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Sample records for refraction profile issa

  1. Auroral interactions with ISSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, Carolyn K.; Snyder, David B.; Jongeward, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    Due to its high inclination orbit, International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) will occasionally experience surface charging by the high energy electrons of the auroral environment. This study looks at the frequency of these occurrences and recapitulates a charging model. ISSA should expect about 80 auoral encounters annually. If the plasma contactor is not run continuously, the vehicle may charge several hundred volts. Charge storage on standard space station coatings should not be a problem, but care must be taken that materials are not introduced inadvertently that cannot bleed off accumulated charge in a reasonable time. A conductivity requirement may be used to ensure surface materials do not charge to high voltages, or store charge for long periods of time.

  2. The SPOrt mission on ISSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortiglioni, S.; Cecchini, S.; Orsini, M.; Boella, G.; Gervasi, M.; Sironi, G.; Fabbri, R.; Monari, J.; Orfei, A.; Ng, K.-W.; Nicastro, L.; Pisani, U.; Tascone, R.; Popa, L.; Strukov, I. A.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the International Space Station (ISSA) utilization a project to measure the sky diffuse polarized emission at microwave frequencies has been presented to the ESA AO. After its selection by ESA the Sky Polarization Observatory (SPOrt) has been slightly modified, within ISSA constrains, to meet better its scientific goal. In this paper the current design of SPOrt is presented with emphasis on changes which have a major impact on the overall performances and that were imposed by the ISSA environment.

  3. Two-dimensional refractive index profiling of optical fibers by modified refractive near-field technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed, A.; Pilz, Soenke; Ryser, Manuel; Romano, Valerio

    2016-02-01

    The refractive index distribution in the core-cladding region of an optical fiber plays an important role in determining the transmission and dispersion properties of the waveguide. The refracted near-field technique (RNF) is among the most widespread techniques used for measuring the refractive index profile of optical fibers and is based on illuminating the end-facet of a fiber with a focused beam whose vertex angle greatly exceeds the acceptance angle of the fiber, which is immersed in an index matching liquid. What one observes are then the refracted unguided rays rather than the guided rays. Nevertheless, the standard refracted near-field technique cannot be applied to a wide range of optical fibers e.g. if their shapes are not axially symmetric. In this work we demonstrate a modified method which allows 2-D imaging of the refractive index profile and thereby overcoming the axial symmetric limitation of the standard RNF. The new system is operating at 630 nm and based on the same principle of the RNF, but the optical path is reversed so that the light at the fiber end-facet is collected by an objective lens and detected by a CCD camera. The method does not require scanning over the fiber end-facet. Thus the system is faster and less sensitive to vibrations and external conditions compared to the standard RNF, furthermore it allows averaging to improve the signal to noise ratio. The spatial resolution of the system is determined by the numerical aperture of the objective and by the resolution of the CCD camera. To calibrate the setup, a reference multi-step index fiber provided by National Physical Laboratory was used.

  4. Two-dimensional refractive index profiling of optical fibers by modified refractive near-field technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed, A.; Pilz, Soenke; Ryser, Manuel; Romano, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    The refractive index distribution in the core-cladding region of an optical fiber plays an important role in determining the transmission and dispersion properties of the waveguide. The refracted near-field technique (RNF) is among the most widespread techniques used for measuring the refractive index profile of optical fibers and is based on illuminating the end-facet of a fiber with a focused beam whose vertex angle greatly exceeds the acceptance angle of the fiber, which is immersed in an index matching liquid. What one observes are then the refracted unguided rays rather than the guided rays. Nevertheless, the standard refracted near-field technique cannot be applied to a wide range of optical fibers e.g. if their shapes are not axially symmetric. In this work we demonstrate a modified method which allows 2-D imaging of the refractive index profile and thereby overcoming the axial symmetric limitation of the standard RNF. The new system is operating at 630 nm and based on the same principle of the RNF, but the optical path is reversed so that the light at the fiber end-facet is collected by an objective lens and detected by a CCD camera. The method does not require scanning over the fiber end-facet. Thus the system is faster and less sensitive to vibrations and external conditions compared to the standard RNF, furthermore it allows averaging to improve the signal to noise ratio. The spatial resolution of the system is determined by the numerical aperture of the objective and by the resolution of the CCD camera. To calibrate the setup, a reference multi-step index fiber provided by National Physical Laboratory was used.

  5. The BHVI-EyeMapper: Peripheral Refraction and Aberration Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C.; Holden, Brien A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Methods Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, −3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (−2.00 to −5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. Results As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p < 0.05) more negative and the profile of M became significantly (p < 0.05) more asymmetric. No significant differences were found for the J45 profiles (p > 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p < 0.05) less asymmetric as accommodation increased, but no differences were found in the curvature. Conclusions The current study showed that significant changes in peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to −5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development. PMID:25105690

  6. Measurement of refractive index profile of non-symmetric, complex silica preforms with high refractive index differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probostova, Jana; Slanicka, Jiri; Mrazek, Jan; Podrazky, Ondrej; Benda, Adam; Peterka, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Refractive index profile measurement is a key instrument for characterization of optical properties of preforms, which are used for drawing of high-quality optical fibers. Common industrial optical preform analyzers have been designed for measurement of simple symmetric structures such as step-index or graded-index preforms with refractive index close to the silica (n=1.457 at 633 nm). However, these conditions are usually far from more complex structures used in fiber lasers or in fiber sensor area. Preforms for the drawing of advanced optical fibers, such as Bragg, microstructure or photonic crystal fibers, are usually constituted from stacks with non-symmetric internal structure or composed of alternating layers with high refractive index contrasts. In this paper we present comparison of refractive index profile measurements of simple as well as complex structures with high refractive index differences simulating the Bragg structures. Commercial Photon Kinetics 2600 preform analyzer was used for the refractive index profile measurements. A set of concentrically arranged silica tubes was welded to form a complex preforms. Free space between the tubes was filled by immersion with varying refractive indices to simulate the Bragg structure. Up to three tubes were used for the analysis and the refractive indices of immersion were changed from 1.4 to 1.5. When refractive index of immersion was independently measured the structure of preform was defined. Profiles of these "known" structures were compared to measured data processed by originally proposed algorithm. The work provides an extension of issues of refractive index profile measurements in non-symmetric complex silica structures by a commercial preform analyzer and proposes more convenient methods of numeric data processing.

  7. Tropospheric Refractivity Profiles Inferred from RF Measurements-Passive Refractive Index by Satellite Monitoring (PRISM).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-24

    238, Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS), Interim User’s Manual , by HV Hitney and RA Paulus, March 1979. 7 Two methods are used by...refractivity, N, as (n-I) X 10’, which has values in the range 0 to 500. For radio frequencies, the refractivity is related to atmospheric tempera - ture...acquisition band, the first local oscillators are manually ad3usted to drive the IF to its nominal 5 kHz. Both first local oscillators (Hewlett Packard

  8. Saudi Arabian seismic deep-refraction profiles; final project report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.; Blank, H.R.; Gettings, M.E.; Kohler, W.M.; Lamson, R.J.; Leone, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    In February 1978 a seismic deep-refraction profile was recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey along a 1000-km line across the Arabian Shield in western Saudi Arabia. The line begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, leads southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan (Tihamat-Asir), and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, including 19 in the Farasan Islands. Six shot points were used: five on land, with most charges placed below the water table in drill holes, and one at sea, with charges placed on the sea floor and detonated from a ship. Slightly more than 61 metric tons of explosives were used in 19 discrete firings. Seismic energy was recorded by 100 newly-developed portable seismic stations deployed in approximately 200 km-long arrays for each firing. Each station consisted of a standard 2-Hz vertical component geophone coupled to a self-contained analog recording instrument equipped with a magnetic-tape cassette. In this final report, we fully document the field and data-processing procedures and present the final seismogram data set as both a digital magnetic tape and as record sections for each shot point. Record sections include a normalized set of seismograms, reduced at 6 km/s, and a true-amplitude set, reduced at 8 km/s, which have been adjusted for amplifier gain, individual shot size, and distance from the shot point. Appendices give recorder station and shot information, digital data set descriptions, computer program listings, arrival times used in the interpretation, and a bibliography of reports published as a result of this project. We used two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques in the data analysis, and our interpretation is based primarily on horizontally layered models. The Arabian Shield is composed, to first-order, of two layers, each about 20 km

  9. International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) Integrated Traffic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses the development process of the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) Integrated Traffic Model which is a subsystem analyses tool utilized in the ISSA design analysis cycles. Fast-track prototyping of the detailed relationships between daily crew and station consumables, propellant needs, maintenance requirements and crew rotation via spread sheets provide adequate benchmarks to assess cargo vehicle design and performance characteristics.

  10. ISSA/TSS power preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A projected power shortfall during the initial utilization flights of the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) has prompted an inquiry into the use of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) to provide station power. The preliminary design of the combined ISSA/TSS system is currently underway in the Preliminary Design Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This document focuses on the justification for using a tether system on space station, the physical principles behind such a system, and how it might be operated to best utilize its capabilities. The basic components of a simple DC generator are a magnet of some type and a conductive wire. Moving the wire through the magnetic field causes forces to be applied to the electric charges in the conductor, and thus current is induced to flow. This simple concept is the idea behind generating power with space-borne tether systems. The function of the magnet is performed by the earth's magnetic field, and orbiting a conductive tether about the earth effectively moves the tether through the field.

  11. Two-dimensional refractive index and stresses profiles of a homogenous bent optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, W A; Wahba, H H; Shams El-Din, M A

    2014-11-01

    We present a significant contribution to the theory of determining the refractive index profile of a bent homogenous optical fiber. In this theory we consider two different processes controlling the index profile variations. The first is the linear index variation due to stress along the bent radius, and the second is the release of this stress on the fiber surface. This release process is considered to have radial dependence on the fiber radius. These considerations enable us to construct the index profile in two dimensions normal to the optical axis, considering the refraction of light rays traversing the fiber. This theory is applied to optical homogenous bent fiber with two bending radii when they are located orthogonal to the light path of the object arm in the holographic setup (like the Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Digital holographic phase shifting interferometry is employed in this study. The recorded phase shifted holograms have been combined, reconstructed, and processed to extract the phase map of the bent optical fiber. A comparison between the extracted optical phase differences and the calculated one indicates that the refractive index profile variation should include the above mentioned two processes, which are considered as a response for stress distribution across the fiber's cross section. The experimentally obtained refractive index profiles provide the stress induced birefringence profile. Thus we are able to present a realistic induced stress profile due to bending.

  12. Fine-scale measurements of microwave refractivity profiles with helicopter and low-cost rocket probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, John R.; Babin, Steven M.

    1987-12-01

    The recent development of computer models that can accurately predict radar performance under ducting or other anomalous propagation conditions has produced a need for high-resolution profiles of microwave refractivity in the lower troposphere. This article contains a brief description of two systems that can make the required meteorological measurements for use in those models. The first system is helicopter-based and has been used for research purposes to verify model performance. The second uses a low-cost rocket to carry a lightweight telemetry package to the desired altitudes. The rocket system shows promise for shipboard use where accurate, high-resolution refractivity profiles near the ocean surface are required.

  13. International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) Integrated Traffic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the development process of the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) Integrated Traffic Model which is a subsystem analyses tool utilized in the ISSA design analysis cycles. Fast-track prototyping of the detailed relationships between daily crew and station consumables, propellant needs, maintenance requirements, and crew rotation via spread sheets provides adequate bench marks to assess cargo vehicle design and performance characteristics.

  14. Reconstruction of fiber grating refractive-index profiles from complex bragg reflection spectra.

    PubMed

    Huang, D W; Yang, C C

    1999-07-20

    Reconstruction of the refractive-index profiles of fiber gratings from their complex Bragg reflection spectra is experimentally demonstrated. The amplitude and phase of the complex reflection spectrum were measured with a balanced Michelson interferometer. By integrating the coupled-mode equations, we built the relationship between the complex coupling coefficient and the complex reflection spectrum as an iterative algorithm for reconstructing the index profile. This method is expected to be useful for reconstructing the index profiles of fiber gratings with any apodization, chirp, or dc structures. An apodized chirped grating and a uniform grating with a depression of index modulation were used to demonstrate the technique.

  15. Airborne GPS radio occultation refractivity profiles observed in tropical storm environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. J.; Haase, J. S.; Muradyan, P.; Garrison, J. L.; Wang, K.-N.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne GPS radio occultation (ARO) data have been collected during the 2010 PRE-Depression Investigation of Cloud systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) experiment. GPS signals received by the airborne Global Navigation Satellite System Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) are used to retrieve vertical profiles of refractivity in the neutral atmosphere. The system includes a conventional geodetic GPS receiver component for straightforward validation of the analysis method in the middle to upper troposphere, and a high-sample rate (10 MHz) GPS recorder for postprocessing complex signals that probe the lower troposphere. The results from the geodetic receivers are presented here. The retrieved ARO profiles consistently agree within ~2% of refractivity profiles calculated from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting model Interim reanalyses as well as from nearby dropsondes and radiosondes. Changes in refractivity obtained from ARO data over the 5 days leading to the genesis of tropical storm Karl are consistent with moistening in the vicinity of the storm center. An open-loop tracking method was implemented in a test case to analyze GPS signals from the GISMOS 10 MHz recording system for comparison with geodetic receiver data. The open-loop mode successfully tracked ~2 km deeper into the troposphere than the conventional receiver and can also track rising occultations, illustrating the benefit from the high-rate recording system. Accurate refractivity retrievals are an important first step toward the future goal of assimilating moisture profiles to improve forecasting of developing storms using this new GPS occultation technique.

  16. Full-field measurement of surface reflectivity using a microscopy for refractive index profiling of GRIN lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Chun-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yen; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Liu, Da-Ren

    2016-10-01

    This paper outlines an improved technique for profiling the refractive index of Graded-index (GRIN) lenses based on the measurements obtained from a reflectivity image. Reflective cross-sectional image of the GRIN lens were compared with a reflectance reference target under illumination at small incidence angles to obtain the full-field refractive index distribution of the GRIN lens quickly and easily.

  17. Ionospheric refraction effects in slant range profiles of auroral HF coherent echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, M. V.; Kustov, A. V.; Sofko, G. J.; Koehler, J. A.; Villain, J. P.; Hanuise, C.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Williams, P. J. S.

    1994-03-01

    The theory of auroral coherent echoes developed for VHF scattering by Uspensky et al. (1988, 1989) is applied to the interpretation of intensity and Doppler velocity slant range profiles of HF radar aurora. The theoretical model includes the effects of irregularity aspect sensitivity, ionospheric refraction of the radar beam, and the reception of signals from different heights. The predicted profiles of HF radar aurora are compared with Schefferville HF radar observations in the frequency interval of 9-18 MHz. Satisfactory agreement is found between theory and experiment for the intensity profiles. However, there are significant discrepancies for the Doppler velocity profiles. We discuss this lack of agreement in light of other recent observations.

  18. Characterization and estimation of refractive index profile of laser-written photopolymer optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinleyici, Mehmet Salih; Sümer, Can

    2011-10-01

    In this study, channel waveguides fabricated in photopolymer films by direct-writing using a low-power CW laser, are used as phase objects in a simple plane-wave diffraction setup, and the refractive index modulation profiles of the waveguides are characterized using the recorded diffraction patterns. Index profiles are modeled by piece-wisely combining two Gaussian functions representing the central and the tail regions. Measured diffraction patterns are matched with patterns generated using the model. This simple model makes it possible to design various channel waveguides embedded into polymer substrates. The proposed model is tested on three distinctive waveguide profiles written on the same Acrylamide/Polyvinyl Alcohol based photopolymer with different exposures.

  19. Vertical profiling of atmospheric refractivity using GPS STD data from a single ground-based station: Simulations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, F.; Dick, G.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Ramatschi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a ray-tracing operator to compute the signal travel time delay due to the neutral atmosphere, known as Slant Total Delay (STD), between a GPS satellite and a ground-based receiving station. Having developed a rapid and precise forward operator we constructed the tangent-linear (adjoint) operator to estimate refractivity in the vicinity of a single station. The refractivity retrievals potentially complement refractivity retrievals from radio occultation data and can be considered a valuable input for Numerical Weather Prediction. In a first experiment (simulation) we study the feasibility for vertical profiling of refractivity using STDs from a single station. The simulation cycle consists of the computation of STDs given a refractivity profile, the addition of noise to mimic observation errors and the retrieval of a refractivity profile from the artificial STDs by a non-linear least-square analysis. Clearly, besides the noise level, the elevation range plays an important role regarding the quality of the refractivity retrieval; near-horizon STDs corrupted by noise allow a significantly better refractivity retrieval than STDs close to the zenith without any noise. The simulation study suggests that near-horizon STDs provide additional information when compared to Zenith Total Delays (ZTDs). In a second experiment (application) we replace the artificial STDs in the simulation by STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations. The procedure is repeated station-by-station for 200 stations in Germany. We do not find a significant benefit from STDs over ZTDs in the retrieved refractivity profile since near-horizon STDs are rarely available and representative errors due to asymmetry are non-negligable. We attempt to mitigate the latter problem by the additional estimation of horizontal gradients, and indeed, we find strong evidence that STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations contain asymmetric information. The former problem still poses a serious limitation

  20. Evaluation of Refractivity Profiles from CHAMP and SAC-C GPS Radio Occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; delaTorreJuarez, Manuel; Hoff, Raymond M.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP and SAC-C missions are the first missions to carry a second-generation 'Blackjack' GPS receiver. One of the new features of this receiver is its ability to sense the lower troposphere closer to the surface than the proof-of-concept GPS/MET 1995 experiment. Since their launch, CHAMP and SAC-C have collected thousands of GPS radio occultations, representing a wealth of measurements available for data assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. In order to evaluate the refractivity data derived by JPL from raw radio occultation measurements, we use Data Assimilation Office (DAO) 6-hour forecasts as an independent state of the atmosphere. We compare CHAMP and SAC-C refractivity (processed by JPL) with refractivity calculated from the DAO global fields of temperature, water vapor content and humidity. We will show statistics of the differences as well as Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of the differences. Depending upon availability of AIRS data, we plan to show individual profile comparisons between GPS radio occultation and AIRS retrievals.

  1. Evaluation of Refractivity Profiles From Champ and SAC-C GPS Radio Occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; delaTorreJuarez, Manuel; Hoff, Raymond M.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP and SAC-C missions are the first missions to carry a second-generation 'Blackjack' GPS receiver. One of the new features of this receiver is its ability to sense the lower troposphere closer to the surface than the proof-of-concept GPS/MET 1995 experiment. Since their launch, CHAMP and SAC-C have collected thousands of GPS radio occultations, representing a wealth of measurements available for data assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. In order to evaluate the refractivity data derived by JPL from raw radio occultation measurements, we use Data Assimilation Office (DAO) shout forecasts as an independent state of the atmosphere. We compare CHAMP and SAC-C refractivity (processed by JPL) with refractivity calculated from the DAO global fields of temperature, water vapor content and humidity. We will show statistics of the differences as well as Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of the differences. Depending upon availability of AIRS data, we plan to show individual profile comparisons between GPS radio occultation and AIRS retrievals.

  2. Spatially resolved refractive index profiles of electrically switchable computer-generated holographic gratings.

    PubMed

    Zito, Gianluigi; Finizio, Andrea; De Nicola, Sergio

    2009-10-12

    We describe a spatially resolved interferometric technique combined with a phase reconstruction method that provides a quantitative two-dimensional profile of the refractive index and spatial distribution of the optical contrast between the on-off states of electrically switchable diffraction gratings as a function of the external electric field. The studied structures are holographic gratings optically written into polymer/liquid crystal composites through single-beam spatial light modulation by means of computer-generated holograms. The electro-optical response of the gratings is also discussed. The diffraction efficiency results to be dependent on the incident light polarization suggesting the possibility to develop polarization dependent switching devices.

  3. Measurement of two dimensional refractive index profiles of channel waveguides using an interferometric technique.

    PubMed

    Oven, R

    2009-10-20

    Two dimensional refractive index profiles of ion exchanged channel waveguides in glass have been measured using an interferometric method. In order to obtain depth data, a shallow bevel is produced in the glass by polishing. A regularization algorithm for the extraction of the phase data from the interferometer image is presented. The method is applied to waveguides formed by the electric field assisted diffusion of Cu+ ions into a borosilicate glass. The index change obtained from the interferometer is in good agreement with that obtained from measurements on planar waveguides.

  4. Thin-film thickness profile and its refractive index measurements by dispersive white-light interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ghim, Young-Sik; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2006-11-27

    As an extension of the authors' previous report of Ref 1, we describe an improved version of dispersive white-light interferometry that enables us to measure the tomographical thickness profile of a thin-film layer through Fourier-transform analysis of spectrally-resolved interference signals. The group refractive index can also be determined without prior knowledge of the geometrical thickness of the film layer. Owing to fast measurement speed with no need of mechanical depth scanning, the proposed method is well suited for in-line 3-D inspection of dielectric thin film layers particularly for the semiconductor and flat-panel display industry.

  5. Ionosphere Profile Estimation Using Ionosonde & GPS Data in an Inverse Refraction Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psiaki, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    A method has been developed to assimilate ionosonde virtual heights and GPS slant TEC data to estimate the parameters of a local ionosphere model, including estimates of the topside and of latitude and longitude variations. This effort seeks to better assimilate a variety of remote sensing data in order to characterize local (and eventually regional and global) ionosphere electron density profiles. The core calculations involve a forward refractive ray-tracing solution and a nonlinear optimal estimation algorithm that inverts the forward model. The ray-tracing calculations solve a nonlinear two-point boundary value problem for the curved ionosonde or GPS ray path through a parameterized electron density profile. It implements a full 3D solution that can handle the case of a tilted ionosphere. These calculations use Hamiltonian equivalents of the Appleton-Hartree magneto-plasma refraction index model. The current ionosphere parameterization is a modified Booker profile. It has been augmented to include latitude and longitude dependencies. The forward ray-tracing solution yields a given signal's group delay and beat carrier phase observables. An auxiliary set of boundary value problem solutions determine the sensitivities of the ray paths and observables with respect to the parameters of the augmented Booker profile. The nonlinear estimation algorithm compares the measured ionosonde virtual-altitude observables and GPS slant-TEC observables to the corresponding values from the forward refraction model. It uses the parameter sensitivities of the model to iteratively improve its parameter estimates in a way the reduces the residual errors between the measurements and their modeled values. This method has been applied to data from HAARP in Gakona, AK and has produced good TEC and virtual height fits. It has been extended to characterize electron density perturbations caused by HAARP heating experiments through the use of GPS slant TEC data for an LOS through the heated

  6. Crustal structure of Yunnan province, People's Republic of China, from seismic refraction profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kan, R.-J.; Hu, H.-X.; Zeng, R.-S.; Mooney, W.D.; McEvilly, T.V.

    1986-01-01

    Seismic refraction, profiles in Yunnan Province, southwestern China, define the crustal structure in an area of active tectonics, on the southern end of the Himalaya-Burma arc. The crustal thickness ranges from 38 to 46 kilometers, and the relatively low mean crustal velocity indicates a crustal composition compatible with normal continental crust and consisting mainly of meta-sedimentary and silicic intrusive rocks, with little mafic or ultramafic component. This composition suggests a crustal evolution involving sedimentary processes on the flank of the Yangtze platform rather than the accretion of oceanic island arcs, as has been proposed. An anomalously low upper-mantle velocity observed on one profile, but not on another at right angles to it may indicate active tectonic processes in the mantle or seismic anisotropy.

  7. Crustal Structure of Yunnan Province, People's Republic of China, from Seismic Refraction Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kan, R J; Hu, H X; Zeng, R S; Mooney, W D; McEvilly, T V

    1986-10-24

    Seismic refraction, profiles in Yunnan Province, southwestern China, define the crustal structure in an area of active tectonics on the southern end of the Himalaya-Burma arc. The crustal thickness ranges from 38 to 46 kilometers, and the relatively low mean crustal velocity indicates a crustal composition compatible with normal continental crust and consisting mainly of meta-sedimentary and silicic intrusive rocks, with little mafic or ultramafic component. This composition suggests a crustal evolution involving sedimentary processes on the flank of the Yangtze platform rather than the accretion of oceanic island arcs, as has been proposed. An anomalously low upper-mantle velocity observed on one profile but not on another at right angles to it may indicate active tectonic processes in the mantle or seismic anisotropy.

  8. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2007-07-01

    A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF), enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL) for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02)-i0.017(±0.003) at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH) profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  9. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2008-02-01

    A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF), enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL) for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02)-i0.017(±0.003) at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH) profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  10. Note: refractive index sensing of turbid media by differentiation of the reflectance profile: does error-correction work?

    PubMed

    Goyal, K G; Dong, M L; Kane, D G; Makkar, S S; Worth, B W; Bali, L M; Bali, S

    2012-08-01

    A widely used method for determining refractive index postulates that the derivative of the angular profile for light reflected from the sample is maximum at the critical angle for total internal reflection (TIR). It is well-known that in turbid media this "differentiation method" yields errors in refractive index. Unexplained anomalies in previous error-calculations are eliminated if one uses a recent model of TIR which departs from traditional Fresnel theory. However we find that, in practical situations, the refractive index obtained by differentiation even after error-correction is significantly different from the best estimate for the refractive index obtained by curve-fitting the reflectance data. Thus the differentiation method lacks scientific validity in turbid media.

  11. Recycling and recovery routes for incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA): a review.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Shane; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2013-11-01

    The drivers for increasing incineration of sewage sludge and the characteristics of the resulting incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) are reviewed. It is estimated that approximately 1.7 milliontonnes of ISSA are produced annually world-wide and is likely to increase in the future. Although most ISSA is currently landfilled, various options have been investigated that allow recycling and beneficial resource recovery. These include the use of ISSA as a substitute for clay in sintered bricks, tiles and pavers, and as a raw material for the manufacture of lightweight aggregate. ISSA has also been used to form high density glass-ceramics. Significant research has investigated the potential use of ISSA in blended cements for use in mortars and concrete, and as a raw material for the production of Portland cement. However, all these applications represent a loss of the valuable phosphate content in ISSA, which is typically comparable to that of a low grade phosphate ore. ISSA has significant potential to be used as a secondary source of phosphate for the production of fertilisers and phosphoric acid. Resource efficient approaches to recycling will increasingly require phosphate recovery from ISSA, with the remaining residual fraction also considered a useful material, and therefore further research is required in this area.

  12. Tropospheric profiles of wet refractivity and humidity from the combination of remote sensing data sets and measurements on the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurter, F.; Maier, O.

    2013-11-01

    We reconstruct atmospheric wet refractivity profiles for the western part of Switzerland with a least-squares collocation approach from data sets of (a) zenith path delays that are a byproduct of the GPS (global positioning system) processing, (b) ground meteorological measurements, (c) wet refractivity profiles from radio occultations whose tangent points lie within the study area, and (d) radiosonde measurements. Wet refractivity is a parameter partly describing the propagation of electromagnetic waves and depends on the atmospheric parameters temperature and water vapour pressure. In addition, we have measurements of a lower V-band microwave radiometer at Payerne. It delivers temperature profiles at high temporal resolution, especially in the range from ground to 3000 m a.g.l., though vertical information content decreases with height. The temperature profiles together with the collocated wet refractivity profiles provide near-continuous dew point temperature or relative humidity profiles at Payerne for the study period from 2009 to 2011. In the validation of the humidity profiles, we adopt a two-step procedure. We first investigate the reconstruction quality of the wet refractivity profiles at the location of Payerne by comparing them to wet refractivity profiles computed from radiosonde profiles available for that location. We also assess the individual contributions of the data sets to the reconstruction quality and demonstrate a clear benefit from the data combination. Secondly, the accuracy of the conversion from wet refractivity to dew point temperature and relative humidity profiles with the radiometer temperature profiles is examined, comparing them also to radiosonde profiles. For the least-squares collocation solution combining GPS and ground meteorological measurements, we achieve the following error figures with respect to the radiosonde reference: maximum median offset of relative refractivity error is -16% and quartiles are 5% to 40% for the lower

  13. Crustal structure of the Southern Rio Grande rift determined from seismic refraction profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinno, Y. A.; Keller, G. R.; Harder, S. H.; Daggett, P. H.; Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    As part of a major cooperative seismic experiment, a series of seismic refraction profiles have been recorded in south-central New Mexico with the goal of determining the crustal structure in the southern Rio Grande rift. The data gathered greatly expand the seismic data base in the area, and consist of three interlocking regional profiles: a reversed E-W line across the rift, an unreversed N-S axial line, and an unreversed SW-SE line. The reversed E-W line shows no significant dip along the Moho (32 km thick crust) and a 7.7 km/s Pn velocity. Results from the N-S axial line and the NW-SE line indicate an apparent Pn velocity of 7.95 km/s and significant dip along the Moho with crustal thinning toward the south and southeast. When interpreted together, these data indicate a crustal thinning in the southern rift of 4-6 km with respect to the northern rift and the adjacent Basin and Range province, and establish the regional Pn velocity to be approximately 7.7 km/s. These results suggest that the Rio Grande rift can be identified as a crustal feature separate and distinct from the Basin and Range province.

  14. Combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling of active seismic refraction profiling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I.; Kopp, H.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new code for combined forward and inverse tomographic modeling based on first-arrival travel times of active seismic refraction profiling data (PROFIT - Profile Forward and Inverse Tomographic modeling). The main features of the algorithm involve the original version of bending ray tracing, parameterization based on nodes, variable grid size definition determined by the ray density, and regularization of the inversion. The key purpose of applying the PROFIT code is rather not in solely producing the tomographic image of a continuous velocity field, but in creating a geologically reasonable synthetic model. This model then includes first-order velocity changes representing petrophysical boundaries and is thus better suited for a geological-tectonic interpretation than its smoothed tomographic counterpart. After performing forward and inverse modeling, the synthetic model will reproduce a congeneric model to the tomographic inversion result of the observed data. We demonstrate the working ability of the code using two marine datasets acquired in the Musicians Seamount Province (Pacific Ocean). The results of the tomographic inversion clearly resolve the dominating extrusive volcanism. In addition, the combined forward and inverse approach tests a large variety of synthetic models to fit the observed data tomography. Along both profiles, the preferred structural model includes a strong positive velocity anomaly extending into the seamount edifice. We suggest that this anomaly pattern represents secondary intrusive processes, which are only revealed by the combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling and could not be resolved by exclusively applying a tomographic inversion. In addition, we present examples of imaging salt domes in the Precaspian oil province as well as a higher-resolution field study that was conducted as a preinvestigative study for tunnel construction to demonstrate the capability of the code in different regimes and on different

  15. Saudi Arabian seismic-refraction profile: A traveltime interpretation of crustal and upper mantle structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, W.D.; Gettings, M.E.; Blank, H.R.; Healy, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The crustal and upper mantle compressional-wave velocity structure across the southwestern Arabian Shield has been investigated by a 1000-km-long seismic refraction profile. The profile begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, trends southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan, and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, and six shot points were used, including one in the Red Sea. Two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques, used to analyze amplitude-normalized record sections indicate that the Arabian Shield is composed, to first order, of two layers, each about 20 km thick, with average velocities of about 6.3 km/s and 7.0 km/s, respectively. West of the Shield-Red Sea margin, the crust thins to a total thickness of less than 20 km, beyond which the Red Sea shelf and coastal plain are interpreted to be underlain by oceanic crust. A major crustal inhomogeneity at the northeast end of the profile probably represents the suture zone between two crustal blocks of different composition. Elsewhere along the profile, several high-velocity anomalies in the upper crust correlate with mapped gneiss domes, the most prominent of which is the Khamis Mushayt gneiss. Based on their velocities, these domes may constitute areas where lower crustal rocks have been raised some 20 km. Two intracrustal reflectors in the center of the Shield at 13 km depth probably represent the tops of mafic intrusives. The Mohorovic??ic?? discontinuity beneath the Shield varies from a depth of 43 km and mantle velocity of 8.2 km/s in the northeast to a depth of 38 km and mantle velocity of 8.0 km/s depth in the southwest near the Shield-Red Sea transition. Two velocity discontinuities occur in the upper mantle, at 59 and 70 km depth. The crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Arabian Shield is

  16. Measurement of planar refractive index profiles with rapid variations in glass using interferometry and total variation regularized differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oven, R.

    2015-12-01

    Planar refractive index profiles with rapid variations, formed in glass, are measured with interferometry. This involves forming a bevel in the glass and orientating the fringe pattern to be normal to the bevel edge. The index profile is determined by differentiation of the phase function of the fringe pattern. The differentiation has been performed using the total variation regularization method in order to preserve rapid changes in the derivative. This new approach avoids the necessity of filtering, in order to reduce noise, in the direction perpendicular to the bevel, which would otherwise smooth out the rapid index changes. The method is assessed using a model refractive index profile that contains an index gradient of 0.24 μm-1 and is then applied practically to measure the refractive index profile of electrically poled BK7 glass. The new approach allows the sharp transition in the index between poled and unpoled glass to be observed as well as the accumulation of potassium ions beyond the poled glass region.

  17. Crustal structure of the Central-Eastern Greenland: results from the TopoGreenland refraction profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Thybo, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Until present, seismic surveys have only been carried out offshore and near the coasts of Greenland, where the crustal structure is affected by oceanic break-up. We present the deep seismic structure of the crust of the interior of Greenland, based on the new and the only existing so far seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile. The seismic data was acquired by a team of six people during a two-month long experiment in summer of 2011 on the ice cap in the interior of central-eastern Greenland. The presence of an up to 3.4 km thick ice sheet, permanently covering most of the land mass, made acquisition of geophysical data logistically complicated. The profile extends 310 km inland in E-W direction from the approximate edge of the stable ice cap near the Scoresby Sund across the center of the ice cap. 350 Reftek Texan receivers recorded high-quality seismic data from 8 equidistant shots along the profile. Explosive charge sizes were 1 ton at the ends and ca. 500 kg along the profile, loaded with about 125 kg at 35-85 m depth in individual boreholes. Given that the data acquisition was affected by the thick ice sheet, we questioned the quality of seismic records in such experiment setup. We have developed an automatic routine to check the amplitudes and spectra of the selected seismic phases and to check the differences/challenges in making seismic experiments on ice and the effects of ice on data interpretation. Using tomographic inversion and forward ray tracing modelling we have obtained the two-dimensional velocity model down to a 50 km depth. The model shows a decrease of crustal thickness from 47 km below the centre of Greenland in the western part of the profile to 40 km in its eastern part. Relatively high lower crustal velocities (Vp 6.8 - 7.3 km/s) in the western part of the TopoGreenland profile may result from past collision tectonics or, alternatively, may be related to the speculated passage of the Iceland mantle plume. Comparison of our results

  18. Influence of refractive profile on the reaction of modes with sensor layer in the planar amplitude chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasinski, Pawel; Rogozinski, Roman

    2003-04-01

    The paper presents the theoretical and experimental results involving the influence of refractive profile on the reaction of modes with the absorption sensor layer. The investigation studies concerned the planar structure in which the waveguides were producd using the ion-exchange technique in glass, and the sensor layer was produced with the application of sol-gel technology. The results of experimental investigations confirm the theoretical predictions.

  19. Crustal velocities near Coalinga, California, modeled from a combined earthquake/explosion refraction profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macgregor-Scott, N.; Walter, A.

    1988-01-01

    Crustal velocity structure for the region near Coalinga, California, has been derived from both earthquake and explosion seismic phase data recorded along a NW-SE seismic-refraction profile on the western flank of the Great Valley east of the Diablo Range. Comparison of the two data sets reveals P-wave phases in common which can be correlated with changes in the velocity structure below the earthquake hypocenters. In addition, the earthquake records reveal secondary phases at station ranges of less than 20 km that could be the result of S- to P-wave conversions at velocity interfaces above the earthquake hypocenters. Two-dimensional ray-trace modeling of the P-wave travel times resulted in a P-wave velocity model for the western flank of the Great Valley comprised of: 1) a 7- to 9-km thick section of sedimentary strata with velocities similar to those found elsewhere in the Great Valley (1.6 to 5.2 km s-1); 2) a middle crust extending to about 14 km depth with velocities comparable to those reported for the Franciscan assemblage in the Diablo Range (5.6 to 5.9 km s-1); and 3) a 13- to 14-km thick lower crust with velocities similar to those reported beneath the Diablo Range and the Great Valley (6.5 to 7.30 km s-1). This lower crust may have been derived from subducted oceanic crust that was thickened by accretionary underplating or crustal shortening. -Authors

  20. Crustal structure of the Kermadec arc from MANGO seismic refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Dan; Kopp, Heidrun; Sutherland, Rupert; Henrys, Stuart; Watts, Anthony B.; Timm, Christian; Scherwath, Martin; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Ronde, Cornel E. J.

    2016-10-01

    Three active-source seismic refraction profiles are integrated with morphological and potential field data to place the first regional constraints on the structure of the Kermadec subduction zone. These observations are used to test contrasting tectonic models for an along-strike transition in margin structure previously known as the 32°S boundary. We use residual bathymetry to constrain the geometry of this boundary and propose the name Central Kermadec Discontinuity (CKD). North of the CKD, the buried Tonga Ridge occupies the fore-arc with VP 6.5-7.3 km s-1 and residual free-air gravity anomalies constrain its latitudinal extent (north of 30.5°S), width (110 ± 20 km), and strike ( 005° south of 25°S). South of the CKD the fore-arc is structurally homogeneous downdip with VP 5.7-7.3 km s-1. In the Havre Trough back-arc, crustal thickness south of the CKD is 8-9 km, which is up to 4 km thinner than the northern Havre Trough and at least 1 km thinner than the southern Havre Trough. We suggest that the Eocene arc did not extend along the current length of the Tonga-Kermadec trench. The Eocene arc was originally connected to the Three Kings Ridge, and the CKD was likely formed during separation and easterly translation of an Eocene arc substrate during the early Oligocene. We suggest that the first-order crustal thickness variations along the Kermadec arc were inherited from before the Neogene and reflect Mesozoic crustal structure, the Cenozoic evolution of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi margin and along-strike variations in the duration of arc volcanism.

  1. Analytical expression of giant Goos-Hänchen shift in terms of proper and improper modes in waveguide structures with arbitrary refractive index profile.

    PubMed

    Alishahi, Fatemeh; Mehrany, Khashayar

    2010-06-01

    We analytically relate the giant Goos-Hänchen shift, observed at the interface of a high refractive index prism and a waveguide structure with an arbitrary refractive index profile, to the spatial resonance phenomenon. The proximity effect of the high refractive index prism on modal properties of the waveguide is discussed, and the observed shift is expressed in terms of proper and improper electromagnetic modes supported by the waveguide with no prism. The transversely increasing improper modes are shown playing an increasingly important role as the high refractive index prism comes closer to the waveguide.

  2. ISSA-PS, The Postage Stamp Server for IRAS Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buren, D.; Ebert, R.; Egret, D.

    The \\htmllink{ISSA Postage Stamp Server}{http://astrovr.ipac.caltech.edu:8888/ISSA-PS} is a Web-accessible service that delivers IRAS images to users with a minimum of effort. It is unique in that it will operate by object name as well as celestial position. Users can connect using custom clients to automatically make requests and fetch images for local use.

  3. Variability of Atmospheric Boundary Layer height over the tropical oceans - A study using atmospheric refractivity profiles from multi campaign in-situ and satellite radio occultation data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, M.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) over the tropical oceans controls and regulates the influx of water vapour into the free atmosphere due to evaporation. The availability of in situ data for determining the ABL characteristics over tropical oceans are limited to different ship based campaigns and hence restricted in spatial and temporal coverage. For ABL studies the Radio Occultation (RO) based satellite data over tropical oceans have good temporal and spatial coverage but limited in temporal and spatial resolution. Atmospheric refractivity profiles are extensively used in many studies to determine the ABL height from both platforms. The present study attempts to use the advantages in both in-situ and satellite (RO) based data to quantify the variability in the ABL height over the tropical oceans. All studies done so far to identify the ABL height from RO derived refractivity profiles rely extensively on the detection of the minimum refractivity gradient (MRG) below ~6 km along with additional threshold criteria. This leads to an over estimation of ABL heights especially in presence of strong subsidence inversion caused by local/ mesoscale/ synoptic scale processes where the MRG lies significantly above the ABL. The present study attempts to quantify this over estimation using atmospheric refractivity profiles derived from thermo-dynamical parameters from radiosonde ascents over the tropical ocean, suggests an improved method of ABL detection and quantifies the variability so deduced. Over 1000 radiosonde ascents from four ship cruises conducted during DYNAMO 2011 field campaign over the tropical Indian Ocean are used for the purpose. ABL heights determined from radiosonde data using traditional methods (using virtual potential temperature and specific humidity) are compared with those identified from simulated atmospheric refractivity profiles from same data (using prevalent methods for RO) to quantify the over estimation. A new method of ABL detection from

  4. Comparison of phosphorus recovery from incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA) and pyrolysed sewage sludge char (PSSC).

    PubMed

    Kleemann, Rosanna; Chenoweth, Jonathan; Clift, Roland; Morse, Stephen; Pearce, Pete; Saroj, Devendra

    2017-02-01

    This research compares and contrasts the physical and chemical characteristics of incinerator sewage sludge ash (ISSA) and pyrolysis sewage sludge char (PSSC) for the purposes of recovering phosphorus as a P-rich fertiliser. Interest in P recovery from PSSC is likely to increase as pyrolysis is becoming viewed as a more economical method of sewage sludge thermal treatment compared to incineration. The P contents of ISSA and PSSC are 7.2-7.5% and 5.6%, respectively. Relative to the sludge, P concentrations are increased about 8-fold in ISSA, compared to roughly 3-fold in PSSC. Both PSSC and ISSA contain whitlockite, an unusual form of calcium phosphate, with PSSC containing more whitlockite than ISSA. Acid leaching experiments indicate that a liquid/solid ratio of 10 with 30min contact time is optimal to release PO4-P into leachate for both ISSA and PSSC. The proportion of P extracted from PSSC is higher due to its higher whitlockite content. Heavy metals are less soluble from PSSC because they are more strongly incorporated in the particles. The results suggest there is potential for the development of a process to recover P from PSSC.

  5. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  6. Evaluation of Refractivity Profiles from CHAMP and SAC-C GPS Radio Occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Ao, Chi On; Joiner, Joanna; delaTorreJuarez, Manuel; Hoff, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    The GeoForschungsZentrum's Challenging Minisatellite Payload for Geophysical Research and Application (CHAMP, Germany-US) and the Comision Nacional de Actividades Especiales' Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C (SAC-C, Argentina-US) missions are the first missions to carry a second-generation Blackjack Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. One of the new features of this receiver is its ability to sense the lower troposphere closer to the surface than the proof-of-concept GPS Meteorology experiment (GPS/MET). Since their launch, CHAMP and SAC-C have collected thousands of GPS radio occultations, representing a wealth of measurements available for data assimilation and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). In order to evaluate the refractivity data derived by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) from raw radio occultation measurements, we use Data Assimilation Office (DAO) 6-hour forecasts as an independent state of the atmosphere. We compare CHAMP and SAC-C refractivity (processed by JPL) with refractivity calculated from the DAO global fields of temperature, water vapor content and humidity. We show statistics of the differences as well as histograms of the differences.

  7. Multi-functional antireflective surface-relief structures based on nanoscale porous germanium with graded refractive index profiles.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jung Woo; Yu, Jae Su

    2013-03-21

    We fabricated the multi-stacked graded refractive index (GRIN) porous amorphous germanium (a-Ge) films with linear, quintic, and Gaussian index profiles for their refractive indices at a wavelength of 1.33 μm by e-beam evaporation with a glancing angle deposition technique. The porous a-Ge films with inclined nanocolumnar structures were deposited on Ge substrates at incident vapor flux angles of 40, 55, and 75°. The surface wetting behaviour of the porous a-Ge films was explored, exhibiting the hydrophilic surfaces with water contact angles below 78°. Their optical reflectance properties were investigated, together with the theoretical analysis using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis simulation. For the GRIN a-Ge films with a quintic index profile, a low reflectance band of <2% was shifted towards the longer wavelength with increasing the total thickness (ttotal) of GRIN a-Ge layers. For the GRIN a-Ge films with optimized ttotal values of 350, 333, and 225 nm for linear, quintic, and Gaussian index profiles, respectively, the low reflectance spectra of <10% were obtained at wavelengths of 1.1-1.7 μm, which yielded the lowest average reflectance value (Ravg) of ∼2.2% for Gaussian index profile (compared to the Ravg ∼ 3.7 and 4% for linear and quintic ones, respectively). The angle-dependent reflectance characteristics were also studied at incident angles of 15-85° for s- and p-polarized lights at a wavelength of 1.33 μm. The calculated results showed similar trends to the experimental data.

  8. Seismic refraction profile, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: field operations, instrumentation, and initial results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blank, H. Richard; Healy, J.H.; Roller, John; Lamson, Ralph; Fisher, Fred; McClearn, Robert; Allen, Steve

    1979-01-01

    In February 1978 a seismic deep-refraction profile was recorded by the USGS along a 1000-km line across the Arabian Shield in western Saudi Arabia. The line begins in Paleozoic and Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, leads southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan (Tihamat Asir), and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, including 19 in the Farasan Islands. Six shot points were used--five on land, with charges placed mostly below water table in drill holes, and one at sea, with charges placed on the sea floor and fired from a ship. The total charge consumed was slightly in excess of 61 metric tons in 21 discrete firings. Seismic energy was recorded by means of a set of 100 newly developed portable seismic stations. Each station consists of a standard 2-Hz vertical geophone coupled to a self-contained analog recording instrument equipped with a magnetic-tape cassette. The stations were deployed in groups of 20 by five observer teams, each generally consisting of two scientist-technicians and a surveyor-guide. On the day prior to deployment, the instruments were calibrated and programmed for automatic operation by means of a specially designed device called a hand-held tester. At each of ten pre-selected recording time windows on a designated firing day, the instruments were programmed to turn on, stabilize, record internal calibration signals, record the seismic signals at three levels of amplification, and then deactivate. After the final window in the firing sequence, all instruments were retrieved and their data tapes removed for processing. A specially designed, field tape- dubbing system was utilized at shot point camps to organize and edit data recorded on the cassette tapes. The main functions of this system are to concatenate all data from each shot on any given day

  9. Nondestructive measurement of two-dimensional refractive index profiles by deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Di; Leger, James R.

    2015-06-01

    We present a method for calculating a two-dimensional refractive index field from measured boundary values of beam position and slope. By initially ignoring the dependence of beam trajectories on the index field and using cubic polynomials to approximate these trajectories, we show that the inverse problem can be reduced to set of linear algebraic equations and solved using a numerical algorithm suited for inverting sparse, ill-conditioned linear systems. The beam trajectories are subsequently corrected using an iterative ray trace procedure so that they are consistent with the ray equation inside the calculated index field. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method through computer simulation, where a hypothetical test index field is reconstructed on a 15 × 15 discrete grid using 800 interrogating rays and refractive index errors (RMS) less than 0.5% of the total index range (nmax-nmin) are achieved. In the subsequent error analysis, we identify three primary sources of error contributing to the reconstruction of the index field and assess the importance of data redundancy. The principles developed in our approach are fully extendable to three-dimensional index fields as well as more complex geometries.

  10. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Criticality Safety Evaluation of the LLNL Inherently Safe Subcritical Assembly (ISSA)

    SciTech Connect

    Percher, Catherine

    2012-06-19

    The LLNL Nuclear Criticality Safety Division has developed a training center to illustrate criticality safety and reactor physics concepts through hands-on experimental training. The experimental assembly, the Inherently Safe Subcritical Assembly (ISSA), uses surplus highly enriched research reactor fuel configured in a water tank. The training activities will be conducted by LLNL following the requirements of an Integration Work Sheet (IWS) and associated Safety Plan. Students will be allowed to handle the fissile material under the supervision of LLNL instructors. This report provides the technical criticality safety basis for instructional operations with the ISSA experimental assembly.

  12. Mapping the megathrust beneath the northern Gulf of Alaska using wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Brocher, T.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Fisher, M.A.; Plafker, G.; Moses, M.J.; Taber, J.J. ); Christensen, N.I. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    In the northern Gulf of Alaska and Prince William Sound, wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiling, earthquake studies, and laboratory measurements of physical properties are used to determine the geometry of the Prince William and Yakutat terranes, and the subducting Pacific plate. In this complex region, the Yakutat terrane is underthrust beneath the Prince William terrane, and both terranes are interpreted to be underlain by the Pacific plate. Wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiles recorded along 5 seismic lines are used to unravel this terrane geometry. Modeled velocities in the upper crust of the Prince William terrane (to 18-km depth) agree closely with laboratory velocity measurements of Orca Group phyllites and quartzofeldspathic graywackes (the chief components of the Prince William terrane) to hydrostatic pressures as high as 600 MPa (6 KBAR). An interpretation consistent with these data extends the Prince William terrane to at least 18-km depth. A landward dipping reflection at depths of 16--24 km is interpreted as the base of the Prince William terrane. This reflector corresponds to the top of the Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity and is interpreted as the megathrust. Beneath this reflector is a 6.9-km/s refractor, that is strongly reflective and magnetic, and is interpreted to be gabbro in Eocene age oceanic crust of the underthrust Yakutat terrane. Both wide-angle seismic and magnetic anomaly data indicate that the Yakutat terrane has been underthrust beneath the Prince William terrane for at least a few hundred kilometers. Wide-angle seismic data are consistent with a 9 to 10[degree] landward dip of the subducting Pacific plate, distinctly different from the inferred average 3 to 4[degree] dip of the overlying 6.9-km/s refractor and Wadati-Benioff seismic zone. The preferred interpretation of the geophysical data is that one composite plate, composed of the Pacific and Yakutat plates, is subducting beneath southern Alaska.

  13. Anatomy of a metamorphic core complex: Seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling in southeastern California and western Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Jill; Larkin, Steven P.; Fuis, Gary S.; Simpson, Robert W.; Howard, Keith A.

    1991-07-01

    The metamorphic core complex belt in southeastern California and western Arizona is a NW-SE trending zone of unusually large Tertiary extension and uplift. Midcrustal rocks exposed in this belt raise questions about the crustal thickness, crustal structure, and the tectonic evolution of the region. Three seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles, acquired and analyzed as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Pacific to Arizona Crustal Experiment, were collected to address these issues. The results presented here, which focus on the Whipple and Buckskin-Rawhide mountains, yield a consistent three-dimensional image of this part of the metamorphic core complex belt. The seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection data are of excellent quality and are characterized by six principal phases that can be observed on all three profiles. These phases include refractions from the near-surface and crystalline basement, reflections from boundaries in the middle and lower crust, and reflections and refractions from the upper mantle. The final model consists of a thin veneer (<2 km) of upper plate and fractured lower plate rocks (1.5-5.5 kms-1) overlying a fairly homogeneous basement (˜6.0 km s-1) and a localized high-velocity (6.4 km s-1) body situated beneath the western Whipple Mountains. A prominent midcrustal reflection is identified beneath the Whipple and Buckskin-Rawhide mountains between 10 and 20 km depth. This reflector has an arch-like shape and is centered beneath, or just west of, the metamorphic core complex belt. This event is underlain by a weaker, approximately subhorizontal reflection at 24 km depth. Together, these two discontinuities define a lens-shaped midcrustal layer with a velocity of 6.35-6.5 km s-1. The apex of this midcrustal layer corresponds roughly to a region of major tectonic denudation and uplift (˜10 km) defined by surface geologic mapping and petrologic barometry studies. The layer thins to the northeast and is absent in the Transition

  14. Direct measurement of the refractive index profile of phase gratings, recorded in silver halide holographic materials by phase-contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2003-11-01

    Plane-wave phase holograms recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD emulsions and processed by the combination of AAC developer and the R-9 bleaching agent were studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using high-power immersion (100×) objective. Thus the modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern can also be determined. Measured diffraction efficiencies were compared to those predicted by coupled wave theory, using the measured refractive index modulations. Direct measurement of the phase profile of the gratings can be used for optimizing processing.

  15. Capturing a reflective cross-sectional image of an optical fiber with partially coherent laser light to measure the refractive index profile of a multimode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Fang-Wen; Jhang, Heng-Jian

    2013-01-28

    We focused partially coherent laser light onto an optical fiber end-face and captured a high-quality reflective cross-sectional image of the fiber. By analyzing the reflected light intensity distribution of the captured fiber image, we can achieve refractive-index profiling of a step-index multimode optical fiber. The measurement error caused by the reflected light from the other fiber end-face positioned in air can be greatly improved by inserting that end of the fiber into water. This simple and easy technique for fiber index profiling by employing reduced-coherence laser light is very useful in determining the refractive index profiles of various multimode optical fibers.

  16. Anatomy of a metamorphic core complex: seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling in southeastern California and western Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, J.; Larkin, S.P.; Fuis, G.S.; Simpson, R.W.; Howard, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    The metamorphic core complex belt in southeastern California and western Arizona is a NW-SE trending zone of unusually large Tertiary extension and uplift. Midcrustal rocks exposed in this belt raise questions about the crustal thickness, crustal structure, and the tectonic evolution of the region. Three seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles were collected to address these issues. The results presented here, which focus on the Whipple and Buckskin-Rawhide mountains, yield a consistent three-dimensiional image of this part of the metamorphic core complex belt. The final model consists of a thin veneer (<2 km) of upper plate and fractured lower plate rocks (1.5-5.5 km s-1) overlying a fairly homogeneous basement (~6.0 km s-1) and a localized high-velocity (6.4 km s -1) body situated beneath the western Whipple Mountains. A prominent midcrustal reflection is identified beneath the Whipple and Buckskin Rawhide mountains between 10 and 20km depth. -from Authors

  17. A crustal model of the ultrahigh-pressure Dabie Shan orogenic belt, China, derived from deep seismic refraction profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Chun-Yong; Zeng, Rong-Sheng; Mooney, W.D.; Hacker, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new crustal cross section through the east-west trending ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) Dabie Shan orogenic belt, east central China, based on a 400-km-long seismic refraction profile. Data from our profile reveal that the cratonal blocks north and south of the orogen are composed of 35-km-thick crust consisting of three layers (upper, middle, and lower crust) with average seismic velocities of 6.0±0.2 km/s, 6.5±0.1 km/s, and 6.8±0.1 km/s. The crust reaches a maximum thickness of 41.5 km beneath the northern margin of the orogen, and thus the present-day root beneath the orogen is only 6.5 km thick. The upper mantle velocity is 8.0±0.1 km/s. Modeling of shear wave data indicate that Poisson's ratio increases from 0.24±0.02 in the upper crust to 0.27±0.03 in the lower crust. This result is consistent with a dominantly felsic upper crustal composition and a mafic lower crustal composition within the amphibolite or granulite metamorphic facies. Our seismic model indicates that eclogite, which is abundant in surface exposures within the orogen, is not a volumetrically significant component in the middle or lower crust. Much of the Triassic structure associated with the formation of the UHP rocks of the Dabie Shan has been obscured by post-Triassic igneous activity, extension and large-offset strike-slip faulting. Nevertheless, we can identify a high-velocity (6.3 km/s) zone in the upper (<5 km depth) crustal core of the orogen which we interpret as a zone of ultrahigh-pressure rocks, a north dipping suture, and an apparent Moho offset that marks a likely active strike-slip fault.

  18. A comparison of photogrammetrically determined astronomical refraction of sunlight at high zenith angles with a ray-tracing computer model employing rawinsonde profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Russell Dean

    2001-11-01

    possible that the VIZ rawinsonde used on December 8 may have been from an old and possibly defective supply. A Modified U.S. Standard Atmosphere (MUSSA) profile produces a better fit between model and observed astronomical refraction than the rawinsonde profiles. The results of this study suggest that the temperature measurements from the rawinsondes may be too inaccurate to improve on a MUSSA model. Nonetheless, both models showed a significant improvement over the Pulkovo Refraction Tables.

  19. The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) End-to-End On-Orbit Maintenance Process Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingrebe, Kenneth W., II

    1995-01-01

    As a tool for construction and refinement of the on-orbit maintenance system to sustain the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA), the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) developed an end to-end on-orbit maintenance process flow. This paper discusses and demonstrates that process flow. This tool is being used by MOD to identify areas which require further work in preparation for MOD's role in the conduct of on-orbit maintenance operations.

  20. Refractive keratoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, I.R. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the titles are: Perspectives on refractive surgery; Radial keratotomy; The refractive aspects of corneal transplantation; Wedge resection and relating incisions; Laser surgery of the cornea; and All plastic corneal lenses.

  1. Recovery of refractivity profiles and pressure and temperature distributions in the lower atmosphere from satellite-to-satellite radio occultation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, C. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of recovering parameters from one-way range rate between two earth orbiting spacecraft during occultation of the tracking signal by the earth's lower atmosphere. The tracking data is inverted by an integral transformation (Abel transform) to obtain a vertical refractivity profile above the point of closest approach of the ray connecting the satellites. Pressure and temperature distributions can be obtained from values of dry refractivity using the hydrostatic equation and perfect gas law. Two methods are investigated for recovering pressure and temperature parameters. Results show that recovery is much more sensitive to satellite velocity errors than to satellite position errors. An error analysis is performed. An example is given demonstrating recovery of parameters from radio occultation data obtained during satellite-to-satellite tracking of Nimbus 6 by the ATS 6 satellite.

  2. Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, Keith

    2000-01-01

    The concept of surgically altering the eye to correct refractive errors has been considered for hundreds of years, but only in the past 60 years has interest grown considerably due to the development of modern refractive surgery techniques such as astigmatic keratotomies to correct astigmatism induced by cataract surgery and future technologies currently being investigated. Modern refractive surgery is more involved than setting the correct parameters on the laser. Patient selection and examination, proper technique, and postoperative follow-up for potential complications are essential for a successful refractive procedure. Critical evaluation of new techniques is vital to avoid the pitfall of overly exuberant enthusiasm for new and unproven methods of refractive surgery. Kellum K. Refractive surgery. The Ochsner Journal 2000; 2:164-167. PMID:21765686

  3. Organization Spotlight: The Power of an Association in Early Childhood Education and Care: ISSA--An Engine for Advocacy, Capacity Building, and Creating a Growing Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ionescu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The International Step by Step Association (ISSA) is an association that believes in learning from each other across cultures and borders, building on each other's strengths, and tapping into the power of a network. Building on the strong legacy of the Open Society Foundations' Step by Step program, ISSA has nurtured a culture of belonging to a…

  4. Atmospheric microwave refractivity and refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, E.; Hodge, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric refractivity can be expressed as a function of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, and operating frequency. Based on twenty-year meteorological data, statistics of the atmospheric refractivity were obtained. These statistics were used to estimate the variation of dispersion, attenuation, and refraction effects on microwave and millimeter wave signals propagating along atmospheric paths. Bending angle, elevation angle error, and range error were also developed for an exponentially tapered, spherical atmosphere.

  5. MEDES clinical research facility as a tool to prepare ISSA space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, A.; Traon, A. Pavy-Le

    This new multi-disciplinary medical experimentation center provides the ideal scientific, medical and technical environment required for research programs and to prepare international space station Alpha (ISSA) missions, where space and healthcare industries can share their expertise. Different models are available to simulate space flight effects (bed-rest, confinement,…). This is of particular interest for research in Human psychology, physiology, physiopathology and ergonomics, validation of biomedical materials and procedures, testing of drugs, and other healthcare related products. This clinical research facility (CRF) provides valuable services in various fields of Human research requiring healthy volunteers. CRF is widely accessible to national and international, scientific, medical and industrial organisations. Furthermore, users have at their disposal the multi-disciplinary skills of MEDES staff and all MEDES partners on a single site.

  6. Production of technical grade phosphoric acid from incinerator sewage sludge ash (ISSA).

    PubMed

    Donatello, S; Tong, D; Cheeseman, C R

    2010-01-01

    The recovery of phosphorus from sewage sludge ash samples obtained from 7 operating sludge incinerators in the UK using a sulfuric acid washing procedure to produce a technical grade phosphoric acid product has been investigated. The influences of reaction time, sulfuric acid concentration, liquid to solid ratio and source of ISSA on P recovery have been examined. The optimised conditions were the minimum stoichiometric acid requirement, a reaction time of 120 min and a liquid to solid ratio of 20. Under these conditions, average recoveries of between 72% and 91% of total phosphorus were obtained. Product filtrate was purified by passing through a cation exchange column, concentrated to 80% H(3)PO(4) and compared with technical grade H(3)PO(4) specifications. The economics of phosphate recovery by this method are briefly discussed.

  7. A simple approach for estimating the refractive index structure parameter (Cn²) profile in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sukanta

    2015-09-01

    Utilizing the so-called Thorpe scale as a measure of the turbulence outer scale, we propose a physically-based approach for the estimation of Cn2 profiles in the lower atmosphere. This approach only requires coarse-resolution temperature profiles (a.k.a., soundings) as input, yet it has the intrinsic ability to capture layers of high optical turbulence. The prowess of this computationally inexpensive approach is demonstrated by validations against observational data from a field campaign over Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  8. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  9. Visual inspection of 3-D surface and refractive-index profiles of microscopic lenses using a single-arm off-axis holographic interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Mok; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-05-16

    A single-arm off-axis holographic interferometer (SA-OHI) system for visual inspection of the three-dimensional (3-D) surfaces and refractive-index profiles of micrometer-scale optical lenses is proposed. In this system, a couple of pellicle beam splitters and optical mirrors are employed to generate two sheared off-axis beams from the single object beam by controlling the tilted angle of the optical mirror. Each sheared beam is divided into two areas with and without object data, which are called half-object and half-reference beams, respectively. These sub-divided object and reference beams then make interference patterns, just like the conventional two-arm holographic interferometer. This holographic interferometer system, called SA-OHI, can solve the DC bias, virtual and duplicated image problems occurred in most lateral shearing interferometers, which allow extraction of the hologram data only related to the target object. The operational principle of the proposed system is analyzed based on ray-optics. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed system in the practical application fields, experiments with test lenses are also carried out and the results are comparatively discussed with those of the conventional system.

  10. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Hassenpflug, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.

    2007-02-01

    Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2) at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne) radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan) by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1) the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR) over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2) the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3) the MU radar can provide stability profiles with a vertical resolution of 50 m at heights where humidity is negligible, 4) stable stratospheric layers as thin

  11. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... LASIK Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Laser Surgery Recovery Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Dec. 12, 2015 Today's refractive ... that releases controlled amounts of radio frequency (RF) energy, instead of a laser, to apply heat to ...

  12. PCR Based Microbial Monitor for Analysis of Recycled Water Aboard the ISSA: Issues and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Gail H.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Glass, John I.

    1995-01-01

    added to a PCR assay; There are not likely to be contaminants in ISSA recycled water that would inhibit PCR resulting in false-negative results; The TaqMan PCR product detection system is the most promising method for developing a rapid, highly automated gene-based microbial monitoring system. The method is inherently quantitative. NASA and other government agencies have invested in other technologies that, although potentially could lead to revolutionary advances, are not likely to mature in the next 5 years into working systems; PCR-based methods cannot distinguish between DNA or RNA of a viable microorganism and that of a non-viable organism. This may or may not be an important issue with reclaimed water on the ISSA. The recycling system probably damages the capacity of the genetic material of any bacteria or viruses killed during processing to serve as a template in a PCR desinged to amplify a large segment of DNA (less than 650 base pairs). If necessary, vital dye staining could be used in addition to PCR, to enumerate the viable cells in a water sample; The quality control methods have been developed to insure that PCR's are working properly, and that reactions are not contaminated with PCR carryover products which could lead to the generation of false-positive results; and The sequences of the small rRNA subunit gene for a large number of microorganisms are known, and they consititue the best database for rational development of the oligonucleotide reagents that give PCR its great specificity. From those gene sequences, sets of oligonucleotide primers for PCR and Taqman detection that could be used in a NASA microbial monitor were constructed using computer based methods. In addition to space utilization, a microbial monitior will have tremendous terrestrial applications. Analysis of patient samples for microbial pathogens, testing industrial effluent for biofouling bacteria, and detection biological warfare agents on the battlefield are but a few of the diverse

  13. Atmospheric refraction errors in laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging systems were investigated by ray tracing through three dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles were generated by performing a multiple regression on measurements from seven or eight radiosondes, using a refractivity model which provided for both linear and quadratic variations in the horizontal direction. The range correction due to horizontal gradients was found to be an approximately sinusoidal function of azimuth having a minimum near 0 deg azimuth and a maximum near 180 deg azimuth. The peak to peak variation was approximately 5 centimeters at 10 deg elevation and decreased to less than 1 millimeter at 80 deg elevation.

  14. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects mild-to-moderate nearsightedness, ...

  15. Refractive error blindness.

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, R.; Dandona, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent data suggest that a large number of people are blind in different parts of the world due to high refractive error because they are not using appropriate refractive correction. Refractive error as a cause of blindness has been recognized only recently with the increasing use of presenting visual acuity for defining blindness. In addition to blindness due to naturally occurring high refractive error, inadequate refractive correction of aphakia after cataract surgery is also a significant cause of blindness in developing countries. Blindness due to refractive error in any population suggests that eye care services in general in that population are inadequate since treatment of refractive error is perhaps the simplest and most effective form of eye care. Strategies such as vision screening programmes need to be implemented on a large scale to detect individuals suffering from refractive error blindness. Sufficient numbers of personnel to perform reasonable quality refraction need to be trained in developing countries. Also adequate infrastructure has to be developed in underserved areas of the world to facilitate the logistics of providing affordable reasonable-quality spectacles to individuals suffering from refractive error blindness. Long-term success in reducing refractive error blindness worldwide will require attention to these issues within the context of comprehensive approaches to reduce all causes of avoidable blindness. PMID:11285669

  16. Remote Measurement of the Atmospheric Isoplanatic Angle and Determination of Refractive Turbulence Profiles by Direct Inversion of the Scintillation Amplitude Covariance Function with Tikhonov Regularization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    shows Good’s 2 data between 500 m and 40 km. Good obtained thisCn profile by differential temperature measurement between two balloon-borne microthermal ...Cn profiles. However, they are difficult to obtain by remote measurements. In Chapters IV and V, I presented a profile measured by microthermal probes

  17. ISSA (iterative screening and structure analysis)—a new reduction method and its application to the tropospheric cloud chemical mechanism RACM/CAPRAM2.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauersberger, G.

    An automated reduction method ISSA (iterative screening and structure analysis) has been developed. It is aimed at the analysis of complex atmospheric chemical multiphase mechanisms and produces reduced mechanisms for specifiable application purposes. Cyclic and non-cyclic reactions identified by a structure analysis are separately evaluated. The normalized valuation coefficients are calculated in a box model framework by using time-averaged reaction rates. Starting with a set of target species, important reactions and species are selected together in an iteration procedure. So, only one threshold value fixed for all box model scenarios is necessary. For every scenario a specific reduced mechanism is obtained. The sum of reactions and species included in the specific reduced mechanisms generates then the ISSA-reduced mechanism. All reactants in the reduced mechanism are included in the verification procedure where the concentrations simulated with the full and the reduced mechanism are compared. The maximum relative deviation of daily maxima was found to be a suitable deviation measure for atmospheric trace species concentrations. An application of the ISSA method to the large cloud chemical mechanism RACM/CAPRAM2.4 resulted in reduction rates of 55% for reactions (46% gas phase, 60% liquid phase), 23% for species, and 23% for phase transfers. The deviation between full and reduced mechanism averaged over all scenarios and reactants was 2.5%. The liquid-phase part of this application was compared with a condensed version of the CAPARAM2.4 mechanism developed simultaneously with the full version. It was found that these two reduced versions of CAPRAM2.4 differ significantly. Whereas the condensed version achieves good verification results only for the target species, the ISSA-reduced version reproduce very well the complete full mechanism results and should be useful for future large-scale models, which will include both detailed microphysics and complex (reduced

  18. Refractivity estimation from sea clutter: An invited review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimian, Ali; Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S.; Barrios, Amalia E.

    2011-12-01

    Non-standard radio wave propagation in the atmosphere is caused by anomalous changes of the atmospheric refractivity index. In recent years, refractivity from clutter (RFC) has been an active field of research to complement traditional ways of measuring the refractivity profile in maritime environments which rely on direct sensing of the environmental parameters. Higher temporal and spatial resolution of the refractivity profile, together with a lower cost and convenience of operations have been the promising factors that brought RFC under consideration. Presented is an overview of the basic concepts, research and achievements in the field of RFC. Topics that require more attention in future studies also are discussed.

  19. Analytical models of optical refraction in the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Nener, Brett D; Fowkes, Neville; Borredon, Laurent

    2003-05-01

    An extremely accurate but simple asymptotic description (with known error) is obtained for the path of a ray propagating over a curved Earth with radial variations in refractive index. The result is sufficiently simple that analytic solutions for the path can be obtained for linear and quadratic index profiles. As well as rendering the inverse problem trivial for these profiles, this formulation shows that images are uniformly magnified in the vertical direction when viewed through a quadratic refractive-index profile. Nonuniform vertical distortions occur for higher-order refractive-index profiles.

  20. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  1. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  2. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  3. Reflection, refraction, and the Legendre transform.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Cristian E

    2011-02-01

    We construct in dimension two a mirror that reflects collimated rays into a set of directions that amplify the image and an optical lens so that collimated rays are refracted into a set of directions with a prescribed magnification factor. The profiles of these optical surfaces are given by explicit formulas involving the Legendre transformation.

  4. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  5. Comparisons between high-resolution profiles of squared refractive index gradient M2 measured by the Middle and Upper Atmosphere Radar and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during the Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Hubert; Kantha, Lakshmi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Lawrence, Dale; Yabuki, Masanori; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Mixa, Tyler

    2017-03-01

    New comparisons between the square of the generalized potential refractive index gradient M2, estimated from the very high-frequency (VHF) Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU) Radar, located at Shigaraki, Japan, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) measurements are presented. These comparisons were performed at unprecedented temporal and range resolutions (1-4 min and ˜ 20 m, respectively) in the altitude range ˜ 1.27-4.5 km from simultaneous and nearly collocated measurements made during the ShUREX (Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment) 2015 campaign. Seven consecutive UAV flights made during daytime on 7 June 2015 were used for this purpose. The MU Radar was operated in range imaging mode for improving the range resolution at vertical incidence (typically a few tens of meters). The proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 is reported for the first time at such high time and range resolutions for stratified conditions for which Fresnel scatter or a reflection mechanism is expected. In more complex features obtained for a range of turbulent layers generated by shear instabilities or associated with convective cloud cells, M2 estimated from UAV data does not reproduce observed radar echo power profiles. Proposed interpretations of this discrepancy are presented.

  6. Effect of alpha and Gaussian refractive index profiles on the design of highly nonlinear optical fibre for efficient nonlinear optical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvendran, S.; Sivanantharaja, A.; Arivazhagan, S.; Kannan, M.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an index profiled, highly nonlinear ultraflattened dispersion fibre (HN-UFF) with appreciable values of fibre parameters such as dispersion, dispersion slope, effective area, nonlinearity, bending loss and splice loss. The designed fibre has normal zero flattened dispersion over S, C, L, U bands and extends up to 1.9857 μm. The maximum dispersion variation observed for this fibre is as low as 1.61 ps km-1 nm-1 over the 500-nm optical fibre transmission spectrum. This fibre also has two zero dispersion wavelengths at 1.487 and 1.9857 μm and the respective dispersion slopes are 0.02476 and 0.0068 ps nm-2 km-1. The fibre has a very low ITU-T cutoff wavelength of 1.2613 μm and a virtuous nonlinear coefficient of 9.43 W-1 km-1. The wide spectrum of zero flattened dispersion and a good nonlinear coefficient make the designed fibre very promising for different nonlinear optical signal processing applications.

  7. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  8. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angle are distorted by the earth's atmosphere. High precision refraction correction equations are presented which are ideally suited for surveying because their inputs are optically measured range and optically measured elevation angle. The outputs are true straight line range and true geometric elevation angle. The 'short distances' used in surveying allow the calculations of true range and true elevation angle to be quickly made using a programmable pocket calculator. Topics covered include the spherical form of Snell's Law; ray path equations; and integrating the equations. Short-, medium-, and long-range refraction corrections are presented in tables.

  9. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  10. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  11. Cross Gradient Based Joint Inversion of 2D Wide Angle Seismic Reflection/Refraction and Gravity Data Along the Profile Through the 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, S.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    2D wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction survey has been widely used to investigate crustal structure and Moho topography. Similarly gravity survey is also very important in the study of local and regional earth features. Seismic survey is sensitive to the seismic velocity parameters and interface variations. For gravity survey, it is sensitive to density parameters of the medium but the resolution along the vertical direction is relatively poor. In this study, we have developed a strategy to jointly invert for seismic velocity model, density model and interface positions using the gravity observations and seismic arrival times from different phases. For the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data, it often relies on the empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density. In comparison, our joint inversion strategy also includes the cross-gradient based structure constraint for seismic velocity and density models in addition to the empirical relationship between them. The objective function for the joint inversion includes data misfit terms for seismic travel times and gravity observations, the cross-gradient constraint, the smoothness terms for two models, and the data misfit term between predicted gravity data based on density model converted from velocity model using the empirical relationship. Each term has its respective weight. We have applied the new joint inversion method to the Riwoqe-Yushu-Maduo profile in northwest China. The profile crosses through the Qiangtang block and Bayan Har block from southwest to northeast, respectively. The 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu earthquake is located on the profile, around the Ganzi-Yushu fault zone. The joint inversion produces the velocity and density models that are similar in structure and at the same time fit their respective data sets well. Compared to separate seismic inversion using seismic travel times, the joint inversion with gravity data gives a velocity model that better delineates the fault zones. Low

  12. Effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging to satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    Numerous formulas have been developed to partially correct laser ranging data for the effects of atmospheric refraction. All the formulas assume the atmospheric refractivity profile is spherically symmetric. The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients are investigated by ray tracing through spherically symmetric and three-dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles are constructed from radiosonde data. The results indicate that the horizontal gradients introduce an rms error of approximately 3 cm when the satellite is near 10 deg elevation. The error decreases to a few millimeters near zenith.

  13. Littoral Refractivity Prognostic Advancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    situational awareness of the 3D radio-frequency (RF) propagation environment and a quantitative diagnostic and prognostic capability for assessing sub- and...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 with the benchmark showing the quantitative improvement with each stage of model development...grid point. Modified the NSWCDD littoral clutter model ( LCM ) to accept COAMPS® derived refractivity fields. Analyzed the impact on ducting of

  14. Precise determination of the refractive index of suspended particles: light transmission as a function of refractive index mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClymer, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Many fluids appear white because refractive index differences lead to multiple scattering. In this paper, we use safe, low-cost commercial index matching fluids to quantitatively study light transmission as a function of index mismatch, reduce multiple scattering to allow single scattering probes, and to precisely determine the index of refraction of suspended material. The transmission profile is compared with Rayleigh-Gans and Mie theory predictions. The procedure is accessible as a student laboratory project, while providing advantages over other standard methods of measuring the refractive index of an unknown nanoparticle, making it valuable to researchers.

  15. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  16. Refractive beam shapers for focused laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-09-01

    Focusing of laser radiation is most often used approach in various industrial micromachining applications like scribing, PCB drilling, and is important in scientific researches like laser heating in geophysics experiments with diamond anvil cells (DAC). Control of intensity distribution in focal spot is important task since optimum intensity profiles are rather flat-top, doughnut or "inverse-Gauss" than typical for lasers Gaussian profile. Because of high intensity of modern CW and pulsed lasers it is advisable to use refractive beam shaping optics with smooth optical surfaces providing high radiation resistance. Workable optical solutions can be built on the base of diffraction theory conclusion that flat-top intensity profile in focal plane of a lens is created when input beam has Airy-disk intensity distribution. It is suggested to apply refractive beam shapers converting, with minimum wavefront deformation, Gaussian profile of TEM00 beam to a beam with Airy disk intensity distribution, thereby optimizing conditions of interference near the focal plane of a lens after the beam shaper and providing flat-top, doughnut, "inverse-Gauss" profiles. This approach allows operation with CW and ultra-short pulse lasers, using F-theta lenses and objectives, mirror scanners, provides extended depth of field similar to Rayleigh length of comparable TEM00 beam, easy integration in industrial equipment, simple adjustment procedure and switching between profiles, telescope and collimator implementations. There will be considered design basics of beam shapers, analysis of profile behaviour near focal plane, examples of implementations in micromachining systems and experimental DAC setups, results of profile measurements and material processing.

  17. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  18. Refraction, including prisms.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, R L

    1991-02-01

    The literature in the past year on refraction is replete with several isolated but very important topics that have been of interest to strabismologists and refractionists for many decades. The refractive changes in scleral buckling procedures include an increase in axial length as well as an increase in myopia, as would be expected. Tinted lenses in dyslexia show little positive effect in the nonasthmatic patients in one study. The use of spectacles or bifocals as a way to control increase in myopia is refuted in another report. It has been shown that in accommodative esotropia not all patients will be able to escape the use of bifocals in the teenage years, even though surgery might be performed. The hope that disposable contact lenses would cut down on the instance of giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis has been given some credence, and the conventional theory that sclerosis alone is the cause of presbyopia is attacked. Also, gas permeable bifocal contact lenses are reviewed and the difficulties of correcting presbyopia by this method outlined. The practice of giving an aphakic less bifocal addition instead of a nonaphakic, based on the presumption of increased effective power, is challenged. In the review of prisms, the majority of articles concern prism adaption. The most significant report is that of the Prism Adaptation Study Research Group (Arch Ophthalmol 1990, 108:1248-1256), showing that acquired esotropia in particular has an increased incidence of stable and full corrections surgically in the prism adaptation group versus the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. GRAVSAT/GEOPAUSE refraction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llewellyn, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A ground station network tracked a high altitude spacecraft which in turn tracked a low orbiting satellite. Orbit data are relayed back to the ground stations. A refraction study was performed on this configuration to compute ionospheric and tropospheric refraction effects along the satellite and ground links.

  20. Binocular vision and refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Alison L

    2007-05-01

    Binocular status can have an effect on the outcome of refractive surgery. Some accommodative deviations and anisometropia can be managed effectively. Fully accommodative esotropia has been successfully treated in young patients but the outcome can be less predictable in older patients. High anisometropes are usually unaffected by the change in aniseikonia following refractive surgery but there are exceptions. Failure to recognise and appropriately classify a binocular vision anomaly pre-surgically can result in symptoms that are difficult to manage post-operatively. Refractive surgery producing a binocular vision anomaly where there was none pre-operatively is less common. I present a review of the literature discussing the relationship between binocular vision anomalies and refractive surgery, illustrating the findings with published reports of successful and unsuccessful binocular postoperative outcomes. I argue that predicting the binocular outcome should be considered pre-operatively for every refractive surgery patient.

  1. Imaging techniques with refractive beam shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2012-10-01

    Applying of the refractive beam shapers in real research optical setups as well as in industrial installations requires very often manipulation of a final laser spot size. In many cases this task can be easily solved by using various imaging optical layouts presuming creating an image of a beam shaper output aperture. Due to the unique features of the refractive beam shapers of field mapping type, like flat wave front and low divergence of the collimated resulting beam with flattop or another intensity profile, there is a freedom in building of various imaging systems with using ordinary optical components, including off-the-shelf ones. There will be considered optical layouts providing high, up to 1/200×, de-magnifying factors, combining of refractive beam shapers like πShaper with scanning systems, building of relay imaging systems with extended depth of field. These optical layouts are widely used in such laser technologies like drilling holes in PCB, welding, various micromachining techniques with galvo-mirror scanning, interferometry and holography, various SLM-based applications. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  2. Linearly decayed evanescent optical field in planar refractive index well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianhua; Tao, Li

    2017-04-01

    Evanescent optical field with linearly decaying profile is theoretically analyzed at the critical angle of incidence in a planar structure of one dimensional refractive index well (RIW). The linearity of the evanescent field is due to the presence of the second refractive index barrier, which also shifts the position of total internal reflection (TIR) away from the critical angle. The decaying rate is determined by the refractive indices of the two barriers, as well as the width of the well. With this linearly decayed evanescent field (LDEF), various profiles across the well, for example uniform one, can be formed via appropriate combination of the LDEFs, which can promote new applications in fields of material analysis and sensing in the molecular scale.

  3. Barren Acidic Soil Assessment using Seismic Refraction Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.; Zawawi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the geophysics subsurface exploration techniques used to determine subsurface profile characteristics. From past experience, seismic refraction method is commonly used to detect soil layers, overburden, bedrock, etc. However, the application of this method on barren geomaterials remains limited due to several reasons. Hence, this study was performed to evaluate the subsurface profile characteristics of barren acidic soil located in Ayer Hitam, Batu Pahat, Johor using seismic refraction survey. The seismic refraction survey was conducted using ABEM Terraloc MK 8 (seismograph), a sledge hammer weighing 7 kg (source) and 24 units of 10 Hz geophones (receiver). Seismic data processing was performed using OPTIM software which consists of SeisOpt@picker (picking the first arrival and seismic configureuration data input) and SeisOpt@2D (generating 2D image of barren acidic soil based on seismic velocity (primary velocity, Vp) distribution). It was found that the barren acidic soil profile consists of three layers representing residual soil (Vp= 200-400 m/s) at 0-2 m, highly to completely weathered soil (Vp= 500-1800 m/s) at 3-8 m and shale (Vp= 2100-6200 m/s) at 9-20 m depth. Furthermore, result verification was successfully done through the correlation of seismic refraction data based on physical mapping and the geological map of the study area. Finally, it was found that the seismic refraction survey was applicable for subsurface profiling of barren acidic soil as it was very efficient in terms of time, cost, large data coverage and sustainable.

  4. Refractive index modulation in photo-thermo-refractive fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotari, Eugeniu; Glebova, Larissa; Glebov, Leonid

    2005-04-01

    Refractive index decrement was discovered in a fiber made from photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass. PTR glass is a fluorosilicate glass doped with cerium and silver which demonstrates refractive index change after UV exposure and thermal development due to precipitation of NaF nanocrystals in the irradiated areas. This glass is widely used for volume holographic optical elements recording. Photosensitivity in PTR optical fibers has been shown after exposure to radiation at 325 nm for about 1 J/cm2 followed by thermal development at 520°C. Refractive index difference between exposed and unexposed areas was about 1000 ppm. A Bragg mirror at 1088 nm was recorded in such fiber which showed narrow band reflection within 1 nm.

  5. Nonlinear refractive index of photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santran, Stephane; Martinez-Rosas, Miguel; Canioni, Lionel; Sarger, Laurent; Glebova, Larissa N.; Tirpak, Alan; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2006-03-01

    Nonlinear properties of a photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass are studied and compared with those in fused silica and a conventional optical glass. PTR glass is a new photosensitive medium for high-efficiency phase volume hologram recording which manifests a linear refractive index modulation after exposure to UV radiation followed by thermal treatment. Nonlinear optical properties of PTR glass exposed to femtosecond laser pulses are studied. Diffraction patterns in a propagated laser beam focused in the sample were detected by a CCD, while a nonlinear refractive index was measured by a collinear-orthogonal-polarization-pump-probe (COP3) method. It was found that nonlinear refractive index of PTRG is n2 = 3.3 × 10-20 m2/W (0.33 ppm cm2/GW) which is about the same as for the fused silica. It is important that n2 in PTR glass does not vary after UV exposure and thermal development.

  6. Investigation of a new method for determination of atmospheric refractivity corrections in satellite laser ranging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, N. T.; Prokopov, A. V.; Remaev, E. V.

    1997-08-01

    A new algorithm is investigated for calculating atmospheric refractivity corrections in satellite laser ranging in the Earth's spherically stratified atmosphere based on results of measuring meteorological parameters on the Earth's surface. A numerical experiment with 125 meteorological sounding profiles shows that the new method allows to determine atmospheric refractivity corrections with the accuracy better than the Marini-Murray method does.

  7. Effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties

    PubMed Central

    Kalkan Akcay, Emine; Canan, Fatih; Simavli, Huseyin; Dal, Derya; Yalniz, Hacer; Ugurlu, Nagihan; Gecici, Omer; Cagil, Nurullah

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties using Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality. METHODS Using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), the temperament and character profiles of 41 participants with refractive errors (17 with myopia, 12 with hyperopia, and 12 with myopic astigmatism) were compared to those of 30 healthy control participants. Here, temperament comprised the traits of novelty seeking, harm-avoidance, and reward dependence, while character comprised traits of self-directedness, cooperativeness, and self-transcendence. RESULTS Participants with refractive error showed significantly lower scores on purposefulness, cooperativeness, empathy, helpfulness, and compassion (P<0.05, P<0.01, P<0.05, P<0.05, and P<0.01, respectively). CONCLUSION Refractive error might have a negative influence on some character traits, and different types of refractive error might have different temperament and character properties. These personality traits may be implicated in the onset and/or perpetuation of refractive errors and may be a productive focus for psychotherapy. PMID:25709911

  8. Seismic refraction survey of the ANS preferred site

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.K.; Hopkins, R.A.; Doll, W.E.

    1992-02-01

    Between September 19, 1991 and October 8, 1991 personnel from Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), Automated Sciences Group, Inc., and Marrich, Inc. performed a seismic refraction survey at the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) preferred site. The purpose of this survey was to provide estimates of top-of-rock topography, based on seismic velocities, and to delineate variations in rock and soil velocities. Forty-four seismic refraction spreads were shot to determine top-of-rock depths at 42 locations. Nine of the seismic spreads were shot with long offsets to provide 216 top-of-rock depths for 4 seismic refraction profiles. The refraction spread locations were based on the grid for the ANS Phase I drilling program. Interpretation of the seismic refraction data supports the assumption that the top-of-rock surface generally follows the local topography. The shallow top-of-rock interface interpreted from the seismic refraction data is also supported by limited drill information at the site. Some zones of anomalous data are present that could be the result of locally variable weathering, a localized variation in shale content, or depth to top-of-rock greater than the site norm.

  9. Refractive Effects Guidebook (REG)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-22

    NORMAL HORIZON (PLOT, EDIT. LIST. SUMRV. RAVS. LOSS , COUER , END if 20K.-1 100 150 PANQf IN NAUTICAL MILES LOCATION 22 02M 159 47U TIME 25...JUL 69 18102 SOURCE HEIGHT - 100 FEET NORMAL HORIZON t PLOT, EDIT. LIST, SUMPV. PAYS , LOSS , COUER , END )? 5-7 PROFILE TYPE G Very...NORMAL HORIZON (PLOT , ED IT. LI ST. SUTRV . PAVS . LOSS. COUER . END )7 5-8 PROFILE TYPE H Multiple ducts with bases at surface and about 5,000

  10. Evaluation of simplified evaporation duct refractivity models for inversion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeger, J. T.; Grimes, N. G.; Rickard, H. E.; Hackett, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    To assess a radar system's instantaneous performance on any given day, detailed knowledge of the meteorological conditions is required due to the dependency of atmospheric refractivity on thermodynamic properties such as temperature, water vapor, and pressure. Because of the significant challenges involved in obtaining these data, recent efforts have focused on development of methods to obtain the refractivity structure inversely using radar measurements and radar wave propagation models. Such inversion techniques generally use simplified refractivity models in order to reduce the parameter space of the solution. Here the accuracy of three simple refractivity models is examined for the case of an evaporation duct. The models utilize the basic log linear shape classically associated with evaporation ducts, but each model depends on various parameters that affect different aspects of the profile, such as its shape and duct height. The model parameters are optimized using radiosonde data, and their performance is compared to these atmospheric measurements. The optimized models and data are also used to predict propagation using a parabolic equation code with the refractivity prescribed by the models and measured data, and the resulting propagation patterns are compared. The results of this study suggest that the best log linear model formulation for an inversion problem would be a two-layer model that contains at least three parameters: duct height, duct curvature, and mixed layer slope. This functional form permits a reasonably accurate fit to atmospheric measurements as well as embodies key features of the profile required for correct propagation prediction with as few parameters as possible.

  11. Experimental verification and simulation of negative index of refraction using Snell's law.

    PubMed

    Parazzoli, C G; Greegor, R B; Li, K; Koltenbah, B E C; Tanielian, M

    2003-03-14

    We report the results of a Snell's law experiment on a negative index of refraction material in free space from 12.6 to 13.2 GHz. Numerical simulations using Maxwell's equations solvers show good agreement with the experimental results, confirming the existence of negative index of refraction materials. The index of refraction is a function of frequency. At 12.6 GHz we measure and compute the real part of the index of refraction to be -1.05. The measurements and simulations of the electromagnetic field profiles were performed at distances of 14lambda and 28lambda from the sample; the fields were also computed at 100lambda.

  12. Measurement of the refractive index of human teeth by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhuo; Yao, X. Steve; Yao, Hui; Liang, Yan; Liu, Tiegen; Li, Yanni; Wang, Guanhua; Lan, Shoufeng

    2009-05-01

    We describe a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the accurate measurement of the refractive index of in vitro human teeth. We obtain the refractive indices of enamel, dentin, and cementum to be 1.631+/-0.007, 1.540+/-0.013, and 1.582+/-0.010, respectively. The profile of the refractive index is readily obtained via an OCT B scan across a tooth. This method can be used to study the refractive index changes caused by dental decay and therefore has great potential for the clinical diagnosis of early dental caries.

  13. Recent advances in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E Y; Jackson, W B

    1999-01-01

    Refractive errors are some of the most common ophthalmic abnormalities world-wide and are associated with significant morbidity. Tremendous advances in treating refractive errors have occurred over the past 20 years. The arrival of the excimer laser has allowed a level of accuracy in modifying the cornea that was unattainable before. Although refractive surgery is generally safe and effective, it does carry some risks. Careful patient selection, meticulous surgical technique and frequent follow-up can avoid most complications. The experience of a surgical team can also affect the outcome and the incidence of complications. The future should bring continued improvement in outcomes, fewer complications and exciting new options for treating refractive errors. PMID:10333840

  14. Refraction characteristics of phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2015-08-01

    Some of the most interesting refraction properties of phononic crystals are revealed by examining the anti-plane shear waves in doubly periodic elastic composites with unit cells containing rectangular and/or elliptical multi-inclusions. The corresponding band structure, group velocity, and energy-flux vector are calculated using a powerful mixed variational method that accurately and efficiently yields all the field quantities over multiple frequency pass-bands. The background matrix and the inclusions can be anisotropic, each having distinct elastic moduli and mass densities. Equifrequency contours and energy-flux vectors are readily calculated as functions of the wave-vector components. By superimposing the energy-flux vectors on equifrequency contours in the plane of the wave-vector components, and supplementing this with a three-dimensional graph of the corresponding frequency surface, a wealth of information is extracted essentially at a glance. This way it is shown that a composite with even a simple square unit cell containing a central circular inclusion can display negative or positive energy and phase velocity refractions, or simply performs a harmonic vibration (standing wave), depending on the frequency and the wave-vector. Moreover, that the same composite when interfaced with a suitable homogeneous solid can display: (1) negative refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (2) negative refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; (3) positive refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (4) positive refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; or even (5) complete reflection with no energy transmission, depending on the frequency, and direction and the wavelength of the plane-wave that is incident from the homogeneous solid to the interface. For elliptical and rectangular inclusion geometries, analytical expressions are given for the key calculation quantities. Expressions for displacement, velocity, linear momentum

  15. Peripheral refraction and the development of refractive error: a review.

    PubMed

    Charman, W Neil; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2010-07-01

    It has been suggested that emmetropic and low-hyperopic eyes in which the refractive error in the periphery of the visual field is relatively hyperopic with respect to the axial refraction may be at greater risk of developing myopia than eyes with similar refractions but relatively myopic peripheral refractive errors. The animal and human evidence to support this hypothesis is reviewed. The most persuasive studies are those in which emmetropization has been shown to occur in infant rhesus monkeys with ablated foveas but intact peripheral fields, and the demonstration that, in similar animals, lens-induced relative peripheral hyperopia produces central axial myopia. Evidence for emmetropization in animals with severed optic nerves suggests that emmetropization is primarily controlled at the retinal level but that the higher levels of the visual system play a significant role in refining the process: there appear to be no directly equivalent human studies. Since any contribution of the higher centres to the control of refractive development must depend upon the sensitivity to defocus, the results of human studies of the changes in depth-of-focus across the field and of the contribution of the retinal periphery to the accommodation response are discussed. Although peripheral resolution is relatively insensitive to focus, this is not the case for detection. Moreover accommodation occurs to peripheral stimuli out to a field angle of at least 10 deg, and the presence of a peripheral stimulus can influence the accommodation to a central target. Although the basic hypothesis that a relatively hyperopic peripheral refractive error can drive the development of human myopia remains unproven, the available data support the possibility of an interaction between the states of focus on axis and in the periphery.

  16. Photonic crystal negative refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Asatsuma, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are multi-dimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the PC. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell's law, can be tailored using photonic band theory. The negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because PCs usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at absorption-free frequencies, affording significant design flexibility for free-space optics. The PC slab, a high-index membrane with a two-dimensional airhole array, must be carefully designed to avoid reflection and diffraction losses. Light focusing based on negative refraction forms a parallel image of a light source, facilitating optical couplers and condenser lenses for wavelength demultiplexing. A compact wavelength demultiplexer can be designed by combining the prism and lens effects. The collimation effect is obtainable not only inside but also outside of the PC by optimizing negative refractive condition.

  17. Refraction effects on the Galileo probe telemetry carrier frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T. R.

    1991-01-01

    As the Galileo probe relay radio link (RRL) signal propagates outward through the Jovian atmosphere, the atmosphere will manifest itself in two ways. First, the geometric path length of the signal is increased, resulting in a small change of the RRL signal departure angle from the proble (transmitter). Secondly, the velocity of the signal is decreased. For a spherical, static atmosphere with a known profile of refractivity versus altitude the effects of refraction on the RRL frequency can be found using a variation of standard ray-tracing techniques, whereby the ray departure angle is found by an iterative process. From the dispersive characteristics of a mixture of hydrogen and helium with trace amounts of methane and ammonia a simple model of the Jovian atmosphere is constructed assuming spherical symmetry and uniform mixing. The contribution to the RRL Doppler frequency arising from refraction is calculated, and its effect on the Doppler wind measurements is discussed.

  18. Anomalous refraction of guided waves via embedded acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongfei; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    We illustrate the design of acoustic metasurfaces based on geometric tapers and embedded in thin-plate structures. The metasurface is an engineered discontinuity that enables anomalous refraction of guided wave modes according to the Generalized Snell's Law. Locally-resonant geometric torus-like tapers are designed in order to achieve metasurfaces having discrete phase-shift profiles that enable a high level of control of refraction of the wavefronts. Results of numerical simulations show that anomalous refraction can be achieved on transmitted anti-symmetric modes (A0) either when using a symmetric (S0) or anti-symmetric (A0) incident wave, where the former case clearly involves mode conversion mechanisms.

  19. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  20. Estimating refractivity from propagation loss in turbulent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Mark; Gerstoft, Peter; Rogers, Ted

    2016-12-01

    This paper estimates lower atmospheric refractivity (M-profile) given an electromagnetic (EM) propagation loss (PL) measurement. Specifically, height-independent PL measurements over a range of 10-80 km are used to infer information about the existence and potential parameters of atmospheric ducts in the lowest 1 km of the atmosphere. The main improvement made on previous refractivity estimations is inclusion of range-dependent fluctuations due to turbulence in the forward propagation model. Using this framework, the maximum likelihood (ML) estimate of atmospheric refractivity has good accuracy, and with prior information about ducting the maximum a priori (MAP) refractivity estimate can be found. Monte Carlo methods are used to estimate the mean and covariance of PL, which are fed into a Gaussian likelihood function for evaluation of estimated refractivity probability. Comparisons were made between inversions performed on propagation loss data simulated by a wide angle parabolic equation (PE) propagation model with added homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulence. It was found that the turbulence models produce significantly different results, suggesting that accurate modeling of turbulence is key.

  1. Crystalline lens and refractive development.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Rafael

    2015-07-01

    Individual refractive errors usually change along lifespan. Most children are hyperopic in early life. This hyperopia is usually lost during growth years, leading to emmetropia in adults, but myopia also develops in children during school years or during early adult life. Those subjects who remain emmetropic are prone to have hyperopic shifts in middle life. And even later, at older ages, myopic shifts are developed with nuclear cataract. The eye grows from 15 mm in premature newborns to approximately 24 mm in early adult years, but, in most cases, refractions are maintained stable in a clustered distribution. This growth in axial length would represent a refractive change of more than 40 diopters, which is compensated by changes in corneal and lens powers. The process which maintains the balance between the ocular components of refraction during growth is still under study. As the lens power cannot be measured in vivo, but can only be calculated based on the other ocular components, there have not been many studies of lens power in humans. Yet, recent studies have confirmed that the lens loses power during growth in children, and that hyperopic and myopic shifts in adulthood may be also produced by changes in the lens. These studies in children and adults give a picture of the changing power of the lens along lifespan. Other recent studies about the growth of the lens and the complexity of its internal structure give clues about how these changes in lens power are produced along life.

  2. Refractive Index Enhancement in Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    experimentally demonstrated the key ingredients of this approach in Rubidium vapor where we have observe enhanced refractive index with vanishing absorption...beam, Ep. We have recently experimentally demonstrated this effect in a 1-mm-long Rubidium (Rb) vapor cell at high vapor densities. Here, we utilize

  3. Index of Refraction without Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several activities that permit students to determine the index of refraction of transparent solids and liquids using simple equipment without the need for geometrical relationships, special lighting or optical instruments. Graphical analysis of the measured data is shown to be a useful method for determining the index of…

  4. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  5. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  6. The effects of atmospheric refraction on the accuracy of laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanter, D. L.; Gardner, C. S.; Rao, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Correction formulas derived by Saastamoinen and Marini, and the ray traces through the refractivity profiles all assume a spherically symmetric refractivity profile. The errors introduced by this assumption were investigated by ray tracing through three-dimensional profiles. The results of this investigation indicate that the difference between ray traces through the spherically symmetric and three-dimensional profiles is approximately three centimeters at 10 deg and decreases to less than one half of a centimeter at 80 deg. If the accuracy desired in future laser ranging systems is less than a few centimeters, Saastamoinen and Marini's formulas must be altered to account for the fact that the refractivity profile is not spherically symmetric.

  7. Effect of the refractive index change kinetics of photosensitive materials on the diffraction efficiency of reflecting Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Lumeau, Julien; Glebov, Leonid B

    2013-06-10

    Experimental and modeled dependencies of the induced refractive index on dosage of UV exposure in photo-thermo-refractive glass for different thermal treatment regimes are presented. Resulting spatial profiles of refractive index modulation in a reflecting Bragg grating recorded by a holographic technique are computed, and corresponding diffraction efficiencies are modeled. It is shown that nonlinearity of the photosensitivity response is responsible for spatial distortions of a recorded grating that result in a decrease of the diffraction efficiency.

  8. Efficient physics-based predictive 3D image modeling and simulation of optical atmospheric refraction phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Colin N.; Hammel, Stephen M.; Tsintikidis, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    We present some preliminary results and discussion of our ongoing effort to develop a prototype volumetric atmospheric optical refraction simulator which uses 3D nonlinear ray-tracing and state-of-art physics-based rendering techniques. The tool will allow simulation of optical curved-ray propagation through nonlinear refractivity gradient profiles in volumetric atmospheric participating media, and the generation of radiometrically accurate images of the resulting atmospheric refraction phenomena, including inferior and superior mirages, over-the-horizon viewing conditions, looming and sinking, towering and stooping of distant objects. The ability to accurately model and predict atmospheric optical refraction conditions and phenomena is important in both defense and commercial applications. Our nonlinear refractive ray-trace method is currently CPU-parallelized and is well-suited for GPU compute implementation.

  9. Triangulation in Random Refractive Distortions.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Swirski, Yohay

    2017-03-01

    Random refraction occurs in turbulence and through a wavy water-air interface. It creates distortion that changes in space, time and with viewpoint. Localizing objects in three dimensions (3D) despite this random distortion is important to some predators and also to submariners avoiding the salient use of periscopes. We take a multiview approach to this task. Refracted distortion statistics induce a probabilistic relation between any pixel location and a line of sight in space. Measurements of an object's random projection from multiple views and times lead to a likelihood function of the object's 3D location. The likelihood leads to estimates of the 3D location and its uncertainty. Furthermore, multiview images acquired simultaneously in a wide stereo baseline have uncorrelated distortions. This helps reduce the acquisition time needed for localization. The method is demonstrated in stereoscopic video sequences, both in a lab and a swimming pool.

  10. [Refractive surgery and flight safety].

    PubMed

    Draeger, J

    1998-09-01

    For both VFR and as IFR flight, visual assessment is the major source of information for the pilot. The new possibilities for change of refraction by means of corneal refractive surgery have led to an increasing demand from pilots for these new methods. Can these methods successfully be applied for aviation purposes? The valid regulations for medical standards of pilots, as well as the future international regulations such as JAR and ICAO, are explained in this respect. A report is given on the work of the Advisory Board of the German Federal Government Air Traffic Authority and on the cases treated so far and their outcome, and recommendations are expressed. Concerning the legal situation and clinical experience, advice for pilots, aviation medical examiners and ophthalmologists is given.

  11. Refractive keratoplasty. Keratophakia and keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Troutman, R C; Swinger, C

    1982-01-01

    Early experience with the refractive keratoplasty techniques of José Barraquer--keratophakia and hypermetropic keratomileusis is presented. In contradistinction to the alloplastic lens substitutes currently being employed for the integral correction of aphakia, Barraquer's techniques would seem to offer a more permanent, more physiologic, full-time optical correction of the aphakic state. Their use is limited only by the condition of the patient's cornea and, in fact, may be applied not only in aphakia but also in phakic eyes with higher degrees of hyperopia or myopia. In the opinion of the authors, the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Barraquer can be performed by any well-instructed ophthalmic surgeon. These techniques offer to many patients a satisfactory, and potentially a physiologically superior alternative to alloplastic lens substitute for aphakic correction.

  12. Refractive keratoplasty: keratophakia and keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Troutman, R C; Swinger, C

    1978-01-01

    We have presented our early experience with the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Doctor Jose Barraquer--keratophakia and hypermetropic keratomileusis. In contradistinction to the alloplastic lens substitutes currently being employed for the integral correction of aphakia, his techniques would seem to offer a more permanent, more physiologic, full-time optical correction of the aphakic state. Their use is limited only by the condition of the patient's corneaa and, in fact, may be applied not only in aphakia but also in phakic eyes with higher degrees of hyperopia or myopia. In the opinion of the authors, the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Barraquer can be perfored by any well-instructed ophthalmic surgeon. These techniques offer to many patients a satisfactory and potentially a physiologically superior alternative to alloplastic lens substitute for aphakic correction.

  13. Electro-refractive photonic device

    SciTech Connect

    Zortman, William A.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-06-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to phase shifting light to facilitate any of light switching, modulation, amplification, etc. Structures are presented where a second layer is juxtaposed between a first layer and a third layer with respective doping facilitating formation of p-n junctions at the interface between the first layer and the second layer, and between the second layer and the third layer. Application of a bias causes a carrier concentration change to occur at the p-n junctions which causes a shift in the effective refractive index per incremental change in an applied bias voltage. The effective refractive index enhancement can occur in both reverse bias and forward bias. The structure can be incorporated into a waveguide, an optical resonator, a vertical junction device, a horizontal junction device, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a tuneable optical filter, etc.

  14. Quantification of scaling exponents and dynamical complexity of microwave refractivity in a tropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuwape, Ibiyinka A.; Ogunjo, Samuel T.

    2016-12-01

    Radio refractivity index is used to quantify the effect of atmospheric parameters in communication systems. Scaling and dynamical complexities of radio refractivity across different climatic zones of Nigeria have been studied. Scaling property of the radio refractivity across Nigeria was estimated from the Hurst Exponent obtained using two different scaling methods namely: The Rescaled Range (R/S) and the detrended fluctuation analysis(DFA). The delay vector variance (DVV), Largest Lyapunov Exponent (λ1) and Correlation Dimension (D2) methods were used to investigate nonlinearity and the results confirm the presence of deterministic nonlinear profile in the radio refractivity time series. The recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) was used to quantify the degree of chaoticity in the radio refractivity across the different climatic zones. RQA was found to be a good measure for identifying unique fingerprint and signature of chaotic time series data. Microwave radio refractivity was found to be persistent and chaotic in all the study locations. The dynamics of radio refractivity increases in complexity and chaoticity from the Coastal region towards the Sahelian climate. The design, development and deployment of robust and reliable microwave communication link in the region will be greatly affected by the chaotic nature of radio refractivity in the region.

  15. Ray tracing evaluation of a technique for correcting the refraction errors in satellite tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.; Hendrickson, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Errors may be introduced in satellite laser ranging data by atmospheric refractivity. Ray tracing data have indicated that horizontal refractivity gradients may introduce nearly 3-cm rms error when satellites are near 10-degree elevation. A correction formula to compensate for the horizontal gradients has been developed. Its accuracy is evaluated by comparing it to refractivity profiles. It is found that if both spherical and gradient correction formulas are employed in conjunction with meteorological measurements, a range resolution of one cm or less is feasible for satellite elevation angles above 10 degrees.

  16. Laser refractive tomography of phase objects

    SciTech Connect

    Raskovskaya, I L

    2013-06-30

    The principles are outlined of laser refractive tomography - a method for reconstructing the values of the refractive index in the cross sections of phase objects, which involves the use of three-dimensional refractive images (3D refractograms) of structured laser radiation. A simulation algorithm is realised and examples are provided of characteristic 3D refractograms obtained by solving the direct problem of refraction of structured radiation. A method was developed for reconstructing the values of refractive index under conditions of strong refraction, which is based on the visualisation of ray trajectories inside an optically inhomogeneous medium. A classification is made of possible approaches to the solution of the inverse problem of refraction based on the visualisation of ray trajectories. Examples are given of cross section reconstruction and quantitative diagnostics of phase objects. (laser imaging)

  17. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Refractivity estimation from radar sea clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Si-Xun; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Sheng, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating lower atmospheric refractivity under the nonstandard propagation conditions frequently encountered in low altitude maritime radar applications. The vertical structure of the refractive environment is modeled by using a five-parameter model, and the horizontal structure is modeled as range-independent. The electromagnetic propagation in the troposphere is simulated by using a split-step fast Fourier transform based on parabolic approximation to the wave equation. A global search marked as a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) for the 5 environmental parameters is performed by using a genetic algorithm (GA) integrated with a simulated annealing technique. The retrieved results from simulated runs demonstrate the ability of this method to make atmospheric refractivity estimations. A comparison with the classical GA and the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (Bayesian-MCMC) technique shows that the MGA can not only shorten the inverse time but also improve the inverse precision. For real data cases, the inversion values do not match the reference data very well. The inverted profile, however, can be used to synoptically describe the real refractive structure.

  18. Negative refraction in a laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    This work is concerned with the reflection and transmission of waves at a plane interface between a homogeneous elastic half-space and a half-space of elastic material that is periodically laminated. The lamination is always in the direction of the x1-coordinate axis and the displacement is always longitudinal shear, so that the only non-zero displacement component is u3(x1 ,x2 , t). After an initial discussion of Floquet-Bloch waves in the laminated material, brief consideration is given to the reflection-transmission problem, when the interface between the two media is the plane x1 = 0. Nothing unusual emerges: there are just a single reflected wave and a single transmitted wave, undergoing positive group-velocity refraction. Then, the problem is considered when the interface between the two media is the plane x2 = 0. The periodic structure of the interface induces an infinite set of reflected waves and an infinite set of transmitted waves. All need to be taken into account, but most decay exponentially away from the interface. It had previously been recognized that, if the incident wave had appropriate frequency and angle of incidence, a propagating transmitted wave would be generated that would undergo negative group-velocity refraction - behaviour usually associated with a metamaterial. It is established by an example in this work that there is, in addition, a propagating transmitted wave with smaller wavelength but larger group velocity that undergoes positive group-velocity refraction. The work concludes with a brief discussion of this finding, including its implications for the utility (or not) of "effective medium" theory.

  19. Influence of refractive index matching on the photon diffuse reflectance.

    PubMed

    Churmakov, D Y; Meglinski, I V; Greenhalgh, D A

    2002-12-07

    Photon migration in a randomly inhomogeneous, highly scattering and absorbing semi-infinite medium with a plane boundary is considered by a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. The employed MC technique combines the statistical weight scheme and real photon paths simulation, allowing the exclusion of the energy conservation problem. The internal reflection of the scattered radiation on the medium interface is taken into account by allowing the trajectories of photon packets to be split into reflected and transmitted parts. The spatial photon sensitivity profile (SPSP), spatially resolved diffuse reflectance and angular and spatial photon detector weight distributions are considered in terms of Fresnel's reflection/refraction on the boundary of the medium. The effect of the refractive index match is predicted correctly by the MC method and by the diffusion approximation. The results demonstrate that matching of the refractive index of the medium significantly improves the contrast and spatial resolution of the spatial photon sensitivity profile (SPSP). The results of simulation of the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance agree well with the results predicted by the diffusion approximation and the experimental results reported earlier.

  20. Refraction of cylindrical converging shock wave at an air/helium gaseous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zhigang; Li, Wei; Si, Ting; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2017-01-01

    Refraction of a cylindrical converging shock wave at an inclined air/helium interface is investigated. Experimentally, based on the shock dynamics theory, a special wall profile is designed to generate a perfectly cylindrical converging shock wave. A soap film technique is developed to form an inclined discontinuous air/helium interface, and high-speed schlieren photography is adopted to capture the flow. Numerical simulations are also performed to compare with the experimental counterparts and to show details of refraction. In this work, two initial incident angles (45° and 60°) are considered. As the incident shock converges inward, the shock intensity increases while the incident angle decreases, causing possible transitions among the wave patterns. For the case of 45°, an irregular refraction of free precursor refraction (FPR) first occurs and gradually transits into regular refraction, while for the case of 60°, various irregular refractions of twin von Neumann refraction (TNR), twin regular refraction (TRR), free precursor von Neumann refraction (FNR), and FPR occur in sequence. The transition sequences do not belong to any groups described in the planar counterpart, indicating that the classification of the refraction phenomenon in the planar case is not exhaustive or cannot be applied to the converging case. It is also the first time to observe the transition from FNR to FPR, providing an experimental evidence for the previous numerical results. It is deemed that the difference between the velocities of the incident and transmitted shocks propagating along the interface is the primary factor that induces the transitions among wave patterns.

  1. Effects of refractive index mismatch in optical CT imaging of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki S, Sharath; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-02-15

    reconstructs the dose profiles by estimating refractive indices of multiple inhomogeneities having different refractive indices and optical densities embedded in the dosimeter. This is achieved by tracking the path of the ray that traverses through the dosimeter. Extensive simulation studies have been carried out and results are found to be matching that of experimental results.

  2. Investigation of refracting flows for acoustic suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, D.; Purves, R. B.; Farquhar, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the possibility of using refracting flows for the suppression of aircraft inlet noise has been completed. Observations of wave behavior in accelerating duct flows have suggested that acoustic wave refraction could be used to direct inlet noise away from the ground upward to where it causes less annoyance. Measurements have also shown that acoustic wave refraction can cause large improvements in the effectiveness of acoustic lining material.

  3. Investigation of refracting flows for acoustic suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, D.; Purves, R. B.; Farquhar, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation to determine the possibility of using refracting flows for the suppression of aircraft inlet noise is described. Observations of wave refraction in duct flows and measurements of the increase in effectiveness of acoustic linings due to refraction have suggested methods for the design of engine inlet ducts which can either suppress noise internally or direct it to where it causes less annoyance.

  4. Polymeric nanolayered gradient refractive index lenses: technology review and introduction of spherical gradient refractive index ball lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shanzuo; Yin, Kezhen; Mackey, Matthew; Brister, Aaron; Ponting, Michael; Baer, Eric

    2013-11-01

    A nanolayered polymer films approach to designing and fabricating gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses with designer refractive index distribution profiles and an independently prescribed lens surface geometry have been demonstrated to produce a new class of optics. This approach utilized nanolayered polymer materials, constructed with polymethylmethacrylate and a styrene-co-acrylonitrile copolymer with a tailorable refractive index intermediate to bulk materials, to fabricate discrete GRIN profile materials. A process to fabricate nanolayered polymer GRIN optics from these materials through thermoforming and finishing steps is reviewed. A collection of technology-demonstrating previously reported nanolayered GRIN case studies is presented that include: (1) the optical performance of a f/# 2.25 spherical GRIN plano-convex singlet with one quarter (2) the weight of a similar BK7 lens and a bio-inspired aspheric human eye GRIN lens. Original research on the fabrication and characterization of a Luneburg inspired GRIN ball lens is presented as a developing application of the nanolayered polymer technology.

  5. Detecting motion through dynamic refraction.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Perona, Pietro; Shamir, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Refraction causes random dynamic distortions in atmospheric turbulence and in views across a water interface. The latter scenario is experienced by submerged animals seeking to detect prey or avoid predators, which may be airborne or on land. Man encounters this when surveying a scene by a submarine or divers while wishing to avoid the use of an attention-drawing periscope. The problem of inverting random refracted dynamic distortions is difficult, particularly when some of the objects in the field of view (FOV) are moving. On the other hand, in many cases, just those moving objects are of interest, as they reveal animal, human, or machine activity. Furthermore, detecting and tracking these objects does not necessitate handling the difficult task of complete recovery of the scene. We show that moving objects can be detected very simply, with low false-positive rates, even when the distortions are very strong and dominate the object motion. Moreover, the moving object can be detected even if it has zero mean motion. While the object and distortion motions are random and unknown, they are mutually independent. This is expressed by a simple motion feature which enables discrimination of moving object points versus the background.

  6. Negative refraction in semiconductor metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Anthony J; Alekseyev, Leonid; Howard, Scott S; Franz, Kale J; Wasserman, Dan; Podolskiy, Viktor A; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Sivco, Deborah L; Gmachl, Claire

    2007-12-01

    An optical metamaterial is a composite in which subwavelength features, rather than the constituent materials, control the macroscopic electromagnetic properties of the material. Recently, properly designed metamaterials have garnered much interest because of their unusual interaction with electromagnetic waves. Whereas nature seems to have limits on the type of materials that exist, newly invented metamaterials are not bound by such constraints. These newly accessible electromagnetic properties make these materials an excellent platform for demonstrating unusual optical phenomena and unique applications such as subwavelength imaging and planar lens design. 'Negative-index materials', as first proposed, required the permittivity, epsilon, and permeability, mu, to be simultaneously less than zero, but such materials face limitations. Here, we demonstrate a comparatively low-loss, three-dimensional, all-semiconductor metamaterial that exhibits negative refraction for all incidence angles in the long-wave infrared region and requires only an anisotropic dielectric function with a single resonance. Using reflection and transmission measurements and a comprehensive model of the material, we demonstrate that our material exhibits negative refraction. This is furthermore confirmed through a straightforward beam optics experiment. This work will influence future metamaterial designs and their incorporation into optical semiconductor devices.

  7. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  8. Statistical Analysis of Refractivity in UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ansari, Kifah; Al-Mal, Abdulhadi Abu; Kamel, Rami

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the refractivity statistics in the UAE (United Arab Emirates) for a period of 14 years (1990-2003). Six sites have been considered using meteorological surface data (Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Al-Ain, Ras Al-Kaimah, and Al-Fujairah). Upper air (radiosonde) data were available at one site only, Abu Dhabi airport, which has been considered for the refractivity gradient statistics. Monthly and yearly averages are obtained for the two parameters, refractivity and refractivity gradient. Cumulative distributions are also provided.

  9. Hard x-ray nanofocusing by refractive lenses of constant thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiboth, F.; Scholz, M.; Patommel, J.; Hoppe, R.; Wittwer, F.; Reinhardt, J.; Seidel, J.; Knaut, M.; Jahn, A.; Richter, K.; Bartha, J. W.; Falkenberg, G.; Schroer, C. G.

    2014-09-01

    In order to focus light or x rays, the thickness of a refractive lens is typically varied over its aperture. Here, we present a refractive x-ray lens made of lamellae of constant thickness, the refractive lamellar lens. Refractive power is created by a specific bending of the lamellae rather than by a concave lens profile. This very special design has the technological advantage that materials like sapphire or diamond can be used to make lenses by coating techniques. A first lens prototype focused x rays with a photon energy E = 15.25 keV to a lateral beam size of 164 nm × 296 nm full width at half maximum.

  10. Refractive index engineering of high performance coupler for compact photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Zhou, Zhiping

    2017-04-01

    High performance couplers are highly desired in many applications, but the design is limited by nearly unchangeable material refractive index. To tackle this issue, refractive index engineering method is investigated, which can be realized by subwavelength grating. Subwavelength gratings are periodical structures with pitches small enough to locally synthesize the refractive index of photonic waveguides, which allows direct control of optical profile as well as easier fabrication process. This review provides an introduction to the basics of subwavelength structures and pay special attention to the design strategies of some representative examples of subwavelength grating devices, including: edge couplers, fiber-chip grating couplers, directional couplers and multimode interference couplers. Benefited from the subwavelength grating which can engineer the refractive index as well as birefringence and dispersion, these devices show better performance when compared to their conventional counterparts.

  11. Hard x-ray nanofocusing by refractive lenses of constant thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Seiboth, F. Scholz, M.; Patommel, J.; Hoppe, R.; Wittwer, F.; Reinhardt, J.; Seidel, J.; Knaut, M.; Jahn, A.; Richter, K.; Bartha, J. W.; Falkenberg, G.; Schroer, C. G.

    2014-09-29

    In order to focus light or x rays, the thickness of a refractive lens is typically varied over its aperture. Here, we present a refractive x-ray lens made of lamellae of constant thickness, the refractive lamellar lens. Refractive power is created by a specific bending of the lamellae rather than by a concave lens profile. This very special design has the technological advantage that materials like sapphire or diamond can be used to make lenses by coating techniques. A first lens prototype focused x rays with a photon energy E = 15.25 keV to a lateral beam size of 164 nm × 296 nm full width at half maximum.

  12. Refractive microlenses for ultraflat photolithographic projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Eisner, Martin; Ossmann, Christian; Weible, Kenneth J.

    2000-08-01

    We report on the fabrication of high quality microlens arrays on 4', 6' and 8'-fused silica wafers. Refractive, plano-convex microlenses are fabricated by using photolithography; a reflow or melting resist technique and reactive ion etching. A diffraction-limited optical performance (p-v wave aberrations of < (lambda) /8, Strehl ratio GTR 0.97) is achieved. Aspherical lens profiles are obtained by varying the etch parameters during the reactive ion etching transfer. The microlens arrays are used for Microlens Projection Lithography (MPL) and within UV-light illumination systems. Microlens Projection Lithography is an innovative technique using KARL SUSS Mask Aligners equipped with an ultra-flat microlens-based projection system. The projection system consists of 500.000 identical micro-objectives side- by-side. Each micro-objective consists of 3 to 4 microlenses. A fully symmetrical optical design eliminates coma, distortion and lateral color. The lens system is frontal- and backside telecentric to provide a unit magnification (+1) over the whole depth of focus. Each micro- objective images a small part of the photomask pattern onto the wafer. The partial images from different channels overlap consistently and form a complete aerial image of the photomask. Microlens Projection Lithography provides an increased depth of focus (GTR 50 microns) at a larger working distance ($GTR 1 mm)than standard proximity printing. Microlens Projection Lithography allows photolithography on curved on non-planar substrates, in V-grooves, holes, etc. using a KARL SUSS Mask Aligner.

  13. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  14. Measuring Variable Refractive Indices Using Digital Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Testa, I.; Sassi, E.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure for performing quantitative measurements in teaching optics is presented. Application of the procedure to accurately measure the rate of change of the variable refractive index of a water-denatured alcohol mixture is described. The procedure can also be usefully exploited for measuring the constant refractive index of distilled…

  15. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  16. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Radko, Ilya P; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2008-03-17

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive index increases inside the array by a factor of approximately 1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase deduced from the SPP refraction by triangular arrays. The SPP refractive index is found to decrease slightly for longer wavelengths within the wavelength range of 700-860 nm. Modeling based on the Green's tensor formalism is in a good agreement with the experimental results, opening the possibility to design nanoparticle arrays for specific applications requiring in-plane SPP manipulation.

  17. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  18. The Northern Walker Lane Seismic Refraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Smith, S. B.; Thelen, W.; Scott, J. B.; Clark, M.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional reference seismic velocity model for the western Great Basin region of Nevada and eastern California. The northern Walker Lane had not been characterized well by previous work. In May 2002 we collected a new crustal refraction profile from Battle Mountain, Nev. across western Nevada, the Reno area, Lake Tahoe, and the northern Sierra to Auburn, Calif. Mine blasts and earthquakes were recorded by 199 Texan instruments (loaned by the PASSCAL Instrument Center) extending across this more than 450-km-long transect. The seismic sources at the eastern end were mining blasts at Barrick's GoldStrike pit. We recorded additional blasts at the Florida Canyon and other mines between Lovelock and Battle Mountain, Nevada. The GoldStrike mine produced several ripple-fired blasts using 10,000-40,000 kg of ANFO each. First arrivals from the larger blasts are obvious to distances exceeding 250 km in the raw records. A M2.4 earthquake near Bridgeport, Calif. also produced pickable P-wave arrivals across at least half the transect, providing fan-shot data. We recorded only during working hours, and so missed an M4 earthquake that occurred at night. Events of M2 occurred during our recording to the west on the San Andreas fault near Pinnacles, Calif.; M3 events occurred near Portola and Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Arrivals from M5 events in the Mariana and Kuril Islands also appear in the records. Time-picks from these earthquakes may be possible after more work on synthetic-time modeling, data filtering, and display. We plan to record blasts at quarries in the western Sierra in future experiments, for a direct refraction reversal. We will compare our time picks against times generated from regional velocity models, to identify potential crustal and upper-mantle velocity anomalies. Such anomalies may be associated with the Battle Mountain heat-flow high, the northern Walker Lane belt, or the northern Sierran block.

  19. 3D refractive index measurements of special optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Cheng; Huang, Su-Juan; Miao, Zhuang; Chang, Zheng; Zeng, Jun-Zhang; Wang, Ting-Yun

    2016-09-01

    A digital holographic microscopic chromatography-based approach with considerably improved accuracy, simplified configuration and performance stability is proposed to measure three dimensional refractive index of special optical fibers. Based on the approach, a measurement system is established incorporating a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer and lab-developed supporting software for data processing. In the system, a phase projection distribution of an optical fiber is utilized to obtain an optimal digital hologram recorded by a CCD, and then an angular spectrum theory-based algorithm is adopted to extract the phase distribution information of an object wave. The rotation of the optic fiber enables the experimental measurements of multi-angle phase information. Based on the filtered back projection algorithm, a 3D refraction index of the optical fiber is thus obtained at high accuracy. To evaluate the proposed approach, both PANDA fibers and special elliptical optical fiber are considered in the system. The results measured in PANDA fibers agree well with those measured using S14 Refractive Index Profiler, which is, however, not suitable for measuring the property of a special elliptical fiber.

  20. Microvolume index of refraction determinations by interferometric backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornhop, Darryl J.

    1995-06-01

    A new method has been applied to the determination of fluid bulk properties in small detection volumes. Through the use of an unfocused He-Ne laser beam and a cylindrical tube of capillary dimensions, relative refractive-index measurements are possible. The backscattered light from the illumination of a tube of capillary dimensions produces an interference pattern that is spatially defined and that contains information related to the bulk properties of the fluid contained in the tube. Positional changes in the intensity-modulated beam profile (interference fringes) are directly related to the refractive index of the fluid in the tube. The determination of dn/n at the 10-7 level is possible in probe volumes of 350 pL. The technique has been applied to tubes as small as 75 mu m inner diameter and as large as 1.0 mm inner diameter. No modification of the simple optical bench is required for facilitating the determination of refractive index for the complete range of tube diameters.

  1. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  2. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  3. A study of refraction of a cylindrical laser beam in stratified liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevichyus, B. S.; Sapronov, M. V.; Pavlov, I. N.

    2016-09-01

    Refraction of a cylindrical laser beam in a transition layer at the interface of two liquids with different optical characteristics is studied theoretically and experimentally. A theoretical basis for calculations of the beam trajectory in the transition layer of stratified liquid is given. Two- and three-dimensional images (2D and 3D refractograms) of a cylindrical laser beam inside and outside the media are obtained on the basis of a tangential model of the refractive index profile. The influence of the parameters of the laser beam and media on the appearance of refractograms is studied and the optimal experimental conditions are selected with the use of computer simulation. A scheme of the setup for recording digital 2D refractogram and experimental results are presented. Algorithms for digitizing experimental images and for their comparison with calculated refractograms to determine the refractive index profile in the transition layer based on the tangential model are developed.

  4. Novel characterization of the nonlinear refractive response of materials using spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Amanda; Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the nonlinear refractive index of a material is important in order to fully understand the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond laser pulses. The most common method to obtaining the nonlinear refractive index is Z-scan. However, since it averages over pulse duration and beam profile, Z-scan is not reliable when there is time- and intensity-dependence of the nonlinear response. The new method we are exploring to make these nonlinear refractive index measurements is spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry (SSRI). SSRI is a method that can give a simultaneous measurement of the spatial wave-front across the frequency or temporal profile of the pulse. The SSRI method proves better in measuring response at specific y and t, allowing it to measure both delayed response and saturation effects. The ability to make a measurement in both dimensions enables understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics in other experiments as cross-wave polarization and filamentation.

  5. Source localization from an elevated acoustic sensor array in a refractive atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ostashev, Vladimir E; Scanlon, Michael V; Wilson, D Keith; Vecherin, Sergey N

    2008-12-01

    Localization of sound sources on the ground from an acoustic sensor array elevated on a tethered aerostat is considered. To improve estimation of the source coordinates, one should take into account refraction of sound rays due to atmospheric stratification. Using a geometrical acoustics approximation for a stratified moving medium, formulas for the source coordinates are derived that account for sound refraction. The source coordinates are expressed in terms of the direction of sound propagation as measured by the sensor array, its coordinates, and the vertical profiles of temperature and wind velocity. Employing these formulas and typical temperature and wind velocity profiles in the atmosphere, it is shown numerically that sound refraction is important for accurate predictions of the source coordinates. Furthermore, it is shown that the effective sound speed approximation, which is widely used in atmospheric acoustics, fails to correctly predict the source coordinates if the grazing angle of sound propagation is relatively large.

  6. Long-Term Global Distributions of Mesoscale Variations in Atmospheric Radio Refraction Obtained from the GPS Champ Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, N. M.; Manuilova, R. O.

    2016-12-01

    We obtain average global distributions of the variances of the mesoscale variations in the atmospheric radio-refraction index (refractive index) at altitudes of 5-35 km from the data of the radio-occultation experiments performed during operation of the low-orbit GPS CHAMP satellite in the period 2001-2009. The filtering of the vertical profiles of the radio-refraction index allows one to determine the variances of the variations with vertical scales below 8 km. The latitudinal-temporal distributions of the zonal-mean variances of the index demonstrate significant interannual variations at various altitudes. Seasonal variations in the variances of radio refraction are studied. Quasi-biennial oscillations at low latitudes are revealed. Acoustic-gravity waves and turbulent and convective motions in the atmosphere can cause a spread of the radio-refraction index.

  7. Negative Refraction in Rare-Earth Doped Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-09

    refraction remained an academic curiosity for a long time , it is now well-understood that negative refraction may have important and far-reaching...of negative refraction remained an academic curiosity for a long time , it is now well-understood that negative refraction may have important and far...concept of negative refraction remained an academic curiosity for a long time , it is now well-understood that negative refraction may have important and

  8. [Does refractive surgery really make eyeglasses superfluous?].

    PubMed

    Seiler, T

    2001-06-14

    Spectacles have become a problem of life-style in some societies. In the USA, in 1999 approximately 1 million LASIK operations have been performed to correct myopia and astigmatism and in Europe the frequency of refractive surgery stead by increases. However, only 3 to 5% of these operations are medically indicated. Refractive surgery is evaluated regarding safety and efficacy. Modern laser techniques demonstrate excellent refractive results: photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) achieved refractive success rates of 90% and more with complication rates of 0.5% and less. PRK is, therefore, a valuable technique for corrections of myopia up to -6.0 D. Similar efficacy is obtained with LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) in corrections up to -10 D, however, the complication rate is somewhat higher. Laser correction of hyperopia is equally successful regarding the refractive success but shows an even higher complication rate and the patient satisfaction is lower. Modern refractive laser surgery may replace spectacles in the majority of the cases, however, none of the techniques is free of complications. Therefore, we understand refractive surgery still to be inferior to the correction of ametropia by means of spectacles and any such operation should be attempted only after thorough discussion.

  9. [Calculations of mean refraction and variation of refraction using a dioptric space].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, O; Costantini, E; Gaujoux, T; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-11-01

    Polar notations (sphere, cylinder, and axis) of refraction perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis or graphic representation. While the spherical component of refraction can be easily analyzed by the spherical equivalent, statistical analysis of astigmatism requires non-polar expressions of refraction. Indeed, the cylinder and axis of astigmatism are not independent data. In addition, axis is a directional data including a non-trigonometric cycle. Refraction can be written in a non-polar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x, y, z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three coordinates constitute three independent (orthogonal) variables that correspond to a sphere-equivalent component and a pair of Jackson cross-cylinder components, oriented at 0°/90° (WTR/ATR astigmatism) and 45°/135° (oblique astigmatism). Statistical analysis and graphical representation become less complicated when using rectangular coordinates of refraction. Rectangular coordinates of the mean refraction are obtained by average rectangular coordinates. Similarly, rectangular coordinates of refraction change are obtained by a single subtraction of rectangular coordinates between the final and initial refractions. After statistical analysis, the rectangular coordinates obtained can be converted into a polar form for a more easily understood result. Finally, non-polar notations including rectangular coordinates are useful for statistical and graphical analysis, which would be difficult with only conventional polar notations of refraction.

  10. Formation of bulk refractive index structures

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jr., Barrett George; Potter, Kelly Simmons; Wheeler, David R.; Jamison, Gregory M.

    2003-07-15

    A method of making a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure in photosensitive materials using photo-patterning where first determined is the wavelength at which a photosensitive material film exhibits a change in refractive index upon exposure to optical radiation, a portion of the surfaces of the photosensitive material film is optically irradiated, the film is marked to produce a registry mark. Multiple films are produced and aligned using the registry marks to form a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure.

  11. Negative refraction in Möbius molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. N.; Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically show the negative refraction existing in Möbius molecules. The negative refractive index is induced by the nontrivial topology of the molecules. With the Möbius boundary condition, the effective electromagnetic fields felt by the electron in a Möbius ring is spatially inhomogeneous. In this regard, the DN symmetry is broken in Möbius molecules and thus the magnetic response is induced through the effective magnetic field. Our findings provide an alternative architecture for negative refractive index materials based on the nontrivial topology of Möbius molecules.

  12. X-ray refraction effect and density determination of steep-gradient, high-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyanaga, N.; Kato, Y.; Yamanaka, C.

    1982-12-01

    X-ray defraction due to the steep density gradient of a laser-produced plasma has been observed. Distribution of the density gradient was determined from the measured refraction angle. Estimation of the radial density profile and the density scale length in the high-density region near the ablation surface are presented.

  13. International Society of Refractive Surgery of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Epithelial Thickness Profile Changes" Go to the Journal of Refractive Surgery » Trending on ISRS Now Visit the ISRS Facebook page to read why Irish Open champion Rory McIlroy says having LASIK surgery helped his golf game. Discover the Benefits of ISRS ISRS is the leading organization for ...

  14. Understanding refraction contrast using a comparison of absorption and refraction computed tomographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, S.; Rhoades, G.; Wei, Z.; Rosenberg, A.; Belev, G.; Chapman, D.

    2013-05-01

    Refraction x-ray contrast is an imaging modality used primarily in a research setting at synchrotron facilities, which have a biomedical imaging research program. The most common method for exploiting refraction contrast is by using a technique called Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). The DEI apparatus allows the detection of refraction between two materials and produces a unique ''edge enhanced'' contrast appearance, very different from the traditional absorption x-ray imaging used in clinical radiology. In this paper we aim to explain the features of x-ray refraction contrast as a typical clinical radiologist would understand. Then a discussion regarding what needs to be considered in the interpretation of the refraction image takes place. Finally we present a discussion about the limitations of planar refraction imaging and the potential of DEI Computed Tomography. This is an original work that has not been submitted to any other source for publication. The authors have no commercial interests or conflicts of interest to disclose.

  15. Isaac Newton and the astronomical refraction.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H

    2008-12-01

    In a short interval toward the end of 1694, Isaac Newton developed two mathematical models for the theory of the astronomical refraction and calculated two refraction tables, but did not publish his theory. Much effort has been expended, starting with Biot in 1836, in the attempt to identify the methods and equations that Newton used. In contrast to previous work, a closed form solution is identified for the refraction integral that reproduces the table for his first model (in which density decays linearly with elevation). The parameters of his second model, which includes the exponential variation of pressure in an isothermal atmosphere, have also been identified by reproducing his results. The implication is clear that in each case Newton had derived exactly the correct equations for the astronomical refraction; furthermore, he was the first to do so.

  16. A fully automated remote refraction system.

    PubMed

    Dyer, A M; Kirk, A H

    2000-01-01

    Traditional methods of performing refractions depend on a trained refractionist being present with the subject and conducting an interactive form of subjective testing. A fully automated refraction system was installed in 13 optical dispensaries and after 15 months the patient and statistical information was gathered. The data from all operators were consistent and suggested a lack of operator effect on the refraction results. The mean of the SD of subjective sphere measurements was 0.2, or slightly less than a quarter dioptre, which would be an acceptable level of accuracy for ordering corrective lenses. The present study suggests an absence of operator influence on the results of the refractions and a degree of consistency and accuracy compatible with the prescription of lenses.

  17. Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shalaev, Vladimir M; Cai, Wenshan; Chettiar, Uday K; Yuan, Hsiao-Kuan; Sarychev, Andrey K; Drachev, Vladimir P; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2005-12-15

    A double-periodic array of pairs of parallel gold nanorods is shown to have a negative refractive index in the optical range. Such behavior results from the plasmon resonance in the pairs of nanorods for both the electric and the magnetic components of light. The refractive index is retrieved from direct phase and amplitude measurements for transmission and reflection, which are all in excellent agreement with simulations. Both experiments and simulations demonstrate that a negative refractive index n' approximately -0.3 is achieved at the optical communication wavelength of 1.5 microm using the array of nanorods. The retrieved refractive index critically depends on the phase of the transmitted wave, which emphasizes the importance of phase measurements in finding n'.

  18. Influence of refractive correction on ocular dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Nanami; Kawamorita, Takushi; Uozato, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the effects of refractive correction and refractive defocus on the assessment of sensory ocular dominance. In 25 healthy subjects (4 males and 21 females) aged between 20 and 31 years, a quantitative measurement of sensory ocular dominance was performed with refractive correction and the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye. Sensory ocular dominance was measured with a chart using binocular rivalry targets. The reversal point changed after the addition of a +1.00 D lens on the dominant eye in all subjects. However, sighting ocular dominance and stereopsis did not change after the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye ( P > 0:05, Wilcoxon test). These results suggest that refractive correction affects sensory ocular dominance, indicating the possible development of a new type of occlusion for amblyopia in the future.

  19. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  20. Hybrid high refractive index polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yubao; Flaim, Tony; Mercado, Ramil; Fowler, Shelly; Holmes, Douglas; Planje, Curtis

    2005-04-01

    Thermally curable hybrid high refractive index polymer solutions have been developed. These solutions are stable up to 6 months under room temperature storage conditions and can be easily spin-coated onto a desired substrate. When cured at elevated temperature, the hybrid polymer coating decomposes to form a metal oxide-rich film that has a high refractive index. The resulting films have refractive indices higher than 1.90 in the entire visible region and achieve film thicknesses of 300-900 nm depending on the level of metal oxide loading, cure temperature being used, and number of coatings. The formed films show greater than 90% internal transmission in the visible wavelength (400-700 nm). These hybrid high refractive index films are mechanically robust, are stable upon exposure to both heat and UV radiation, and are currently being investigated for microlithographic patterning potential.

  1. Assessment of the Effects of Refractive Conditions on Electronic Warfare in Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    charatterize the type uf refracti% e profiles occuring at a station. Radiosonde data collected by coastal stations in the area were used to establish...Gaviria Maldonado Lieutenant, Colombian Navy Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SYSTEMS...atmospheric ducts and to characterize the type of refractive profiles occurring at a station. Radiosonde data collected by coastal stations in the area were

  2. Controlling plasmon hybridization for negative refraction metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanté, B.; Burokur, S. N.; Sellier, A.; de Lustrac, A.; Lourtioz, J.-M.

    2009-02-01

    The hybridization scheme of plasmon modes in cut-wire-based left-handed metamaterials is shown to critically depend on the coupling between paired cut wires. We show that an inverted hybridization scheme obtained with an asymmetric alignment of paired cut wires is the most appropriate to negative refraction. This is validated (numerically and experimentally) by the first demonstration of negative refraction in the microwave domain using only periodic ensembles of cut wires.

  3. [Polar and non polar notations of refraction].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, O; Gaujoux, T; Costantini, E; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-01-01

    Refraction can be expressed by four polar notations which correspond to four different combinations of spherical or cylindrical lenses. Conventional expressions of refraction (plus and minus cylinder notation) are described by sphere, cylinder, and axis. In the plus cylinder notation, the axis visualizes the most powerful meridian. The axis usually corresponds to the bow tie axis in curvature maps. Plus cylinder notation is also valuable for all relaxing procedures (i.e., selective suture ablation, arcuate keratotomy, etc.). In the cross-cylinder notation, two orthogonal cylinders can describe (without the sphere component) the actual refraction of both the principal meridians. This notation must be made before performing the vertex calculation. Using an association of a Jackson cross-cylinder and a spherical equivalent, refraction can be broken down into two pure components: astigmatism and sphere. All polar notations of refraction may perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis, which requires nonpolar expression. After doubling the axis, a rectangular projection breaks down the Jackson cross-cylinder, which has a polar axis, into two Jackson cross-cylinders on the 0 degrees /90 degrees and 45 degrees /135 degrees axis. This procedure results in the loss of the directional nature of the data. Refraction can be written in a nonpolar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x,y,z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three independent (orthogonal) variables have a concrete optical significance: a spherical component, a direct/inverse (WTR/ATR) component, and an oblique component of the astigmatism. Finally, nonpolar notations are useful for statistical analysis and graphical representation of refraction.

  4. Indices of refraction for the HITRAN compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.

    1994-01-01

    Indices of refraction of sulfuric acid solutions, water, and ice, which will become part of the HITRAN database, are discussed. Representative calculations are presented for the sulfate aerosol, to illustrate the broadband spectral features of i.r. aerosol extinction spectra. Values of the sulfuric acid mass density are used in an application of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, which is used to estimate the sensitivity of extinction coefficients to temperature dependent refractive indices.

  5. On the effective refractive index of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmad-Rohen, Alexander; Contreras-Tello, Humberto; Morales-Luna, Gesuri; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index {n}{eff} of blood as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm; we employed van de Hulst’s theory, together with the anomalous diffraction approximation, for the calculation. We modelled blood as a mixture of plasma and erythrocytes. Our results indicate that erythrocyte orientation has a strong effect on {n}{eff}, making blood an optically anisotropic medium except when the erythrocytes are randomly oriented. In the case in which their symmetry axis is perpendicular to the wave vector, {n}{eff} equals the refractive index of plasma at certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the erythrocytes’ shape affects their contribution to {n}{eff} in an important way, implying that studies on the effective refractive index of blood should avoid approximating them as spheres or spheroids. Finally, the effective refractive index of blood predicted by van de Hulst’s theory is different from what would be obtained by averaging the refractive indices of its constituents weighted by volume; such a volume-weighted average is appropriate only for haemolysed blood. We then measured the real part of the refractive index of various blood solutions using two different experimental setups. One of the most important results of our expriment is that {n}{eff} is measurable to a good degree of precision even for undiluted blood, although not all measuring apparatuses are appropriate. The experimental data is self-consistent and in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations.

  6. Heritability of refractive value and ocular biometrics.

    PubMed

    Paget, Sandrine; Vitezica, Zulma G; Malecaze, François; Calvas, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse genetic influences on ocular refractive value and axial length using the hypothesis of a polygenic control. The genealogical records of 55 families were used in the analyses. The cohort included 723 individuals and clinical data were collected for 445 individuals with a mean age of 37.86 years. Ocular refraction was determined by standard autorefractometry. Axial length was evaluated by scan ultrasonography. Gender, age and ethnic origin were included as covariates in the statistical analyses. Using variance component analysis via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, we estimated the heritability of refractive value and axial length in the pedigree. We then performed a segregation analysis, using Loki, a (MCMC) linkage analysis program for multilocus inheritance models, examining different inheritance models with polygenic components. Polygenic control was modelled under an additive infinitesimal model (which assumes infinite loci with small effects, with additive actions) and under a finite locus model (i.e. several causal loci). The estimates of heritability were 0.20 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.36) for refractive value and 0.20 (95% CI 0.03-0.43) for axial length. Segregation analyses suggested that ocular refraction and axial length are under a polygenic control. A finite number of genes were identified with or without a polygenic, infinitesimal component. Ocular refraction is mildly-moderately heritable in the studied population.

  7. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  8. Multimeridional refraction: dependence of the measurement accuracy on the number of meridians refracted.

    PubMed

    Oechsner, U; Kusel, R

    1997-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of multimeridional refraction measurements was used to investigate the dependence of the accuracy of the measurement on the number of meridians refracted, N, and on the standard deviation of a measurement in a single meridian, sigma. For the description of the measurement errors, the residual refraction values were used, i.e., the parameters of the refraction remaining after application of the measured correction. The distributions of the residual refraction values were found to be independent of the "true" refraction values; in addition, by means of a factor square root of N/sigma, reduced residual refraction values could be defined which also were independent of N and sigma. A vector space proposed by Lakshminarayanan and Varadharajan (based on Long's power matrix) was used to represent the joint distribution of the residual refraction values in three-dimensional space. It was found to be a three-variate Gaussian distribution with zero mean and diagonal covariance matrix. It could further be shown that the vector space proposed by Harris is identical to the one used, up to a linear transformation. Several criteria, based on the one- and three-dimensional distributions and corresponding to different levels of accuracy, are discussed resulting in a wide range of answers about the number of meridians to be refracted.

  9. Origin of crystallization-induced refractive index changes in photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumeau, Julien; Glebova, Larissa; Golubkov, Valerii; Zanotto, Edgar D.; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2009-11-01

    Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is a multi-component silicate that undergoes localized refractive index decrease after UV-exposure and thermal treatment for partial crystallization. Based on this refractive index change, high efficiency volume Bragg gratings have been developed in PTR glass and have been successfully used for laser beam control. However, despite the fact that this type of glass has been widely studied and used over the last 20 years, the origin of the refractive index change upon crystallization is poorly understood. In this paper, we introduce three possible mechanisms (the precipitation of nano-sized NaF crystals and the associated local chemical changes of the glass matrix, the volumetric changes due to relaxation, and the local residual stresses) for the refractive index decrement in PTR glass and estimate the partial refractive index change due to each mechanism. Refractive index measurements are compared with high temperature XRD experiments and a general approach for the simulation of the refractive index change in PTR glass is proposed. We show that among the studied variables the residual stresses surrounding the crystals are the main responsible for the local refractive index decrement in this glass.

  10. Electromagnetic waves: Negative refraction by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    2004-03-01

    Recently left-handed materials (LHM) attracted great attention since these materials exhibit negative effective index, which is due to simultaneously negative permeability and permittivity. Pendry proposed that negative effective index in left-handed materials can be used for constructing a perfect lens, which is not limited by diffraction(J. B. Pendry, Negative refraction makes a perfect lens, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 85, 3966 (2000)). Negative refraction is also achievable in a dielectric photonic crystal (PC) that has a periodically modulated positive permittivity and a permeability of unity. Luo et al. has studied negative refraction and subwavelength imaging in photonic crystals(C. Luo, S. G. Johnson, J. D. Joannopoulos, J. B. Pendry, Subwavelength Imaging in Photonic Crystals Phys. Rev. B 68, 045115 (2003)). In this presentation, we report our experimental and theoretical investigation of negative refraction and subwavelength focusing of electromagnetic waves in a 2D PC. Our structure consists of a square array of dielectric rods in air. Transmission measurements are performed for experimentally verifying the predicted negative refraction behavior in our structure. Negative index of refraction determined from the experiment is -1.94 which is very close to the theoretical value of -2.06. Negative refraction is observed for the incidence angles of > 20°(Ertugrul Cubukcu, Koray Aydin, Ekmel Ozbay, S. Foteinopolou, and Costas Soukoulis, Negative Refraction by Photonic Crystals, Nature, vol. 423, 604 (2003)). Since we know the optimum frequency for a broad angle negative refraction, we can use our crystal to test the superlensing effect that was predicted for negative refractive materials. Scanning transmission measurement technique is used to measure the spatial power distribution of the focused electromagnetic waves that radiate from a point source. Full width at half maximum of the focused beam is measured to be 0.21λ, which is in good agreement with the finite

  11. Virtual edge illumination and one dimensional beam tracking for absorption, refraction, and scattering retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Vittoria, Fabio A. Diemoz, Paul C.; Endrizzi, Marco; Olivo, Alessandro; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.

    2014-03-31

    We propose two different approaches to retrieve x-ray absorption, refraction, and scattering signals using a one dimensional scan and a high resolution detector. The first method can be easily implemented in existing procedures developed for edge illumination to retrieve absorption and refraction signals, giving comparable image quality while reducing exposure time and delivered dose. The second method tracks the variations of the beam intensity profile on the detector through a multi-Gaussian interpolation, allowing the additional retrieval of the scattering signal.

  12. Near-surface velocity structure from borehole and refraction seismic surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.; Lawton, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic refraction and borehole reflection data have been used in conjunction with other geophysical tools to characterize the near-surface geology in the vicinity of a shallow well near Calgary, Alberta. The investigated section is comprised primarily of glacial tills and gravels. Seismic waves generated in the lower gravel units travel as compressional waves up to the till/gravel interface, where they are converted to shear waves upon transmission. Velocity structure from a reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) survey agrees closely with that from refraction surveying.

  13. Refractive Turbulence, Transient Propagation Disturbances, and Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, O.; Wroblewski, D.; Hacker, J.

    This paper examines the proposition that mission limiting space situational awareness (SSA) has important and fundamental turbulence and propagation physics issues to be investigated. We propose to call these aspects, propagation situational awareness (PSA). Transient disturbances can be present in communication to and from ground stations and satellites and in the performance of ground based and space based optical and infra-red imaging and tracking systems. Propagation frequency is important in characterizing whether the source of the disturbance lay in the electron density fluctuations of ionosphere or the refractive turbulence of the neutral atmosphere. Over the past ten years high altitude airborne measurements of clear air and refractive turbulence were made in Australia to support design and performance evaluations of the Airborne Laser. More recently in collaboration with the Australian Defence Science & Technology Organization (DSTO) smaller aircraft were used to investigate the effect of ducting layers on the signal strength of an airborne emitter as a low cost simulation of potential for loss of track in the coverage pattern of an airborne radar. From 2002 onward we were also tasked to do fundamental investigations of clear air turbulence for flight safety evaluations of both manned and unmanned high altitude surveillance aircraft. These investigations covered a wide spread in frequency, from infra-red to microwave. Most of these investigations were confined to measurement days and altitudes where strong turbulence was expected. The decision to measure was based on predictions of the location of jet streams relative to the measurement area as well as bulk gradient Richardson (Ri) vertical profiles derived from radio sound measurements from stations surround the potential measurement location. We will show how all these analyses and decision aids, including the Ri profiles, can be used to estimate potential for propagation disturbances to SSA. Current DOD

  14. Interferometric Methods of Measuring Refractive Indices and Double-Refraction of Fibres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, A. A.; El-Kader, H. I. Abd

    1986-01-01

    Presents two methods used to measure the refractive indices and double-refraction of fibers. Experiments are described, with one involving the use of Pluta microscope in the double-beam interference technique, the other employing the multiple-beam technique. Immersion liquids are discussed that can be used in the experiments. (TW)

  15. Variable beam shaping with using the same field mapping refractive beam shaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2012-02-01

    Modern laser scientific techniques and industrial technologies require not only simple homogenizing of a beam but also more freedom in manipulation of intensity profile and generating such profiles like super-Gaussian, inverse-Gaussian, skewed flattop and others. In many cases the task of variable beam shaping can be solved by refractive beam shaping optics of field mapping type which operational principle presumes saving of beam consistency, providing collimated output beam of low divergence, high transmittance and flatness of output beam profile, extended depth of field; another important feature is negligible residual wave aberration. Typically the fields mapping refractive beam shapers, like πShaper, are designed to generate flattop intensity profile for a beam of pre-determined size and input intensity profile. Varying of the input beam diameter lets it possible to realize either super-Gaussian (smaller input) or inverse-Gaussian (bigger input) intensity profiles of output beam that are important in pumping of solid-state lasers, hardening, cladding and other techniques. By lateral shift of a beam with respect to a πShaper the output flattop profile gets a skew in direction of that shift, the skew angle corresponds to the shift value. The skewed profile is important, for example, in some acousto-optical techniques where compensation of acoustic wave attenuation is required. All variety of profiles can be provided by the same beam shaper unit. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type and techniques to vary the output intensity profile, experimental results will be presented as well.

  16. Estimation of the Atmospheric Refraction Effect in Airborne Images Using Radiosonde Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisl, U.; Tempelmann, U.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the atmospheric refraction on the geometric accuracy of airborne photogrammetric images was already considered in the days of analogue photography. The effect is a function of the varying refractive index on the path from the ground to the image sensor. Therefore the effect depends on the height over ground, the view zenith angle and the atmospheric constituents. It is leading to a gradual increase of the scale towards the borders of the image, i.e. a magnification takes place. Textbooks list a shift of several pixels at the borders of standard wide angle images. As it was the necessity of that time when images could only be acquired at good weather conditions, the effect was calculated using standard atmospheres for good atmospheric conditions, leading to simple empirical formulas. Often the pixel shift caused by refraction was approximated as linear with height and compensated by an adjustment of the focal length. With the advent of sensitive digital cameras, the image dynamics allows for capturing images at adverse weather conditions. So the influence of the atmospheric profiles on the geometric accuracy of the images has to be investigated and the validity of the standard correction formulas has to be checked. This paper compares the results from the standard formulas by Saastamoinen with the results calculated from a broad selection of atmospheres obtained from radiosonde profile data. The geometric deviation is calculated by numerical integration of the refractive index as a function of the height using the refractive index formula by Ciddor. It turns out that the effect of different atmospheric profiles (including inversion situations) is generally small compared to the overall effect except at low camera heights. But there the absolute deviation is small. Since the necessary atmospheric profile data are often not readily available for airborne images a formula proposed by Saastamoinen is verified that uses only camera height, the pressure

  17. Preliminary results from the retrieval and assimilation of GPS radio occultation refractivity observations during tropical storm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Murphy, B.; Chen, X.; Chen, S.; Muradyan, P.; Nievinski, F. G.; Larson, K. M.; Garrison, J. L.; Wang, E. K.; Chen, S.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne GPS radio occultation (RO) data have been collected by the GNSS Instrument System for Multi-static and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) during the 2010 PRE-Depression Investigation of Cloud systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) experiment to study developing Atlantic tropical storms. This airborne system is designed to receive and record radio signals from setting and rising GPS satellites. The additional phase delay of the GPS radio signals due to refraction in the atmosphere is used to retrieve vertical profiles of refractivity, which depend strongly on moisture. A large airborne RO dataset was acquired from twenty-six research flights and refractivity profiles have been derived from the GISMOS geodetic GPS receivers. The airborne RO profiles consistently agree within ~2% with refractivity profiles calculated from ECMWF model analyses above 5 km altitude and with nearby dropsonde profiles. Accurate refractivity results are an important first step in investigating the impact of assimilating moisture profiles within the mesoscale environment of developing storms. A case study is conducted for pre-Hurricane Karl. The evolution of refractivity derived from RO data over the five days leading to the genesis of tropical storm Karl are consistent with mid-tropospheric moistening in the vicinity of the storm center. The algorithm to assimilate airborne GPS observations has been implemented in the Three-Dimensional Variational (3DVAR) Data Assimilation (DA) system of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We use a non-local operator for the integrated excess phase, defined as the integrated value of refractivity along the GPS radio ray path. One observation per horizontal and vertical model grid point is assimilated instead of only one per vertical model level, so that the horizontal drift of the occultation points within each model level is considered. Three data assimilation experiments were conducted: 1) NONE: No data are assimilated during data cycling. 2

  18. [Retinal detachment in various myopic refractions].

    PubMed

    Alimanović-Halilović, Emina

    2009-01-01

    The basic aim of this study was to find the group of "critical" myopic refraction with the highest occurrence of retinal detachment. In the study, 180 myopic eyes were analyzed. Upon the targeted ophthalmological anamnesis, definition of the objective refraction, and indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy, we analyzed the distribution of retinal detachment and the area affected in relation to refraction. All the eyes were divided into groups according to the refraction height. Average age of our patients ranged from 48.43 to 51.60 years with SD from 13.88 to 18.45. We did not find a statistically significant difference for a certain age. The study covered 102 (56.6%) male and 78 (43.3%) female patients. The highest occurrence of retinal detachment was found in Refraction Group from 3.5 to 7.49 dsph, total 21 (11.6%). The retinal detachments usually affected 2/4 or 3/4 of the eye fundus surface respectively.

  19. Refractive Secondary Concentrators for Solar Thermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing technologies that utilize solar energy for various space applications including electrical power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces. Common to all of these applications is the need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway to develop the innovative single crystal refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. The refractive secondary offers very high throughput efficiencies (greater than 90%), and when used in combination with advanced primary concentrators, enables very high concentration ratios (10,0(X) to 1) and very high temperatures (greater than 2000 K). Presented is an overview of the refractive secondary concentrator development effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center, including optical design and analysis techniques, thermal modeling capabilities, crystal materials characterization testing, optical coatings evaluation, and component testing. Also presented is a discussion of potential future activity and technical issues yet to be resolved. Much of the work performed to date has been in support of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Thermal Propulsion Program. The many benefits of a refractive secondary concentrator that enable efficient, high temperature thermal propulsion system designs, apply equally well to other solar applications including furnaces and power generation systems such as solar dynamics, concentrated thermal photovoltaics, and thermionics.

  20. Inversion for Refractivity Parameters Using a Dynamic Adaptive Cuckoo Search with Crossover Operator Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua; Sheng, Zheng; Shi, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Using the RFC technique to estimate refractivity parameters is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. In this paper, an improved cuckoo search (CS) algorithm is proposed to deal with this problem. To enhance the performance of the CS algorithm, a parameter dynamic adaptive operation and crossover operation were integrated into the standard CS (DACS-CO). Rechenberg's 1/5 criteria combined with learning factor were used to control the parameter dynamic adaptive adjusting process. The crossover operation of genetic algorithm was utilized to guarantee the population diversity. The new hybrid algorithm has better local search ability and contributes to superior performance. To verify the ability of the DACS-CO algorithm to estimate atmospheric refractivity parameters, the simulation data and real radar clutter data are both implemented. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the DACS-CO algorithm can provide an effective method for near-real-time estimation of the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter.

  1. Inversion for Refractivity Parameters Using a Dynamic Adaptive Cuckoo Search with Crossover Operator Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihua; Sheng, Zheng; Shi, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Using the RFC technique to estimate refractivity parameters is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. In this paper, an improved cuckoo search (CS) algorithm is proposed to deal with this problem. To enhance the performance of the CS algorithm, a parameter dynamic adaptive operation and crossover operation were integrated into the standard CS (DACS-CO). Rechenberg's 1/5 criteria combined with learning factor were used to control the parameter dynamic adaptive adjusting process. The crossover operation of genetic algorithm was utilized to guarantee the population diversity. The new hybrid algorithm has better local search ability and contributes to superior performance. To verify the ability of the DACS-CO algorithm to estimate atmospheric refractivity parameters, the simulation data and real radar clutter data are both implemented. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the DACS-CO algorithm can provide an effective method for near-real-time estimation of the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter. PMID:27212938

  2. Linear parabolic single-crystal diamond refractive lenses for synchrotron X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, Sergey; Polikarpov, Maxim; Snigireva, Irina; Di Michiel, Marco; Zholudev, Sergey; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    Linear parabolic diamond refractive lenses are presented, designed to withstand high thermal and radiation loads coming from upgraded accelerator X-ray sources. Lenses were manufactured by picosecond laser treatment of a high-quality single-crystal synthetic diamond. Twelve lenses with radius of curvature at parabola apex R = 200 µm, geometrical aperture A = 900 µm and length L = 1.5 mm were stacked as a compound refractive lens and tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline. A focal spot of size 2.2 µm and a gain of 20 were measured at 8 keV. The lens profile and surface quality were estimated by grating interferometry and X-ray radiography. In addition, the influence of X-ray glitches on the focusing properties of the compound refractive lens were studied.

  3. Refractive index dispersion sensing using an array of photonic crystal resonant reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hermannsson, Pétur G.; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Sørensen, Kristian T.; Kristensen, Anders

    2015-08-10

    Refractive index sensing plays a key role in various environmental and biological sensing applications. Here, a method is presented for measuring the absolute refractive index dispersion of liquids using an array of photonic crystal resonant reflectors of varying periods. It is shown that by covering the array with a sample liquid and measuring the resonance wavelength associated with transverse electric polarized quasi guided modes as a function of period, the refractive index dispersion of the liquid can be accurately obtained using an analytical expression. This method is compact, can perform measurements at arbitrary number of wavelengths, and requires only a minute sample volume. The ability to sense a material's dispersion profile offers an added dimension of information that may be of benefit to optofluidic lab-on-a-chip applications.

  4. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  5. Interferometric atmospheric refractive-index environmental monitor.

    PubMed

    Ludman, J E; Ludman, J J; Callahan, H; Caulfield, H J; Watt, D; Sampson, J L; Robinson, J; Davis, S; Hunt, A

    1995-06-20

    Long, open-path, outdoor interferometric measurement of the index of refraction as a function of wavelength (spectral refractivity) requires a number of innovations. These include active compensation for vibration and turbulence. The use of electronic compensation produces an electronic signal that is ideal for extracting data. This allows the appropriate interpretation of those data and the systematic and fast scanning of the spectrum by the use of bandwidths that are intermediate between lasers (narrow bandwidth) and white light (broad bandwidth). An Environmental Interferometer that incorporates these features should be extremely valuable in both pollutant detection and pollutant identification. Spectral refractivity measurements complement the information available from spectral absorption instruments (e.g., a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer). The Environmental Interferometer currently uses an electronic compensating device with a 1-kHz response time, and therefore rapid spectral scans are feasibe so that it is possible to monitor the time evolution of pollutant events.

  6. Refraction by a spherical nematic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Richard David

    1989-08-01

    A formalism is developed to study refraction by a spherical nematic bubble. It is applicable to bubbles that are larger than light wavelengths, but smaller than the dimensions for excitation of director-fluctuation-induced scattering. The technique yields a nonlinear differential equation and an associated integral which govern the trajectory of a ray inside a nematic region for an arbitrary director configuration. Explicit solutions are provided for five simple interior arrangements-isotropic, onion skin, radial star, horizontal (bottle brush), and vertical. It is then demonstrated that for extraordinary-ordinary refractive-index difference small compared to either, interfacial refraction at the bubble surface is the dominant contribution; deviations from a rectilinear path are small. When ranked in terms of decreasing scattering effectiveness, the sequence is horizontal, onion, isotropic, radial, and vertical if the light is linearly polarized and coupling optimally to the extraordinary index component; for unpolarized incoherent light the order becomes isotropic, horizontal, onion, radial, and vertical.

  7. Fiber optic liquid refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this present work we report fabrication of fiber optic liquid refractive index (RI) measurement sensor based on Michelson Interferometer method. This sensor was assembled by using graded index multimode (MM) fiber with core diameter 50 µm and the cladding of fiber was removed by simple chemical method. To perform this experiment a 2×2 3dB coupler is used. The fiber ends are then immersed in solvent and solution to provide reference and refractive index measurements, respectively. This method was successfully used to measure refractive index of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)-Water solution at different concentrations. The fringe contrast sensitivity of device is 92.90 dB/RIU measured in the RI range from 1.34 to 1.42 which is better than Mach-Zehnder Interferometer sensor [1] and Fabry perot based sensor [2]. The fabrication of sensor is simple, low cost and highly sensitive.

  8. A Liquid Prism for Refractive Index Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmiston, Michael D.

    2001-11-01

    A hollow glass prism filled with liquid becomes a "liquid prism". A simple method for constructing hollow glass prisms is presented. A method is given for a demonstration that uses the liquid prism with a laser or laser pointer so the audience can observe differences in refractive index for various liquids. The demonstration provides a quick and easy determination of the sugar content of soft drinks and juices. The prism makes it easy to determine a numerical value for the refractive index of a liquid.

  9. Refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound.

    PubMed

    Cervera, F; Sanchis, L; Sánchez-Pérez, J V; Martínez-Sala, R; Rubio, C; Meseguer, F; López, C; Caballero, D; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-14

    We show that a sonic crystal made of periodic distributions of rigid cylinders in air acts as a new material which allows the construction of refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound. It is demonstrated that, in the long-wave regime, the crystal has low impedance and the sound is transmitted at subsonic velocities. Here, the fabrication and characterization of a convergent lens are presented. Also, an example of a Fabry-Perot interferometer based on this crystal is analyzed. It is concluded that refractive devices based on sonic crystals behave in a manner similar to that of optical systems.

  10. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2011-11-15

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  11. Plasmonic crystal enhanced refractive index sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Benedikt; Devaux, Eloïse; Genet, Cyriaque Ebbesen, Thomas W.

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate experimentally how the local anisotropy of the dispersion relation of surface plasmon modes propagating over periodic metal gratings can lead to an enhancement of the figure of merit of refractive index sensors. Exploiting the possibility to acquire defocused images of the Fourier space of a highly stable leakage radiation microscope, we report a twofold increase in sensing sensitivity close to the band gap of a one-dimensional plasmonic crystal where the anisotropy of the band structure is the most important. A practical sensing resolution of O(10{sup −6}) refractive index units is demonstrated.

  12. Ray Curvature and Refraction of Wave Packets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    1!~~~~~ _ ‘ AD AOM 302 FLORIDA STATE UNIV TALLAHASSEE DEPT OF OCEANOGRAPHY FIG B/3 RAY CURVATURE AND REFRACTION OF WAVE PACKETS. (U) SEP 78 .J E...BREEDING N00014—77—C—0329 UNCLASSIFIED TR JE6 3 NL _ _ _ rwii__ _ ~iU ir!I I -~~ RAYOJR\\1L~[UREAND REFRACI ION OF WAVE F1~\\CKET~S ~y J. Ernest Breeding...01 29 014 -~ Technical Report No. JEB-3 Department of Oceanography • Florida State University RAY CURVATURE AND REFRACTION OF WAVE PACKETS b O G • J

  13. Sensitivity analysis and performance estimation of refractivity from clutter techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S.

    2009-02-01

    Refractivity from clutter (RFC) refers to techniques that estimate the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter returns. A RFC algorithm works by finding the environment whose simulated clutter pattern matches the radar measured one. This paper introduces a procedure to compute RFC estimator performance. It addresses the major factors such as the radar parameters, the sea surface characteristics, and the environment (region, time of the day, season) that affect the estimator performance and formalizes an error metric combining all of these. This is important for applications such as calculating the optimal radar parameters, selecting the best RFC inversion algorithm under a set of conditions, and creating a regional performance map of a RFC system. The performance metric is used to compute the RFC performance of a non-Bayesian evaporation duct estimator. A Bayesian estimator that incorporates meteorological statistics in the inversion is introduced and compared to the non-Bayesian estimator. The performance metric is used to determine the optimal radar parameters of the evaporation duct estimator for six scenarios. An evaporation duct inversion performance map for a S band radar is created for the larger Mediterranean/Arabian Sea region.

  14. Implantable collamer lens for residual refractive error after corneal refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xun; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Zhi; Zhou, Xing-Tao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the safety, efficacy, predictability and stability of implantable collamer lens (ICL) for residual refractive error after corneal refractive surgery. METHODS This study evaluated 19 eyes of 12 patients who underwent ICL implantation after corneal refractive surgeries. They were followed up for 1y to 5y of uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), manifest refractive error, flat and steep K value, axial length, intraocular pressure, corneal endothelial cell density, adverse events after ICL surgery. RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 39.05±19.22 mo (range, 1-5y). Spherical equivalent refractive error changed from -7.45±3.02 D preoperatively to -0.85±1.10 D 1wk to 1mo after ICL implantation, with the safety and efficacy indices being 1.12 and 1.15, respectively. A total of 52.63% of eyes were within ±0.5 D of the predicted spherical equivalents, 73.68% were within ±1.0 D. A trend of mild regression towards myopia with axial elongation after 5y was observed. One eye with mild anterior capsule opacity and retinal detachment 1y after surgery were observed. CONCLUSION ICL implantation is safe and effective for the correction of residual refractive error after corneal refractive surgeries, especially in moderate to high residual myopia. PMID:27803858

  15. Refractive index of air: 3. The roles of CO2, H2O, and refractivity virials.

    PubMed

    Ciddor, Philip E

    2002-04-20

    The author's recent studies of the refractive index of air are extended, and several assumptions made therein are further examined. It is shown that the alternative dispersion equations for CO2, which are due to Edlen [Metrologia 2, 71 (1966)] and Old et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 89 (1971)] result in differences of less than 2 x 10(-9) in the phase refractive index and less than 3 x 10(-9) in the group refractive index for current and predicted concentrations of CO2. However, because the dispersion equation given by Old et al. is consistent with experimental data in the near infrared, it is preferable to the equation used by Edlen, which is valid only in the ultraviolet and the visible. The classical measurement by Barrell and Sears [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 238, 1 (1939)] on the refractivity of moist air is shown to have some procedural errors in addition to the one discussed by Birch and Downs [Metrologia 30, 155 (1993)]. It is shown that for normal atmospheric conditions the higher refractivity virial coefficients related to the Lorentz-Lorenz relation are adequately incorporated into the empirically determined first refractivity virial. As a guide to users the practical limits to the calculation of the refractive index of the atmosphere that result from the uncertainties in the measurement of the various atmospheric parameters are summarized.

  16. Modal study of refractive effects on x-ray laser coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A. ); Strauss, M. . Nuclear Research Center-Negev)

    1991-04-05

    The role of smoothly varying transverse gain and refraction profiles on x-ray laser intensity and coherence is analyzed by modally expanding the electric field within the paraxial approximation. Comparison with a square transverse profile reveals that smooth-edged profiles lead to: (1) a greatly reduced number of guided modes, (2) the continued cancellation of local intensity from a loosely guided mode by resonant free modes, (3) and the absence of extraneous (or anomalous) free mode resonances. These generic spectral properties should enable a considerable simplification in analyzing and optimizing the coherence properties of laboratory soft x-ray lasers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Fabrication of gradient refractive index ball lenses using the method of combination of ion exchanging and sagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lv; Bangren, Shi; Jijiang, Wu; Lijun, Guo; Aimei, Liu

    2007-08-01

    Based on the Fick's diffusion equations, the distribution function of refractive index of a gradient refractive index ball lens (GRIN ball lens/GBL) is derived. Lithium containing silicate glass is fabricated and GRIN ball lenses (GBLs) which diameters are from 0.3 mm to 3.0 mm are made by the method of combination of Ion exchanging and sagging in sodium nitrate. Refractive index profiles of these GBLs are measured by interferometer, and the performances such as effective focal length (EFL), back focal length (BFL) and numerical aperture (NA) between GBLs and homogeneous ball lenses (HBLs) are compared. Results show that the distribution of the index of refraction is parabolic curve and its Δn is about 0.0002, the performances of the former are super to the latter.

  18. Calculations of atmospheric refraction for spacecraft remote-sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the refraction integrals appropriate for ray trajectories along slant paths through the atmosphere are derived in this paper. This type of geometry is commonly encountered in remote-sensing applications utilizing an occultation technique. The solutions are obtained by evaluating higher-order terms from expansion of the refraction integral and are dependent on the vertical temperature distributions. Refraction parameters such as total refraction angles, air masses, and path lengths can be accurately computed. It is also shown that the method can be used for computing refraction parameters in astronomical refraction geometry for large zenith angles.

  19. Joint analysis of refractions with surface waves: An inverse solution to the refraction-traveltime problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a possible solution to the inverse refraction-traveltime problem (IRTP) that reduces the range of possible solutions (nonuniqueness). This approach uses a reference model, derived from surface-wave shear-wave velocity estimates, as a constraint. The application of the joint analysis of refractions with surface waves (JARS) method provided a more realistic solution than the conventional refraction/tomography methods, which did not benefit from a reference model derived from real data. This confirmed our conclusion that the proposed method is an advancement in the IRTP analysis. The unique basic principles of the JARS method might be applicable to other inverse geophysical problems. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  20. Temperature Humidity and Sea Level Pressure Increments Induced by 1DVAR Analysis of GPS Refractivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Kursinski, Emil Robert; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) transmitted signals are affected by the atmosphere. Using the radio occultation technique, where a receiver is placed on a low-Earth-orbiting platform. it is possible to perform soundings. by measuring the bending angles of the rays. The information can be converted into atmospheric refractivity. We have developed a one dimensional variational (1DVAR) analysis that uses GPS/MET 1995 refractivity and 6-hour FVDAS (Finite Volume Data Assimilation System) forecasts as background information to constrain the retrievals. The analysis increments are defined as 1DVAR minus background temperature, humidity and sea level pressure. Before assimilating the 1DVAR profiles into the FVDAS. the increments need to be understood. First, some bias could be induced in the retrievals when confronted with actual biased data: second. bias in the back-round could create undesired bias in the retrievals. Anv bias in the analyses will ultimately change the climatology of the model the retrievals will be assimilated into. We relate the increments to the reduction of the difference between observed minus computed refractivity profiles. We also point out the difference in the mean increments using backgrounds which have assimilated either NESDIS TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) operational retrievals or Data Assimilation Office (DAO) TOVS interactive retrievals. The climatology of the model in terms of refractivity is significantly different and this impacts the GPS 1DVAR increments. This testifies that changing the basic load of assimilated data has an influence on the impact the GPS data may have in a DAS.

  1. The estimation of lower refractivity uncertainty from radar sea clutter using the Bayesian—MCMC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Zheng

    2013-02-01

    The estimation of lower atmospheric refractivity from radar sea clutter (RFC) is a complicated nonlinear optimization problem. This paper deals with the RFC problem in a Bayesian framework. It uses the unbiased Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling technique, which can provide accurate posterior probability distributions of the estimated refractivity parameters by using an electromagnetic split-step fast Fourier transform terrain parabolic equation propagation model within a Bayesian inversion framework. In contrast to the global optimization algorithm, the Bayesian—MCMC can obtain not only the approximate solutions, but also the probability distributions of the solutions, that is, uncertainty analyses of solutions. The Bayesian—MCMC algorithm is implemented on the simulation radar sea-clutter data and the real radar sea-clutter data. Reference data are assumed to be simulation data and refractivity profiles are obtained using a helicopter. The inversion algorithm is assessed (i) by comparing the estimated refractivity profiles from the assumed simulation and the helicopter sounding data; (ii) the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) posterior probability distribution of solutions.

  2. Non-interferometric phase retrieval using refractive index manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chyong-Hua; Hsu, Hsin-Feng; Chen, Hou-Ren; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel, inexpensive and non-interferometric technique to retrieve phase images by using a liquid crystal phase shifter without including any physically moving parts. First, we derive a new equation of the intensity-phase relation with respect to the change of refractive index, which is similar to the transport of the intensity equation. The equation indicates that this technique is unneeded to consider the variation of magnifications between optical images. For proof of the concept, we use a liquid crystal mixture MLC 2144 to manufacture a phase shifter and to capture the optical images in a rapid succession by electrically tuning the applied voltage of the phase shifter. Experimental results demonstrate that this technique is capable of reconstructing high-resolution phase images and to realize the thickness profile of a microlens array quantitatively. PMID:28387382

  3. Semiconductor laser devices having lateral refractive index tailoring

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Hohimer, John P.; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1990-01-01

    A broad-area semiconductor laser diode includes an active lasing region interposed between an upper and a lower cladding layer, the laser diode further comprising structure for controllably varying a lateral refractive index profile of the diode to substantially compensate for an effect of junction heating during operation. In embodiments disclosed the controlling structure comprises resistive heating strips or non-radiative linear junctions disposed parallel to the active region. Another embodiment discloses a multi-layered upper cladding region selectively disordered by implanted or diffused dopant impurities. Still another embodiment discloses an upper cladding layer of variable thickness that is convex in shape and symmetrically disposed about a central axis of the active region. The teaching of the invention is also shown to be applicable to arrays of semiconductor laser diodes.

  4. Infrasonic interferometry of stratospherically refracted microbaroms--a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Julius T; El Allouche, Nihed; Simons, Dick G; Ruigrok, Elmer N; Wapenaar, Kees; Evers, Läslo G

    2013-10-01

    The atmospheric wind and temperature can be estimated through the traveltimes of infrasound between pairs of receivers. The traveltimes can be obtained by infrasonic interferometry. In this study, the theory of infrasonic interferometry is verified and applied to modeled stratospherically refracted waves. Synthetic barograms are generated using a raytracing model and taking into account atmospheric attenuation, geometrical spreading, and phase shifts due to caustics. Two types of source wavelets are implemented for the experiments: blast waves and microbaroms. In both numerical experiments, the traveltimes between the receivers are accurately retrieved by applying interferometry to the synthetic barograms. It is shown that microbaroms can be used in practice to obtain the traveltimes of infrasound through the stratosphere, which forms the basis for retrieving the wind and temperature profiles.

  5. Refractive Surgery in Systemic and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    AlKharashi, Majed; Bower, Kraig S.; Stark, Walter J.; Daoud, Yassine J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with underlying systemic disease represent challenging treatment dilemma to the refractive surgeon. The refractive error in this patient population is accompanied by a systemic disease that may have an ocular or even a corneal component. The literature is rather sparse about the use of laser refractive surgery (LRS) and such procedure is not approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in this patient population. Patients with collagen vascular disease, diabetes mellitus (DM), allergic and atopic disease, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are never ideal for LRS. Patients with uncontrolled systemic disease or ocular involvement of the disease should not undergo LRS. However, a patient with well-controlled and mild disease, no ocular involvement, and not on multidrug regimen may be a suitable candidate if they meet stringent criteria. There is a need for a large, multicenter, controlled trial to address the safety and efficacy of LRS in patients with systemic disease before such technology can be widely adopted by the refractive surgery community. PMID:24669141

  6. A Mechanical Analogue of the Refracting Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Molesini, Giuseppe; Sordini, Andrea; Straulino, Samuele

    2011-01-01

    The recent celebration of the discoveries made by Galileo four centuries ago has attracted new attention to the refracting telescope and to its use as an instrument for the observation of the night sky. This has offered the opportunity for addressing in the classroom the basic principles explaining the operation of the telescope. When doing so, a…

  7. Subjective refraction: the mechanism underlying the routine.

    PubMed

    Harris, W F

    2007-11-01

    The routine of subjective refraction is usually understood, explained and taught in terms of the relative positions of line or point foci and the retina. This paper argues that such an approach makes unnecessary and sometimes invalid assumptions about what is actually happening inside the eye. The only assumption necessary in fact is that the subject is able to guide the refractionist to (or close to) the optimum power for refractive compensation. The routine works even in eyes in which the interval of Sturm does not behave as supposed; it would work, in fact, regardless of the structure of the eye. The idealized subjective refraction routine consists of two steps: the first finds the best sphere (the stigmatic component) and the second finds the remaining Jackson cross-cylinder (the antistigmatic component). The model makes use of the concept of symmetric dioptric power space. The second part of the refraction routine can be performed with Jackson cross-cylinders alone. However, it is usually taught and practiced using spheres, cylinders and Jackson cross-cylinders in a procedure that is not easy to understand and learn. Recognizing that this part of the routine is equivalent to one involving Jackson cross-cylinders only allows one to teach and understand the procedure more naturally and easily.

  8. Refraction of light by light in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, Xavier; Couchot, François; Djannati-Ataï, Arache; Guilbaud, Olivier; Kazamias, Sophie; Pittman, Moana; Urban, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In very intense electromagnetic fields, the vacuum refractive index is expected to be modified due to nonlinear quantum electrodynamics (QED) properties. Several experimental tests using high intensity lasers have been proposed to observe electromagnetic nonlinearities in vacuum, such as the diffraction or the reflection of intense laser pulses. We propose a new approach which consists in observing the refraction, i.e. the rotation of the waveplanes of a probe laser pulse crossing a transverse vacuum index gradient. The latter is produced by the interaction of two very intense and ultra short laser pulses, used as pump pulses. At the maximum of the index gradient, the refraction angle of the probe pulse is estimated to be 0.2 × (w0/10 μm)-3 × I/1J prad, where I is the total energy of the two pump pulses and w0 is the minimum waist (fwhm) at the interaction area. Assuming the most intense laser pulses attainable by the LASERIX facility (I = 25 J, 30 fs fwhm duration, 800 nm central wavelength) and assuming a minimum waist of w = 10 μm (fwhm) (corresponding to an intensity of the order of 1021 W/cm2), the expected maximum refraction angle is about 5 prad. An experimental setup, using a Sagnac interferometer, is proposed to perform this measurement.

  9. Validation of Ray Tracing Code Refraction Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; McAninch, Gerry L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's current predictive capabilities using the ray tracing program (RTP) are validated using helicopter noise data taken at Eglin Air Force Base in 2007. By including refractive propagation effects due to wind and temperature, the ray tracing code is able to explain large variations in the data observed during the flight test.

  10. Blending History with Physics: Acoustic Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Charles D.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that the study of refraction of sound waves, although usually neglected, is an excellent ancillary to the normal optical approach in physics courses. Discusses the historical context of interest in the science behind outdoor sound propagation, particularly during the Civil War in the United States. (WRM)

  11. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.; Cahn, Robert; Cederstrom, Bjorn; Danielsson, Mats; Vestlund, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  12. Refractive Indices of Gases at Microwave Frequencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhead, D. T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple microwave interferometer capable of measuring small phase shifts. Proposes laboratory exercises involving the use of the interferometer in the determination of refractive indices of gases and the analysis of the reflection in a test chamber. (Author/CP)

  13. Specific features of measuring the optical power of artificial refractive and diffractive-refractive eye lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkova, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Methods for monitoring the optical power of artificial refractive eye lenses (intraocular lenses) based on measuring focal lengths in air and in medium are analyzed. The methods for determining the refraction of diffractive-refractive lenses (in particular, of MIOL-Akkord type), with allowance for the specific features of the diffractive structure, are considered. A computer simulation of the measurement of the focal length of MIOL-Akkord lenses is performed. The effective optical power of the diffractive component of these lenses is shown to depend on the diaphragm diameter. The optimal diaphragm diameter, at which spherical aberrations do not affect the position of foci, is found to be 3 mm. Possible errors in measuring the focal lengths are analyzed, and the necessary corrections that must be introduced into measurement results and calculations of refractions are determined.

  14. Effects of myopic spectacle correction and radial refractive gradient spectacles on peripheral refraction.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Juan; Vazquez, Daniel; Seidemann, Anne; Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Schaeffel, Frank

    2009-08-01

    The recent observation that central refractive development might be controlled by the refractive errors in the periphery, also in primates, revived the interest in the peripheral optics of the eye. We optimized an eccentric photorefractor to measure the peripheral refractive error in the vertical pupil meridian over the horizontal visual field (from -45 degrees to 45 degrees ), with and without myopic spectacle correction. Furthermore, a newly designed radial refractive gradient lens (RRG lens) that induces increasing myopia in all radial directions from the center was tested. We found that for the geometry of our measurement setup conventional spectacles induced significant relative hyperopia in the periphery, although its magnitude varied greatly among different spectacle designs and subjects. In contrast, the newly designed RRG lens induced relative peripheral myopia. These results are of interest to analyze the effect that different optical corrections might have on the emmetropization process.

  15. Electrodynamics of moving media inducing positive and negative refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M.; Kong, Jin Au

    2006-07-15

    Negative refraction is a phenomenon that has been recently reported with left-handed media (either isotropic or not), photonic crystals, and rotated uniaxial media. In this Brief Report, we identify another origin of negative refraction, due to the motion of the transmitted medium parallel to the interface at which refraction occurs. Previous works in this domain have concentrated on media velocities that are above the Cerenkov limit, while we show here that negative refraction is in fact achievable at any velocities of the transmitted medium. A possible experimental implementation is proposed to verify this effect. Next, we consider an isotropic frequency-dispersive medium for which the index of refraction can take negative values, and we study the wave refraction phenomenon as a function of frequency and medium velocity. It is found that the motion of the medium induces a rotation of refraction, which can either enhance or attenuate the natural negative refraction of the medium.

  16. Automatic Refraction: How It Is Done: Some Clinical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safir, Aran; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Compaired are methods of determining visual refraction needs of young children or other unreliable observers by means of retinosocopy or the Opthalmetron, an automatic instrument which can be operated by a technician with no knowledge of refraction. (DB)

  17. Design of Amphoteric Refraction Models Using WAVICA and RAYICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of refraction of light is due to refractive index mismatches in two different media. However, to achieve this effect, a finite reflection loss is inevitable. A recent finding presented a unique type of interface, ferroelastic materials, that enables refraction without any reflection for either an electron or a light beam. This property is called total refraction. The same type of interface that yields total refraction can also yield amphoteric refraction, where the index of refraction can be either positive or negative depending on the incident angle. This interface could potentially be used to steer light without reflections which could have major applications in high power optics. My goal this summer is to first familiarize myself with the Mathematica software, especially the Wavica and Rayica packages. I will then model the amphoteric refraction by either modifying the Wavica and Rayica packages or using the built-in functions in these packages.

  18. Goos-Hänchen shift in negatively refractive media.

    PubMed

    Berman, P R

    2002-12-01

    The Goos-Hänchen shift is calculated when total internal reflection occurs at an interface between "normal" and negatively refractive media. The shift is negative, consistent with the direction of energy flow in the negatively refractive medium.

  19. Negative light refraction in a gradient medium with ultrasound-modulated refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimi, E. K.; Vekilov, Yu. Kh.

    2015-01-01

    The conditions of the formation of a spatially ordered optical structure with an ultrasound-modulated refractive index in a gradient medium have been considered. It has been shown that the excitation of a standing ultrasonic wave in the medium creates a structure consisting of trajectories of separate light beams, which is a superlattice of the "dynamic 4D photonic crystal." Regions corresponding to negative light refraction have been revealed in beam trajectories. Possible fields of application of such structures have been discussed.

  20. [Results of refractive surgery in hyperopic and combined astigmatism].

    PubMed

    Vlaicu, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    The refractive surgery includes a lot of procedures for changing the refraction of the eye to obtain a better visual acuity with no glasses or contact lenses. LASIK is the most commonly performed laser refractive surgery today. The goal is to present the postoperative evolution of the refraction and visual acuity after LASIK for Mixed and Hyperopic Astigmatism. The results show that LASIK is safe and predictible if we have well performed interventions and well-selected patients.

  1. Refractive Changes Induced by Strabismus Corrective Surgery in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Leshno, Ari; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Stolovitch, Chaim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate refractive changes after strabismus correction procedures among adults. Methods. Retrospective chart review of adult patients who had horizontal recti muscles surgery with preoperative and postoperative cycloplegic refraction measurements. The preoperative refraction was mathematically subtracted from the postoperative refraction, and the induced refractive changes were statistically analyzed. Vector analysis was used to examine the magnitude of the toric change. The proportion of clinically significant refractive change was evaluated as well. Results. Thirty-one eyes from 22 subjects met the criteria and were included in the final analysis. A significant postoperative refractive change of the spherical equivalent towards myopia and a change of the astigmatism in the with-the-rule direction were observed. In a subset of 9 cases a third cycloplegic refraction measurement demonstrated stable refraction compared to the 1-month postoperative measurement. In 10 cases of single eye surgery, significant refractive changes were observed only in the operated side when compared to the sound eye. The induced surgical refractive change was of clinical significance (≥0.5 D) in 11 eyes of 9 patients (40.9% of patients). Conclusions. Refractive changes are a significant side effect of horizontal strabismus corrective surgery among adults. Therefore, patients should be informed about it prior to surgery and should be rerefracted in the postoperative period. PMID:28191347

  2. Postoperative refraction in the second eye having cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Christopher T; Wilkes, Martin; Reeves, Juliana; Mahmood, Muneera A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Previous cataract surgery studies assumed that first-eye predicted and observed postoperative refractions are equally important for predicting second-eye postoperative refraction. Methods. In a retrospective analysis of 173 patients having bilateral sequential phacoemulsification, multivariable linear regression was used to predict the second-eye postoperative refraction based on refractions predicted by the SRK-T formula for both eyes, the first-eye postoperative refraction, and the difference in IOL selected between eyes. Results. The first-eye observed postoperative refraction was an independent predictor of the second eye postoperative refraction (P < 0.001) and was weighted more heavily than the first-eye predicted refraction. Compared with the SRK-T formula, this model reduced the root-mean-squared (RMS) error of the predicted refraction by 11.3%. Conclusions. The first-eye postoperative refraction is an independent predictor of the second-eye postoperative refraction. The first-eye predicted refraction is less important. These findings may be due to interocular symmetry.

  3. Shuttle program: Computing atmospheric scale height for refraction corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for computing the atmospheric scale height to determine radio wave refraction were investigated for different atmospheres, and different angles of elevation. Tables of refractivity versus altitude are included. The equations used to compute the refraction corrections are given. It is concluded that very accurate corrections are determined with the assumption of an exponential atmosphere.

  4. Analytical properties of the effective refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzko, R. S.; Merzlikin, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a plane wave through a periodic layered system is considered in terms of the effective parameters. The problem of introduction of effective parameters is discussed. It was demonstrated that although the effective admittance cannot be introduced, it is possible to introduce the effective refractive index, which tends toward the Rytov value when the system size increases. It was shown that the effective wave vector derivative is an analytical function of frequency. In particular, the Kramers-Kronig-like relations for real and imaginary parts of the effective wave vector derivative were obtained. The Kramers-Kronig-like relations for the effective refractive index were also considered. The results obtained numerically were proved by exact solution of Maxwell's equations in the specific case of an "equi-impedance" system.

  5. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  6. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  7. The use of measured RF power signals to evaluate feasibility of inverse methods to retrieve refractivity parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Ove K. S.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Holm, Peter; Waern, Åsa; von Schoenberg, Pontus; Thaning, Lennart; Nordstrand, Melker; Persson, Rolf

    2006-09-01

    Radio wave propagation over sea paths is influenced by the local meteorological condition at the atmospheric layer near the surface, especially during ducts. Duct condition can be determined by measurements of local meteorological parameters, by weather forecast models or by using inverse methods. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using inverse methods to retrieve the refractivity profiles a measurement of RF signals and meteorological parameters were carried out at a test site in the Baltic. During the measurements, signal power from two broadcast antennas, one at Visby and one at Vastervik, were received at Musko, an island south of Stockholm. The measurements were performed during the summer 2005 and the data was used to test the software package for inversion methods, SAGA (Seismo Acoustic inversion using Genetic Algorithms, by Peter Gerstoft UCSD, US). Refractivity profiles retrieved by SAGA were compared with the refractivity profiles calculated from measured parameters, during parts of the experiment, from rocket sounding, radio sounding, local meteorological measurements using bulk model calculations, and also obtained by the Swedish operational weather forecast model HIRLAM. Surface based duct height are predicted in relative many situations even though the number of frequencies or antennas height has to be increased to diminish the ambiguous of the refractive index profile.

  8. Nonlinear refraction and reflection travel time tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Jiahua; ten Brink, U.S.; Toksoz, M.N.

    1998-01-01

    We develop a rapid nonlinear travel time tomography method that simultaneously inverts refraction and reflection travel times on a regular velocity grid. For travel time and ray path calculations, we apply a wave front method employing graph theory. The first-arrival refraction travel times are calculated on the basis of cell velocities, and the later refraction and reflection travel times are computed using both cell velocities and given interfaces. We solve a regularized nonlinear inverse problem. A Laplacian operator is applied to regularize the model parameters (cell slownesses and reflector geometry) so that the inverse problem is valid for a continuum. The travel times are also regularized such that we invert travel time curves rather than travel time points. A conjugate gradient method is applied to minimize the nonlinear objective function. After obtaining a solution, we perform nonlinear Monte Carlo inversions for uncertainty analysis and compute the posterior model covariance. In numerical experiments, we demonstrate that combining the first arrival refraction travel times with later reflection travel times can better reconstruct the velocity field as well as the reflector geometry. This combination is particularly important for modeling crustal structures where large velocity variations occur in the upper crust. We apply this approach to model the crustal structure of the California Borderland using ocean bottom seismometer and land data collected during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment along two marine survey lines. Details of our image include a high-velocity zone under the Catalina Ridge, but a smooth gradient zone between. Catalina Ridge and San Clemente Ridge. The Moho depth is about 22 km with lateral variations. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. The ionospheric refraction at 38 MHz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milogradov-Turin, J.

    The investigation of the observed shift of the North Polar Spur (NPS) at the 38 MHz survey of Milogradov-Turin and Smith (1973) in respect to the position of the NPS on the survey at 408 MHz convolved to the same resolution (Haslam and Salter 1977) has shown that there is no dependence of the NPS position on frequency and that the ionospheric refraction should be larger than believed.

  10. Matched Index of Refraction Flow Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Mcllroy, Hugh

    2016-07-12

    What's 27 feet long, 10 feet tall and full of mineral oil (3000 gallons' worth)? If you said INL's Matched Index of Refraction facility, give yourself a gold star. Scientists use computers to model the inner workings of nuclear reactors, and MIR helps validate those models. INL's Hugh McIlroy explains in this video. You can learn more about INL energy research at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Matched Index of Refraction Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mcllroy, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    What's 27 feet long, 10 feet tall and full of mineral oil (3000 gallons' worth)? If you said INL's Matched Index of Refraction facility, give yourself a gold star. Scientists use computers to model the inner workings of nuclear reactors, and MIR helps validate those models. INL's Hugh McIlroy explains in this video. You can learn more about INL energy research at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. Autonomous satellite navigation by stellar refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gounley, R.; White, R.; Gai, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an error analysis of an autonomous navigator using refraction measurements of starlight passing through the upper atmosphere. The analysis is based on a discrete linear Kalman filter. The filter generated steady-state values of navigator performance for a variety of test cases. Results of these simulations show that in low-earth orbit position-error standard deviations of less than 0.100 km may be obtained using only 40 star sightings per orbit.

  13. Lens Design Using Group Indices of Refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    An approach to lens design is described in which the ratio of the group velocity to the speed of light (the group index) in glass is used, in conjunction with the more familiar phase index of refraction, to control certain chromatic properties of a system of thin lenses in contact. The first-order design of thin-lens systems is illustrated by examples incorporating the methods described.

  14. Emerging Technology in Refractive Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, João; Neatrour, Kristin; Waring IV, George O.

    2016-01-01

    Technology in cataract surgery is constantly evolving to meet the goals of both surgeons and patients. Recent major advances in refractive cataract surgery include innovations in preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS), and a new generation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). This paper presents the latest technologies in each of these major categories and discusses how these contributions serve to improve cataract surgery outcomes in a safe, effective, and predictable manner. PMID:27433353

  15. Refraction effects of atmosphere on geodetic measurements to celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The problem is considered of obtaining accurate values of refraction corrections for geodetic measurements of celestial bodies. The basic principles of optics governing the phenomenon of refraction are defined, and differential equations are derived for the refraction corrections. The corrections fall into two main categories: (1) refraction effects due to change in the direction of propagation, and (2) refraction effects mainly due to change in the velocity of propagation. The various assumptions made by earlier investigators are reviewed along with the basic principles of improved models designed by investigators of the twentieth century. The accuracy problem for various quantities is discussed, and the conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  16. Optofluidic two-dimensional grating volume refractive index sensor.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anirban; Shivakiran Bhaktha, B N; Khastgir, Sugata Pratik

    2016-09-10

    We present an optofluidic reservoir with a two-dimensional grating for a lab-on-a-chip volume refractive index sensor. The observed diffraction pattern from the device resembles the analytically obtained fringe pattern. The change in the diffraction pattern has been monitored in the far-field for fluids with different refractive indices. Reliable measurements of refractive index variations, with an accuracy of 6×10-3 refractive index units, for different fluids establishes the optofluidic device as a potential on-chip tool for monitoring dynamic refractive index changes.

  17. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 μm which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  18. Adjustable hybrid diffractive/refractive achromatic lens

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Pouria; Savidis, Nickolaos; Schwiegerling, Jim; Dodge, Mohammad Reza; Peyman, Gholam; Peyghambarian, N.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a variable focal length achromatic lens that consists of a flat liquid crystal diffractive lens and a pressure-controlled fluidic refractive lens. The diffractive lens is composed of a flat binary Fresnel zone structure and a thin liquid crystal layer, producing high efficiency and millisecond switching times while applying a low ac voltage input. The focusing power of the diffractive lens is adjusted by electrically modifying the sub-zones and re-establishing phase wrapping points. The refractive lens includes a fluid chamber with a flat glass surface and an opposing elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane surface. Inserting fluid volume through a pump system into the clear aperture region alters the membrane curvature and adjusts the refractive lens’ focal position. Primary chromatic aberration is remarkably reduced through the coupling of the fluidic and diffractive lenses at selected focal lengths. Potential applications include miniature color imaging systems, medical and ophthalmic devices, or any design that utilizes variable focal length achromats. PMID:21503055

  19. Correction of subtle refractive error in aviators.

    PubMed

    Rabin, J

    1996-02-01

    Optimal visual acuity is a requirement for piloting aircraft in military and civilian settings. While acuity can be corrected with glasses, spectacle wear can limit or even prohibit use of certain devices such as night vision goggles, helmet mounted displays, and/or chemical protective masks. Although current Army policy is directed toward selection of pilots who do not require spectacle correction for acceptable vision, refractive error can become manifest over time, making optical correction necessary. In such cases, contact lenses have been used quite successfully. Another approach is to neglect small amounts of refractive error, provided that vision is at least 20/20 without correction. This report describes visual findings in an aviator who was fitted with a contact lens to correct moderate astigmatism in one eye, while the other eye, with lesser refractive error, was left uncorrected. Advanced methods of testing visual resolution, including high and low contrast visual acuity and small letter contrast sensitivity, were used to compare vision achieved with full spectacle correction to that attained with the habitual, contact lens correction. Although the patient was pleased with his habitual correction, vision was significantly better with full spectacle correction, particularly on the small letter contrast test. Implications of these findings are considered.

  20. Surgical options for correction of refractive error following cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, Ahmed A; Alio, Jorge L

    2014-01-01

    Refractive errors are frequently found following cataract surgery and refractive lens exchange. Accurate biometric analysis, selection and calculation of the adequate intraocular lens (IOL) and modern techniques for cataract surgery all contribute to achieving the goal of cataract surgery as a refractive procedure with no refractive error. However, in spite of all these advances, residual refractive error still occasionally occurs after cataract surgery and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) can be considered the most accurate method for its correction. Lens-based procedures, such as IOL exchange or piggyback lens implantation are also possible alternatives especially in cases with extreme ametropia, corneal abnormalities, or in situations where excimer laser is unavailable. In our review, we have found that piggyback IOL is safer and more accurate than IOL exchange. Our aim is to provide a review of the recent literature regarding target refraction and residual refractive error in cataract surgery.

  1. A Direct Spectral Domain Method for Near-ground Microwave Radiation by a Vertical Dipole above Earth in the Presence of Atmospheric Refractivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) modeling of refractive and terrain effects over long links has been mod- eled by ray tracing [1, 17, 20] or by using the parabolic...REFERENCES 1. Akbarpour, R. and A. R. Webster, “ Ray - tracing and parabolic equation methods in the mod- eling of a tropospheric microwave link,” IEEE...No. 2, 131–140, Jan. 2008. 20. Valtr, P. and P. Pechac, “Analytic tropospheric ray - tracing model for constant refractivity gradient profiles,” First

  2. What Time Is Sunrise? Revisiting the Refraction Component of Sunrise/set Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Teresa; Bartlett, Jennifer L.; Hilton, James Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    Algorithms that predict sunrise and sunset times currently have an error of one to four minutes at mid-latitudes (0° - 55° N/S) due to limitations in the atmospheric models they incorporate. At higher latitudes, slight changes in refraction can cause significant discrepancies, even including difficulties determining when the Sun appears to rise or set. While different components of refraction are known, how they affect predictions of sunrise/set has not yet been quantified. A better understanding of the contributions from temperature profile, pressure, humidity, and aerosols could significantly improve the standard prediction. We present a sunrise/set calculator that interchanges the refraction component by varying the refraction model. We then compare these predictions with data sets of observed rise/set times to create a better model. Sunrise/set times and meteorological data from multiple locations will be necessary for a thorough investigation of the problem. While there are a few data sets available, we will also begin collecting this data using smartphones as part of a citizen science project. The mobile application for this project will be available in the Google Play store. Data analysis will lead to more complete models that will provide more accurate rise/set times for the benefit of astronomers, navigators, and outdoorsmen everywhere.

  3. Tropospheric refractivity and zenith path delays from least-squares collocation of meteorological and GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilgan, Karina; Hurter, Fabian; Geiger, Alain; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jarosław

    2017-02-01

    Precise positioning requires an accurate a priori troposphere model to enhance the solution quality. Several empirical models are available, but they may not properly characterize the state of troposphere, especially in severe weather conditions. Another possible solution is to use regional troposphere models based on real-time or near-real time measurements. In this study, we present the total refractivity and zenith total delay (ZTD) models based on a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data and ground-based meteorological observations. We reconstruct the total refractivity profiles over the western part of Switzerland and the total refractivity profiles as well as ZTDs over Poland using the least-squares collocation software COMEDIE (Collocation of Meteorological Data for Interpretation and Estimation of Tropospheric Pathdelays) developed at ETH Zürich. In these two case studies, profiles of the total refractivity and ZTDs are calculated from different data sets. For Switzerland, the data set with the best agreement with the reference radiosonde (RS) measurements is the combination of ground-based meteorological observations and GNSS ZTDs. Introducing the horizontal gradients does not improve the vertical interpolation, and results in slightly larger biases and standard deviations. For Poland, the data set based on meteorological parameters from the NWP Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and from a combination of the NWP model and GNSS ZTDs shows the best agreement with the reference RS data. In terms of ZTD, the combined NWP-GNSS observations and GNSS-only data set exhibit the best accuracy with an average bias (from all stations) of 3.7 mm and average standard deviations of 17.0 mm w.r.t. the reference GNSS stations.

  4. Deep crustal structure of the Cascade Range and surrounding regions from seismic refraction and magnetotelluric data

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, W.D. ); Mooney, W.D.; Fuis, G.S. )

    1990-11-10

    Analysis of three MT and two seismic refraction profiles in Oregon and a coincident MT and refraction profile in northern California show a high degree of correlation between resistivity and velocity models. The main feature that is evident in both data sets is a highly conductive (2-20 ohm m) zone that occurs at depths of 6-20 km and largely within a midcrustal velocity layer of 6.4-6.6 km/s, overlying a lower crust with velocities of 7.0-7.4 km/s. Although this conductor and the midcrustal zone of 6.4-6.6 km/s velocities are generally rather horizontal, important structures do occur. For instance, near the boundary of Western Cascades and High Cascades the MT midcrustal conductor rises to within 6 km of the surface. In addition, on the coincident MT-refraction profile in northern California a significant westward downdip occurs on both the MT deep conductor and the 6.4-km/s velocity layer, with both occurring at very similar depths. However, in the Columbia Plateau of Washington, no deep crustal conductors occur shallower than 25 km; also, the velocity structure is quite different, with a 6.8-km/s midcrust and a 7.5-km/s lower crust. Complex accretionary structures occur on MT models for the southern Washington Cascades. The accretionary structures in the southern Washington Cascades have been shown to be related to stress release in the area of Mount St. Helens. In order to explain the similar structures in the MT and refraction models for Oregon and California, the authors propose a model involving the effects of metamorphic zonation to produce the velocity structure, combined with metamorphically produced fluids and partial melt to produce the deep conductor.

  5. Deviations of Lambert-Beer's law affect corneal refractive parameters after refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, José R.; Rodríguez-Marín, Francisco; Anera, Rosario G.; Jiménez Del Barco, Luis

    2006-06-01

    We calculate whether deviations of Lambert-Beer’s law, which regulates depth ablation during corneal ablation, significantly influence corneal refractive parameters after refractive surgery and whether they influence visual performance. For this, we compute a point-to-point correction on the cornea while assuming a non-linear (including a quadratic term) fit for depth ablation. Post-surgical equations for refractive parameters using a non-linear fit show significant differences with respect to parameters obtained from a linear fit (Lambert-Beer’s law). Differences were also significant for corneal aberrations. These results show that corneal-ablation algorithms should include analytical information on deviations from Lambert-Beer’s law for achieving an accurate eye correction.

  6. Measurement of refractive index distribution of biotissues by scanning focused refractive index microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tengqian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-11-01

    We adapt the improved scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to the quantitative study of biological tissues. Delicate refractive index (RI) imaging of a porcine muscle tissue is obtained in a reflection mode. Some modifications are made to the SFRIM for better two dimension (2-D) observation of the tissues. The RI accuracy is 0.002. The central spatial resolution of SFRIM achieves 1μm, smaller than the size of the focal spot. Our method is free from signal distortion. The experimental result demonstrates that SFRIM is a potential technique in a wide field of biomedical research.

  7. Refraction of nonlinear beams by localized refractive index changes in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Assanto, Gaetano; Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.

    2010-11-15

    The propagation of solitary waves in nematic liquid crystals in the presence of localized nonuniformities is studied. These nonuniformities can be caused by external electric fields, other light beams, or any other mechanism which results in a modified director orientation in a localized region of the liquid-crystal cell. The net effect is that the solitary wave undergoes refraction and trajectory bending. A general modulation theory for this refraction is developed, and particular cases of circular, elliptical, and rectangular perturbations are considered. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  8. EDITORIAL: Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Refractive index effects using nanoscale systems are frequently applied in new imaging, sensing and even visibility cloaking technology. In this issue, researchers in Japan use simulations and experiments to describe the confinement of optical vortices in nanoscale fin structures and the sensitivity of these systems to the refractive index of the surrounding media [1]. The effects of refraction as light rays pass between different media were recorded as long ago as the first century AD, by Ptolemy [2]. Over the following centuries the phenomena inspired Ibn Sahl in 984 [3], Thomas Harriot in 1602 [4], Willebrord Snellius in 1621 [5] and Rene Descartes in 1637 [6] to independently derive the more accurate and elegant equation for refraction so familiar to us today. Recent studies of the interactions between light and matter continue to reveal a wealth of phenomena that originate in the effects of the refractive indices of materials. Nanostructures can be used to manipulate conditions that affect the refractive indices of materials, such as temperature. A E Aliev et al at the University of Texas reported a striking demonstration of temperature-dependent refractive index effects using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet [7]. They used the extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of transparent carbon nanotube sheets to enable high-frequency modulation of the sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range. The resulting sharp, rapidly changing gradient of the refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas makes objects seem to disappear and can be used for visibility cloaking. Light-matter interaction resonances, where light is confined at the nanoscale, can be extremely sensitive to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media [8], even allowing single-molecule detection [9]. Plasmons, the collective oscillations of electrons in response to incident light, are a typical example. Researchers at Rice

  9. Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia causes hyperopic refractive shift in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tkatchenko, Tatiana V.; Tkatchenko, Andrei V.

    2010-01-01

    Mice have increasingly been used as a model for studies of myopia. The key to successful use of mice for myopia research is the ability to obtain accurate measurements of refractive status of their eyes. In order to obtain accurate measurements of refractive errors in mice, the refraction needs to be performed along the optical axis of the eye. This represents a particular challenge, because mice are very difficult to immobilize. Recently, ketamine-xylazine anesthesia has been used to immobilize mice before measuring refractive errors, in combination with tropicamide ophthalmic solution to induce mydriasis. Although these drugs have increasingly been used while refracting mice, their effects on the refractive state of the mouse eye have not yet been investigated. Therefore, we have analyzed the effects of tropicamide eye drops and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on refraction in P40 C57BL/6J mice. We have also explored two alternative methods to immobilize mice, i.e. the use of a restraining platform and pentobarbital anesthesia. We found that tropicamide caused a very small, but statistically significant, hyperopic shift in refraction. Pentobarbital did not have any substantial effect on refractive status, whereas ketamine-xylazine caused a large and highly significant hyperopic shift in refraction. We also found that the use of a restraining platform represents good alternative for immobilization of mice prior to refraction. Thus, our data suggest that ketamine-xylazine anesthesia should be avoided in studies of refractive development in mice and underscore the importance of providing appropriate experimental conditions when measuring refractive errors in mice. PMID:20813132

  10. Refractive index matching and clear emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sun, James Ziming; Erickson, Michael C E; Parr, James W

    2005-01-01

    Refractive index (RI) matching is a unique way of making clear emulsions to meet market trends. However, RI matching has not been sufficiently investigated in terms of physical principles and methodologies. Snell's law (n2 sin r2= n1 sin r1) is applicable to cosmetic emulsions. When oil phase and water phase have equal RI (n2 = n1) values, light will not bend as it strikes obliquely at the emulsion interface. Instead, light is transmitted through the emulsion without refraction, which produces clarity. Theoretical RI values in solution can be calculated with summation of the product of the weight percentage and refractive index of each ingredient (RI(mix) = [W1 x n1 + W2 x n2 + W3 x n3 + + Wn x nn]Wtau). Oil-phase RI values are normally at 1.4 or higher. Glycols are used to adjust the water phase RI, since they typically have larger RI values than water. Noticeable deviations from calculated RI values are seen in experimentally prepared solutions. Three basic deviation types are observed: negative, positive, and slightly negative or positive, which can occur in glycol aqueous solutions at different concentrations. The deviations are attributed to changes in molecular interaction between molecules in solution, which can lead to changes in specific gravity. Negative RI deviation corresponds to a decrease in specific gravity, and positive RI deviation corresponds to an increase in specific gravity. RI values will deviate from calculated values since an increase or decrease in specific gravity leads to a change in optical density.

  11. Seismic refraction methodology for groundwater level determination: “Water seismic index”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grelle, Gerardo; Guadagno, Francesco Maria

    2009-07-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in the use of refraction seismic data for the exploration and development of hydrological reservoirs. The aim of this study is to provide a procedure in order to identify groundwater levels by means of seismic refraction profiles. Assuming that the velocity of shear waves increases much less than the velocity of compressional waves in a saturated soil, seismic refraction surveys were performed for the determination of the water table. In order to have a perfect overlay of the tomography 2D grids, P and S wave seismic profiles were obtained with the same geometrical configuration. Based on the propagation of the P and S waves in the unsaturated and saturated media, a "Water Seismic Index" (WSI) was defined. WSI is related to the local variations of the P and S wave velocities and, in theoretical terms, it is correlated to groundwater level. Preliminary results indicate that there is a good agreement between the depth of the ground water and the WSI parameter.

  12. The Alvarez and Lohmann refractive lenses revisited.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Sergio

    2009-05-25

    Alvarez and Lohmann lenses are variable focus optical devices based on lateral shifts of two lenses with cubic-type surfaces. I analyzed the optical performance of these types of lenses computing the first order optical properties (applying wavefront refraction and propagation) without the restriction of the thin lens approximation, and the spot diagram using a ray tracing algorithm. I proposed an analytic and numerical method to select the most optimum coefficients and the specific configuration of these lenses. The results show that Lohmann composite lens is slightly superior to Alvarez one because the overall thickness and optical aberrations are smaller.

  13. Refraction and reflection of diffusion fronts.

    PubMed

    Remhof, A; Wijngaarden, R J; Griessen, R

    2003-04-11

    Diffusion waves form the basis of several measurement technologies in materials science as well as in biological systems. They are, however, so heavily damped that their observation is a real challenge to the experimentalist. We show that accurate information about the refraction-like and reflection-like behavior of diffusion waves can be obtained by studying diffusion fronts. For this we use hydrogen in a metal as a model system and visualize its 2D migration with an optical indicator. The similarities between classical optics and diffusion, in particular, the applicability of Snell's law to diffusive systems are discussed. Our measurements are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  14. Near-zero refractive index photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2017-03-01

    Structures with near-zero parameters (for example, media with near-zero relative permittivity and/or relative permeability, and thus a near-zero refractive index) exhibit a number of unique features, such as the decoupling of spatial and temporal field variations, which enable the exploration of qualitatively different wave dynamics. This Review summarizes the underlying principles and salient features, physical realizations and technological potential of these structures. In doing so, we revisit their distinctive impact on multiple optical processes, including scattering, guiding, trapping and emission of light. Their role in emphasizing secondary responses of matter such as nonlinear, non-reciprocal and non-local effects is also discussed.

  15. Negative refraction and energy funneling by hyperbolic materials: an experimental demonstration in acoustics.

    PubMed

    García-Chocano, Victor M; Christensen, Johan; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-04-11

    This Letter reports the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of hyperbolic materials showing negative refraction and energy funneling of airborne sound. Negative refraction is demonstrated using a stack of five holey Plexiglas plates where their thicknesses, layer separation, hole diameters, and lattice periodicity have been determined to show hyperbolic dispersion around 40 kHz. The resulting hyperbolic material shows a flat band profile in the equifrequency contour allowing the gathering of acoustic energy in a broad range of incident angles and its funneling through the material. Our demonstrations foresee interesting developments based on both phenomena. Acoustic imaging with subwavelength resolution and spot-size converters that harvest and squeeze sound waves irradiating from many directions into a collimated beam are just two possible applications among many.

  16. Fabrication of refractive microlens array by etching ammonium dichromate gelatin (ADG) with enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Gao, Fuhua; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Yixiao; Su, Jingqin; Guo, Yongkang; Cui, Zheng

    2000-08-01

    A new method has been developed to fabricate refractive microlens by etching ammonium dichromate gelatin (ADG) with enzyme solution. Unlike previous methods which are used to fabricate refractive microlens with photoresist, the process of fabricating microlens by etching ADG with enzyme solution doesn't require the use of expensive equipment, and it isn't sophisticated and time consuming. The light exposes ADG through a high contrast binary mask, then the exposed parts of ADS generate cross- linking reaction. Usually, the relief achieved by water developing is very shallow (<1um) when nonpre-harden gelatin is used, so we compound a certain concentration enzyme solution, and because of surface tension, ADG turns to spherical structure after developing. The optimum technique parameters of this process are presented. Results are presented for experiments and evaluated by profile meter and interference microscope.

  17. Correction of laser range tracking data for atmospheric refraction at elevations above 10 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marini, J. W.; Murray, C. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A formula for correcting laser measurements of satellite range for the effect of atmospheric refraction is given. The corrections apply above 10 deg elevation to satellites whose heights exceed 70 km. The meteorological measurements required are the temperature, pressure, and relative humidity of the air at the laser site at the time of satellite pass. The accuracy of the formula was tested by comparison with corrections obtained by ray-tracing radiosonde profiles. The standard deviation of the difference between the refractive retardation given by the formula and that calculated by ray-tracing was less than about 0.04% of the retardation or about 0.5 cm at 10 deg elevation, decreasing to 0.04 cm near zenith.

  18. Data report for seismic refraction surveys conducted from 1980 to 1982 in the Livermore Valley and the Santa Cruz Mountains, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Angela J.; Brocher, Thomas M.; Mooney, Walter D.; Boken, Annette

    1999-01-01

    We provide documentation for two seismic refraction profiles acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey in the San Francisco Bay area between 1980 and 1982 in Livermore Valley and the Santa Cruz Mountains. We also include the waveforms and travel times from five aftershocks of the April 1980 Livermore earthquake that were recorded on temporary seismic stations and that have not been published. Although seismic refraction profiles from the 1980 Livermore study have been published, none of the other data for this experiment, including shot times and locations, receiver locations, data quality, and travel times, have been reported. Similarly, such data from the 1981 to 1982 seismic refraction survey in the Santa Cruz Mountains included here have not been published. The first-arrival travel times from these profiles are reported in the hope that they can be used for three-dimensional velocity models in the San Francisco Bay area, particularly for the Livermore Valley and Santa Cruz Mountains.

  19. Negative-Refraction Metamaterials: Fundamental Principles and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriades, G. V.; Balmain, K. G.

    2005-06-01

    Learn about the revolutionary new technology of negative-refraction metamaterials Negative-Refraction Metamaterials: Fundamental Principles and Applications introduces artificial materials that support the unusual electromagnetic property of negative refraction. Readers will discover several classes of negative-refraction materials along with their exciting, groundbreaking applications, such as lenses and antennas, imaging with super-resolution, microwave devices, dispersion-compensating interconnects, radar, and defense. The book begins with a chapter describing the fundamentals of isotropic metamaterials in which a negative index of refraction is defined. In the following chapters, the text builds on the fundamentals by describing a range of useful microwave devices and antennas. Next, a broad spectrum of exciting new research and emerging applications is examined, including: Theory and experiments behind a super-resolving, negative-refractive-index transmission-line lens 3-D transmission-line metamaterials with a negative refractive index Numerical simulation studies of negative refraction of Gaussian beams and associated focusing phenomena Unique advantages and theory of shaped lenses made of negative-refractive-index metamaterials A new type of transmission-line metamaterial that is anisotropic and supports the formation of sharp steerable beams (resonance cones) Implementations of negative-refraction metamaterials at optical frequencies Unusual propagation phenomena in metallic waveguides partially filled with negative-refractive-index metamaterials Metamaterials in which the refractive index and the underlying group velocity are both negative This work brings together the best minds in this cutting-edge field. It is fascinating reading for scientists, engineers, and graduate-level students in physics, chemistry, materials science, photonics, and electrical engineering.

  20. Calculation of electron wave functions and refractive index of Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2008-10-01

    The radial wave functions of inner electron shell and outer electron shell of a Ne atom were obtained by the approximate analytical method and tested by calculating the ground state energy of the Ne atom. The equivalent volume of electron cloud and the refractive index of Ne were calculated. The calculated refractive index agrees well with the experimental result. Relationship between the refractive index and the wave function of Ne was discovered.

  1. Determination of refractive index by Moiré deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad; Madanipour, Khosro; Javadianvarjovi, Soheila

    2015-06-01

    Determination of refractive index is an important characteristic of material which is crucial parameter for physicists and engineers. Moiré deflectometry technique is convenient, easy-aligning, nondestructive, non-contact and fairly accurate method for refractive index measurement of gas, liquid, solid. In this paper we investigate the theory of the technique and simulate some relations then finally measure refractive index of a glassy lamella, n=1.536.

  2. Fiber in-line Michelson Interferometer for refractive index sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Wang, D. N.; Wang, Min; Yang, Minghong; Wang, Yiping

    2013-09-01

    A fiber in-line Michelson interferometer based on open micro-cavity is demonstrated, which is fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining and thin film coating technique. In refractive index sensing, this interferometer operates in a reflection mode of detection, exhibits compact sensor head, good mechanical reliability, wide operation range and high sensitivity of 975nm/RIU (refractive index unit) at the refractive index value of 1.484.

  3. Refractive index fiber sensor based on Brillouin fast light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiali; Gan, Jiulin; Zhang, Zhishen; Yang, Tong; Deng, Huaqiu; Yang, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    A new type of refractive index fiber sensor was invented by combining the evanescent-field scattering sensing mechanism with the Brillouin fast light scheme. Superluminal light was realized using Brillouin lasing oscillation in a fiber ring cavity. The refractive index of the solution around the microfiber within the cavity is related to the group velocity of the fast light. This fast light refractive index sensor offers an alternative for high-accuracy sensing applications.

  4. Retinal evaluation and treatment after refractive corneal surgery.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Kraushar, M F

    1985-08-01

    Refractive corneal surgery (a collective term used to describe a variety of surgical procedures that alter the refractive status of the eye through the surgical modification of corneal curvature) shows promise for use in situations where current methods of optical correction do not meet the patient's needs. This article reviews our experiences with the retinal evaluation of patients who have undergone corneal refractive surgery and offers recommendations for the treatment of retinal pathology after such surgery.

  5. Experimental analysis of distributed pump absorption and refractive index changes in Yb-doped fibers using acousto-optic interaction.

    PubMed

    Alcusa-Sáez, E P; Díez, A; Andrés, M V

    2015-03-01

    In-fiber acousto-optic interaction is used to characterize the refractive index changes at the C band in a single-mode ytterbium-doped optical fiber under 980 nm pumping. The transmission notch created by the acoustic-induced coupling between the core mode and a cladding mode shifts to longer wavelengths when the pump is delivered to the fiber. The electronic contribution to the refractive index change is quantified from the wavelength shift. Using a time-resolved acousto-optic method, we investigate the distribution of pump absorption, and the resulting refractive index change profile, along sections of ytterbium-doped fiber exceeding 1 m long under different pump power levels.

  6. Achromatic doublets using group indices of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosete-Aguilar, M.; Estrada-Silva, F. C.; Román-Moreno, C. J.; Ortega-Martínez, R.

    2008-03-01

    One main function of short pulses is to concentrate energy in time and space [1]. The use of refractive lenses allows us to concentrate energy in a small volume of focusing around the focal point of the lens. When using refractive lenses, there are three effects that affect the concentration of energy around the focal point of the lens. These are the group velocity dispersion (GVD), the propagation time difference (PTD), and the aberrations of the lens. In this paper, we study lenses which are diffraction limited so that the monochromatic aberrations are negligible; the group velocity dispersion and the propagation time difference are the main effects affecting the spreading of the pulse at the focus. We will show that for 100-fs pulses the spatial spreading is larger than the temporal spreading of the pulse. It is already known that the effect of spatial spreading of the pulse due to PTD can be reduced by using achromatic optics. We use the theory proposed by A. Vaughan to analyze simple lenses and normal achromatic doublets, where normal means doublets that we can buy from catalogs. We then use the Vaughan theory to design achromatic doublets in phase and group, which produce no spatial spreading of the pulse, i.e., PTD = 0, when the doublet is designed for the carrier of the pulse. We compare these phase and group achromatic doublets with normal achromatic doublets. Finally, we show that apochromatic optics can give a much better correction of PTD than using normal achromatic doublets.

  7. Demonstration of optical interference filters utilizing tunable refractive index layers.

    PubMed

    Poxson, David J; Mont, Frank W; Schubert, Martin F; Kim, Jong Kyu; Cho, Jaehee; Schubert, E Fred

    2010-11-08

    Optical interference filters utilizing tunable refractive index layers are shown to have higher spectral fidelity as compared to conventional filters consisting of non-tunable refractive index layers. To demonstrate this increase in spectral fidelity, we design and compare a variety of optical interference filters employing both tunable and non-tunable refractive index layers. Additionally, a five-layer optical interference filter utilizing tunable refractive index layers is designed and fabricated for use with a Xenon lamp to replicate the Air Mass 0 solar irradiance spectrum and is shown to have excellent spectral fidelity.

  8. Two different looks at Kepler’s refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusche, Sascha; Wagner, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    Most refraction experiments are theory-laden and far from everyday experience. Accordingly, many students fail to apply the law of refraction to phenomena. To guide students from phenomena to theory, teachers can use a refraction experiment proposed by Kepler, where measurements are based on shadow images. For a different look at Kepler’s experiment, one can use the principle of reversibility to get equivalent results, but based on apparent depth. For this reversal, rays of light are reinterpreted as lines of sight, and vice versa. The principle allows students to relate refracted rays to shifted images, and applies to other optical phenomena.

  9. Baseline peripheral refractive error and changes in axial refraction during one year in a young adult population

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Andreas; Charman, William Neil; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the initial characteristics of individual patterns of peripheral refraction relate to subsequent changes in refraction over a one-year period. Methods 54 myopic and emmetropic subjects (mean age: 24.9 ± 5.1 years; median 24 years) with normal vision were recruited and underwent conventional non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. Peripheral refraction was also measured at 5° intervals over the central 60° of horizontal visual field, together with axial length. After one year, measurements of subjective refraction and axial length were repeated on the 43 subjects who were still available for examination. Results In agreement with earlier studies, higher myopes tended to show greater relative peripheral hyperopia. There was, however, considerable inter-subject variation in the pattern of relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) at any level of axial refraction. Across the group, mean one-year changes in axial refraction and axial length did not differ significantly from zero. There was no correlation between changes in these parameters for individual subjects and any characteristic of their RPRE. Conclusion No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that the pattern of RPRE is predictive of subsequent refractive change in this age group. PMID:26188389

  10. Porous Silicon Gradient Refractive Index Micro-Optics.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Neil A; Holsteen, Aaron L; Kang, Seung-Kyun; Ocier, Christian R; Zhou, Weijun; Mensing, Glennys; Rogers, John A; Brongersma, Mark L; Braun, Paul V

    2016-12-14

    The emergence and growth of transformation optics over the past decade has revitalized interest in how a gradient refractive index (GRIN) can be used to control light propagation. Two-dimensional demonstrations with lithographically defined silicon (Si) have displayed the power of GRIN optics and also represent a promising opportunity for integrating compact optical elements within Si photonic integrated circuits. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of three-dimensional Si-based GRIN micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous Si (PSi). Conventional microfabrication creates Si square microcolumns (SMCs) that can be electrochemically etched into PSi elements with nanoscale porosity along the shape-defined etching pathway, which imparts the geometry with structural birefringence. Free-space characterization of the transmitted intensity distribution through a homogeneously etched PSi SMC exhibits polarization splitting behavior resembling that of dielectric metasurfaces that require considerably more laborious fabrication. Coupled birefringence/GRIN effects are studied by way of PSi SMCs etched with a linear (increasing from edge to center) GRIN profile. The transmitted intensity distribution shows polarization-selective focusing behavior with one polarization focused to a diffraction-limited spot and the orthogonal polarization focused into two laterally displaced foci. Optical thickness-based analysis readily predicts the experimentally observed phenomena, which strongly match finite-element electromagnetic simulations.

  11. A noble refractive optical scanner with linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, Yair J.; Lai, Zhenhua; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-03-01

    Many applications in various fields of science and engineering use steered optical beam systems. Currently, many methods utilize mirrors in order to steer the beam. However, this approach is an off-axis solution, which normally increases the total size of the system as well as its error and complexity. Other methods use a "Risely Prisms" based solution, which is on-axis solution, however it poses some difficulties from an engineering standpoint, and therefore isn't widely used. We present here a novel technique for steering a beam on its optical axis with a linear deflection response. We derived the formulation for the profile required of the refractive optical component necessary for preforming the beam steering. The functionality of the device was simulated analytically using Matlab, as well as using a ray-tracing software, Zemax, and showed agreement with the analytical model. An optical element was manufactured based on the proposed design and the device was tested. The results show agreement with our hypothesis. We also present some proposed geometries of the several other devices, all based on the same concept, which can be used for higher performance applications such as two-dimensional scanner, video rate scanner etc.

  12. Cylindrical radiant energy direction device with refractive medium

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for directing radiant energy and includes a refractive element and a reflective boundary. The reflective boundary is so contoured that incident energy directed thereto by the refractive element is directed to the exit surface thereof or onto the surface of an energy absorber positioned at the exit surface.

  13. Surface refractivity measurements at NASA spacecraft tracking sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    High-accuracy spacecraft tracking requires tropospheric modeling which is generally scaled by either estimated or measured values of surface refractivity. This report summarizes the results of a worldwide surface-refractivity test conducted in 1968 in support of the Apollo program. The results are directly applicable to all NASA radio-tracking systems.

  14. Index of Refraction Measurements Using a Laser Distance Meter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochoa, Romulo; Fiorillo, Richard; Ochoa, Cris

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method to determine the refractive indices of transparent media using a laser distance meter. Indices of refraction have been obtained by measuring the speed of light in materials. Some speed of light techniques use time-of-flight measurements in which pulses are emitted by lasers and the time interval is measured for the pulse…

  15. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  16. Anterior segment surgery IOLs, lasers, and refractive keratoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, W.J.; Terry, A.C.; Maumenee, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The contributors to this text combine their expertise to make this book available on intraocular lenses, refractive corneal surgery, and the use of the YAG laser. Included is information on; IOL power calculations; the use of the YAG laser; retinal damage by short wavelength light; reviews of corneal refractive surgery; possibilities for the medical prevention of cataracts; and more.

  17. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  18. Refraction in Terms of the Deviation of the Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Fred M.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses refraction in terms of the deviation of light. Points out that in physics courses where very little mathematics is used, it might be more suitable to describe refraction entirely in terms of the deviation, rather than by introducing Snell's law. (DH)

  19. Determining the Thickness and Refractive Index of a Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uysal, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    When a laser beam reflects from a back surface glass mirror and falls on a screen, a pattern of discrete bright spots is created by partial reflection and refraction of the light at the air-glass interface and reflection at the mirror surface (Fig. 1). This paper explains how this phenomenon can be used to determine the refractive index and the…

  20. Negative Refraction in a Uniaxial Absorbent Dielectric Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-01-01

    Refraction of light from an isotropic dielectric medium to an anisotropic dielectric material is a complicated phenomenon that can have several different characteristics not usually discussed in electromagnetics textbooks for undergraduate students. With a simple problem wherein the refracting material is uniaxial with its optic axis normal to the…

  1. Unbiased Estimation of Refractive State of Aberrated Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jesson; Vasudevan, Balamurali; Himebaugh, Nikole; Bradley, Arthur; Thibos, Larry

    2011-01-01

    To identify unbiased methods for estimating the target vergence required to maximize visual acuity based on wavefront aberration measurements. Experiments were designed to minimize the impact of confounding factors that have hampered previous research. Objective wavefront refractions and subjective acuity refractions were obtained for the same monochromatic wavelength. Accommodation and pupil fluctuations were eliminated by cycloplegia. Unbiased subjective refractions that maximize visual acuity for high contrast letters were performed with a computer controlled forced choice staircase procedure, using 0.125 diopter steps of defocus. All experiments were performed for two pupil diameters (3mm and 6mm). As reported in the literature, subjective refractive error does not change appreciably when the pupil dilates. For 3 mm pupils most metrics yielded objective refractions that were about 0.1D more hyperopic than subjective acuity refractions. When pupil diameter increased to 6 mm, this bias changed in the myopic direction and the variability between metrics also increased. These inaccuracies were small compared to the precision of the measurements, which implies that most metrics provided unbiased estimates of refractive state for medium and large pupils. A variety of image quality metrics may be used to determine ocular refractive state for monochromatic (635nm) light, thereby achieving accurate results without the need for empirical correction factors. PMID:21777601

  2. Diffractive-refractive correction units for plastic compact zoom lenses.

    PubMed

    Greisukh, Grigoriy I; Ezhov, Evgeniy G; Kalashnikov, Alexander V; Stepanov, Sergei A

    2012-07-10

    A method of designing a plastic zoom lens with a diffractive-refractive hybrid corrector, comprising one diffractive lens and one refractive lens, is described. The efficiency of this method is demonstrated by designing a compact zoom lens for a mobile phone. This zoom design, incorporating lenses made only of two commercial optical plastics (polymethylmethacrylate and polycarbonate), provides high optical performance.

  3. Measurement of Refractive Index Using a Michelson Interferometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendley, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a novel and simple method of measuring the refractive index of transparent plates using a Michelson interferometer. Since it is necessary to use a computer program when determining the refractive index, undergraduates could be given the opportunity of writing their own programs. (Author/JN)

  4. Helping Secondary School Students Develop a Conceptual Understanding of Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmann, Scott; Anderson, Charles W.; Boeckman, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Using real-world examples, ray diagrams, and a cognitive apprenticeship cycle, this paper focuses on developing students' conceptual (not mathematical) understanding of refraction. Refraction can be a difficult concept for students to comprehend if they do not have well-designed opportunities to practice explaining situations where reflection and…

  5. Comment on "Refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Cecilio; Fragoso-López, Ana Belén

    2014-02-01

    In 2007 Yin, Zhang and Tian [1] [Yin et al., 2007] derived the expressions of the refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation. In the past we have researched about the simultaneous measurement of birefringence and optical activity in different crystals [2] [Hernández-Rodríguez et al., 2000], [3] [Hernández-Rodríguez and Gómez-Garrido, 2000], [4] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2003], [5] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2005] and [6] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2007], and recently, when we used their methods for the study of nonlinear crystals such as KTiOAsO4 (KTA) and KTiOPO4 (KTP), we found some errors in some expressions in their paper which were used by other authors [7] [Gao et al., 2003].

  6. CHARMS: The Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The success of numerous upcoming NASA infrared (IR) missions will rely critically on accurate knowledge of the IR refractive indices of their constituent optical components at design operating temperatures. To satisfy the demand for such data, we have built a Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS), which, for typical 1R materials. can measure the index of refraction accurate to (+ or -) 5 x 10sup -3 . This versatile, one-of-a-kind facility can also measure refractive index over a wide range of wavelengths, from 0.105 um in the far-ultraviolet to 6 um in the IR, and over a wide range of temperatures, from 10 K to 100 degrees C, all with comparable accuracies. We first summarize the technical challenges we faced and engineering solutions we developed during the construction of CHARMS. Next we present our "first light," index of refraction data for fused silica and compare our data to previously published results.

  7. Software for teaching refraction of light with the semicircle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Software is presented for teaching elementary optics using a transparent semicircle. We demonstrate the use of the semicircle to investigate Snell’s lawand students can are presented with the difficulties involved in experiments. An Excel spreadsheet can show to students that small errors in positioning of the semicircle can result in a non-constant index of refraction. Students can study the effect of changing some of the parameters of placement of a semicircle on the accuracy of the experimental results. They can see from the analysis of data that much better results are obtained by doing regression analysis rather than by just taking the average value of the index of refraction. Measuring the critical angle also gives a method of calculating the index of refraction. Another way to measure the index of refraction is the use of the semicircle as a lens and from its focal length we can deduce the index of refraction.

  8. Parabolic refractive X-ray lenses: a breakthrough in X-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengeler, Bruno; Schroer, Christian G.; Benner, Boris; Günzler, Til Florian; Kuhlmann, Marion; Tümmler, Johannes; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina

    2001-07-01

    Refractive X-ray lenses, considered for a long time as unfeasible, have been realized with a rotational parabolic profile at our institute: The main features of the new lenses are: they focus in two directions and are free of spherical aberration. By varying the number of individual lenses in the stack the focal length can be chosen in a typical range from 0.5 to 2 m for photon energies between about 6 and 60 keV. The aperture of the lens is about 1 mm matching the angular divergence of undulator beams at 3d generation synchrotron radiation sources. They cope without problems with the heat load from the white beam of an undulator. Finally, they are easy to align and to operate. Refractive X-ray lenses can be used with hard X-rays in the same way as glass lenses can be used for visible light, if it is take into account that the numerical aperture is small (of the order 10 -4). Being high-quality optical elements, the refractive X-ray lenses can be used for generating a focal spot in the μm range with a gain of a factor 1000 and more, or for imaging purposes as in a hard X-ray microscope. Recent examples from microanalysis, microtomography, fluorescence tomography, X-ray microscopy will be shown to demonstrate the state of the art. Possible new developments will be discussed.

  9. Optimization of refractive liquid crystal lenses using an efficient multigrid simulation.

    PubMed

    Milton, Harry; Brimicombe, Paul; Morgan, Philip; Gleeson, Helen; Clamp, John

    2012-05-07

    A multigrid computational model has been developed to assess the performance of refractive liquid crystal lenses, which is up to 40 times faster than previous techniques. Using this model, the optimum geometries producing an ideal parabolic voltage distribution were deduced for refractive liquid crystal lenses with diameters from 1 to 9 mm. The ratio of insulation thickness to lens diameter was determined to be 1:2 for small diameter lenses, tending to 1:3 for larger lenses. The model is used to propose a new method of lens operation with lower operating voltages needed to induce specific optical powers. The operating voltages are calculated for the induction of optical powers between + 1.00 D and + 3.00 D in a 3 mm diameter lens, with the speed of the simulation facilitating the optimization of the refractive index profile. We demonstrate that the relationship between additional applied voltage and optical power is approximately linear for optical powers under + 3.00 D. The versatility of the computational simulation has also been demonstrated by modeling of in-plane electrode liquid crystal devices.

  10. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part II: Quantifying refraction nonuniqueness using a three-layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second of a set of two papers in which we study the inverse refraction problem. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," studies and classifies the types of nonuniqueness that exist when solving inverse problems depending on the participation of a priori information required to obtain reliable solutions of inverse geophysical problems. In view of the classification developed, in this paper we study the type of nonuniqueness associated with the inverse refraction problem. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined by using a simple three-layer model. Like many other inverse geophysical problems, the inverse refraction problem does not have a unique solution. Conventionally, nonuniqueness is considered to be a result of insufficient data and/or error in the data, for any fixed number of model parameters. This study illustrates that even for overdetermined and error free data, nonlinear inverse refraction problems exhibit exact-data nonuniqueness, which further complicates the problem of nonuniqueness. By evaluating the nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem, this paper targets the improvement of refraction inversion algorithms, and as a result, the achievement of more realistic solutions. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined initially by using a simple three-layer model. The observations and conclusions of the three-layer model nonuniqueness study are used to evaluate the nonuniqueness of more complicated n-layer models and multi-parameter cell models such as in refraction tomography. For any fixed number of model parameters, the inverse refraction problem exhibits continuous ranges of exact-data nonuniqueness. Such an unfavorable type of nonuniqueness can be uniquely solved only by providing abundant a priori information

  11. Transmission and refractive index sensing based on Fano resonance in MIM waveguide-coupled trapezoid cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinli; Chen, Huibin; Zhang, Zhidong; Tang, Jun; Cui, Jiangong; Xue, Chenyang; Yan, Shubin

    2017-01-01

    A metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide-coupled trapezoid cavity is presented, and the transmission properties are investigated by finite-element method. Results show that an asymmetric Fano profile emerged in the transmission spectrum, which was caused by the asymmetrical break of the MIM waveguide-coupled trapezoid cavity system. A refractive index sensitivity, Q-factor and FOM of approximately 750nm/RIU, 68.3 and 65.2 were measured based on the Fano resonance. The effect of the structural parameters on the transmission properties is also investigated. The results provide a new possibility for designing high-performance plasmonic devices.

  12. Swift and heavy ion implanted chalcogenide laser glass waveguides and their different refractive index distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Feng; Narusawa, Tadashi; Zheng Jie

    2011-02-10

    Planar waveguides have been fabricated in Nd- or Ho-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide laser glasses by 60 MeV Ar or 20 MeV N ion implantation. The refractive index profiles were reconstructed based on the results of prism coupling. The Ar implanted waveguides exhibit an approximate steplike distribution, while the N implanted ones show a ''well + barrier'' type. This difference can be attributed to the much lower dose of Ar ions. After annealing, the N implanted waveguides can support two modes at 1539 nm and have low propagation loss, which makes them candidates for novel waveguide lasers.

  13. Improving directivity of laser beams by employing the effect of conical refraction in biaxial crystals.

    PubMed

    Peet, V

    2010-09-13

    The far-field pattern of Gaussian beams transformed by conical refraction in biaxial crystal is analyzed. It is shown that one of the two outgoing beam components acquires, under certain conditions, a profile with a dominating central peak. The width of this peak can be made significantly smaller than the width of the parent diffraction-limited Gaussian beam at the same propagation distance. The formation of such structurally-stable sub-diffraction beam core improves the beam directivity. Another component is a charge-one optical vortex, that forms the annular shell of the beam and carries the rest of the beam power.

  14. Cycloplegic refraction is the gold standard for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ian G; Iribarren, Rafael; Fotouhi, Akbar; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Many studies on children have shown that lack of cycloplegia is associated with slight overestimation of myopia and marked errors in estimates of the prevalence of emmetropia and hyperopia. Non-cycloplegic refraction is particularly problematic for studies of associations with risk factors. The consensus around the importance of cycloplegia in children left undefined at what age, if any, cycloplegia became unnecessary. It was often implicitly assumed that cycloplegia is not necessary beyond childhood or early adulthood, and thus, the protocol for the classical studies of refraction in older adults did not include cycloplegia. Now that population studies of refractive error are beginning to fill the gap between schoolchildren and older adults, whether cycloplegia is required for measuring refractive error in this age range, needs to be defined. Data from the Tehran Eye Study show that, without cycloplegia, there are errors in the estimation of myopia, emmetropia and hyperopia in the age range 20-50, just as in children. Similar results have been reported in an analysis of data from the Beaver Dam Offspring Eye Study. If the only important outcome measure of a particular study is the prevalence of myopia, then cycloplegia may not be crucial in some cases. But, without cycloplegia, measurements of other refractive categories as well as spherical equivalent are unreliable. In summary, the current evidence suggests that cycloplegic refraction should be considered as the gold standard for epidemiological studies of refraction, not only in children, but in adults up to the age of 50.

  15. Refractive Errors Affect the Vividness of Visual Mental Images

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Liana; Nori, Raffaella; Piccardi, Laura; Zeri, Fabrizio; Babino, Antonio; Giusberti, Fiorella; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that visual perception and mental imagery are equivalent has never been explored in individuals with vision defects not preventing the visual perception of the world, such as refractive errors. Refractive error (i.e., myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism) is a condition where the refracting system of the eye fails to focus objects sharply on the retina. As a consequence refractive errors cause blurred vision. We subdivided 84 individuals according to their spherical equivalent refraction into Emmetropes (control individuals without refractive errors) and Ametropes (individuals with refractive errors). Participants performed a vividness task and completed a questionnaire that explored their cognitive style of thinking before their vision was checked by an ophthalmologist. Although results showed that Ametropes had less vivid mental images than Emmetropes this did not affect the development of their cognitive style of thinking; in fact, Ametropes were able to use both verbal and visual strategies to acquire and retrieve information. Present data are consistent with the hypothesis of equivalence between imagery and perception. PMID:23755186

  16. Recursive Bayesian electromagnetic refractivity estimation from radar sea clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Sathyanarayanan; Anderson, Richard H.; Kraut, Shawn; Gerstoft, Peter; Rogers, L. Ted; Krolik, Jeffrey L.

    2007-04-01

    Estimation of the range- and height-dependent index of refraction over the sea surface facilitates prediction of ducted microwave propagation loss. In this paper, refractivity estimation from radar clutter returns is performed using a Markov state space model for microwave propagation. Specifically, the parabolic approximation for numerical solution of the wave equation is used to formulate the refractivity from clutter (RFC) problem within a nonlinear recursive Bayesian state estimation framework. RFC under this nonlinear state space formulation is more efficient than global fitting of refractivity parameters when the total number of range-varying parameters exceeds the number of basis functions required to represent the height-dependent field at a given range. Moreover, the range-recursive nature of the estimator can be easily adapted to situations where the refractivity modeling changes at discrete ranges, such as at a shoreline. A fast range-recursive solution for obtaining range-varying refractivity is achieved by using sequential importance sampling extensions to state estimation techniques, namely, the forward and Viterbi algorithms. Simulation and real data results from radar clutter collected off Wallops Island, Virginia, are presented which demonstrate the ability of this method to produce propagation loss estimates that compare favorably with ground truth refractivity measurements.

  17. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D "water-steel" model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  18. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ning Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-31

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D 'water-steel' model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  19. Variable thickness double-refracting plate

    DOEpatents

    Hadeishi, Tetsuo

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides an A.C., cyclic, current-controlled, phase retardation plate that uses a magnetic clamp to produce stress birefringence. It was developed for an Isotope-Zeeman Atomic Absorption Spectrometer that uses polarization modulation to effect automatic background correction in atomic absorption trace-element measurements. To this end, the phase retardation plate of the invention is a variable thickness, photoelastic, double-refracting plate that is alternately stressed and released by the magnetic clamp selectively to modulate specific components selected from the group consisting of circularly and plane polarized Zeeman components that are produced in a dc magnetic field so that they correspond respectively to Zeeman reference and transmission-probe absorption components. The polarization modulation changes the phase of these polarized Zeeman components, designated as .sigma. reference and .pi. absorption components, so that every half cycle the components change from a transmission mode to a mode in which the .pi. component is blocked and the .sigma. components are transmitted. Thus, the Zeeman absorption component, which corresponds in amplitude to the amount of the trace element to be measured in a sample, is alternately transmitted and blocked by a linear polarizer, while the circularly polarized reference components are continuously transmitted thereby. The result is a sinusoidally varying output light amplitude whose average corresponds to the amount of the trace element present in the sample.

  20. Development of High Refractive Index Conjugated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew; Jin, Shi; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this project is to fabricate a polymeric material with a complete 3-D PBG, to bring the tailorable physical, electrical, and optical properties of polymeric materials to 3-D PBG materials. Because of its conjugated nature and the presence of a heavy sulfur atom in its repeat unit, poly(thiophene) (PT) is predicted to have one of the highest polymeric refractive indices, but the reported n values for PT are 1.4 at 633 nm. This discrepancy is because the potential needed to electrosynthesize PT, the only method available to synthesize thick and high quality PT films, is higher than its degradation potential. It was found that by polymerizing thiophene with an optimized monomer concentration, proton trap concentration, and reaction temperature in a strong aprotic Lewis acid solvent, the polymerization potential could be reduced below the degradation potential of PT. The resultant PT film had a significantly elevated n Photonic templates were then constructed using a combination of Colvin's method^ with monodisperse spheres and mechanical annealing. High n PT was used to infiltrate the templates, and the templates were removed leaving a polymeric inverse opal with the possibility of a complete 3-D PBG.

  1. Failure Analysis of Sapphire Refractive Secondary Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Quinn, George D.

    2009-01-01

    Failure analysis was performed on two sapphire, refractive secondary concentrators (RSC) that failed during elevated temperature testing. Both concentrators failed from machining/handling damage on the lens face. The first concentrator, which failed during testing to 1300 C, exhibited a large r-plane twin extending from the lens through much of the cone. The second concentrator, which was an attempt to reduce temperature gradients and failed during testing to 649 C, exhibited a few small twins on the lens face. The twins were not located at the origin, but represent another mode of failure that needs to be considered in the design of sapphire components. In order to estimate the fracture stress from fractographic evidence, branching constants were measured on sapphire strength specimens. The fractographic analysis indicated radial tensile stresses of 44 to 65 MPa on the lens faces near the origins. Finite element analysis indicated similar stresses for the first RSC, but lower stresses for the second RSC. Better machining and handling might have prevented the fractures, however, temperature gradients and resultant thermal stresses need to be reduced to prevent twinning.

  2. Detection system for ocular refractive error measurement.

    PubMed

    Ventura, L; de Faria e Sousa, S J; de Castro, J C

    1998-05-01

    An automatic and objective system for measuring ocular refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism) was developed. The system consists of projecting a light target (a ring), using a diode laser (lambda = 850 nm), at the fundus of the patient's eye. The light beams scattered from the retina are submitted to an optical system and are analysed with regard to their vergence by a CCD detector (matrix). This system uses the same basic principle for the projection of beams into the tested eye as some commercial refractors, but it is innovative regarding the ring-shaped measuring target for the projection system and the detection system where a matrix detector provides a wider range of measurement and a less complex system for the optical alignment. Also a dedicated electronic circuit was not necessary for treating the electronic signals from the detector (as the usual refractors do); instead a commercial frame grabber was used and software based on the heuristic search technique was developed. All the guiding equations that describe the system as well as the image processing procedure are presented in detail. Measurements in model eyes and in human eyes are in good agreement with retinoscopic measurements and they are also as precise as these kinds of measurements require (0.125D and 5 degrees).

  3. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  4. Refractive index and temperature nanosensor with plasmonic waveguide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yan; Qiu, Peng; Wei, Qi; Quan, Wei; Wang, Shouyu; Qian, Weiying

    2016-07-01

    A surface plasmon polariton sensor consisting of two metal-insulator-metal waveguides and a transverse rectangular resonator is proposed. Both refractive index and temperature sensing characteristics are analyzed by investigating the transmission spectra which demonstrates that the transmission peak wavelength shifting satisfies linear relation with environmental refractive index and temperature, respectively. The proposed design provides high refractive index and temperature sensitivity as 3.38×106%/RIU and 82%/K estimated by integrated response of the sensor, and owns the potentials for high-throughput array sensing. It is believed that the nanoscale sensor can be applied in spot detection for high speed multi-parameter sensing and accurate measurements.

  5. Studies of atmospheric refraction effects on laser data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, P. J.; Pearce, W. A.; Johnson, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    The refraction effect from three perspectives was considered. An analysis of the axioms on which the accepted correction algorithms were based was the first priority. The integrity of the meteorological measurements on which the correction model is based was also considered and a large quantity of laser observations was processed in an effort to detect any serious anomalies in them. The effect of refraction errors on geodetic parameters estimated from laser data using the most recent analysis procedures was the focus of the third element of study. The results concentrate on refraction errors which were found to be critical in the eventual use of the data for measurements of crustal dynamics.

  6. Refractive phenomena in the shock wave dispersion with variable gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.

    2010-06-15

    In this article the refraction effects in the weak shock wave (SW) dispersion on an interface with a temperature variation between two mediums are described. In the case of a finite-gradient boundary, the effect of the SW dispersion is remarkably stronger than in the case of a step change in parameters. In the former case the vertical component of velocity for the transmitted SW (the refraction effect) must be taken into account. Results of comparative calculations based on the two-dimensional model corrected for the refraction effect show significant differences in the shapes of the dispersed SW fronts.

  7. Black and gray Helmholtz-Kerr soliton refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S.

    2011-01-15

    Refraction of black and gray solitons at boundaries separating different defocusing Kerr media is analyzed within a Helmholtz framework. A universal nonlinear Snell's law is derived that describes gray soliton refraction, in addition to capturing the behavior of bright and black Kerr solitons at interfaces. Key regimes, defined by beam and interface characteristics, are identified, and predictions are verified by full numerical simulations. The existence of a unique total nonrefraction angle for gray solitons is reported; both internal and external refraction at a single interface is shown possible (dependent only on incidence angle). This, in turn, leads to the proposal of positive or negative lensing operations on soliton arrays at planar boundaries.

  8. Determination of the refractive index of paper with clearing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabritius, Tapio; Saarela, Juha; Myllyla, Risto

    2006-01-01

    The refractive index of paper was determined by measuring the propagation delay of photons in optically cleared paper boards. The determination was based on the assumption that photon propagation delay achieves minimum value as the paper is optimally cleared. The measured paper sheets was made from elemental chlorine-free market pulp, i.e. fully bleached, unbeaten, softwood kraft pulp. Nine different clearing agents with a refraction index between 1.329 and 1.741 were eLuperimented with. According to the streakmem measurements, the refractive index of the test paper was 1.557.

  9. Analyzing refractive index changes and differential bending in microcantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, François; Lang, Hans Peter; Hegner, Martin; Despont, Michel; Drechsler, Ute; Gerber, Christoph

    2008-08-01

    A new microcantilever array design is investigated comprising eight flexible microcantilevers introducing two solid bars, enabling to subtract contributions from differences in refractive index in an optical laser read out system. Changes in the refractive index do not contribute undesirably to bending signals at picomolar to micromolar DNA or protein concentrations. However, measurements of samples with high salt concentrations or serum are affected, requiring corrections for refractive index artifacts. Moreover, to obtain a deeper understanding of molecular stress formation, the differential curvature of cantilevers is analyzed by positioning the laser spots along the surface of the levers during pH experiments.

  10. A novel acousto-optic modulation-deflection mechanism using refractive index grating as graded index beam router

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangjoo, Alireza; Reza Baezzat, Mohammad; Razavizadeh, Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    A novel acousto-optic modulation mechanism will be addressed in this paper. Focused Gaussian beam passing through acousto-optic media experiences different refractive index regions arising from acoustic waves generated by ultrasonic source. In this way according to the snell's law of refraction the beam propagation path will be altered when these periodic traveling waves reach the incoming radiation where a typical p-n junction photodiode located inside the rising or falling lobe of the undiffracted Gaussian beam senses these small lateral deflections. Due to small variations of the refractive index the magnitude of deflection will be up to tens of micron outside the modulator. Hence, sharp intensity gradient is required for detecting such small beam movements by appropriate lens configuration to focus the Gaussian profile on the detector junction area. In the other words intensity profile of zero order beam oscillates proportional to the time dependent amplitude of the acoustic waves versus previous methods that intensity of diffracted beam changes with applied ultrasonic intensity. The extracted signal properties depend on the beam collimation, quality of beam profile and depth of focus inside the modulator. The first experimental approach was proceeded using a collimated 532 nm diode laser source (TEM00), distilled water as interaction media and 10 MHz transducer as ultrasonic generator where a cylindrical glass column with input-output flat windows was used for liquid support. The present method has advantages over common acoustooptical techniques as low cost, simplicity of operation, direct modulation of the signal and minimum alignment requirement.

  11. Refractive cylinder outcomes after calculating toric intraocular lens cylinder power using total corneal refractive power

    PubMed Central

    Davison, James A; Potvin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the total corneal refractive power (TCRP) value, which is based on measurement of both anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism, is effective for toric intraocular lens (IOL) calculation with AcrySof® Toric IOLs. Patients and methods A consecutive series of cataract surgery cases with AcrySof toric IOL implantation was studied retrospectively. The IOLMaster® was used for calculation of IOL sphere, the Pentacam® TCRP 3.0 mm apex/ring value was used as the keratometry input to the AcrySof Toric IOL Calculator and the VERION™ Digital Marker for surgical orientation. The keratometry readings from the VERION reference unit were recorded but not used in the actual calculation. Vector differences between expected and actual residual refractive cylinder were calculated and compared to simulated vector errors using the collected VERION keratometry data. Results In total, 83 eyes of 56 patients were analyzed. Residual refractive cylinder was 0.25 D or lower in 58% of eyes and 0.5 D or lower in 80% of eyes. The TCRP-based calculation resulted in a statistically significantly lower vector error (P<0.01) and significantly more eyes with a vector error ≤0.5 D relative to the VERION-based calculation (P=0.02). The TCRP and VERION keratometry readings suggested a different IOL toric power in 53/83 eyes. In these 53 eyes the TCRP vector error was lower in 28 cases, the VERION error was lower in five cases, and the error was equal in 20 cases. When the anterior cornea had with-the-rule astigmatism, the VERION was more likely to suggest a higher toric power and when the anterior cornea had against-the-rule astigmatism, the VERION was less likely to suggest a higher toric power. Conclusion Using the TCRP keratometry measurement in the AcrySof toric calculator may improve overall postoperative refractive results. Consideration of measured posterior corneal astigmatism, rather than a population-averaged value, appears advantageous. PMID:26316693

  12. Seismic reflection data imaging and interpretation from Braniewo2014 experiment using additional wide-angle refraction and reflection and well-logs data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Majdański, Mariusz; Białas, Sebastian; Gaczyński, Edward; Maksym, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Braniewo2014 reflection and refraction experiment was realized in cooperation between Polish Oil and Gas Company (PGNiG) and the Institute of Geophysics (IGF), Polish Academy of Sciences, near the locality of Braniewo in northern Poland. PGNiG realized a 20-km-long reflection profile, using vibroseis and dynamite shooting; the aim of the reflection survey was to characterise Silurian shale gas reservoir. IGF deployed 59 seismic stations along this profile and registered additional full-spread wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with offsets up to 12 km; maximum offsets from the seismic reflection survey was 3 km. To improve the velocity information two velocity logs from near deep boreholes were used. The main goal of the joint reflection-refraction interpretation was to find relations between velocity field from reflection velocity analysis and refraction tomography, and to build a velocity model which would be consistent for both, reflection and refraction, datasets. In this paper we present imaging results and velocity models from Braniewo2014 experiment and the methodology we used.

  13. Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianjun; Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Feng, Yaming; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials’ refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science. PMID:26149952

  14. Multiple scattering induced negative refraction of matter waves

    PubMed Central

    Pinsker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Starting from fundamental multiple scattering theory it is shown that negative refraction indices are feasible for matter waves passing a well-defined ensemble of scatterers. A simple approach to this topic is presented and explicit examples for systems of scatterers in 1D and 3D are stated that imply negative refraction for a generic incoming quantum wave packet. Essential features of the effective scattering field, densities and frequency spectrum of scatterers are considered. Additionally it is shown that negative refraction indices allow perfect transmission of the wave passing the ensemble of scatterers. Finally the concept of the superlens is discussed, since it is based on negative refraction and can be extended to matter waves utilizing the observations presented in this paper which thus paves the way to ‘untouchable’ quantum systems in analogy to cloaking devices for electromagnetic waves. PMID:26857266

  15. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  16. Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianjun; Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Feng, Yaming; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-07-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials’ refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science.

  17. Refractive index of K9 Glass under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Changming; Wang, Xiang; Cai, Lingcang; Liu, Cangli

    2013-06-01

    We study K9 glass refraction index under shock loading conducted on powder gun,all experimental tests are plate impact loading. The impact veceloty range from 300m/s to 1200m/s, and the measure method is laser interferometer Photon Doppler Velocimetry(PDV) to measure the particle velocity both at the impact interface and free surface, The shock pressure from 2 GPa to 8 GPa, values for refraction are found from velocity corrections that must be made to account for refraction-index changes in the K9 glass due to shock wave motion. Experiment results show that refraction-index of K9 glass changes with the shock pressure in line relations, it can be as measure window to study the interesting materials under 10 GPa during the shock loading.

  18. Photoresist Exposure Parameter Extraction from Refractive Index Change during Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Sung, Moon-Gyu; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Eun-Mi; Oh, Jin-Kyung; Byun, Sung-Hwan; Jeong, Yeon-Un; Oh, Hye-Keun; An, Ilsin; Lee, Kun-Sang; Park, In-Ho; Cho, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Ho

    1998-12-01

    The refractive indices of photoresist are usually measured byan ellipsometer or spectrophotometer, but the values are limited to pre-exposure. It is known thatthe real and imaginary indices are changed during the exposure.But there is little report on these variations since itis difficult to measure this refractive index change at deep ultraviolet. The DillABC parameters show a significant variation with the resist and substrate thicknessas well as the experimental conditions.A method is suggested to extract the parameters from the refractive index changes.We can get the refractive index change and extract the Dill ABC exposure parameters from that.The multiple thin film interference calculation is used to fit the measured transmittance data.The results of our experiments and calculations for several resists including193 nm chemically amplified resists are compared with other methods.The results are agreed well with the full multilayer thin film simulation.

  19. Asronomical refraction: Computational methods for all zenith angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, L. H.; Standish, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of computing astronomical refraction for any value of the zenith angle may be reduced to a simple, nonsingular, numerical quadrature when the proper choice is made for the independent variable of integration.

  20. Multiple scattering induced negative refraction of matter waves.

    PubMed

    Pinsker, Florian

    2016-02-09

    Starting from fundamental multiple scattering theory it is shown that negative refraction indices are feasible for matter waves passing a well-defined ensemble of scatterers. A simple approach to this topic is presented and explicit examples for systems of scatterers in 1D and 3D are stated that imply negative refraction for a generic incoming quantum wave packet. Essential features of the effective scattering field, densities and frequency spectrum of scatterers are considered. Additionally it is shown that negative refraction indices allow perfect transmission of the wave passing the ensemble of scatterers. Finally the concept of the superlens is discussed, since it is based on negative refraction and can be extended to matter waves utilizing the observations presented in this paper which thus paves the way to 'untouchable' quantum systems in analogy to cloaking devices for electromagnetic waves.

  1. An Analogue Model for Teaching Reflection and Refraction of Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Harry E.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a concrete model for teaching the concepts of reflection and refraction without the use of formal mathematics. The model has been tested in five sections of a physics course for nonscience majors at Towson State University, Baltimore, Maryland. (HM)

  2. Spatially Varying Index of Refraction: An Open Ended Undergraduate Topic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an experiment on the bending of light in a medium with a continuously varying index of refraction. Several theoretical approaches for the analysis of this experiment, designed for college physics students, are also presented. (HM)

  3. Chirality-induced negative refraction in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B.

    2013-09-15

    Characteristic equations in magnetized plasma with chirality are derived in simple formulations and the dispersion relations for propagation parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field are studied in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations of each eigenwave, the author explores chirality-induced negative refraction in magnetized plasma and investigates the effects of parameters (i.e., chirality degree, external magnetic field, etc.) on the negative refraction. The results show that the chirality is the necessary and only one factor which leads to negative refraction without manipulating electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability. Both increasing the degree of chirality and reducing the external magnetic field can result in greater range negative refraction. Parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  4. Resolving controversy of unusually high refractive index of a tubulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosudský, O.; Dráber, P.; Cifra, M.

    2017-02-01

    The refractive index of a tubulin is an important parameter underlying fundamental electromagnetic and biophysical properties of microtubules – protein fibers essential for several cell functions including cell division. Yet, the only experimental data available in the current literature show values of the tubulin refractive index (n=2.36\\text{--}2.90) which are much higher than what the established theories predict based on the weighted contribution of the polarizability of individual amino acids constituting the protein. To resolve this controversy, we report here modeling and rigorous experimental analysis of the refractive index of a purified tubulin dimer. Our experimental data revealed that the refractive index of the tubulin is n=1.64 at wavelength 589 nm and 25 °C, that is much closer to the values predicted by the established theories than what the earlier experimental data provide.

  5. Refracting solar energy concentrator and thin flexible fresnel lens

    SciTech Connect

    Appeldorn, R.H.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a solar energy concentrator. It comprises: a target area; lens means including a sheet of thin flexible transparent polymeric film having a first surface and a second surface, and having a plurality of lenticular light refracting prisms forming the second surface for refracting incident solar radiation striking the lens means at an acute angle to the lens means; support means for supporting the lens means above the target area and the lens means being mounted upon the support means to open toward the target area whereby the lens means is folded at at least one line parallel to the lenticular light refracting prisms to define at least two sections, and the light refracting prisms being defined for focusing the incident solar radiation onto the target area. The efficiency of the concentrator is not materially affected by image deterioration at the target area due to bowing of the sections of the lens means during use.

  6. Miniature interferometer for refractive index measurement in microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghui; Geiser, Martial; Truffer, Frederic; Song, Chengli

    2012-12-01

    The design and development of the miniaturized interferometer for measurement of the refractive index or concentration of sub-microliter volume aqueous solution in microfludic chip is presented. It is manifested by a successful measurement of the refractive index of sugar-water solution, by utilizing a laser diode for light source and the small robust instrumentation for practical implementation. Theoretically, the measurement principle and the feasibility of the system are analyzed. Experimental device is constructed with a diode laser, lens, two optical plate and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS). Through measuring the positional changes of the interference fringes, the refractive index change are retrieved. A refractive index change of 10-4 is inferred from the measured image data. The entire system is approximately the size of half and a deck of cards and can operate on battery power for long time.

  7. Helping secondary school students develop a conceptual understanding of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashmann, Scott; Anderson, Charles W.; Boeckman, Heather

    2016-07-01

    Using real-world examples, ray diagrams, and a cognitive apprenticeship cycle, this paper focuses on developing students’ conceptual (not mathematical) understanding of refraction. Refraction can be a difficult concept for students to comprehend if they do not have well-designed opportunities to practice explaining situations where reflection and refraction occur. The use of ray diagrams can be useful in (a) the teacher modelling a correct explanation to a situation where refraction occurs and (b) for students to create as they practice other examples. This paper includes eight examples of increasing complexity that use a cognitive apprenticeship cycle approach to scaffold student learning. The first examples (rock fish, floating penny) are shown and a solution is modeled using a ray diagram. Three more examples (bent pencil, dropping an item in water, sunrise/sunset) are presented for students to practice, with each becoming more sophisticated. Three assessment exercises are then provided (two dots, three coins, broken tube).

  8. Refractive eye surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about refractive eye surgery; Nearsightedness surgery - what to ask your doctor; LASIK - what to ... Will this surgery help my type of vision problem? Will I still need glasses or contact lenses after the surgery? Will ...

  9. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient’s age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy. PMID:27143849

  10. Seismic refraction study of the continental edge off the eastern united states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, R.E.; Grow, J.A.; Behrendt, John C.; Bayer, K.C.

    1979-01-01

    Three long, strike-parallel, seismic-refraction profiles were made on the continental shelf edge, slope and upper rise off New Jersey during 1975. The shelf edge line lies along the axis of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly (ECMA), while the continental rise line lies 80 km seaward of the shelf edge. Below the unconsolidated sediments (1.7-3.6 km/sec), high-velocity sedimentary rocks (4.2-6.2 km/sec) were found at depths of 2.6-8.2 km and are inferred to be cemented carbonates. Although multichannel seismic-reflection profiles and magnetic depth-to-source data predicted the top of oceanic basement at 6-8 km beneath the shelf edge and 10-11 km beneath the rise, no refracted events occurred as first arrivals from either oceanic basement (layer 2, approximately 5.5 km/ sec) or the upper oceanic crust (layer 3A, approximately 6.8 km/sec). Second arrivals from 10.5 km depth beneath the shelf edge are interpreted as events from a 5.9 km/sec refractor within igneous basement. Other refracted events from either layers 2 or 3A could not be resolved within the complex second arrivals. A well-defined crustal layer with a compressional velocity of 7.1-7.2 km/sec, which can be interpreted as oceanic layer 3B, occurred at 15.8 km depth beneath the shelf and 12.9 km beneath the upper rise. A well-reversed mantle velocity of 8.3 km/sec was measured at 18-22 km depth beneath the upper continental rise. Comparison with other deep-crustal profiles along the continental edge of the Atlantic margin off the United States, specifically in the inner magnetically quiet zone, indicates that the compressional wave velocities and layer depths determined on the U.S.G.S. profiles are very similar to those of nearby profiles. This suggests that the layers are continuous and that the interpretation of the oceanic layer 3B under the shelf edge east of New Jersey implies progradation of the shelf outward over the oceanic crust in that area. This agrees with magnetic anomaly evidence which shows the

  11. Data report for the 1985 seismic-refraction experiment at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, V.D.

    1985-12-31

    In February 1985, the US Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-refraction survey in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, southwestern Nevada to better define the P(compressional)-wave velocity structure of the upper crust in this area. This experiment is a continuation of seismic investigations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by the USGS on behalf of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI) to assess the feasibility of a proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain. The 1985 seismic-refraction survey consisted of three separate deployments: two East-West profiles, Line A and Line B, and a North-South profile (Plate 1). Thirty-one shots were recorded by 120 portable seismographs, where recorder station spacing averaged .3 km, and the shotpoints averaged 5 to 8 km apart. Additionally, off set shots were fired at shotpoints located about 7 to 15 km from the endpoints of the deployment lines. This report includes record sections from the twenty-nine shotpoints (Plates 2 to 17), a list of seismograph locations (Appendix A), a list of shotpoint locations and shot times, DKDAT data files and Tape Grade Code (Appendix B), and a list of first-arrival traveltime picks (Appendix C). Detailed interpretation of these data will be published in a subsequent report.

  12. Three-dimensional passive acoustic tracking of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) in ray-refracting environments.

    PubMed

    Thode, Aaron

    2005-12-01

    A wide-aperture towed passive acoustic array is used to obtain ranges and depths of acoustically active sperm whales in the Gulf of Mexico in June 2004, by extending a technique previously reported [Thode, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 245-253 (2004)] to explicitly account for ray-refraction effects arising from a depth-dependent sound speed profile. Under this expanded approach, three quantities are measured from an impulsive sound: the time difference between direct-path arrivals on a forward and rear subarray, the time difference between the direct and surface-reflected paths on the rear subarray, and the acoustic bearing measured on the rear subarray. These quantities, combined with independent measurements of hydrophone depths and cable inclination, are converted into range-depth position fixes by implementing an efficient numerical procedure that uses a ray-tracing code to account for ray-refraction effects caused by depth-dependent sound speed profiles. Analytic expressions that assume a constant waterborne sound speed are also derived. Foraging depths of various sperm whales over 10 days in June, 2004 are estimated using the numerical technique.

  13. Velocity structure of the Kapuskasing Uplift, northern Ontario, from seismic refraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, A. V.; Ellis, R. M.

    1989-06-01

    A crustal scale seismic refraction experiment was conducted over the Kapuskasing structural zone, northern Ontario, in 1984. The zone cuts obliquely across the east-west structural grain of the Superior Province in the Canadian shield and has been proposed as a cross section of Archean crust exposed by thrust faulting along the Ivanhoe Lake cataclastic zone during early Proterozoic time. Five seismic refraction lines of 360-450 km were shot over the area. There were 18 profile shots and two fan shots with a recorder spacing of 2-5 km. We have modeled the travel times and amplitudes of the data from the profile lines and analyzed reflections from the crust-mantle boundary on the fan shots. We have imaged a low-velocity zone under the Abitibi greenstone belt ranging from 4-5 to 9-12 km depth that is underlain by a highly reflective zone. There is a considerable deepening of the Moho from 40-43 km to 50-53 km under and to the west of the southern end of the Kapuskasing structural zone. A high-velocity anomaly of 6.6-6.7 km/s has been imaged in the upper crust down to 20 km depth beneath the Kapuskasing structure with a suggested dip of 15°±2° to the west. This corresponds well to the proposed location of a granulite zone thrust up from the middle or lower crust in the early Proterozoic.

  14. Ducting and Boundary Layer Refractivity Bias Correction in GPS Radio Occultation Soundings with MODIS over the Subtropical Eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, F.; Ao, C. O.; Adhikari, L.; Yu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Over the subtropical eastern Pacific, a large stratus cloud deck is often trapped below a strong inversion layer resulting from the combination of strong free tropospheric subsidence and the cool sea surface temperature underneath. The stable inversion leads to a sharp moisture decrease and a large negative refractivity gradient that often causes ducting right above the cloudy boundary layer (CBL). The presence of duct results in systematically negative biases in the GPS radio occultation (RO) refractivity (i.e., N-bias) inside the CBL due to a non-unique retrieval problem. An independent physical constraint is required to extract a unique and bias-free RO refractivity observation. In the overcast scenario, the inversion base temperature corresponds well to the cloud-top-temperature (CTT) of the stratus, which can be precisely measured from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) longwave infrared window channel. In this presentation, the MODIS CTT measurements are used as an independent constraint to correct the systematic biases in the near co-incident RO refractivity soundings from COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate). The sensitivity analysis on the reconstruction technique and the comparison of the reconstructed (bias-free) RO profiles with the radiosonde and ECMWF reanalysis will be presented. The synergy of GPS RO and MODIS cloud measurements provides model-independent observation of CBL thermodynamic structures that are crucial for understanding the boundary layer and low cloud processes in global weather and climate model simulations.

  15. Refractive error among urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Dan; Feng, Ruifang; Zhao, Huashuo; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of refractive errors in urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China remains unknown. Children attending twelve randomly selected kindergartens participated in this study. Visual acuity, ocular alignment, cover-uncover test, cycloplegic refraction, slit-lamp and funduscopy were performed under a standardized testing environment. Cycloplegic streak retinoscopy was performed for all subjects. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error was the main outcome measure. Emmetropia was defined as refractive status between +1.75 diopters (D) and -0.75D. Myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and anisometropia were defined as SE < -0.50D, SE > +2.0 D, cylindrical error > 1.0 D and SE difference ≥ 1 D between fellow eyes, respectively. Out of 2349 eligible children, 2255 (96%) children completed a refractive examination. Of the 2255 children, the mean SE of right eyes was +1.14 ± 0.95 diopters (D). Mean SE of the right eyes did not decline with age (r = -0.01; P = 0.56). The majority (86.6%) of children were emmetropia. The prevalence of myopia and hyperopia was 0.9% and 14.3%, respectively. The mean astigmatism for the right eyes was 0.87 ± 0.62 D. The prevalence of With-the-rule, against the rule and oblique astigmatism was 93.8%, 4.7% and 1.5%, respectively. The mean anisometropia between two eyes was 0.14 ± 0.38 D. The most common type of refractive error was hyperopia (14.3%), followed by astigmatism (8.8%), anisometropia (3.2%), and myopia (0.9%). The refractive status in this population of urban Xuzhou preschool children was stable and there was no evidence of a myopic refractive shift over this age range in our cross-sectional study. PMID:25674266

  16. A general relationship for the second virial refraction coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Seminogov, V.N.; Sinel'nikov, S.P.; Timoshenko, N.I.; Yamnov, A.L.

    1986-05-01

    Experimental data have been used to obtain a general formula for the second virial refraction coefficient as a function of temperature. A qualitative analysis of the formula is given. Laser techinques have substantially extended the scope for optical methods in thermophysical research, including high-temperature processes. The general formula for the second virial refraction coefficient presented enables one to calculate polarizabilities at low densities.

  17. Apparatus and method to compensate for refraction of radiation

    DOEpatents

    Allen, G.R.; Moskowitz, P.E.

    1990-03-27

    An apparatus to compensate for refraction of radiation passing through a curved wall of an article is provided. The apparatus of a preferred embodiment is particularly advantageous for use in arc tube discharge diagnostics. The apparatus of the preferred embodiment includes means for pre-refracting radiation on a predetermined path by an amount equal and inverse to refraction which occurs when radiation passes through a first wall of the arc tube such that, when the radiation passes through the first wall of the arc tube and into the cavity thereof, the radiation passes through the cavity approximately on the predetermined path; means for releasably holding the article such that the radiation passes through the cavity thereof; and means for post-refracting radiation emerging from a point of the arc tube opposite its point of entry by an amount equal and inverse to refraction which occurs when radiation emerges from the arc tube. In one embodiment the means for pre-refracting radiation includes a first half tube comprising a longitudinally bisected tube obtained from a tube which is approximately identical to the arc tube's cylindrical portion and a first cylindrical lens, the first half tube being mounted with its concave side facing the radiation source and the first cylindrical lens being mounted between the first half tube and the arc tube and the means for post-refracting radiation includes a second half tube comprising a longitudinally bisected tube obtained from a tube which is approximately identical to the arc tube's cylindrical portion and a second cylindrical lens, the second half tube being mounted with its convex side facing the radiation source and the second cylindrical lens being mounted between the arc tube and the second half tube. Methods to compensate for refraction of radiation passing into and out of an arc tube is also provided. 4 figs.

  18. Steering and collimating ballistic electrons with amphoteric refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, A.; Dragoman, D.; Iftimie, S.

    2012-07-15

    We show that amphoteric refraction of ballistic electrons, i.e., positive or negative refraction depending on the incidence angle, occurs at an interface between an isotropic and an anisotropic medium and can be employed to steer and collimate electron beams. The steering angle is determined by the materials' parameters, but the degree of collimation can be tuned in a significant range by changing the energy of ballistic electrons.

  19. Apparatus and method to compensate for refraction of radiation

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Gary R.; Moskowitz, Philip E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus to compensate for refraction of radiation passing through a curved wall of an article is provided. The apparatus of a preferred embodiment is particularly advantageous for use in arc tube discharge diagnostics. The apparatus of the preferred embodiment includes means for pre-refracting radiation on a predetermined path by an amount equal and inverse to refraction which occurs when radiation passes through a first wall of the arc tube such that, when the radiation passes through the first wall of the arc tube and into the cavity thereof, the radiation passes through the cavity approximately on the predetermined path; means for releasably holding the article such that the radiation passes through the cavity thereof; and means for post-refracting radiation emerging from a point of the arc tube opposite its point of entry by an amount equal and inverse to refraction which occurs when radiation emerges from the arc tube. In one embodiment the means for pre-refracting radiation includes a first half tube comprising a longitudinally bisected tube obtained from a tube which is approximately identical to the arc tube's cylindrical portion and a first cylindrical lens, the first half tube being mounted with its concave side facing the radiation source and the first cylindrical lens being mounted between the first half tube and the arc tube and the means for post-refracting radiation includes a second half tube comprising a longitudinally bisected tube obtained from a tube which is approximately identical to the arc tube's cylindrical portion and a second cylindrical lens, the second half tube being mounted with its convex side facing the radiation source and the second cylindrical lens being mounted between the arc tube and the second half tube. Methods to compensate for refraction of radiation passing into and out of an arc tube is also provided.

  20. Recent developments in refractive concentrators for space photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Oneill, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    Since SPRAT 11, significant progress has been made in the development of refractive concentrator elements and components designed specifically for space applications. The status of the mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator array is discussed and then the results of work recently completed in the area of prismatic cell covers for concentrator systems are summarized. This is followed by a brief discussion of some work just starting in the area of line-focus refractive concentrators for space.

  1. Refractive error among urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Dan; Feng, Ruifang; Zhao, Huashuo; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of refractive errors in urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China remains unknown. Children attending twelve randomly selected kindergartens participated in this study. Visual acuity, ocular alignment, cover-uncover test, cycloplegic refraction, slit-lamp and funduscopy were performed under a standardized testing environment. Cycloplegic streak retinoscopy was performed for all subjects. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error was the main outcome measure. Emmetropia was defined as refractive status between +1.75 diopters (D) and -0.75D. Myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and anisometropia were defined as SE < -0.50D, SE > +2.0 D, cylindrical error > 1.0 D and SE difference ≥ 1 D between fellow eyes, respectively. Out of 2349 eligible children, 2255 (96%) children completed a refractive examination. Of the 2255 children, the mean SE of right eyes was +1.14 ± 0.95 diopters (D). Mean SE of the right eyes did not decline with age (r = -0.01; P = 0.56). The majority (86.6%) of children were emmetropia. The prevalence of myopia and hyperopia was 0.9% and 14.3%, respectively. The mean astigmatism for the right eyes was 0.87 ± 0.62 D. The prevalence of With-the-rule, against the rule and oblique astigmatism was 93.8%, 4.7% and 1.5%, respectively. The mean anisometropia between two eyes was 0.14 ± 0.38 D. The most common type of refractive error was hyperopia (14.3%), followed by astigmatism (8.8%), anisometropia (3.2%), and myopia (0.9%). The refractive status in this population of urban Xuzhou preschool children was stable and there was no evidence of a myopic refractive shift over this age range in our cross-sectional study.

  2. Assimilation Experiments of One-Dimensional Variational Analyses with GPS/MET Refractivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The GPS/MET 1995 experiment demonstrated the feasibility of remote soundings of the Earth's atmosphere using the GPS radio occultation technique. Subsequent studies assessed the information content of such measurements. Several groups have attempted to assimilate the GPS radio occultation measurements into a global Data Assimilation System (DAS). These attempts followed in general the methodology proposed by Eyre, and range from die act four-dimensional variational assimilation of bending angles to assimilation of inverted profiles of temperature and/or humidity. We present here an hybrid approach. We attempted to take advantage of the accuracy of current, weather models to constrain one-dimensional variational analyses using GPS refractivity. Retrieved profiles of atmospheric parameters were then assimilated like other types of observations in a global DAS for issuing the next forecast period.

  3. A Newtonian approach to extraordinarily strong negative refraction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hosang; Yeung, Kitty Y M; Umansky, Vladimir; Ham, Donhee

    2012-08-02

    Metamaterials with negative refractive indices can manipulate electromagnetic waves in unusual ways, and can be used to achieve, for example, sub-diffraction-limit focusing, the bending of light in the 'wrong' direction, and reversed Doppler and Cerenkov effects. These counterintuitive and technologically useful behaviours have spurred considerable efforts to synthesize a broad array of negative-index metamaterials with engineered electric, magnetic or optical properties. Here we demonstrate another route to negative refraction by exploiting the inertia of electrons in semiconductor two-dimensional electron gases, collectively accelerated by electromagnetic waves according to Newton's second law of motion, where this acceleration effect manifests as kinetic inductance. Using kinetic inductance to attain negative refraction was theoretically proposed for three-dimensional metallic nanoparticles and seen experimentally with surface plasmons on the surface of a three-dimensional metal. The two-dimensional electron gas that we use at cryogenic temperatures has a larger kinetic inductance than three-dimensional metals, leading to extraordinarily strong negative refraction at gigahertz frequencies, with an index as large as -700. This pronounced negative refractive index and the corresponding reduction in the effective wavelength opens a path to miniaturization in the science and technology of negative refraction.

  4. Seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in Canada Basin, Northwind Ridge and Northwind Basin, Arctic Ocean in 1988, 1992 and 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, Arthur; Hart, Patrick E.; May, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data were collected in generally ice-covered waters of the Canada Basin and the eastern part of the Chukchi Continental Borderland of the Amerasia Basin, Arctic Ocean, during the late summers of 1988, 1992, and 1993. The data were acquired from a Polar class icebreaker, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, using a seismic reflection system designed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The northernmost data extend to 78? 48' N latitude. In 1988, 155 km of reflection data were acquired with a prototype system consisting of a single 195 cubic inch air gun seismic source and a two-channel hydrophone streamer with a 150-m active section. In 1992 and 1993, 500 and 1,900 km, respectively, of seismic reflection profile data were acquired with an improved six air gun, 674 to 1303 cubic inch tuned seismic source array and the same two-channel streamer. In 1993, a 12-channel streamer with a 150-m active section was used to record five of the reflection lines and one line was acquired using a three air gun, 3,000 cubic inch source. All data were recorded with a DFS-V digital seismic recorder. Processed sections feature high quality vertical incidence images to more than 6 km of sub-bottom penetration in the Canada Basin. Refraction data were acquired with U.S. Navy sonobuoys recorded simultaneously with the seismic reflection profiles. In 1988 eight refraction profiles were recorded with the single air gun, and in 1992 and 1993 a total of 47 refraction profiles were recorded with the six air gun array. The sonobuoy refraction records, with offsets up to 35 km, provide acoustic velocity information to complement the short-offset reflection data. The report includes trackline maps showing the location of the data, as well as both digital data files (SEG-Y) and images of all of the profiles.

  5. Deep seismic refraction experiment in northeast Brazil: New constraints for Borborema province evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marcus Vinicius A. G. de; Berrocal, Jesus; Soares, José E. P.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.

    2015-03-01

    The Borborema Province of northeastern Brazil is a major Proterozoic crustal province that, until now, has never been explored using deep crustal seismic methods. Here are reported the first results obtained from a high-quality seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile that has defined the internal seismic velocity structure and thickness of the crust in this region. Almost 400 recording stations were deployed in the Deep Seismic Refraction (DSR) experiment through an NW-SE ca. 900 km linear array and 19 shots were exploded at every 50 km along the line. Data from the 10 southeastern most shots of the seismic profile were processed in this work. The main features and geological structures crossed by the studied portion of the profile belong to the so-called Central Sub-province of the Borborema tectonic province. The crustal model obtained is compatible with a typical structure of extended crust. The model was essentially divided into three layers: upper crust, lower crust, and a half-space represented by the shallower portion of the mantle. The Moho is an irregular interface with depth ranging between 31.7 and 34.5 km, and beneath the Central Sub-province it varies from 31.5 to 33 km depth, where its limits are related to major crustal discontinuities. The distribution of velocities within the crust is heterogeneous, varying vertically from 5.7 to 6.3 km/s in the upper crust and from 6.45 to 6.9 km/s in the lower crust. From the average crustal velocity distribution it is evident that the Central Sub-province has seismic characteristics different from neighboring domains. The crust is relatively thin and crustal thickness variations in the profile are subtle due to stretching that occurred in the Cretaceous, during the fragmentation of Pangaea, opening of the South Atlantic Ocean and separation of South America from Africa.

  6. Manufacture of refractive and diffractive beam-shaping elements in higher quantities using glass molding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, Michael; Blöcher, Ullrich; Dross, Gerhard; Schmitt, Jana; Bischoff, Christian; Umhofer, Udo

    2015-03-01

    Laser beam shaping elements can be used e.g. for material processing. The results of these processes can be improved when the usually Gaussian profile of the laser is transformed into a top hat profile, which can be circular or rectangular in shape. Another frequently used type of beam-forming devices are beam splitters for parallel processing using only one laser. These types of beam formers can be implemented as diffractive or refractive elements. So far these optics are produced either directly by means of lithography e.g. in glass or in plastic using a hot embossing process or nanoimprint technology. Elements produced in this way have either the disadvantage of high costs or they are limited in temperature range, laser power or wavelength. A newly developed molding process for glass allows the manufacture of larger numbers of optics with reduced cost. The production of molds for refractive top hat beam shaping devices requires very high precision of the applied grinding process. Form deviations below 100 nm are necessary to obtain a homogeneous illumination. Measurements of the surface topography of gauss to top hat beam shaping elements using white light interferometry are presented as well as results of optical measurements of the beam profile using a camera. Continuous diffractive beam shaping elements for beam splitting applications are designed to generate several sub-beams each carrying the same energy. In order to achieve this, form deviations of less than 50 nm are required. Measurements of the surface of a 1 x 5 beam splitter are compared with ideal beam splitter profiles. The resulting beam intensity distribution of a molded element is presented.

  7. The northern Walker Lane refraction experiment: Pn arrivals and the northern Sierra Nevada root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, John N.; Thelen, Weston; Smith, Shane B.; Scott, James B.; Clark, Matthew; Pullammanappallil, Satish

    2004-09-01

    In May 2002, we collected a new crustal refraction profile from Battle Mountain, Nevada across western Nevada, the Reno area, Lake Tahoe, and the northern Sierra Nevada Mountains to Auburn, CA. Mine blasts and earthquakes were recorded by 199 Texan instruments extending across this more than 450-km-long transect. The use of large mine blasts and the ultra-portable Texan recorders kept the field costs of this profile to less than US$10,000. The seismic sources at the eastern end were mining blasts at Barrick's GoldStrike mine. The GoldStrike mine produced several ripple-fired blasts using 8000-44,000 kg of ANFO each, a daily occurrence. First arrivals from the larger GoldStrike blasts are obvious to distances of 300 km in the raw records. First arrivals from a quarry blast west of the survey near Watsonville, CA, located by the Northern California Seismic Network with a magnitude of 2.2, can be picked across the recording array to distances of 600 km. The Watsonville blast provides a western source, nearly reversing the GoldStrike blasts. A small earthquake near Bridgeport, CA. also produced pickable P-wave arrivals across the transect, providing fan-shot data. Arrivals from M5 events in the Mariana and Kuril Islands also appear in the records. This refraction survey observes an unexpectedly deep crustal root under the northern Sierra Nevada range, over 50 km in thickness and possibly centered west of the topographic crest. Pn delays of 4-6 s support this interpretation. At Battle Mountain, Nevada, we observe anomalously thin crust over a limited region perhaps only 150 km wide, with a Moho depth of 19-23 km. Pn crossover distances of less than 80 km support this anomaly, which is surrounded by observations of more normal, 30-km-thick crust. A 10-km-thick and high-velocity lower-crustal "pillow" is an alternative hypothesis, but unlikely due to the lack of volcanics west of Battle Mountain. Large mine and quarry blasts prove very effective crustal refraction sources

  8. Global cost of correcting vision impairment from uncorrected refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, TR; Wilson, DA; Schlenther, G; Naidoo, KS; Resnikoff, S; Frick, KD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the global cost of establishing and operating the educational and refractive care facilities required to provide care to all individuals who currently have vision impairment resulting from uncorrected refractive error (URE). Methods The global cost of correcting URE was estimated using data on the population, the prevalence of URE and the number of existing refractive care practitioners in individual countries, the cost of establishing and operating educational programmes for practitioners and the cost of establishing and operating refractive care facilities. The assumptions made ensured that costs were not underestimated and an upper limit to the costs was derived using the most expensive extreme for each assumption. Findings There were an estimated 158 million cases of distance vision impairment and 544 million cases of near vision impairment caused by URE worldwide in 2007. Approximately 47 000 additional full-time functional clinical refractionists and 18 000 ophthalmic dispensers would be required to provide refractive care services for these individuals. The global cost of educating the additional personnel and of establishing, maintaining and operating the refractive care facilities needed was estimated to be around 20 000 million United States dollars (US$) and the upper-limit cost was US$ 28 000 million. The estimated loss in global gross domestic product due to distance vision impairment caused by URE was US$ 202 000 million annually. Conclusion The cost of establishing and operating the educational and refractive care facilities required to deal with vision impairment resulting from URE was a small proportion of the global loss in productivity associated with that vision impairment. PMID:23109740

  9. Three-dimensional optical metamaterial with a negative refractive index.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Jason; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Genov, Dentcho A; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2008-09-18

    Metamaterials are artificially engineered structures that have properties, such as a negative refractive index, not attainable with naturally occurring materials. Negative-index metamaterials (NIMs) were first demonstrated for microwave frequencies, but it has been challenging to design NIMs for optical frequencies and they have so far been limited to optically thin samples because of significant fabrication challenges and strong energy dissipation in metals. Such thin structures are analogous to a monolayer of atoms, making it difficult to assign bulk properties such as the index of refraction. Negative refraction of surface plasmons was recently demonstrated but was confined to a two-dimensional waveguide. Three-dimensional (3D) optical metamaterials have come into focus recently, including the realization of negative refraction by using layered semiconductor metamaterials and a 3D magnetic metamaterial in the infrared frequencies; however, neither of these had a negative index of refraction. Here we report a 3D optical metamaterial having negative refractive index with a very high figure of merit of 3.5 (that is, low loss). This metamaterial is made of cascaded 'fishnet' structures, with a negative index existing over a broad spectral range. Moreover, it can readily be probed from free space, making it functional for optical devices. We construct a prism made of this optical NIM to demonstrate negative refractive index at optical frequencies, resulting unambiguously from the negative phase evolution of the wave propagating inside the metamaterial. Bulk optical metamaterials open up prospects for studies of 3D optical effects and applications associated with NIMs and zero-index materials such as reversed Doppler effect, superlenses, optical tunnelling devices, compact resonators and highly directional sources.

  10. Pre- and Postcycloplegic Refractions in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xianrong; Yang, Dayong; Guo, Kai; Guo, Yuanyuan; Jing, Xinxia; Pan, Chen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error and its associated factors in Chinese children and adolescents with a high prevalence of myopia. Methods A school-based study including 1565 students aged 6 to 21 years was conducted in 2013 in Ejina, Inner Mongolia, China. Comprehensive eye examinations were performed. Pre-and postcycloplegic refractive error were measured using an auto-refractor. For cycloplegic refraction, one drop of topical 1.0% cyclopentolate was administered to each eye twice with a 5-minute interval and a third drop was administered 15 minutes after the second drop if the pupil size was less than 6 mm or if the pupillary light reflex was still present. Results Two drops of cyclopentolate were found to be sufficient in 59% of the study participants while the other 41% need an additional drop. The prevalence of myopia was 89.5% in participants aged over 12 years and 68.6% in those aged 12 years or younger (P<0.001). When myopia was defined as spherical equivalent (SE) of less than -0.5 diopter (D), the prevalence estimates were 76.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 74.6–78.8) and 54.1% (95%CI 51.6–56.6) before and after cycloplegic refraction, respectively. When hyperopia was defined as SE of more than 0.5D, the prevalence was only 2.8% (95%CI 1.9–3.6) before cycloplegic refraction while it was 15.5% (95%CI 13.7–17.3) after cycloplegic refraction. Increased difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error was associated with decreased intraocular pressures (P = 0.01). Conclusions Lack of cycloplegia in refractive error measurement was associated with significant misclassifications in both myopia and hyperopia among Chinese children and adolescents. Decreased intraocular pressure was related to a greater difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error. PMID:27907165

  11. Water absorption in a refractive index model for bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegrist, K. M.; Thrush, E.; Airola, M.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D. M.; Boggs, N. T.; Thomas, M. E.; Carter, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of biological agents can make it difficult to identify the important factors impacting scattering characteristics among variables such as size, shape, internal structure and biochemical composition, particle aggregation, and sample additives. This difficulty is exacerbated by the environmentally interactive nature of biological organisms. In particular, bacterial spores equilibrate with environmental humidity by absorption/desorption of water which can affect both the complex refractive index and the size/shape distributions of particles - two factors upon which scattering characteristics depend critically. Therefore accurate analysis of experimental data for determination of refractive index must take account of particle water content. First, spectral transmission measurements to determine visible refractive index done on suspensions of bacterial spores must account for water (or other solvent) uptake. Second, realistic calculations of aerosol scattering cross sections should consider effects of atmospheric humidity on particle water content, size and shape. In this work we demonstrate a method for determining refractive index of bacterial spores bacillus atropheus (BG), bacillus thuringiensis (BT) and bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAs) which accounts for these effects. Visible index is found from transmission measurements on aqueous and DMSO suspensions of particles, using an anomalous diffraction approximation. A simplified version of the anomalous diffraction theory is used to eliminate the need for knowledge of particle size. Results using this approach indicate the technique can be useful in determining the visible refractive index of particles when size and shape distributions are not well known but fall within the region of validity of anomalous dispersion theory.

  12. The molecular refractive function of lens γ-crystallins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Brown, Patrick H.; Magone, M. Teresa; Schuck, Peter

    2011-01-01

    γ-crystallins constitute the major protein component in the nucleus of the vertebrate eye lens. Present at very high concentrations, they exhibit extreme solubility and thermodynamic stability to prevent scattering of light and the formation of cataracts. However, functions beyond this structural role have remained mostly unclear. Here, we calculate molecular refractive index increments of crystallins. We show that all lens γ-crystallins have evolved a significantly elevated molecular refractive index increment, which is far above those of most proteins, including non-lens members of the βγ-crystallin family from different species. The same trait has evolved in parallel in crystallins of different phyla, including in the S-crystallins of cephalopods. A high refractive index increment can lower the crystallin concentration required to achieve a suitable refractive power of the lens, and thereby reduce their propensity to aggregate and form cataract. To produce a significant increase of the refractive index increment, a substantial global shift in the amino acid composition is required, which can naturally explain the highly unusual amino acid composition of γ-crystallins and their functional homologues. This function provides a new perspective for interpreting their molecular structure. PMID:21684289

  13. Empirical modelling to predict the refractive index of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, M.; Saghir, M. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Optical techniques used for the measurement of the optical properties of blood are of great interest in clinical diagnostics. Blood analysis is a routine procedure used in medical diagnostics to confirm a patient’s condition. Measuring the optical properties of blood is difficult due to the non-homogenous nature of the blood itself. In addition, there is a lot of variation in the refractive indices reported in the literature. These are the reasons that motivated the researchers to develop a mathematical model that can be used to predict the refractive index of human blood as a function of concentration, temperature and wavelength. The experimental measurements were conducted on mimicking phantom hemoglobin samples using the Abbemat Refractometer. The results analysis revealed a linear relationship between the refractive index and concentration as well as temperature, and a non-linear relationship between refractive index and wavelength. These results are in agreement with those found in the literature. In addition, a new formula was developed based on empirical modelling which suggests that temperature and wavelength coefficients be added to the Barer formula. The verification of this correlation confirmed its ability to determine refractive index and/or blood hematocrit values with appropriate clinical accuracy.

  14. Optofluidic whispering gallery mode microcapillary lasers for refractive index sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Alexandre; Riesen, Nicolas; Gardner, Kristy; Monro, Tanya M.; Meldrum, Al

    2016-12-01

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) allow for remarkable refractive index sensing performance with extremely low detection limits, and thus have found use in various emerging label free biosensing applications. Among the different types of resonators which have been studied, microcapillaries have the unique property of having the evanescent fields extend into and sample the medium inside the resonator, which is particularly interesting because the resonator itself serves as a microfluidic channel. Here, lasing of the WGMs in fluorescent microcapillaries is demonstrated for the first time, and their application to refractive index sensing is investigated. The laser gain medium used here is embedded inside a high refractive index polymer coating deposited onto the inner surface of the capillary. Lasing can only be realized for thick polymer coatings (in this case >= 800 nm), with higher Q factor but also stronger confinement of the propagating wave, which lowers the refractive index sensitivity compared to non-lasing capillaries which can have thinner polymer coatings. We however find that the large improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and Q factor realized upon lasing more than compensates for the reduced sensitivity, resulting in an order-of-magnitude improvement in the detection limit for refractive index sensing.

  15. Imaging Shallow Salt With 3D Refraction Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschuyver, C. J.; Hilterman, F. J.

    2005-05-01

    In offshore West Africa, numerous salt walls are within 200 m of sea level. Because of the shallowness of these salt walls, reflections from the salt top can be difficult to map, making it impossible to build an accurate velocity model for subsequent pre-stack depth migration. An accurate definition of salt boundaries is critical to any depth model where salt is present. Unfortunately, when a salt body is very shallow, the reflection from the upper interface can be obscured due to large offsets between the source and near receivers and also due to the interference from multiples and other near-surface noise events. A new method is described using 3D migration of the refraction waveforms which is simplified because of several constraints in the model definition. The azimuth and dip of the refractor is found by imaging with Kirchhoff theory. A Kirchhoff migration is performed where the traveltime values are adjusted to use the CMP refraction traveltime equation. I assume the sediment and salt velocities to be known such that once the image time is specified, then the dip and azimuth of the refraction path can be found. The resulting 3D refraction migrations are in excellent depth agreement with available well control. In addition, the refraction migration time picks of deeper salt events are in agreement with time picks of the same events on the reflection migration.

  16. Clinical refraction in three-dimensional dioptric space revisited.

    PubMed

    Raasch, T

    1997-06-01

    The traditional clinical designation of spherocylindrical power unambiguously specifies the refractive properties of a thin lens or refractive surface. This representation of dioptric power is not, however, optimum in mathematical terms, as is apparent when, for example, two spherocylindrical lens powers are added. Alternative systems have been described which are not subject to this same type of difficulty, and the essential feature of these other systems is that spherocylindrical power is defined in terms of a three-dimensional dioptric space in which the axes are usually orthogonal. The advantages of this orthogonality can be exploited in the practice of clinical refraction, provided lens powers in these three dimensions can be physically implemented. Systems using these characteristics have been introduced in the past, but the clinical community has not adopted them on a widespread basis. However, systems which take advantages of these features do have unique advantages relative to traditional clinical refraction procedures. These characteristics, and refractive procedures which exploit their advantages, are described.

  17. Reflection and Refraction of Acoustic Waves by a Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillouin, J.

    1957-01-01

    The presence of sound waves in one or the other of the fluid regions on either side of a shock wave is made apparent, in the region under superpressure, by acoustic waves (reflected or refracted according to whether the incident waves lie in the region of superpressure or of subpressure) and by thermal waves. The characteristics of these waves are calculated for a plane, progressive, and uniform incident wave. In the case of refraction, the refracted acoustic wave can, according to the incidence, be plane, progressive, and uniform or take the form of an 'accompanying wave' which remains attached to the front of the shock while sliding parallel to it. In all cases, geometrical constructions permit determination of the kinematic characteristics of the reflected or refractive acoustic waves. The dynamic relationships show that the amplitude of the reflected wave is always less than that of the incident wave. The amplitude of the refracted wave, whatever its type, may in certain cases be greater than that of the incident wave.

  18. On the anodic aluminium oxide refractive index of nanoporous templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Rocha-Rodrigues, P.; Valdés-Bango, F.; Alameda, J. M.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Santos, J. L.; Araujo, J. P.; Teixeira, J. M.; Guerreiro, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we have determined the intrinsic refractive index of anodic aluminium oxide, which is originated by the formation of nanoporous alumina templates. Different templates have been fabricated by the conventional two-step anodization procedure in oxalic acid. Their porosities were modified by chemical wet etching allowing the tuning of their effective refractive indexes (air-filled nanopores  +  anodic aluminium oxide). By standard spectroscopic light transmission measurements, the effective refractive index for each different template was extracted in the VIS-NIR region. The determination of the intrinsic anodic aluminium oxide refractive index was performed by using the Maxwell-Garnett homogenization theory. The results are coincident for all the fabricated samples. The obtained refractive index (~1.55) is quite lower (~22%) than the commonly used Al2O3 handbook value (~1.75), showing that the amorphous nature of the anodic oxide structure strongly conditions its optical properties. This difference is critical for the correct design and modeling of optical plasmonic metamaterials based on anodic aluminium oxide nanoporous templates.

  19. Application of seismic-refraction techniques to hydrologic studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeni, F.P.

    1986-01-01

    Seismic-refraction methods have been extensively used in petroleum, mineral, and engineering investigations and to some extent, for hydrologic applications during the past 30 years. Recent advances in equipment, sound sources, and computer-interpretation techniques make seismic-refraction methods a highly effective and economical means of obtaining subsurface data in hydrologic studies. Aquifers that can be defined by one or more high seismic-velocity surfaces, such as alluvial or glacial deposits in consolidated rock valleys, limestone or sandstone underlain by metamorphic or igneous rock, or saturated unconsolidated deposits overlain by unsaturated unconsolidated deposits, are ideally suited for applying seismic-refraction methods. These methods allow the economical collection of subsurface data and provide the basis for more efficient collection of subsurface data by test drilling or aquifer tests and results in improved hydrologic studies. This manual briefly reviews the basics of seismic refraction theory and principles. It emphasizes the use of this technique in hydrologic investigations and describes the planning, equipment, field procedures, and interpretation techniques needed for this type of study. Examples of the use of seismic refraction techniques in a wide variety of hydrologic studies are presented. (USGS)

  20. Application of seismic-refraction techniques to hydrologic studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeni, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    During the past 30 years, seismic-refraction methods have been used extensively in petroleum, mineral, and engineering investigations and to some extent for hydrologic applications. Recent advances in equipment, sound sources, and computer interpretation techniques make seismic refraction a highly effective and economical means of obtaining subsurface data in hydrologic studies. Aquifers that can be defined by one or more high-seismic-velocity surface, such as (1) alluvial or glacial deposits in consolidated rock valleys, (2) limestone or sandstone underlain by metamorphic or igneous rock, or (3) saturated unconsolidated deposits overlain by unsaturated unconsolidated deposits, are ideally suited for seismic-refraction methods. These methods allow economical collection of subsurface data, provide the basis for more efficient collection of data by test drilling or aquifer tests, and result in improved hydrologic studies. This manual briefly reviews the basics of seismic-refraction theory and principles. It emphasizes the use of these techniques in hydrologic investigations and describes the planning, equipment, field procedures, and interpretation techniques needed for this type of study. Further-more, examples of the use of seismic-refraction techniques in a wide variety of hydrologic studies are presented.

  1. Modeling refractive metasurfaces in series as a single metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Guneratne, Ananda C.

    2016-03-01

    Metasurfaces are boundaries between two media that are engineered to induce an abrupt phase shift in propagating light over a distance comparable to the wavelength of the light. Metasurface applications exploit this rapid phase shift to allow for precise control of wavefronts. The phase gradient is used to compute the angle at which light is refracted using the generalized Snell's Law. [1] In practice, refractive metasurfaces are designed using a relatively small number of phaseshifting elements such that the phase gradient is discrete rather than continuous. Designing such a metasurface requires finding phase-shifting elements that cover a full range of phases (a phase range) from 0 to 360 degrees. We demonstrate an analytical technique to calculate the refraction angle due to multiple metasurfaces arranged in series without needing to account for the effect of each individual metasurface. The phase gradients of refractive metasurfaces in series may be summed to obtain the phase gradient of a single equivalent refractive metasurface. This result is relevant to any application that requires a system with multiple metasurfaces, such as biomedical imaging [2], wavefront correctors [3], and beam shaping [4].

  2. Refractive index dependence of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaeni, Muslimin, Ahmad Novi; Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang

    2016-02-01

    We have observed and utilized butterfly wings of Papilio Ulysses for refractive index sensor. We noticed this butterfly wings have photonic crystal structure, which causes blue color appearance on the wings. The photonic crystal structure, which consists of cuticle and air void, is approximated as one dimensional photonic crystal structure. This photonic crystal structure opens potential to several optical devices application, such as refractive index sensor. We have utilized small piece of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings to characterize refractive index of several liquid base on reflectance spectrum of butterfly wings in the presence of sample liquid. For comparison, we simulated reflectance spectrum of one dimensional photonic crystal structure having material parameter based on real structure of butterfly wings. We found that reflectance spectrum peaks shifted as refractive index of sample changes. Although there is a slight difference in reflectance spectrum peaks between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum, the trend of reflectance spectrum peaks as function of sample's refractive index is the similar. We assume that during the measurement, the air void that filled by sample liquid is expanded due to liquid pressure. This change of void shape causes non-similarity between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum.

  3. Transient Thermal Analysis of a Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    A secondary concentrator is an optical device that accepts solar energy from a primary concentrator and further intensifies and directs the solar flux. The refractive secondary is one such device; fabricated from an optically clear solid material that can efficiently transmit the solar energy by way of refraction and total internal reflection. When combined with a large state-of-the-art rigid or inflatable primary concentrator, the refractive secondary enables solar concentration ratios of 10,000 to 1. In support of potential space solar thermal power and propulsion applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a single-crystal refractive secondary concentrator for use at temperatures exceeding 2000K. Candidate optically clear single-crystal materials like sapphire and zirconia are being evaluated for this application. To support this evaluation, a three-dimensional transient thermal model of a refractive secondary concentrator in a typical solar thermal propulsion application was developed. This paper describes the model and presents thermal predictions for both sapphire and zirconia prototypes. These predictions are then used to establish parameters for analyzing and testing the materials for their ability to survive thermal shock and stress.

  4. Design and imaging performance of achromatic diffractive-refractive x-ray and gamma-ray Fresnel lenses.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2004-09-01

    Achromatic combinations of a diffractive phase Fresnel lens and a refractive correcting element have been proposed for x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy and for microlithography, but considerations of absorption often dictate that the refractive component be given a stepped profile, resulting in a double Fresnel lens. The imaging performance of corrected Fresnel lenses, with and without stepping, is investigated, and the trade-off between resolution and useful bandwidth in different circumstances is discussed. Provided that the focal ratio is large, correction lenses made from low atomic number materials can be used with x rays in the range of approximately 10-100 keV without stepping. The use of stepping extends the possibility of correction to higher-aperture systems, to energies as low as a few kilo electron volts, and to gamma rays of mega electron volt energy.

  5. Neutron depth profiling study of lithium niobate optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolářova, P.; Vacík, J.; Špirková-Hradilová, J.; Červená, J.

    1998-05-01

    The relation between optical properties and the structure of proton exchanged and annealed proton exchanged optical waveguides in lithium niobate was studied using the mode spectroscopy and neutron depth profiling methods. We have found a close correlation between the lithium depletion and the depth profile of the extraordinary refractive index. The form of the observed dependence between Li depletion and refractive index depends on the fabrication procedure by which the waveguide was prepared but it is highly reproducible for specimens prepared by the same procedure.

  6. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  7. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  8. Deep Structure of The NW Moroccan Margin Off El Jadida Using The Sismar Cruise Seismic Refraction Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, J.; Contrucci, I.; Géli, L.; Matias, L.; Malod, J.-A.; Sahabi, M.

    The aim of the SISMAR survey was to analyse the deep structure of the NW Mar- gin of Morocco off El Jadida using reflection and refraction data. The preliminary study of the seismic reflection profiles shows a thinned continental crust and some seaward dipping reflectors (SDR) with a well defined Moho that could correspond to the continent-ocean transition. The Moho is difficult to image beneath the domain considered to consist of oceanic crust (Malod et al., 2001). A 350 km long seismic refraction profile striking NNW-SSE was acquired, deploying 14 OBS at sea and 15 seismometers on land. The OBS and seismometer wide-angle reflection and refraction data were interpreted by using a ray tracing program. The shallow part of the model was obtained by using the geometry deduced from the in- terpretation of the seismic profiles. Despite the disturbance brought by salt domes, the simultaneous study of multichannel seismic profiles, OBS and land-stations allows us to construct a well constrained crustal model of the Moroccan margin off El Jadida. These new results permit us to discuss some key points about the deep structure: the geometry and the nature of the SDR's, the geometry of the Moho oceanwards and the nature of the transitional domain. It will enable us to place additional contraints on the lithospheric thinning. Malod J., Réhault J.-P., Sahabi M., Géli L., Matias L., Diaz J., Zitellini N., Sismar Group, Eos trans. AGU, 82(47) Fall Meeting Suppl., Abstract T52C-0963, 2001.

  9. Internal characteristics of refractive-index matched debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollin, Devis; Bowman, Elisabeth; Sanvitale, Nicoletta

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows are channelized masses of granular material saturated with water that travel at high speeds downslope. Their destructive character represents a hazard to lives and properties, especially in regions of high relief and runoff. The characteristics that distinguish their heterogeneous, multi-phase, nature are numerous: non-uniform surge formation, particle size ranging from clay to boulders, flow segregation with larger particles concentrating at the flow front and fluid at the tail making the composition and volume of the bulk varying with time and space. These aspects render these events very difficult to characterise and predict, in particular in the area of the deposit spread or runout - zones which are generally of most interest in terms of human risk. At present, considerable gaps exist in our understanding of the flow dynamics of debris flows, which originates from their complex motion and relatively poor observations available. Flume studies offer the potential to examine in detail the behaviour of model debris flows, however, the opaque nature of these flows is a major obstacle in gaining insight of their internal behaviour. Measurements taken at the sidewalls may be poorly representative leading to incomplete or misleading results. To probe internally to the bulk of the flow, alternative, nonintrusive techniques can be used, enabling, for instance, velocities and solid concentrations within the flowing material to be determined. We present experimental investigations into polydisperse granular flows of spherical immersed particles down an inclined flume, with specific attention directed to their internal behavior. To this end, the refractive indices of solids and liquid are closely matched allowing the two phases to be distinguished. Measurements are then made internally at a point in the channel via Plane Laser Induced Fluorescence, Particle Tracking Velocimetry, PTV and Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV. The objective is to to increase our

  10. Observations of Anomalous Refraction with Co-housed Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Malinda S.; McGraw, J. T.; Zimmer, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous refraction is described as a low frequency, large angular scale motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by previous astrometric catalogs. These motions of typically several tenths of an arcsecond with timescales on the order of ten minutes are ubiquitous to drift-scan ground-based astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to meter scale slowly evolving coherent dynamical structures in the boundary-layer below 60 meters. The localized nature of the effect and general inconsistency of the motions seen by even closely spaced telescopes in individual domes has led to the hypothesis that the dome or other type of telescope housing may be responsible. This hypothesis is tested by observing anomalous refraction using two telescopes housed in a single roll-off roof observatory building with the expected outcome that the two telescopes will see correlated anomalous refraction induced motions.

  11. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-08-14

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal.

  12. Refractive results after corneal triple procedures (PK+ECCE+IOL)

    PubMed

    Claoué, C; Ficker, L; Kirkness, C; Steele, A

    1993-01-01

    We have analysed the refractive results of corneal triple procedures (penetrating keratoplasty with extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation) in 52 eyes of 47 patients with a mean follow-up of 39 months. The patients were predominantly old and female and most received unilateral surgery. The contralateral acuity was 6/24 or worse in more than 50% of cases at the time of surgery. Many of these patients were significantly ametropic pre-operatively. Biometry does not seem to have improved the refractive results in those patients in whom it was attempted. The majority of patients were hypermetropic when their refraction stabilised, with resulting poor uncorrected visual performance. Possible improvements are discussed.

  13. Refractive index of carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-05-01

    Near-infrared optical techniques for clinical breast cancer screening in humans are rapidly advancing. Based on the computational inversion of the photon diffusion process through the breast, these techniques rely on optical tissue models for accurate image reconstruction. Recent interest has surfaced regarding the effect of refractive index variations on these reconstructions. Although many data exist regarding the scattering and absorption properties of normal and diseased tissue, no measurements of refractive index appear in the literature. In this paper, we present near-infrared refractive index data acquired from N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced rat mammary tumours, which are similar in pathology and disease progression to human ductal carcinoma. Eight animals, including one control, were employed in this study, yielding data from 32 tumours as well as adjacent adipose and connective tissues.

  14. Refractive index sensor based on tapered multicore fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanbiao; Ning, Tigang; Li, Jing; Pei, Li; Li, Chao; Lin, Heng

    2017-01-01

    A novel refractive index (RI) sensor based on middle-tapered multicore fiber (TMCF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensing structure consists of two singlemode fibers (SMF) and simply spliced a section tapered four-core fiber between them. The light injected from the SMF into the multicore fiber (MCF) will excite multiple cladding mode, and interference between these modes can be affected by the surrounding refractive index (SRI), which also dictates the wavelength shift of the transmission spectrum. Our experimental investigations achieved a sensitivity around 171.2 nm/RIU for a refractive index range from 1.3448 to 1.3774. All sensors fabricated in this paper show good linearity in terms of the spectral wavelength shift versus changes in RI.

  15. Photonic crystal fiber tip interferometer for refractive index sensing.

    PubMed

    Mileńko, Karolina; Hu, Dora Juan Juan; Shum, Perry Ping; Zhang, Taishi; Lim, Jun Long; Wang, Yixin; Woliński, Tomasz R; Wei, Huifeng; Tong, Weijun

    2012-04-15

    In this paper we present an interferometer based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) tip ended with a solid silica-sphere for refractive index sensing. The sensor is fabricated by splicing one end of the holey PCF to a single mode fiber (SMF) and applying arc at the other end to form a solid sphere. The sensor has been experimentally tested for refractive index and temperature sensing by monitoring its wavelength shift. Measurement results show that the sensor has the resolution of the order of 8.7×10(-4) over the refractive index range of 1.33-1.40, and temperature sensitivity of the order of 10 pm/°C in the range of 20-100 °C.

  16. How To Prepare Materials With a Desired Refraction Coefficient?

    SciTech Connect

    Ramm, A. G.

    2010-05-21

    In this talk a method is described for preparing materials with a desired refraction coefficient. The method consists of embedding into a material with known refraction coefficient many small particles of size a. The number of particles per unit volume around any point is prescribed, the distance between neighboring particles is O(a{sup (2-kappa/3)}) as a->0, 00. The refraction coefficient is the coefficient n{sup 2}(x) in the wave equation [nabla{sup 2}+kappa{sup 2}n{sup 2}(x)]u = 0.

  17. SH-wave refraction/reflection and site characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.; Street, R.L.; Woolery, E.W.; Madin, I.P.

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, nonintrusive techniques used to characterize soils have been based on P-wave refraction/reflection methods. However, near-surface unconsolidated soils are oftentimes water-saturated, and when groundwater is present at a site, the velocity of the P-waves is more related to the compressibility of the pore water than to the matrix of the unconsolidated soils. Conversely, SH-waves are directly relatable to the soil matrix. This makes SH-wave refraction/reflection methods effective in site characterizations where groundwater is present. SH-wave methods have been used extensively in site characterization and subsurface imaging for earthquake hazard assessments in the central United States and western Oregon. Comparison of SH-wave investigations with geotechnical investigations shows that SH-wave refraction/reflection techniques are viable and cost-effective for engineering site characterization.

  18. Enhanced Nonlinear Refractive Index in ɛ -Near-Zero Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspani, L.; Kaipurath, R. P. M.; Clerici, M.; Ferrera, M.; Roger, T.; Kim, J.; Kinsey, N.; Pietrzyk, M.; Di Falco, A.; Shalaev, V. M.; Boltasseva, A.; Faccio, D.

    2016-06-01

    New propagation regimes for light arise from the ability to tune the dielectric permittivity to extremely low values. Here, we demonstrate a universal approach based on the low linear permittivity values attained in the ɛ -near-zero (ENZ) regime for enhancing the nonlinear refractive index, which enables remarkable light-induced changes of the material properties. Experiments performed on Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films show a sixfold increase of the Kerr nonlinear refractive index (n2) at the ENZ wavelength, located in the 1300 nm region. This in turn leads to ultrafast light-induced refractive index changes of the order of unity, thus representing a new paradigm for nonlinear optics.

  19. Exposed core microstructured optical fiber Bragg gratings: refractive index sensing.

    PubMed

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Monro, Tanya M

    2014-01-27

    Bragg gratings have been written in exposed-core microstructured optical fibers for the first time using a femtosecond laser. Second and third order gratings have been written and both show strong reflectivity at 1550 nm, with bandwidths as narrow as 60 pm. Due to the penetration of the guided field outside the fiber the Bragg reflections are sensitive to the external refractive index. As different modes have different sensitivities to refractive index but the same temperature sensitivity the sensor can provide temperature-compensated refractive index measurements. Since these Bragg gratings have been formed by physical ablation, these devices can also be used for high temperature sensing, demonstrated here up to 800°C. The fibers have been spliced to single mode fiber for improved handling and integration with commercial interrogation units.

  20. Analysis of seasonal changes in residual refraction 1-year after corneal laser refractive surgery: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Luger, Michiel H.A.; Ewering, Tobias; Arba-Mosquera, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the effect of seasonal changes in residual refraction 1-year after corneal refractive surgery using the SCHWIND AMARIS laser system. Methods 5740 consecutive treatments have been retrospectively reviewed. For all eyes, aspheric treatments were planned with the Custom Ablation Manager software and the ablations were performed with the SCHWIND AMARIS system (SCHWIND eye-tech-solutions). Seasonal outcomes were evaluated in terms of residual refraction stratified per treatment month, as well as stratified per year season. Student's T test comparing stratified values with global ones was used for the statistical analysis. Results Treatments performed in April, June, August, September, and October showed relative undercorrections of the spherical equivalent (SE) (−0.09D), whereas treatments performed in January, February, and March showed relative overcorrections of the SE (+0.13D). Similarly, treatments performed in spring and summer showed relative undercorrections of the SE (−0.04D), whereas treatments performed in winter showed relative overcorrections of the SE (+0.10D). Conclusions Seasonal differences in refractive outcomes were observed among a large scale population. The effect of these environmental variables on refractive outcomes warrants further evaluation. PMID:25000869

  1. Peripheral Refraction with and without Contact Lens Correction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Clark, Christopher A.; Soni, P. Sarita; Thibos, Larry N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral refractive error degrades the quality of retinal images and has been hypothesized to be a stimulus for the development of refractive error. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in refractive error across the horizontal visual field produced by contact lenses (CLs) and to quantify the effect of CLs on peripheral image blur. Methods A commercial Shack-Hartmann aberrometer measured ocular wavefront aberrations in 5° steps across the central 60° of visual field along the horizontal meridian before and after CLs correction. Wavefront refractions for peripheral lines-of-sight were based on the full elliptical pupil encountered in peripheral measurements. Curvature of field is the change in peripheral spherical equivalent relative to the eye’s optical axis. Results Hyperopic curvature of field in the naked eye increases with increasing amounts central myopic refractive error as predicted by Atchison (2006). For an eccentricity of E degrees, field curvature is approximately E percent of foveal refractive error. Rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses changed field curvature in the myopic direction twice as much as soft contact lenses (SCLs). Both of these effects varied with CLs power. For all lens powers, SCL cut the degree of hyperopic field curvature in half whereas RGP lenses nearly eliminated field curvature. The benefit of reduced field curvature was partially offset by increased oblique astigmatism. The net reduction of retinal blur due to CLs is approximately constant across the visual field. Conclusions Both SCL and RGP lenses reduced the degree of hyperopic field curvature present in myopic eyes, with RGP lenses having greater effect. The tradeoff between field curvature and off-axis astigmatism with RGP lenses may limit their effectiveness for control of myopia progression. These results suggest that axial growth mechanisms that depend on retinal image quality will be affected more by RGP than by SCL lenses. PMID:20601913

  2. Inter-tester Agreement in Refractive Error Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen G.; Ciner, Elise; Kulp, Marjean T.; Quinn, Graham E.; Orel-Bixler, Deborah; Cyert, Lynn A.; Moore, Bruce; Ying, Gui-Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the inter-tester agreement of refractive error measurements between lay and nurse screeners using the Retinomax Autorefractor (Retinomax) and the SureSight Vision Screener (SureSight). Methods Trained lay and nurse screeners measured refractive error in 1452 preschoolers (3- to 5-years old) using the Retinomax and the SureSight in a random order for screeners and instruments. Inter-tester agreement between lay and nurse screeners was assessed for sphere, cylinder and spherical equivalent (SE) using the mean difference and the 95% limits of agreement. The mean inter-tester difference (lay minus nurse) was compared between groups defined based on child’s age, cycloplegic refractive error, and the reading’s confidence number using analysis of variance. The limits of agreement were compared between groups using the Brown-Forsythe test. Inter-eye correlation was accounted for in all analyses. Results The mean inter-tester differences (95% limits of agreement) were −0.04 (−1.63, 1.54) Diopter (D) sphere, 0.00 (−0.52, 0.51) D cylinder, and −0.04 (1.65, 1.56) D SE for the Retinomax; and 0.05 (−1.48, 1.58) D sphere, 0.01 (−0.58, 0.60) D cylinder, and 0.06 (−1.45, 1.57) D SE for the SureSight. For either instrument, the mean inter-tester differences in sphere and SE did not differ by the child’s age, cycloplegic refractive error, or the reading’s confidence number. However, for both instruments, the limits of agreement were wider when eyes had significant refractive error or the reading’s confidence number was below the manufacturer’s recommended value. Conclusions Among Head Start preschool children, trained lay and nurse screeners agree well in measuring refractive error using the Retinomax or the SureSight. Both instruments had similar inter-tester agreement in refractive error measurements independent of the child’s age. Significant refractive error and a reading with low confidence number were associated with worse inter

  3. Negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths through plasmon-photon hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kalusniak, Sascha; Sadofev, Sergey; Henneberger, Fritz

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths through plasmon-photon hybridization on a simple microcavity with metallic mirrors. Instead of using conventional metals, the plasmonic excitations are provided by a heavily doped semiconductor which enables us to tune them into resonance with the infrared photon modes of the cavity. In this way, the dispersion of the resultant hybrid cavity modes can be widely adjusted. In particular, negative dispersion and negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths on an all-ZnO monolithical cavity are demonstrated.

  4. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is not sensitive to the loss of the materials. Other advantages over existing methods are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to verify the performance of the proposed devices.

  5. Refractive index matching applied to fecal smear clearing.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Claúdio S

    2005-01-01

    Thick smears of human feces can be made adequate for identification of helminth eggs by means of refractive index matching. Although this effect can be obtained by simply spreading a fleck of feces on a microscope slide, a glycerol solution has been routinely used to this end. Aiming at practicability, a new quantitative technique has been developed. To enhance both sharpness and contrast of the images, a sucrose solution (refractive index = 1.49) is used, which reduces the effect of light-scattering particulates. To each slide a template-measured (38.5 mm3) fecal sample is transferred. Thus, egg counts and sensitivity evaluations are easily made.

  6. Refraction of sound by a shear layer - Experimental assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the refraction angle and amplitude changes associated with sound transmission through a circular, open jet shear layer. Both on-axis and off-axis acoustic source locations were used. Source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz while freestream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. The experimental results were compared with an existing refraction theory which was extended to account for off-axis source positions. A simple experiment was also conducted to assess the importance of turbulence scattering between 1 kHz and 25 kHz.

  7. Quantum dot-embedded microspheres for remote refractive index sensing

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Shuo; Beckham, Richard E.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a refractometric sensor based on quantum dot-embedded polystyrene microspheres. Optical resonances within a microsphere, known as whispering-gallery modes (WGMs), produce narrow spectral peaks. For sensing applications, spectral shifts of these peaks are sensitive to changes in the local refractive index. In this work, two-photon excited luminescence from the quantum dots couples into several WGMs within the microresonator. By optimizing the detection area, the spectral visibility of the WGMs is improved. The spectral shifts are measured as the surrounding index of the refraction changes. The experimental sensitivity is about five times greater than that predicted by the Mie theory. PMID:19488403

  8. Analysis of ionospheric refraction error corrections for GRARR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.; Parker, H. C.; Berbert, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    A determination is presented of the ionospheric refraction correction requirements for the Goddard range and range rate (GRARR) S-band, modified S-band, very high frequency (VHF), and modified VHF systems. The relation ships within these four systems are analyzed to show that the refraction corrections are the same for all four systems and to clarify the group and phase nature of these corrections. The analysis is simplified by recognizing that the range rate is equivalent to a carrier phase range change measurement. The equation for the range errors are given.

  9. Multilayer structures as negative refractive and left-handed materials.

    PubMed

    Chui, S T; Chan, C T; Lin, Z F

    2006-02-15

    We examine multilayer structures as negative refractive index and left-handed materials, and find that for one polarization there is a wide range (≈90°) of incident angle within which negative refraction will occur. This comes about because the group velocity and the Poynting vector have a large component parallel to the layers, no matter what the angle of incidence of the incoming radiation is. This behaviour in turn comes from the large anisotropy of the phase velocities. If one of the components is a ferromagnetic metal, the system can be a left-handed material above the ferromagnetic resonance frequency.

  10. Geodetic Refraction: Effects of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Through the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossy, L.; Paquet, P.

    The atmospheric refraction has always been one of the main perturbations of classical terrestrial geodesy. For the future, and taking into account that a precision of a few centimeters is attainable over distances of few thousand kilometers, the monitoring of the atmospheric perturbation also requires a strong improvement for space applications that are mainly based on radio techniques. This is the reason why, for 2 decades, the interest in refraction studies has increased, as reflected in this monograph, which is entirely devoted to the properties of the atmospheric effects on various geodetic measurements and to their evaluation.

  11. Evaluation of the effective corneal ablation in refractive surgery by two 3D topographic surface matching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueeler, M.; Donitzky, Ch.; Mrochen, M.

    2006-02-01

    The effectiveness of the corneal ablation process in refractive surgery is mostly evaluated by indirect measures of vision or optical quality such as post-operative refraction or wavefront aberrometry. Yet, the effective amount of corneal tissue removed in the treatment can only be determined by correctly overlapping a pre- and a post-operative topography measurement. However such an overlap is not trivial due to the discrepancy in the centration axes used in the measurement and the treatment, as well as due to the shift of ocular axes through the treatment or tilt between the two surfaces. We therefore present two methods for overlapping pre- and post-operative topographies for the purpose of extracting an effective corneal ablation profile. Method one uses a 3-dimensional profile matching algorithm and cross-correlation analysis on surface rings outside the optical zone of the topographies. Method two employs a surface normal matching routine to align the two surfaces along their common ablation axis. The profile matching method implies the problem that it requires measurement data outside of the optical zone which was found to be uncertain with placido-disk-based topographers. Method number two is more simple and implies the advantage of using measurement data within the optical zone. For regular profiles the extracted ablation profiles showed a very good match with the planned ones. Surprisingly, even for highly irregular profiles of topography-guided laser treatments the method delivered reasonable overlaps when being compared to the planned profiles. Analysis of the effective tissue removal yields valuable information on the quality of the ablation process.

  12. Waveguides and nonlinear index of refraction of borate glass doped with transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Juliana M. P.; Fonseca, Ruben D.; De Boni, Leonardo; Diniz, Andre Rosa S.; Hernandes, Antonio C.; Ferreira, Paulo H. D.; Mendonca, Cleber R.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to write 3D waveguides by femtosecond laser micromachining and the nonlinear refractive index (n2) spectrum of a new borate glass matrix, containing zinc and lead oxides - (BZP) have been investigated. The transparent matrix was doped with transition metals (CdCl2, Fe2O3, MnO2 and CoO) in order to introduce electronic transitions in visible spectrum, aiming to evaluate their influence on the waveguides and n2 spectrum. We observed that n2 is approximately constant from 600 to 1500 nm, exhibiting an average value of 4.5 × 10-20 m2/W, which is about twice larger than the one for fused silica. The waveguide profile is influenced by the self-focusing effect of the matrix owing to its positive nonlinear index of refraction in the wavelength used for micromachining. A decrease in the waveguide loss of approximately four times was observed for the sample doped with Fe in comparison to the other ones, which may be associated with the change in the optical gap energy.

  13. Generation of doughnut spot for high-power laser technologies using refractive beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2015-03-01

    Doughnut and inverse-Gauss intensity distributions of laser spot are required in laser technologies like welding, cladding where high power fiber coupled diode or solid-state lasers as well as fiber lasers are used. In comparison to Gaussian and flat-top distributions the doughnut and inverse-Gauss profiles provide more uniform temperature distribution on a work piece - this improves the technology, increase stability of processes and efficiency of using the laser energy, reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ). This type of beam shaping has become frequently asked by users of multimode lasers, especially multimode fiber coupled diode lasers. Refractive field mapping beam shapers are applied as one of solutions for the task to manipulate intensity distribution of multimode lasers. The operation principle of these devices presumes almost lossless transformation of laser beam irradiance from Gaussian to flat-top, doughnut or inverse-Gauss through controlled wavefront manipulation inside a beam shaper using lenses with smooth optical surfaces. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type and optical layouts of their applying with high-power multimode lasers. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  14. An over-refraction program for the TI 59 card-programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Carter, J H

    1979-07-01

    Over-refraction provides a powerful method for the refractive examination of the aphakic or highly ametropic patient. Nevertheless, in the past, practical difficulties that attend mathematical or graphical combination of over-refraction and original spherocylinders have tended to limit the clinical use of over-refraction methods. Programmable calculators, now available inexpensively, render over-refraction clinically practical. An over-refraction program for the Texas Instruments TI-59 Card-Programmable Calculator is presented. Program running time, exclusive of data entry and readout, is under 15 sec.

  15. Hidden quantum mirage by negative refraction in semiconductor P-N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Hui; Zhu, Jia-Ji; Yang, Wen; Lin, Hai-Qing; Chang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    We predict a robust quantum interference phenomenon in a semiconductor P-N junction: with a local pump on one side of the junction, the response of a local probe on the other side behaves as if the disturbance emanates not from the pump but instead from its mirror image about the junction. This phenomenon follows from the matching of Fermi surfaces of the constituent materials, thus it is robust against the details of the junction (e.g., width, potential profile, and even disorder), in contrast to the widely studied anomalous focusing caused by negative refraction. The recently fabricated P-N junctions in 2D semiconductors provide ideal platforms to explore this phenomenon and its applications to dramatically enhance charge and spin transport as well as carrier-mediated long-range correlation.

  16. DC resistivity and seismic refraction survey across the SE margin of Lake Ngami, NW Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemang, Elisha; Molwalefhe, Loago

    2009-09-01

    Seismic refraction survey and DC resistivity measurements were made across the margin of the Lake Ngami. The structure and stratigraphy at the lake were determined. High resolution aeromagnetic data showed a prominent anomaly coinciding with the Kunyere Fault. Estimated depths to magnetic sources are increasing towards the lake. Two velocity layers were mapped. The top layer (500 m/s) is thin outside the lake and thicker inside the lake. The underlying layer (3125 m/s) has undeterminable thickness. Resistivity sounding results inside the lake showed that the low velocity layer has four sub-units: dry hard clays; diatomaceous earth; soft clays interlayered with silts; and wet whitish clays interlayered with silts. Normal faults were mapped along the profile with a total displacement up to 50 m. The results of the study indicate that the formation of the Lake Ngami basin was structurally controlled and probably initiated by the tectonics of the Okavango Rift Zone.

  17. Refraction-enhanced tomography of mouse and rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Sera, T.; Uesugi, K.; Yagi, N.

    2005-09-15

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of edge enhancement by refraction in computed tomography, images of a cross section of a euthanized mouse thorax were recorded at low (20 keV) and high (72 keV) x-ray energies at a spatial resolution of about 40 {mu}m. Compared with the images obtained with the detector at 30 cm from an object, when the object was located at 113 cm from the detector, the contrast between tissues and air was improved at both energies. The improvement was more pronounced at 72 keV where the absorption contrast was weaker. This effect was due to refraction at the surfaces of alveolar membranes and small airways which creates areas with apparently high and low linear attenuation coefficients within tissues. The edge enhancement by refraction was also effective in images of a euthanized rabbit thorax at x-ray energies of 40 and 70 keV at a spatial resolution of about 0.15 mm. These results raise the possibility that the refraction contrast may be utilized to obtain a high-resolution tomographic image of human lung and bone with low dose.

  18. Abnormal refraction of microwave in ferrite/wire metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjie; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji; Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Li, Weibin

    2011-08-15

    We report the experimentally observed abnormal refraction in metamaterials (MMs) consisting of ferrite rods and metallic wires with two kinds of configurations. Negative refraction (NR) and positive refraction (PR) are demonstrated in an MM constructed with parallel-arranged rods and wires. The frequencies of both NR and PR can be adjusted dynamically and together by an applied magnetic field and the PR occurs at frequencies slightly lower than that of the NR. The NR is attributed to simultaneously negative effective permittivity and permeability, and the PR is resulted from positive effective permittivity and permeability with the positive effective permittivity originating from electromagnetic coupling between the closest rod and wire. By making the rod cross the wire to reduce the coupling, we observed sole NR in an MM consisting of the cross-arranged rods and wires. Theoretical analysis explained qualitatively the abnormal refraction behaviors of microwave for the two kinds of MMs and it is supported by the retrieved effective parameters and field distributions.

  19. Unidirectional transmission using array of zero-refractive-index metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yangyang; Xu, Lin; Hong Hang, Zhi; Chen, Huanyang

    2014-05-12

    In this Letter, we find that high efficient unidirectional transmission occurs for an array of prisms made of zero-refractive-index metamaterials. As a specific demonstration, we further design the device using Dirac-cone-like photonic crystals. The device can function for a broadband of spectrum. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the one-way wave functionality.

  20. Refractive index and its impact on pseudophakic dysphotopsia

    PubMed Central

    Radmall, Bryce R; Floyd, Anne; Oakey, Zack; Olson, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It has been shown that the biggest dissatisfier for uncomplicated cataract surgery patients is pseudophakic dysphotopsia (PD). While edge design of an intraocular lens (IOL) impacts this problem, refractive index is still controversial as to its impact. This retrospective cohort study was designed to determine the role of increasing refractive index in PD. Patients and methods This study was conducted at the John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, USA. A retrospective chart review identified patients who received one of two hydrophobic acrylic single piece IOLs (AcrySof WF SP [SN60WF] or Tecnis SP [ZCB00]), which differed mainly by refractive index (1.55 versus 1.47). Eighty-seven patients who had received implantation of a one-piece hydrophobic acrylic IOL were enrolled. Patients were included if the surgery had been uncomplicated and took place at least a year before study participation. All eligible patients had 20/20 best corrected vision, without any disease known to impact visual quality. In addition to conducting a record review, the enrolled patients were surveyed for PD, using a modified National Eye Institute Visual Function questionnaire, as well as for overall satisfaction with visual quality. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated no difference between the two cohorts regarding PD, general visual function, and overall visual satisfaction. Conclusion The study suggests that with the two IOLs assessed, increasing the refractive index does not increase incidence of PD or decrease overall visual satisfaction. PMID:26229427

  1. A Widely Tunable Refractive Index in a Nanolayered Photonic Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-03

    ethylene - octene ! ~EO!, and the glassy polymer, polycarbonate ~PC! were fabricated using a con- tinuous multilayer co-extrusion process.13 PC possesses...both a substantially larger refractive index and a substantially larger elastic modulus than poly~ ethylene - octene !. Three composite films were

  2. Calculation of refraction indices of triple chalcogenide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchikov, V. N.; Suslikov, L. M.

    2015-04-01

    We use Harrison's bond-orbital method to calculate high frequency refraction indices of AgGaS2, CdGa2S4, and CdGa2Se4 crystals. We demonstrate a satisfactory agreement between obtained results and experimental data.

  3. Nano-imprint gold grating as refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Sudha; Mohapatra, Saswat; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2016-05-01

    Large scale of fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures has been a challenging task due to time consuming process and requirement of expensive nanofabrication tools such as electron beam lithography system, focused ion beam system, and extreme UV photolithography system. Here, we present a cost-effective fabrication technique so called soft nanoimprinting to fabricate nanostructures on the larger sample area. In our fabrication process, a commercially available optical DVD disc was used as a template which was imprinted on a polymer glass substrate to prepare 1D polymer nano-grating. A homemade nanoimprinting setup was used in this fabrication process. Further, a label-free refractive index sensor was developed by utilizing the properties of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a gold coated 1D polymer nano-grating. Refractive index sensing was tested by exposing different solutions of glycerol-water mixture on the surface of gold nano-grating. The calculated bulk refractive index sensitivity was found to be 751nm/RIU. We believed that our proposed SPR sensor could be a promising candidate for developing low-cost refractive index sensor with high sensitivity on a large scale.

  4. S-wave refraction survey of alluvial aggregate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Tuttle, Gary J.; Williams, Jackie M.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.

    2005-01-01

    An S-wave refraction survey was conducted in the Yampa River valley near Steamboat Springs, Colo., to determine how well this method could map alluvium, a major source of construction aggregate. At the field site, about 1 m of soil overlaid 8 m of alluvium that, in turn, overlaid sedimentary bedrock. The traveltimes of the direct and refracted S-waves were used to construct velocity cross sections whose various regions were directly related to the soil, alluvium, and bed-rock. The cross sections were constrained to match geologic logs that were developed from drill-hole data. This constraint minimized the ambiguity in estimates of the thickness and the velocity of the alluvium, an ambiguity that is inherent to the S-wave refraction method. In the cross sections, the estimated S-wave velocity of the alluvium changed in the horizontal direction, and these changes were attributed to changes in composition of the alluvium. The estimated S-wave velocity of the alluvium was practically constant in the vertical direc-tion, indicating that the fine layering observed in the geologic logs could not be detected. The S-wave refraction survey, in conjunction with independent information such as geologic logs, was found to be suitable for mapping the thickness of the alluvium.

  5. Refraction effects in soft x-ray multilayer blazed gratings.

    PubMed

    Voronov, D L; Salmassi, F; Meyer-Ilse, J; Gullikson, E M; Warwick, T; Padmore, H A

    2016-05-30

    A 2500 lines/mm Multilayer Blazed Grating (MBG) optimized for the soft x-ray wavelength range was fabricated and tested. The grating coated with a W/B4C multilayer demonstrated a record diffraction efficiency in the 2nd blazed diffraction order in the energy range from 500 to 1200 eV. Detailed investigation of the diffraction properties of the grating demonstrated that the diffraction efficiency of high groove density MBGs is not limited by the normal shadowing effects that limits grazing incidence x-ray grating performance. Refraction effects inherent in asymmetrical Bragg diffraction were experimentally confirmed for MBGs. The refraction affects the blazing properties of the MBGs and results in a shift of the resonance wavelength of the gratings and broadening or narrowing of the grating bandwidth depending on diffraction geometry. The true blaze angle of the MBGs is defined by both the real structure of the multilayer stack and by asymmetrical refraction effects. Refraction effects can be used as a powerful tool in providing highly efficient suppression of high order harmonics.

  6. Statistics of the residual refraction errors in laser ranging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model for the range error covariance was derived by assuming that the residual refraction errors are due entirely to errors in the meteorological data which are used to calculate the atmospheric correction. The properties of the covariance function are illustrated by evaluating the theoretical model for the special case of a dense network of weather stations uniformly distributed within a circle.

  7. Studies of the Reflection, Refraction and Internal Reflection of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanchester, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive apparatus and associated experiments are described for studying the basic laws of reflection and refraction of light at an air-glass interface, and multiple internal reflections within a glass block. In order to motivate students and encourage their active participation, a novel technique is described for determining the refractive…

  8. The experience in production of composite refraction lenses from beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. A.; Zabrodin, A. V.; Gorlevskiy, V. V.; Sheverdyaev, M. S.; Lizunov, A. V.; Brylev, D. A.; Anikin, A. S.; Klykov, S. S.; Kozlova, E. V.; Lesina, I. G.; Nebera, A. L.; Morozov, I. A.; Demin, A. V.; Buzmakov, A. V.; Dymshicz, Yu. M.; Volkov, V. V.; Zhigalina, O. M.; Konarev, P. V.; Khmelenin, D. N.; Seregin, A. V.; Senin, R. A.; Roshchin, B. S.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The choice of beryllium-based material for the use in X-ray optics has been substantiated based on electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction data. The first results of applying refraction lenses made of this material are reported.

  9. Velocity aberration and atmospheric refraction in satellite laser communication experiments.

    PubMed

    Nugent, L J; Condon, R J

    1966-11-01

    The effects of satellite velocity aberration and atmospheric refraction on the direction of propagation of lagser radiation reflected from a satellite back to an observer on the earth are examined. A velocity aberration analysis for the two-dimensional case where the satellite passes directly overhead at velocity v is presented to first order in v/c in order to illustrate the method. The equations for the more general threedimensional case are then given to first order in v/c, and it is indicated that higher order treatments are normally unnecessary in typical experimental considerations. Following this, a simple approximate equation giving the atmospheric refraction to an accuracy of a few microradians is developed; it is indicated that greater accuracy is not important because of laser pointing limitations imposed by atmospheric scattering and turbulence. The atmospheric refraction equation depends only on the apparent zenith angle of the satellite reflector relative to the earth-based laser, on the satelli-te altitude, and on the index of refraction of the laser radiation in the atmosphere at the earth's surface. Both of these developments should be useful in the design and interpretation of satellite laser-communication experiments.

  10. Wave Refraction During the May 2002 Rarefaction Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. W.; Mullan, D. J.; Ness, N. F.; Skoug, R. M.

    2002-12-01

    In previous work [Smith et al., 2001] we examined IMF wave refraction during the May 1999 rarefaction interval known as ``The Day The Solar Wind Disappeared.'' On that day, Alfvén speeds remained elevated over an extended region. Analysis of the recorded ACE fields and plasma data revealed depressed magnetic fluctuation levels, reduced compression in the fluctuations, and a reduced wave-like component within the region of elevated Alfvén speed, all consistent with wave refraction. The May 2002 event provides a third such period (the second identified event occured 2 weeks prior to the May 1999 period) and it again demonstrates properties which are consistent with refraction. Smith, C.~W., D.~J. Mullan, N.~F. Ness, R.~M. Skoug, and J.~Steinberg, Day the solar wind almost disappeared: Magnetic field fluctuations, wave refraction and dissipation, J. Geophys. Res., A106, 18,625--18,634, 2001. Efforts at the Bartol Research Institute were supported by CIT subcontract PC251439 under NASA grant NAG5-6912 for support of the ACE magnetic field experiment and by the NASA Delaware Space College Grant. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy with financial support from the NASA ACE program.

  11. Dual interferometer system for measuring index of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Eric Peter

    The optical power of a lens is determined by the surface curvature and the refractive index, n. Knowledge of the index is required for accurate lens design models and for examining material variations from sample to sample. The refractive index of glass can be accurately measured using a prism spectrometer, but measuring the index of soft contact lens materials presents many challenges. These materials are non-rigid, thin, and must remain hydrated in a saline solution during testing. Clearly an alternative to a prism spectrometer must be used to accurately measure index. A Dual Interferometer System has been designed, built and characterized as a novel method for measuring the refractive index of transparent optical materials, including soft contact lens materials. The first interferometer is a Low Coherence Interferometer in a Twyman-Green configuration with a scanning reference mirror. The contact lens material sample is placed in a measurement cuvette, where it remains hydrated. By measuring the locations of the multiple optical interfaces, the physical thickness t of the material is measured. A new algorithm has been developed for processing the low coherence signals obtained from the reflection at each optical interface. The second interferometer is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a tunable HeNe laser light source. This interferometer measures the optical path length (OPL) of the test sample in the cuvette in transmission as a function of five wavelengths in the visible spectrum. This is done using phase-shifting interferometry. Multiple thickness regions are used to solve 2pi phase ambiguities in the OPL. The outputs of the two interferometers are combined to determine the refractive index as a function of wavelength: n(lambda) = OPL(lambda)/t. Since both t and OPL are measured using a detector array, n is measured at hundreds of thousands of data points. A measurement accuracy of 0.0001 in refractive index is achieved with this new instrument, which is

  12. Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator Demonstrated High-Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2002-01-01

    Space applications that utilize solar thermal energy--such as electric power conversion systems, thermal propulsion systems, and furnaces--require highly efficient solar concentration systems. The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing the refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. When used in combination with advanced lightweight primary concentrators, such as inflatable thin films, the refractive secondary concentrator enables very high system concentration ratios and very high temperatures. Last year, Glenn successfully demonstrated a secondary concentrator throughput efficiency of 87 percent, with a projected efficiency of 93 percent using an antireflective coating. Building on this achievement, Glenn recently successfully demonstrated high-temperature operation of the secondary concentrator when it was used to heat a rhenium receiver to 2330 F. The high-temperature demonstration of the concentrator was conducted in Glenn's 68-ft long Tank 6 thermal vacuum facility equipped with a solar simulator. The facility has a rigid panel primary concentrator that was used to concentrate the light from the solar simulator onto the refractive secondary concentrator. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center provided a rhenium cavity, part of a solar thermal propulsion engine, to serve as the high-temperature receiver. The prototype refractive secondary concentrator, measuring 3.5 in. in diameter and 11.2 in. long, is made of single-crystal sapphire. A water-cooled splash shield absorbs spillage light outside of the 3.5-in. concentrator aperture. Multilayer foil insulation composed of tungsten, molybdenum, and niobium is used to minimize heat loss from the hightemperature receiver. A liquid-cooled canister calorimeter is used to measure the heat loss through the multilayer foil insulation.

  13. Temperature-dependent Refractive Index of Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Madison, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon and germanium are perhaps the two most well-understood semiconductor materials in the context of solid state device technologies and more recently micromachining and nanotechnology. Meanwhile, these two materials are also important in the field of infrared lens design. Optical instruments designed for the wavelength range where these two materials are transmissive achieve best performance when cooled to cryogenic temperatures to enhance signal from the scene over instrument background radiation. In order to enable high quality lens designs using silicon and germanium at cryogenic temperatures, we have measured the absolute refractive index of multiple prisms of these two materials using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, as a function of both wavelength and temperature. For silicon, we report absolute refractive index and thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K at wavelengths from 1.1 to 5.6 pin, while for germanium, we cover temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K and wavelengths from 1.9 to 5.5 microns. We compare our measurements with others in the literature and provide temperature-dependent Sellmeier coefficients based on our data to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. Citing the wide variety of values for the refractive indices of these two materials found in the literature, we reiterate the importance of measuring the refractive index of a sample from the same batch of raw material from which final optical components are cut when absolute accuracy greater than k5 x 10" is desired.

  14. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  15. An updated equation for the refractive index of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenchen; Dai, Zuoxiao; Dai, Ning; Chen, Ren; Sun, Xiaojie; Xia, Xiang; Li, Tao; Ma, Bei; Sheng, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Laser has been widely used in spectroscopic and metrological measurement. High-precision laser metrology is affected by the refractive index of air. In order to apply the algorithm for the refractive index of air in some situation where low calculation complexity and high-precision are needed, the algorithm of the refractive index of Rueger is updated. As the errors of Rueger's algorithm are mainly affected by temperature, humidity, and the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as well as laser wavelength, we do some revisions about these effects of the factors of atmosphere in Rueger's algorithm. The conditions of standard air is redefined in this paper because of the average concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been changed in the past few decades. As the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air is not constant, the effect of carbon dioxide on the refractive index of air is taken into consideration in the updated algorithm. The updated algorithm adapts to the real atmosphere well. The effects of dry air and humid air on the algorithm are also corrected, and the refractive index of air calculated by the updated algorithm is much closer to that of Philip E.Ciddor's algorithm defined as reference algorithm in the paper because of its high-precision. The performance of the updated algorithm is also analyzed in this paper. It is compared to that of the reference algorithm and the real measured data. Comparing results show that the performance of the algorithm has been improved after the correction. Comparing to the reference algorithm, the performance of the updated algorithm is a little bit lower, but the updated algorithm is much simpler and easier to be applied. Comparing to Rueger's algorithm, the performance of the updated algorithm is much higher and the complexity of the updated algorithm increases very small. The updated algorithm meets low calculation complexity and high-precision requirements.

  16. Treatment of Anisometropic Amblyopia in Children with Refractive Correction

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of refractive correction alone for the treatment of untreated anisometropic amblyopia in children 3 to <7 years old. Design: Prospective, multicenter, noncomparative intervention. Participants: 84 children 3 to <7 years old with untreated anisometropic amblyopia ranging from 20/40 to 20/250. Methods: Optimal refractive correction was provided and visual acuity was measured with the new spectacle correction at baseline, and at 5-week intervals until visual acuity stabilized or amblyopia resolved. Main Outcome Measures: Maximum improvement in best-corrected visual acuity in the amblyopic eye and proportion of children whose amblyopia resolved (interocular difference of 1 line or less) with refractive correction alone. Results: Amblyopia improved with optical correction by 2 or more lines in 77% of the patients and resolved in 27%. Improvement took up to 30 weeks for stabilization criteria to be met. After stabilization, additional improvement occurred with spectacles alone in 21 of 34 patients followed in a control group of a subsequent randomized trial, with amblyopia resolving in 6. Treatment outcome was not related to age, but was related to better baseline visual acuity and lesser amounts of anisometropia. Conclusion: Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in many cases and results in resolution of amblyopia in at least one third of 3 to <7-year-old children with untreated anisometropic amblyopia. While most cases of resolution occur with moderate (20/40 to 20/100) amblyopia, the average 3-line improvement in visual acuity resulting from treatment with spectacles may lessen the burden of subsequent amblyopia therapy for those with denser levels of amblyopia. Precis Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in many cases and results in resolution of amblyopia in at least one third of children 3 to <7 years old with untreated anisometropic amblyopia. PMID:16751032

  17. An experimental investigation of the effect of boundary layer refraction on the noise from a high-speed propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Burns, R. J.; Leciejewski, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Models of supersonic propellers were previously tested for acoustics in the Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel using pressure transducers mounted in the tunnel ceiling. The boundary layer on the tunnel ceiling is believed to refract some of the propeller noise away from the measurement transducers. Measurements were made on a plate installed in the wind tunnel which had a thinner boundary layer than the ceiling boundary layer. The plate was installed in two locations for comparison with tunnel ceiling noise data and with fuselage data taken on the NASA Dryden Jetstar airplane. Analysis of the data indicates that the refraction increases with: increasing boundary layer thickness; increasing free stream Mach number; increasing frequency; and decreasing sound radiation angle (toward the inlet axis). At aft radiation angles greater than about 100 deg there was little or no refraction. Comparisons with the airplane data indicated that not only is the boundary layer thickness important but also the shape of the velocity profile. Comparisons with an existing two-dimensional theory, using an idealized shear layer to approximate the boundary layer, showed that the theory and data had the same trends. Analysis of the data taken in the tunnel at two different distances from the propeller indicates a decay with distance in the wind tunnel at high Mach numbers but the decay at low Mach numbers is not as clear.

  18. Joint French-German radar measurements for the determination of the refractive index in the maritime boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, Helmut; Danklmayer, Andreas; Förster, Jörg; Behn, Mario; Hurtaud, Yvonick; Fabbro, Vincent; Castanet, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    To predict the performance of coastal and shipborne radars, it is essential to assess the propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in the maritime boundary layer. To be independent upon environmental measurements, which are generally not as precise and reliable as they have to be for a proper input to simulation programs, usually based upon parabolic equation models, a method to retrieve the refractive index gradients in the low troposphere is the Refractivity from Clutter (RFC) algorithm. The propagation factor is computed from the received clutter power and is iteratively processed in order to retrieve the refractive index profiles. Under a respective French-German technical agreement a measurement program concerning radar propagation in the maritime boundary layer has been initiated, with contributions from ONERA-CERT, DGA MI / TN, Fraunhofer-FHR and the German Technical Center for Ships and Naval Weapons (WTD 71). The paper gives an overview on the RFC method with examples from the previous campaigns. It describes the experimental set-up and its methodology.

  19. Parameter estimation of atmospheric refractivity from radar clutter using the particle swarm optimization via Lévy flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Sheng, Zheng; Shi, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Estimating refractivity profiles from radar sea clutter is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. To deal with the ill-posed difficulties, an inversion algorithm, particle swarm optimization with a Lévy flight (LPSO), was proposed to be applied in the refractivity from clutter (RFC) technique to retrieve atmospheric duct in this paper. PSO has many advantages in solving continuous optimization problems, while in its late period it has slow convergence speed and low precision. Therefore, we integrate the Lévy flights into the standard PSO algorithm to improve the precision and enhance the capability of jumping out of the local optima. To verify the feasibility and validation of the LPSO for estimating atmospheric duct parameters based on the RFC method, the synthetic and Wallops98 experimental data are implemented. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the optimal solutions obtained from the hybrid algorithm are more precise and efficient. Additionally, to test the algorithm inversion performance, the antinoise ability of LPSO is analyzed. The results indicate that the LPSO algorithm has a certain antinoise ability. Finally, according to the experiment results, it can be concluded that the LPSO algorithm can provide a more precise and efficient method for near-real-time inversion of atmospheric refractivity from radar clutter.

  20. Seismic Wave Velocities in Deep Sediments in Poland: Borehole and Refraction Data Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2015-06-01

    Sedimentary cover has significant influence on seismic wave travel times and knowing its structure is of great importance for studying deeper structures of the Earth. Seismic tomography is one of the methods that require good knowledge of seismic velocities in sediments and unfortunately by itself cannot provide detailed information about distribution of seismic velocities in sedimentary cover. This paper presents results of P-wave velocity analysis in the old Paleozoic sediments in area of Polish Lowland, Folded Area, and all sediments in complicated area of the Carpathian Mountains in Poland. Due to location on conjunction of three major tectonic units — the Precambrian East European Craton, the Paleozoic Platform of Central and Western Europe, and the Alpine orogen represented by the Carpathian Mountains the maximum depth of these sediments reaches up to 25 000 m in the Carpathian Mountains. Seismic velocities based on 492 deep boreholes with vertical seismic profiling and a total of 741 vertical seismic profiles taken from 29 seismic refraction profiles are analyzed separately for 14 geologically different units. For each unit, velocity versus depth relations are approximated by second or third order polynomials.

  1. The crustal structure of the Guayana Shield, Venezuela, from seismic refraction and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Michael; Chalbaud, Daniel; Castillo, Jesús; Izarra, Carlos

    2002-02-01

    We present results from a seismic refraction experiment on the northern margin of the Guayana Shield performed during June 1998, along nine profiles of up to 320 km length, using the daily blasts of the Cerro Bolı´var mines as energy source, as well as from gravimetric measurements. Clear Moho arrivals can be observed on the main E-W profile on the shield, whereas the profiles entering the Oriental Basin to the north are more noisy. The crustal thickness of the shield is unusually high with up to 46 km on the Archean segment in the west and 43 km on the Proterozoic segment in the east. A 20 km thick upper crust with P-wave velocities between 6.0 and 6.3 km/s can be separated from a lower crust with velocities ranging from 6.5 to 7.2 km/s. A lower crustal low velocity zone with a velocity reduction to 6.3 km/s is observed between 25 and 25 km depth. The average crustal velocity is 6.5 km/s. The changes in the Bouguer Anomaly, positive (30 mGal) in the west and negative (-20 mGal) in the east, cannot be explained by the observed seismic crustal features alone. Lateral variations in the crust or in the upper mantle must be responsible for these observations.

  2. Variations of refraction angles from observations of the Moon from space.

    PubMed

    Kireev, S V; Sokolovskiy, S V

    1994-12-20

    We present the results of measurements of optical refraction angles from photographs of the Moon taken from the orbital station Mir. We made estimations of rms fluctuations of refraction angles and of the characteristics of multipath propagation.

  3. Measurement of optical glass refractive index free from effect of environmental temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian-rong; Hao, Qun; Zhu, Qiu-dong; Hu, Yao; Cheng, Xu

    2010-08-01

    A method based on measurement of critical refraction angle is proposed for measurement of optical glass refractive index independent of environment temperature. The critical refraction angle difference between the test sample and a standard refractive index block is measured first, and then the refractive index difference is obtained by a linear regression algorithm and the refractive index of the sample can be calculated from it. The requirement for environmental temperature is 25+/-5 °C , which can be easily satisfied on the production line. Compared with the non-linear algorithm used for direct measurement, this method is simpler, more efficient, and can directly get the refractive index value at standard temperature. Experimental result shows that the measurement repeatability is 1×10-5. The method can be used for fast and accurate measurement of the refractive index for the same glass material in mass production (e.g. X-cube made of K9 optical glass).

  4. Predicted and measured boundary layer refraction for advanced turboprop propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    1990-01-01

    Currently, boundary layer refraction presents a limitation to the measurement of forward arc propeller noise measured on an acoustic plate in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The use of a validated boundary layer refraction model to adjust the data could remove this limitation. An existing boundary layer refraction model is used to predict the refraction for cases where boundary layer refraction was measured. In general, the model exhibits the same qualitative behavior as the measured refraction. However, the prediction method does not show quantitative agreement with the data. In general, it overpredicts the amount of refraction for the far forward angles at axial Mach number of 0.85 and 0.80 and underpredicts the refraction at axial Mach numbers of 0.75 and 0.70. A more complete propeller source description is suggested as a way to improve the prediction method.

  5. Influence of quantum Hall effect on wave refraction in ferrite-semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarkhanyan, Roland H.; Niarchos, Dimitris G.

    2008-12-01

    Peculiarities of wave refraction are investigated in periodic structures consisting of alternating layers of ferromagnetic insulator and GaAs-AlGaAs-type semiconductor bilayers. It is shown that in quantum Hall effect conditions, the refractive indices and consequently the refraction angles of the propagating waves are quantized.Two different geometries of the refracting plane are considered: (I) parallel and (II) perpendicular to the quantizing magnetic field. It is shown that in the first case, negative refraction through the lateral surface of the structure is possible. A frequency region is found where the refraction is negative for all angles of incidence and regardless of the sign of permittivity tensor components. Analytical expressions for both phase and group refractive indices are obtained.In the second case, one of the propagating waves (in the birefringent regime) is backward. Despite this, and unlike in the case of non-quantizing magnetic fields, negative refraction is impossible.

  6. At-wavelength characterization of refractive x-ray lenses using a two-dimensional grating interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Donath, Tilman

    2011-11-28

    We report on the application of a two-dimensional hard x-ray grating interferometer to x-ray optics metrology. The interferometer is sensitive to refraction angles in two perpendicular directions with a precision of 10 nrad. It is used to observe the wavefront changes induced by a single parabolic beryllium focusing lens of large radius of curvature. The lens shape is reconstructed and its residual aberrations are analyzed. Its profile differs from an ideal parabolic shape by less than 2 {mu}m or {lambda}/50 at {lambda} = 0.54 A wavelength.

  7. Refractive surgery training during residency – do not be afraid of the dark

    PubMed Central

    Balparda, Kepa; Díaz, Ana María; Londoño, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    Refractive errors are a fairly common eye condition worldwide, and the ophthalmologist should be capable of offering the patient both nonsurgical and surgical solutions to their refractive conditions. Nevertheless, currently, refractive surgery training during residency is poor at best. This paper explores recent evidence to suggest that postsurgical results of patients operated on by residents are not inferior to those operated on by experienced staff. It points out the urgent need to improve the current approach to refractive surgery training. PMID:25429199

  8. Eye-Ball Rebuilding Using Splines with a View to Refractive Surgery Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Refractive Surgery Simulation DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Algorithms...compilation report: ADP013708 thru ADP013761 UNCLASSIFIED Eye-ball rebuilding using splines with a view to refractive surgery simulation Mathieu Lamard...ophthalmology, refractive surgery has experiencied an important expansion for about fifteen years. It allows the surgeons to correct different refractive errors

  9. Refractive results with the use of AT.Lisa intraocular lens (2008-2015).

    PubMed

    Filip, Mircea; Nicolae, Miruna; Filip, Andrei; Antonescu, Cristina; Dragne, Carmen; Triantafyllidis, Grigorios; Moisescu, Raluca; Lutic, Irina; Ungureanu, Ileana; Teodorov, Anamaria

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the refractive results on a large cohort of patients who were implanted spherical or toric multifocal IOL's for cataract surgery or for refractive purpose. Preoperative refractive investigations included auto refractometer topography, pentacam, contact and noncontact biometry and many non-refractive investigations. The target in multifocal IOL usage was emmetropia and it was achieved in most cases. Ametropia occurrence involved correction in different ways.

  10. Optical refractive index of air: dependence on pressure, temperature and composition.

    PubMed

    Owens, J C

    1967-01-01

    The theoretical background and present status of formulas for the refractive index of air are reviewed. In supplement to Edlén's recently revised formula for relative refractivity, the density dependence of refractive index is reanalyzed. New formulas are presented for both phase and group refractive index which are more useful over a wide range of pressure, temperature, and composition than any presently available. The application of the new formulas to optical distance measuring is briefly discussed.

  11. Measurement of near-surface seismic compressional wave velocities using refraction tomography at a proposed construction site on the Presidio of Monterey, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is determining the feasibility of constructing a new barracks building on the U.S. Army Presidio of Monterey in Monterey, California. Due to the presence of an endangered orchid in the proposed area, invasive techniques such as exploratory drill holes are prohibited. To aid in determining the feasibility, budget, and design of this building, a compressional-wave seismic refraction survey was proposed by the U.S. Geological Survey as an alternative means of investigating the depth to competent bedrock. Two sub-parallel profiles were acquired along an existing foot path and a fence line to minimize impacts on the endangered flora. The compressional-wave seismic refraction tomography data for both profiles indicate that no competent rock classified as non-rippable or marginally rippable exists within the top 30 feet beneath the ground surface.

  12. Modified Kramers-Kronig relations and sum rules for meromorphic total refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Saarinen, Jarkko J.; Vartiainen, Erik M.

    2003-08-01

    Modified Kramers-Kronig relations and corresponding sum rules are shown to hold for the total refractive index that can be presented as a sum of complex linear and nonlinear refractive indices, respectively. It is suggested that a self-action process, involving the degenerate third-order nonlinear susceptibility, can yield a negative total refractive index at some spectral range.

  13. Inversion of the anomalous diffraction approximation for variable complex index of refraction near unity. [numerical tests for water-haze aerosol model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Fymat analytic inversion method for retrieving a particle-area distribution function from anomalous diffraction multispectral extinction data and total area is generalized to the case of a variable complex refractive index m(lambda) near unity depending on spectral wavelength lambda. Inversion tests are presented for a water-haze aerosol model. An upper-phase shift limit of 5 pi/2 retrieved an accurate peak area distribution profile. Analytical corrections using both the total number and area improved the inversion.

  14. New Physical Optics Method for Curvilinear Refractive Surfaces and its Verification in the Design and Testing of W-band Dual-Aspheric Lenses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    system. 1 Introduction Quasi-optical refractive components such as compact diffractive lenses are in growing demand in modern applications of THz and sub... Introduction 4 2 New design approaches and simulation methods for quasi-optical lenses 8 2.1 Dual-aspheric non-paraxial lens profiles...THz wave bands. High-quality quasi-optical compo- nents and efficient methods of their simulations are needed, e.g., in astrophysics (particularly

  15. The crustal structure of the axis of the Great Valley, California, from seismic refraction measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holbrook, W.S.; Mooney, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    In 1982 the U.S. Geological Survey collected six seismic refraction profiles in the Great Valley of California: three axial profiles with a maximum shot-to-receiver offset of 160 km, and three shorter profiles perpendicular to the valley axis. This paper presents the results of two-dimensional raytracing and synthetic seismogram modeling of the central axial profile. The crust of the central Great Valley is laterally heterogeneous along its axis, but generally consists of a sedimentary section overlying distinct upper, middle, and lower crustal units. The sedimentary rocks are 3-5 km thick along the profile, with velocities increasing with depth from 1.6 to 4.0 km/s. The basement (upper crust) consists of four units: 1. (1) a 1.0-1.5 km thick layer of velocity 5.4-5.8 km/s, 2. (2) a 3-4 km thick layer of velocity 6.0-6.3 km/s, 3. (3) a 1.5-3.0 km thick layer of velocity 6.5-6.6 km/s, and 4. (4) a laterally discontinuous, 1.5 km thick layer of velocity 6.8-7.0 km/s. The mid-crust lies at 11-14 km depth, is 5-8 km thick, and has a velocity of 6.6-6.7 km/s. On the northwest side of our profile the mid-crust is a low-velocity zone beneath the 6.8-7.0 km/s lid. The lower crust lies at 16-19 km depth, is 7-13 km thick, and has a velocity of 6.9-7.2 km/s. Crustal thickness increases from 26 to 29 km from NW to SE in the model. Although an unequivocal determination of crustal composition is not possible from P-wave velocities alone, our model has several geological and tectonic implications. We interpret the upper 7 km of basement on the northwest side of the profile as an ophiolitic fragment, since its thickness and velocity structure are consistent with that of oceanic crust. This fragment, which is not present 10-15 km to the west of the refraction profile, is probably at least partially responsible for the Great Valley gravity and magnetic anomalies, whose peaks lie about 10 km east of our profile. The middle and lower crust are probably gabbroic and the product of

  16. Refractive Index Compensation in Over-Determined Interferometric Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Čížek, Martin; Hrabina, Jan; Buchta, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    We present an interferometric technique based on a differential interferometry setup for measurement under atmospheric conditions. The key limiting factor in any interferometric dimensional measurement are fluctuations of the refractive index of air representing a dominating source of uncertainty when evaluated indirectly from the physical parameters of the atmosphere. Our proposal is based on the concept of an over-determined interferometric setup where a reference length is derived from a mechanical frame made from a material with a very low thermal coefficient. The technique allows one to track the variations of the refractive index of air on-line directly in the line of the measuring beam and to compensate for the fluctuations. The optical setup consists of three interferometers sharing the same beam path where two measure differentially the displacement while the third evaluates the changes in the measuring range, acting as a tracking refractometer. The principle is demonstrated in an experimental setup. PMID:23202037

  17. Refractive index compensation in over-determined interferometric systems.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Čížek, Martin; Hrabina, Jan; Buchta, Zdeněk

    2012-10-19

    We present an interferometric technique based on a differential interferometry setup for measurement under atmospheric conditions. The key limiting factor in any interferometric dimensional measurement are fluctuations of the refractive index of air representing a dominating source of uncertainty when evaluated indirectly from the physical parameters of the atmosphere. Our proposal is based on the concept of an over-determined interferometric setup where a reference length is derived from a mechanical frame made from a material with a very low thermal coefficient. The technique allows one to track the variations of the refractive index of air on-line directly in the line of the measuring beam and to compensate for the fluctuations. The optical setup consists of three interferometers sharing the same beam path where two measure differentially the displacement while the third evaluates the changes in the measuring range, acting as a tracking refractometer. The principle is demonstrated in an experimental setup.

  18. The whistler mode refractive index as a function of gyrofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J. M.

    2011-08-15

    The refractive index for a constant-frequency whistler mode wave in an electron-proton plasma is considered as a function of position, through the local gyrofrequencies {Omega}{sub e,i}. The full cold plasma dispersion relation is used. The wave frequency can take any value up to the smaller of {Omega}{sub e} and the plasma frequency {omega}{sub pe}, but {omega}{sub pe} is allowed to take any fixed value, as is the wavenormal angle. It is rigorously established that the refractive index is a decreasing function of {Omega}{sub e}. One application of this is to finding locations of Landau and cyclotron resonances, to evaluate the effects of whistler mode waves on radiation belt electrons.

  19. Focusing high-energy x rays by compound refractive lenses.

    PubMed

    Snigirev, A; Kohn, V; Snigireva, I; Souvorov, A; Lengeler, B

    1998-02-01

    Compound lenses made from low-Z materials (e.g., Be, B, C, and Al) set up as a linear array of refractive lenses are proposed for submicrometer focusing of high-energy x rays (>5 keV) in one or two dimensions. A theory of focusing based on Maxwell's equation and the Fresnel-Kirchhoff approach is presented. Compound refractive lenses were manufactured by drilling into an Al block a linear array of 200 closely spaced holes 0.5 mm in diameter for linear focusing and two crossed arrays of 100 holes each for point focusing. Focal spots of 3.7 mum and 8 mum x 18 mum were obtained at 30 keV for linear and two-dimensional lenses, respectively. Different technologies of manufacturing and possible applications of the proposed lenses are discussed.

  20. The feasibility of large refracting telescopes for solar coronal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Elmore, David F.; Kolinski, Donald J.

    2008-07-01

    Measuring magnetic fields in the solar corona requires a large aperture telescope with exceptionally low levels of scattered light. For internally-occulted coronagraphs the main source is scattering from dust or microroughness on the primary lens or mirror. We show refracting primaries offer significantly lower levels for both sources. To observe magnetic fields in the solar corona with scientifically interesting spatial and temporal resolutions, a 1 meter aperture or larger is required. For a long time such large-scale refractors have been deemed impractical or impossible to construct due to gravitational deformation of the lens. We present the results of finite-element and optical analyses of the gravitational deformation, stress-induced birefringence, and absorptive heating of a (see manuscript)1.5 meter f/5 fused silica lens. These studies demonstrate the traditional objections to large refractors are unfounded and large refracting primaries have unique capabilities.

  1. Imaging based refractometer for hyperspectral refractive index detection

    DOEpatents

    Baba, Justin S.; Boudreaux, Philip R.

    2015-11-24

    Refractometers for simultaneously measuring refractive index of a sample over a range of wavelengths of light include dispersive and focusing optical systems. An optical beam including the range of wavelengths is spectrally spread along a first axis and focused along a second axis so as to be incident to an interface between the sample and a prism at a range of angles of incidence including a critical angle for at least one wavelength. An imaging detector is situated to receive the spectrally spread and focused light from the interface and form an image corresponding to angle of incidence as a function of wavelength. One or more critical angles are identified and corresponding refractive indices are determined.

  2. A microstrip tunable negative refractive index metamaterial and phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, P.; Gao, J.; Marinis, C. T.; Parimi, P. V.; Vittoria, C.; Harris, V. G.

    2008-11-01

    A tunable negative refractive index metamaterial and miniature phase shifter have been designed and fabricated in a microstrip configuration for applications in radio frequency integrated circuits. The metamaterial consists of plasmonic copper wires and yttrium iron garnet slabs having a low insertion loss of 5dB at the center of the transmission band. The yttrium iron garnet material enables the magnetic field tuning of the negative refractive index in a dynamic frequency band from 7.0to11.0GHz. The insertion phase can be tuned by 45° continuously by varying the bias field from 3.8to4.6kOe at 9.0GHz.

  3. Complex refractive index of Martian dust - Mariner 9 ultraviolet observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.; Hord, C. W.; Egan, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Mariner 9 ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the 1971 dust clouds obscuring the surface of Mars have been analyzed by matching the observed dust phase function with Mie scattering calculations for size distributions of homogeneous and isotropic material. Preliminary results indicate an effective particle radius of not less than 0.2. The real component of the index of refraction is not less than 1.8 at both 268 and 305 nm; corresponding values for the imagery component are 0.02 and 0.01. These values are consistent with those found by Mead (1970) for the visible and near-visible wavelengths. The refractive index and the absorption coefficient increase rapidly with decreasing wavelength in going from the visible to the ultraviolet, indicating the presence of an ultraviolet absorption band which may shield organisms from ultraviolet irradiation.

  4. Effect of parallel refraction on magnetospheric upper hybrid waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, J.; Kennel, C. F.

    1984-01-01

    Large amplitude (not less than 10 mV/m) electrostatic plasma waves near the upper hybrid (UH) frequency have been observed from 0 to 50 deg magnetic latitude (MLAT) during satellite plasma-pause crossings. A three-dimensional numerical ray-tracing calculation, based on an electron distribution measured during a GEOS 1 dayside intense upper-hybrid wave event, suggests how UH waves might achieve such large amplitudes away from the geomagnetic equator. Refractive effects largely control the wave amplification and, in particular, the unavoidable refraction due to parallel geomagnetic field gradients restricts growth to levels below those observed. However, a cold electron density gradient parallel to the field can lead to upper hybrid wave growth that can account for the observed emission levels.

  5. Shock wave refraction enhancing conditions on an extended interface

    SciTech Connect

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.

    2013-04-15

    We determined the law of shock wave refraction for a class of extended interfaces with continuously variable gradients. When the interface is extended or when the gas parameters vary fast enough, the interface cannot be considered as sharp or smooth and the existing calculation methods cannot be applied. The expressions we derived are general enough to cover all three types of the interface and are valid for any law of continuously varying parameters. We apply the equations to the case of exponentially increasing temperature on the boundary and compare the results for all three types of interfaces. We have demonstrated that the type of interface can increase or inhibit the shock wave refraction. Our findings can be helpful in understanding the results obtained in energy deposition experiments as well as for controlling the shock-plasma interaction in other settings.

  6. INDEX OF REFRACTION OF SHOCK LOADED SODA-LIME GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C. S.

    2009-12-28

    Soda-lime glass (SLG) is a potential low-cost VISAR window for use at moderate shock pressures (up to 2430 GPa) where the material remains transparent. In order for SLG to be practical as a VISAR window, the correction factor, which describes the frequency correction related to the strain dependence of the refractive index, and hence the index of refraction itself, must be characterized as a function of pressure. Characterization data are reported in this paper and compared to previous results. The present data show good agreement with those of Dandekar [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 6614 (1998)] and separate study results by Gibbons and Ahrens [J. Geophys. Res. 76, 5489 (1971)] up to 7 GPa. However, at stresses over 7 GPa, marked discrepancies are evident between the present data and that of Gibbons and Ahrens. Differences in test methods may explain these discrepancies.

  7. Correction of group refraction index based on pulse trains interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong; Aketagawa, Masato

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new concept for an unconventional type of two-color method for interferometry-based length measurements based on the adjacent pulse repetition interval length (APRIL), which is the physical length associated with the pulse repetition period. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that if the wavelength-based two-color method can eliminate the inhomogeneous disturbance of effects caused by the phase refractive index, then the APRIL-based two-color method can eliminate the air turbulence of errors induced by the group refractive index. We show that our analysis will benefit the pulse-laser-based two-color method, which secures traceability to the definition of the meter.

  8. Sharp Nose Lens Design Using Refractive Index Gradient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    the normal (N’) were defined previously (equations 3.32, 3.39). 22 The refracted angle at the rear surface: I cos IR N’ (3.41) Both the ray and the...tan-1 [ Yz(l) (4.14)BF -- 22 (I) 4 4 (h) Solve for the Refractive Angles at the Front Surface As in the homogeneous case: 28 n (J) + 12 ’ (J) = 8(J...I- : 22 t.4fl. 11N nv w co -- 4N 0 C -1245 ;.:.;x X 00 (" m.𔄃�,1 -ni 91W’W’.-1.9rnr9’..11 991 rr .im mmmmm n119199mlnmmm9 .91"Cmml amrfMmm imr

  9. Nonlinear refraction of silver hydrosols during their aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, S V; Kodirov, M K; Ryasnyansky, A I; Slabko, V V

    2001-10-31

    The relation between the degree of aggregation of silver hydrosols and their nonlinear refractive index n{sub 2} is studied experimentally. It is found that the sign of n{sub 2} at a wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m changes with increasing the aggregation degree, which corresponds to the replacing of self-focusing by self-defocusing. The observed effects are explained based on the analysis of a change in nonlinear dispersion of the medium, taking into account the interaction between phases and the photochromic effects, which are typical for colloidal structures with fractal geometry. It is shown that the change in the sign of the nonlinear refractive index of hydrosols upon irradiation by laser pulses of duration of less than 10{sup -7} s is caused by the perturbation of resonances of silver and water and by the competition between Kerr nonlinear polarisations involving these resonances. (nonlinear optical phenomena and devices)

  10. State Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State-Federal Information Clearinghouse for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA.

    State-by-state public policy profiles are provided by the Council for Exceptional Children's State-Federal Information Clearinghouse. These profiles summarize the present legal base for the delivery of educational services to handicapped children in the United States. Included in each profile is information from various avenues used to establish…

  11. Nonresonant Transient Refractive Index Spectroscopy in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, D. K.; Leontyev, A. V.; Shmelev, A. G.; Nikiforov, V. G.; Lobkov, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report transient refractive index change in semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in polymethylmethacrylate matrix via pump-probe experiment. At lower pump intensities the detected signal consists of the pulse autocorrelation-shaped part and another part delayed by 300 fs. The latter's relative intensity depends on the pump level. However in CdS monocrystal the detected signal was found to lack this second feature completely.

  12. Fiber Optic-Based Refractive Index Sensing at INESC Porto

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Pedro A. S.; Silva, Susana O.; Gouveia, Carlos; Tafulo, Paula; Coelho, Luis; Caldas, Paulo; Viegas, Diana; Rego, Gaspar; Baptista, José M.; Santos, José L.; Frazão, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    A review of refractive index measurement based on different types of optical fiber sensor configurations and techniques is presented. It addresses the main developments in the area, with particular focus on results obtained at INESC Porto, Portugal. The optical fiber sensing structures studied include those based on Bragg and long period gratings, on micro-interferometers, on plasmonic effects in fibers and on multimode interference in a large spectrum of standard and microstructured optical fibers. PMID:22969405

  13. Kepler: Analogies in the search for the law of refraction.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carlos Alberto

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the methodology used by Kepler to discover a quantitative law of refraction. The aim is to argue that this methodology follows a heuristic method based on the following two Pythagorean principles: (1) sameness is made known by sameness, and (2) harmony arises from establishing a limit to what is unlimited. We will analyse some of the author's proposed analogies to find the aforementioned law and argue that the investigation's heuristic pursues such principles.

  14. Nonlocal nonlinear refraction in Hibiscus sabdariffa with large phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Martínez, D; Alvarado-Méndez, E; Trejo-Durán, M; Vázquez-Guevara, M A

    2014-10-20

    In this work we present a study of nonlinear optical properties in organic materials (hibiscus sabdariffa). Our results demonstrate that the medium exhibits a highly nonlocal nonlinear response. We show preliminary numerical results of the transmittance as nonlocal response by considering, simultaneously, the nonlinear absorption and refraction in media. Numerical results are accord to measurement obtained by Z- scan technique where we observe large phase shifts. We also analyze the far field diffraction ring patterns of the sample.

  15. New Refractive Surgery Procedures and Their Implications for Aviation Safety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    and the introduction of corneal topography analysis have led to the development of a safer and more effective LTK procedure . The patient’s...myopia: clinical results in sighted eyes . Ophthalmol. May 1993; 100(5):739-45 . 25 46 . Klyce SD, Smolek MK . Corneal topography of ex- cimer laser...of the cornea as a quantitative descriptor in corneal topography . J Cataract Refract Surg. Feb 1993; 19(Suppl):S155-65 . 53 . Gartry DS . Treating

  16. Refraction data survey: 2nd generation correlation of myopia.

    PubMed

    Greene, Peter R; Medina, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The objective herein is to provide refraction data, myopia progression rate, prevalence, and 1st and 2nd generation correlations, relevant to whether myopia is random or inherited. First- and second-generation ocular refraction data are assembled from N = 34 families, average of 2.8 children per family. From this group, data are available from N = 165 subjects. Inter-generation regressions are performed on all the data sets, including correlation coefficient r, and myopia prevalence [%]. Prevalence of myopia is [M] = 38.5 %. Prevalence of high myopes with |R| >6 D is [M-] = 20.5 %. Average refraction is  = -1.84 D ± 3.22 (N = 165). For the high myopes, |R| >6 D, prevalence for the parents is [M-] = 25 %, for the 2nd generation [M-] = 16.5 %. Average myopia level for the high myopes, both generations, is  = -7.52 D ± 1.31 D (N = 33). Regression parameters are calculated for all the data sets, yielding correlation coefficients in the range r = 0.48-0.72 for some groups of myopes and high myopes, fathers to daughters, and mothers to sons. Also of interest, some categories show essentially no correlation, -0.20 < r < 0.20, indicating that the refractive errors occur randomly. Time series results show myopia diopter rates = -0.50 D/year.

  17. Comment on ''Perfect imaging with positive refraction in three dimensions''

    SciTech Connect

    Merlin, R.

    2010-11-15

    Leonhardt and Philbin [Phys. Rev. A 81, 011804(R) (2010)] have recently constructed a mathematical proof that the Maxwell's fish-eye lens provides perfect imaging of electromagnetic waves without negative refraction. In this comment, we argue that the unlimited resolution is an artifact of having introduced an unphysical drain at the position of the geometrical image. The correct solution gives focusing consistent with the standard diffraction limit.

  18. Controllable nonlinear refraction characteristics in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, D. Q.; Ye, Q. H.; Shen, W. Z.; Su, W. A.

    2014-02-07

    Nonlinear refraction (NLR) of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) has been investigated through the close aperture Z-scan method. We demonstrate a significant NLR and a unique feature of controllable NLR characteristics between saturable and Kerr NLR with the incident photon energy. We numerically evaluate the proportion of these two mechanisms in different wavelengths by a modified NLR equation. The band tail of nc-Si:H appears to play a crucial role in such NLR responses.

  19. Lithium metal for x-ray refractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Nino R.; Arms, Dohn A.; Clarke, Roy; Dierker, Steve B.; Dufresne, Eric; Foster, D.

    2001-12-01

    Lithium is the best material for refractive x-ray lenses, with peak performance around 8 keV. To date we have built a prototype of Cederstrom's so-called alligator lens, and have tested the lens with beamline 7ID's 10 keV x-rays on the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratories. To date we have attained only a threefold gain, most likely limited by surface roughness that is avoidable with more careful manufacturing techniques.

  20. Ocular Changes during Pregnancy and Their Effects on Refraction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    pregnancy and menstrual cycle effects, or from studies dealing with ocular changes produced by the use of oral contraceptives which mimic many of the...using oral contraceptives reported that refractive changes toward increased myopia ocurred, but 7,9,9 did not specify any amounts. Thus, there is no...there was not universal agreement on this point. In two separate studies of 72 and 74 women taking oral contraceptives , the first reported general

  1. Ultrashort laser pulse interaction with photo-thermo-refractive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siiman, Leo A.

    Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is an ideal photosensitive material for recording phase volume holograms. It is a homogeneous multi-component silicate glass that demonstrates all the advantages of optical glass: thermal stability, high laser damage threshold, and a wide transparency range. Moreover the ability to record phase patterns (i.e. spatial refractive index variations) into PTR glass has resulted in the fabrication of volume holograms with diffraction efficiency greater than 99%. The conventional method of recording a hologram in PTR glass relies on exposure to continuous-wave ultraviolet laser radiation. In this dissertation the interaction between infrared ultrashort laser pulses and PTR glass is studied. It is shown that photosensitivity in PTR glass can be extended from the UV region to longer wavelengths (near-infrared) by exposure to ultrashort laser pulses. It is found that there exists a focusing geometry and laser pulse intensity interval for which photoionization and refractive index change in PTR glass after thermal development occur without laser-induced optical damage. Photoionization of PTR glass by IR ultrashort laser pulses is explained in terms of strong electric field ionization. This phenomenon is used to fabricate phase optical elements in PTR glass. The interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and volume holograms in PTR glass is studied in two laser intensity regimes. At intensities below ˜10 12 W/cm2 properties such as diffraction efficiency, angular divergence, selectivity, and pulse front tilt are shown to agree with the theory of linear diffraction for broad spectral width lasers. A volume grating pair arrangement is shown to correct the laser pulse distortions arising from pulse front tilt and angular divergence. At higher intensities of irradiation, nonlinear generation and diffraction of third harmonic is observed for three types of interactions: sum-frequency generation, front-surface THG generation, and THG due to

  2. Image Quality Analysis of Eyes Undergoing LASER Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Samrat; Vaddavalli, Pravin Krishna; Bharadwaj, Shrikant R.

    2016-01-01

    Laser refractive surgery for myopia increases the eye’s higher-order wavefront aberrations (HOA’s). However, little is known about the impact of such optical degradation on post-operative image quality (IQ) of these eyes. This study determined the relation between HOA’s and IQ parameters (peak IQ, dioptric focus that maximized IQ and depth of focus) derived from psychophysical (logMAR acuity) and computational (logVSOTF) through-focus curves in 45 subjects (18 to 31yrs) before and 1-month after refractive surgery and in 40 age-matched emmetropic controls. Computationally derived peak IQ and its best focus were negatively correlated with the RMS deviation of all HOA’s (HORMS) (r≥-0.5; p<0.001 for all). Computational depth of focus was positively correlated with HORMS (r≥0.55; p<0.001 for all) and negatively correlated with peak IQ (r≥-0.8; p<0.001 for all). All IQ parameters related to logMAR acuity were poorly correlated with HORMS (r≤|0.16|; p>0.16 for all). Increase in HOA’s after refractive surgery is therefore associated with a decline in peak IQ and a persistence of this sub-standard IQ over a larger dioptric range, vis-à-vis, before surgery and in age-matched controls. This optical deterioration however does not appear to significantly alter psychophysical IQ, suggesting minimal impact of refractive surgery on the subject’s ability to resolve spatial details and their tolerance to blur. PMID:26859302

  3. Measuring Refractive Index Using the Focal Displacement Method (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    measurements of wafer- shaped InAs and InSb,” Appl. Opt. 47, 164–168 (2008). 6. H. J. Choi , H. H. Lim, H. S. Moon, T. B. Eom, J. J. Ju, and M. Cha...coefficients of germanium and silicon,” Appl. Opt. 15, 2348–2351 (1976). 13. P. Hlidek, J. Bok , J. Franc, and R. Grill, “Refractive index of CdTe: spectral and

  4. Enhancement of Far Field Sound Levels by Refractive Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, D. W.; Roth, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    The enhancement of sound pressure levels resulting from refractive focusing was calculated for meteorological conditions representative of those observed at the MOD-1 site near Boone, N.C. The results show that 10 to 20dB enhancements can occur over ranges of several hundred meters. Localized enhancements in excess of 20dB can occur but will probably be of limited duration as a consequence of normal temporally varying meteorological conditions.

  5. Refractive Index Measurement of Fibers Through Fizeau Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    3 Table 2. Lasers used in interferometer for fiber refractive index measurement. Manufacturer Model Wavelength Laserglow Technologies , Inc...1.4605, well within the acceptable range of error. A similarly precise listed value for S-2 glass was not found, but the manufacturer lists the...internally manufactured fibers. The interferometer is shown to produce accurate, repeatable results for fibers with a cross-sectional area of over

  6. Measurements of refractive index and physical thickness using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guiju; Wang, Xiangzhao; Ren, Hongwu; Zhang, Weizai; Zhang, Lianying; Fang, Zujie

    2000-05-01

    The measurements of refractive index and thickness of various transparent plates and films are very important for quality control. Additionally, the knowledge of refractive index, and thickness is significant in biomedicine for the treatment of many kinds of tumors. In this paper, we propose a new method for noninvasive and simultaneous measurement of refractive indices and physical thickness of specimens, which consist of surrounding and interior components with different refractive indices. In our experiment, we measure the refractive index and the physical thickness of a multimode fiber and a lotus root with a hollow hole, respectively. The experimental results verify the feasibility of this method.

  7. Determining index of refraction from polarimetric hyperspectral radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jacob A.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2015-09-01

    Polarimetric hyperspectral imaging (P-HSI) combines two of the most common remote sensing modalities. This work leverages the combination of these techniques to improve material classification. Classifying and identifying materials requires parameters which are invariant to changing viewing conditions, and most often a material's reflectivity or emissivity is used. Measuring these most often requires assumptions be made about the material and atmospheric conditions. Combining both polarimetric and hyperspectral imaging, we propose a method to remotely estimate the index of refraction of a material. In general, this is an underdetermined problem because both the real and imaginary components of index of refraction are unknown at every spectral point. By modeling the spectral variation of the index of refraction using a few parameters, however, the problem can be made overdetermined. A number of different functions can be used to describe this spectral variation, and some are discussed here. Reducing the number of spectral parameters to fit allows us to add parameters which estimate atmospheric downwelling radiance and transmittance. Additionally, the object temperature is added as a fit parameter. The set of these parameters that best replicate the measured data is then found using a bounded Nelder-Mead simplex search algorithm. Other search algorithms are also examined and discussed. Results show that this technique has promise but also some limitations, which are the subject of ongoing work.

  8. Refraction Correction in 3D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first correction of refraction in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging using an iterative approach that traces propagation paths through a two-layer planar tissue model, applying Snell’s law in 3D. This approach is applied to real-time 3D transcranial ultrasound imaging by precomputing delays offline for several skull thicknesses, allowing the user to switch between three sets of delays for phased array imaging at the push of a button. Simulations indicate that refraction correction may be expected to increase sensitivity, reduce beam steering errors, and partially restore lost spatial resolution, with the greatest improvements occurring at the largest steering angles. Distorted images of cylindrical lesions were created by imaging through an acrylic plate in a tissue-mimicking phantom. As a result of correcting for refraction, lesions were restored to 93.6% of their original diameter in the lateral direction and 98.1% of their original shape along the long axis of the cylinders. In imaging two healthy volunteers, the mean brightness increased by 8.3% and showed no spatial dependency. PMID:24275538

  9. Organic Plasmon-Emitting Diodes for Detecting Refractive Index Variation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    A photo-excited organic layer on a metal thin film with a corrugated substrate was used to generate surface plasmon grating coupled emissions (SPGCEs). Directional emissions corresponded to the resonant condition of surface plasmon modes on the Au/air interface. In experimental comparisons of the effects of different pitch sizes on the plasmonic band-gap, the obtained SPGCEs were highly directional, with intensity increases as large as 10.38-fold. The FWHM emission spectrum was less than 70 nm. This method is easily applicable to detecting refractive index changes by using SP-coupled fluorophores in which wavelength emissions vary by viewing angle. The measurements and calculations in this study confirmed that the color wavelength of the SPGCE changed from 545.3 nm to 615.4 nm at certain viewing angles, while the concentration of contacting glucose increased from 10 to 40 wt%, which corresponded to a refractive index increase from 1.3484 to 1.3968. The organic plasmon-emitting diode exhibits a wider linearity range and a resolution of the experimental is 1.056 × 10−3 RIU. The sensitivity of the detection limit for naked eye of the experimental is 0.6 wt%. At a certain viewing angle, a large spectral shift is clearly distinguishable by the naked eye unaided by optoelectronic devices. These experimental results confirm the potential applications of the organic plasmon-emitting diodes in a low-cost, integrated, and disposable refractive-index sensor. PMID:23812346

  10. Organic plasmon-emitting diodes for detecting refractive index variation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-06-28

    A photo-excited organic layer on a metal thin film with a corrugated substrate was used to generate surface plasmon grating coupled emissions (SPGCEs). Directional emissions corresponded to the resonant condition of surface plasmon modes on the Au/air interface. In experimental comparisons of the effects of different pitch sizes on the plasmonic band-gap, the obtained SPGCEs were highly directional, with intensity increases as large as 10.38-fold. The FWHM emission spectrum was less than 70 nm. This method is easily applicable to detecting refractive index changes by using SP-coupled fluorophores in which wavelength emissions vary by viewing angle. The measurements and calculations in this study confirmed that the color wavelength of the SPGCE changed from 545.3 nm to 615.4 nm at certain viewing angles, while the concentration of contacting glucose increased from 10 to 40 wt%, which corresponded to a refractive index increase from 1.3484 to 1.3968. The organic plasmon-emitting diode exhibits a wider linearity range and a resolution of the experimental is 1.056 × 10-3 RIU. The sensitivity of the detection limit for naked eye of the experimental is 0.6 wt%. At a certain viewing angle, a large spectral shift is clearly distinguishable by the naked eye unaided by optoelectronic devices. These experimental results confirm the potential applications of the organic plasmon-emitting diodes in a low-cost, integrated, and disposable refractive-index sensor.

  11. Focusing on Plates: Controlling Guided Waves using Negative Refraction.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Franck D; Murray, Todd W; Prada, Claire

    2015-06-08

    Elastic waves are guided along finite structures such as cylinders, plates, or rods through reflection, refraction, and mode conversion at the interfaces. Such wave propagation is ubiquitous in the world around us, and studies of elastic waveguides first emerged in the later part of the 19(th) century. Early work on elastic waveguides revealed the presence of backward propagating waves, in which the phase velocity and group velocity are anti-parallel. While backward wave propagation exists naturally in very simple finite elastic media, there has been remarkably little attention paid to this phenomenon. Here we report the development of a tunable acoustic lens in an isotropic elastic plate showing negative refraction over a finite acoustic frequency bandwidth. As compared to engineered acoustic materials such as phononic crystals and metamaterials, the design of the acoustic lens is very simple, with negative refraction obtained through thickness changes rather than internal periodicity or sub-wavelength resonant structures. A new class of acoustic devices, including resonators, filters, lenses, and cloaks, may be possible through topography optimization of elastic waveguide structures to exploit the unique properties of backward waves.

  12. Modelling refractive index changes due to molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    There are a large number of sensing techniques which use optical changes to monitor interactions between molecules. In the absence of fluorophores or other labels, the basic signal transduction mechanism relies on refractive index changes arising from the interactions of the molecules involved. A quantitative model incorporating molecular transport, reaction kinetics and optical mixing is presented which reveals important insights concerning the optimal detection of molecular interactions optically. Although conceptually simple, a comprehensive model such as this has not been reported anywhere. Specifically, we investigate the pros and cons of detecting molecular interactions in free solution relative to detecting molecular interactions on surfaces using surface bound receptor molecules such as antibodies. The model reveals that the refractive index change produced in surface based sensors is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that from interactions in free solution. On the other hand, the model also reveals that it is indeed possible to distinguish specific molecular interactions from non-specific ones based on free-solution bulk refractometry without any washing step necessary in surface based sensors. However, the refractive index change for free solution interactions predicted by the model is smaller than 10-7 RIU, even for large proteins such as IgG in sufficiently high concentrations. This value is smaller than the typical 10-6 RIU detection limit of most state of the art optical sensing techniques therefore requiring techniques with substantially higher index sensitivity such as Back Scattering Interferometry.

  13. Observation of negative refraction of Dirac fermions in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Park, Geon-Hyoung; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-11-01

    Half a century ago, Veselago proposed `left-handed’ materials with negative permittivity and permeability, in which waves propagate with phase and group velocities in opposite directions. Significant work has been undertaken to attain this left-handed response, such as establishing a negative refractive index in so-called metamaterials, which consist of periodic sub-wavelength structures. However, an electronic counterpart has not been demonstrated owing to difficulties in creating repeated structures smaller than the electronic Fermi wavelength of the order ~10 nm. Here, without needing to engineer sub-wavelength structures, we demonstrate negative refractive behaviour of Dirac fermions in graphene, exploiting its unique relativistic band structure. Analysis of both electron focusing through an n-p-n flat lens and negative refraction across n-p junctions confirms left-handed behaviour in the electronic system. This approach to electronic optics is of particular relevance to the on-going efforts to develop novel quantum devices with emerging layered materials.

  14. Refraction and scattering of sound by a shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The angle and amplitude changes for acoustic waves refracted by a circular open jet shear layer were determined. The generalized refraction theory was assessed experimentally for on axis and off axis acoustic source locations as source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz and free stream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. Angle and amplitude changes across the shear layer show good agreement with theory. Experiments confirm that the refraction theory is independent of shear layer thickness, acoustic source frequency, and source type. A generalized theory is, thus, available for correcting far field noise data acquired in open jet test facilities. The effect of discrete tone scattering by the open jet turbulent shear layer was also studied. Scattering effects were investigated over the same Mach number range as frequency varied from 5 kHz to 15 kHz. Attenuation of discrete tone amplitude and tone broadening were measured as a function of acoustic source position and radiation angle. Scattering was found to be stronger at angles close to the open jet axis than at 90 deg, and becomes stronger as the acoustic source position shifts downstream. A scattering analysis provided an estimate of the onset of discrete tone scattering.

  15. Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator Being Designed and Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macosko, Robert P.; Donovan, Richard M.

    1998-01-01

    As the need for achieving super high temperatures (2000 K and above) in solar heat receivers has developed so has the need for secondary concentrators. These concentrators refocus the already highly concentrated solar energy provided by a primary solar collector, thereby significantly reducing the light entrance aperture of the heat receiver and the resulting infrared radiation heat loss from the receiver cavity. Although a significant amount of research and development has been done on nonimaging hollow reflective concentrators, there has been no other research or development to date on solid, single crystal, refractive concentrators that can operate at temperatures above 2000 K. The NASA Lewis Research Center recently initiated the development of single-crystal, optically clear, refractive secondary concentrators that, combined with a flux extractor, offer a number of significant advantages over the more conventional, hollow, reflective concentrators at elevated temperatures. Such concentrators could potentially provide higher throughput (efficiency), require no special cooling device, block heat receiver material boiloff from the receiver cavity, provide for flux tailoring in the cavity via the extractor, and potentially reduce infrared heat loss via an infrared block coating.The many technical challenges of designing and fabricating high-temperature refractive secondary concentrators and flux extractors include identifying optical materials that can survive the environment (high-temperature, vacuum and/or hydrogen atmosphere), developing coatings for enhanced optical and thermal performance, and developing crystal joining techniques and hardware that can survive launch loads.

  16. On refractive processes in strong laser field quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.

    2013-11-15

    Refractive processes in strong-field QED are pure quantum processes, which involve only external photons and the background electromagnetic field. We show analytically that such processes occurring in a plane-wave field and involving external real photons are all characterized by a surprisingly modest net exchange of energy and momentum with the laser field, corresponding to a few laser photons, even in the limit of ultra-relativistic laser intensities. We obtain this result by a direct calculation of the transition matrix element of an arbitrary refractive QED process and accounting exactly for the background plane-wave field. A simple physical explanation of this modest net exchange of laser photons is provided, based on the fact that the laser field couples with the external photons only indirectly through virtual electron–positron pairs. For stronger and stronger laser fields, the pairs cover a shorter and shorter distance before they annihilate again, such that the laser can transfer to them an energy corresponding to only a few photons. These results can be relevant for the future experiments aiming to test strong-field QED at present and next-generation facilities. -- Highlights: •Investigation of the one-loop amplitude of refractive QED processes in a laser field. •The amplitude is suppressed for a large number of net-exchanged laser photons. •Suggestion for first observation of high-nonlinear vacuum effects in a laser field.

  17. Advances in photo-thermo-refractive glass composition modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, S. A.; Ignatiev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    The novel photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass developed in ITMO University is a very promising optical material for photonic and plasmonic applications. In this paper authors represent study of tin influence on photo thermo inducted crystallization process and make a comparison of the optical and holographic properties of the new and classic composition of glass. Also during this work was made overall optimization of chemical composition namely was optimized concentration of halides, fluorides, bromides which are responsible for crystalline phase properties. Ions of antimony, which playing key role in catching and transferring electrons emitted during the UV exposure and subsequent heating. Also was lowered the concentration of stray impurity ions which a capable to catch photo-electrons. Optical spectra show that new composition of PTR glass has no absorption band in visible range caused by metal nano particles of silver. That allows recording of pure phase holograms in wide spectral range. Furthermore new PTR glass allows receiving refractive index modulation up to 1500 ppm. And the UV exposures needed to achieve maximum changes in refraction index are 6-7 times lower than in classic glass.

  18. Intraocular camera for retinal prostheses: Refractive and diffractive lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauer, Michelle Christine

    The focus of this thesis is on the design and analysis of refractive, diffractive, and hybrid refractive/diffractive lens systems for a miniaturized camera that can be surgically implanted in the crystalline lens sac and is designed to work in conjunction with current and future generation retinal prostheses. The development of such an intraocular camera (IOC) would eliminate the need for an external head-mounted or eyeglass-mounted camera. Placing the camera inside the eye would allow subjects to use their natural eye movements for foveation (attention) instead of more cumbersome head tracking, would notably aid in personal navigation and mobility, and would also be significantly more psychologically appealing from the standpoint of personal appearances. The capability for accommodation with no moving parts or feedback control is incorporated by employing camera designs that exhibit nearly infinite depth of field. Such an ultracompact optical imaging system requires a unique combination of refractive and diffractive optical elements and relaxed system constraints derived from human psychophysics. This configuration necessitates an extremely compact, short focal-length lens system with an f-number close to unity. Initially, these constraints appear highly aggressive from an optical design perspective. However, after careful analysis of the unique imaging requirements of a camera intended to work in conjunction with the relatively low pixellation levels of a retinal microstimulator array, it becomes clear that such a design is not only feasible, but could possibly be implemented with a single lens system.

  19. Evolution of graded refractive index in squid lenses.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Alison M; Des Marais, David L; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Johnsen, Sönke

    2007-08-22

    A lens with a graded refractive index is required for vision in aquatic animals with camera-type eyes. This optical design entails a radial gradient of protein density, with low density in external layers and high density in internal layers. To maintain the optical stability of the eye, different material properties are required for proteins in different regions of the lens. In low-density regions of the lens where slight protein aggregation causes significant light scattering, aggregation must be minimized. Squid lens S-crystallin proteins are evolutionarily derived from the glutathione S-transferase protein family. We used biochemistry, optical modelling and phylogenetics to study the evolution and material properties of S-crystallins. S-crystallins are differentially expressed in a radial gradient, suggesting a role in refractive index. This gradient in S-crystallin expression is correlated with their evolutionary history and biochemistry. S-crystallins have been under positive selection. This selection appears to have resulted in stabilization of derived S-crystallins via mutations in the dimer interface and extended electrostatic fields. These derived S-crystallins probably cause the glassy organization and stability of low refractive index lens layers. Our work elucidates the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the production and maintenance of camera-like optics in squid lenses.

  20. Foldable antibacterial acrylic intraocular lenses of high refractive index.

    PubMed

    Parra, F; Vázquez, B; Benito, L; Barcenilla, J; San Román, J

    2009-11-09

    Hydrophilic copolymers with high refractive index and bactericide properties based on quaternary ammonium salts monomers and methacrylates bearing benzothiazole moieties have been developed for application as foldable intraocular lenses. Composition of the systems was adjusted to get materials with optimized flexibility, wettability, and refractive properties. All the materials have been characterized in terms of optical properties, glass transition temperature, water content, and wettability. Water contact values oscillated between 37 and 15% and refractive index values in the wet state between 1.49 and 1.53, depending on composition. Glass transition temperature interval was 63-77 degrees C. Values of surface free energy of the solid ranged from 49 to 54 mN/m, characteristic of IOL hydrogel materials. Bactericide properties of the quaternary ammonium salts methacrylates were higher than that of the benzothiazole derivative, showing inhibition halos as high as 23-25 mm in antibiogram tests against S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa , strains found in the ocular cavity and responsible for most postsurgical endolphthalmitis. Biocompatibility of the systems was evaluated in cell cultures using human fibroblasts. Cellular viability was higher than 90%, and close to 100% in many cases, for the extracts of selected formulations collected at different periods of time.