05). The myopic retinas were thinner than those of emmetropic or hyperopic subjects in the superior parafoveal and all 4 perifoveal subfields (P < .05), but no other subfields differed significantly among different refractive groups (P > .05). The axial length and refractive diopters were independently related to central foveal choroidal thickness (R(2) = 0.17, P < .01), while age and intraocular pressure were independently associated with central fovea retinal (R(2) = 0.15, P < .01) and ganglion cell layer thicknesses (R(2) = 0.10, P < .01) after adjustment for other systematic and ocular factors. Central foveal choroidal and retinal thickness were unrelated in children of different refractive status (P > .05). Choroidal thickness, but not retinal thickness, correlated closely with axial length and refractive diopters in Chinese children. Choroid thinning occurs before retina thinning early in myopic progression. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Apparent accommodation in pseudophakic eyes with refractive against-the-rule, with-the-rule and minimum astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiya; Hiraoka, Takahiro; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    To compare the magnitude of apparent accommodation in pseudophakic eyes with refractive against-the-rule (ATR), with-the-rule (WTR) and minimum astigmatism. Factors associated with apparent accommodation were also examined in each group. In total, 87 pseudophakic eyes (87 patients) that underwent monofocal intraocular lens (IOL) implantation after uneventful cataract surgery were included. There were 33, 24 and 30 eyes with refractive ATR, WTR and minimum (<0.5 dioptres) astigmatism, respectively. Age, time after surgery, pupil size, corneal and refractive astigmatism, axial length, IOL power, best-corrected visual acuity, corneal multifocality, ocular wavefront aberrations and apparent accommodation without cylindrical correction were compared among the three groups. No significant difference was found in the amount of apparent accommodation between groups. In the ATR group, the amount of apparent accommodation was significantly correlated with pupil size (r=-0.470, p=0.005) and refractive astigmatism (r=0.529, p=0.001). In the WTR group, the amount of apparent accommodation was significantly correlated with coma Zernike term (r=0.409, p=0.047). In the minimum astigmatism group, corneal multifocality was significantly associated with apparent accommodation (r=0.464, p=0.009). There was no significant difference in the average amount of apparent accommodation in pseudophakic eyes with refractive ATR, WTR and minimum astigmatism. However, the factors relevant to apparent accommodation varied depending on the status of postoperative refractive astigmatism. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Keratometry obtained by corneal mapping versus the IOLMaster in the prediction of postoperative refraction in routine cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Dulku, Simon; Smith, Henry B; Antcliff, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    To establish whether simulated keratometry values obtained by corneal mapping (videokeratography) would provide a superior refractive outcome to those obtained by Zeiss IOLMaster (partial coherence interferometry) in routine cataract surgery. Prospective, non-randomized, single-surgeon study set at the The Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK, District General Hospital. Thirty-three patients undergoing routine cataract surgery in the absence of significant ocular comorbidity. Conventional biometry was recorded using the Zeiss IOLMaster. Postoperative refraction was calculated using the SRK/T formula and the most appropriate power of lens implanted. Preoperative keratometry values were also obtained using Humphrey Instruments Atlas Version A6 corneal mapping. Achieved refraction was compared with predicted refraction for the two methods of keratometry after the A-constants were optimized to obtain a mean arithmetic error of zero dioptres for each device. The mean absolute prediction error was 0.39 dioptres (standard deviation 0.29) for IOLMaster and 0.48 dioptres (standard deviation 0.31) for corneal mapping (P = 0.0015). Keratometry readings between the devices were highly correlated by Spearman correlation (0.97). The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated close agreement between keratometers, with a bias of 0.0079 dioptres and 95% limits of agreement of -0.48-0.49 dioptres. The IOLMaster was superior to Humphrey Atlas A6 corneal mapping in the prediction of postoperative refraction. This difference could not have been predicted from the keratometry readings alone. When comparing biometry devices, close agreement between readings should not be considered a substitute for actual postoperative refraction data. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  2. Refractive Secondary Concentrators for Solar Thermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing technologies that utilize solar energy for various space applications including electrical power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces. Common to all of these applications is the need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway to develop the innovative single crystal refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. The refractive secondary offers very high throughput efficiencies (greater than 90%), and when used in combination with advanced primary concentrators, enables very high concentration ratios (10,0(X) to 1) and very high temperatures (greater than 2000 K). Presented is an overview of the refractive secondary concentrator development effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center, including optical design and analysis techniques, thermal modeling capabilities, crystal materials characterization testing, optical coatings evaluation, and component testing. Also presented is a discussion of potential future activity and technical issues yet to be resolved. Much of the work performed to date has been in support of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Thermal Propulsion Program. The many benefits of a refractive secondary concentrator that enable efficient, high temperature thermal propulsion system designs, apply equally well to other solar applications including furnaces and power generation systems such as solar dynamics, concentrated thermal photovoltaics, and thermionics.

  3. Cryogenic Refractive Index of Heraeus Homosil Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of the refractive index of Homosil (Heraeus) over the wavelength range of 0.34-3.16 microns and temperature range of 120-335 K. These measurements were performed by using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at the NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. These measurements were in support of an integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model that was developed for a field-widened Michelson interferometer that is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The cryogenic refractive index measurements were required in order to account for the highly sensitivity performance of the HSRL instrument to changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, thermal expansion, and deformation due to mounting stresses. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index over the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) and dispersion relation (dn/d(lamda)) as a function of wavelength and temperature. Our measurements of Homosil will be compared with measurements of other glasses from the fused silica family studied in CHARMS as well as measurements reported elsewhere in literature.

  4. [Retinal detachment in various myopic refractions].

    PubMed

    Alimanović-Halilović, Emina

    2009-01-01

    The basic aim of this study was to find the group of "critical" myopic refraction with the highest occurrence of retinal detachment. In the study, 180 myopic eyes were analyzed. Upon the targeted ophthalmological anamnesis, definition of the objective refraction, and indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy, we analyzed the distribution of retinal detachment and the area affected in relation to refraction. All the eyes were divided into groups according to the refraction height. Average age of our patients ranged from 48.43 to 51.60 years with SD from 13.88 to 18.45. We did not find a statistically significant difference for a certain age. The study covered 102 (56.6%) male and 78 (43.3%) female patients. The highest occurrence of retinal detachment was found in Refraction Group from 3.5 to 7.49 dsph, total 21 (11.6%). The retinal detachments usually affected 2/4 or 3/4 of the eye fundus surface respectively.

  5. Cryogenic Refractive Index of Heraeus Homosil Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of the refractive index of Homosil (Heraeus) over the wavelength range of 0.343.16 m and temperature range of 120335 K. These measurements were performed by using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at the NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. These measurements were in support of an integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model that was developed for a field-widened Michelson interferometer that is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The cryogenic refractive index measurements were required in order to account for the highly sensitivity performance of the HSRL instrument to changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, thermal expansion, and deformation due to mounting stresses. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index over the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dndT) and dispersion relation (dnd) as a function of wavelength and temperature. Our measurements of Homosil will be compared with measurements of other glasses from the fused silica family studied in CHARMS as well as measurements reported elsewhere in literature.

  6. Ocular microtremor laser speckle metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kalbani, M.; Mihaylova, E.; Collins, N.; Toal, V.; Coakley, D.; Boyle, G.

    2009-02-01

    Ocular Microtremor (OMT) is a continual, high frequency physiological tremor of the eye present in all subjects even when the eye is apparently at rest. OMT causes a peak to peak displacement of around 150nm-2500nm with a broadband frequency spectrum between 30Hz to 120Hz; with a peak at about 83Hz. OMT carries useful clinical information on depth of consciousness and on some neurological disorders. Nearly all quantitative clinical investigations have been based on OMT measurements using an eye contacting piezoelectric probe which has low clinical acceptability. Laser speckle metrology is a candidate for a high resolution, non-contacting, compact, portable OMT measurement technique. However, tear flow and biospeckle might be expected to interfere with the displacement information carried by the speckle. The paper investigates the properties of the scattered speckle of laser light (λ = 632.8nm) from the eye sclera to assess the feasibility of using speckle techniques to measure OMT such as the speckle correlation. The investigation is carried using a high speed CMOS video camera adequate to capture the high frequency of the tremor. The investigation is supported by studies using an eye movement simulator (a bovine sclera driven by piezoelectric bimorphs). The speckle contrast and the frame to frame spatiotemporal variations are analyzed to determine if the OMT characteristics are detectable within speckle changes induced by the biospeckle or other movements.

  7. Cockpit Ocular Recording System (CORS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenheber, Edward; Stokes, James; Lagrossa, Charles; Arnold, William; Dick, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal was the development of a Cockpit Ocular Recording System (CORS). Four tasks were used: (1) the development of the system; (2) the experimentation and improvement of the system; (3) demonstrations of the working system; and (4) system documentation. Overall, the prototype represents a workable and flexibly designed CORS system. For the most part, the hardware use for the prototype system is off-the-shelf. All of the following software was developed specifically: (1) setup software that the user specifies the cockpit configuration and identifies possible areas in which the pilot will look; (2) sensing software which integrates the 60 Hz data from the oculometer and heat orientation sensing unit; (3) processing software which applies a spatiotemporal filter to the lookpoint data to determine fixation/dwell positions; (4) data recording output routines; and (5) playback software which allows the user to retrieve and analyze the data. Several experiments were performed to verify the system accuracy and quantify system deficiencies. These tests resulted in recommendations for any future system that might be constructed.

  8. New observations on ocular onchocerciasis

    PubMed Central

    Rodger, F. C.

    1957-01-01

    The records of 2000 blind or partially blind persons in the onchocerciasis areas of West Africa provided the background information for this report. The author has grouped his material in three sections. The first of these deals with diagnostic methods, and contains the results of skin and conjunctival biopsies, as well as a description of onchocercomas and an estimate of the life-span of Onchocerca adults. Next, the pathogenesis of ocular lesions is discussed in the light of evidence obtained from a series of animal experiments designed to test two theories—namely, the existence of an allergic state and damage by toxins. In the last section, which is devoted to clinical observations, the author demonstrates the existence of a relationship between the posterior segmental lesion and vitamin A deficiency, and shows that punctate corneal opacities result more often from certain virus diseases and malaria than from onchocerciasis. A description follows of various degenerations due to a local nutritional disorder combined with vitamin A deficiency in onchocercal limbitis and anterior uveitis. PMID:13472406

  9. Vision Screening of Ophthalmic Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Eye Care Hospital: Outcomes and ocular healthcare-seeking behaviours.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ruhi A; Souru, Ches; Vaghese, Sejo; Yasir, Ziaul; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate ocular healthcare-seeking behaviours and vision screening outcomes of nursing staff at a tertiary eye care hospital. This study was conducted between April and September 2016 among all 500 nurses employed at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected on age, gender, use of visual aids, the presence of diabetes, a history of refractive surgery and date of last ocular health check-up. Participants were tested using a handheld Spot(™) Vision Screener (Welch Allyn Inc., Skaneateles Falls, New York, USA). A total of 150 nurses participated in the study (response rate: 30.0%). The mean age was 41.2 ± 8.9 years old. Distance spectacles, reading spectacles and both types of spectacles were used by 37 (24.7%), 32 (21.3%) and 10 (6.7%) nurses, respectively. A total of 58 nurses (38.7%) failed the vision screening test. Visual defects were detected for the first time in 13 nurses (8.7%). With regards to regular eye checkups, 77 participants (51.3%) reported acceptable ocular healthcare-seeking behaviours; this factor was significantly associated with age and the use of visual aids (P <0.01 each). A high proportion of participants failed the vision screening tests and only half displayed good ocular healthcare-seeking behaviours. This is concerning as ophthalmic nurses are likely to face fewer barriers to eye care services than the general population.

  10. Systematic analysis of ocular trauma by a new proposed ocular trauma classification.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Bhartendu; Agrawal, Rupesh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Seen, Sophia

    2017-08-01

    The current classification of ocular trauma does not incorporate adnexal trauma, injuries that are attributable to a nonmechanical cause and destructive globe injuries. This study proposes a new classification system of ocular trauma which is broader-based to allow for the classification of a wider range of ocular injuries not covered by the current classification. A clinic-based cross-sectional study to validate the proposed classification. We analyzed 535 cases of ocular injury from January 1, 2012 to February 28, 2012 over a 4-year period in an eye hospital in central India using our proposed classification system and compared it with conventional classification. The new classification system allowed for classification of all 535 cases of ocular injury. The conventional classification was only able to classify 364 of the 535 trauma cases. Injuries involving the adnexa, nonmechanical injuries and destructive globe injuries could not be classified by the conventional classification, thus missing about 33% of cases. Our classification system shows an improvement over existing ocular trauma classification as it allows for the classification of all type of ocular injuries and will allow for better and specific prognostication. This system has the potential to aid communication between physicians and result in better patient care. It can also provide a more authentic, wide spectrum of ocular injuries in correlation with etiology. By including adnexal injuries and nonmechanical injuries, we have been able to classify all 535 cases of trauma. Otherwise, about 30% of cases would have been excluded from the study.

  11. Categorical evaluation of the ocular irritancy of cosmetic and consumer products by human ocular instillation procedures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Kanengiser, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of ocular irritation potential is an important part of safety testing for cosmetic and consumer products. The purpose of this investigation was to examine ocular irritancy levels elicited in humans by various categories of a specific class of cosmetic and consumer products that have a potential to enter the eye inadvertently during use. Test materials assessed belonged to one of seven categories, which included liquid makeup, shampoo, baby wash, mascara, eye makeup remover, powder eye shadow, and facial cleanser. These test materials were evaluated by human ocular instillation, followed by examinations, for which subjective perceptions of irritation were recorded, and component areas of ocular tissues were individually examined for inflammation and for the area and density of fluorescein staining patterns at 30 seconds and at 5, 15, 60, and 120 minutes post-instillation. Subjective and objective ocular irritation scores of 410 eyes were analyzed by product classification. Average score levels were determined for subjective responses, inflammation, and fluorescein staining patterns. This investigation determined that irritation levels of the evaluated test materials varied markedly with respect to product category, type of ocular irritation, and ocular tissue, demonstrating that these factors are important considerations for the prediction of the ocular irritancy of a test material.

  12. Refraction by a spherical nematic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Richard David

    1989-08-01

    A formalism is developed to study refraction by a spherical nematic bubble. It is applicable to bubbles that are larger than light wavelengths, but smaller than the dimensions for excitation of director-fluctuation-induced scattering. The technique yields a nonlinear differential equation and an associated integral which govern the trajectory of a ray inside a nematic region for an arbitrary director configuration. Explicit solutions are provided for five simple interior arrangements-isotropic, onion skin, radial star, horizontal (bottle brush), and vertical. It is then demonstrated that for extraordinary-ordinary refractive-index difference small compared to either, interfacial refraction at the bubble surface is the dominant contribution; deviations from a rectilinear path are small. When ranked in terms of decreasing scattering effectiveness, the sequence is horizontal, onion, isotropic, radial, and vertical if the light is linearly polarized and coupling optimally to the extraordinary index component; for unpolarized incoherent light the order becomes isotropic, horizontal, onion, radial, and vertical.

  13. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  14. Cosmology with a dark refraction index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Kantowski, R.

    2008-08-01

    We review Gordon’s optical metric and the transport equations for the amplitude and polarization of a geometrical optics wave traveling in a gravity field. We apply the theory to the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmologies by associating a refraction index with the cosmic fluid. We then derive an expression for the accumulated effect of a refraction index on the distance-redshift relations and fit the Hubble curve of current supernova observations with a nonaccelerating cosmological model. We also show that some observational effects caused by inhomogeneities, e.g., the Sachs-Wolfe effect, can be interpreted as being caused by an effective index of refraction, and hence this theory could extend to other speed of light communications such as gravitational radiation and neutrino fluxes.

  15. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  16. Fiber optic liquid refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this present work we report fabrication of fiber optic liquid refractive index (RI) measurement sensor based on Michelson Interferometer method. This sensor was assembled by using graded index multimode (MM) fiber with core diameter 50 µm and the cladding of fiber was removed by simple chemical method. To perform this experiment a 2×2 3dB coupler is used. The fiber ends are then immersed in solvent and solution to provide reference and refractive index measurements, respectively. This method was successfully used to measure refractive index of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)-Water solution at different concentrations. The fringe contrast sensitivity of device is 92.90 dB/RIU measured in the RI range from 1.34 to 1.42 which is better than Mach-Zehnder Interferometer sensor [1] and Fabry perot based sensor [2]. The fabrication of sensor is simple, low cost and highly sensitive.

  17. Removing singular refractive indices with sculpted surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Mitchell–Thomas, R. C.; Quevedo–Teruel, O.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of Transformation Optics established the link between geometry and material properties, and has resulted in a degree of control over electromagnetic fields that was previously impossible. For waves confined to a surface it is known that there is a simpler, but related, geometrical equivalence between the surface shape and the refractive index, and here we demonstrate that conventional devices possessing a singularity — that is, the requirement of an infinite refractive index — can be re