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Sample records for regeneratively cooled thrust

  1. A Regeneratively Cooled Thrust Chamber For The Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kendall K.; Sparks, Dave; Woodcock, Gordon

    2000-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the development of a low-cost, regeneratively-cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine. The chamber was fabricated using hydraformed copper tubing to form the coolant jacket and wrapped with a fiber reinforced polymer composite Material to form a structural jacket. The thrust chamber design and fabrication approach was based upon Space America. Inc.'s 12,000 lb regeneratively-cooled LOX/kerosene rocket engine. Fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers by tubewall construction dates back to the early US ballistic missile programs. The most significant innovations in this design was the development of a low-cost process for fabrication from copper tubing (nickel alloy was the usual practice) and use of graphite composite overwrap as the pressure containment, which yields an easily fabricated, lightweight pressure jacket around the copper tubes A regeneratively-cooled reusable thrust chamber can benefit the Fastrac engine program by allowing more efficient (cost and scheduler testing). A proof-of-concept test article has been fabricated and will he tested at Marshall Space Flight Center in the late Summer or Fall of 2000.

  2. Investigation of electroforming techniques. [fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Copper and nickel electroforming was examined for the purpose of establishing the necessary processes and procedures for repeatable, successful fabrication of the outer structures of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The selection of electrolytes for copper and nickel deposition is described. The development studies performed to refine and complete the processes necessary for successful chamber shell fabrication and the testing employed to verify the applicability of the processes and procedures to small scale hardware are described. Specifications were developed to afford a guideline for the electroforming of high quality outer shells on regeneratively cooled thrust chamber liners. Test results indicated repeatable mechanical properties could be produced in copper deposits from the copper sulfate electrolyte with periodic current reversal and in nickel deposits from the sulfamate solution. Use of inert, removable channel fillers and the conductivizing of such is described. Techniques (verified by test) which produce high integrity bonds to copper and copper alloy liners are discussed.

  3. A graphite-lined regeneratively cooled thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    Design concepts, based on use of graphite as a thermal barrier for regeneratively cooled FLOX-methane thrust chambers, have been screened and concepts selected for detailed thermodynamic, stress, and fabrication analyses. A single design employing AGCarb-101, a fibrous graphite composite material, for a thermal barrier liner and an electroformed nickel structure with integral coolant passages was selected for fabrication and testing. The fabrication processes and the test results are described and illustrated.

  4. Performance of a transpiration-regenerative cooled rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valler, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis, design, fabrication, and testing of a liquid rocket engine thrust chamber which is gas transpiration cooled in the high heat flux convergent portion of the chamber and water jacket cooled (simulated regenerative) in the barrel and divergent sections of the chamber are described. The engine burns LOX-hydrogen propellants at a chamber pressure of 600 psia. Various transpiration coolant flow rates were tested with resultant local hot gas wall temperatures in the 800 F to 1400 F range. The feasibility of transpiration cooling with hydrogen and helium, and the use of photo-etched copper platelets for heat transfer and coolant metering was successfully demonstrated.

  5. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers, task 1. [evaluation of filler materials for regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Schmid, T. E.; Hecht, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Filler materials proposed for use in the sputter fabrication regeneratively cooled thrust chambers were evaluated. Low melting castable alloys, CERROBEND. CERROCAST, and CERROTRU, slurry applied SERMETEL 481 and flame-sprayed aluminum were investigated as filler materials. Sputter deposition from a cylindrical cathode inverted magnestron was used to apply an OFHC copper closeout layer to filled OFHC copper ribbed-wall cylindrical substrates. The sputtered closeout layer structure was evaluated with respect to filler material contamination, predeposition machining and finishing operations, and deposition parameters. The application of aluminum by flame-spraying resulted in excessiver filler porosity. Though the outgassing from this porosity was found to be detrimental to the closeout layer structure, bond strengths in excess of 10,500 psi were achieved. Removal of the aluminum from the grooves was readily accomplished by leaching in a 7.0 molar solution of sodium hydroxide at 353 K. Of the other filler materials evaluated, CERROTRU was found to be the most suitable material with respect to completely filling the ribbed-wall cylinders and vacuum system compatibility. However, bond contamination resulted in low closeout layer bond strength with the CERROTRU filler. CERROBEND, CERROCAST, and SERMETEL 481 were found to be unacceptable as filler materials.

  6. Development of sputtering process to deposit stoichiometric zirconia coatings for the inside wall of regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings of yttria stabilized zirconia and zirconia-ceria mixtures were deposited by RF reactive sputtering. Coatings were 1-2 mils thick, and were deposited on copper cylinders intended to simulate the inner wall of a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber. Coating stoichiometry and adherence were investigated as functions of deposition parameters. Modest deposition rates (approximately 0.15 mil/hr) and subambient sustrate temperatures (-80 C) resulted in nearly stoichiometric coatings which remained adherent through thermal cycles between -196 and 400 C. Coatings deposited at higher rates or substrates temperatures exhibited greater oxygen deficiences, while coatings deposited at lower temperatures were not adherent. Substrate bias resulted in structural changes in the coating and high krypton contents; no clear effect on stoichiometry was observed.

  7. Regeneratively Cooled Porous Media Jacket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); London, Adam Pollok (Inventor); Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The fluid and heat transfer theory for regenerative cooling of a rocket combustion chamber with a porous media coolant jacket is presented. This model is used to design a regeneratively cooled rocket or other high temperature engine cooling jacket. Cooling jackets comprising impermeable inner and outer walls, and porous media channels are disclosed. Also disclosed are porous media coolant jackets with additional structures designed to transfer heat directly from the inner wall to the outer wall, and structures designed to direct movement of the coolant fluid from the inner wall to the outer wall. Methods of making such jackets are also disclosed.

  8. Propellant feed system of a regeneratively cooled scramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, Takeshi; Masuya, Goro; Wakamatsu, Yoshio )

    1991-04-01

    An expander cycle for an airframe-integrated hydrogen-fueled scramjet is analyzed to study regenerative cooling characteristics and overall specific impulse. Below Mach 10, the specific impulse and thrust coincide with the reference values. At Mach numbers above 10, a reduction of the specific impulse occurs due to the coolant flow rate requirement, which is accompanied by an increase of thrust. It is shown that the thrust may be increased by injecting excess fuel into the combustor to compensate for the decrease of the specific impulse. 9 refs.

  9. Regeneratively cooled rocket engine for space storable propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis, design, fabrication, and test efforts were performed for the existing OF2/B2H6 regeneratively cooled lK (4448 N) thrust chamber to illustrate simultaneous B2H6 fuel and OF2 oxidizer cooling and to provide results for a gaseous propellant condition injected into the combustion chamber. Data derived from performance, thermal and flow measurements confirmed predictions derived from previous test work and from concurrent analytical study. Development data derived from the experimental study were indicated to be sufficient to develop a preflight thrust chamber demonstrator prototype for future space mission objectives.

  10. Cooling of rocket thrust chambers with liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Schlumberger, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Rocket engines using high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP-1) as the propellants have been considered for future launch vehicle propulsion. Generaly, in regeneratively cooled engines, thefuel is used to cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability at high temperatures and pressures. Therefore, LOX is being considered as an alternative coolant. However, there has been concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot-gas side wall. To address this concern, an investigation was previously conducted with simulated fatigue cracks upstream of the thrust chamber throat. When these chambers were tested, an unexpected melting in the throat region developed which was not in line with the simulated fatigue cracks. The current experimental program was conducted in order to determine the cause for the failure in the earlier thrust chambers and to further investigate the effects of cracks in the thrust chamber liner upstream of the throat. The thrust chambers were tested at oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratios from 1.5 to 2.86 at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa. As a result of the test series, the reason for the failure occurring in the earlier work was determined to be injector anomalies. The LOX leaking through the simulated fatigue cracks did not affect the integrity of the chambers.

  11. Cooling of rocket thrust chambers with liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Schlumberger, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Rocket engines using high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP-1) as the propellants have been considered for future launch vehicle propulsion. Generally, in regeneratively cooled engines, the fuel is used to cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability at high temperatures and pressures. Therefore, LOX is being considered as an alternative coolant. However, there has been concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot-gas side wall. To address this concern, an investigation was previously conducted with simulated fatigue cracks upstream of the thrust chamber throat. When these chambers were tested, an unexpected melting in the throat region developed which was not in line with the simulated fatigue cracks. The current experimental program was conducted in order to determine the cause for the failure in the earlier thrust chambers and to further investigate the effects of cracks in the thrust chamber liner upstream of the throat. The thrust chambers were tested at oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratios from 1.5 to 2.86 at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa. As a result of the test series, the reason for the failure occurring in the earlier work was determined to be injector anomalies. The LOX leaking through the simulated fatigue cracks did not affect the integrity of the chambers.

  12. Transpiration And Regenerative Cooling Of Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    Transpiration cooling extends limits of performance. Addition of transpiration cooling to regeneratively-cooled rocket-engine combustion chamber proposed. Modification improves performance of engine by allowing use of higher chamber pressure. Throat section of combustion-chamber wall cooled by transpiration, while chamber and nozzle sections cooled by fluid flowing in closed channels. Concept applicable to advanced, high-performance terrestrial engines or some kinds of industrial combustion chambers. With proper design, cooling scheme makes possible to achieve higher chamber pressure and higher overall performance in smaller engine.

  13. Regeneratively cooled rocket engine for space storable propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.; Waldman, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses and experimental studies were performed with the OF2 (F2/O2)/B2H6 propellant combination over a range in operating conditions to determine suitability for a space storable pressure fed engine configuration for an extended flight space vehicle configuration. The regenerative cooling mode selected for the thrust chamber was explored in detail with the use of both the fuel and oxidizer as coolants in an advanced milled channel construction thrust chamber design operating at 100 psia chamber pressure and a nominal mixture ratio of 3.0 with a 60:1 area ratio nozzle. Benefits of the simultaneous cooling as related to gaseous injection of both fuel and oxidizer propellants were defined. Heat transfer rates, performance and combustor stability were developed for impinging element triplet injectors in uncooled copper calorimeter hardware with flow, pressure and temperature instrumentation. Evaluation of the capabilities of the B2H6 and OF2 during analytical studies and numerous tests with flow through electrically heated blocks provided design criteria for subsequent regenerative chamber design and fabrication.

  14. Analysis of Regen Cooling in Rocket Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Merkle, C. L.; Li, D.; Sankaran, V.

    2004-01-01

    The use of detailed CFD modeling for the description of cooling in rocket chambers is discussed. The overall analysis includes a complete three-dimensional analysis of the flow in the regenerative cooling passages, conjugate heat transfer in the combustor walls, and the effects of film cooling on the inside chamber. The results in the present paper omit the effects of film cooling and include only regen cooling and the companion conjugate heat transfer. The hot combustion gases are replaced by a constant temperature wall boundary condition. Load balancing for parallel cluster computations is ensured by using single-block unstructured grids for both fluids and solids, and by using a 'multiple physical zones' to account for differences in the number of equations. Validation of the method is achieved by comparing simple two-dimensional solutions with analytical results. Representative results for cooling passages are presents showing the effects of heat conduction in the copper walls with tube aspect ratios of 1.5:l.

  15. Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Oxygen/Methane Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Joel W.; Greene, Christopher B.; Stout, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) has identified Liquid Oxygen (LOX)/Liquid Methane (LCH4) as a potential propellant combination for future space vehicles based upon exploration studies. The technology is estimated to have higher performance and lower overall systems mass compared to existing hypergolic propulsion systems. NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in concert with industry partner Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) utilized a Space Act Agreement to test an oxygen/methane engine system in the Summer of 2010. PWR provided a 5,500 lbf (24,465 N) LOX/LCH4 regenerative cycle engine to demonstrate advanced thrust chamber assembly hardware and to evaluate the performance characteristics of the system. The chamber designs offered alternatives to traditional regenerative engine designs with improvements in cost and/or performance. MSFC provided the test stand, consumables and test personnel. The hot fire testing explored the effective cooling of one of the thrust chamber designs along with determining the combustion efficiency with variations of pressure and mixture ratio. The paper will summarize the status of these efforts.

  16. Comprehensive Design Method for LOX/Liquid-Methane Regenerative Cooling Combustor with Coaxial Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuyanagi, Nobuyuki

    A comprehensive design method for a LOX/Liquid-Methane (L-CH4) rocket engine combustor with a coaxial injector and the preliminary design of the regenerative cooling combustor with 100-kN thrust in vacuum at a combustion pressure of a 3.43 MPa are presented. Reasonable dimensions for the combustor that satisfy the targeted C* efficiency of more than 98% and combustion stability are obtained.

  17. Influence of curvature in regenerative cooling system of rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Y.; Stefanini, L.; Suslov, D.

    2009-09-01

    Thermomechanical loads in rocket engines can be drastically reduced by a reliable cooling system. The regenerative cooling system uses propellants as coolant which flows through milled cooling channels in the chamber walls. Due to centrifugal forces, dynamic secondary motions appear in cooling-channel curvatures, which strongly modify heat transfer. Three-dimensional (3D) numerical calculations have been performed in order to compare this heat flux modification with empirical correlations. Different turbulence models and wall treatments have been tested to develop a complete numerical data base about asymmetrical (concave side) heat transfer in curved cooling channels of rocket engine.

  18. Advanced regenerative-cooling techniques for future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.; Shoji, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A review of regenerative-cooling techniques applicable to advanced planned engine designs for space booster and orbit transportation systems has developed the status of the key elements of this cooling mode. This work is presented in terms of gas side, coolant side, wall conduction heat transfer, and chamber life fatigue margin considerations. Described are preliminary heat transfer and trade analyses performed using developed techniques combining channel wall construction with advanced, high-strength, high-thermal-conductivity materials (NARloy-Z or Zr-Cu alloys) in high heat flux regions, combined with lightweight steel tubular nozzle wall construction. Advanced cooling techniques such as oxygen cooling and dual-mode hydrocarbon/hydrogen fuel operation and their limitations are indicated for the regenerative cooling approach.

  19. Development of preliminary design program for combustor of regenerative cooled liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Won Kook; Seol, Woo Seok; Son, Min; Seo, Min Kyo; Koo, Jaye

    2011-10-01

    An integrated program was established to design a combustor for a liquid rocket engine and to analyze regenerative cooling results on a preliminary design level. Properties of burnt gas from a kerosene-LOx mixture in the combustor and rocket performance were calculated from CEA which is the code for the calculation of chemical equilibrium. The heat transfer of regenerative cooling was analyzed by using SUPERTRAPP code for coolant properties and by one-dimensional correlations of the heat transfer coefficient from the combustor liner to the coolant. Profiles of the combustors of F-1 and RS-27A engines were designed from similar input data and the present results were compared to actual data for validation. Finally, the combustors of 30 tonf class, 75 tonf class and 150 tonf class were designed from the required thrust, combustion chamber, exit pressure and mixture ratio of propellants. The wall temperature, heat flux and pressure drop were calculated for heat transfer analysis of regenerative cooling using the profiles.

  20. A hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine coolant passage design program (RECOP) for fluid-cooled thrust chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of coolant passages in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers is critical to the operation and safety of a rocket engine system. Designing a coolant passage is a complex thermal and hydraulic problem requiring an accurate understanding of the heat transfer between the combustion gas and the coolant. Every major rocket engine company has invested in the development of thrust chamber computer design and analysis tools; two examples are Rocketdyne's REGEN code and Aerojet's ELES program. In an effort to augment current design capabilities for government and industry, the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing a computer model to design coolant passages for advanced regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The RECOP code incorporates state-of-the-art correlations, numerical techniques and design methods, certainly minimum requirements for generating optimum designs of future space chemical engines. A preliminary version of the RECOP model was recently completed and code validation work is in progress. This paper introduces major features of RECOP and compares the analysis to design points for the first test case engine; the Pratt & Whitney RL10A-3-3A thrust chamber.

  1. Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Oxygen/Methane Technology Development Between NASA MSFC and PWR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Joel W.; Greene, Christopher B.; Stout, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) has identified Liquid Oxygen (LOX)/Liquid Methane (LCH4) as a potential propellant combination for future space vehicles based upon exploration studies. The technology is estimated to have higher performance and lower overall systems mass compared to existing hypergolic propulsion systems. NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in concert with industry partner Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) utilized a Space Act Agreement to test an oxygen/methane engine system in the Summer of 2010. PWR provided a 5,500 lbf (24,465 N) LOX/LCH4 regenerative cycle engine to demonstrate advanced thrust chamber assembly hardware and to evaluate the performance characteristics of the system. The chamber designs offered alternatives to traditional regenerative engine designs with improvements in cost and/or performance. MSFC provided the test stand, consumables and test personnel. The hot fire testing explored the effective cooling of one of the thrust chamber designs along with determining the combustion efficiency with variations of pressure and mixture ratio. The paper will summarize the status of these efforts.

  2. Regeneratively cooled transition duct with transversely buffered impingement nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Jay A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Crawford, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    A cooling arrangement (56) having: a duct (30) configured to receive hot gases (16) from a combustor; and a flow sleeve (50) surrounding the duct and defining a cooling plenum (52) there between, wherein the flow sleeve is configured to form impingement cooling jets (70) emanating from dimples (82) in the flow sleeve effective to predominately cool the duct in an impingement cooling zone (60), and wherein the flow sleeve defines a convection cooling zone (64) effective to cool the duct solely via a cross-flow (76), the cross-flow comprising cooling fluid (72) exhausting from the impingement cooling zone. In the impingement cooling zone an undimpled portion (84) of the flow sleeve tapers away from the duct as the undimpled portion nears the convection cooling zone. The flow sleeve is configured to effect a greater velocity of the cross-flow in the convection cooling zone than in the impingement cooling zone.

  3. Experimental and simulation study of a Gaseous oxygen/Gaseous hydrogen vortex cooling thrust chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nanjia; Zhao, Bo; Li, Gongnan; Wang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, RNG k-ε turbulence model and PDF non-premixed combustion model are used to simulate the influence of the diameter of the ring of hydrogen injectors and oxidizer-to-fuel ratio on the specific impulse of the vortex cooling thrust chamber. The simulation results and the experimental tests of a 2000 N Gaseous oxygen/Gaseous hydrogen vortex cooling thrust chamber reveal that the efficiency of the specific impulse improves significantly with increasing of the diameter of the ring of hydrogen injectors. Moreover, the optimum efficiency of the specific impulse is obtained when the oxidizer-to-fuel ratio is near the stoichiometric ratio.

  4. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1986-01-01

    In previous tests of liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastropic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed here.

  5. Transient three-dimensional startup side load analysis of a regeneratively cooled nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop a computational methodology to capture the side load physics and to anchor the computed aerodynamic side loads with the available data by simulating the startup transient of a regeneratively cooled, high-aspect-ratio nozzle, hot-fired at sea level. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, reacting flow computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer formulation, and a transient inlet history based on an engine system simulation. Emphases were put on the effects of regenerative cooling on shock formation inside the nozzle, and ramp rate on side load reduction. The results show that three types of asymmetric shock physics incur strong side loads: the generation of combustion wave, shock transitions, and shock pulsations across the nozzle lip, albeit the combustion wave can be avoided with sparklers during hot-firing. Results from both regenerative cooled and adiabatic wall boundary conditions capture the early shock transitions with corresponding side loads matching the measured secondary side load. It is theorized that the first transition from free-shock separation to restricted-shock separation is caused by the Coanda effect. After which the regeneratively cooled wall enhances the Coanda effect such that the supersonic jet stays attached, while the hot adiabatic wall fights off the Coanda effect, and the supersonic jet becomes detached most of the time. As a result, the computed peak side load and dominant frequency due to shock pulsation across the nozzle lip associated with the regeneratively cooled wall boundary condition match those of the test, while those associated with the adiabatic wall boundary condition are much too low. Moreover, shorter ramp time results show that higher ramp rate has the potential in reducing the nozzle side loads.

  6. Nondestructive test of regenerative chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Stauffis, R.; Wood, R.

    1972-01-01

    Flat panels simulating internally cooled regenerative thrust chamber walls were fabricated by electroforming, brazing and diffusion bonding to evaluate the feasibility of nondestructive evaluation techniques to detect bonds of various strength integrities. Ultrasonics, holography, and acoustic emission were investigated and found to yield useful and informative data regarding the presence of bond defects in these structures.

  7. Thermal Stability of RP-2 for Hydrocarbon Boost Regenerative Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Deans, Matthew C.; Stiegemeier, Benjamin R.; Psaras, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests were performed in the NASA Glenn Research Centers Heated Tube Facility to study the heat transfer and thermal stability behavior of RP-2 under conditions similar to those found in rocket engine cooling channels. It has long been known that hydrocarbon fuels, such as RP-2, can decompose at high temperature to form deposits (coke) which can adversely impact rocket engine cooling channel performance. The heated tube facility provides a simple means to study these effects. Using resistively heated copper tubes in a vacuum chamber, flowing RP-2 was heated to explore thermal effects at a range of test conditions. Wall temperature (850-1050F) and bulk fluid temperature (300-500F) were varied to define thermal decomposition and stability at each condition. Flow velocity and pressure were fixed at 75 fts and 1000 psia, respectively. Additionally, five different batches of RP-2 were tested at identical conditions to examine any thermal stability differences resulting from batch to batch compositional variation. Among these tests was one with a potential coke reducing additive known as 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroquinoline (THQ). While copper tubes were used for the majority of tests, two exploratory tests were performed with a copper alloy known as GRCop-42. Each tube was instrumented with 15 thermocouples to examine the temperature profile, and carbon deposition at each thermocouple location was determined post-test in an oxidation furnace. In many tests, intermittent local temperature increases were observed visually and in the thermocouple data. These hot spots did not appear to correspond with a higher carbon deposition.

  8. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program has been planned at the NASA Lewis Research Center to build confidence in the feasibility of liquid oxygen cooling for hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines. Although liquid oxygen cooling has previously been incorporated in test hardware, more runtime is necessary to gain confidence in this concept. In the previous tests, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot-gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastrophic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed in this report. Four thrust chambers, three with cracks and one without, should be tested. The axial location of the cracks should be varied parametrically. Each chamber should be instrumented to determine the effects of the cracks, as well as the overall performance and durability of the chambers.

  9. Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal

    DOEpatents

    Beaufrere, A.H.

    1982-04-30

    A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

  10. Timing and conditions of peak metamorphism and cooling across the Zimithang Thrust, Arunachal Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Clare J.; Singh, Athokpam K.; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Regis, Daniele; Halton, Alison M.; Singh, Rajkumar B.

    2014-07-01

    The Zimithang Thrust juxtaposes two lithotectonic units of the Greater Himalayan Sequence in Arunachal Pradesh, NE India. Monazite U-Pb, muscovite 40Ar/39Ar and thermobarometric data from rocks in the hanging and footwall constrain the timing and conditions of their juxtaposition across the structure, and their subsequent cooling. Monazite grains in biotite-sillimanite gneiss in the hanging wall yield LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages of 16 ± 0.2 to 12.7 ± 0.4 Ma. A schistose gneiss within the high strain zone yields overlapping-to-younger monazite ages of 14.9 ± 0.3 to 11.5 ± 0.3 Ma. Garnet-staurolite-mica schists in the immediate footwall yield older monazite ages of 27.3 ± 0.6 to 17.1 ± 0.2 Ma. Temperature estimates from Ti-in-biotite and garnet-biotite thermometry suggest similar peak temperatures were achieved in the hanging and footwalls (~ 525-650 °C). Elevated temperatures of ~ 700 °C appear to have been reached in the high strain zone itself and in the footwall further from the thrust. Single grain fusion 40Ar/39Ar muscovite data from samples either side of the thrust yield ages of ~ 7 Ma, suggesting that movement along the thrust juxtaposed the two units by the time the closure temperature of Ar diffusion in muscovite had been reached. These data confirm previous suggestions that major orogen-parallel out-of-sequence structures disrupt the Greater Himalayan Sequence at different times during Himalayan evolution, and highlight an eastwards-younging trend in 40Ar/39Ar muscovite cooling ages at equivalent structural levels along Himalayan strike.

  11. Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal

    DOEpatents

    Beaufrere, Albert H.

    1983-10-04

    A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

  12. Establishment of Design Method for Liquid Hydrogen Regenerative Cooling Combustor of LOX/Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuyanagi, Nobuyuki

    An optimum method for design of a liquid hydrogen regenerative cooling combustor for the LOX/hydrogen engine was constructed using the author’s previous empirical correlation of C* efficiency and calculation model for combustion characteristics, and the present calculation model for the heat load characteristics for LOX/hydrogen combustion. Using this method, the atomization characteristics of the injected LOX jet, the combustion performance including combustion stability, and the heat load on the combustor were evaluated for LOX/hydrogen upper-stage engines such as the LE-5, RL-10 and HM-7. This method was then applied to the LE-5B engine, which is the derivative engine of the LE-5 and has been used as the second stage of the H-2A launcher, to improve combustion stability and to optimize configuration of the injector and combustor. A reduction of about 30% in chamber length of it with sufficient combustion performance was achieved by such optimization.

  13. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  14. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  15. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  16. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study evaluating thrust chamber cooling engine cycles and preliminary engine design for low thrust chemical rocket engines for orbit transfer vehicles is described. Oxygen/hydrogen, oxygen/methane, and oxygen/RP-1 engines with thrust levels from 444.8 N to 13345 N, and chamber pressures from 13.8 N/sq cm to 689.5 N/sq cm were evaluated. The physical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant theoretical performance data, and transport properties are documented. The thrust chamber cooling limits for regenerative/radiation and film/radiation cooling are defined and parametric heat transfer data presented. A conceptual evaluation of a number of engine cycles was performed and a 2224.1 N oxygen/hydrogen engine cycle configuration and a 2224.1 N oxygen/methane configuration chosen for preliminary engine design. Updated parametric engine data, engine design drawings, and an assessment of technology required are presented.

  17. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Reusable thrust chamber and injector concepts were evaluated for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine (OME). Parametric engine calculations were carried out by computer program for N2O4/amine, LOX/amine and LOX/hydrocarbon propellant combinations for engines incorporating regenerative cooled and insulated columbium thrust chambers. The calculation methods are described including the fuel vortex film cooling method of combustion gas temperature control, and performance prediction. A method of acceptance of a regeneratively cooled heat rejection reduction using a silicone oil additive was also demonstrated by heated tube heat transfer testing. Regeneratively cooled thrust chamber operation was also demonstrated where the injector was characterized for the OME application with a channel wall regenerative thrust chamber. Bomb stability testing of the demonstration chambers/injectors demonstrated recovery for the nominal design of acoustic cavities. Cavity geometry changes were also evaluated to assess their damping margin. Performance and combustion stability was demonstrated of the originally developed 10 inch diameter combustion pattern operating in an 8 inch diameter thrust chamber.

  18. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric data and preliminary designs on liquid rocket engines for low thrust cargo orbit-transfer-vehicles are described and those items where technology is required to enhance the designs are identified. The results of film cooling studies to establish the upper chamber pressure limit are given. The study showed that regen cooling with RP-1 was not feasible over the entire thrust and chamber pressure ranges. The thermal data showed that the RP-1 bulk temperature exceeded the study coking temperature limit of 1010 R. Based upon the results presented, O2/H2 and O2/CH4 regen engine systems and O2/H2 film cooled engines were selected for further study in the system analysis. Six engine design concepts are examined.

  19. Basement control on thermochronometer cooling ages: an example from the Andean fold-thrust belt in Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuarrie, N.; Ehlers, T. A.; Rak, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the style, geometry and kinematics of basement deformation where it is not exposed is an ongoing challenge in orogenic belts. Basement deformation must be inferred based on the resulting surface observables. Geologic map patterns, thermochronometer cooling signals, and synorogenic sediment distribution in the northern Bolivian Andes strongly argue for displacement on large-scale basement thrust sheets. To show the relationship between basement deformation and surface observables such as mapped geology and thermochronometer cooling ages, we link a forward modeled balanced cross section to a 2-D thermokinematic model to compare predicted to measured cooling ages. Applying isostasy and erosion to sequentially deformed balanced cross sections links the growth of hinterland structures to the developing foreland basins and highlights subsurface controls on surface geology. The cross section kinematics become velocity vectors by assigning ages to displacement amounts. A range of potential velocity vectors is then used to calculate heat transport, erosion, and rock cooling. Predicted cooling ages highlight that large basement ramps impart a significant and tractable cooling signal. This signal is the most visible in the across strike pattern of cooling ages for each system (zircon fission track, apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/ He). The pronounced, predicted cooling age pattern generated by large basement thrust sheets match measured ages across the northern Bolivian Andes strongly suggesting basement deformation similar to that show in balanced cross sections.

  20. Liquid oxygen cooling of high pressure LOX/hydrocarbon rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. G.; Masters, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program using liquid oxygen (LOX) and RP-1 as the propellants and supercritical LOX as the coolant was conducted at 4.14, 8.27, and 13.79 MN/sq m (600, 1200, and 2000 psia) chamber pressure. The objectives of this program were to evaluate the cooling characteristics of LOX with the LOX/RP-1 propellants, the buildup of the soot on the hot-gas-side chamber wall, and the effect of an internal LOX leak on the structural integrity of the combustor. Five thrust chambers with throat diameters of 6.6 cm (2.5 in.) were tested successfully. The first three were tested at 4.14 MN/sq m (600 psia) chamber pressure over a mixture ratio range of 2.25 to 2.92. One of these three was tested for over 22 cyclic tests after the first through crack from the coolant channel to the combustion zone was observed with no apparent metal burning or distress. The fourth chamber was tested at 8.27 MN/sq m (1200 psia) chamber pressure over a mixture range of 1.93 to 2.98. The fourth and fifth chambers were tested at 13.79 MN/sq m (2000 psia) chamber pressure over a mixture ratio range of 1.79 to 2.68.

  1. Low-thrust Isp sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of the cooling requirements and attainable specific impulse performance of engines in the 445 to 4448N thrust class utilizing LOX/RP-1, LOX/Hydrogen and LOX/Methane propellants is presented. The unique design requirements for the regenerative cooling of low-thrust engines operating at high pressures (up to 6894 kPa) were explored analytically by comparing single cooling with the fuel and the oxidizer, and dual cooling with both the fuel and the oxidizer. The effects of coolant channel geometry, chamber length, and contraction ratio on the ability to provide proper cooling were evaluated, as was the resulting specific impulse. The results show that larger contraction ratios and smaller channels are highly desirable for certain propellant combinations.

  2. Task 12 data dump (phase 2) OME integrated thrust chamber test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.; Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics and performance of the orbit maneuvering engine for the space shuttle are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the regeneratively cooled thrust chamber of the engine. Tests were conducted to determine engine operating parameters during the start, shutdown, and restart. Characteristics of the integrated thrust chamber and the performance and thermal conditions for blowdown operation without supplementary boundary layer cooling were investigated. The results of the test program are presented.

  3. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Engine data and information are presented to perform system studies on cargo orbit-transfer vehicles which would deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit. Low-thrust engine performance, weight, and envelope parametric data were established, preliminary design information was generated, and technologies for liquid rocket engines were identified. Two major engine design drivers were considered in the study: cooling and engine cycle options. Both film-cooled and regeneratively cooled engines were evaluated. The propellant combinations studied were hydrogen/oxygen, methane/oxygen, and kerosene/oxygen.

  4. Reliability assessment of thrust chamber cooling concepts using probabilistic analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1993-01-01

    The reliability of OFHC (Oxygen Free High Conductivity) copper and NARloy-Z thrust chambers is assessed by applying probabilistic structural analysis techniques to incorporate design parameter variability and uncertainty. Thrust chambers specifically evaluated are the cylindrical test fixtures employed in a plug-nozzle configuration at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Direct sampling Monte Carlo simulations based on a simplified life prediction methodology established probability densities of firing cycles to structural failure. Simulated cyclic lives demonstrated modest agreement to experiment. Similarly, regions of high structural failure probability were determined using a limit state approach employing calculated cumulative distribution functions for effective stress response and an assumed material strength distribution. A probability of failure of 0.012 was calculated at the center of the coolant channel hot-gas-side wall for an OFHC milled channel. Structural response was found to be sensitive to the uncertainties in the thrust chamber thermal environment and the material's thermal expansion coefficient.

  5. Fabrication of liquid-rocket thrust chambers by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Electroforming has proven to be an excellent fabrication method for building liquid rocket regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. NASA sponsored technology programs have investigated both common and advanced methods. Using common procedures, several cooled spool pieces and thrust chambers have been made and successfully tested. The designs were made possible through the versatility of the electroforming procedure, which is not limited to simple geometric shapes. An advanced method of electroforming was used to produce a wire-wrapped, composite, pressure-loaded electroformed structure, which greatly increased the strength of the structure while still retaining the advantages of electroforming.

  6. LEO-to-GEO low thrust chemical propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    One approach being considered for transporting large space structures from low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO) is the use of low thrust chemical propulsion systems. A variety of chemical rocket engine cycles evaluated for this application for oxygen/hydrogen and oxygen/hydrocarbon propellants (oxygen/methane and oxygen/RF-1) are discussed. These cycles include conventional propellant turbine drives, turboalternator/electric motor pump drive, and fuel cell/electric motor pump drive as well as pressure fed engines. Thrust chamber cooling analysis results are presented for regenerative/radiation and film/radiation cooling.

  7. Determination of thermal load in film cooled bipropellant thrust chambers by an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckel, J. N.; Savonov, R. I.; Patire, H.

    2013-03-01

    A method to obtain the heat load on the internal wall of a rocket thrust chamber using an inverse problem approach is described. According to the "classical" approach, the heat load on the internal wall of the chamber is assumed as the product of a heat transfer coefficient and the temperature difference of adiabatic wall temperature and local wall surface temperature. The time-dependent temperature distribution of the external wall of the thruster chamber is used to obtain empirical curve fittings to the temperature profile of the near wall flow field (adiabatic wall temperature) and the heat transfer coefficient profile. The applicability of the method is verified by applying it to three different problems; a model problem, an analytical solution, and a set of experimental data.

  8. A proposed regenerative thermosyphon blade cooling system for high efficiency gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Masri, M. A.

    A novel scheme for cooling high-efficiency gas turbine engines is proposed, briefly analyzed, and evaluated. The scheme consists of a self-pumping thermosiphon loop for the rotors and a closed forced-convection loop for the stators. With a suitable coolant, such as liquid metal, the rotating thermosiphon loop is self-pumping. The circulation rates can be large enough that the loop acts as a heat pipe of large conductance between the turbine and the compressor. The flow stability and distribution in the multiple parallel rotating loops are examined, and stable configurations are identified. A simple thermodynamic model for cycle cooling losses is developed and used to evaluate the potential efficiency advantage of using this scheme compared to current air-cooling technology. A gain of five to eight percent is found possible.

  9. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Tobin, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    Analyses and preliminary designs of candidate OME propellant combinations and corresponding engine designs were conducted and evaluated in terms of performance, operating limits, program cost, risk, inherent life and maintainability. For the Rocketdyne recommended and NASA approved propellant combination and cooling concept (NTO/MMH regeneratively cooled engine), a demonstration thrust chamber was designed, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated to define operating characteristics and limits. Alternate fuel (50-50) operating characteristics were also investigated with the demonstration chamber. Adverse operating effects on regenerative cooled operation were evaluated using subscale electrically heated tubes and channels. An investigation of like doublet element characteristics using subscale tests was performed. Full scale 8- and 10-inch diameter like-doublet injectors for the OME were designed, fabricated, and tested. Injector stability was evaluated analytically and experimentally.

  10. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine, reusable thrust chamber program. Task 6: Data dump hot fuel element investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurick, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of reusable thrust chambers for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine was conducted. Tests were conducted using subscale injector hot-fire procedures for the injector configurations designed for a regenerative cooled engine. The effect of operating conditions and fuel temperature on combustion chamber performance was determined. Specific objectives of the evaluation were to examine the optimum like-doublet element geometry for operation at conditions consistent with a fuel regeneratively cooled engine (hot fuel, 200 to 250 F) and the sensitivity of the triplet injector element to hot fuels.

  11. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  12. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  13. Nondestructive tests of regenerative chambers. [evaluating nondestructive methods of determining metal bond integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Vecchies, L.; Wood, R.

    1974-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of nondestructive evaluation methods were studied to detect and locate bond deficiencies in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers for rocket engines. Flat test panels and a cylinder were produced to simulate regeneratively cooled thrust chamber walls. Planned defects with various bond integrities were produced in the panels to evaluate the sensitivity, accuracy, and limitations of nondestructive methods to define and locate bond anomalies. Holography, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic scan were found to yield sufficient data to discern bond quality when used in combination and in selected sequences. Bonding techniques included electroforming and brazing. Materials of construction included electroformed nickel bonded to Nickel 200 and OFHC copper, electroformed copper bonded to OFHC copper, and 300 series stainless steel brazed to OFHC copper. Variations in outer wall strength, wall thickness, and defect size were evaluated for nondestructive test response.

  14. Graphical method for predicting life of a rocket thrust chamber with half-hard zirconium-copper liner and electroformed nickel closeout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    A method for estimating the life of a regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chamber was developed and is based on the hot-gas wall temperature and the temperature difference between the hot-gas wall and the outside surface of the closeout. This method permits a quick estimate of the life of a thrust chamber when design changes or test-cycle variations are considered. Strain range and life are presented graphically as functions of these temperature parameters for a typical high-performance rocket thrust chamber with a half-hard zirconium-copper liner and an electroformed nickel closeout.

  15. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Schmid, T. E.; Torrey, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and materials were developed and evaluated for the fabrication and coating of advanced, long life, regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. Materials were analyzed as fillers for sputter application of OFHC copper as a closeout layer to channeled inner structures; of the materials evaluated, aluminum was found to provide the highest bond strength and to be the most desirable for chamber fabrication. The structures and properties were investigated of thick sputtered OFHC copper, 0.15 Zr-Cu, Al2O3,-Cu, and SiC-Cu. Layered structures of OFHC copper and 0.15 Zr-Cu were investigated as means of improving chamber inner wall fatigue life. The evaluation of sputtered Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, NASA IIb-11, aluminum and Al2O3-Al alloys as high strength chamber outer jackets was performed. Techniques for refurbishing degraded thrust chambers with OFHC copper and coating thrust chambers with protective ZrO2 and graded ZrO2-copper thermal barrier coatings were developed.

  16. Influence of thrust belt geometry and shortening rate on thermochronometer cooling ages: Insights from thermokinematic and erosion modeling of the Bhutan Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuarrie, Nadine; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in thermochronology and numerical modeling offer the potential to associate the age of thermochronometric samples to both exhumational and deformational processes. However, understanding how these components are related in compressional systems requires linking the geometry and magnitude of fault slip to the distribution and amount of erosion. To address this, we apply a 2-D thermokinematic model to a forward modeled balanced cross section to quantify the cooling history in fold-thrust belt settings. The restored cross section provides a kinematic path of rocks and structures necessary to reproduce the surface geology. By assigning ages to displacement amounts, we produced a range of potential velocity vectors used to calculate heat transport, erosion, and rock cooling. We test the predicted ages against a suite of previously published thermochronometric data from the Bhutan Himalaya to explore the utility of the data to constrain the timing, rate, and geometry of fault motion as well as variations in the exhumation rate. We evaluate the cooling history associated with a constant rate of shortening of 18 mm/yr, rates that are 2.0, 1.5, 0.75, and 0.5 times the constant rate, and rates that vary with time to determine which kinematic history best matches the measured cooling ages. The combination of relatively old apatite fission track and zircon (U-Th)/He measured ages and younger (15-9 Ma) 40Ar/39Ar ages from white mica is best matched with faster rates (relative to constant rates) between 11.5 and 8 Ma and slower than constant rates from 17 to 11.5 Ma and 8 Ma to present.

  17. Hydrogen film cooling of a small hydrogen-oxygen thrust chamber and its effect on erosion rates of various ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N.; Roberts, W. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine what arrangement of film-coolant-injection orifices should be used to decrease the erosion rates of small, high temperature, high pressure ablative thrust chambers without incurring a large penalty in combustion performance. All of the film cooling was supplied through holes in a ring between the outer row of injector elements and the chamber wall. The best arrangement, which had twice the number of holes as there were outer row injection elements, was also the simplest. The performance penalties, presented as a reduction in characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, were 0.8 and 2.8 percentage points for the 10 and 20 percent cooling flows, respectively, The best film-coolant injector was then used to obtain erosion rates for 19 ablative materials. The throat erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 2.5 with a 10 percent coolant flow. Only the more expensive silica phenolic materials had low enough erosion rates to be considered for use in the nozzle throat. However, some of the cheaper materials might qualify for use in other areas of small nozzles with large throat diameters where the higher erosion rates are more acceptable.

  18. Hydrogen film/conductive cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewen, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Small scale nozzle tests using heated nitrogen were run to obtain effectiveness and wall heat transfer data with hydrogen film cooling. Effectiveness data are compared with an entrainment model developed from planar, unaccelerated flow data. Results indicate significant effects due to flow turning and acceleration. With injection velocity effects accounted for explicitly, heat transfer correlation coefficients were found to be the same with and without film cooling when properties are evaluated at an appropriate reference temperature for the local gas composition defined by the coolant effectiveness. A design study for an O2/H2 application with 300 psia (207 N/sq cm) chamber pressure and 1500 lbs (6670 N) thrust indicates an adiabatic wall design requires 4 to 5 percent of the total flow as hydrogen film cooling. Internal regenerative cooling designs were found to offer no reduction in coolant requirements.

  19. Regenerative air heater

    DOEpatents

    Hasselquist, Paul B.; Baldner, Richard

    1982-01-01

    A gas-cooled steel skirt is used to support a refractory cored brick matrix and dome structure in a high temperature regenerative air heater useful in magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The steel skirt thermally expands to accommodate the thermal expansion of the dome structure despite substantial temperature differential thereby reducing relative movement between the dome bricks. Gas cooling of the steel skirt allows the structure to operate above its normal temperature during clean-out cycles and also allows for the control of the thermal expansion of the steel skirt.

  20. Regenerative air heater

    DOEpatents

    Hasselquist, P.B.; Baldner, R.

    1980-11-26

    A gas-cooled steel skirt is used to support a refractory cored brick matrix and dome structure in a high temperature regenerative air heater useful in magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The steel skirt thermally expands to accommodate the thermal expansion of the dome structure despite substantial temperature differential thereby reducing relative movement between the dome bricks. Gas cooling of the steel skirt allows the structure to operate above its normal temperature during clean-out cycles and also allows for the control of the thermal expansion of the steel skirt.

  1. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers. [coolant passage closing by triode sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Broch, J. W.; Allard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for closing out coolant passages in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers by triode sputtering, using post and hollow Cu-0.15 percent Zr cathodes are described. The effects of aluminum composite filler materials, substrate preparation, sputter cleaning, substrate bias current density and system geometry on closeout layer bond strength and structure are evaluated. High strength closeout layers were sputtered over aluminum fillers. The tensile strength and microstructure of continuously sputtered Cu-0.15 percent Zr deposits were determined. These continuous sputtered deposits were as thick as 0.75 cm. Tensile strengths were consistently twice as great as the strength of the material in wrought form.

  2. Structural analysis of cylindrical thrust chambers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    Life predictions of regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chambers are normally derived from classical material fatigue principles. The failures observed in experimental thrust chambers do not appear to be due entirely to material fatigue. The chamber coolant walls in the failed areas exhibit progressive bulging and thinning during cyclic firings until the wall stress finally exceeds the material rupture stress and failure occurs. A preliminary analysis of an oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper cylindrical thrust chamber demonstrated that the inclusion of cumulative cyclic plastic effects enables the observed coolant wall thinout to be predicted. The thinout curve constructed from the referent analysis of 10 firing cycles was extrapolated from the tenth cycle to the 200th cycle. The preliminary OFHC copper chamber 10-cycle analysis was extended so that the extrapolated thinout curve could be established by performing cyclic analysis of deformed configurations at 100 and 200 cycles. Thus the original range of extrapolation was reduced and the thinout curve was adjusted by using calculated thinout rates at 100 and 100 cycles. An analysis of the same underformed chamber model constructed of half-hard Amzirc to study the effect of material properties on the thinout curve is included.

  3. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  4. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  5. Regenerative Aerobraking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2005-02-01

    NASA's exploration goals for Mars and Beyond will require new power systems and in situ resource utilization technologies. Regenerative aerobraking may offer a revolutionary approach for in situ power generation and oxygen harvesting during these exploration missions. In theory, power and oxygen can be collected during aerobraking and stored for later use in orbit or on the planet. This technology would capture energy and oxygen from the plasma field that occurs naturally during hypersonic entry using well understood principles of magnetohydrodynamics and oxygen filtration. This innovative approach generates resources upon arrival at the operational site, and thus greatly differs from the traditional approach of taking everything you need with you from Earth. Fundamental analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and some testing of experimental hardware have established the basic feasibility of generating power during a Mars entry. Oxygen filtration at conditions consistent with spacecraft entry parameters at Mars has been studied to a lesser extent. Other uses of the MHD power are presented. This paper illustrates how some features of regenerative aerobraking may be applied to support human and robotic missions at Mars.

  6. Regenerative Aerobraking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals for Mars and Beyond will require new power systems and in situ resource utilization technologies. Regenerative aerobraking may offer a revolutionary approach for in situ power generation and oxygen harvesting during these exploration missions. In theory, power and oxygen can be collected during aerobraking and stored for later use in orbit or on the planet. This technology would capture energy and oxygen from the plasma field that occurs naturally during hypersonic entry using well understood principles of magnetohydrodynamics and oxygen filtration. This innovative approach generates resources upon arrival at the operational site, and thus greatly differs from the traditional approach of taking everything you need with you from Earth. Fundamental analysis, computational fluid dynamics, and some testing of experimental hardware have established the basic feasibility of generating power during a Mars entry. Oxygen filtration at conditions consistent with spacecraft entry parameters at Mars has been studied to a lesser extent. Other uses of the MHD power are presented. This paper illustrates how some features of regenerative aerobraking may be applied to support human and robotic missions at Mars.

  7. Entropy generation analysis of two-bed, silica gel-water, non-regenerative adsorption chillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, H. T.; Ng, K. C.; Malek, A.; Kashiwagi, T.; Akisawa, A.; Saha, B. B.

    1998-06-01

    The current thrust on the use of environmentally friendly technologies for cooling applications, inter alia, envisages the adoption of adsorption systems. Adsorption chillers are known to be `inefficient' due to their low coefficient of performance. Although the basic physics of heat and mass transfer in various components of the system is well understood, there is a lacuna in the quantification of irreversibilities. In this paper, a silica gel-water, two-bed, non-regenerative chiller is analysed. It is shown that the largest cycle-averaged rate of entropy generation is in the beds and that the least is in the condenser. The entropy generation rates in the beds are further studied, showing that the maximum contribution is made during the switching phase. In general, manufacturers' effort to maximize cooling capacity is shown to correspond to maximum entropy generation in the evaporator.

  8. Fully relayed regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1981-01-01

    A regenerative laser apparatus and method using the optical relay concept to maintain high fill factors, to suppress diffraction effects, and to minimize phase distortions in a regenerative amplifier.

  9. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  10. Improved Regenerative Sorbent-Compressor Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Conceptual regenerative sorbent-compressor refrigerator attains regeneration efficiency and, therefore, overall power efficiency and performance greater than conventional refrigerators. Includes two fluid loops. In one, CH2FCF3 (R134a) ciculates by physical adsorption and desorption in four activated-charcoal sorption compressors. In other, liquid or gas coolant circulated by pump. Wave of regenerative heating and cooling propagates cyclically like peristatic wave among sorption compressors and associated heat exchangers. Powered by electricity, oil, gas, solar heat, or waste heat. Used as air conditioners, refrigerators, and heat pumps in industrial, home, and automotive applications.

  11. Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS Operations Water Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Barry

    2010-01-01

    In November 2008, the Water Regenerative System racks were launched aboard Space Shuttle flight, STS-126 (ULF2) and installed and activated on the International Space Station (ISS). These racks, consisting of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), completed the installation of the Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS systems which includes the Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) that was launched 2 years prior. With the onset of active water management on the US segment of the ISS, a new operational concept was required, that of "water balance." Even more recently, in 2010 the Sabatier system came online which converts H2 and CO2 into water and methane. The Regen ECLSS systems accept condensation from the atmosphere, urine from crew, and processes that fluid via various means into potable water which is used for crew drinking, building up skip-cycle water inventory, and water for electrolysis to produce oxygen. Specification rates of crew urine output, condensate output, O2 requirements, toilet flush water and drinking needs are well documented and used as a general plan when Regen ECLSS came online. Spec rates are useful in long term planning, however, daily or weekly rates are dependent on a number of variables. The constantly changing rates created a new challenge for the ECLSS flight controllers, who are responsible for operating the ECLSS systems onboard ISS. This paper will review the various inputs to rate changes and inputs to planning events, including but not limited to; crew personnel makeup, Regen ECLSS system operability, vehicle traffic, water containment availability, and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) capability. Along with the inputs that change the various rates, the paper will review the different systems, their constraints and finally the operational means by which flight controllers manage this new challenge of "water balance."

  12. Low Thrust Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This video presents an overview of low thrust rocket engine propulsion concepts for space missions. Chemical and electrical rocket engines are shown. Animation illustrates various propulsion applications.

  13. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  14. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  15. A review of thrust-vectoring schemes for fighter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of thrust vectoring schemes for advanced fighter applications. Results are presented from wind tunnel and system integration studies on thrust vectoring nozzle concepts. Vectoring data are presented from wind tunnel tests of axisymmetric C-D (convergent-divergent) and nonaxisymmetric wedge, C-D, single ramp and USB (upper-surface blowing) nozzle concepts. Results from recent airframe/nozzle integration studies on the impact of thrust vectoring on weight, cooling and performance characteristics are discussed. This review indicates that the aircraft designer has, at his disposal, a wide range of thrust vectoring schemes which offer potential for added or improved aircraft capability.

  16. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of potential reusable thrust chamber concepts is studied. Propellant condidates were examined and analytically combined with potential cooling schemes. A data base of engine data which would assist in a configuration selection was produced. The data base verification was performed by the demonstration of a thrust chamber of a selected coolant scheme design. A full scale insulated columbium thrust chamber was used for propellant coolant configurations. Combustion stability of the injectors and a reduced size thrust chamber were experimentally verified as proof of concept demonstrations of the design and study results.

  17. Staged regenerative sorption heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system for cooling and heating a space. A sorbent is confined in a plurality of compressors of which at least four are first stage and at least four are second stage. The first stage operates over a first pressure region and the second stage over a second pressure region which is higher than the first. Sorbate from the first stage enters the second stage. The sorbate loop includes a condenser, expansion valve, evaporator and the compressors. A single sorbate loop can be employed for single-temperature-control such as air conditioning and heating. Two sorbate loops can be used for two-temperature-control as in a refrigerator and freezer. The evaporator temperatures control the freezer and refrigerator temperatures. Alternatively the refrigerator temperature can be cooled by the freezer with one sorbate loop. A heat transfer fluid is circulated in a closed loop which includes a radiator and the compressors. Low temperature heat is exhausted by the radiator. High temperature heat is added to the heat transfer fluid entering the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Heat is transferred from compressors which are sorbing vapor to the heat transfer fluid, and from the heat transfer fluid to the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Each compressor is subjected to the following phases, heating to its highest temperature, cooling down from its highest temperature, cooling to its lowest temperature, and warming up from its lowest temperature. The phases are repeated to complete a cycle and regenerate heat.

  18. PPT Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A torsional-type thrust stand has been designed and built to test Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) in both single shot and repetitive operating modes. Using this stand, momentum per pulse was determined strictly as a function of thrust stand deflection, spring constant, and natural frequency. No empirical corrections were required. The accuracy of the method was verified using a swinging impact pendulum. Momentum transfer data between the thrust stand and the pendulum were consistent to within 1%. Following initial calibrations, the stand was used to test a Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES-8/9) thruster. The LES-8/9 system had a mass of approximately 7.5 kg, with a nominal thrust to weight ratio of 1.3 x 10(exp -5). A total of 34 single shot thruster pulses were individually measured. The average impulse bit per pulse was 266 microN-s, which was slightly less than the value of 300 microN-s published in previous reports on this device. Repetitive pulse measurements were performed similar to ordinary steady-state thrust measurements. The thruster was operated for 30 minutes at a repetition rate of 132 pulses per minute and yielded an average thrust of 573 microN. Using average thrust, the average impulse bit per pulse was estimated to be 260 microN-s, which was in agreement with the single shot data. Zero drift during the repetitive pulse test was found to be approximately 1% of the measured thrust.

  19. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  20. Supercritical oxygen heat transfer. [regenerative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. G.; Rousar, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Heat transfer to supercritical oxygen was experimentally measured in electrical heated tubes. Experimental data were obtained for pressures ranging from 17 to 34.5 MPa (2460 to 5000 psia), and heat fluxes from 2 to 90 million w/sq cm (1.2 to 55 Btu/(sq in. sec)). Bulk temperatures ranged from 96 to 217 K (173 to 391 R). Experimental data obtained by other investigators were added to this to increase the range of pressure down to 2 MPa (290 psia) and increase the range of bulk temperature up to 566 K (1019 R). From this compilation of experimental data a correlating equation was developed which predicts over 95% of the experimental data within + or - 30%.

  1. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  2. Ion thrusting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An ion thrusting system is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which a gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas molecules passing therethrough to form ions and electrons, and an accelerator element which accelerates the ions to form thrust. In some variations, a potential is applied to the ionization membrane may be reversed to thrust ions in an opposite direction. The ionization membrane may also include an opening with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of the gas being ionized. Methods of manufacture and use are also provided.

  3. Thrust vectoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. J.; Schnelker, D.; Ward, J. W.; Dulgeroff, C.; Vahrenkamp, R.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of thrust vectorable ion optical systems capable of controlling the thrust direction from both 5- and 30-cm diameter ion thrusters is described. Both systems are capable of greater than 10 deg thrust deflection in any azimuthal direction. The 5-cm system is electrostatic and hence has a short response time and minimal power consumption. It has recently been tested for more than 7500 hours on an operational thruster. The 30-cm system is mechanical, has a response time of the order of 1 min, and consumes less than 0.3% of the total system input power at full deflection angle.

  4. Advanced cooling techniques for high-pressure hydrocarbon-fueled engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The regenerative cooling limits (maximum chamber pressure) for 02/hydrocarbon gas generator and staged combustion cycle rocket engines over a thrust range of 89,000 N (20,000lbf) to 2,669,000 N (600,000 lbf) for a reusable life of 250 missions were defined. Maximum chamber pressure limits were first determined for the three propellant combinations (O2/CH4, O2/C3H8, and O2/RP-1 without a carbon layer (unenhanced designs). Chamber pressure cooling enhancement limits were then established for seven thermal barriers. The thermal barriers evaluated for these designs were: carbon layer, ceramic coating, graphite liner, film cooling, transpiration cooling, zoned combustion, and a combination of two of the above. All fluid barriers were assessed a 3 percent performance loss. Sensitivity studies were then conducted to determine the influence of cycle life and RP-1 decomposition temperature on chamber pressure limits. Chamber and nozzle design parameters are presented for the unenahanced and enhanced designs. The maximum regenerative cooled chamber pressure limits were attained with the O2/CH4 propellant combination. The O2/RP-1 designs relied on a carbon layer and liquid gas injection chamber contours, short chamber, to be competitive with the other two propellant combinations. This was attributed to the low decomposition temperature of RP-1.

  5. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kunning G.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is ±0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation.

  6. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunning G; Walker, Mitchell L R

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is +/-0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation.

  7. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  8. Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

  9. Thrust stand for low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qin; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Min; Jia, Zhen-yuan; Sun, Bao-yuan

    2010-09-01

    A thrust stand is developed for measuring the pulsed thrust generated by low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines. It mainly consists of a thrust dynamometer, a base frame, a connecting frame, and a data acquisition and processing system. The thrust dynamometer assembled with shear mode piezoelectric quartz sensors is developed as the core component of the thrust stand. It adopts integral shell structure. The sensors are inserted into unique double-elastic-half-ring grooves with an interference fit. The thrust is transferred to the sensors by means of static friction forces of fitting surfaces. The sensors could produce an amount of charges which are proportional to the thrust to be measured. The thrust stand is calibrated both statically and dynamically. The in situ static calibration is performed using a standard force sensor. The dynamic calibration is carried out using pendulum-typed steel ball impact technique. Typical thrust pulse is simulated by a trapezoidal impulse force. The results show that the thrust stand has a sensitivity of 25.832 mV/N, a linearity error of 0.24% FSO, and a repeatability error of 0.23% FSO. The first natural frequency of the thrust stand is 1245 Hz. The thrust stand can accurately measure thrust waveform of each firing, which is used for fine control of on-orbit vehicles in the thrust range of 5-20 N with pulse frequency of 50 Hz. PMID:20887003

  10. Regenerative similariton laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Thibault; Brès, Camille-Sophie

    2016-05-01

    Self-pulsating lasers based on cascaded reshaping and reamplification (2R) are capable of initiating ultrashort pulses despite the accumulation of large amounts of nonlinearities in all-fiber resonators. The spectral properties of pulses in self-similar propagation are compatible with cascaded 2R regeneration by offset filtering, making parabolic pulses suitable for the design of a laser of this recently introduced class. A new type of regenerative laser giving birth to similaritons is numerically investigated and shows that this laser is the analog of regenerative sources based solely on self-phase modulation and offset filtering. The regenerative similariton laser does not suffer from instabilities due to excessive nonlinearities and enables ultrashort pulse generation in a simple cavity configuration.

  11. Regenerative Life Support Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, G. N.; Thompson, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development plan and design concept of the Regenerative Life Support Evaluation (RLSE) planned for flight testing in the European Space Agency Spacelab. The development plan encompasses the ongoing advanced life support subsystem and a systems integration effort to evolve concurrently subsystem concepts that perform their function and can be integrated with other subsystems in a flight demonstration of a regenerative life support system. The design concept for RLSE comprises water-electrolysis O2 generation, electrochemically depolarized CO2 removal, and Sabatier CO2 reduction for atmosphere regeneration, urine vapor-compression distillation, and wash-water hyperfiltration for waste-water recovery. The flight demonstration by RLSE is an important step in qualifying the regenerative concepts for life support in space stations.

  12. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  13. Environmental Thrust Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    This handbook was prepared as a tool to assist U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) employees coordinate their resources and efforts to help people improve their environment. Twenty-two projects are outlined as potential environmental thrusts at the community level. It is the role of USDA employees to encourage and assist, in every way possible,…

  14. Design of a thrust stand for high power electric propulsion devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    A thrust stand for use with high power electric propulsion devices was designed and tested. The thrust stand was specifically tailored to the needs of a 100 to 250 kW magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster program currently in progress at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The thrust stand structure was built as an inverted pendulum arrangement, supported at the base by water-cooled electrical power flexures. Thrust stand tares due to thruster discharge current were demonstrated to be negligible. Tares due to an applied field magnet current, after considerable effort, were reduced to less than 3.0 percent of measured thrust. These tares, however, could be determined independently and subtracted from the indicated thrust measurement. A detailed description is given for the thrust stand design and operation with a 100 kW class MPD device. Other thrust stand tares due to vibration and thermal effects are discussed, along with issues of accuracy and repeatability.

  15. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.; Lee, Jonathan; Holmes, Richard; Zimmerman, Frank; Effinger, Mike; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has successfully applied new materials and fabrication techniques to create actively cooled thrust chambers that operate 200-400 degrees hotter and weigh 50% lighter than conventional designs. In some vehicles, thrust assemblies account for as much as 20% of the engine weight. So, reducing the weight of these components and increasing their operating range will benefit many engines and vehicle designs, including Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concepts. Obviously, copper and steel alloys have been used successfully for many years in the chamber components of thrust assemblies. Yet, by replacing the steel alloys with Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) and/or Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials, design weights can be drastically reduced. In addition, replacing the traditional copper alloys with a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) or an advanced copper alloy (Cu-8Cr-4Nb, also known as GRCop-84) significantly increases allowable operating temperatures. Several small MMC and PMC demonstration chambers have recently been fabricated with promising results. Each of these designs included GRCop-84 for the cooled chamber liner. These units successfully verified that designs over 50% lighter are feasible. New fabrication processes, including advanced casting technology and a low cost vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, were also demonstrated with these units. Hot-fire testing at MSFC is currently being conducted on the chambers to verify increased operating temperatures available with the GRCop-84 liner. Unique CMC chamber liners were also successfully fabricated and prepared for hot-fire testing. Yet, early results indicate these CMC liners need significantly more development in order to use them in required chamber designs. Based on the successful efforts with the MMC and PMC concepts, two full size "lightweight" chambers are currently being designed and fabricated for hot

  16. Regenerative photonic therapy: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salansky, Natasha; Salansky, Norman

    2012-09-01

    After four decades of research of photobiomodulation phenomena in mammals in vitro and in vivo, a solid foundation is created for the use of photobiomodulation in regenerative medicine. Significant accomplishments are achieved in animal models that demonstrate opportunities for photo-regeneration of injured or pathological tissues: skin, muscles and nerves. However, the use of photobiomodulation in clinical studies leads to controversial results while negative or marginal clinical efficacy is reported along with positive findings. A thor ough analysis of requirements to the optical parameters (dosimetry) for high efficacy in photobimodulation led us to the conclusion that there are several misconceptions in the clinical applications of low level laser therapy (LLLT). We present a novel appr oach of regenerative photonic therapy (RPT) for tissue healing and regeneration that overcomes major drawbacks of LLLT. Encouraging clinical results on RPT efficacy are presented. Requirements for RPT approach and vision for its future development for tissue regeneration is discussed.

  17. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  18. Cytomics in regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárnok, Attila; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz

    2008-02-01

    Cytomics is the high-content analysis of cell-systems [6, 78]. The area of Cytomics and Systems Biology received great attention during the last years as it harbours the promise to substantially impact on various fields of biomedicine, drug discovery, predictive medicine [6] and may have major potential for regenerative medicine. In regenerative medicine Cytomics includes process control of cell preparation and culturing using non-invasive detection techniques, quality control and standardization for GMP and GLP conformity and even prediction of cell fate based on sophisticated data analysis. Cytomics requires quantitative and stoichiometric single cell analysis. In some areas the leading cytometric techniques represent the cutting edge today. Many different applications/variations of multicolour staining were developed for flow- or slide-based cytometry (SBC) analysis of suspensions and sections to whole animal analysis [78]. SBC has become an important analytical technology in drug discovery, diagnosis and research and is an emerging technology for systems analysis [78]. It enables high-content high-throughput measurement of cell suspensions, cell cultures and tissues. In the last years various commercial SBC instruments were launched principally enabling to perform similar tasks. Standardisation as well as comparability of different instruments is a major challenge. Hyperspectral optical imaging may be implemented in SBC analysis for label free cell detection based on cellular autofluorescence [3]. All of these developments push the systemic approach of the analysis of biological specimens to enhance the outcome of regenerative medicine.

  19. Monte Mountain thrust, additional confirmation of the central Nevada thrust

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, A.K. ); Chamberlain, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Monte Mountain thrust, a newly identified thrust exposed in the Timpahute Range, east central Nevada places porous Devonian reservoir rocks over rich Mississippian source rocks at the peak oil generating window. The thrust provides insurmountable evidence of a thrust model that may lead to discovery of giant oil and gas fields along the 400-mi long central Nevada thrust belt. The Timpahute Range lies a little over 50 mi on strike to the south of the prolific Grant Canyon field. Scattered remnants of the north-trending thrust belt are obscured by parallel valleys of Tertiary valley fill and volcanics. The fact that the east-west-trending Timpahute Range could contain exposures of the north-south-trending central Nevada thrust belt attracted them to the range, Familiarity with the stratigraphic section led to the discovery of the thrust. As much as 750 ft of Devonian Guilmette sandstones, in the hanging wall just above the thrust contact have been erroneously mapped as Mississippian Scotty Wash sandstones. These Devonian sandstones could be excellent reservoir rocks. Sandstones in the Guilmette increase in thickness westward. East-vergent thrusting has juxtaposed plates of thicker Guilmette sandstones with plates of thinner sandstones, Reconstruction of Devonian paleogeography provides a clue to the amount of displacement along thrust boundaries.

  20. Regenerative rotary displacer Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Isshiki, Naotsugu; Watanabe, Hiroichi; Raggi, L.; Isshiki, Seita; Hirata, Koichi

    1996-12-31

    A few rotary displacer Stirling engines in which the displacer has one gas pocket space at one side and rotates in a main enclosed cylinder, which is heated from one side and cooled from opposite side without any regenerator, have been studied for some time by the authors. The authors tried to improve this engine by equipping it with a regenerator, because without a regenerator, pressure oscillation and efficiency are too small. Here, several types of regenerative rotary displacer piston Stirling engines are proposed. One is the contra-rotating tandem two disc type displacer engine using axial heat conduction through side walls or by heat pipes and another is a single disc type with circulating fluid regenerator or heat pipes. Stirling engines of this new rotary displacer type are thought to attain high speed. Here, experimental results of the original rotary displacer Stirling engine without a regenerator, and one contra-rotating tandem displacer engine with side wall regenerator by axial heat conduction are reported accompanied with a discussion of the results.

  1. A regenerative elastocaloric heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tušek, Jaka; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Eriksen, Dan; Dall’Olio, Stefano; Tušek, Janez; Pryds, Nini

    2016-10-01

    A large fraction of global energy use is for refrigeration and air-conditioning, which could be decarbonized if efficient renewable energy technologies could be found. Vapour-compression technology remains the most widely used system to move heat up the temperature scale after more than 100 years; however, caloric-based technologies (those using the magnetocaloric, electrocaloric, barocaloric or elastocaloric effect) have recently shown a significant potential as alternatives to replace this technology due to high efficiency and the use of green solid-state refrigerants. Here, we report a regenerative elastocaloric heat pump that exhibits a temperature span of 15.3 K on the water side with a corresponding specific heating power up to 800 W kg‑1 and maximum COP (coefficient-of-performance) values of up to 7. The efficiency and specific heating power of this device exceeds those of other devices based on caloric effects. These results open up the possibility of using the elastocaloric effect in various cooling and heat-pumping applications.

  2. Transforming healthcare through regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Jessop, Zita M; Al-Sabah, Ayesha; Francis, Wendy R; Whitaker, Iain S

    2016-08-10

    Regenerative medicine therapies, underpinned by the core principles of rejuvenation, regeneration and replacement, are shifting the paradigm in healthcare from symptomatic treatment in the 20th century to curative treatment in the 21st century. By addressing the reasons behind the rapid expansion of regenerative medicine research and presenting an overview of current clinical trials, we explore the potential of regenerative medicine to reshape modern healthcare.

  3. REGENERATIVE TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Kabell, L.J.

    1958-11-25

    Electrical circults for use in computers and the like are described. particularly a regenerative bistable transistor amplifler which is iurned on by a clock signal when an information signal permits and is turned off by the clock signal. The amplifier porforms the above function with reduced power requirements for the clock signal and circuit operation. The power requirements are reduced in one way by employing transformer coupling which increases the collector circuit efficiency by eliminating the loss of power in the collector load resistor.

  4. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  5. Regenerative Sorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Wen, Liang-Chi; Bard, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Two-stage sorption refrigerator achieves increased efficiency via regenerative-heating concept in which waste heat from praseodymium/cerium oxide (PCO) chemisorption compressor runs charcoal/krypton (C/Kr) sorption compressor. Waste heat from each PCO sorption compressor used to power surrounding C/Kr sorption compressor. Flows of heat in two compressor modules controlled by gas-gap thermal switches. Has no wearing moving parts other than extremely long life, room-temperature check valves operating about twice per hour. Virtually no measurable vibration, and has potential operating life of at least ten years.

  6. Regenerative medicine: an insight.

    PubMed

    Muraca, M; Galbiati, G; Realdi, G; Vilei, M T; Fabricio, A Sueli Coelho; Caruso, M

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative Medicine is a rapidly evolving field of therapy integrating different scientific and technological areas, including cell biology, biomedical and computer engineering, and clinical medicine, thus creating an interdisciplinary exchange network of skill, ideas, materials and efforts between basic and clinical research. Even if significant achievements have been obtained particularly in Plastic Surgery, Ophthalmology and Orthopedics, the field is still experimental and so far has failed to meet the expectations. The present article reviews the major hurdles that are still hampering the translational "bench to bedside" process and limiting the availability of these innovative therapeutic tools.

  7. Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System Dryer-Humidifier Analytical Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian

    2003-01-01

    A Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC) Energy Storage System is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This URFC system is unique in that it uses regenerative gas dryers/humidifiers that are mounted on the surface of the gas storage tanks that act as the radiators for thermal control of the URFC system. As the gas storage tanks cool down during URFC charging the regenerative gas dryers/humidifiers dry the hydrogen and oxygen gases produced by electrolysis. As the gas storage tanks heat up during URFC discharging, the regenerative gas dryers/humidifiers humidify the hydrogen and oxygen gases used by fuel cell. An analytical model was developed to simulate the URFC system's regenerative gas dryers/humidifiers. The model is in the form of an EXCEL@ worksheet that allows the investigation of the regenerative gas dryers/humidifier performance as a function of time and position within the regenerative gas dryers/humidifiers, as well as other key system variables. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modeling of the regenerative gas dryers/humidifier and gas storage tank wall was also done to analyze spatial temperature distribution within the regenerative gas dryers/humidifiers and the localized tank wall. Test results obtained from the testing of the regenerative gas dryers/humidifiers in a thermal vacuum environment were used to corroborate the analyses.

  8. Regenerative Medicine Build-Out

    PubMed Central

    Pfenning, Michael A.; Gores, Gregory J.; Harper, C. Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regenerative technologies strive to boost innate repair processes and restitute normative impact. Deployment of regenerative principles into practice is poised to usher in a new era in health care, driving radical innovation in patient management to address the needs of an aging population challenged by escalating chronic diseases. There is urgency to design, execute, and validate viable paradigms for translating and implementing the science of regenerative medicine into tangible health benefits that provide value to stakeholders. A regenerative medicine model of care would entail scalable production and standardized application of clinical grade biotherapies supported by comprehensive supply chain capabilities that integrate sourcing and manufacturing with care delivery. Mayo Clinic has rolled out a blueprint for discovery, translation, and application of regenerative medicine therapies for accelerated adoption into the standard of care. To establish regenerative medical and surgical service lines, the Mayo Clinic model incorporates patient access, enabling platforms and delivery. Access is coordinated through a designated portal, the Regenerative Medicine Consult Service, serving to facilitate patient/provider education, procurement of biomaterials, referral to specialty services, and/or regenerative interventions, often in clinical trials. Platforms include the Regenerative Medicine Biotrust and Good Manufacturing Practice facilities for manufacture of clinical grade products for cell-based, acellular, and/or biomaterial applications. Care delivery leverages dedicated interventional suites for provision of regenerative services. Performance is tracked using a scorecard system to inform decision making. The Mayo Clinic roadmap exemplifies an integrated organization in the discovery, development, and delivery of regenerative medicine within a growing community of practice at the core of modern health care. Significance Regenerative medicine is at the

  9. Esophagus and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Ricardo; Jobe, Blair A; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Badylak, Stephen F

    2012-01-01

    In addition to squamous cell carcinoma, the incidence of Barrett’s esophagus with high-grade dysplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma is rapidly increasing worldwide. Unfortunately, the current standard of care for esophageal pathology involves resection of the affected tissue, sometimes involving radical esophagectomy. Without exception, these procedures are associated with a high morbidity, compromised quality of life, and unacceptable mortality rates. Regenerative medicine approaches to functional tissue replacement include the use of biological and synthetic scaffolds to promote tissue remodeling and growth. In the case of esophageal repair, extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds have proven to be effective for the reconstruction of small patch defects, anastomosis reinforcement, and the prevention of stricture formation after endomucosal resection (EMR). More so, esophageal cancer patients treated with ECM scaffolds have shown complete restoration of a normal, functional, and disease-free epithelium after EMR. These studies provide evidence that a regenerative medicine approach may enable aggressive resection of neoplastic tissue without the need for radical esophagectomy and its associated complications. PMID:23322986

  10. Nanotechnologies in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kubinová, Sárka; Syková, Eva

    2010-06-01

    Nanotechnology offers promising perspectives in biomedical research as well as in clinical practice. To cover some of the latest nanotechnology trends in regenerative medicine, this review will focus on the use of nanomaterials for tissue engineering and cell therapy. Nanofibrous materials that mimic the native extracellular matrix and promote the adhesion of various cells are being developed as tissue-engineered scaffolds for the skin, bone, vasculature, heart, cornea, nervous system, and other tissues. A range of novel materials has been developed to enhance the bioactive or therapeutic properties of these nanofibrous scaffolds via surface modifications, including the immobilization of functional cell-adhesive ligands and bioactive molecules such as drugs, enzymes and cytokines. As a new approach, nanofibers prepared by using industrial scale needleless technology have been recently introduced, and their use as scaffolds to treat spinal cord injury or as cell carriers for the regeneration of the injured cornea is the subject of much current study. Cell therapy is a modern approach of regenerative medicine for the treatment of various diseases or injuries. To follow the migration and fate of transplanted cells, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been developed for cell labeling and non-invasive MRI monitoring of cells in the living organism, with successful applications in, e.g, the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney and also in pancreatic islet and stem cell transplantation. PMID:20497067

  11. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Pancotti, Anthony; Haag, Thomas; King, Scott; Walker, Mitchell; Blakely, Joseph; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, direct measurement of thrust or impulse is one of the most critical elements of electric thruster characterization, and one of the most difficult measurements to make. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has started an initiative to develop standards for many important measurement processes in electric propulsion, including thrust measurements. This paper summarizes recommended practices for the design, calibration, and operation of pendulum thrust stands, which are widely recognized as the best approach for measuring micro N- to mN-level thrust and micro Ns-level impulse bits. The fundamentals of pendulum thrust stand operation are reviewed, along with its implementation in hanging pendulum, inverted pendulum, and torsional balance configurations. Methods of calibration and recommendations for calibration processes are presented. Sources of error are identified and methods for data processing and uncertainty analysis are discussed. This review is intended to be the first step toward a recommended practices document to help the community produce high quality thrust measurements.

  12. Low thrust vehicle concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Low thrust chemical (hydrogen-oxygen) propulsion systems configured specifically for low acceleration orbit transfer of large space systems were defined. Results indicate that it is cost effective and least risk to combine the OTV and stowed spacecraft in a single 65 K Shuttle. The study shows that the engine for an optimized low thrust stage (1) does not require very low thrust; (2) 1-3 K thrust range appears optimum; (3) thrust transient is not a concern; (4) throttling probably not worthwhile; and (5) multiple thrusters complicate OTV/LSS design and aggravate LSS loads. Regarding the optimum vehicle for low acceleration missions, the single shuttle launch (LSS and expendable OTV) is most cost effective and least risky. Multiple shuttles increase diameter 20%. The space based radar structure short OTV (which maximizes space available for packaged LSS) favors use of torus tank. Propellant tank pressures/vapor residuals are little affected by engine thrust level or number of burns.

  13. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  14. Thrust stand for high-power electric propulsion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, T. W.

    1991-05-01

    A thrust stand for use with magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters operated at powers up to 250 kW steady state has been built and tested. The stand was based on an inverted pendulum configuration which resulted in large displacements and high resolution. Up to 50 mm of deflection was observed under a force of 5 N. This large range of displacement significantly reduced the effects of facility induced vibrations on thrust measurements. A remotely operated system was provided for in situ calibration of the thrust stand prior to and immediately after data were obtained. Calibrations showed that thrust measurements were linear and repeatable to within a fraction of 1%. Structural distortions of the vacuum facility due to pumpdown were detected with an inclinometer located in the thrust stand base. Slope deviations as small as 10 arcsec could be compensated using a remotely controlled leveling motor. Early problems with magnetically induced tares caused by the thruster discharge current were reduced by rerouting high-current cables to decrease stray fields. Tares due to discharge current were on the order of 26 mN at 3000 A, and those due to an applied field current were 63 mN at 1400 A. The thrust stand was used with a water-cooled, applied field, steady-state MPD device at power levels up to 125 kW. Hot thruster firings as long as 1 h were performed. By precisely maintaining a level thrust stand base, thermal drift was held to about 2% of the full scale reading over this period. The remaining thermal drift could be subtracted from the thrust measurement to further reduce systematic error. Tares caused by the applied magnetic field were similarly removed. By subtracting tabulated discharge current magnetic tares, thrust measurement uncertainty was reduced to approximately 2% of the measured value.

  15. Will Regenerative Medicine Replace Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J.; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs. PMID:23906883

  16. Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation?

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs.

  17. Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation?

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs. PMID:23906883

  18. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher

  19. PEM regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, Larry L.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Mccatty, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper will update the progress in developing electrocatalyst systems and electrode structures primarily for the positive electrode of single-unit solid polymer proton exchange membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cells. The work was done with DuPont Nafion 117 in complete fuel cells (40 sq cm electrodes). The cells were operated alternately in fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode at 80 C. In fuel cell mode, humidified hydrogen and oxygen were supplied at 207 kPa (30 psi); in electrolysis mode, water was pumped over the positive electrode and the gases were evolved at ambient pressure. Cycling data will be presented for Pt-Ir catalysts and limited bifunctional data will be presented for Pt, Ir, Ru, Rh, and Na(x)Pt3O4 catalysts as well as for electrode structure variations.

  20. Hydrogels in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Brandon V.; Khurshid, Shahana S.; Fisher, Omar Z.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels, due to their unique biocompatibility, flexible methods of synthesis, range of constituents, and desirable physical characteristics, have been the material of choice for many applications in regenerative medicine. They can serve as scaffolds that provide structural integrity to tissue constructs, control drug and protein delivery to tissues and cultures, and serve as adhesives or barriers between tissue and material surfaces. In this work, the properties of hydrogels that are important for tissue engineering applications and the inherent material design constraints and challenges are discussed. Recent research involving several different hydrogels polymerized from a variety of synthetic and natural monomers using typical and novel synthetic methods are highlighted. Finally, special attention is given to the microfabrication techniques that are currently resulting in important advances in the field. PMID:20882499

  1. Regenerative combustion device

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.

    2004-03-16

    A regenerative combustion device having a combustion zone, and chemicals contained within the combustion zone, such as water, having a first equilibrium state, and a second combustible state. Means for transforming the chemicals from the first equilibrium state to the second combustible state, such as electrodes, are disposed within the chemicals. An igniter, such as a spark plug or similar device, is disposed within the combustion zone for igniting combustion of the chemicals in the second combustible state. The combustion products are contained within the combustion zone, and the chemicals are selected such that the combustion products naturally chemically revert into the chemicals in the first equilibrium state following combustion. The combustion device may thus be repeatedly reused, requiring only a brief wait after each ignition to allow the regeneration of combustible gasses within the head space.

  2. Regenerative braking device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1982-01-12

    Disclosed are several embodiments of a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a plurality of rubber rollers (24, 26) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (14) connectable to the vehicle drivetrain and an output shaft (16) which is drivingly connected to the input shaft by a variable ratio transmission (20). When the transmission ratio is such that the input shaft rotates faster than the output shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy, thereby slowing the vehicle. When the transmission ratio is such that the output shaft rotates faster than the input shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally relaxed to deliver accumulated energy, thereby accelerating or driving the vehicle.

  3. Internal performance characteristics of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton

    1995-01-01

    A series of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles were designed and experimentally tested for internal performance and pumping characteristics at the Langley research center. This study indicated that discontinuities in the performance occurred at low primary nozzle pressure ratios and that these discontinuities were mitigated by decreasing expansion area ratio. The addition of secondary flow increased the performance of the nozzles. The mid-to-high range of secondary flow provided the most overall improvements, and the greatest improvements were seen for the largest ejector area ratio. Thrust vectoring the ejector nozzles caused a reduction in performance and discharge coefficient. With or without secondary flow, the vectored ejector nozzles produced thrust vector angles that were equivalent to or greater than the geometric turning angle. With or without secondary flow, spacing ratio (ejector passage symmetry) had little effect on performance (gross thrust ratio), discharge coefficient, or thrust vector angle. For the unvectored ejectors, a small amount of secondary flow was sufficient to reduce the pressure levels on the shroud to provide cooling, but for the vectored ejector nozzles, a larger amount of secondary air was required to reduce the pressure levels to provide cooling.

  4. Hydrodynamic optimization of trust ring pump and lubricating oil system for large hydroelectric units thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X.; Lu, Z.; Zhang, X.; Yang, S.

    2014-03-01

    Thrust-ring-pump is a kind of extreme-low specific speed centrifugal pump with special structure as numerous restrictions form thrust bearing and operation conditions of hydro turbine generator unit. Because the oil circulating and cooling system with thrust-ring- pump has a lot of advantages in maintenance and compactness in structure, it has widely been used in large and medium-sized hydro-generator units. Since the diameter and the speed of the thrust ring is limited by the generator set, the matching relationship between the flow passage inside the thrust ring (equivalent to impeller) and oil bath (equivalent to volute) has great influence on hydrodynamic performance of thrust-ring-pump, additionally, the head and discharge are varying with the operation conditions of hydro-generator unit and characteristic of the oil circulating and cooling system. As so far, the empirical calculation method is employed during the actual engineering design, in order to guarantee the operating performance of the oil circulating and cooling system with thrust-ring-pump at different conditions, a collaborative hydrodynamic design and optimization of both the oil circulating and cooling system and thrust-ring-pump is purposed in this paper. Firstly, the head and discharge required at different conditions are decided by 1D flow numerical simulation of the oil circulating and cooling system. Secondly, the flow passages of thrust-ring-pump are empirically designed under the restrictions of diameter and the speed of the thrust ring according to the head and discharge from the simulation. Thirdly, the flow passage geometry matching optimization between holes inside the thrust ring and oil bath is implemented by means of 3D flow simulation and performance prediction. Then, the pumps and the oil circulating and cooling system are collaborative hydrodynamic optimized with predicted head- discharge curve and the efficiency-discharge curve of thrust-ring-pump. The presented methodology has

  5. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  7. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  8. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  9. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  10. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a seriesed combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided.

  11. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, J.D.

    1998-06-02

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a series combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electrically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided. 14 figs.

  12. Fabrication of GRCop-84 Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84, a copper alloy, Cu-8 at% Cr-4 at% Nb developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for regeneratively cooled rocket engine liners has excellent combinations of elevated temperature strength, creep resistance, thermal conductivity and low cycle fatigue. GRCop-84 is produced from prealloyed atomized powder and has been fabricated into plate, sheet and tube forms as well as near net shapes. Fabrication processes to produce demonstration rocket combustion chambers will be presented and includes powder production, extruding, rolling, forming, friction stir welding, and metal spinning. GRCop-84 has excellent workability and can be readily fabricated into complex components using conventional powder and wrought metallurgy processes. Rolling was examined in detail for process sensitivity at various levels of total reduction, rolling speed and rolling temperature representing extremes of commercial processing conditions. Results indicate that process conditions can range over reasonable levels without any negative impact to properties.

  13. The maximum cooling density of a realistic Stirling refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrin Erbay, L.; Yavuz, Hasbi

    1998-02-01

    The maximum cooling density of a Stirling refrigerator operating in a closed regenerative thermodynamic cycle is presented in this paper. The cooling density is the cooling load per unit volume of the refrigerator. Since the size of the refrigerator is involved in the cooling density, the maximization of the cooling density has given a critical compression ratio. The maximum cooling density serves as a better comparison criterion for thermoeconomic considerations.

  14. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  15. Low thrust optimal orbital transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, Shannon S.

    1994-01-01

    For many optimal transfer problems it is reasonable to expect that the minimum time solution is also the minimum fuel solution. However, if one allows the propulsion system to be turned off and back on, it is clear that these two solutions may differ. In general, high thrust transfers resemble the well known impulsive transfers where the burn arcs are of very short duration. The low and medium thrust transfers differ in that their thrust acceleration levels yield longer burn arcs and thus will require more revolutions. In this research, we considered two approaches for solving this problem: a powered flight guidance algorithm previously developed for higher thrust transfers was modified and an 'averaging technique' was investigated.

  16. In-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust are reviewed. Basic definitions are presented as well as analytical and ground-test methods for gathering data and calculating the thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Test analysis examples include a single-exhaust turbofan, an intermediate-cowl turbofan, and a mixed-flow afterburning turbofan.

  17. The Pharmacology of Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Justin M.; Furth, Mark E.; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase “regenerative pharmacology” to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is “the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues.” As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all. PMID:23818131

  18. Micro thrust and heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to micromachines such as microengines or micromotors. More specifically, the invention is directed to a micro rocket which functions as a source of heat and thrust, and utilizes chemical energy to drive or power micromechanical apparatuses. The invention is adaptable to applications involving defense, bio-medical, manufacturing, consumer product, aviation, automotive, computer, inspection, and safety systems. A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachine techniques (LIGA).

  19. Army (MANTECH) thrust area concept: Optics thrust area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-04-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  20. Evaluation of fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle via thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Hirota, M.; Ouchi, K.; Saito, T.

    2016-03-01

    Shock vector control (SVC) in a converging-diverging nozzle with a rectangular cross-section is discussed as a fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) method. The interaction between the primary nozzle flow and the secondary jet is examined using experiments and numerical simulations. The relationships between FTV parameters [nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and secondary jet pressure ratio (SPR)] and FTV performance (thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment) are investigated. The experiments are conducted with an NPR of up to 10 and an SPR of up to 2.7. Numerical simulations of the nozzle flow are performed using a Navier-Stokes solver with input parameters set to match the experimental conditions. The thrust pitching angle and moment computed from the force-moment balance are used to evaluate FTV performance. The experiment and numerical results indicate that the FTV parameters (NPR and SPR) directly affect FTV performance. Conventionally, FTV performance evaluated by the common method using thrust pitching angle is highly dependent on the location of evaluation. Hence, in this study, we show that the thrust pitching moment, a parameter which is independent of the location, is the appropriate figure of merit to evaluate the performance of FTV systems.

  1. Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

  2. Bio-regenerative life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, Robert D.; Wydeven, Theodore, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The basis for and the potential uses of bio-regenerative life support are examined. Bio-regenerative life support systems are an alternative to physical-chemical regeneration techniques for use when resupply of a crew in space is expensive, or when the logistics of resupply are difficult. Many of the scientific studies required for bio-regenerative life support systems have been completed and preliminary development of some components will begin within the next 12 to 18 months. The focus of the work that lies ahead will be efficient power and mass use, long-term system stability, component function, systems integration, and extensive testing in the space environment. Because of the advantages of bio-regeneration, it is anticipated that human life support for long-term space missions will evolve to include increasingly large amounts of biologically-based regeneration.

  3. Biomaterials for Bone Regenerative Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohua; Tang, Xiaoyan; Gohil, Shalini V; Laurencin, Cato T

    2015-06-24

    Strategies for bone tissue regeneration have been continuously evolving for the last 25 years since the introduction of the "tissue engineering" concept. The convergence of the life, physical, and engineering sciences has brought in several advanced technologies available to tissue engineers and scientists. This resulted in the creation of a new multidisciplinary field termed as "regenerative engineering". In this article, the role of biomaterials in bone regenerative engineering is systematically reviewed to elucidate the new design criteria for the next generation of biomaterials for bone regenerative engineering. The exemplary design of biomaterials harnessing various materials characteristics towards successful bone defect repair and regeneration is highlighted. Particular attention is given to the attempts of incorporating advanced materials science, stem cell technologies, and developmental biology into biomaterials design to engineer and develop the next generation bone grafts.

  4. Laser system using regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, J.L.

    1980-03-04

    High energy laser system is disclosed using a regenerative amplifier, which relaxes all constraints on laser components other than the intrinsic damage level of matter, so as to enable use of available laser system components. This can be accomplished by use of segmented components, spatial filters, at least one amplifier using solid state or gaseous media, and separated reflector members providing a long round trip time through the regenerative cavity, thereby allowing slower switching and adequate time to clear the spatial filters, etc. The laser system simplifies component requirements and reduces component cost while providing high energy output. 10 figs.

  5. Laser system using regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L. [Pleasanton, CA

    1980-03-04

    High energy laser system using a regenerative amplifier, which relaxes all constraints on laser components other than the intrinsic damage level of matter, so as to enable use of available laser system components. This can be accomplished by use of segmented components, spatial filters, at least one amplifier using solid state or gaseous media, and separated reflector members providing a long round trip time through the regenerative cavity, thereby allowing slower switching and adequate time to clear the spatial filters, etc. The laser system simplifies component requirements and reduces component cost while providing high energy output.

  6. Post-burnout thrust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, E. F.; Smith, H. T.

    1980-06-01

    Research was conducted into the problems of avoiding collision between separated payloads and spent rocket motors due to post burnout thrust, and the problem of contamination of scientific instrumentation due to outgassing of the smoldering insulation. The post burnout thrust was measured using a payload instrument module separated from an instrumented Black Brant VC Rocket in the exoatmosphere. In addition to measuring acceleration and velocities the spent motor was observed by a TV camera on board the command attitude controlled payload module. Analysis shows that the payload separated cleanly from the vehicle at a relative separation velocity of 0.69 m/sec, however the residual thrust of the spent motor overcame this differential, catching up to the payload 37 sec after separation and continuing on a parallel velocity vector at about 1.03 m/sec.

  7. New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Bergander

    2005-08-29

    The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient of performance for geothermal heat pumps based on a new regenerative thermodynamic cycle as comparing to existing technology. In order to demonstrate the improved performance of the prototype, it will be compared to published parameters of commercially available geothermal heat pumps manufactured by US and foreign companies. Other objectives are to optimize the design parameters and to determine the economic viability of the new technology. Background (as stated in the proposal): The proposed technology closely relates to EERE mission by improving energy efficiency, bringing clean, reliable and affordable heating and cooling to the residential and commercial buildings and reducing greenhouse gases emission. It can provide the same amount of heating and cooling with considerably less use of electrical energy and consequently has a potential of reducing our nations dependence on foreign oil. The theoretical basis for the proposed thermodynamic cycle was previously developed and was originally called a dynamic equilibrium method. This theory considers the dynamic equations of state of the working fluid and proposes the methods for modification of T-S trajectories of adiabatic transformation by changing dynamic properties of gas, such as flow rate, speed and acceleration. The substance of this proposal is a thermodynamic cycle characterized by the regenerative use of the potential energy of two-phase flow expansion, which in traditional systems is lost in expansion valves. The essential new features of the process are: (1) The application of two-step throttling of the working fluid and two-step compression of its vapor phase. (2) Use of a compressor as the initial step compression and a jet device as a second step, where throttling and compression are combined. (3) Controlled ratio of a working fluid at the first and

  8. Regenerative Strategies for Craniofacial Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Catharine B.; Pomerantz, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial disorders present markedly complicated problems in reconstruction because of the complex interactions of the multiple, simultaneously affected tissues. Regenerative medicine holds promise for new strategies to improve treatment of these disorders. This review addresses current areas of unmet need in craniofacial reconstruction and emphasizes how craniofacial tissues differ from their analogs elsewhere in the body. We present a problem-based approach to illustrate current treatment strategies for various craniofacial disorders, to highlight areas of need, and to suggest regenerative strategies for craniofacial bone, fat, muscle, nerve, and skin. For some tissues, current approaches offer excellent reconstructive solutions using autologous tissue or prosthetic materials. Thus, new “regenerative” approaches would need to offer major advantages in order to be adopted. In other tissues, the unmet need is great, and we suggest the greatest regenerative need is for muscle, skin, and nerve. The advent of composite facial tissue transplantation and the development of regenerative medicine are each likely to add important new paradigms to our treatment of craniofacial disorders. PMID:23248598

  9. Low thrust propulsion literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Darrel

    1989-01-01

    A literature search was performed to investigate the area of low thrust propulsion. In an effort to evaluate this technology, a number of articles, obtained through the use of the NASA-RECON database, were collected and categorized. The study indicates that although much was done, particularly in the 1960's and 1970's, more can be done in the area of practical navigation and guidance. It is suggested that the older studies be reinvestigated to see what potential there exists for future low thrust applications.

  10. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  11. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  12. Elimination of High-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Tomas E.

    1999-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to stabilize the combustion of the Fastrac engine thrust chamber. The first few stability tests resulted in unstable combustion due ineffective acoustic cavity designs. The thrust chamber exhibited unstable combustion in the first-tangential mode and its harmonics. Combustion was stabilized by increasing the volume of the acoustic cavities and by plugging the dump-cooling orifices so that the cavities were uncooled. Although the first few stability tests resulted in unstable combustion, prior and subsequent long-duration performance tests of the Fastrac thrust chamber were spontaneously stable. Stability considerations during the injector faceplate design were based on the Hewitt correlation.

  13. Regenerative Fuel Cell Test Rig at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Bents, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell development effort at Glenn Research Center (GRC) involves the integration of a dedicated fuel cell and electrolyzer into an energy storage system test rig. The test rig consists of a fuel cell stack, an electrolysis stack, cooling pumps, a water transfer pump, gas recirculation pumps, phase separators, storage tanks for oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2), heat exchangers, isolation valves, pressure regulators, interconnecting tubing, nitrogen purge provisions, and instrumentation for control and monitoring purposes. The regenerative fuel cell (RFC) thus formed is a completely closed system which is capable of autonomous cyclic operation. The test rig provides direct current (DC) load and DC power supply to simulate power consumption and solar power input. In addition, chillers are used as the heat sink to dissipate the waste heat from the electrochemical stack operation. Various vents and nitrogen (N2) sources are included in case inert purging is necessary to safe the RFC test rig.

  14. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  15. Pulsed Electric Propulsion Thrust Stand Calibration Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance of any propulsion device requires the accurate measurement of thrust. While chemical rocket thrust is typically measured using a load cell, the low thrust levels associated with electric propulsion (EP) systems necessitate the use of much more sensitive measurement techniques. The design and development of electric propulsion thrust stands that employ a conventional hanging pendulum arm connected to a balance mechanism consisting of a secondary arm and variable linkage have been reported in recent publications by Polzin et al. These works focused on performing steady-state thrust measurements and employed a static analysis of the thrust stand response. In the present work, we present a calibration method and data that will permit pulsed thrust measurements using the Variable Amplitude Hanging Pendulum with Extended Range (VAHPER) thrust stand. Pulsed thrust measurements are challenging in general because the pulsed thrust (impulse bit) occurs over a short timescale (typically 1 micros to 1 millisecond) and cannot be resolved directly. Consequently, the imparted impulse bit must be inferred through observation of the change in thrust stand motion effected by the pulse. Pulsed thrust measurements have typically only consisted of single-shot operation. In the present work, we discuss repetition-rate pulsed thruster operation and describe a method to perform these measurements. The thrust stand response can be modeled as a spring-mass-damper system with a repetitive delta forcing function to represent the impulsive action of the thruster.

  16. Tectonothermal history of an exhumed thrust-sheet-top basin: An example from the south Pyrenean thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaume, Pierre; Meresse, Florian; Jolivet, Marc; Teixell, Antonio; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new balanced structural cross section of the Jaca thrust-sheet-top basin of the southern Pyrenees combined with paleothermometry and apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology data. The cross section, based on field data and interpretation of industrial seismic reflection profiles, allows refinement of previous interpretations of the south directed thrust system, involving the identification of new thrust faults, and of the kinematic relationships between basement and cover thrusts from the middle Eocene to the early Miocene. AFT analysis shows a southward decrease in the level of fission track resetting, from totally reset Paleozoic rocks and lower Eocene turbidites (indicative of heating to Tmax > ~120°C), to partially reset middle Eocene turbidites and no/very weak resetting in the upper Eocene-lower Oligocene molasse (Tmax < ~60°C). AFT results indicate a late Oligocene-early Miocene cooling event throughout the Axial Zone and Jaca Basin. Paleomaximum temperatures determined by vitrinite reflectance measurements and Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material reach up to ~240°C at the base of the turbidite succession. Inverse modeling of AFT and vitrinite reflectance data with the QTQt software for key samples show compatibility between vitrinite-derived Tmax and the AFT reset level for most of the samples. However, they also suggest that the highest temperatures determined in the lowermost turbidites correspond to a thermal anomaly rather than burial heating, possibly due to fluid circulation during thrust activity. From these results, we propose a new sequential restoration of the south Pyrenean thrust system propagation and related basin evolution.

  17. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  18. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  19. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  20. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  1. CMD kinetics and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2016-01-01

    The author’s theory of the cell memory disc (CMD) offers a radical and holistic picture of the cell from both functional and structural perspectives. Despite all of the attention that has been focused on different regenerative strategies, several serious CMD-based obstacles still remain that make current cell therapies inherently unethical, harmful, and largely ineffective from a clinical viewpoint. Accordingly, unless there is a real breakthrough in finding an alternative or complementary approach to overcome these barriers, all of the discussion regarding cell-based therapies may be fruitless. Hence, this paper focuses on the issue of CMD kinetics in an attempt to provide a fresh perspective on regenerative medicine. PMID:27186287

  2. Electrospun Nanofibers for Regenerative Medicine**

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenying; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent progress in applying electrospun nanofibers to the emerging field of regenerative medicine. We begin with a brief introduction to electrospinning and nanofibers, with a focus on issues related to the selection of materials, incorporation of bioactive molecules, degradation characteristics, control of mechanical properties, and facilitation of cell infiltration. We then discuss a number of approaches to fabrication of scaffolds from electrospun nanofibers, including techniques for controlling the alignment of nanofibers and for producing scaffolds with complex architectures. We also highlight applications of the nanofiber-based scaffolds in four areas of regenerative medicine that involve nerves, dural tissues, tendons, and the tendon-to-bone insertion site. We conclude this review with perspectives on challenges and future directions for design, fabrication, and utilization of scaffolds based on electrospun nanofibers. PMID:23184683

  3. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  4. Cardiac Regenerative Capacity and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The heart holds the monumental yet monotonous task of maintaining circulation. Although cardiac function is critical to other organs and to life itself, mammals are not equipped with significant natural capacity to replace heart muscle that has been lost by injury. This deficiency plays a role in leaving millions worldwide each year vulnerable to heart failure. By contrast, certain other vertebrate species like zebrafish are strikingly good at heart regeneration. A cellular and molecular understanding of endogenous regenerative mechanisms, combined with advances in methodology to transplant cells, together project a future in which cardiac muscle regeneration can be therapeutically stimulated in injured human hearts. This review will focus on what has been discovered recently about cardiac regenerative capacity and how natural mechanisms of heart regeneration in model systems are stimulated and maintained. PMID:23057748

  5. Effect of Tube Geometry on Regenerative Cooling Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parris, Daniel K.; Landrum, D. Brian

    2005-01-01

    The flowfield characteristics in a rocket engine coolant channels are analyzed by use of a commercial CFD and multiphysics software developed by the CFD Research Corp. called CFD-ACE+. The channels are characterized by high Reynolds number flow, varying aspect ratio, varying curvature, asymmetric and symmetric heating. The supercritical hydrogen coolant introduces large property variations that have a strong influence on the developing flow and the resulting heat transfer. This paper only shows the effect of aspect ratio and curvature for constant properties.

  6. Low thrust orbit determination program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, P. E.; Shults, G. L.; Huling, K. R.; Ratliff, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Logical flow and guidelines are provided for the construction of a low thrust orbit determination computer program. The program, tentatively called FRACAS (filter response analysis for continuously accelerating spacecraft), is capable of generating a reference low thrust trajectory, performing a linear covariance analysis of guidance and navigation processes, and analyzing trajectory nonlinearities in Monte Carlo fashion. The choice of trajectory, guidance and navigation models has been made after extensive literature surveys and investigation of previous software. A key part of program design relied upon experience gained in developing and using Martin Marietta Aerospace programs: TOPSEP (Targeting/Optimization for Solar Electric Propulsion), GODSEP (Guidance and Orbit Determination for SEP) and SIMSEP (Simulation of SEP).

  7. Constraints on the tectonics of the Mule Mountains thrust system, southeast California and southwest Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Tosdal, R.M. )

    1990-11-10

    The Mule Mountains thrust system crops out discontinuously over a 100-km-strike length in the Blythe-Quartzsite region of southeast California and southwest Arizona. Along the thrust system, middle and upper crustal metamorphic and plutonic rocks of Proterozoic and Mesozoic age are thrust north-northeastward (015{degree} to 035{degree}) over a lower plate metamorphic terrane that formed part of the Proterozoic North American craton, its Paleozoic sedimentary rock cover, overlying Mesozoic volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and the intruding Jurassic and Cretaceous granitic rocks. Stratigraphic, petrologic, and Pb isotopic ties for Jurassic granitoids and for Jurassic( ) and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks across the various parts of the thrust system indicate that related crustal blocks are superposed and preclude it from having large displacements. The thick-skinned thrust system is structurally symmetrical along its length with a central domain of synmetamorphic thrust faults that are flanked by western and eastern domains where lower plate domains where lower plate synclines underlie the thrusts. Deformation occurred under low greenschist facies metamorphic conditions in the upper crust. Movement along the thrust system was probably limited to no more than a few tens of kilometers and occurred between 79{plus minus}2 Ma and 70{plus minus}4 Ma. The superposition of related rocks and the geometry of the thrust system preclude it from being a major tectonic boundary of post-Middle Jurassic age, as has been previously proposed. Rather, the thrust system forms the southern boundary of the narrow zone of Cretaceous intracratonic deformation, and it is one of the last tectonic events in the zone prior to regional cooling.

  8. Simulation of a regenerative MW FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, R.T.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Both oscillator and regenerative amplifier configurations are being studied to optimize the design of a MW class FEL. The regenerative amplifier uses a longer undulator and relies on higher extraction efficiency to achieve high average power, whereas the oscillator is a more compact overall design requiring the transport of the high energy electron beam around bends for energy recovery. Using parameters extrapolated from the 1 kW LANL regenerative amplifier, simulations study the feasibility of achieving 1 MW average power.

  9. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Low epsilon stability test report data dump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The stability characteristics of the like-doublet injector were defined over the range of OME chamber pressures and mixture ratios. This was accomplished by bomb testing the injector and cavity configurations in solid wall thrust chamber hardware typical of a flight contour with fuel heated to regenerative chamber outlet temperatures. It was found that stability in the 2600-2800 Hz region depends upon injector hydraulics and on chamber acoustics.

  10. Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles

    DOEpatents

    Dao, Kim

    1990-01-01

    Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

  11. Regenerative Engineering and Bionic Limbs

    PubMed Central

    James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2015-01-01

    Amputations of the upper extremity are severely debilitating, current treatments support very basic limb movement, and patients undergo extensive physiotherapy and psychological counselling. There is no prosthesis that allows the amputees near-normal function. With increasing number of amputees due to injuries sustained in accidents, natural calamities and international conflicts, there is a growing requirement for novel strategies and new discoveries. Advances have been made in technological, material and in prosthesis integration where researchers are now exploring artificial prosthesis that integrate with the residual tissues and function based on signal impulses received from the residual nerves. Efforts are focused on challenging experts in different disciplines to integrate ideas and technologies to allow for the regeneration of injured tissues, recording on tissue signals and feed-back to facilitate responsive movements and gradations of muscle force. A fully functional replacement and regenerative or integrated prosthesis will rely on interface of biological process with robotic systems to allow individual control of movement such as at the elbow, forearm, digits and thumb in the upper extremity. Regenerative engineering focused on the regeneration of complex tissue and organ systems will be realized by the cross-fertilization of advances over the past thirty years in the fields of tissue engineering, nanotechnology, stem cell science, and developmental biology. The convergence of toolboxes crated within each discipline will allow interdisciplinary teams from engineering, science, and medicine to realize new strategies, mergers of disparate technologies, such as biophysics, smart bionics, and the healing power of the mind. Tackling the clinical challenges, interfacing the biological process with bionic technologies, engineering biological control of the electronic systems, and feed-back will be the important goals in regenerative engineering over the next

  12. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  13. Entropy Generation in Regenerative Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Heat exchange to the oscillating flows in regenerative coolers generates entropy. These flows are characterized by oscillating mass flows and oscillating temperatures. Heat is transferred between the flow and heat exchangers and regenerators. In the former case, there is a steady temperature difference between the flow and the heat exchangers. In the latter case, there is no mean temperature difference. In this paper a mathematical model of the entropy generated is developed for both cases. Estimates of the entropy generated by this process are given for oscillating flows in heat exchangers and in regenerators. The practical significance of this entropy is also discussed.

  14. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  15. Heat regenerative external combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duva, Anthony W.

    1993-10-01

    A heat regenerative external combustion engine is disclosed. The engine includes fuel inlet means which extends along the exhaust passage and/or combustion chamber in order to preheat the fuel, To provide for preheating by gases in both the combustion chamber and the exhaust passage, the combustion chamber is arranged annularly around the drive shaft and between the cylinders. This configuration also is advantageous in that it reduces the noise of combustion. The engine of the invention is particularly well-suited for use in a torpedo.

  16. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  17. Synfolding magnetization in the Jurassic Preuss Sandstone, Wyoming- Idaho-Utah thrust belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, M.R.; Reynolds, R.L.; Fishman, N.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Jurassic Preuss Sandstone, exposed in five thrust plates of the Wyoming-Idaho-Utah thrust belt, carried directions of remanent magnetization that group most tightly after only partial unfolding. Field, petrographic, and rock magnetic evidence indicates that the carrier of this magnetization is detrital, low-Ti titanomagnetite. The detrital titanomagnetite was remagnetized at low temperatures (75??-150??C) probably completely during folding. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and petrographic observations indicate that the detrital titanomagnetite has been affected by tectonic strain. The locus of acquisition of synfolding magnetization in the Preuss migrated in conjunction with deformation in the thrust belt. A model is presented in which synfolding magnetization was acquired during cooling and folding as strata moved up thrust ramps. A lack of reverse-polarity directions remains a puzzling feature of the remanence. -from Authors

  18. Modular multi-engine thrust control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a modular thrust control lever assembly for controling forward/reverse thrust generated by an aircraft engine. It includes an electric/electronic engine thrust control system, an inhibit mechanism for preventing inadverent or premature establishment of at least one of forward and reverse engine thrust. It consists of a (a) housing; (b) a control lever assembly pivotally mounted within the housing for fore and aft pivotal movement in a single vertical plane; (c) movable inhibit mechanism normally mounted in the path of movement of the laterally projecting roller on the control lever assembly between at least one of the maximum thrust limit positions of the assembly and the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (d) a electric/electronic engine thrust control system including an mechanism for reconfiguring the thrust controls of the engine upon movement of the thrust control lever assembly to the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (e) a mechanism responsive to the output signal for shifting the inhibit mechanism out of the path of movement of the control lever assembly.

  19. Regenerative medicine in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Felsenstein, Kevin M; Candelario, Kate M; Steindler, Dennis A; Borchelt, David R

    2014-04-01

    Identifying novel, effective therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major unmet medical needs for the coming decade. Because the current paradigm for developing and testing disease-modifying AD therapies is protracted and likely to be even longer, with the shift toward earlier intervention in preclinical AD, it is an open issue whether we can develop, test, and widely deploy a novel therapy in time to help the current at-risk generation if we continue to follow the standard paradigms of discovery and drug development. There is an imperative need to find safe and effective preventive measures that can be distributed rapidly to stem the coming wave of AD that will potentially engulf the next generation. We can define regenerative medicine broadly as approaches that use stem cell-based therapies or approaches that seek to modulate inherent neurogenesis. Neurogenesis, although most active during prenatal development, has been shown to continue in several small parts of the brain, including the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, suggesting its potential to reverse cognitive deficits. If AD pathology affects neurogenesis, then it follows that conditions that stimulate endogenous neurogenesis (eg, environmental stimuli, physical activity, trophic factors, cytokines, and drugs) may help to promote the regenerative and recovery process. Herein, we review the complex logistics of potentially implementing neurogenesis-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD. PMID:24286919

  20. Regenerative Medicine in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Candelario, Kate M.; Steindler, Dennis A.; Borchelt, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying novel, effective therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major unmet medical needs for the coming decade. Because the current paradigm for developing and testing disease modifying AD therapies is protracted and likely to be even longer with the shift towards earlier intervention in pre-clinical AD, it is an open question whether we can develop, test, and widely deploy a novel therapy in time to help the current at-risk generation if we continue to follow the standard paradigms of discovery and drug development. There is an imperative need to find safe and effective preventative measures that can be rapidly deployed to stem the coming wave of AD that will potentially engulf the next generation. We can broadly define regenerative medicine as approaches that use stem-cell-based therapies or approaches that seek to modulate inherent neurogenesis. Neurogenesis, though most active during pre-natal development has been shown to continue in several small parts of the brain, which includes the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, suggesting its potential to reverse cognitive deficits. If AD pathology impacts neurogenesis then it follows that conditions that stimulate endogenous neurogenesis (e.g., environmental stimuli, physical activity, trophic factors, cytokines, and drugs) may help to promote the regenerative and recovery process. Herein, we review the complex logistics of potentially implementing neurogenesis-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD. PMID:24286919

  1. Regenerative thermal oxidation for non-conventional applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gosselin, G.; Gravel, J.J.O.

    1999-07-01

    Regenerative Thermal Oxidation has been applied by Biothermica to treat non-conventional emissions. These emissions include pollutants as VOC, COC, TRS, PAH, PCB, HCl and odors. In the kraft pulping industry, environmental requirements for reduced emissions of total reduced sulfur (TRS) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) from pulping operations are leading to incinerators of high destruction efficiency and thermal performance. The first installation in Canada of a Regenerative Thermal Oxidation (RTO) was placed in service early in 1997 at a kraft pulp mill in the province of Quebec. Tests have shown a TRS reduction of 99.6% with a thermal efficiency of 88.5% in the RTO. It can be considered the best method to comply with the new norms for TRS atmospheric emissions in the pulp and paper industry. In the primary aluminum process, a marked improvement in anode properties can be gained by preparing the paste at high temperature, followed by cooling with a water addition in an intensive mixer. However, the addition of cooling water results in a large increase in the emissions of VOC and PAH which can prejudice the process. A number of emission control processes were evaluated. An improved Regenerative Thermal Oxidation (RTO) unit was installed in a modern aluminum plant in Canada. The emissions of VOCs and PAHs from an EIRICH intensive mixer-cooler were reduced by more than 99.9% while all troublesome deposits in the fumes collection system were eliminated. This enabled the plant to remain well within the emission levels allowed by the environmental authority while enjoying considerable benefits from improved anode qualities. In the asphalt roofing industry, RTO was applied to treat the VOC and COC emissions and several units have been in operation since 1990. In the United States two units were installed in asphalt shingle plants and new features in the process show a VOC and COC reduction of 99%.

  2. Theoretical and experimental study on regenerative rotary displacer Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Raggi, L.; Katsuta, Masafumi; Isshiki, Naotsugu; Isshiki, Seita

    1997-12-31

    Recently a quite new type of hot air engine called rotary displacer engine, in which the displacer is a rotating disk enclosed in a cylinder, has been conceived and developed. The working gas, contained in a notch excavated in the disk, is heated and cooled alternately, on account of the heat transferred through the enclosing cylinder that is heated at one side and cooled at the opposite one. The gas temperature oscillations cause the pressure fluctuations that get out mechanical power acting on a power piston. In order to attempt to increase the performances for this kind of engine, the authors propose three different regeneration methods. The first one comprises two coaxial disks that, revolving in opposite ways, cause a temperature gradient on the cylinder wall and a regenerative axial heat conduction through fins shaped on the cylinder inner wall. The other two methods are based on the heat transferred by a proper closed circuit that in one case has a circulating liquid inside and in the other one is formed by several heat pipes working each one for different temperatures. An engine based on the first principle, the Regenerative Tandem Contra-Rotary Displacer Stirling Engine, has been realized and experimented. In this paper experimental results with and without regeneration are reported comparatively with a detailed description of the unity. A basic explanation of the working principle of this engine and a theoretical analysis investigating the main influential parameters for the regenerative effect are done. This new rotating displacer Stirling engines, for their simplicity, are expected to attain high rotational speed especially for applications as demonstration and hobby unities.

  3. AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration for low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration technology for low temperature applications that is a novel cooling method to expand the temperature span of magnetic refrigerator. The key component of the AMR system is a porous magnetic regenerator which allows a heat transfer medium (typically helium gas) to flow through it and therefore obviate intermittently operating an external heat switch. The AMR system alternatingly heats and cools the heat transfer medium by convection when the magneto-caloric effect is created under varying magnetic field. AMR may extend the temperature span for wider range than ADR (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) at higher temperatures above 10 K because magneto-caloric effects are typically concentrated in a small temperature range in usual magnetic refrigerants. The regenerative concept theoretically enables each magnetic refrigerant to experience a pseudo-Carnot magnetic refrigeration cycle in a wide temperature span if it is properly designed, although adequate thermodynamic matching of strongly temperature-dependent MCE (magneto-caloric effect) of the regenerator material and the heat capacity of fluid flow is often tricky due to inherent characteristics of magnetic materials. This paper covers historical developments, fundamental concepts, key components, applications, and recent research trends of AMR refrigerators for liquid helium or liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  4. Transient Three-Dimensional Side Load Analysis of a Film Cooled Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Guidos, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Transient three-dimensional numerical investigations on the side load physics for an engine encompassing a film cooled nozzle extension and a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber, were performed. The objectives of this study are to identify the three-dimensional side load physics and to compute the associated aerodynamic side load using an anchored computational methodology. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet history based on an engine system simulation. Ultimately, the computational results will be provided to the nozzle designers for estimating of effect of the peak side load on the nozzle structure. Computations simulating engine startup at ambient pressures corresponding to sea level and three high altitudes were performed. In addition, computations for both engine startup and shutdown transients were also performed for a stub nozzle, operating at sea level. For engine with the full nozzle extension, computational result shows starting up at sea level, the peak side load occurs when the lambda shock steps into the turbine exhaust flow, while the side load caused by the transition from free-shock separation to restricted-shock separation comes at second; and the side loads decreasing rapidly and progressively as the ambient pressure decreases. For the stub nozzle operating at sea level, the computed side loads during both startup and shutdown becomes very small due to the much reduced flow area.

  5. Transient Three-Dimensional Side Load Analysis of Out-of-Round Film Cooled Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Lin, Jeff; Ruf, Joe; Guidos, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of nozzle out-of-roundness on the transient startup side loads. The out-of-roundness could be the result of asymmetric loads induced by hardware attached to the nozzle, asymmetric internal stresses induced by previous tests and/or deformation, such as creep, from previous tests. The rocket engine studied encompasses a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and a film cooled nozzle extension with film coolant distributed from a turbine exhaust manifold. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet history based on an engine system simulation. Transient startup computations were performed with the out-of-roundness achieved by four degrees of ovalization of the nozzle: one perfectly round, one slightly out-of-round, one more out-of-round, and one significantly out-of-round. The computed side load physics caused by the nozzle out-of-roundness and its effect on nozzle side load are reported and discussed.

  6. Changes in Regenerative Capacity through Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Maximina H.

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms experience changes in regenerative abilities through their lifespan. During aging, numerous tissues exhibit a progressive decline in homeostasis and regeneration that results in tissue degeneration, malfunction and pathology. The mechanisms responsible for this decay are both cell intrinsic, such as cellular senescence, as well as cell-extrinsic, such as changes in the regenerative environment. Understanding how these mechanisms impact on regenerative processes is essential to devise therapeutic approaches to improve tissue regeneration and extend healthspan. This review offers an overview of how regenerative abilities change through lifespan in various organisms, the factors that underlie such changes and the avenues for therapeutic intervention. It focuses on established models of mammalian regeneration as well as on models in which regenerative abilities do not decline with age, as these can deliver valuable insights for our understanding of the interplay between regeneration and aging. PMID:26512653

  7. Changes in Regenerative Capacity through Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Yun, Maximina H

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms experience changes in regenerative abilities through their lifespan. During aging, numerous tissues exhibit a progressive decline in homeostasis and regeneration that results in tissue degeneration, malfunction and pathology. The mechanisms responsible for this decay are both cell intrinsic, such as cellular senescence, as well as cell-extrinsic, such as changes in the regenerative environment. Understanding how these mechanisms impact on regenerative processes is essential to devise therapeutic approaches to improve tissue regeneration and extend healthspan. This review offers an overview of how regenerative abilities change through lifespan in various organisms, the factors that underlie such changes and the avenues for therapeutic intervention. It focuses on established models of mammalian regeneration as well as on models in which regenerative abilities do not decline with age, as these can deliver valuable insights for our understanding of the interplay between regeneration and aging. PMID:26512653

  8. Chronology of paleozoic metamorphism and deformation in the Blue Ridge thrust complex, North Carolina and Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, S.A.; Dallmeyer, R.D.

    1997-05-01

    The Blue Ridge province in northwestern North Carolina and northeastern Tennessee records a multiphase collisional and accretionary history from the Mesoproterozoic through the Paleozoic. To constrain the tectonothermal evolution in this region, radiometric ages have been determined for 23 regionally metamorphosed amphibolites, granitic gneisses, and pelitic schists and from mylonites along shear zones that bound thrust sheets and within an internal shear zone. The garnet ages from the Pumpkin Patch a thrust sheet (458, 455, and 451 Ma) are similar to those from the structurally overlying Spruce Pine thrust sheet (460, 456, 455, and 450 Ma). Both thrust sheets exhibit similar upper amphibolite-facies conditions. Because of the high closure temperature for garnet, the garnet ages are interpreted to date growth at or near the peak of Taconic metamorphism. Devonian metamorphic ages are recognized in the Spruce Pine thrust sheet, where Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr garnet ages of 386 and 393 Ma and mineral isochron ages of 397 {+-} 14 and 375 {+-} 27 Ma are preserved. Hornblendes record similar {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar, Sm-Nd, and Rb-Sr ages of 398 to 379 Ma. Devonian {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar hornblende ages are also recorded in the structurally lower Pumpkin Patch thrust sheet. The Devonian mineral ages are interpreted to date a discrete tectonothermal event, as opposed to uplift and slow cooling from an Ordovician metamorphic event. The Mississippian mylonitization is interpreted to represent thrusting and initial assembly of crystalline sheets associated with the Alleghanian orogeny. The composite thrust stack of the Blue Ridge complex was subsequently thrust northwestward along the Linville Falls fault during middle Alleghanian orogeny (about 300 Ma).

  9. Solar electric propulsion thrust beam interactive effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Interactive effects between ion engine thrust beams and an SEP spacecraft and its science payload have been examined. AC electric contamination from thrust beam potential fluctuations of both 'common mode' and 'point-to-point' forms has been evaluated. Quenching of point-to-point E-fields by both thrust ion and charge exchange ion plasmas is expected. Reduction methods for AC electric contamination from common mode thrust beam potential fluctuations have been developed. Charged particle contamination of ambient space and plasma wave contamination may result from density magnitude and spatial extent of charge exchange plasma plumes. Reduction methods for cone of directions of high angle charge exchange ions have been examined.

  10. Design and evaluation of thrust vectored nozzles using a multicomponent thrust stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Thomas W.; Blattner, Ernest W.; Stagner, Robert E.; Contreras, Juanita; Lencioni, Dennis; Mcintosh, Greg

    1990-01-01

    Future aircraft with the capability of short takeoff and landing, and improved maneuverability especially in the post-stall flight regime will incorporate exhaust nozzles which can be thrust vectored. In order to conduct thrust vector research in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cal Poly, a program was planned with two objectives; design and construct a multicomponent thrust stand for the specific purpose of measuring nozzle thrust vectors; and to provide quality low moisture air to the thrust stand for cold flow nozzle tests. The design and fabrication of the six-component thrust stand was completed. Detailed evaluation tests of the thrust stand will continue upon the receipt of one signal conditioning option (-702) for the Fluke Data Acquisition System. Preliminary design of thrust nozzles with air supply plenums were completed. The air supply was analyzed with regard to head loss. Initial flow visualization tests were conducted using dual water jets.

  11. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  12. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators Thrust-Measurement Methodology Incorporating New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a large diameter, grounded, metal sleeve.

  13. Regenerative Therapies for Diabetic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Roberto; Trevisani, Alessio; Tezza, Sara; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Gatti, Francesca; Vergani, Andrea; Farina, Antonio; Fiorina, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia occurring in diabetes is responsible for accelerated arterial remodeling and atherosclerosis, affecting the macro- and the microcirculatory system. Vessel injury is mainly related to deregulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin/insulin-precursors production, generation of advanced glycation end-products, reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, and oxidative and reductive stress. It occurs both at extracellular level with increased calcium and matrix proteins deposition and at intracellular level, with abnormalities of intracellular pathways and increased cell death. Peripheral arterial disease, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke are the main causes of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients representing a major clinical and economic issue. Pharmacological therapies, administration of growth factors, and stem cellular strategies are the most effective approaches and will be discussed in depth in this comprehensive review covering the regenerative therapies of diabetic microangiopathy. PMID:22536216

  14. Unitized regenerative fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell system uses heat pipes to convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the reactant storage tanks. The storage tanks act as heat sinks/sources and as passive radiators of the waste heat from the fuel cell stack. During charge up, i.e., the electrolytic process, gases are conveyed to the reactant storage tanks by way of tubes that include dryers. Reactant gases moving through the dryers give up energy to the cold tanks, causing water vapor in with the gases to condense and freeze on the internal surfaces of the dryer. During operation in its fuel cell mode, the heat pipes convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the respective reactant storage tanks, thereby heating them such that the reactant gases, as they pass though the respective dryers on their way to the fuel cell stacks retrieve the water previously removed.

  15. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  16. Unitized regenerative fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitlitsky, F; Molter, T M; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

    1998-09-10

    Energy storage systems with extremely high specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) have been designed that use lightweight pressure vessels to contain the gases generated by reversible (unitized) regenerative fuel cells (URFCs).[1] URFC systems are being designed and developed for a variety of applications, including high altitude long endurance (HALE) solar rechargeable aircraft (SRA), zero emission vehicles (ZEVs), hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems for spacecraft, energy storage for remote (off-grid) power sources, and peak shaving for on-grid applications.[1-10] Energy storage for HALE SRA was the original application for this set of innovations, and a prototype solar powered aircraft (Pathfinder-Plus) recently set another altitude record for all propeller-driven aircraft on August 6, 1998, when it flew to 80,285 feet (24.47 km).[11

  17. Perivascular cells for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, Mihaela; Corselli, Mirko; Chen, William CW; Péault, Bruno; Moldovan, NI

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are currently the best candidate therapeutic cells for regenerative medicine related to osteoarticular, muscular, vascular and inflammatory diseases, although these cells remain heterogeneous and necessitate a better biological characterization. We and others recently described that MSC originate from two types of perivascular cells, namely pericytes and adventitial cells and contain the in situ counterpart of MSC in developing and adult human organs, which can be prospectively purified using well defined cell surface markers. Pericytes encircle endothelial cells of capillaries and microvessels and express the adhesion molecule CD146 and the PDGFRβ, but lack endothelial and haematopoietic markers such as CD34, CD31, vWF (von Willebrand factor), the ligand for Ulex europaeus 1 (UEA1) and CD45 respectively. The proteoglycan NG2 is a pericyte marker exclusively associated with the arterial system. Besides its expression in smooth muscle cells, smooth muscle actin (αSMA) is also detected in subsets of pericytes. Adventitial cells surround the largest vessels and, opposite to pericytes, are not closely associated to endothelial cells. Adventitial cells express CD34 and lack αSMA and all endothelial and haematopoietic cell markers, as for pericytes. Altogether, pericytes and adventitial perivascular cells express in situ and in culture markers of MSC and display capacities to differentiate towards osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic cell lineages. Importantly, adventitial cells can differentiate into pericyte-like cells under inductive conditions in vitro. Altogether, using purified perivascular cells instead of MSC may bring higher benefits to regenerative medicine, including the possibility, for the first time, to use these cells uncultured. PMID:22882758

  18. The Beaufort Sea fold-and-thrust belt, northwestern Canada: Implications for thrust-belt evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Root, K.G. )

    1991-06-01

    The northeasternmost segment of the Cordilleran thrust belt of western North American underlies the Beaufort Sea continental margin. Folds and associated northesat-directed thrusts in this region formed synchronously with Tertiary sedimentation. As a result, the times of fold development can be determined from reflection seismic data by analyzing lateral thickness changes in stratigraphic sequences of known ages, and onlap and truncation relationships at unconformities. Thrust faulting occurred throughout the late Paleocene-Pliocene. The abundant temporal data indicate the deformational seuqence was significantly differet from the simple, steplike, foreland-propagating model formulated in other less well-dated thrust belts. Many thrusts were active simultaneously, especially during the late Eocnee, when the region of active thrusting had an across-strike width of greater than 200 km. This observation calls into question the popular concept that only one thrust moves at a time as a thrust belt develops. The thrust belt propagated along, as well as across, strike. During the late Paleocene-middle Eocene, the area of active thrusting was bounded on the southeast by poorly imaged zones of right-lateral strike-slip faults that apparently are the northern offshore continuation of the Rapid fault array. The change in the age of thrusting along strike results in no obvious geometrical anomalies and could not be deduced without timing information. This has an important implication: temporal data cannot necessarily be projected along strike in a thrust belt.

  19. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  20. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  1. High power thrust vector actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittock, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    Modern missile programs are frequently favoring electro-mechanical (EM) thrust vector actuation (TVA) over hydraulic for a variety of reasons. However, actuation system performance requirements are not relaxed for EM systems. Thus the development of EM systems with greater power output is required. The configuration of EM actuator studied consists of a DC brushless motor driving a spur gear train, which drives a ballscrew that converts rotary motion to rectilinear motion. This design produces an actuator with high levels of performance in a compact mechanical package. Design for manufacturability and assembly (DFMA) was part of the design process, resulting in an actuator that can be assembled easily and will operate reliably. This paper will discuss the mechanical details of the resultant actuator and report test results on a prototype derivative.

  2. Low thrust rocket test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    A low thrust chemical rocket test facility has recently become operational at the NASA-Lewis. The new facility is used to conduct both long duration and performance tests at altitude over a thruster's operating envelope using hydrogen and oxygen gas for propellants. The facility provides experimental support for a broad range of objectives, including fundamental modeling of fluids and combustion phenomena, the evaluation of thruster components, and life testing of full rocket designs. The major mechanical and electrical systems are described along with aspects of the various optical diagnostics available in the test cell. The electrical and mechanical systems are designed for low down time between tests and low staffing requirements for test operations. Initial results are also presented which illustrate the various capabilities of the cell.

  3. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-12-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force—the thrust—on the rocket.1,2 Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of conservation of momentum is generally used in textbooks3,4 and elsewhere5 in deriving the rocket thrust equation. In this paper we take the somewhat different approach of explicitly applying Newton's second law to the rocket. This method provides a good opportunity to show the importance of choosing carefully the system to which Newton's second law is applied.

  4. Modeling regenerative braking and storage for vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, F.; Donnelly, K.

    1997-12-31

    The fuel savings benefits of regenerative braking and storage for vehicles are often described but not quantified. For example, the federal government and automobile manufacturers are sponsoring a Program for a New Generation of Vehicles (PGNV) with a goal of obtaining a performance of 80 mpg in a family size car. It is typically suggested that such a vehicle will be a hybrid engine and electric drive with regenerative braking. The authors note that while regenerative braking has the potential of saving fuel, it may also do more harm than good as a result of additional weight, less than ideal charge/discharge efficiency on the batteries or storage flywheels and the limited portion of the entire driving cycle when regenerative braking can be utilized. The authors also noted that if regenerative braking can have a net benefit, it would be on a heavy vehicle such as a municipal bus because of the frequent stop and go requirements for both traffic light and passengers. Thus the authors initiated a study of regenerative braking on such a vehicle. The resulting analysis presented in this paper includes data following municipal buses to define the driving cycle, modeling the bus power requirements from weight, aerodynamics and rolling resistance, and then calculating the fuel saving that could result from an ideal regenerative braking system.

  5. Thrust bolting: roof bolt support apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tadolini, Stephen C.; Dolinar, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    A method of installing a tensioned roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads by applying thrust to the bolt (19) as the bonding material (7') is curing to compress the strata (3) surrounding the borehole (1), and then relieving the thrust when the bonding material (7') has cured.

  6. Mu rhythm desynchronization by tongue thrust observation

    PubMed Central

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Inagaki, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the mu rhythm in the sensorimotor area during tongue thrust observation and to obtain an answer to the question as to how subtle non-verbal orofacial movement observation activates the sensorimotor area. Ten healthy volunteers performed finger tap execution, tongue thrust execution, and tongue thrust observation. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 128 electrodes placed on the scalp, and regions of interest were set at sensorimotor areas. The event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) for the mu rhythm (8–13 Hz) and beta (13−25 Hz) bands were measured. Tongue thrust observation induced mu rhythm ERD, and the ERD was detected at the left hemisphere regardless whether the observed tongue thrust was toward the left or right. Mu rhythm ERD was also recorded during tongue thrust execution. However, temporal analysis revealed that the ERD associated with tongue thrust observation preceded that associated with execution by approximately 2 s. Tongue thrust observation induces mu rhythm ERD in sensorimotor cortex with left hemispheric dominance. PMID:26441599

  7. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  8. Thrust Characterization for Vortex Ring Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Mike; Mohseni, Kamran

    2007-11-01

    Synthetic jets are zero net mass pulsatile jets that are commonly used in flow control applications in air. In these cases the natural resonant frequency of the actuators plays an important role. In this work we will present thrust characterization of vortex ring thrusters (VRTs) in liquid (equivalent of synthetic jets in liquid medium). VRTs design are motivated by pulsatile jet propulsion in squid and jellyfish. A prototype jet thruster was designed and build for this investigation. The effect of the actuation frequency and stroke ratio on the thrust level was experimentally studied. A simplified slug model was defined which predicted the thrust according to the momentum transfer. According to the model the thrust values for various frequencies converges to a single non-dimensionalized thrust, which is only a function of the stroke ratio. The accuracy of the model was defined in terms of a coefficient α which related predicted thrust values to those measured experimentally. This coefficient was observed to be nearly unity for stroke ratios below the formation number of the jet, and for frequencies below critical cavitation frequencies. α was seen to decrease (measured thrust drops below predicted thrust) with increasing frequency for all jets with stroke ratios above the formation number. The feasibility of using such a device in typical marine vehicles was tested by implementing the thruster in an unmanned underwater vehicle. The vehicle test-bed was operated in various dynamic maneuvers, including a simulated parallel park.

  9. Constraints on the tectonics of the Mule Mountains thrust system, southeast California and southwest Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tosdal, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Mule Mountains thrust system crops out discontinuously over a 100-km-strike length in this Blythe-Quartzsite region. Along the thrust system, middle and upper crustal metamorphic and plutonic rocks of Proterozoic and Mesozoic age are thrust N-NE (015??-035??) over a lower plate metamorphic terrane. Stratigraphic, petrologic, and Pb isotopic ties for Jurassic granitoids and for Jurassic(?) and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks across the various parts of the thrust system indicate that related crustal blocks are superposed and preclude it from having large displacements. Deformation occurred under low greenschist facies metamorphic conditions in the upper crust. Movement along the thrust system was probably limited to no more than a few tens of kilometers and occurred between 79??2 Ma and 70??4 Ma. Results suggest that the thrust system forms the southern boundary of the narow zone of Cretaceous intracratonic deformation, and it is one of the last tectonic events in the zone prior to regional cooling. -from Author

  10. Optimal thermoeconomic performance of an irreversible regenerative ferromagnetic Ericsson refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhichao; Guo, Juncheng; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of the Langevin theory of classical statistical mechanics, the magnetization, entropy, and iso-field heat capacity of ferromagnetic materials are analyzed and their mathematical expressions are derived. An irreversible regenerative Ericsson refrigeration cycle by using a ferromagnetic material as the working substance is established, in which finite heat capacity rates of low and high temperature reservoirs, non-perfect regenerative heat of the refrigeration cycle, additional regenerative heat loss, etc. are taken into account. Based on the regenerative refrigeration cycle model, a thermoeconomic function is introduced as one objective function and optimized with respect to the temperatures of the working substance in the two iso-thermal processes. By means of numerical calculation, the effects of the effective factor of the heat exchangers in high/low temperature reservoir sides, efficiency of the regenerator, heat capacity rate of the low temperature reservoir, and applied magnetic field on the optimal thermoeconomic function as well as the corresponding cooling rate and coefficient of performance are revealed. The results obtained in this paper can provide some theoretical guidance for the optimal design of actual regenerative magnetic refrigerator cycle.

  11. Transpiration cooled throat for hydrocarbon rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Lee R.; Burkhardt, Wendel M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective for the Transpiration Cooled Throat for Hydrocarbon Rocket Engines Program was to characterize the use of hydrocarbon fuels as transpiration coolants for rocket nozzle throats. The hydrocarbon fuels investigated in this program were RP-1 and methane. To adequately characterize the above transpiration coolants, a program was planned which would (1) predict engine system performance and life enhancements due to transpiration cooling of the throat region using analytical models, anchored with available data; (2) a versatile transpiration cooled subscale rocket thrust chamber was designed and fabricated; (3) the subscale thrust chamber was tested over a limited range of conditions, e.g., coolant type, chamber pressure, transpiration cooled length, and coolant flow rate; and (4) detailed data analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between the key performance and life enhancement variables.

  12. Oxygen/Alcohol Dual Thrust RCS Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angstadt, Tara; Hurlbert, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust RCS engine offers significant operational, safety, and performance advantages to the space shuttle and the next generation RLVs. In this concept, a single engine produces two thrust levels of 25 and 870 lbf. The low thrust level is provided by the spark torch igniter, which, with the addition of 2 extra valves, can also be made to function as a vernier. A dual thrust RCS engine allows 38 verniers to be packaged more efficiently on a vehicle. These 38 vemiers improve translation and reduce cross coupling, thereby providing more pure roll, pitch, and yaw maneuvers of the vehicle. Compared to the 6 vemiers currently on the shuttle, the 38 dual thrust engines would be 25 to 40% more efficient for the same maneuvers and attitude control. The vernier thrust level also reduces plume impingement and contamination concerns. Redundancy is also improved, thereby improving mission success reliability. Oxygen and ethanol are benign propellants which do not create explosive reaction products or contamination, as compared to hypergolic propellants. These characteristics make dual-thrust engines simpler to implement on a non-toxic reaction control system. Tests at WSTF in August 1999 demonstrated a dual-thrust concept that is successful with oxygen and ethanol. Over a variety of inlet pressures and mixture ratios at 22:1 area ratio, the engine produced between 230 and 297 sec Isp, and thrust levels from 8 lbf. to 50 lbf. This paper describes the benefits of dual-thrust engines and the recent results from tests at WSTF.

  13. Is cooling still cool?

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Ashwin; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Botha, John

    2015-03-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH), where patients are cooled to between 32°C and 36°C for a period of 12-24 hours and then gradually rewarmed, may reduce the risk of ischemic injury to cerebral tissue following a period of insufficient blood flow. This strategy of TH could improve mortality and neurological function in patients who have experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA). The necessity of TH in OOHCA was challenged in late 2013 by a fascinating and potentially practice changing publication, which found that targeting a temperature of 36°C had similar outcomes to cooling patients to 33°C. This article reviews the current literature and summarizes the uncertainties and questions raised when considering cooling of patients at risk of hypoxic brain injury. Irrespective of whether TH or targeted temperature management is deployed in patients at risk of hypoxic brain injury, it would seem that avoiding hyperpyrexia is important and that a more rigorous approach to neurological evaluation is mandated. PMID:25423577

  14. A reevaluation of the age of the Vincent-Chocolate Mountains thrust system, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.E. . Dept. of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences); Barth, A.P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Vincent-Chocolate Mountains (VCM) thrust superposes Mesozoic arc plutons and associated Precambrian country rock above subduction-related Pelona-Orocopia schist. The thrust is disrupted in many areas by postmetamorphic deformation, but appears to be intact in the San Gabriel Mountains. Two Rb-Sr mineral-isochron ages from Pelona Schist and mylonite in the San Gabriel Mountains led Ehlig (1981) to conclude that the original thrusting event occurred at c. 60 Ma. However, biotite K-Ar ages determined by Miller and Morton (1980) for upper plate in the same area caused Dillon (1986) to reach a different conclusion. The biotite ages range mainly from 74--60 Ma and increase structurally upward from the VCM thrust. Dillon (1986) inferred that the age gradient was due to uplift and cooling of the upper plate during underthrusting of Pelona Schist. This would indicate that the VCM thrust was at least 74 Ma in age. An alternative to the interpretation of Dillon (1986) is that the biotite age gradient largely predates the VCM thrust. Upward heat flow, leading to older ages at higher structural levels, could have resulted from either static cooling of Cretaceous plutons or uplift and erosion induced by crustal thickening during possible west-directed intra-arc thrusting at c. 88--78 Ma (May and Walker, 1989). Subsequent underthrusting of Pelona Schist would establish a cold lower boundary to the crust and cause the closure of isotopic systems in the base of the upper plate. A 60 Ma time of thrusting is also suggested by two amphibole [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages from the Pelona Schist of the San Gabriel Mountains. Peak metamorphic temperature in this area was below 480 C and amphibole ages should thus indicate time of crystallization rather than subsequent cooling. Four phengite [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages of 55--61 Ma from Pelona Schist and mylonite indicate rapid cooling from peak metamorphic temperatures, consistent with subduction refrigeration.

  15. Electron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.

    2004-10-01

    The brief review of the most significant and interesting achievements in electron cooling method, which took place during last two years, is presented. The description of the electron cooling facilities-storage rings and traps being in operation or under development-is given. The applications of the electron cooling method are considered. The following modern fields of the method development are discussed: crystalline beam formation, expansion into middle and high energy electron cooling (the Fermilab Recycler Electron Cooler, the BNL cooler-recuperator, cooling with circulating electron beam, the GSI project), electron cooling in traps, antihydrogen generation, electron cooling of positrons (the LEPTA project).

  16. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  17. Regenerative medicine applications in combat casualty care.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mark E; Bharmal, Husain; Valerio, Ian

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe regenerative medicine applications in the management of complex injuries sustained by service members injured in support of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Improvements in body armor, resuscitative techniques and faster transport have translated into increased patient survivability and more complex wounds. Combat-related blast injuries have resulted in multiple extremity injuries, significant tissue loss and amputations. Due to the limited availability and morbidity associated with autologous tissue donor sites, the introduction of regenerative medicine has been critical in managing war extremity injuries with composite massive tissue loss. Through case reports and clinical images, this report reviews the application of regenerative medicine modalities employed to manage combat-related injuries. It illustrates that the novel use of hybrid reconstructions combining traditional and regenerative medicine approaches are an effective tool in managing wounds. Lessons learned can be adapted to civilian care. PMID:24750059

  18. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  19. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  20. Global strategic partnerships in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    French, Anna; Suh, Jane Y; Suh, Carol Y; Rubin, Lee; Barker, Richard; Bure, Kim; Reeve, Brock; Brindley, David A

    2014-09-01

    The approach to research and development in biomedical science is changing. Increasingly, academia and industry seek to collaborate, and share resources and expertise, by establishing partnerships. Here, we explore the co-development partnership landscape in the field of regenerative medicine, focusing on agreements involving one or more private entities. A majority of the largest biopharmaceutical companies have announced strategic partnerships with a specific regenerative medicine focus, signifying the growth and widening appeal of this emerging sector.

  1. Global strategic partnerships in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    French, Anna; Suh, Jane Y; Suh, Carol Y; Rubin, Lee; Barker, Richard; Bure, Kim; Reeve, Brock; Brindley, David A

    2014-09-01

    The approach to research and development in biomedical science is changing. Increasingly, academia and industry seek to collaborate, and share resources and expertise, by establishing partnerships. Here, we explore the co-development partnership landscape in the field of regenerative medicine, focusing on agreements involving one or more private entities. A majority of the largest biopharmaceutical companies have announced strategic partnerships with a specific regenerative medicine focus, signifying the growth and widening appeal of this emerging sector. PMID:25150363

  2. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  3. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  4. Current overview on challenges in regenerative endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regenerative endodontics provides hope of converting the non-vital tooth into vital once again. It focuses on substituting traumatized and pathological pulp with functional pulp tissue. Current regenerative procedures successfully produce root development but still fail to re-establish real pulp tissue and give unpredictable results. There are several drawbacks that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of the treatment. Aim: The aim of this review article is to discuss major priorities that ought to be dealt before applications of regenerative endodontics flourish the clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using filter terms Review, published in the last 10 years and Dental journals. Keywords used for research were “regenerative endodontics,” “dental stem cells,” “growth factor regeneration,” “scaffolds,” and “challenges in regeneration.” This review article screened about 150 articles and then the relevant information was compiled. Results: Inspite of the impressive growth in regenerative endodontic field, there are certain loopholes in the existing treatment protocols that might sometimes result in undesired and unpredictable outcomes. Conclusion: Considerable research and development efforts are required to improve and update existing regenerative endodontic strategies to make it an effective, safe, and biological mode to save teeth. PMID:25657518

  5. Regenerative fuel cell engineering - FY99

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Inbody; Rodney L. Borup; James C. Hedstrom; Jose Tafoya; Byron Morton; Lois Zook; Nicholas E. Vanderborgh

    2000-01-01

    The authors report the work conducted by the ESA-EPE Fuel Cell Engineering Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY99 on regenerative fuel cell system engineering. The work was focused on the evaluation of regenerative fuel cell system components obtained through the RAFCO program. These components included a 5 kW PEM electrolyzer, a two-cell regenerative fuel cell stack, and samples of the electrolyzer membrane, anode, and cathode. The samples of the electrolyzer membrane, anode, and cathode were analyzed to determine their structure and operating characteristics. Tests were conducted on the two-cell regenerative fuel cell stack to characterize its operation as an electrolyzer and as a fuel cell. The 5 kW PEM electrolyzer was tested in the Regenerative Fuel Cell System Test Facility. These tests served to characterize the operation of the electrolyzer and, also, to verify the operation of the newly completed test facility. Future directions for this work in regenerative fuel cell systems are discussed.

  6. Closed cycle desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernev, D. I.; Emerson, D. T.

    1986-10-01

    The breadboard prototype of a closed cycle desiccant cooling system was designed, constructed and its performance tested. The system combines the sorption properties of solid zeolite/refrigerant vapor pairs with the principle of regenerative heat exchangers. Since solid zeolites are difficult to move in vacuum tight containers and in order to avoid intermittent operation, the desiccant is housed in two separate containers which are alternately heated and cooled by a heat transfer fluid. Using the principle of energy regeneration, the heat removed from the container being cooled is recycled in the container being heated. The breadboard system, with 90 pounds of zeolite, demonstrated a recycling efficiency of 75%, while the system capacity was 2,000 Btu/hr. This significantly increased the system thermal Coefficient of Performance (COP) to 1.1 at ARI conditions from the single container thermal COP of 0.4.

  7. Low-thrust chemical orbit transfer propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The need for large structures in high orbit is reported in terms of the many mission opportunities which require such structures. Mission and transportation options for large structures are presented, and it is shown that low-thrust propulsion is an enabling requirement for some missions and greatly enhancing to many others. Electric and low-thrust chemical propulsion are compared, and the need for an requirements of low-thrust chemical propulsion are discussed in terms of the interactions that are perceived to exist between the propulsion system and the large structure.

  8. Rocket thrust variation with foamed liquid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, G

    1957-01-01

    An analysis is presented on a method for varying rocket thrust by varying the bulk density of the propellants. This density variation was accomplished by uniformly dispersing an inert, insoluble gas in the liquid propellants. Only qualitative agreement with theory was obtained from preliminary experiments with a 1000-pound-thrust ammonia - nitric acid rocket engine; the required experimental gas-flow rates were two to six times greater than those predicted by theory. It was demonstrated, however, that this method of rocket-thrust variation is feasible.

  9. Preserving human cells for regenerative, reproductive, and transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Assal, Rami El; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Cell cryopreservation enables maintaining cellular life at sub-zero temperatures by slowing down biochemical processes. Various cell types are routinely cryopreserved in modern reproductive, regenerative, and transfusion medicine. Current cell cryopreservation methods involve freezing (slow/rapid) or vitrifying cells in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA). Although these methods are clinically utilized, cryo-injury due to ice crystals, osmotic shock, and CPA toxicity cause loss of cell viability and function. Recent approaches using minimum volume vitrification provide alternatives to the conventional cryopreservation methods. Minimum volume vitrification provides ultra-high cooling and rewarming rates that enable preserving cells without ice crystal formation. Herein, we review recent advances in cell cryopreservation technology and provide examples of techniques that are utilized in oocyte, stem cell, and red blood cell cryopreservation. PMID:24995723

  10. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the Probe Thrust Vector Control concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Lewis, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    A concept that offers an alternate method for thrust vector control of liquid or solid propellant rockets is the use of a solid body or probe that is inserted on demand through the wall of the rocket nozzle. This Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) concept is an alternative to that of a gimbaled nozzle or a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector control system. The viability of the PTVC concept can be assessed either experimentally and/or with the use of CFD. A purely experimental assessment is time consuming and expensive, whereas a CFD assessment is time- and cost-effective. Two key requirements of the concept are PTVC vectoring performance and active cooling requirements for the probe to maintain its thermal and structural integrity. The objective of the work reported here is presentation of experimental subscale cold flow tests and comparison of these tests with CFD predictions and the response time of the PTVC system.

  11. Thrust and power required in climbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, George

    1923-01-01

    The following article shows that the phenomena of climbing flight can be determined with sufficient accuracy and represented very clearly, for all flight positions, by means of the thrust diagrams. This method has often given good results.

  12. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If the engine incorporates a reverser, the endurance calibration, operation, and vibration tests prescribed...

  13. Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

  14. Comparative investigation of multiplane thrust vectoring nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F.; Smereczniak, P.; Spetnagel, D.; Thayer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inflight aerodynamic performance of multiplane vectoring nozzles is critical to development of advanced aircraft and flight control systems utilizing thrust vectoring. To investigate vectoring nozzle performance, subscale models of two second-generation thrust vectoring nozzle concepts currently under development for advanced fighters were integrated into an axisymmetric test pod. Installed drag and vectoring performance characteristics of both concepts were experimentally determined in wind tunnel testing. CFD analyses were conducted to understand the impact of internal flow turning on thrust vectoring characteristics. Both nozzles exhibited drag comparable with current nonvectoring axisymmetric nozzles. During vectored-thrust operations, forces produced by external flow effects amounted to about 25 percent of the total force measured.

  15. GSFC Technology Thrusts and Partnership Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Moigne, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology thrusts and the opportunities to partner in developing software in support of the technological advances at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). There are thrusts in development of end-to-end software systems for mission data systems in areas of flight software, ground data systems, flight dynamic systems and science data systems. The required technical expertise is reviewed, and the supported missions are shown for the various areas given.

  16. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  17. Thrusting and sedimentation along an emergent thrust front: an example from the External Sierras of the Southern Pyrenees, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasio, D.J.; De Paor, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Depending on the relative rates of thrusting and erosion, emergent thrusts, like glaciers, may advance or retreat while continually moving forward. The relative rates of thrusting and erosion as a thrust ruptures the land surface also control the mountain front geometry. For listric thrusts, the high angle of intersection with the land surface results in primarily upward rather than horizontal movement. If thrust movement is much faster than the prevailing erosion a large emergent toe will develop as the thrust sheet advances over its synorogenic deposits. Alternatively, if the erosion rates are generally faster than thrusting, synorogenic deposits will progressively onlap onto a receding mountain front. Comparable rates of thrusting and erosion result in steady state uplift and denudation. In the External Sierras the thrust front reached the synorogenic surface during the Paleogene and resulted in the accumulation of thick synorogenic deposits. Relatively slow rates of thrusting (<1mm/a) and uplift (<0.5mm/a) of the External Sierras, coupled with moderate erosion rates resulted in a near stationary mountain front. Despite this, temporal and spatial fluctuations in the thrusting resulted in three different mountain front geometries. In places, the thrust front has been buried by molasse, elsewhere, the emergent thrust sheet has deformed its proximal molasse by bulldozing, producing deposits analogous to push moraines, and in other places the frontal thrust has overridden its molasse. Striated cobbles within the molasse immediately below the frontal thrust may have functioned like ball bearings, reducing the friction with the overriding thrust sheet.

  18. Regenerative treatments to enhance orthopedic surgical outcome.

    PubMed

    Murrell, William D; Anz, Adam W; Badsha, Humeira; Bennett, William F; Boykin, Robert E; Caplan, Arnold I

    2015-04-01

    In orthopedic surgery there has been a never-ending quest to improve surgical outcome and the patient's experience. Progression has been marked by the refinement of surgical techniques and instruments and later by enhanced diagnostic imaging capability, specifically magnetic resonance. Over time implant optimization was achieved, along with the development of innovative minimally invasive arthroscopic technical skills to leverage new versions of classic procedures and implants to improve short-term patient morbidity and initial, mid-term, and long-term patient outcomes. The use of regenerative and/or biological adjuncts to aid the healing process has followed in the drive for continual improvement, and major breakthroughs in basic science have significantly unraveled the mechanisms of key healing and regenerative pathways. A wide spectrum of primary and complementary regenerative treatments is becoming increasingly available, including blood-derived preparations, growth factors, bone marrow preparations, and stem cells. This is a new era in the application of biologically active material, and it is transforming clinical practice by providing effective supportive treatments either at the time of the index procedure or during the postoperative period. Regenerative treatments are currently in active use to enhance many areas of orthopedic surgery in an attempt to improve success and outcome. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the peer-reviewed evidence-based literature, highlighting the clinical outcomes in humans both with preclinical data and human clinical trials involving regenerative preparations within the areas of rotator cuff, meniscus, ligament, and articular cartilage surgical repair.

  19. Regenerative medicine: Current therapies and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Angelo S.; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Organ and tissue loss through disease and injury motivate the development of therapies that can regenerate tissues and decrease reliance on transplantations. Regenerative medicine, an interdisciplinary field that applies engineering and life science principles to promote regeneration, can potentially restore diseased and injured tissues and whole organs. Since the inception of the field several decades ago, a number of regenerative medicine therapies, including those designed for wound healing and orthopedics applications, have received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and are now commercially available. These therapies and other regenerative medicine approaches currently being studied in preclinical and clinical settings will be covered in this review. Specifically, developments in fabricating sophisticated grafts and tissue mimics and technologies for integrating grafts with host vasculature will be discussed. Enhancing the intrinsic regenerative capacity of the host by altering its environment, whether with cell injections or immune modulation, will be addressed, as well as methods for exploiting recently developed cell sources. Finally, we propose directions for current and future regenerative medicine therapies. PMID:26598661

  20. Functional imaging for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Martin; Thompson, Kerry; Zafar, Haroon; Alexandrov, Sergey; Foley, Mark; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Dockery, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging is a platform technology with the power to put function in its natural structural context. With the drive to translate stem cell therapies into pre-clinical and clinical trials, early selection of the right imaging techniques is paramount to success. There are many instances in regenerative medicine where the biological, biochemical, and biomechanical mechanisms behind the proposed function of stem cell therapies can be elucidated by appropriate imaging. Imaging techniques can be divided according to whether labels are used and as to whether the imaging can be done in vivo. In vivo human imaging places additional restrictions on the imaging tools that can be used. Microscopies and nanoscopies, especially those requiring fluorescent markers, have made an extraordinary impact on discovery at the molecular and cellular level, but due to their very limited ability to focus in the scattering tissues encountered for in vivo applications they are largely confined to superficial imaging applications in research laboratories. Nanoscopy, which has tremendous benefits in resolution, is limited to the near-field (e.g. near-field scanning optical microscope (NSNOM)) or to very high light intensity (e.g. stimulated emission depletion (STED)) or to slow stochastic events (photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM)). In all cases, nanoscopy is limited to very superficial applications. Imaging depth may be increased using multiphoton or coherence gating tricks. Scattering dominates the limitation on imaging depth in most tissues and this can be mitigated by the application of optical clearing techniques that can impose mild (e.g. topical application of glycerol) or severe (e.g. CLARITY) changes to the tissue to be imaged. Progression of therapies through to clinical trials requires some thought as to the imaging and sensing modalities that should be used. Smoother progression is facilitated by the use of

  1. Duration of activity on lobate-scarp thrust faults on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Maria E.; Xiao, Zhiyong; Watters, Thomas R.; Strom, Robert G.; Braden, Sarah E.; Chapman, Clark R.; Solomon, Sean C.; Klimczak, Christian; Byrne, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Lobate scarps, landforms interpreted as the surface manifestation of thrust faults, are widely distributed across Mercury and preserve a record of its history of crustal deformation. Their formation is primarily attributed to the accommodation of horizontal shortening of Mercury's lithosphere in response to cooling and contraction of the planet's interior. Analyses of images acquired by the Mariner 10 and MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft during flybys of Mercury showed that thrust faults were active at least as far back in time as near the end of emplacement of the largest expanses of smooth plains. However, the full temporal extent of thrust fault activity on Mercury, particularly the duration of this activity following smooth plains emplacement, remained poorly constrained. Orbital images from the MESSENGER spacecraft reveal previously unrecognized stratigraphic relations between lobate scarps and impact craters of differing ages and degradation states. Analysis of these stratigraphic relations indicates that contraction has been a widespread and long-lived process on the surface of Mercury. Thrust fault activity had initiated by a time near the end of the late heavy bombardment of the inner solar system and continued through much or all of Mercury's subsequent history. Such deformation likely resulted from the continuing secular cooling of Mercury's interior.

  2. Project S'COOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Carolyn J.; Chambers, Lin H.

    1998-01-01

    The Students Clouds Observations On-Line or S'COOL project was piloted in 1997. It was created with the idea of using students to serve as one component of the validation for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument which was launched with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November, 1997. As part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise CERES is interested in the role clouds play in regulating our climate. Over thirty schools became involved in the initial thrust of the project. The CERES instrument detects the location of clouds and identifies their physical properties. S'COOL students coordinate their ground truth observations with the exact overpass of the satellite at their location. Their findings regarding cloud type, height, fraction and opacity as well as surface conditions are then reported to the NASA Langley Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data is then accessible to both the CERES team for validation and to schools for educational application via the Internet. By March of 1998 ninety-three schools, in nine countries had enrolled in the S'COOL project. Joining the United States participants were from schools in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The project is gradually becoming the global project envisioned by the project s creators. As students obtain the requested data useful for the scientists, it was hoped that students with guidance from their instructors would have opportunity and motivation to learn more about clouds and atmospheric science as well.

  3. Along-Strike Variability in Erosion of the Nepalese Himalayan Thrust Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCelles, P. G.; Carrapa, B.; Cross, E. A., III; Ojha, T. P.; Reiners, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    We present 22 apatite fission track (AFT) and 82 single grain zircon He (ZHe) ages for thirty samples from Greater Himalayan (GH) and Lesser Himalayan (LH) rocks and AFT ages for two detrital samples from the Kaligandaki River and Modi Khola in central and western Nepal. At regional scale ages decrease from central to western Nepal. Ages in central Nepal are < 5 Ma with many < 2 Ma, whereas ages west of the Kaligandaki are 5-14 Ma. The sand samples are dominated by 8-6 Ma detrital AFT age populations. Thermal modeling of AFT and ZHe ages in western Nepal shows an episode of rapid cooling between 12 and 8 Ma during emplacement of the Ramgarh thrust. Rocks from lower structural positions have younger (< 8 Ma) ages, consistent with growth of the Lesser Himalayan duplex. Old cooling ages in western Nepal correlate with lower erosion rates, drier climate, and an upward-convex to gently sloping topographic profile. Precipitation in western Nepal is concentrated at the front of the high-grade, GH klippen, which orographically shelter the thrust belt to the north. Younger ages in central Nepal instead correlate with higher erosion rates, northward penetration of intense monsoonal precipitation into the interior of the range, and development of an upward-concave topographic profile indicative of relatively intense erosion. This region lacks GH rocks south of the trace of the Main Central thrust, and the area between the Main Boundary and Main Frontal thrusts is lower than 1 km allowing precipitation to penetrate farther north. Higher erosion in central compared to western Nepal is also supported by the geology: resistant GH rocks in southern central Nepal are limited to the Kathmandu klippe, whereas in western Nepal they cover a larger area in the Dadeldhura and Jajarkot klippen. Cooling ages in western Nepal are interpreted to date the timing of thrust-sheet emplacement as supported by a southward decrease of ages. In central Nepal the correlation between intense

  4. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  5. Cardiovascular Regenerative Technologies: Update and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Mallone, Anna; Weber, Benedikt; Hoerstrup, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    In the effort of improving treatment for cardiovascular disease (CVD), scientists struggle with the lack of the regenerative capacities of finally differentiated cardiovascular tissues. In this context, the advancements in regenerative medicine contributed to the development of cell-based therapies as well as macro- and micro-scale tissue-engineering technologies. The current experimental approaches focus on different regenerative strategies including a broad spectrum of techniques such as paracrine-based stimulation of autologous cardiac stem cells, mesenchymal cell injections, 3D microtissue culture techniques and vascular tissue-engineering methods. These potential next-generation strategies are leading the way to a revolution in addressing CVD, and numerous studies are now undertaken to assess their therapeutic value. With this review, we provide an update on the current research directions, on their major challenges, limitations, and achievements. PMID:27721705

  6. Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Soumen; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Dowding, Janet; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Baer, Donald R.; McGinnis, James F.; Mattson, Mark P.; Self, William; Seal, Sudipta

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim to achieve functional restoration of tissue or cells damaged through disease, aging or trauma. Advancement of tissue engineering requires innovation in the field of 3D scaffolding, and functionalization with bioactive molecules. Nanotechnology offers advanced materials with patterned nano-morphologies for cell growth and different molecular substrates which can support cell survival and functions. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) can control intracellular as well as extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent findings suggest that nanoceria can enhance long-term cell survival, enable cell migration and proliferation, and promote stem cell differentiation. Moreover, the self-regenerative property of nanoceria permits a small dose to remain catalytically active for extended time. This review summarizes the possibilities and applications of nanoceria in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  7. Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system

    DOEpatents

    Venkataperumal, Rama R.; Mericle, Gerald E.

    1981-06-02

    A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle, with the braking system being responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

  8. Combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system

    DOEpatents

    Venkataperumal, R.R.; Mericle, G.E.

    1979-08-09

    A combined hydraulic and regenerative braking system and method for an electric vehicle is disclosed. The braking system is responsive to the applied hydraulic pressure in a brake line to control the braking of the vehicle to be completely hydraulic up to a first level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a constant braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly increasing braking force from the first level of applied brake line pressure to a higher second level of brake line pressure, to be partially hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force and partially regenerative at a linearly decreasing braking force from the second level of applied line pressure to a third and higher level of applied line pressure, and to be completely hydraulic at a linearly increasing braking force from the third level to all higher applied levels of line pressure.

  9. Middle Proterozoic thrusting in central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Grambling, J.A.; Thompson, A.G. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences); Dallmeyer, R.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Ductile thrust faults truncate contact-metamorphic aureoles surrounding two 1.4 Ga plutons in central New Mexico. The Priest quartz monzonite (1440 Ma) and Sandia granite (1420 Ma) are 50 km apart in the continuous Sandia/Manzano mountain chain. Thermobarometry and phase relations demonstrate that country-rock temperatures rose from 700 C toward the pluton, at pressure near 4 kb. The northern edge of this aureole is cut by the southeast-dipping ductile Monte Largo thrust fault. Prograde, greenschist-facies metamorphism of footwall rocks accompanied local retrogression of hangingwall rocks during thrusting. This second metamorphism took place at P-T conditions of 2-3 kb and 450-475 C. Another contact aureole surrounds the Sandia granite. Mafic rocks near the granite reflect amphibolite-facies conditions, whereas pelites display low-pressure contact assemblages. Quantitative temperatures increase from 500--750 C toward the granite, at pressures of 2.5--3.5 kb. The shallowly southeast-dipping Vincent Moore fault truncates the Sandia granite and the southern portion of its contact aureole. This ductile shear zone emplaced greenschist-facies rocks northwestward above the Sandia contact aureole. Footwall rocks were retrograded to the greenschist facies within 100 m of this fault; the retrograde phases are aligned parallel to the trace of the thrust. Metamorphic temperatures in hangingwall rocks (during thrusting ) were 400-475 C at pressures above 2.75 kb. Additional northwest-vergent ductile thrusts are found elsewhere in the mountain chain. This may represent the age of thrusting and of the related greenschist and the related greenschist-facies metamorphic overprint.

  10. On the Thrust of a Single Electrode Electrohydrodynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilit', Tomáš; Váry, Michal; Valko, Pavol

    2015-03-01

    Linear thrust generation by a single pin emitter electrode under AC excitation has been studied. Presented are thrust measurements of a single electrode thruster, in comparison with classical, two electrode electrohydrodynamic thruster. The experiments show comparable thrust for both configurations at low voltage levels, suggesting higher thrust-to-weight ratio of single electrode thrusters at low applied voltages. Further, a hypothesis of single electrode thrust creation is proposed.

  11. Functionalized Nanostructures with Application in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Perán, Macarena; García, María A.; López-Ruiz, Elena; Bustamante, Milán; Jiménez, Gema; Madeddu, Roberto; Marchal, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, both regenerative medicine and nanotechnology have been broadly developed leading important advances in biomedical research as well as in clinical practice. The manipulation on the molecular level and the use of several functionalized nanoscaled materials has application in various fields of regenerative medicine including tissue engineering, cell therapy, diagnosis and drug and gene delivery. The themes covered in this review include nanoparticle systems for tracking transplanted stem cells, self-assembling peptides, nanoparticles for gene delivery into stem cells and biomimetic scaffolds useful for 2D and 3D tissue cell cultures, transplantation and clinical application. PMID:22489186

  12. WIDE BAND REGENERATIVE FREQUENCY DIVIDER AND MULTIPLIER

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1959-11-17

    A regenerative frequency divider and multiplier having wide band input characteristics is presented. The circuit produces output oscillations having frequencies related by a fixed ratio to input oscillations over a wide band of frequencies. In accomplishing this end, the divider-multiplier includes a wide band input circuit coupled by mixer means to a wide band output circuit having a pass band related by a fixed ratio to that of the input circuit. A regenerative feedback circuit derives a fixed frequency ratio feedback signal from the output circuit and applies same to the mixer means in proper phase relation to sustain fixed frequency ratio oscillations in the output circuit.

  13. Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System Gas Dryer/Humidifier Analytical Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian

    2004-01-01

    A lightweight Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC) Energy Storage System concept is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System (URFCS) is unique in that it uses Regenerative Gas Dryers/Humidifiers (RGD/H) that are mounted on the surface of the gas storage tanks that act as the radiators for thermal control of the Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System (URFCS). As the gas storage tanks cool down during URFCS charging the RGD/H dry the hydrogen and oxygen gases produced by electrolysis. As the gas storage tanks heat up during URFCS discharging, the RGD/H humidify the hydrogen and oxygen gases used by the fuel cell. An analytical model was developed to simulate the URFCS RGD/H. The model is in the form of a Microsoft (registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation) Excel worksheet that allows the investigation of the RGD/H performance. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modeling of the RGD/H and the gas storage tank wall was also done to analyze spatial temperature distribution within the RGD/H and the localized tank wall. Test results obtained from the testing of the RGD/H in a thermal vacuum environment were used to corroborate the analyses.

  14. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.; Jones, J. E.; Cox, M. D.

    2004-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting thrusters with total mass of up to 125 kg and 1 mN to 1 N thrust levels has been developed and tested. The mechanical design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that transforms horizontal motion into amplified vertical motion, with accommodation for variable displacement sensitivity. Unlike conventional hanging pendulum thrust stands, the deflection is independent of the length of the pendulum arm, and no reference structure is required at the end of the pendulum. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer. Mechanical oscillations are attenuated using a passive, eddy current damper. An on-board microprocessor-based level control system, which includes a two axis accelerometer and two linear-displacement stepper motors, continuously maintains the level of the balance mechanism - counteracting mechanical %era drift during thruster testing. A thermal control system, which includes heat exchange panels, thermocouples, and a programmable recirculating water chiller, continuously adjusts to varying thermal loads to maintain the balance mechanism temperature, to counteract thermal drifts. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady state calibration both prior to and during thruster testing. Thrust measurements were carried out on a well-characterized 1 kW Hall thruster; the thrust stand was shown to produce repeatable results consistent with previously published performance data.

  15. Static performance of a cruciform nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring and reverse-thrust capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1992-01-01

    A multiaxis thrust vectoring nozzle designed to have equal flow turning capability in pitch and yaw was conceived and experimentally tested for internal, static performance. The cruciform-shaped convergent-divergent nozzle turned the flow for thrust vectoring by deflecting the divergent surfaces of the nozzle, called flaps. Methods for eliminating physical interference between pitch and yaw flaps at the larger multiaxis deflection angles was studied. These methods included restricting the pitch flaps from the path of the yaw flaps and shifting the flow path at the throat off the nozzle centerline to permit larger pitch-flap deflections without interfering with the operation of the yaw flaps. Two flap widths were tested at both dry and afterburning settings. Vertical and reverse thrust configurations at dry power were also tested. Comparison with two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles showed lower but still competitive thrust performance and thrust vectoring capability.

  16. Initiation of subduction by post-collision foreland thrusting and back-thrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. H. G.

    1984-07-01

    While postulated causes of initial subduction and trench formation include underthrusting, controls on its location and age have not been determined. Consideration of the age of subduction zones bordering five collisional orogens suggests that subduction may have been initiated by foreland thrusts and back-thrusts. Foreland thrusts develop within a continental foreland on the subducting plate mostly within 50 my of collision with an arc system; where the foreland is narrow the thrusts may intersect the continent-ocean crust boundary. Back-thrusts develop in the fore-arc or back-arc area on the overriding plate within 10 to 20 my of collision, and can result in tectonic burial of the magmatic arc; where the arc system is oceanic the back-thrusts may intersect the arc-ocean crust boundary. Possible examples of subduction initiated by foreland thrusts are the start of subduction in the late Jurassic beneath the northern Sunda Arc, and at the end-Miocene in the Negros Trench. Examples of back-thrusts which have initiated or may initiate subduction are the late Cenozoic eastward translation of Taiwan over the Philippine Sea plate, the incipient southward subduction of the Banda Sea beneath Timor, and the W-dipping back-thrust comprising the Highland Boundary Fault zone and postulated early Ordovician thrusts to the SE in Scotland. The suggested relationship of subduction to collision helps to explain the persistence of Wilson cycles in the still-active late Mesozoic to Cenozoic orogenic belts and implies that orogeny will cease only with collision between major continents.

  17. Fluid-rock interaction and thermal evolution during thrusting of an Alpine metamorphic complex (Tinos island, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, A.; Lieberman, J.; Avigad, D.; Garfunkel, Z.

    This study examines the fluid-rock interaction and thermal evolution along a thrust that juxtaposes calcite-rich marbles of high P-T metamorphic unit of the Attic-Cycladic Massif (Greece) on top of a lower-grade dolomite marble unit. The Tertiary thrust represents a major phase of tectonic movement related to the decompression of the Alpine orogen in the Hellenides. The stable isotope signatures of the thrust plane and adjacent sections of the footwall and hanging wall rocks are characterized by significant carbon and oxygen isotope depletions. The depletion is most pronounced in calcite, but is almost entirely missing in coexisting dolomite. The isotopic patterns in the thrust zone can be explained by the infiltration of an externally derived water-rich H2O-CO2-CH4 fluid [XC (=XCO2+XCH4)<0.05] at water-rock ratios on the order of 0.1 to 0.5 by weight. The fluid-induced calcite recrystallization is viewed as an important rheological control during thrusting. The temperature evolution of the footwall, hanging wall and mylonitic tectonic contact was determined by calcite-dolomite solvus thermometry. Histograms of calcite-dolomite temperatures are interpreted as indicating a heating of the footwall dolomite marble during the thrusting of the hotter upper plate. Conversely, the hanging wall marble unit was cooled during the thrusting. The calcite-dolomite thermometry of the thrust plane gives temperatures intermediate between the initial temperatures of the lower and upper marble units, and this leads to the conclusion that conductive heat transfer rather than fluid infiltration controlled the thermal evolution during thrusting.

  18. Status of Low Thrust Work at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.

    2004-01-01

    High performance low thrust (solar electric, nuclear electric, variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket) propulsion offers a significant benefit to NASA missions beyond low Earth orbit. As NASA (e.g., Prometheus Project) endeavors to develop these propulsion systems and associated power supplies, it becomes necessary to develop a refined trajectory design capability that will allow engineers to develop future robotic and human mission designs that take advantage of this new technology. This ongoing work addresses development of a trajectory design and optimization tool for assessing low thrust (and other types) trajectories. This work targets to advance the state of the art, enable future NASA missions, enable science drivers, and enhance education. This presentation provides a summary of the low thrust-related JSC activities under the ISP program and specifically, provides a look at a new release of a multi-gravity, multispacecraft trajectory optimization tool (Copernicus) along with analysis performed using this tool over the past year.

  19. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  20. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion

  1. Regenerative Studies: College Community and Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woltz, Mary G.

    This case study applies principles derived from the Center for Regenerative Studies (CRS) to a community college in North Carolina. CRS, on the campus of California State Polytechnic Institute (California), is dedicated to the education, demonstration, and research of degenerative systems in the areas of shelter, food production, energy, water and…

  2. Regenerative treatment strategies in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hegewald, Aldemar Andres; Ringe, Jochen; Sittinger, Michael; Thome, Claudius

    2008-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is considered a major source of low back pain. Recent advances in regenerative medicine have led to promising new approaches for the biological treatment of disc degeneration. Treatment modalities include the administration of growth factors, the application of autologous or allogenic cells, gene therapy, in situ therapy and the introduction of biomaterials or a combination thereof. Promising experimental results in vitro and in animal studies support the potential feasibility of these treatment modalities in clinical studies. We will review the current literature on regenerative treatment strategies and discuss potential drawbacks as well as opportunities in translating current knowledge into clinical practice. Major obstacles to regenerative treatment strategies might be insufficient nutritional supply, pain mediating factors and functionally impaired donor cells. Therefore, for clinical application, patient selection will be essential. Molecular, cellular and radiological diagnostic tools to evaluate the eligibility of patients for particular treatment strategies need to be developed. In spinal surgery, two approaches are conceivable. Patients operated on lumbar disc herniations often develop back pain due to disc degeneration months to years after surgery. Here, additional regenerative interventions would have a preventive intention, whereas interventions for painful degenerative disc disease as an alternative to spinal fusion or disc arthroplasty would be a curative approach.

  3. Regenerative nanomedicine: current perspectives and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Koel; Kumar, Vishu; Kandasamy, Jayaprakash; RoyChoudhury, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has considerably accelerated the growth of regenerative medicine in recent years. Application of nanotechnology in regenerative medicine has revolutionized the designing of grafts and scaffolds which has resulted in new grafts/scaffold systems having significantly enhanced cellular and tissue regenerative properties. Since the cell–cell and cell-matrix interaction in biological systems takes place at the nanoscale level, the application of nanotechnology gives an edge in modifying the cellular function and/or matrix function in a more desired way to mimic the native tissue/organ. In this review, we focus on the nanotechnology-based recent advances and trends in regenerative medicine and discussed under individual organ systems including bone, cartilage, nerve, skin, teeth, myocardium, liver and eye. Recent studies that are related to the design of various types of nanostructured scaffolds and incorporation of nanomaterials into the matrices are reported. We have also documented reports where these materials and matrices have been compared for their better biocompatibility and efficacy in supporting the damaged tissue. In addition to the recent developments, future directions and possible challenges in translating the findings from bench to bedside are outlined. PMID:25214780

  4. Regenerative nanomedicine: ethical, legal, and social issues.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Linda MacDonald; Boyce, Jeanann S

    2012-01-01

    Advances in regenerative nanomedicine raise a host of ethical, legal, and social questions that healthcare providers and scientists will need to consider. These questions and concerns include definitions, appropriate applications, dual use, potential risks, regulations, and access. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the questions and concerns and recommend proactive consideration and solutions. PMID:22042687

  5. Simulations of the LANL regenerative amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kesselring, M.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    The LANL regenerative amplifier FEL is designed to produce an average output power of 1 kW. Simulations study the transverse effects due to guiding by the intense electron beam and feedback. These simulations coupled with experimental measurements can be used to improve future high-power FEL designs.

  6. Applications of regenerative medicine in organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Aditya; Bansal, Ramta

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide shortage of organs for clinical implantation establishes the need to bring forward and test new technologies that will help in solving the problem. The concepts of regenerative medicine hold the potential for augmenting organ function or repairing damaged organ or allowing regeneration of deteriorated organs and tissue. Researchers are exploring possible regenerative medicine applications in organ transplantation so that coming together of the two fields can benefit each other. The present review discusses the strategies that are being implemented to regenerate or bio-engineer human organs for clinical purposes. It also highlights the limitations of the regenerative medicine that needs to be addressed to explore full potential of the field. A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using keywords “regenerative medicine,” “tissue-engineering,” “bio-engineered organs,” “decellularized scaffold” and “three-dimensional printing.” This review screened about 170 articles to get the desired knowledge update. PMID:26229352

  7. Wing design with attainable thrust considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Shrout, B. L.; Darden, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    A CAD process that includes leading-edge thrust considerations for wings with high aerodynamic efficiencies is outlined. Rectangular grids are used for evaluation of both subsonic and supersonic pressure loadings. Account is taken of the Mach number, Re, the wing planform, the presence of camber, the airfoil geometry and the locations and forces induced by shed vortices. Optimization techniques are applied to the candidate surfaces in order to consider the attainable thrust. Inclusion of the optimization techniques permits analyses of mission-adaptive wings and various flap systems and the elimination of singularities in the flight envelope.

  8. SEP thrust subsystem performance sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.; Sauer, C. G., Jr.; Kerrisk, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    This is a two-part report on solar electric propulsion (SEP) performance sensitivity analysis. The first part describes the preliminary analysis of the SEP thrust system performance for an Encke rendezvous mission. A detailed description of thrust subsystem hardware tolerances on mission performance is included together with nominal spacecraft parameters based on these tolerances. The second part describes the method of analysis and graphical techniques used in generating the data for Part 1. Included is a description of both the trajectory program used and the additional software developed for this analysis. Part 2 also includes a comprehensive description of the use of the graphical techniques employed in this performance analysis.

  9. A microNewton thrust stand for average thrust measurement of pulsed microthruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei-Jing; Hong, Yan-Ji; Chang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A torsional thrust stand has been developed for the study of the average thrust for microNewton pulsed thrusters. The main body of the thrust stand mainly consists of a torsional balance, a pair of flexural pivots, a capacitive displacement sensor, a calibration assembly, and an eddy current damper. The behavior of the stand was thoroughly studied. The principle of thrust measurement was analyzed. The average thrust is determined as a function of the average equilibrium angle displacement of the balance and the spring stiffness. The thrust stand has a load capacity up to 10 kg, and it can theoretically measure the force up to 609.6 μN with a resolution of 24.4 nN. The static calibrations were performed based on the calibration assembly composed of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet. The calibration results demonstrated good repeatability (less than 0.68% FSO) and good linearity (less than 0.88% FSO). The assembly of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet was also used as an exciter to simulate the microthruster to further research the performance of the thrust stand. Three sets of force pulses at 17, 33.5, and 55 Hz with the same amplitude and pulse width were tested. The repeatability error at each frequency was 7.04%, 1.78%, and 5.08%, respectively.

  10. A microNewton thrust stand for average thrust measurement of pulsed microthruster.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Jing; Hong, Yan-Ji; Chang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A torsional thrust stand has been developed for the study of the average thrust for microNewton pulsed thrusters. The main body of the thrust stand mainly consists of a torsional balance, a pair of flexural pivots, a capacitive displacement sensor, a calibration assembly, and an eddy current damper. The behavior of the stand was thoroughly studied. The principle of thrust measurement was analyzed. The average thrust is determined as a function of the average equilibrium angle displacement of the balance and the spring stiffness. The thrust stand has a load capacity up to 10 kg, and it can theoretically measure the force up to 609.6 μN with a resolution of 24.4 nN. The static calibrations were performed based on the calibration assembly composed of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet. The calibration results demonstrated good repeatability (less than 0.68% FSO) and good linearity (less than 0.88% FSO). The assembly of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet was also used as an exciter to simulate the microthruster to further research the performance of the thrust stand. Three sets of force pulses at 17, 33.5, and 55 Hz with the same amplitude and pulse width were tested. The repeatability error at each frequency was 7.04%, 1.78%, and 5.08%, respectively.

  11. Deformation and fluid flow of a major out-of-sequence thrust located at seismogenic depth in an accretionary complex: Nobeoka Thrust in the Shimanto Belt, Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hideki; Kimura, Gaku; Masago, Hideki; Ohmori-Ikehara, Kotoe; Kitamura, Yujin; Ikesawa, Eisei; Sakaguchi, Arito; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Okamoto, Shin'ya

    2005-12-01

    Nobeoka Thrust in Kyushu, southwest Japan, was investigated to understand the relationship between the seismogenic out-of-sequence thrust (OST) and fluid flow in accretionary prisms. The Nobeoka Thrust is a fossilized OST, being active at seismogenic depth. The hanging wall exhibits a penetrative plastic deformation, while a brittle, cataclastic mélange-like occurrence characterizes the footwall, although both of them have same shale and sandstone-dominant protolith. Vitrinite reflectance analyses indicate that the maximum temperatures of the hanging wall and footwall are approximately 320 and 250°C, respectively. This thermal gap across the thrust corresponds to 8.6-14.4 km of displacement assuming a 28-47°C/km geothermal gradient. The brittle damage zone of the thrust is asymmetric: only 2 m for hanging wall side and 100 m for footwall. Three types of mineral veins, quartz, and carbonate are well developed, especially in the damaged footwall: the tension crack-filling vein, the fault-filling vein, and postmélange one. The first is harmonious with fabric, perpendicular to the P surface. Fluid inclusion geothermobarometry indicates the P-T of fluid in the intensively damaged zone of the footwall is ˜300°C, 230-250 MPa, higher than that from vitrinite reflectance, which suggests that hydrothermal fluid flow is associated with deformation. The same type vein in the lowest portion of the footwall-damaged zone includes a much lower P-T fluid. This difference suggests that continuous underplating caused the damaged zone to propagate downward with cooling and shallowing, which differs from faults characterized by shear localization and might be unique to aquiferous OST in accretionary complexes.

  12. Development of a Microwave Regenerative Sorbent-Based Hydrogen Purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Dewberry, Ross H.; McCurry, Bryan D.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a Microwave Regenerative Sorbent-based Hydrogen Purifier (MRSHP). This unique microwave powered technology was developed for the purification of a hydrogen stream produced by the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA). The PPA is a hydrogen recovery (from methane) post processor for NASA's Sabatier-based carbon dioxide reduction process. Embodied in the Carbon dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA), currently aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Sabatier reaction employs hydrogen to catalytically recover oxygen, in the form of water, from respiratory carbon dioxide produced by the crew. This same approach is base-lined for future service in the Air Revitalization system on extended missions into deep space where resupply is not practical. Accordingly, manned exploration to Mars may only become feasible with further closure of the air loop as afforded by the greater hydrogen recovery permitted by the PPA with subsequent hydrogen purification. By utilizing the well-known high sorbate loading capacity of molecular sieve 13x, coupled with microwave dielectric heating phenomenon, MRSHP technology is employed as a regenerative filter for a contaminated hydrogen gas stream. By design, freshly regenerated molecular sieve 13x contained in the MRSHP will remove contaminants from the effluent of a 1-CM scale PPA for several hours prior to breakthrough. By reversing flow and pulling a relative vacuum the MRSHP prototype then uses 2.45 GHz microwave power, applied through a novel coaxial antenna array, to rapidly heat the sorbent bed and drive off the contaminants in a short duration vacuum/thermal contaminant desorption step. Finally, following rapid cooling via room temperature cold plates, the MRSHP is again ready to serve as a hydrogen filter.

  13. Performance analysis of reciprocating regenerative magnetic heat pumping. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.T.; Murphy, R.W.; Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.; Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S.

    1994-02-01

    Transient flow phenomena in the regenerator tube of reciprocating magnetic heat pumps have been studied numerically and experimentally. In the numerical study, two approaches were taken: (1) solving the energy balance equations for fluid through a porous bed directly and (2) solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a buoyancy force term in the momentum equation. A flow thermal mixing problem was found in both approaches because of the piston-like motion of the regenerator tube that hinders the development of the temperature. The numerical study results show that a 45 K temperature span can be reached in 10 minutes of charge time through the use of a 7-Tesla magnetic field. Using the second numerical approach, temperature stratification in the regenerator fluid column was clearly indicated through temperature rasters. The study also calculates regenerator efficiency and energy delivery rates when heating load and cooling load are applied. Piecewise variation of the regenerator tube moving speed has been used in the present numerical study to control the mass flow rate, reduce thermal mixing of the flow and thus the regenerative losses. The gadolinium`s adiabatic temperature has been measured under 6.5 Tesla of magnet field and different of operating temperatures ranging from 285 K to 320 K. Three regenerative heat pumping tests have also been conducted based on the Reynolds number of the regenerator tube flow, namely Re=300, Re=450, and Re=750 without loads. Maximum temperature span are 12 & 11 K and 9 K for the case of Re=300, Re=450 and Re=750, respectively. Experimental data are in good agreement with the numerical calculation results, and have been used to calibrate the numerical results and to develop a design database for reciprocating-type room-temperature magnetic heat pumps.

  14. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  15. 100-kHz 22-fs Ti:sapphire regenerative amplification laser with programmable spectral control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nam, Chang Hee; Lee, Seong Ku

    2016-05-01

    An ultrashort, high-power Ti:sapphire laser operating at 100 kHz was developed. A regenerative amplifier with a cryogenically cooled Ti:sapphire crystal and a grism compressor were incorporated in the laser. For achieving a wide bandwidth of 78 nm, a programmable spectral control filter was applied to the regenerative amplifier to compensate for the gain narrowing effect. An output power of 1.4 GW with near Fourier-transform-limited pulse duration of 22 fs was achieved after minimizing a spectral phase error with the grism compressor, and the measured beam quality factor ( M 2) was less than 1.2. This high-quality laser will facilitate applications requiring high-repetition rate, ultrashort, high-power laser pulses.

  16. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  17. Experimental fatigue life investigation of cylindrical thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-two cylindrical test sections of a cylindrical rocket thrust chamber were fabricated and 21 of them were cycled to failure to explore the failure mechanisms, determine the effects of wall temperature on cyclic life, and to rank the material life characteristics for comparison with results from isothermal tests of 12 alloys at 538 C. Cylinder liners were fabricated from OFHC copper, Amzirc, and NAR1loy-Z. Tests were conducted at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MW/sq m using hydrogen-oxygen propellants at an oxidant-fuel ratio of 6.0, which resulted in an average throat heat flux of 54 MW/sq m. The cylinders were cooled with liquid hydrogen at an average rate of 0.91 Kg/sec. All failures were characterized by a thinning of the cooling channel wall at the centerline and eventual failure by tensile rupture. Cyclic life rankings of the materials based on temperature do not agree with published rankings based on uniaxial, isothermal strain tests.

  18. Take-off and propeller thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenk, Martin

    1933-01-01

    As a result of previous reports, it was endeavored to obtain, along with the truest possible comprehension of the course of thrust, a complete, simple and clear formula for the whole take-off distance up to a certain altitude, which shall give the correct relative weight to all the factors.

  19. Improved heat transfer prediction engineering capabilities for rocket thrust chamber layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeding, C.; Wiedmann, D.; Quering, K.; Knab, O.

    2011-10-01

    The demand for a more comprehensive engineering tool for design and parametric investigations of thrust-chamber relevant heat transfer is pushing the improvement of coolant and hot gas side prediction tools. Regenerative Coolant Flow Simulation (RCFS) [1], Astrium in-house developed one-dimensional (1D) tool to compute hot gas and coolant side heat transfer in a coupled approach, is based on the hot gas side Cinjarew approach which has its origin in the late 1960s. This tool was used as a starting basis for the development and validation of a further improved method. Over the past years, Astrium Space Transportation (ST) has continuously expanded the knowledge in this field. In addition, subscale hot firings, using different propellant combinations and injection conditions, relevant to open and closed cycle applications, were used for the second RCFS generation - the RCFS-II.

  20. Early Cenozoic thrust in Qiangtang block, Northern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Ye, P.; Hu, D.; Lu, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Huge thrust systems, North Qiangtang Thrust (NQT) and South Qiangtang Thrust (SQT), were discovered in Qiangtang block, northern Tibetan Plateau. North Qiangtang thrust (NQT), including Dogai Coren thrust (DCT) and Longwei Co Thrust (LCT) formed in northern Qiangtang block. Triassic shale, sandstone and slate were thrusted southward over Late Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic conglomerate and sandstone (simplified as red-beds) along thrust faults of DCT, and Jurassic limestone and sandstone were thrusted over Late Cretaceous-Paleogene red-beds and Paleozoic metamorphic rocks along thrust faults of LCT in north of Central Qiangtang Uplift (CQU). South Qiangtang Thrust (SQT), including Xiaocaka-Shuanghu thrust (XST), Doma-Qixiang Co thrust (DQT) and Saibu Co-Zagya thrust (SZT), formed in southern Qiangtang block, accompanied by Nima-Silin thrust (NST) in northern Lhasa block. Permian marbleized limestone and dolomite, Triassic sandstone and shale, Jurassic limestone and ophiolite were thrusted southward over Paleogene red-beds along thrust faults of XST, DQT and SZT. Early Cenozoic thrust along NQT and SQT formed variety of tectonic slices, outliers and nappes of Permian-Jurassic rocks overlying Late Cretaceous-Paleogene red-beds in northern, central and southern Qiangtang block. Minimal estimation on southward offsets of DCT and LCT is 25km and 50km respectively, corresponding to 43% shortening in northern Qiangtang block, and minimal estimation on southward thrust offsets of XST, DQT and SZT yields ~90km southward thrust displacement of SQT, corresponding to ~47% shortening in southern Qiangtang block. Major thrust faults of NQT and SQT formed in upper crust according to seismic reflection profile, and such thrust and shortening were geodynamically related to northward subduction of India continental plate. Intensive thrust of NQT and SQT stopped before Early Miocene, followed by regional peneplanation, widespread lacustrine deposits in Early Miocene and crust extension as

  1. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.; Dehoyos, Amado; Spaun, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting testing of thrusters having a total mass of up to 125 kg and producing thrust levels between 100 microN to 1 N has been developed and tested. The design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that converts horizontal deflections produced by the operating thruster into amplified vertical motion of a secondary arm. The level of amplification is changed through adjustment of the location of one of the pivot points linking the system. Response of the system depends on the relative magnitudes of the restoring moments applied by the displaced thruster mass and the twisting torsional pivots connecting the members of the balance mechanism. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer and balance oscillatory motion is attenuated using a passive, eddy-current damper. The thrust stand employs an automated leveling and thermal control system. Pools of liquid gallium are used to deliver power to the thruster without using solid wire connections, which can exert undesirable time-varying forces on the balance. These systems serve to eliminate sources of zero-drift that can occur as the stand thermally or mechanically shifts during the course of an experiment. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady-state calibration before, during and after thruster operation. Thrust measurements were carried out on a cylindrical Hall thruster that produces mN-level thrust. The measurements were very repeatable, producing results that compare favorably with previously published performance data, but with considerably smaller uncertainty.

  2. Transient Three-Dimensional Side Load Analysis of Out-of-Round Film Cooled Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Lin, Jeff; Ruf, Joe; Guidos, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of nozzle out-of-roundness on the transient startup side loads at a high altitude, with an anchored computational methodology. The out-of-roundness could be the result of asymmetric loads induced by hardware attached to the nozzle, asymmetric internal stresses induced by previous tests, and deformation, such as creep, from previous tests. The rocket engine studied encompasses a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and a film cooled nozzle extension with film coolant distributed from a turbine exhaust manifold. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet history based on an engine system simulation. Transient startup computations were performed with the out-of-roundness achieved by four different degrees of ovalization: one perfectly round, one slightly out-of-round, one more out-of-round, and one significantly out-of-round. The results show that the separation-line-jump is the peak side load physics for the round, slightly our-of-round, and more out-of-round cases, and the peak side load increases as the degree of out-of-roundness increases. For the significantly out-of-round nozzle, however, the peak side load reduces to comparable to that of the round nozzle and the separation line jump is not the peak side load physics. The counter-intuitive result of the significantly out-of-round case is found to be related to a side force reduction mechanism that splits the effect of the separation-line-jump into two parts, not only in the circumferential direction and most importantly in time.

  3. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  4. Direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B.; Rawlin, V.; Weigand, A.; Walker, J.

    1975-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm diameter ion thruster was accomplished by means of a laser interferometer thrust stand. The thruster was supported in a pendulum manner by three 3.65-m long wires. Electrical power was provided by means of 18 mercury filled pots. A movable 23-button planar probe rake was used to determine thrust loss due to ion beam divergence. Values of thrust, thrust loss due to ion beam divergence, and thrust loss due to multiple ionization were measured for ion beam currents ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 A. Measured thrust values indicate an accuracy of approximately 1% and are in good agreement with thrust values calculated by indirect measurements.

  5. Direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B.; Rawlin, V.; Weigand, A. J.; Walker, J.

    1975-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm diameter ion thruster was accomplished by means of a laser interferometer thrust stand. The thruster was supported in a pendulum manner by three 3.65-m long wires. Electrical power was provided by means of 18 mercury filled pots. A movable 23-button planar probe rake was used to determine thrust loss due to ion beam divergence. Values of thrust, thrust loss due to ion beam divergence, and thrust loss due to multiple ionization were measured for ion beam currents ranging from 0.5 A to 2.5 A. Measured thrust values indicate an accuracy of approximately 1% and are in good agreement with thrust values calculated by indirect measurements.

  6. Thrusting and gravel progradation in foreland basins: A test of post-thrusting gravel dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.W.; Beck, R.A.; Hobbs, R. ); Raynolds, R.G.H. ); Tahirkheli, R.A.K. )

    1988-12-01

    The use of gravels as syntectonic indicators of thrusting has recently been questioned by foreland-basin models that assign gravels to a post-thrusting interval of progradation, except in very proximal areas. On the basis of precise temporal control provided by magnetostratigraphically dated sections, the history of gravel progradation after a major thrusting and uplift event in the northwestern Himalaya is shown to be a virtually syntectonic phenomenon. Despite considerable crustal subsidence driven by a thick-skinned thrust, gravels prograded {approximately} 70 km during a 1.5-m.y.-long thrusting event. By 3 m.y. after the start of thrusting, gravels extended more than 110 km into the basin. Although delayed gravel progradation appears appropriate for many Rocky Mountain foreland basins, it is clearly not valid for the Himalaya. The authors attribute the difference in depositional response between these basins to difference in the quantity of sediment supplied to them (sediment starved vs. overfilled), the availability of resistates in the source area, and the size of the antecedent drainage.

  7. Electrospun Silk Biomaterial Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Reagan, Michaela R; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique that enables the development of nanofiber-based biomaterial scaffolds. Scaffolds can be generated that are useful for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine since they mimic the nanoscale properties of certain fibrous components of the native extracellular matrix in tissues. Silk is a natural protein with excellent biocompatibility, remarkable mechanical properties as well as tailorable degradability. Integrating these protein polymer advantages with electrospinning results in scaffolds with combined biochemical, topographical and mechanical cues with versatility for a range of biomaterial, cell and tissue studies and applications. This review covers research related to electrospinning of silk, including process parameters, post treatment of the spun fibers, functionalization of nanofibers, and the potential applications for these material systems in regenerative medicine. Research challenges and future trends are also discussed. PMID:19643154

  8. Regenerative Endodontics: A Road Less Travelled

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve patients’ quality of life. This review article offers a detailed overview of present regenerative endodontic approaches aiming to revitalize teeth and also outlines the problems to be dealt before this emerging field contributes to clinical treatment protocols. It conjointly covers the basic trilogy elements of tissue engineering. PMID:25478476

  9. Regenerative cells for transplantation in hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Banas, Agnieszka; Teratani, Takumi; Iwaguro, Hideki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have an enormous potential; however, their potential clinical application is being arrested due to various limitations such as teratoma formation followed by tumorigenesis, emergent usage, and the quality control of cells, as well as safety issues regarding long-term culture are also delaying their clinical application. In addition, human ES cells have two crucial issues: immunogenicity and ethical issues associated with their clinical application. The efficient generation of human iPS cells requires gene transfer, yet the mechanism underlying pluripotent stem cell induction has not yet been fully elucidated. Otherwise, although human adult regenerative cells including mesenchymal stem cells have a limited capacity for differentiation, they are nevertheless promising candidates for tissue regeneration in a clinical setting. This review highlights the use of regenerative cells for transplantation in hepatic failure.

  10. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hirschi, Karen K.; Li, Song; Roy, Krishnendu

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, it is now possible to convert differentiated somatic cells into multipotent stem cells that have the capacity to generate all cell types of adult tissues. Thus, there is a wide variety of applications for this technology, including regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modeling, and drug screening/discovery. Although biological and biochemical techniques have been well established for cell reprogramming, bioengineering technologies offer novel tools for the reprogramming, expansion, isolation, and differentiation of iPS cells. In this article, we review these bioengineering approaches for the derivation and manipulation of iPS cells and focus on their relevance to regenerative medicine. PMID:24905879

  11. Micro-Scale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    A micro-scale regenerative heat exchanger has been designed, optimized and fabricated for use in a micro-Stirling device. Novel design and fabrication techniques enabled the minimization of axial heat conduction losses and pressure drop, while maximizing thermal regenerative performance. The fabricated prototype is comprised of ten separate assembled layers of alternating metal-dielectric composite. Each layer is offset to minimize conduction losses and maximize heat transfer by boundary layer disruption. A grating pattern of 100 micron square non-contiguous flow passages were formed with a nominal 20 micron wall thickness, and an overall assembled ten-layer thickness of 900 microns. Application of the micro heat exchanger is envisioned in the areas of micro-refrigerators/coolers, micropower devices, and micro-fluidic devices.

  12. Translational strategies and challenges in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Dimmeler, Stefanie; Ding, Sheng; Rando, Thomas A; Trounson, Alan

    2014-08-01

    The scientific community is currently witnessing substantial strides in understanding stem cell biology in humans; however, major disappointments in translating this knowledge into medical therapies are flooding the field as well. Despite these setbacks, investigators are determined to better understand the caveats of regeneration, so that major pathways of repair and regrowth can be exploited in treating aged and diseased tissues. Last year, in an effort to contribute to this burgeoning field, Nature Medicine, in collaboration with the Volkswagen Foundation, organized a meeting with a panel of experts in regenerative medicine to identify the most pressing challenges, as well as the crucial strategies and stem cell concepts that can best help advance the translational regenerative field. Here some experts who participated in the meeting provide an outlook at some of those key issues and concepts. PMID:25100527

  13. Regenerative Cell Therapy for Corneal Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Bartakova, Alena; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2014-09-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction as in Fuchs dystrophy or pseudophakic bullous keratopathy, and the limited regenerative capacity of human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), drive the need for corneal transplant. In response to limited donor corneal availability, significant effort has been directed towards cell therapy as an alternative to surgery. Stimulation of endogenous progenitors, or transplant of stem cell-derived HCECs or in vitro-expanded, donor-derived HCECs could replace traditional surgery with regenerative therapy. Ex vivo expansion of HCECs is technically challenging, and the basis for molecular identification of functional HCECs is not established. Delivery of cells to the inner layer of the human cornea is another challenge: different techniques, from simple injection to artificial corneal scaffolds, are being investigated. Despite remaining questions, corneal endothelial cell therapies, translated to the clinic, represent the future for the treatment of corneal endotheliopathies. PMID:25328857

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Karen K; Li, Song; Roy, Krishnendu

    2014-07-11

    With the discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, it is now possible to convert differentiated somatic cells into multipotent stem cells that have the capacity to generate all cell types of adult tissues. Thus, there is a wide variety of applications for this technology, including regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modeling, and drug screening/discovery. Although biological and biochemical techniques have been well established for cell reprogramming, bioengineering technologies offer novel tools for the reprogramming, expansion, isolation, and differentiation of iPS cells. In this article, we review these bioengineering approaches for the derivation and manipulation of iPS cells and focus on their relevance to regenerative medicine.

  15. Regenerative nanomedicines: an emerging investment prospective?

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Cells respond to their structural surrounding and within nanostructures exhibit unique proliferative and differentiation properties. The application of nanotechnologies to the field of regenerative medicine offers the potential to direct cell fate, target the delivery of cells and reduce immune rejection (via encapsulation), thereby supporting the development of regenerative medicines. The overall objective of any therapy is the delivery of the product not just into the clinic but also to patients on a routine basis. Such a goal typically requires a commercial vehicle and substantial levels of investment in scientific, clinical, regulatory and business expertise, resources, time and funding. Therefore, this paper focuses on some of the challenges facing this emerging industry, including investment by the venture capital community. PMID:20826478

  16. Graphene-Based Materials in Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xili; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2015-07-15

    Graphene possesses many unique properties such as two-dimensional planar structure, super conductivity, chemical and mechanical stability, large surface area, and good biocompatibility. In the past few years, graphene-based materials have risen as a shining star on the path of researchers seeking new materials for future regenerative medicine. Herein, the recent research advances made in graphene-based materials mostly utilizing the mechanical and electrical properties of graphene are described. The most exciting findings addressing the impact of graphene-based materials on regenerative medicine are highlighted, with particular emphasis on their applications including nerve, bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, cardiac, skin, adipose tissue regeneration, and their effects on the induced pluripotent stem cells. Future perspectives and emerging challenges are also addressed in this Review article.

  17. Graphene-Based Materials in Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xili; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2015-07-15

    Graphene possesses many unique properties such as two-dimensional planar structure, super conductivity, chemical and mechanical stability, large surface area, and good biocompatibility. In the past few years, graphene-based materials have risen as a shining star on the path of researchers seeking new materials for future regenerative medicine. Herein, the recent research advances made in graphene-based materials mostly utilizing the mechanical and electrical properties of graphene are described. The most exciting findings addressing the impact of graphene-based materials on regenerative medicine are highlighted, with particular emphasis on their applications including nerve, bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, cardiac, skin, adipose tissue regeneration, and their effects on the induced pluripotent stem cells. Future perspectives and emerging challenges are also addressed in this Review article. PMID:26037920

  18. First Lasing of the Regenerative Amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Fortang, C.M.; Goldstein, J.C.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Ebrahim, N.A.

    1998-08-17

    The Regenerative Amplifier Free-Electron Laser (RAFEL) is a high-gain RF-linac FEL capable of producing high optical power from a compact design. The combination of a high-gain and small optical feedback enables the FEL to reach saturation and produce a high optical power and high extraction efficiency without risk of optical damage to the mirrors. This paper summarizes the first lasing of the Regenerative Amplifier FEL and describes recent experimental results. The highest optical energy achieved thus far at 16.3 {micro}m is 1.7 J over an 9-{micro}s macropulse, corresponding to an average power during the macropulse of 190 kW. They deduce an energy of 1.7 mJ in each 16 ps micropulse, corresponding to a peak power of 110 MW.

  19. Fluorescent Cell Imaging in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sapoznik, Etai; Niu, Guoguang; Zhou, Yu; Murphy, Sean V.; Soker, Shay

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent protein imaging, a promising tool in biological research, incorporates numerous applications that can be of specific use in the field of regenerative medicine. To enhance tissue regeneration efforts, scientists have been developing new ways to monitor tissue development and maturation in vitro and in vivo. To that end, new imaging tools and novel fluorescent proteins have been developed for the purpose of performing deep-tissue high-resolution imaging. These new methods, such as intra-vital microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer, are providing new insights into cellular behavior, including cell migration, morphology, and phenotypic changes in a dynamic environment. Such applications, combined with multimodal imaging, significantly expand the utility of fluorescent protein imaging in research and clinical applications of regenerative medicine. PMID:27158228

  20. Low temperature thermally regenerative electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, Raouf O.; Brown, Alan P.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1983-01-01

    A thermally regenerative electrochemical system including an electrochemical cell with two water-based electrolytes separated by an ion exchange membrane, at least one of the electrolytes containing a complexing agent and a salt of a multivalent metal whose respective order of potentials for a pair of its redox couples is reversible by a change in the amount of the complexing agent in the electrolyte, the complexing agent being removable by distillation to cause the reversal.

  1. Low-temperature thermally regenerative electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, R.O.; Brown, A.P.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-21

    A thermally regenerative electrochemical system is described including an electrochemical cell with two water-based electrolytes separated by an ion exchange membrane, at least one of the electrolytes containing a complexing agent and a salt of a multivalent metal whose respective order of potentials for a pair of its redox couples is reversible by a change in the amount of the ocmplexing agent in the electrolyte, the complexing agent being removable by distillation to cause the reversal.

  2. Cool Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    ILC, Dover Division's lightweight cooling garment, called Cool Vest was designed to eliminate the harmful effects of heat stress; increases tolerance time in hot environments by almost 300 percent. Made of urethane-coated nylon used in Apollo, it works to keep the body cool, circulating chilled water throughout the lining by means of a small battery-powered pump. A pocket houses the pump, battery and the coolant which can be ice or a frozen gel, a valve control allows temperature regulation. One version is self-contained and portable for unrestrained movement, another has an umbilical line attached to an external source of coolant, such as standard tap water, when extended mobility is not required. It is reported from customers that the Cool Vest pays for itself in increased productivity in very high temperatures.

  3. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  4. Application of regenerative medicine for kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Takashi; Fukui, Akira; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    Following recent advancements of stem cell research, the potential for organ regeneration using somatic stem cells as an ultimate therapy for organ failure has increased. However, anatomically complicated organs such as the kidney and liver have proven more refractory to stem cell-based regenerative techniques. At present, kidney regeneration is considered to require one of two approaches depending on the type of renal failure, namely acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF).The kidney has the potential to regenerate itself provided that the damage is not too severe and the kidney's structure remains intact. Regenerative medicine for ARF should therefore aim to activate or support this potent. In cases of the irreversible damage to the kidney, which is most likely in patients with CRF undergoing long-term dialysis, self-renewal is totally lost. Thus, regenerative medicine for CRF will likely involve the establishment of a functional whole kidney de novo. This article reviews the challenges and recent advances in both approaches and discusses the potential approach of these novel strategies for clinical application. PMID:19279698

  5. Application of Regenerative Medicine for Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Akira; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    Following recent advancements of stem cell research, the potential for organ regeneration using somatic stem cells as an ultimate therapy for organ failure has increased. However, anatomically complicated organs such as the kidney and liver have proven more refractory to stem cell-based regenerative techniques. At present, kidney regeneration is considered to require one of two approaches depending on the type of renal failure, namely acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF). The kidney has the potential to regenerate itself provided that the damage is not too severe and the kidney's structure remains intact. Regenerative medicine for ARF should therefore aim to activate or support this potent. In cases of the irreversible damage to the kidney, which is most likely in patients with CRF undergoing long-term dialysis, self-renewal is totally lost. Thus, regenerative medicine for CRF will likely involve the establishment of a functional whole kidney de novo. This article reviews the challenges and recent advances in both approaches and discusses the potential approach of these novel strategies for clinical application. PMID:19279698

  6. Common ethical issues in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Awaya, Tsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    One of the common ethical issues in regenerative medicine is progress in 'componentation' (= being treated as parts) of the human body, and the enhancement of the view of such "human body parts." 'Componentation' of the human body represents a preliminary step toward commodification of the human body. The process of commodification of the human body follows the steps of 'materialization' (= being treated as a material object) [first step] -- 'componentation' [second step] -- 'resourcialization' (= being treated as resources) [third step] -- commodification [fourth step]. Transplantation medicine and artificial organ developments have dramatically exposed the potential of organs and tissues as parts, and regenerative medicine has a role in advancing 'componentation' of the human body and further enhancing the view of human body parts. The 'componentation' of the human body, regardless of the degree of regenerative medicine's contribution to it, is considered as a challenge to the traditional view of human bodies and the abstract value of "Human Dignity" in the same way or alongside the 'resourcialization' and commodification. However, in the future, a new perspective of human bodies that means "a perspective whereby human bodies, organs, tissues, and even the bodies themselves are perceived as disposable tools like disposable cameras, syringes, or contact lens" and therefore a new ethical view, suitable for a new reality, may emerge.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient’s medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to discuss possibilities, limitations, and future clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells. [Subjects and Methods] The authors have identified and discussed clinically and scientifically relevant articles from PubMed that have met the inclusion criteria. [Results] Direct treatment of muscle injuries, stroke, damaged peripheral nerves, and cartilage with mesenchymal stem cells has been demonstrated to be effective, with synergies seen between cellular and physical therapies. Over the past few years, several researchers, including us, have shown that there are certain limitations in the use of mesenchymal stem cells. Aging and spontaneous malignant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells significantly affect the functionality of these cells. [Conclusion] Definitive conclusions cannot be made by these studies because limited numbers of patients were included. Studies clarifying these results are expected in the near future. PMID:27390452

  8. Upconversion Nanoparticles for Bioimaging and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    González-Béjar, María; Francés-Soriano, Laura; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are proving useful for regenerative medicine in combination with stem cell therapy. Nanoparticles (NPs) can be administrated and targeted to desired tissues or organs and subsequently be used in non-invasive real-time visualization and tracking of cells by means of different imaging techniques, can act as therapeutic agent nanocarriers, and can also serve as scaffolds to guide the growth of new tissue. NPs can be of different chemical nature, such as gold, iron oxide, cadmium selenide, and carbon, and have the potential to be used in regenerative medicine. However, there are still many issues to be solved, such as toxicity, stability, and resident time. Upconversion NPs have relevant properties such as (i) low toxicity, (ii) capability to absorb light in an optical region where absorption in tissues is minimal and penetration is optimal (note they can also be designed to emit in the near-infrared region), and (iii) they can be used in multiplexing and multimodal imaging. An overview on the potentiality of upconversion materials in regenerative medicine is given. PMID:27379231

  9. Stem cell platforms for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Timothy J; Behfar, Atta; Yamada, Satsuki; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Terzic, Andre

    2009-06-01

    The pandemic of chronic degenerative diseases associated with aging demographics mandates development of effective approaches for tissue repair. As diverse stem cells directly contribute to innate healing, the capacity for de novo tissue reconstruction harbors a promising role for regenerative medicine. Indeed, a spectrum of natural stem cell sources ranging from embryonic to adult progenitors has been recently identified with unique characteristics for regeneration. The accessibility and applicability of the regenerative armamentarium has been further expanded with stem cells engineered by nuclear reprogramming. Through strategies of replacement to implant functional tissues, regeneration to transplant progenitor cells or rejuvenation to activate endogenous self-repair mechanisms, the overarching goal of regenerative medicine is to translate stem cell platforms into practice and achieve cures for diseases limited to palliative interventions. Harnessing the full potential of each platform will optimize matching stem cell-based biologics with the disease-specific niche environment of individual patients to maximize the quality of long-term management, while minimizing the needs for adjunctive therapy. Emerging discovery science with feedback from clinical translation is therefore poised to transform medicine offering safe and effective stem cell biotherapeutics to enable personalized solutions for incurable diseases. PMID:19779576

  10. Regenerative magnetorheological dampers for vehicle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Zou, Li; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are promising for vehicle suspensions, by virtue of their adaptive properties. During the everyday use of vehicles, a lot of energy is wasted due to the energy dissipation by dampers under the road irregularities. On the other hand, extra batteries are required for the current MR damper systems. To reduce the energy waste and get rid of the dependence on extra batteries, in this paper, regenerative MR dampers are proposed for vehicle suspensions, which integrate energy harvesting and controllable damping functions. The wasted vibration energy can be converted into electrical energy and power the MR damper coil. A regenerative MR damper for vehicle suspensions is developed. Damping force and power generation characteristics of the regenerative MR damper were modeled and analyzed. Then the damper is applied to a 2 DOF suspension system for system simulation under various road conditions. Simulation results show that riding comfort can be significantly improved, while harvesting energy for other use in addition to supply power for the controlled MR damper.

  11. Regenerative scaffold electrodes for peripheral nerve interfacing.

    PubMed

    Clements, Isaac P; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Srinivasan, Akhil; Bentley, John T; Andreasen, Dinal S; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2013-07-01

    Advances in neural interfacing technology are required to enable natural, thought-driven control of a prosthetic limb. Here, we describe a regenerative electrode design in which a polymer-based thin-film electrode array is integrated within a thin-film sheet of aligned nanofibers, such that axons regenerating from a transected peripheral nerve are topographically guided across the electrode recording sites. Cultures of dorsal root ganglia were used to explore design parameters leading to cellular migration and neurite extension across the nanofiber/electrode array boundary. Regenerative scaffold electrodes (RSEs) were subsequently fabricated and implanted across rat tibial nerve gaps to evaluate device recording capabilities and influence on nerve regeneration. In 20 of these animals, regeneration was compared between a conventional nerve gap model and an amputation model. Characteristic shaping of regenerated nerve morphology around the embedded electrode array was observed in both groups, and regenerated axon profile counts were similar at the eight week end point. Implanted RSEs recorded evoked neural activity in all of these cases, and also in separate implantations lasting up to five months. These results demonstrate that nanofiber-based topographic cues within a regenerative electrode can influence nerve regeneration, to the potential benefit of a peripheral nerve interface suitable for limb amputees. PMID:23033438

  12. Thrust measurements of a hollow-cathode discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, A.; Banks, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thrust measurements of a hollow cathode mercury discharge were made with a synthetic mica target on a torsion pendulum. Thrust measurements were made for various target angles, tip temperatures, flow rates, keeper discharge powers, and accelerator electrode voltages. The experimental thrust data are compared with theoretical values for the case where no discharge power was employed.

  13. Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency from an Instructive Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static…

  14. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R.; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2013-01-01

    High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20–30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages. PMID:23401713

  15. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate.

    PubMed

    Reed, William R; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R; Kawchuk, Gregory N; Pickar, Joel G

    2013-01-01

    High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20-30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages.

  16. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel burning thrust augmentor. Each fuel burning thrust augmentor, including the nozzle, must— (a) Provide cutoff...

  17. Cooling of in-situ propellant rocket engines for Mars mission. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1991-01-01

    One propulsion option of a Mars ascent/descent vehicle is multiple high-pressure, pump-fed rocket engines using in-situ propellants, which have been derived from substances available on the Martian surface. The chosen in-situ propellant combination for this analysis is carbon monoxide as the fuel and oxygen as the oxidizer. Both could be extracted from carbon dioxide, which makes up 96 percent of the Martian atmosphere. A pump-fed rocket engine allows for higher chamber pressure than a pressure-fed engine, which in turn results in higher thrust and in higher heat flux in the combustion chamber. The heat flowing through the wall cannot be sufficiently dissipated by radiation cooling and, therefore, a regenerative coolant may be necessary to avoid melting the rocket engine. The two possible fluids for this coolant scheme, carbon monoxide and oxygen, are compared analytically. To determine their heat transfer capability, they are evaluated based upon their heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics.

  18. Pressure Available for Cooling with Cowling Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickle, George W; Naiman, Irven; Crigler, John L

    1941-01-01

    Report presents the results of a full-scale investigation conducted in the NACA 20-foot tunnel to determine the pressure difference available for cooling with cowling flaps. The flaps were applied to an exit slot of smooth contour at 0 degree flap angle. Flap angles of 0 degree, 15 degrees, and 30 degrees were tested. Two propellers were used; propeller c which has conventional round blade shanks and propeller f which has airfoil sections extending closer to the hub. The pressure available for cooling is shown to be a direct function of the thrust disk-loading coefficient of the propeller.

  19. Researches on regenerative medicine-current state and prospect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Guo; Xiao, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Since 1980s, the rapid development of tissue engineering and stem cell research has pushed regenerative medicine to a new fastigium, and regenerative medicine has become a noticeable research field in the international biology and medicine. In China, about 100 million patients need repair and regeneration treatment every year, while the number is much larger in the world. Regenerative medicine could provide effective salvation for these patients. Both Chinese Academy of Sciences and Chinese Academy of Engineering have made roadmaps of 2010-2050 and 2011-2030 for regenerative medicine. The final goal of the two roadmaps is to make China go up to leading position in most research aspects of regenerative medicine. In accord with this strategy, the government and some enterprises have invested 3-5 billion RMB (0.5-0.8 billion USD) for the research on regenerative medicine. In order to push the translation of regenerative medicine forward-from bench to bedside, a strategic alliance has been established, and it includes 27 top-level research institutes, medical institutes, colleges, universities and enterprises in the field of stem cell and regeneration medicine. Recently the journal, Science, has published a special issue-Regenerative Medicine in China, consisting of 35 papers dealing with stem cell and regeneration, tissue engineering and regeneration, trauma and regeneration and bases for tissue repair and regenerative medicine. It is predicated that a greater breakthrough in theory and practice of regenerative medicine will be achieved in the near future (20 to 30 years). PMID:23069095

  20. Flow visualization study in high aspect ratio cooling channels for rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1993-11-01

    The structural integrity of high pressure liquid propellant rocket engine thrust chambers is typically maintained through regenerative cooling. The coolant flows through passages formed either by constructing the chamber liner from tubes or by milling channels in a solid liner. Recently, Carlile and Quentmeyer showed life extending advantages (by lowering hot gas wall temperatures) of milling channels with larger height to width aspect ratios (AR is greater than 4) than the traditional, approximately square cross section, passages. Further, the total coolant pressure drop in the thrust chamber could also be reduced, resulting in lower turbomachinery power requirements. High aspect ratio cooling channels could offer many benefits to designers developing new high performance engines, such as the European Vulcain engine (which uses an aspect ratio up to 9). With platelet manufacturing technology, channel aspect ratios up to 15 could be formed offering potentially greater benefits. Some issues still exist with the high aspect ratio coolant channels. In a coolant passage of circular or square cross section, strong secondary vortices develop as the fluid passes through the curved throat region. These vortices mix the fluid and bring lower temperature coolant to the hot wall. Typically, the circulation enhances the heat transfer at the hot gas wall by about 40 percent over a straight channel. The effect that increasing channel aspect ratio has on the curvature heat transfer enhancement has not been sufficiently studied. If the increase in aspect ratio degrades the secondary flow, the fluid mixing will be reduced. Analysis has shown that reduced coolant mixing will result in significantly higher wall temperatures, due to thermal stratification in the coolant, thus decreasing the benefits of the high aspect ratio geometry. A better understanding of the fundamental flow phenomena in high aspect ratio channels with curvature is needed to fully evaluate the benefits of this

  1. Flow visualization study in high aspect ratio cooling channels for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The structural integrity of high pressure liquid propellant rocket engine thrust chambers is typically maintained through regenerative cooling. The coolant flows through passages formed either by constructing the chamber liner from tubes or by milling channels in a solid liner. Recently, Carlile and Quentmeyer showed life extending advantages (by lowering hot gas wall temperatures) of milling channels with larger height to width aspect ratios (AR is greater than 4) than the traditional, approximately square cross section, passages. Further, the total coolant pressure drop in the thrust chamber could also be reduced, resulting in lower turbomachinery power requirements. High aspect ratio cooling channels could offer many benefits to designers developing new high performance engines, such as the European Vulcain engine (which uses an aspect ratio up to 9). With platelet manufacturing technology, channel aspect ratios up to 15 could be formed offering potentially greater benefits. Some issues still exist with the high aspect ratio coolant channels. In a coolant passage of circular or square cross section, strong secondary vortices develop as the fluid passes through the curved throat region. These vortices mix the fluid and bring lower temperature coolant to the hot wall. Typically, the circulation enhances the heat transfer at the hot gas wall by about 40 percent over a straight channel. The effect that increasing channel aspect ratio has on the curvature heat transfer enhancement has not been sufficiently studied. If the increase in aspect ratio degrades the secondary flow, the fluid mixing will be reduced. Analysis has shown that reduced coolant mixing will result in significantly higher wall temperatures, due to thermal stratification in the coolant, thus decreasing the benefits of the high aspect ratio geometry. A better understanding of the fundamental flow phenomena in high aspect ratio channels with curvature is needed to fully evaluate the benefits of this

  2. NATURAL BARRIERS TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-07-27

    This booklet contains project descriptions of work performed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology and International's (OST&I) Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust during Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust is part of OST&I's Science and Technology Program which supports the OCRWM mission to manage and dispose of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. In general, the projects described will continue beyond FY 2004 assuming that the technical work remains relevant to the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and sufficient funding is made available to the Science and Technology Program.

  3. Thrust improvement with ablative insert nozzle extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.; Back, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects are examined of an investigation by the Marshall Space Flight Center into the conceptual feasibility of increasing the thrust performance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) by using a conical nozzle extension fitted with an ablative insert in order to achieve a low-cost, near-term gain in payload. The ablating insert would provide a controlled increase in nozzle expansion ratio during launch and early climbout (first 30-60 seconds) so as to reduce thrust loss from nozzle over-expansion in the lower atmosphere. Summaries are given of JPL studies in the area of: defining the near-wall flow environment in the extended nozzle insert region; selecting potential insert materials; conceptualizing an extension/insert geometrical configuration; and identifying future experimental efforts necessary to verify the feasibility of the concepts.

  4. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2005-09-13

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

  5. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  6. Static Thrust Analysis of the Lifting Airscrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Hefner, Ralph A

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation conducted at the Georgia School of Technology on the static thrust of the lifting air screw of the type used in modern autogiros and helicopters. The theoretical part of this study is based on Glauert's analysis but certain modifications are made that further clarify and simplify the problem. Of these changes the elimination of the solidity as an independent parameter is the most important. The experimental data were obtained from tests on four rotor models of two, four, and five blades and, in general, agree quite well with the theoretical calculations. The theory indicates a method of evaluating scale effects on lifting air screws, and these corrections have been applied to the model results to derive general full-scale static thrust, torque, and figure-of-merit curves for constant-chord, constant-incidence rotors. Convenient charts are included that enable hovering flight performance to be calculated rapidly.

  7. Electromechanical actuator for thrust vector control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkow, Zygmunt

    Attention is given to the development and testing of electromechanical actuator (EMA) systems for use in first- and second-stage thrust vector control of rocket engines. An overview of the test program is also presented. Designs for both first- and second-stage actuators employ redundant dc brushless, three-phase rare-earth permanent magnet motors. The first-stage actuator is about 28 hp per motor and uses a roller screw. Second-stage thrust vector control is implemented with a much smaller actuator of about 1 hp per motor. This actuator uses a gear drive with a recycling ball screw mechanism. An operational EMA is presented. This 6.5-in. actuator is capable of a stall force of 1350 pounds per motor and a frequency response of about 5 HZ.

  8. Thrust production by a mechanical swimming lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, M. C.; Smits, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey to investigate the formation of the wake structure, the shedding vorticity from the body, and the relationship between thrust production and pressure on the surface of the robot. The robot mimics the motion of living lamprey in steady swimming by using a programmable microcomputer to actuate 13 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments. This indicates that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined, showing a clear connection between the location of vortex structures and the fluctuations of the pressure signal.

  9. CFD Code Survey for Thrust Chamber Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Klaus W.

    1990-01-01

    In the quest fo find analytical reference codes, responses from a questionnaire are presented which portray the current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program status and capability at various organizations, characterizing liquid rocket thrust chamber flow fields. Sample cases are identified to examine the ability, operational condition, and accuracy of the codes. To select the best suited programs for accelerated improvements, evaluation criteria are being proposed.

  10. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, S.; Effinger, M.; Holmes, R.; Lee, J.; Jaskowiak, M.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional metals like steel and copper alloys have been used for many years to fabricate injector and chamber components of thruster assemblies. While the materials perform well, reducing engine weights would help existing and future vehicles gain performance and payload capability. It may now be possible to reduce current thruster weights up to 50% by applying composite materials. In this task, these materials are being applied to an existing thrust cell design to demonstrate new fabrication processes and potential weight savings. Two ceramic matrix composite (CMC) designs, three polymer matrix composite (PMC) designs, and two metal matrix composite (MMC) designs are being fabricated as small chamber demonstration units. In addition, a new alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is being investigated for thrust chamber liners since it offers higher strength and increased cycle life over traditional alloys. This new alloy is being used for the liner in each MMC and PMC demonstration unit. During June-August of 2000, hot-fire testing of each unit is planned to validate designs in an oxygen/hydrogen environment at chamber pressures around 850 psi. Although the weight savings using CMC materials is expected to be high, they have proven to be much harder to incorporate into chamber designs based on current fabrication efforts. However, the PMC & MMC concepts using the Cu-8Cr-4Nb liner are nearly complete and ready for testing. Additional efforts intend to use the PMC & MMC materials to fabricate a full size thrust chamber (60K lb(sub f) thrust class). The fabrication of this full size unit is expected to be complete by October 2000, followed by hot-fire testing in November-December 2000.

  11. Low Carbon Propulsion Strategic Thrust Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Jay

    2014-01-01

    NASA is taking a leadership role with regard to developing new options for low-carbon propulsion. Work related to the characterization of alternative fuels is coordinated with our partners in government and industry, and NASA is close to concluding a TC in this area. Research on alternate propulsion concepts continues to grow and is an important aspect of the ARMD portfolio. Strong partnerships have been a key enabling factor for research on this strategic thrust.

  12. Timing of Eocene-Miocene thrust activity in the Western Axial Zone and Chaînons Béarnais (west-central Pyrenees) revealed by multi-method thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. Bosch, Gemma; Teixell, Antonio; Jolivet, Marc; Labaume, Pierre; Stockli, Daniel; Domènech, Mireia; Monié, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    We present new apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe), apatite fission track (AFT) and zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) data to unravel the timing of exhumation and thrusting in the western Axial Zone of the Pyrenees and the adjacent North Pyrenean Zone (Chaînons Béarnais). In the north, ZHe data yield cooling signals between 26 and 50 Ma in the Chaînons Béarnais, which are consistent with the onset of thrust-related cooling in the neighboring Mauléon Basin modeled by previous authors. Non-reset Triassic ages are found in the footwall of the North Pyrenean Frontal thrust (Aquitaine Basin). To the south, similar ZHe ages in both the hanging wall and footwall of the Lakora thrust record Late Eocene to Oligocene cooling that we attribute to the activity of the Gavarnie thrust. Thermal modeling of samples from the Lakora thrust hanging wall indicates cooling from Early Eocene times, recording activity of the Lakora thrust. Paleozoic detrital samples from the westernmost Axial Zone and from the Eaux-Chaudes and Balaitous-Panticosa granitic plutons yield AFT signals between 20 and 30 Ma and ZHe between 20 and 25 Ma. Modelling indicates fast cooling during this time, which we attribute to the motion of the Guarga thrust. AHe data from these Axial Zone plutons, combined with modelling, show a post-tectonic signal (8-9 Ma), which indicates renewed erosion after a period without major cooling and exhumation between 20 to 10 Ma.

  13. The thrust belts of Western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Moulton, F.C.

    1993-08-01

    Most of the Basin and Range physiographic province of western North America is now believed to be part of the overthrust. The more obvious overthrust belt along the eastern edge of the Basin and Range Province is named the Sevier orogenic belt, where older rocks are observed thrust onto younger rocks. More detailed surface geological mapping, plus deep multiple-fold geophysical work and many oil and gas wildcat wells, have confirmed an east-vergent shortened and stacked sequence is present in many places in the Basin and Range. This western compressive deformed area in east central Nevada is now named the Elko orogenic belt by the U.S. Geological Survey. This older compressed Elko orogenic belt started forming approximately 250 m.y. ago when the North American plate started to move west as the Pangaea supercontinent started to fragment. The North American plate moved west under the sediments of the Miogeocline that were also moving west. Surface-formed highlands and oceanic island arcs on the west edge of the North American plate restricted the westward movement of the sediments in the Miogeocline, causing east-vergent ramp thrusts to form above the westward-moving North American plate. The flat, eastward-up-cutting thrust assemblages moved on the detachment surfaces.

  14. Thrust and power measurements of Olympic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Wu, Vicki; Hutchison, Sean; Mark, Russell

    2012-11-01

    Elite level swimming is an extremely precise and even choreographed activity. Swimmers not only know the exact number of strokes necessary to take them across the pool, they also plan to be a precise distance from the wall at the end of their last stroke. Too far away and they lose time by drifting into the wall. Too close and their competitor may slide in before their hand comes forward to touch the wall. In this context, it is important to know, in detail, where and how a swimmer propels her/himself through the water. Over the past decade, state-of-the-art flow and thrust measurement diagnostics have been brought to competitive swimming. But the ability to correlate stroke mechanics to thrust production without somehow constraining the swimmer has here-to-fore not been possible. Using high speed video, a simple approach to mapping the swimmer's speed, thrust and net power output in a time resolved manner has been developed. This methodology has been applied to Megan Jendrick, gold medalist in the 100 individual breast stroke and 4 × 100 medley relay events in 2000 and Ariana Kukors, 2009 world champion and continuing world record holder in the 200 individual medley. Implications for training future elite swimmers will be discussed.

  15. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  16. Nozzle Thrust Optimization While Reducing Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.; Gilinsky, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    A Bluebell nozzle design concept is proposed for jet noise reduction with minimal thrust loss or even thrust augmentation. A Bluebell nozzle has a sinusoidal lip line edge (chevrons) and a sinusoidal cross section shape with linear amplitude increasing downstream in the divergent nozzle part (corrugations). The experimental tests of several Bluebell nozzle designs have shown nose reduction relative to a convergent-divergent round nozzle with design exhaust number M(e) = 1.5. The best design provides an acoustic benefit near 4dB with about 1 percent thrust augmentation. For subsonic flow ((M(e)= 0.6)), the tests indicated that the present method for design of Bluebell nozzles gives less acoustic benefit and in most cases jet noise increased. The proposed designs incorporate analytical theory and 2D and 3D numerical simulations. Full Navier-Stokes and Euler solvers were utilized. Boundary layer effects were used. Several different designs were accounted for in the Euler applications.

  17. Evolutionary Computing for Low-thrust Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Fink, Wolfgang; vonAllmed, Paul; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.; Russell, Ryan P.; Terrile, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of new mission concepts requires efficient methodologies to analyze, design and simulate the concepts before implementation. New mission concepts are increasingly considering the use of ion thrusters for fuel-efficient navigation in deep space. This paper presents parallel, evolutionary computing methods to design trajectories of spacecraft propelled by ion thrusters and to assess the trade-off between delivered payload mass and required flight time. The developed methods utilize a distributed computing environment in order to speed up computation, and use evolutionary algorithms to find globally Pareto-optimal solutions. The methods are coupled with two main traditional trajectory design approaches, which are called direct and indirect. In the direct approach, thrust control is discretized in either arc time or arc length, and the resulting discrete thrust vectors are optimized. In the indirect approach, a thrust control problem is transformed into a costate control problem, and the initial values of the costate vector are optimized. The developed methods are applied to two problems: 1) an orbit transfer around the Earth and 2) a transfer between two distance retrograde orbits around Europa, the closest to Jupiter of the icy Galilean moons. The optimal solutions found with the present methods are comparable to other state-of-the-art trajectory optimizers and to analytical approximations for optimal transfers, while the required computational time is several orders of magnitude shorter than other optimizers thanks to an intelligent design of control vector discretization, advanced algorithmic parameterization, and parallel computing.

  18. Effect of port corner geometry on the internal performance of a rotating-vane-type thrust reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Capone, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of reverser port geometry on the internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric rotating-vane-type thrust reverser. Thrust reverser vane positions representing a spoiled-trust (partially deployed) position and a full-reverse-thrust (fully deployed) position were tested with each port geometry variable. The effects of upstream port corner radius and wall angle on internal performance were determined. In addition, the effect of the length of a simulated cooling liner (blunt-base step) near the reverser port entrance was investigated; five different lengths were tested. All tests were conducted with no external flows, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.2 to 5.0.

  19. Initiation process of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Dotare, Tatsuya; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-04-01

    We conducted 2D (cross-sectional) analog experiments with dry sand using a high resolution digital image correlation (DIC) technique to reveal initiation process of a thrust fault in detail, and identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the thrust initiation. The observations suggest that the process can be divided into three stages. Stage 1: characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will be generated later. Before initiation of the fault, the area to be the hanging wall starts to uplift. Stage 2: defined by the generation of the new thrust and its active displacement. The location of the new thrust seems to be constrained by its associated back-thrust, produced at the foot of the surface slope (by the previous thrust). The activity of the previous thrust turns to zero once the new thrust is generated, but the timing of these two events is not the same. Stage 3: characterized by a constant displacement along the (new) thrust. Similar minor shear bands can be seen in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan and we can correlate the along-strike variations in seismic profiles to the model results that show the characteristic features in each thrust development stage.

  20. Plio-Plistocene in-sequence thrust propagation along the Main Central Thrust zone (Kumaon-Garhwal Himalaya, India): New thermochronological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Paramjeet; Patel, R. C.; Lal, Nand

    2012-10-01

    The Kumaon and Garhwal Himalayas, NW-India have similar geologic, tectonic, topographic and precipitation pattern. However, low-temperature thermochronological age pattern varies significantly along the strike as well as across the strike of major faults. Here, we interpret the new set of thermochronological age data across the strike of major faults namely Vaikrita Thrust (VT), Munsiari Thrust (MT), Berinag Thrust (BT) and the Baijnath nappe along Pindari valley in the Kumaon-Garhwal Himalaya. In the present work, 18 new apatite fission track (AFT) ages of samples collected along a north-south transect have been reported. Ages in the hanging wall of VT which range from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 4.2 ± 0.7 Ma, have been found to be becoming younger linearly with distance from north to the VT. This trend crosses the VT with significant jump in ages. In the south of the VT, ages are lying between 0.3 ± 0.1 and 3.9 ± 0.8 Ma, and show linear variation with distance from the VT to BT. No significant jump in ages across the MT is observed and the linear trend of younging southward is continuing till the BT. The break and displacement in age pattern with youngest ages close to thrusts possibly indicate progressive late thrust movement. It reflects sequential uplift and cooling towards the south from the VT to BT which is consistent with an in-sequence style of thrust propagation. We compare our new data to the published thermochronological data from its adjacent traverses along the Goriganga and Dhauliganga valleys (~ 25 km away from the present traverse towards east and west respectively) in the Kumaon-Garhwal Himalaya in order to understand potential along-strike variations in the kinematics. Our observations indicate a dynamic coupling between tectonic and surface processes in the Garhwal-Kumaon Himalaya and support that the geometry of crustal scale faults and their associated kinematics control exhumation pathways of rocks.

  1. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  2. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  3. Earthquake rupture in shallow portion of subduction zone: An ancient record from the Ishido thrust (out-of-sequence thrust) in Boso Peninsula, central Japa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Chiyonobu, S.; Ujiie, K.; Hamada, Y.; Kamiya, N.; Saito, S.; Yamada, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Although earthquake ruptures in shallow portion of plate boundary have recently been identified (e.g. Tohoku, Nankai, etc.), their mechanisms why the shallow portion of plate boundary composed mainly of clay minerals can accumulate strain and make seismic slip are under controversial. In this presentation, we show an ancient record of earthquake rupture in shallow portion of subduction zone, characterized by frictional melting of smectite. Two young and non-metamorphosed accretionary complexes developed in the Miura and Boso peninsulas, central Japan: 1) the Early to Middle Miocene and 2) the Late Miocene to Early Pliocene accretionary complex. Based on the vitrinite reflectance, the maximum burial depth were estimated as 2-3 km (65-90˚C) and less than 1 km (about 20 ˚C), respectively. The former complex thrust up above the latter one, leading to formation of the Ishido thrust. The difference of maximum paleotemperature and low angle of the thrust dipping (<30˚) implies the total net slip should be over a few km. The fault core is composed of black-colored thin (<1 mm) pseudotachylite and fault gouge. Under SEM-BSE observation, the pseudotachylite is characterized by homogeneous glassy matrix including fragments of quartz/feldspar, submicron-sized Fe-rich spherules, and vesicles. Based on the mineralogy of the host rock, spot analyses and elemental mapping, origin of the pseudotachylite was apparently frictional melting of smectite containing Fe. Fe-rich spherules formed by rapid cooling of pseudotachylite. On the other hand, occurrences of the fault gouge: no grain-preferred orientations, folding with pseudotachylite, intrusion into pseudotachylite and vice versa, suggest that the gouge corresponds to the fluidized zone associated with high-speed shear. This fluidized zone contains large number of pseudotachylite fragments, and some pseudotachylite cut the fluidized zone, indicative of plural earthquake ruptures occurred along this thrust.

  4. Regenerative pulse shaping and amplification of ultrabroadband optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Barty, C P; Korn, G; Raksi, F; Rose-Petruck, C; Squier, J; Tien, A C; Wilson, K R; Yakovlev, V V; Yamakawa, K

    1996-02-01

    Regenerative pulse shaping is used to alleviate gain narrowing during ultrashort-pulse amplification. Amplification bandwidths of ~ 100 nm, or nearly three times wider than the traditional gain-narrowing limit, are produced with a modified Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier. This novel regenerative amplifier has been used to amplify pulses to the 5-mJ level with a bandwidth sufficient to support ~ 10-fs pulses.

  5. Could we also be regenerative superheroes, like salamanders?

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Development of methods to reawaken the semi-dormant regenerative potential that lies within adult human tissues would hold promise for the restoration of diseased or damaged organs and tissues. While most of the regeneration potential is suppressed in many vertebrates, including humans, during adult life, urodele amphibians (salamanders) retain their regenerative ability throughout adulthood. Studies in newts and axolotls, two salamander models, have provided significant knowledge about adult limb regeneration. In this review, we present a comparative analysis of salamander and mammalian regeneration and discuss how evolutionarily altered properties of the regenerative environment can be exploited to restore full regenerative potential in the human body. PMID:27338874

  6. Could we also be regenerative superheroes, like salamanders?

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Development of methods to reawaken the semi-dormant regenerative potential that lies within adult human tissues would hold promise for the restoration of diseased or damaged organs and tissues. While most of the regeneration potential is suppressed in many vertebrates, including humans, during adult life, urodele amphibians (salamanders) retain their regenerative ability throughout adulthood. Studies in newts and axolotls, two salamander models, have provided significant knowledge about adult limb regeneration. In this review, we present a comparative analysis of salamander and mammalian regeneration and discuss how evolutionarily altered properties of the regenerative environment can be exploited to restore full regenerative potential in the human body.

  7. Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Paul, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    Portable life support systems in future space suits will include a ventilation subsystem driven by a dedicated fan. This ventilation fan must meet challenging requirements for pressure rise, flow rate, efficiency, size, safety, and reliability. This paper describes research and development that showed the feasibility of a regenerative blower that is uniquely suited to meet these requirements. We proved feasibility through component tests, blower tests, and design analysis. Based on the requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) ventilation fan, we designed the critical elements of the blower. We measured the effects of key design parameters on blower performance using separate effects tests, and used the results of these tests to design a regenerative blower that will meet the ventilation fan requirements. We assembled a proof-of-concept blower and measured its performance at sub-atmospheric pressures that simulate a PLSS ventilation loop environment. Head/flow performance and maximum efficiency point data were used to specify the design and operating conditions for the ventilation fan. We identified materials for the blower that will enhance safety for operation in a lunar environment, and produced a solid model that illustrates the final design. The proof-of-concept blower produced the flow rate and pressure rise needed for the CSSE ventilation subsystem while running at 5400 rpm, consuming only 9 W of electric power using a non-optimized, commercial motor and controller and inefficient bearings. Scaling the test results to a complete design shows that a lightweight, compact, reliable, and low power regenerative blower can meet the performance requirements for future space suit life support systems.

  8. Extended performance solar electric propulsion thrust system study. Volume 2: Baseline thrust system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; Hawthorne, E. I.

    1977-01-01

    Several thrust system design concepts were evaluated and compared using the specifications of the most advanced 30- cm engineering model thruster as the technology base. Emphasis was placed on relatively high-power missions (60 to 100 kW) such as a Halley's comet rendezvous. The extensions in thruster performance required for the Halley's comet mission were defined and alternative thrust system concepts were designed in sufficient detail for comparing mass, efficiency, reliability, structure, and thermal characteristics. Confirmation testing and analysis of thruster and power-processing components were performed, and the feasibility of satisfying extended performance requirements was verified. A baseline design was selected from the alternatives considered, and the design analysis and documentation were refined. The baseline thrust system design features modular construction, conventional power processing, and a concentractor solar array concept and is designed to interface with the space shuttle.

  9. Orbital transfer vehicle 3000 LBF thrust chamber assembly hot fire test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Hayden, Warren R.

    1988-01-01

    The Aerojet Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) Thrust Chamber Assembly (TCA) concept consists of a hydrogen cooled chamber, and annular injector, and an oxygen cooled centerbody. The hot fire testing of a heat sink version of the chamber with only the throat section using hydrogen cooling is documented. Hydraulic performance of the injector and cooled throat were verified by water flow testing prior to TCA assembly. The cooled throat was proof tested to 3000 psia to verify the integrity of the codeposited EF nickel-cobalt closeout. The first set of hot fire tests were conducted with a heat sink throat to obtain heat flux information. After demonstration of acceptable heat fluxes, the heat sink throat was replaced with the LH2 cooled throat section. Fourteen tests were conducted with a heat sink chamber and throat at chamber pressures of 85 to 359 psia. The injector face was modified at this time to add more face coolant flow. Ten tests were then conducted at chamber pressures of 197 to 620 psia. Actual heat fluxes at the higher chamber pressure range were 23 percent higher than the average of 10 Btu/in 2 predicted.

  10. Regenerative nanotechnology in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Kaveh; Tan, Aaron; Soskic, Vukic; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-12-01

    Regenerative nanotechnology is at the forefront of medical research, and translational medicine is a challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Although there has been an exponential rise in the volume of research generated about it for both medical and surgical uses, key questions remain about its actual benefits. Nevertheless, some people think that therapeutics based on its principles may form the core of applied research for the future. Here we give an account of its current use in oral and maxillofacial surgery, and implications and challenges for the future.

  11. Phosphorous-Containing Polymers for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendan M.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    Disease and injury have resulted in a large, unmet need for functional tissue replacements. Polymeric scaffolds can be used to deliver cells and bioactive signals to address this need for regenerating damaged tissue. Phosphorous-containing polymers have been implemented to improve and accelerate the formation of native tissue both by mimicking the native role of phosphorous groups in the body and by attachment of other bioactive molecules. This manuscript reviews the synthesis, properties, and performance of phosphorous-containing polymers that can be useful in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:24565855

  12. The essential materials paradigms for regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David

    2011-04-01

    Medical technology is changing rapidly. Several disease states can now be treated very effectively by implantable devices that restore mechanical and physical functionality, such as replacement of hip joints or restoration of heart rhythms by pacemakers. These techniques, however, are rather limited, and no biological functionality can be restored through the use of inert materials and devices. This paper explores the role of new types of biomaterials within the emerging area of regenerative medicine, where they are able to play a powerful role in persuading the human body to regenerate itself.

  13. Bioprinting is changing regenerative medicine forever.

    PubMed

    Collins, Scott Forrest

    2014-12-01

    3D printing, or solid freeform fabrication, applied to regenerative medicine brings technologies from several industries together to help solve unique challenges in both basic science and tissue engineering. By more finely organizing cells and supporting structures precisely in 3D space, we will gain critical knowledge of cell-cell communications and cell-environment interactions. As we increase the scale, we will move toward complex tissue and organ structures where several cell phenotypes will functionally and structurally interact, thus recapitulating the form and function of native tissues and organs. PMID:25457969

  14. Phosphorous-containing polymers for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Watson, Brendan M; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-04-01

    Disease and injury have resulted in a large, unmet need for functional tissue replacements. Polymeric scaffolds can be used to deliver cells and bioactive signals to address this need for regenerating damaged tissue. Phosphorous-containing polymers have been implemented to improve and accelerate the formation of native tissue both by mimicking the native role of phosphorous groups in the body and by attachment of other bioactive molecules. This manuscript reviews the synthesis, properties, and performance of phosphorous-containing polymers that can be useful in regenerative medicine applications.

  15. Stress, strain, and fault behavior at a thrust ramp: Insights from the Naukluft thrust, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Smith, Zach; Rowe, Christie D.; Makhubu, Bandile; Sylvester, Fernando Y. G.

    2014-01-01

    We report observations from a kilometer-scale thrust ramp on the Naukluft thrust, Namibia. The Naukluft thrust is a low angle thrust that was active at subgreenschist facies conditions and accommodated several tens of kilometers of displacement at the base of the Naukluft Nappe Complex in the Pan-African Damara Orogeny. The fault zone is generally planar and a few meters thick, comprising predominantly a dolomite-rich cataclasite. At the ramp, the fault-rock assemblage increases in thickness, and the hanging-wall, which elsewhere is relatively intact, contains a high density network of inclined quartz veins, subvertical dolomite and calcite veins, breccia zones, as well as injectites of cataclastic fault rock emanating from the fault surface. The geometry of the hanging-wall structures indicates local subhorizontal extension. Local tensile stress can be explained by bending in the hanging-wall as it deformed to slide above the ramp structure. High fluid pressures created dynamically during fast slip by decarbonation of carbonate fault rock, and by dewatering of the footwall under an impermeable fault during interseismic periods, led to additional reduction in local effective compressive stresses. In this location, the ramp is more optimally oriented for slip in the inferred regional stress field, and therefore likely to fail before the contiguous thrust flats that are subparallel to the maximum principal stress. As such, the ramp represents the likely location for nucleation of fault slip, which could both trigger dynamic failure of the adjacent thrust faults, and produce hanging-wall extensional structures.

  16. Thrust Performance of a Low Power Hall Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoji; Ezaki, Toru; Nakashima, Hideki

    For the application of Hall thrusters to small satellites, we have been developing a low power Hall thruster. As an initial test, we evaluated the thrust performance of a 50 W class miniature Hall thruster developed at Kyushu University. The outer diameter and the length of the acceleration channel are 18 mm and 7 mm, respectively. A torsional type thrust stand was developed, since the estimated thrust is 1-3 mN, which is too small to be measured by means of a conventional pendulum type thrust stand for Hall thrusts. The uncertainty of this thrust stand is less than 10% at 2 mN with calibration. The thrust, the discharge current, specific impulse and the thrust efficiency at xenon mass flow rate of 0.30 mg/s and discharge voltage of 125 V were 1.7 mN, 0.35 A, 600 sec and 11.4%, respectively. The thrust increased with an increase in discharge voltage and the thrust became 3.1 mN at discharge voltage of 250 V.

  17. Initiation of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotare, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-08-01

    To reveal in detail the process of initiation of a thrust fault, we conducted analog experiments with dry quartz sand using a high-resolution digital image correlation technique to identify minor shear-strain patterns for every 27 μm of shortening (with an absolute displacement accuracy of 0.5 μm). The experimental results identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the initiation of a thrust in cross-section view. The observations suggest that the process is closely linked to the activity of an adjacent existing thrust, and can be divided into three stages. Stage 1 is characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will subsequently be generated. The area that will eventually be the hanging wall starts to uplift before the fault forms. The shear strain along the existing thrust decreases linearly during this stage. Stage 2 is defined by the generation of the new thrust and active displacements along it, identified by the shear strain along the thrust. The location of the new thrust may be constrained by its back-thrust, generally produced at the foot of the surface slope. The activity of the existing thrust falls to zero once the new thrust is generated, although these two events are not synchronous. Stage 3 of the thrust is characterized by a constant displacement that corresponds to the shortening applied to the model. Similar minor shear bands have been reported in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan. By comparing several transects across this subduction margin, we can classify the lateral variations in the structural geometry into the same stages of deformation identified in our experiments. Our findings may also be applied to the evaluation of fracture distributions in thrust belts during unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and production.

  18. Mercury's global fabric of thrust faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimczak, C.; Byrne, P. K.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury's global tectonic history is thought to have been shaped by two major processes: tidal despinning and global contraction. Each process is expected to have produced a distinctive global stress field and resultant fault pattern. Data from three years of orbital operations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft reveal thousands of thrust faults that are attributed to global contraction, but no global signature of tidal despinning has been conclusively documented. Global contraction operated throughout an extended portion of Mercury's geologic history, whereas tidal despinning likely operated for a shorter duration. Therefore, any tidal despinning pattern, if not entirely obliterated by the late heavy bombardment, either would have formed together with global contraction, or would have been modified by global contraction after despinning was complete. Here, we reassess global fracture patterns predicted to result from tidal despinning alone, and from a combination of tidal despinning and global contraction. We specifically make use of rock strength and deformability parameters appropriate for Mercury's fractured lithosphere. Our results indicate that a tidal despinning pattern would consist only of a global set of opening-mode fractures (joints) in the upper part of the lithosphere, whereas the combination of tidal despinning and global contraction would have produced a global population of thrust faults, with no preferred orientations in the polar regions but with an increasing preference for north-south orientations toward the equator. If an equatorial bulge from an early state of rapid spin were supported by Mercury's lithosphere, two end-member scenarios for the timing and duration of these two processes can be considered. In one, tidal despinning predated global contraction; in the other, tidal despinning and global contraction temporally overlapped. We test the predictions for both scenarios against the

  19. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  20. PRMT7 Preserves Satellite Cell Regenerative Capacity.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Chen, Taiping; Crist, Colin; Richard, Stéphane

    2016-02-16

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle requires the continued presence of quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells), which become activated in response to injury. Here, we report that whole-body protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT7(-/-) adult mice and mice conditionally lacking PRMT7 in satellite cells using Pax7-CreERT2 both display a significant reduction in satellite cell function, leading to defects in regenerative capacity upon muscle injury. We show that PRMT7 is preferentially expressed in activated satellite cells and, interestingly, PRMT7-deficient satellite cells undergo cell-cycle arrest and premature cellular senescence. These defects underlie poor satellite cell stem cell capacity to regenerate muscle and self-renew after injury. PRMT7-deficient satellite cells express elevated levels of the CDK inhibitor p21CIP1 and low levels of its repressor, DNMT3b. Restoration of DNMT3b in PRMT7-deficient cells rescues PRMT7-mediated senescence. Our findings define PRMT7 as a regulator of the DNMT3b/p21 axis required to maintain muscle stem cell regenerative capacity.

  1. Advances in individualized and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Blum, Hubert E

    2014-03-01

    Molecular and cell biology have resulted in major advances in our understanding of disease pathogenesis as well as in novel strategies for the diagnosis, therapy and prevention of human diseases. Based on modern molecular, genetic and biochemical methodologies it is on the one hand possible to identify for example disease-related point mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. On the other hand, using high throughput array and other technologies, it is for example possible to simultaneously analyze thousands of genes or gene products (RNA and proteins), resulting in an individual gene or gene expression profile ('signature'). Such data increasingly allow to define the individual disposition for a given disease and to predict disease prognosis as well as the efficacy of therapeutic strategies in the individual patient ('individualized medicine'). At the same time, the basic discoveries in cell biology, including embryonic and adult stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, genetically modified cells and others, have moved regenerative medicine into the center of biomedical research worldwide with a major translational impact on tissue engineering as well as transplantation medicine. All these aspects have greatly contributed to the recent advances in regenerative medicine and the development novel concepts for the treatment of many human diseases, including liver diseases.

  2. Extracellular Vesicles: Potential Roles in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    De Jong, Olivier G.; Van Balkom, Bas W. M.; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.; Verhaar, Marianne C.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) consist of exosomes, which are released upon fusion of the multivesicular body with the cell membrane, and microvesicles, which are released directly from the cell membrane. EV can mediate cell–cell communication and are involved in many processes, including immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. The vast amount of processes that EV are involved in and the versatility of manner in which they can influence the behavior of recipient cells make EV an interesting source for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Successes in the fields of tumor biology and immunology sparked the exploration of the potential of EV in the field of regenerative medicine. Indeed, EV are involved in restoring tissue and organ damage, and may partially explain the paracrine effects observed in stem cell-based therapeutic approaches. The function and content of EV may also harbor information that can be used in tissue engineering, in which paracrine signaling is employed to modulate cell recruitment, differentiation, and proliferation. In this review, we discuss the function and role of EV in regenerative medicine and elaborate on potential applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25520717

  3. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    DOEpatents

    George, V.E.; Haas, R.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Schlitt, L.G.

    1980-05-27

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation. 11 figs.

  4. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    DOEpatents

    George, Victor E. [Livermore, CA; Haas, Roger A. [Pleasanton, CA; Krupke, William F. [Pleasanton, CA; Schlitt, Leland G. [Livermore, CA

    1980-05-27

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation.

  5. Regenerative fuel cell systems R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Weisberg, A.H.

    1998-08-01

    Regenerative fuel cell (RFC) systems produce power and electrolytically regenerate their reactants using stacks of electrochemical cells. Energy storage systems with extremely high specific energy (> 400 Wh/kg) have been designed that use lightweight pressure vessels to contain the gases generated by reversible (unitized) regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). Progress is reported on the development, integration, and operation of rechargeable energy storage systems with such high specific energy. Lightweight pressure vessels that enable high specific energies have been designed with performance factors (burst pressure/internal volume/tank weight) > 50 km (2.0 million inches), and a vessel with performance factor of 40 km (1.6 million inches) was fabricated. New generations of both advanced and industry-supplied hydrogen tankage are under development. A primary fuel cell test rig with a single cell (46 cm{sup 2} active area) has been modified and operated reversibly as a URFC (for up to 2010 cycles on a single cell). This URFC uses bifunctional electrodes (oxidation and reduction electrodes reverse roles when switching from charge to discharge, as with a rechargeable battery) and cathode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the hydrogen side of the cell). Recent modifications also enable anode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the oxygen side of the cell). Hydrogen/halogen URFCs, capable of higher round-trip efficiency than hydrogen/oxygen URFCs, have been considered, and will be significantly heavier. Progress is reported on higher performance hydrogen/oxygen URFC operation with reduced catalyst loading.

  6. Integrated regenerative fuel cell experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of an integrated regenerative fuel cell (IRFC) concept. The IRFC consists of a separate fuel cell unit and electrolysis cell unit in the same structure, with internal storage of fuel cell product water and external storage of electrolysis cell produced hydrogen and oxygen. The fuel cell unit incorporates an enhanced Orbiter-type cell capable of improved performance at reduced weight. The electrolysis cell features a NiCo2O4 catalyst oxygen evolution eletrode with a porous Teflon cover to retard electrolyte loss. Six complete IRFC assemblies were assembled and performance tested at an operating temperature of 200 F (93.3 C) and reactant pressures up to 170 psia (117.2 n/cu cm) on IRFC No. 4. Anomalous pressure charge/discharge characteristics were encountered during performance evaluation. A reversible fuel cell incorporating a proprietary bi-functional oxygen electrode operated satisfactory at 200 F (93.3 C) at reactant pressures up to 50 psia (41.4 n/cu cm) as a regenerative fuel cell for one cycle, before developing an electrical short in the fuel cell mode. Electrolysis cell 300-hour endurance tests demonstrated the electrolyte retention capability of the electrode Teflon cover and the performance stability of the bi-functional oxygen electrode at high potential.

  7. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  8. Reconciling Himalayan midcrustal discontinuities: The Main Central thrust system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kyle P.; Ambrose, Tyler K.; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Cottle, John M.; Shrestha, Sudip

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of thrust-sense tectonometamorphic discontinuities within the exhumed Himalayan metamorphic core can be explained as part of the Main Central thrust system. This imbricate thrust structure, which significantly thickened the orogenic midcrustal core, comprises a series of thrust-sense faults that all merge into a single detachment. The existence of these various structures, and their potential for complex overprinting along the main detachment, may help explain the contention surrounding the definition, mapping, and interpretation of the Main Central thrust. The unique evolution of specific segments of the Main Central thrust system along the orogen is interpreted to be a reflection of the inherent basement structure and ramp position, and structural level of exposure of the mid-crust. This helps explain the variation in the timing and structural position of tectonometamorphic discontinuities along the length of the mountain belt.

  9. State of the art: stem cells in equine regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M J; Jarazo, J

    2015-03-01

    According to Greek mythology, Prometheus' liver grew back nightly after it was removed each day by an eagle as punishment for giving mankind fire. Hence, contrary to popular belief, the concept of tissue and organ regeneration is not new. In the early 20th century, cell culture and ex vivo organ preservation studies by Alexis Carrel, some with famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, established a foundation for much of modern regenerative medicine. While early beliefs and discoveries foreshadowed significant accomplishments in regenerative medicine, advances in knowledge within numerous scientific disciplines, as well as nano- and micromolecular level imaging and detection technologies, have contributed to explosive advances over the last 20 years. Virtually limitless preparations, combinations and applications of the 3 major components of regenerative medicine, namely cells, biomaterials and bioactive molecules, have created a new paradigm of future therapeutic options for most species. It is increasingly clear, however, that despite significant parallels among and within species, there is no 'one-size-fits-all' regenerative therapy. Likewise, a panacea has yet to be discovered that completely reverses the consequences of time, trauma and disease. Nonetheless, there is no question that the promise and potential of regenerative medicine have forever altered medical practices. The horse is a relative newcomer to regenerative medicine applications, yet there is already a large body of work to incorporate novel regenerative therapies into standard care. This review focuses on the current state and potential future of stem cells in equine regenerative medicine. PMID:24957845

  10. State of the art: stem cells in equine regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M J; Jarazo, J

    2015-03-01

    According to Greek mythology, Prometheus' liver grew back nightly after it was removed each day by an eagle as punishment for giving mankind fire. Hence, contrary to popular belief, the concept of tissue and organ regeneration is not new. In the early 20th century, cell culture and ex vivo organ preservation studies by Alexis Carrel, some with famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, established a foundation for much of modern regenerative medicine. While early beliefs and discoveries foreshadowed significant accomplishments in regenerative medicine, advances in knowledge within numerous scientific disciplines, as well as nano- and micromolecular level imaging and detection technologies, have contributed to explosive advances over the last 20 years. Virtually limitless preparations, combinations and applications of the 3 major components of regenerative medicine, namely cells, biomaterials and bioactive molecules, have created a new paradigm of future therapeutic options for most species. It is increasingly clear, however, that despite significant parallels among and within species, there is no 'one-size-fits-all' regenerative therapy. Likewise, a panacea has yet to be discovered that completely reverses the consequences of time, trauma and disease. Nonetheless, there is no question that the promise and potential of regenerative medicine have forever altered medical practices. The horse is a relative newcomer to regenerative medicine applications, yet there is already a large body of work to incorporate novel regenerative therapies into standard care. This review focuses on the current state and potential future of stem cells in equine regenerative medicine.

  11. Stem cells: intellectual property issues in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Zachariades, Nicholas A

    2013-12-01

    The topic of stem cells for use in regenerative medicine, especially embryonic stem cells, inspires much debate, discussion, and outrage as it slices through the very core moral values of society. These social and moral issues have, in turn, resulted in government policies that have influenced the study of stem cells in regenerative medicine.

  12. Fluid storage and transport in thrust belts: the Gavarnie Thrust system revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaig, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    There has been renewed interest in the pressure and movement of fluids in thrust systems in recent years with the discovery and increasing importance of slow slip earthquakes. Unfortunately the overpressured regime thought to be the source region for both normal and slow-slip earthquakes is inaccessible to direct observation, so information about the actual water content, flow regimes and permeability structure at the time of thrusting can only be obtained in exhumed rocks. The Gavarnie Thrust System in the Pyrenees (including the immediate footwall of the thrust and overlying thrust sheets) is exceptionally well studied in terms of structural and microstructural work, fluid inclusions, and isotopic tracing of fluid flow. Southward thrusting by 12-15 km occurred during the Eocene, and the current geometry of the thrust is a broad dome, allowing sampling at many locations. There is abundant evidence for near-lithostatic fluid pressures at depths of 8-15 km in the crust and temperatures of 300-400 °C, and fluids at these levels are dominated by hypersaline brines with Cl/Br ratios indicating evaporation of seawater. They are inferred to be derived from widespread Triassic evaporates, and stored in underlying redbeds and fractured basement rocks. There is also evidence from fluid inclusions for periodic pressure cycling down to near-hydrostatic values. This is thought to be related to co-seismic fault valve behaviour with release of fluid both into the shallow thrust and into steeply dipping shear zones in the hangingwall. Isotopic studies of carbonate mylonites along the Gavarnie thrust indicate unidirectional southward (structurally upward) flow of fluid , again probably mainly during transient veining events. These relatively slow moving fluids appear to have fed into a hydrostatic regime with topographically driven flow at higher levels. If time averaged permeability was high, most of the fluid would have rapidly escaped, since there is little opportunity to

  13. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-07-01

    Biostratigraphy is essential to exploration for oil and gas in the Wyoming thrust belt because fossils provide a temporal framework for interpretation of events of faulting, erosion, sedimentation, and the development of hydrocarbon traps and migration pathways. In the Cretaceous section, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites), which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonities are restricted to rocks of margin origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in investigations of stratigraphy and structures in the subsurface of the thrust belt because palynomorphs can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. In this paper, stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming, are correlated with the occurrence of ammonities and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior.

  14. Experimental Results of Schlicher's Thrusting Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the claims by Rex L. Schlicher, et al., (Patent 5,142,86 1) that a certain antenna geometry produces thrust greatly exceeding radiation reaction, when driven by repetitive, fast rise, and relatively slower decay current pulses. In order to test this hypothesis, the antenna was suspended by strings as a 3 in pendulum. Current pulses were fed to the antenna along the suspension path by a very flexible coaxial line constructed from loudspeaker cable and copper braid sheath. When driving the antenna via this cabling, our pulser was capable of sustaining 1200 A pulses at a rate of 30 per second up to a minute. In this way, bursts of pulses could be delivered in synch with the pendulum period in order to build up any motion. However, when using a laser beam passing through a lens attached to the antenna to amplify linear displacement by a factor of at least 25, no correlated motion of the beam spot could be detected on a distant wall. We conclude, in agreement with the momentum theorem of classical electromagnetic theory, that any thrust produced is far below practically useful levels. Hence, within classical electrodynamics, there is little hope of detecting any low level motion that cannot be explained by interactions with surrounding structural steel and the Earth's magnetic field.

  15. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, R.T.; Hall, D.K.

    1995-01-25

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  16. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batakis, A. P.; Vogan, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to generate data and develop analytical techniques to predict the performance and reliability of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments. A finite element model was used to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of coating systems in rocket thrust chambers. Candidate coating systems (using a copper substrate, NiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2.8Y2O3 ceramic overcoat) were selected for detailed study based on photomicrographic evaluations of experimental test specimens. The effects of plasma spray application parameters on the material properties of these coatings were measured and the effects on coating performance evaluated using the finite element model. Coating design curves which define acceptable operating envelopes for seleted coating systems were constructed based on temperature and strain limitations. Spray gun power levels was found to have the most significant effect on coating structure. Three coating systems were selected for study using different power levels. Thermal conductivity, strain tolerance, density, and residual stress were measured for these coatings. Analyses indicated that extremely thin coatings ( 0.02 mm) are required to accommodate the high heat flux of a rocket thrust chamber and ensure structural integrity.

  17. Effects of thrust reversing in ground proximity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, P. B.; Hughes, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The changes in stability and control characteristics encountered by a thrust reversing aircraft during its final approach, landing, and ground roll are described. These changes include a strong pitch-up accompanied by the loss of horizontal tail and aileron control effectiveness. The magnitude of reverser induced changes in ground effect are much larger than corresponding changes in free air. Some unexpected unsteady motions exhibited in wind tunnel by an aircraft model with reversers operating in ground proximity are also described. The cause of this oscillatory behavior was determined to be an unsteady interaction between the wall jets formed by impingement of reverser jets on the ground and the on-coming free stream. Time histories of rolling moments measured by the wind tunnel balance or support system were removed and frequencies were scaled by Strouhal number to full scale. Corrected time series were used to simulate the motion of a fighter aircraft with thrust reversers in ground effect. The simulation predicted large roll angles and nose down attitude at touchdown. Some phenomena of jet attachment to solid surfaces are discussed and areas for future research are recommended.

  18. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, Louis; Litchford, Ron; Jeng, San-Mou

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the variable thrust engine (VTE) in the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N2O4 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  19. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, L.; Litchford, R.; Jeng, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) in the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two-phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N204 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  20. Emergency Control Aircraft System Using Thrust Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J. (Inventor); Burcham, Frank W., Jr. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A digital longitudinal Aircraft Propulsion Control (APC system of a multiengine aircraft is provided by engine thrust modulation in response to comparing an input flightpath angle signal (gamma)c from a pilot thumbwheel. or an ILS system with a sensed flightpath angle y to produce an error signal (gamma)e that is then integrated (with reasonable limits) to generate a drift correction signal to be added to the error signal (gamma)e after first subtracting a lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) for phugoid damping. The output error signal is multiplied by a constant to produce an aircraft thrust control signal ATC of suitable amplitude to drive a throttle servo for all engines. each of which includes its own full-authority digital engine control (FADEC) computer. An alternative APC system omits sensed flightpath angle feedback and instead controls the flightpath angle by feedback of the lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) which also inherently provides phugoid damping. The feature of drift compensation is retained.

  1. Global cooling?

    PubMed

    Damon, P E; Kunen, S M

    1976-08-01

    The world's inhabitants, including Scientists, live primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. It is quite natural to be concerned about events that occur close to home and neglect faraway events. Hence, it is not surprising that so little attention has been given to the Southern Hemisphere. Evidence for global cooling has been based, in large part, on a severe cooling trend at high northern latitudes. This article points out that the Northern Hemisphere cooling trend appears to be out of phase with a warming trend at high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. The data are scanty. We cannot be sure that these temperature fluctuations are be not the result of natural causes. How it seems most likely that human activity has already significantly perturbed the atmospheric weather system. The effect of particulate matter pollution should be most severe in the highly populated and industrialized Northern Hemisphere. Because of the rapid diffusion of CO(2) molecules within the atmosphere, both hemispheres will be subject to warming due to the atmospheric (greenhouse) effect as the CO(2) content of the atmosphere builds up from the combustion of fossil fuels. Because of the differential effects of the two major sources of atmospheric pollution, the CO(2) greenhouse effect warming trend should first become evident in the Southern Hemisphere. The socioeconomic and political consequences of climate change are profound. We need an early warning system such as would be provided by a more intensive international world weather watch, particularly at high northern and southern latitudes.

  2. A 3-D Model of Stacked Thrusts in the Sevier Thrust Belt, Eastern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. W.; Clayton, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using published and new geologic map data and two exploratory wells for control, we constructed a three-dimensional geological model of the Pine Creek area in the Big Hole Mountains of eastern Idaho, where stacked Sevier thrust sheets are exposed at the surface. In this area, Cretaceous crustal shortening displaced and folded strata from Cambrian to Cretaceous in age. Using geologic map data as a primary input to a 3-D model presents a number of challenges, especially representing fault geometries at depth and maintaining strata thicknesses. The highly variable attitudes measured at the surface are also difficult to represent in a subsurface model because they require extensive extrapolation to depth. To overcome these challenges we EarthVision software, which has tools for model construction with minimal data inputs and uses a minimum tension algorithm to create geologically realistic surfaces. We also constructed two primary cross-sections to constrain strata and fault geometries according to structural principles, and used these to guide construction of fault and horizon surfaces. We then designated horizons with the best control as reference horizons to constrain strata geometries, and built the remaining horizons using isochores to add or subtract from those surfaces. The model shows classic flat-ramp thrust geometries as seen farther southeast in the Wyoming section of the thrust belt. The model also shows uniform southwestward tilting of faults and strata in the north end above younger thrusts, but strong effects from a duplex on a younger thrust fault encountered in the southern well, which rotated the strata and older faults above it.

  3. Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

  4. Stem Cells Applications in Regenerative Medicine and Disease Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mahla, Ranjeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, the most recent and emerging branch of medical science, deals with functional restoration of tissues or organs for the patient suffering from severe injuries or chronic disease. The spectacular progress in the field of stem cell research has laid the foundation for cell based therapies of disease which cannot be cured by conventional medicines. The indefinite self-renewal and potential to differentiate into other types of cells represent stem cells as frontiers of regenerative medicine. The transdifferentiating potential of stem cells varies with source and according to that regenerative applications also change. Advancements in gene editing and tissue engineering technology have endorsed the ex vivo remodelling of stem cells grown into 3D organoids and tissue structures for personalized applications. This review outlines the most recent advancement in transplantation and tissue engineering technologies of ESCs, TSPSCs, MSCs, UCSCs, BMSCs, and iPSCs in regenerative medicine. Additionally, this review also discusses stem cells regenerative application in wildlife conservation.

  5. Stem Cells Applications in Regenerative Medicine and Disease Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, the most recent and emerging branch of medical science, deals with functional restoration of tissues or organs for the patient suffering from severe injuries or chronic disease. The spectacular progress in the field of stem cell research has laid the foundation for cell based therapies of disease which cannot be cured by conventional medicines. The indefinite self-renewal and potential to differentiate into other types of cells represent stem cells as frontiers of regenerative medicine. The transdifferentiating potential of stem cells varies with source and according to that regenerative applications also change. Advancements in gene editing and tissue engineering technology have endorsed the ex vivo remodelling of stem cells grown into 3D organoids and tissue structures for personalized applications. This review outlines the most recent advancement in transplantation and tissue engineering technologies of ESCs, TSPSCs, MSCs, UCSCs, BMSCs, and iPSCs in regenerative medicine. Additionally, this review also discusses stem cells regenerative application in wildlife conservation. PMID:27516776

  6. Stem Cells Applications in Regenerative Medicine and Disease Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mahla, Ranjeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, the most recent and emerging branch of medical science, deals with functional restoration of tissues or organs for the patient suffering from severe injuries or chronic disease. The spectacular progress in the field of stem cell research has laid the foundation for cell based therapies of disease which cannot be cured by conventional medicines. The indefinite self-renewal and potential to differentiate into other types of cells represent stem cells as frontiers of regenerative medicine. The transdifferentiating potential of stem cells varies with source and according to that regenerative applications also change. Advancements in gene editing and tissue engineering technology have endorsed the ex vivo remodelling of stem cells grown into 3D organoids and tissue structures for personalized applications. This review outlines the most recent advancement in transplantation and tissue engineering technologies of ESCs, TSPSCs, MSCs, UCSCs, BMSCs, and iPSCs in regenerative medicine. Additionally, this review also discusses stem cells regenerative application in wildlife conservation. PMID:27516776

  7. Solar Airplanes and Regenerative Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    2007-01-01

    A solar electric aircraft with the potential to "fly forever" has captured NASA's interest, and the concept for such an aircraft was pursued under Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Feasibility of this aircraft happens to depend on the successful development of solar power technologies critical to NASA's Exploration Initiatives; hence, there was widespread interest throughout NASA to bring these technologies to a flight demonstration. The most critical is an energy storage system to sustain mission power during night periods. For the solar airplane, whose flight capability is already limited by the diffuse nature of solar flux and subject to latitude and time of year constraints, the feasibility of long endurance flight depends on a storage density figure of merit better than 400-600 watt-hr per kilogram. This figure of merit is beyond the capability of present day storage technologies (other than nuclear) but may be achievable in the hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC). This potential has led NASA to undertake the practical development of a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell, initially as solar energy storage for a high altitude UAV science platform but eventually to serve as the primary power source for NASAs lunar base and other planet surface installations. Potentially the highest storage capacity and lowest weight of any non-nuclear device, a flight-weight RFC aboard a solar-electric aircraft that is flown continuously through several successive day-night cycles will provide the most convincing demonstration that this technology's widespread potential has been realized. In 1998 NASA began development of a closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC under the Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project and continued its development, originally for a solar electric airplane flight, through FY2005 under the Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) project. Construction of

  8. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  9. Kinematic modeling of folding above listric propagating thrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardozo, Nestor; Brandenburg, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a kinematic approach to simulate folds above listric propagating thrusts. The model is based on a pre-defined circular thrust geometry with a maximum central angle beyond which the thrust is planar, inclined shear above the circular thrust, and trishear in front of the thrust. Provided the trajectory of thrust propagation is established, the model can be run forward and backwards. We use this last feature to implement a global simulated annealing, inverse modeling strategy. This inverse modeling strategy is applied to synthetic folds as well as two real examples in offshore Venezuela and the Niger Delta toe-thrust system. These three examples illustrate the benefits of the algorithm, particularly in predicting the possible range of models that can fit the structures. Thrust geometry, depth to detachment level, and backlimb geometry have high impact in model parameters such as backlimb shear angle and fault slip; while forelimb geometry is critical to constrain parameters such as fault propagation to fault slip ratio and trishear angle. Steep to overturned beds in forelimb areas are often not imaged by seismic, so in the absence of additional well data, considering all possible thrust-fold geometries is critical for the modeling and whatever prediction (e.g. hydrocarbon trap integrity) is made from it.

  10. The Chevron Foil Thrust Bearing: Improved Performance Through Passive Thermal Management and Effective Lubricant Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An improved foil thrust bearing is described that eliminates or reduces the need for forced cooling of the bearing foils while at the same time improves the load capacity of the bearing, enhances damping, provides overload tolerance, and eliminates the high speed load capacity drop-off that plagues the current state of the art. The performance improvement demonstrated by the chevron foil thrust bearing stems from a novel trailing edge shape that splays the hot lubricant in the thin film radially, thus preventing hot lubricant carry-over into the ensuing bearing sector. Additionally, the chevron shaped trailing edge induces vortical mixing of the hot lubricant with the gas that is naturally resident within the inter-pad region of a foil thrust bearing. The elimination of hot gas carry-over in combination with the enhanced mixing has enabled a completely passive thermally managed foil bearing design. Laboratory testing at NASA has confirmed the original analysis and reduced this concept to practice.

  11. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accommodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part 1: Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2: Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3: Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine. two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and

  12. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accomodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part I-Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2-Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25.800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3-Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine, two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and BPR

  13. Regenerative medicine: the emergence of an industry.

    PubMed

    Nerem, Robert M

    2010-12-01

    Over the last quarter of a century there has been an emergence of a tissue engineering industry, one that has now evolved into the broader area of regenerative medicine. There have been 'ups and downs' in this industry; however, it now appears to be on a track that may be described as 'back to the future'. The latest data indicate that for 2007 the private sector activity in the world for this industry is approaching $2.5 billion, with 167 companies/business units and more than 6000 employee full time equivalents. Although small compared with the medical device and also the pharmaceutical industries, these numbers are not insignificant. Thus, there is the indication that this industry, and the related technology, may still achieve its potential and address the needs of millions of patients worldwide, in particular those with needs that currently are unmet.

  14. Understanding regenerative medicine: a commissioner's viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Warren, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Regenerative medicines (RMs) represent a relatively new mode of care. Commissioners of healthcare need a pragmatic method to identify RMs which are safe and that will, when delivered in the context of an appropriate care pathway, avoid premature death and reduce morbidity for patients. This article offers a way of distinguishing between those which are useful currently and those which are not, although they may be in the future. This information is set in the context of reflection on issues that experience has demonstrated to be relevant to funding RMs. This article is potentially useful to developers of RM products as well as to commissioners of care, as it demonstrates what information will be required for a key step towards the adoption of their product.

  15. Regenerative system for a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, W.

    1987-04-28

    A regenerative system is described for a gas turbine, wherein the turbine has a single shaft on which are mounted a compressor section and a work section, comprising: an air heater mounted adjacent the exit of the work section, the hot exit gas and pressurized air passing through passages formed in the air heater; combustor housings surrounding the compressor section, each containing a combustor mounted within it and extending coaxially thereof, each combustor having a transition section extending to the entrance to the work section; an annular connector housing extending between the combustor housing and the exit of the compressor section to carry the compressed air radially; an outer duct leading from the connector housing to one end of the air heater; and an inner duct attached to the other end of the air heater.

  16. Regenerative Medicine Strategies for Esophageal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies that involve the structure and/or function of the esophagus can be life-threatening. The esophagus is a complex organ comprising nonredundant tissue that does not have the ability to regenerate. Currently available interventions for esophageal pathology have limited success and are typically associated with significant morbidity. Hence, there is currently an unmet clinical need for effective methods of esophageal repair. The present article presents a review of esophageal disease along with the anatomic and functional consequences of each pathologic process, the shortcomings associated with currently available therapies, and the latest advancements in the field of regenerative medicine with respect to strategies for esophageal repair from benchtop to bedside. PMID:25813694

  17. Epidermal Stem Cells in Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Zhen, Gehua; Tsai, Shin-Yi; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, great advances have been made in epidermal stem cell studies at the cellular and molecular level. These studies reported various subpopulations and differentiations existing in the epidermal stem cell. Although controversies and unknown issues remain, epidermal stem cells possess an immune-privileged property in transplantation together with easy accessibility, which is favorable for future clinical application. In this review, we will summarize the biological characteristics of epidermal stem cells, and their potential in orthopedic regenerative medicine. Epidermal stem cells play a critical role via cell replacement, and demonstrate significant translational potential in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases, including treatment for wound healing, peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury, and even muscle and bone remodeling. PMID:23727934

  18. Genetic engineering for skeletal regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Phillips, Jennifer E; García, Andrés J

    2007-01-01

    The clinical challenges of skeletal regenerative medicine have motivated significant advances in cellular and tissue engineering in recent years. In particular, advances in molecular biology have provided the tools necessary for the design of gene-based strategies for skeletal tissue repair. Consequently, genetic engineering has emerged as a promising method to address the need for sustained and robust cellular differentiation and extracellular matrix production. As a result, gene therapy has been established as a conventional approach to enhance cellular activities for skeletal tissue repair. Recent literature clearly demonstrates that genetic engineering is a principal factor in constructing effective methods for tissue engineering approaches to bone, cartilage, and connective tissue regeneration. This review highlights this literature, including advances in the development of efficacious gene carriers, novel cell sources, successful delivery strategies, and optimal target genes. The current status of the field and the challenges impeding the clinical realization of these approaches are also discussed.

  19. [Use of adipose tissue in regenerative medicine].

    PubMed

    Casteilla, L; Planat-Benard, V; Bourin, P; Laharrague, P; Cousin, B

    2011-04-01

    Adipose tissue is abundant and well known for its involvement in obesity and associated metabolic disorders. Its uses in regenerative medicine recently attracted many investigators, as large amounts of this tissue can be easily obtained using liposuction and it contains several populations of immature cells. The largest pool of such cells corresponds to immature stromal cells, called adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs). These cells are purified after proteolytic digestion of adipose tissue and selection by an adherent step. ADSCs display many common features with mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, including paracrine activity, but with some specific features, among which a greater angiogenic potential. This potential is now investigating at clinical level to treat critical ischemic hindlimb by autologous cells. Other potentials are also investigated and the treatment of fistula associated or not with Crohn's disease is reaching now phase III level.

  20. Regenerative Electronic Biosensors Using Supramolecular Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xuexin; Rajan, Nitin K.; Routenberg, David A.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2013-01-01

    A supramolecular interface for Si nanowire FETs has been developed with the aim of creating regenerative electronic biosensors. The key to the approach are Si-NWs functionalized with β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD), to which receptor moieties can be attached with an orthogonal supramolecular linker. Here we demonstrate full recycling using the strongest biomolecular system known, streptavidin (SAv)-biotin. The bound SAv and the linkers can be selectively removed from the surface through competitive desorption with concentrated β-CD, regenerating the sensor for repeated use. An added advantage of β-CD is the possibility of stereoselective sensors, and we demonstrate here the ability to quantify the enantiomeric composition of chiral targets. PMID:23566420

  1. Regenerative medicine: the emergence of an industry

    PubMed Central

    Nerem, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last quarter of a century there has been an emergence of a tissue engineering industry, one that has now evolved into the broader area of regenerative medicine. There have been ‘ups and downs’ in this industry; however, it now appears to be on a track that may be described as ‘back to the future’. The latest data indicate that for 2007 the private sector activity in the world for this industry is approaching $2.5 billion, with 167 companies/business units and more than 6000 employee full time equivalents. Although small compared with the medical device and also the pharmaceutical industries, these numbers are not insignificant. Thus, there is the indication that this industry, and the related technology, may still achieve its potential and address the needs of millions of patients worldwide, in particular those with needs that currently are unmet. PMID:20843840

  2. The international translational regenerative medicine center.

    PubMed

    Alexis, Mardi de Veuve; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik; Jove, Richard

    2012-11-01

    The International Translational Regenerative Medicine Center, an organizing sponsor of the World Stem Cell Summit 2012, is a global initiative established in 2011 by founding partners Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm, Sweden) and Beckman Research Institute at City of Hope (CA, USA) with a mission to facilitate the acceleration of translational research and medicine on a global scale. Karolinska Institutet, home of the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology, is one of the most prestigious medical research institutions in the world. The Beckman Research Institute/City of Hope is ranked among the leading NIH-designated comprehensive cancer research and treatment institutions in the USA, has the largest academic GMP facility and advanced drug discovery capability, and is a pioneer in diabetes research and treatment.

  3. Liposomes in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Nelson; Martins, Albino; Reis, Rui L.; Neves, Nuno M.

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes are vesicular structures made of lipids that are formed in aqueous solutions. Structurally, they resemble the lipid membrane of living cells. Therefore, they have been widely investigated, since the 1960s, as models to study the cell membrane, and as carriers for protection and/or delivery of bioactive agents. They have been used in different areas of research including vaccines, imaging, applications in cosmetics and tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is defined as a strategy for promoting the regeneration of tissues for the human body. This strategy may involve the coordinated application of defined cell types with structured biomaterial scaffolds to produce living structures. To create a new tissue, based on this strategy, a controlled stimulation of cultured cells is needed, through a systematic combination of bioactive agents and mechanical signals. In this review, we highlight the potential role of liposomes as a platform for the sustained and local delivery of bioactive agents for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:25401172

  4. Carbohydrate Engineered Cells for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jian; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Carbohydrates are integral components of the stem cell niche on several levels; proteoglycans are a major constituent of the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding a cell, glycosoaminoglycans (GAGs) help link cells to the ECM and the neighboring cells, and small but informationally-rich oligosaccharides provide a “sugar code” that identifies each cell and provides it with unique functions. This article samples roles that glycans play in development and then describes how metabolic glycoengineering – a technique where monosaccharide analogs are introduced into the metabolic pathways of a cell and are biosynthetically incorporated into the glycocalyx – is overcoming many of the long-standing barriers to manipulating carbohydrates in living cells and tissues and is becoming an intriguing new tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20117158

  5. Heart Valve Replacements with Regenerative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Dijkman, Petra E.; Fioretta, Emanuela S.; Frese, Laura; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Hoerstrup, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of severe valvular dysfunctions (e.g., stenosis and insufficiency) is increasing, leading to over 300,000 valves implanted worldwide yearly. Clinically used heart valve replacements lack the capacity to grow, inherently requiring repetitive and high-risk surgical interventions during childhood. The aim of this review is to present how different tissue engineering strategies can overcome these limitations, providing innovative valve replacements that proved to be able to integrate and remodel in pre-clinical experiments and to have promising results in clinical studies. Upon description of the different types of heart valve tissue engineering (e.g., in vitro, in situ, in vivo, and the pre-seeding approach) we focus on the clinical translation of this technology. In particular, we will deepen the many technical, clinical, and regulatory aspects that need to be solved to endure the clinical adaptation and the commercialization of these promising regenerative valves. PMID:27721704

  6. The TMI Regenerative Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Thomas L.; Ruhl, Robert C.; Petrik, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Energy storage and production in space requires rugged, reliable hardware which minimizes weight, volume, and maintenance while maximizing power output and usable energy storage. Systems generally consist of photovoltaic solar arrays which operate (during sunlight cycles) to provide system power and regenerate fuel (hydrogen) via water electrolysis and (during dark cycles) fuel cells convert hydrogen into electricity. Common configurations use two separate systems (fuel cell and electrolyzer) in conjunction with photovoltaic cells. Reliability, power to weight and power to volume ratios could be greatly improved if both power production (fuel cells) and power storage (electrolysis) functions can be integrated into a single unit. The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) based design integrates fuel cell and electrolyzer functions and potentially simplifies system requirements. The integrated fuel cell/electrolyzer design also utilizes innovative gas storage concepts and operates like a rechargeable 'hydrogen-oxygen battery'. Preliminary research has been completed on improved H2/H20 electrode (SOFC anode/electrolyzer cathode) materials for regenerative fuel cells. Tests have shown improved cell performance in both fuel and electrolysis modes in reversible fuel cell tests. Regenerative fuel cell efficiencies, ratio of power out (fuel cell mode) to power in (electrolyzer mode), improved from 50 percent using conventional electrode materials to over 80 percent. The new materials will allow a single SOFC system to operate as both the electolyzer and fuel cell. Preliminary system designs have also been developed to show the technical feasibility of using the design for space applications requiring high energy storage efficiencies and high specific energy. Small space systems also have potential for dual-use, terrestrial applications.

  7. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.

  8. Materials science tools for regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Wade Nicholas

    Regenerative therapies originating from recent technological advances in biology could revolutionize medicine in the coming years. In particular, the advent of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), with their ability to become any cell in the adult body, has opened the door to an entirely new way of treating disease. However, currently these medical breakthroughs remain only a promise. To make them a reality, new tools must be developed to surmount the new technical hurdles that have arisen from dramatic departure from convention that this field represents. The collected work presented in this dissertation covers several projects that seek to apply the skills and knowledge of materials science to this tool synthesizing effort. The work is divided into three chapters. The first deals with our work to apply Raman spectroscopy, a tool widely used for materials characterization, to degeneration in cartilage. We have shown that Raman can effectively distinguish the matrix material of healthy and diseased tissue. The second area of work covered is the development of a new confocal image analysis for studying hPSC colonies that are chemical confined to uniform growth regions. This tool has important application in understanding the heterogeneity that may slow the development of hPSC -based treatment, as well as the use of such confinement in the eventually large-scale manufacture of hPSCs for therapeutic use. Third, the use of structural templating in tissue engineering scaffolds is detailed. We have utilized templating to tailor scaffold structures for engineering of constructs mimicking two tissues: cartilage and lung. The work described here represents several important early steps towards large goals in regenerative medicine. These tools show a great deal of potential for accelerating progress in this field that seems on the cusp of helping a great many people with otherwise incurable disease.

  9. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  10. Thermal history of crystalline nappes of the Maria fold and thrust belt, west central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.H. ); Heizler, M.T. )

    1990-11-10

    The thermal history of the crust in west central Arizona, as documented by {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar step-heating analysis of mineral suites from crystalline nappes of the Maria fold and thrust belt, is characterized by three distinct stages for Late Cretaceous and Tertiary time. Regional heating of the crust occurred during basement-involved folding and thrust faulting in middle Late Cretaceous time and represents the earliest phase recorded by the {sup 40}/{sup 39}Ar data. The second stage was dominated by uplift and slow cooling (5-10C/m.y.) of the crust throughout latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary time. Tectonic denudation in late Oligocene to early Miocene time resulted in rapid uplift and cooling of midcrustal rocks in the footwall of the Whipple-Buckskin-Rawhide detachment system, marking the final thermal signature in the region. Partially outgassed hornblende in the northern Granite Wash Mountains reflects temperatures of {approximately}450C, whereas complete resetting of hornblende at Mesquite Mountain suggests that this area attained temperatures in excess of 500C. In contrast, data from the northern Plomosa Mountains indicate that this area did not attain temperatures sufficient to completely degas biotite or K-feldspar during Late Cretaceous time. Either (1) lower plate rocks were still sufficiently hot following Late Cretaceous heating that argon clocks were set simply due to rapid cooling or (2) the area experienced a renewed thermal input associated with extension, causing argon loss from previously cool rocks. Based on consideration of diffusion domain behavior in K-feldspars, the authors infer that a renewed thermal pulse was associated with the early stages of extension and was related to the cause for crustal weakening.

  11. Dating thrust systems on Mercury: new clues on the thermal evolution of the planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Ferrari, Sabrina; Zagato, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The global tectonic scenario of Mercury is dominated by contractional features mainly represented by lobate scarps. These structures are the expression of surface-breaking thrust faults and are linear or arcuate features widely distributed on Mercury. Since they display a broad distribution of orientations, lobate scarps are thought to be related to a global contractional strain, associated to planetary cooling (Watters et al., 1998, Geology, 26, 991-994). The age determination of these features will contribute to better constrain whether limits could be placed on when the contraction occurred. For these reasons we dated two thrust systems, located in different regions of Mercury. The first system is located at the edge between Kuiper and Beethoven quadrangle (latitude 9°20'N-23°42'S and longitude 72°73'-59°52'W). These 1500-long thrust system is constituted by several lobate scarps with a NNE-SSW orientation. The second thrust system considered in this work is the Enterprise Rupes, a 820 km-long scarp system that cuts the Rembrandt basin. We dated the activity of these systems through the buffered crater counting technique, which is used to derive absolute model ages of linear landforms (e.g. Fassett and Head, 2008, Icarus, 198, 37-56; Giacomini, et al, 2015, GSL, 401, 291-311). The results gave comparable ages for the two systems and suggest that the activity along major rupes all around planet Mercury have most probably begun before 3.5 Ga. This will give us new clues to better understanding the thermal evolution of the planet.

  12. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Mateu, Vicent; Pietrulewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e+e- → hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N3LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(ΛQCD) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  13. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  14. Thrust Production in a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey as a means of investigating the surface pressure and wake structure during swimming. A programmable microcomputer actuates 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform is based on the motion of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), as described by Tytell and Lauder (2004) and kinematic studies of living lamprey. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments indicating that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined. The project is supported by NIH CNRS Grant 1R01NS054271.

  15. Analysis of Factors Affecting the Performance of RLV Thrust Cell Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M. (Technical Monitor); Butler, Daniel T., Jr.; Pinders, Marek-Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    The reusable launch vehicle (RLV) thrust cell liner, or thrust chamber, is a critical component of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). It is designed to operate in some of the most severe conditions seen in engineering practice. This requirement, in conjunction with experimentally observed 'dog-house' failure modes characterized by bulging and thinning of the cooling channel wall, provides the motivation to study the factors that influence RLV thrust cell liner performance. Factors or parameters believed to be directly related to the observed characteristic deformation modes leading to failure under in-service loading conditions are identified, and subsequently investigated using the cylindrical version of the higher-order theory for functionally graded materials in conjunction with the Robinson's unified viscoplasticity theory and the power-law creep model for modeling the response of the liner s constituents. Configurations are analyzed in which specific modifications in cooling channel wall thickness or constituent materials are made to determine the influence of these parameters on the deformations resulting in the observed failure modes in the outer walls of the cooling channel. The application of thermal barrier coatings and functional grading are also investigated within this context. Comparison of the higher-order theory results based on the Robinson and power-law creep model predictions has demonstrated that, using the available material parameters, the power-law creep model predicts more precisely the experimentally observed deformation leading to the 'dog-house' failure mode for multiple short cycles, while also providing much improved computational efficiency. However, for a single long cycle, both models predict virtually identical deformations. Increasing the power-law creep model coefficients produces appreciable deformations after just one long cycle that would normally be obtained after multiple cycles, thereby enhancing the efficiency of the

  16. A review of the regenerative endodontic treatment procedure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bin-Na; Moon, Jong-Wook; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Hwang, In-Nam; Oh, Won-Mann; Hwang, Yun-Chan

    2015-08-01

    Traditionally, apexification has been used to treat immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This technique promotes the formation of an apical barrier to close the open apex so that the filling materials can be confined to the root canal. Because tissue regeneration cannot be achieved with apexification, a new technique called regenerative endodontic treatment was presented recently to treat immature permanent teeth. Regenerative endodontic treatment is a treatment procedure designed to replace damaged pulp tissue with viable tissue which restores the normal function of the pulp-dentin structure. After regenerative endodontic treatment, continued root development and hard tissue deposition on the dentinal wall can occur under ideal circumstances. However, it is difficult to predict the result of regenerative endodontic treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to summarize multiple factors effects on the result of regenerative endodontic treatment in order to achieve more predictable results. In this study, we investigated the features of regenerative endodontic treatment in comparison with those of other pulp treatment procedures and analyzed the factors that have an effect on regenerative endodontic treatment.

  17. A review of the regenerative endodontic treatment procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bin-Na; Moon, Jong-Wook; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Hwang, In-Nam; Oh, Won-Mann

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, apexification has been used to treat immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This technique promotes the formation of an apical barrier to close the open apex so that the filling materials can be confined to the root canal. Because tissue regeneration cannot be achieved with apexification, a new technique called regenerative endodontic treatment was presented recently to treat immature permanent teeth. Regenerative endodontic treatment is a treatment procedure designed to replace damaged pulp tissue with viable tissue which restores the normal function of the pulp-dentin structure. After regenerative endodontic treatment, continued root development and hard tissue deposition on the dentinal wall can occur under ideal circumstances. However, it is difficult to predict the result of regenerative endodontic treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to summarize multiple factors effects on the result of regenerative endodontic treatment in order to achieve more predictable results. In this study, we investigated the features of regenerative endodontic treatment in comparison with those of other pulp treatment procedures and analyzed the factors that have an effect on regenerative endodontic treatment. PMID:26295020

  18. Regenerative PN ranging experience with New Horizons during 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. R.; Haskins, C. B.; DeBoy, C. C.

    The New Horizons mission to Pluto is the first deep space mission to include the capability of supporting regenerative PN ranging. During the current phase of the mission, sequential tone ranging supports the mission navigation requirements but regenerative ranging will expand the conditions (antenna selection, integration time, etc.) over which ranging will be successful during any extended mission following the Pluto fly-by, to objects in the Kuiper belt. Experience with regenerative ranging is being obtained now in preparation for its use in an extended mission. During most of 2012, New Horizons was in a hibernation state. Tracking was conducted between late April and early July. Six regenerative ranging passes were performed to bookend this interval; 2 at the beginning and 4 at the end. During that time, the distance between the spacecraft and Earth was in excess of 22 Astronautical Units (AU) and the Pr/No levels were below 15 dB-Hz. A seventh regenerative ranging pass was performed in May at a higher signal level in order to test the acquisition of the ranging code by the spacecraft during a variety of conditions. The consistency of the regenerative range measurements with the adjacent sequential tone ranging measurements has been demonstrated and serves as a check on the calibration of the regenerative ranging system conditions. The range measurement precision has been shown to follow the predictions that are based on the uplink and downlink signal power. The regenerative ranging system has been shown to acquire the uplink ranging code with and without a commanded reset and regardless of the noise bandwidth setting of the system. This paper will present the data that was obtained during 2012 and will describe the analysis results for the regenerative ranging experience during 2012.

  19. Preliminary analysis of effects of air cooling turbine blades on turbojet-engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Wilson B; Nachtigall, Alfred J; Arne, Vernon L

    1950-01-01

    The effects of turbine-blade cooling on engine performance were analytically investigated for a turbojet engine in which cooling air is bled from the engine compressor. The analysis was made for a constant turbine-inlet temperature and a range of altitudes to determine the minimum cooling requirements to permit substitution of nonstrategic materials in turbine blading. The results indicate that, for a constant inlet temperature, air cooling of the turbine blades increases the specific fuel consumption and decreases the thrust of the engine. The highest possible cooling effectiveness is desirable to minimize coolant weight flow and its effects on engine performance.

  20. A magnetic coupling thrust stand for microthrust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. P.; Ferrer, P.

    2016-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement system that is based on a horizontal lever and utilizes a novel magnetic coupling mechanism to measure thrust has been developed. The system is capable of measuring thrusts as low as 10’s of μN. While zero drift is observed in the balance, tests have shown that they do not have an appreciable effect on thrust measurements. The thrust stand’s sensitivity can be adjusted by shifting the position of the coupling magnet inside the stand’s thrust support member, which allows flexibility for testing both higher and lower powered thrusters. The thrust stand has been modeled theoretically and the predicted results from the model are compared with experimentally measured data. The system was tested using a simple cold gas thruster and provided credible results that can be compared with other systems studied in the literature. Advantages include that the thrust stand is very cheap and easy to construct and further, the calibration process takes no longer than half an hour, facilitating rapid turnaround times while still retaining accuracy. Repeatability tests have shown that the balance gives consistent results.

  1. Thrust augmentation nozzle (TAN) concept for rocket engine booster applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Scott; Bulman, Mel; Neill, Todd

    2006-07-01

    Aerojet used the patented thrust augmented nozzle (TAN) concept to validate a unique means of increasing sea-level thrust in a liquid rocket booster engine. We have used knowledge gained from hypersonic Scramjet research to inject propellants into the supersonic region of the rocket engine nozzle to significantly increase sea-level thrust without significantly impacting specific impulse. The TAN concept overcomes conventional engine limitations by injecting propellants and combusting in an annular region in the divergent section of the nozzle. This injection of propellants at moderate pressures allows for obtaining high thrust at takeoff without overexpansion thrust losses. The main chamber is operated at a constant pressure while maintaining a constant head rise and flow rate of the main propellant pumps. Recent hot-fire tests have validated the design approach and thrust augmentation ratios. Calculations of nozzle performance and wall pressures were made using computational fluid dynamics analyses with and without thrust augmentation flow, resulting in good agreement between calculated and measured quantities including augmentation thrust. This paper describes the TAN concept, the test setup, test results, and calculation results.

  2. Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, S. J.; Lamprou, D.; Knoll, A. K.; Lappas, V. J.

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges.

  3. A Target Indirect Thrust Measurement Method of Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiqiao; Xiong, Yuefei; Li, Chao; Zheng, Longxi; Li, Qing

    2015-05-01

    An indirect thrust measurement method based on impulse of a target plate was developed, and a new thrust measurement system (TMS) was successfully designed and constructed. A series of multi-cycle experiments on thrust measurement were conducted to investigate the feasibility of this method with the newly-built indirect TMS. The thrust measurement of PDE was made at different plate target axial positions and operating frequencies. All the experiments were conducted using gasoline as fuel and air as oxidant. The experimental results implied that the thrust of PDE by using the indirect impulse method was a function of the target plate axial position, and there existed an optimum measurement position for PDE with a diameter of 60 mm. The optimum target plate position located at 3.33. According to the experimental results, the thrusts obtained by using indirect TMS were less than the actual values, and so the observed value of thrust was modified in order to make the thrust more reliable. A relative accurate calibration formula depending on the operating frequency was found.

  4. The 30-centimeter ion thrust subsystem design manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the 30-centimeter ion propulsion thrust subsystem technology that was developed to satisfy the propulsion needs of future planetary and early orbital missions are described. Functional requirements and descriptions, interface and performance requirements, and physical characteristics of the hardware are described at the thrust subsystem, BIMOD engine system, and component level.

  5. Optimal low-thrust, Earth-Moon trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluever, Craig Allen

    1993-01-01

    A variety of optimal trajectories from a circular low-Earth parking orbit to a circular low-lunar parking orbit are computed for a range of low-thrust spacecraft. The problem is studied in the context of the classical restricted three-body problem. Minimum-fuel, planar trajectories with a fixed thrust-coast-thrust engine sequence are computed for both a 'high-end' low-thrust spacecraft and 'moderate' low-thrust nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft. Since a low-thrust trajectory is a long duration transfer with slowly developing spirals about the Earth and Moon, the minimum-fuel Earth-Moon trajectory is obtained by formulating and successively solving a hierarchy of subproblems. The subproblems include optimal Earth-escape and Moon-capture trajectories and sub-optimal translunar trajectories. The complete minimum-fuel trajectory problem is eventually solved using a 'hybrid' direct/indirect method which utilizes the benefits of a direct optimization method and an indirect method from optimal control theory. Minimum-fuel transfers are also computed using a switching function structure which results in multiple thrust and coast arcs. In addition, a new combined vehicle and trajectory optimization problem of maximum payload fraction is formulated and solved. Finally, 3-D minimum-fuel trajectories are obtained for both the 'high-end' and 'moderate' low-thrust spacecraft. Numerical results are presented for various optimal Earth-Moon trajectories.

  6. Heat pipe technology for advanced rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    The application of heat pipe technology to the design of rocket engine thrust chambers is discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) evaporator wick development, (2) specific heat pipe designs and test results, (3) injector design, fabrication, and cold flow testing, and (4) preliminary thrust chamber design.

  7. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

  8. Development of a He3-He4 sub Kelvin active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) with no moving parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, A. E.; Miller, F. K.

    2014-01-01

    Current state of the art particle and photon detectors such as Transition Edge Sensors (TES) and Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) use large arrays of sensors or detectors for space science missions. As the size of these space science detectors increases, future astrophysics missions will require sub-Kelvin cooling over larger areas. This leads to not only increased cooling power requirements, but also a requirement for distributed sub-Kelvin cooling. We propose an active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) that uses a Superfluid Magnetic Pump (SMP) to circulate liquid He3-He4 through a magnetic regenerator to provide the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Such system will be capable of distributing the cooling load to a relatively large array of objects. One advantage of using a fluid for heat transfer in such systems is to isolate components such as the superconducting magnets from detectors that are sensitive to magnetic fields. Another advantage of the proposed tandem AMRR is that it does not need Gas Gap Heat Switches (GGHS) to transfer heat during various stages of the magnetic cooling. Our proposed system consists of four superconducting magnets, one superleak, and three heat exchangers. It will operate continuously with no moving parts and it will be capable of providing the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures for future space science applications.

  9. GMP cryopreservation of large volumes of cells for regenerative medicine: active control of the freezing process.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Fuller, Barry; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G John

    2014-09-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to -60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze-viabilities at 93.4% ± 7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3 ± 1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5 ± 1.7

  10. GMP Cryopreservation of Large Volumes of Cells for Regenerative Medicine: Active Control of the Freezing Process

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G. John

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to −60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze—viabilities at 93.4%±7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3±1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5±1.7

  11. GMP cryopreservation of large volumes of cells for regenerative medicine: active control of the freezing process.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Selden, Clare; Hodgson, Humphrey; Fuller, Barry; Gibbons, Stephanie; Morris, G John

    2014-09-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are increasingly required in regenerative medicine applications but must deliver functional products at clinical scale and comply with Good Manufacturing Process (GMP). While GMP cryopreservation is achievable on a small scale using a Stirling cryocooler-based controlled rate freezer (CRF) (EF600), successful large-scale GMP cryopreservation is more challenging due to heat transfer issues and control of ice nucleation, both complex events that impact success. We have developed a large-scale cryocooler-based CRF (VIA Freeze) that can process larger volumes and have evaluated it using alginate-encapsulated liver cell (HepG2) spheroids (ELS). It is anticipated that ELS will comprise the cellular component of a bioartificial liver and will be required in volumes of ∼2 L for clinical use. Sample temperatures and Stirling cryocooler power consumption was recorded throughout cooling runs for both small (500 μL) and large (200 mL) volume samples. ELS recoveries were assessed using viability (FDA/PI staining with image analysis), cell number (nuclei count), and function (protein secretion), along with cryoscanning electron microscopy and freeze substitution techniques to identify possible injury mechanisms. Slow cooling profiles were successfully applied to samples in both the EF600 and the VIA Freeze, and a number of cooling and warming profiles were evaluated. An optimized cooling protocol with a nonlinear cooling profile from ice nucleation to -60°C was implemented in both the EF600 and VIA Freeze. In the VIA Freeze the nucleation of ice is detected by the control software, allowing both noninvasive detection of the nucleation event for quality control purposes and the potential to modify the cooling profile following ice nucleation in an active manner. When processing 200 mL of ELS in the VIA Freeze-viabilities at 93.4% ± 7.4%, viable cell numbers at 14.3 ± 1.7 million nuclei/mL alginate, and protein secretion at 10.5 ± 1.7

  12. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the test campaigns designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QVPT), but instead will describe the recent test campaign. In addition, it contains a brief description of the supporting radio frequency (RF) field analysis, lessons learned, and potential applications of the technology to space exploration missions. During the first (Cannae) portion of the campaign, approximately 40 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 935 megahertz and 28 watts. During the subsequent (tapered cavity) portion of the campaign, approximately 91 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 1933 megahertz and 17 watts. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level. Test campaign results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma.

  13. Tectonic Significance of Intraoceanic Thrusts in the Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Kodaira, S.; Park, J.; Ashi, J.; Fukao, Y.; Moore, G. F.; Matsuoka, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is a convergent margin where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath southwest Japan. Because this subduction zone has repeatedly generated great earthquakes with Mw>8, seismic reflection studies have been intensively carried out in the whole Nankai Trough region. However, the role of oceanic crust in plate convergent margins was not well understood. Recently, Tsuji et al. [2009] identified intraoceanic thrusts developed as imbricate structures within the subducting Philippine Sea plate off the Kii Peninsula in central Japan manifesting as strong-amplitude reflections observed in an industry-standard 3D seismic reflection data set. In this study, we use other 2D and 3D seismic reflection data acquired in the whole Nankai Trough region and extract geometries of (1) intraoceanic thrusts, (2) surface of oceanic crust and (3) Moho in order to discuss characteristics of intraoceanic thrusts distributed in the whole Nankai Trough region. We mainly use seismic reflection data acquired by JAMSTEC. Seismic profiles demonstrate that intraoceanic faults are densely distributed eastern side of the Cape Shionomisaki (southern edge of the Kii Peninsula). Large displacements of a few major intraoceanic thrusts elevate the crust surface, and the offset due to cumulative displacements reaches >1 km at the sediment-igneous crust interface. A part of Kashinozaki-Knoll is also uplifted by the thrust displacement. These imbricate intraoceanic thrusts cut through the oceanic crust as a discontinuous thrust plane. The intraoceanic thrusts strike nearly parallel to the trend of the trough axis. However the fault traces are bending at the western termination; the fault planes extend upward from side edges of the underlying intraoceanic thrusts and work as lateral faults. The deformation within oceanic crust may have continued until recently with subduction, because the shallow sediment as well as the seafloor is deformed due to the thrust displacement [Kodaira et

  14. The Quest toward limb regeneration: a regenerative engineering approach

    PubMed Central

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Nair, Lakshmi S.

    2016-01-01

    The Holy Grail to address the clinical grand challenge of human limb loss is to develop innovative strategies to regrow the amputated limb. The remarkable advances in the scientific understanding of regeneration, stem cell science, material science and engineering, physics and novel surgical approaches in the past few decades have provided a regenerative tool box to face this grand challenge and address the limitations of human wound healing. Here we discuss the convergence approach put forward by the field of Regenerative Engineering to use the regenerative tool box to design and develop novel translational strategies to limb regeneration. PMID:27047679

  15. Integrate and boost: bioscaffolds nurture the cardiac regenerative paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bartunek, Jozef; Vanderheyden, Marc; Behfar, Atta

    2015-09-23

    The traditional cardiac regenerative paradigm using non-modified adult stem cells with various routes of delivery into the myocardial target has thus far yielded unconvincing clinical outcomes. Besides factors related to heterogeneity in trial methodology, inter-patient variability and the rare incidence of adult stem cells with intrinsic repair potency underscore the importance of further optimization and standardization of regenerative platforms. Cardiac tissue engineering seizing upon the advances of cellular, molecular, and biomaterial development is shaping the next generation of the regenerative paradigm and thereby fostering disruptive curative treatments in heart failure.

  16. Biomolecule delivery to engineer the cellular microenvironment for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Corey J; Kim, Jayoung; Green, Jordan J

    2014-07-01

    To realize the potential of regenerative medicine, controlling the delivery of biomolecules in the cellular microenvironment is important as these factors control cell fate. Controlled delivery for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine often requires bioengineered materials and cells capable of spatiotemporal modulation of biomolecule release and presentation. This review discusses biomolecule delivery from the outside of the cell inwards through the delivery of soluble and insoluble biomolecules as well as from the inside of the cell outwards through gene transfer. Ex vivo and in vivo therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as combination delivery of biomolecules, scaffolds, and cells. Various applications in regenerative medicine are highlighted including bone tissue engineering and wound healing.

  17. Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system

    DOEpatents

    Davis, R.I.

    1990-10-16

    A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more road wheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the road wheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the road wheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded. 8 figs.

  18. Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roy I.

    1990-01-01

    A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more roadwheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the roadwheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the roadwheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded.

  19. Cyclic ductile and brittle deformation related to coseismic thrust fault propagation: Structural record at the base of a basement nappe (Preveli, Crete)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüchter, Jens-Alexander; Wassmann, Sara; Stöckhert, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    structural record at the base of a basement nappe (Preveli nappe, Crete, Greece) thrust upon sedimentary rocks is investigated, aimed on understanding mechanisms which result in decoupling of the thrust sheet from its original substratum. We identify several superimposed deformation stages, each with characteristic structural style and indications of episodic deformation at initially high differential stress. The final stage involves formation of a matrix supported breccia transected by pseudotachylytes, comprising the lowermost 30 m of the nappe. Brecciation and pseudotachylyte formation occurred in a single event, and structures were not modified afterward. Complete induration of breccia and composition of phengite crystallized during devitrification of pseudotachylytes place the sequence of events into the middle crust. We propose a model relating episodic deformation and cyclic stress history to propagation of a thrust fault in a limited number of seismic events. Terminal brecciation and frictional fusion record passage of the fault front beneath the site of observation and decoupling of the thrust sheet. Absence of discernible further deformation is consistent with negligible basal friction during transport as a nappe. Brecciation and pseudotachylyte formation mark the switch from a history of repeated coseismic loading and postseismic stress relaxation in the plastosphere, driven by seismic events on the approaching thrust fault, to passive transport with deformation localized in a weak thrust plane. For a sequence of superimposed ductile to brittle structures, our model provides an alternative to progressive cooling and exhumation concomitant with deformation over millions of years.

  20. New Highly Dynamic Approach for Thrust Vector Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M.; Ettl, J.; Grothe, D.; Hrbud, I.

    2015-09-01

    For a new launcher system a thrust vector control system is needed. This launch vehicle system consists of two rockets which are namely the VS-50 (two-stage suborbital vehicle) and the VLM-1 (three-stage microsatellite launch vehicle). VLM-1 and VS-50 are developed in a cooperation between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute (IAE). To keep these two rockets on its trajectory during flight a highly dynamic thrust vector control system is required. For the purpose of developing such a highly dynamic thrust vector control system a master thesis was written by the author. The development includes all mechanical constructions as well as control algorithms and electronics design. Moreover an optimization of control algorithms was made to increase the dynamic capabilities of the thrust vector control system. The composition of the right components plus the sophisticated control algorithm make the thrust vector control system highly dynamic.

  1. Thrust Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pak, Sibtosh; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S. R.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors aimed at probing different aspects of PDE ejector processes, are presented and discussed. The PDE was operated using ethylene as the fuel and an equimolar oxygen/nitrogen mixture as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. The thrust measurements for the PDE alone are in excellent agreement with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature and serve as a Baseline for the ejector studies. These thrust measurements were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups using constant diameter ejector tubes and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. The results show that for the geometries studied here, a maximum thrust augmentation of 24% is achieved. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  2. Static thrust recovery of PAR craft on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, K. I.

    2008-08-01

    Power-Augmented-Ram Vehicles belong to a new class of ground-effect machines with hybrid support. Recovered static thrust and static lift on solid surfaces are important amphibious characteristics of this craft. Experimental data for the static thrust recovery and the transition to a hovering mode are obtained in the tests with a vehicle model on two types of ground surface and with variable engine thrust and flap trailing-edge gap. The uphill surface and increased mass of the model demonstrate reductions in thrust recovery. A comparison with a two-dimensional potential-flow theory is presented. The static thrust accumulation, identified in the pre-hovering regime of a model on solid surface, does not significantly benefit the low-speed forward motion.

  3. Interactive property of large thrust sheets with footwall rocks—the Sub thrust interactive duplex hypothesis: A mechanism of dome formation in thrust sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, Robert D.

    1991-06-01

    Recently acquired Appalachian Ultradeep Core Hole (ADCOH) Project site investigation seismic reflection data and geologic data from the Appalachians and several other orogenic belts suggest an important mutually interdependent relationship exists between emplacement of large crystalline thrust sheets and the deforming foreland rocks beneath. This relationship suggests isolated domes beneath crystalline thrust sheets may be produced by passive folding of the sheet as a result of formation of an antiformal stack duplex in the platform sedimentary sequence beneath. Suggestions that domes in crystalline thrust sheets formed by interference of late open folds is doubtlessly still valid in places, but the platform duplex mechanism is probably also valid to explain the late doming of many crystalline and other large thrust sheets. The dome beneath the Shooting Creek and Brasstown Bald windows in the ADCOH site region is imaged as an antiformal stack duplex at depth. The Tallulah Falls dome, Grandfather Mountain and Mountain City windows, and Smokies Foothills duplex in the site region and elsewhere in the southern Blue Ridge are all late isolated domes and all are probably or demonstrably underlain by antiformal stack duplexes beneath the Blue Ridge-Piedmont composite crystalline thrust sheet. The Assynt window and footwall duplex benath the Arnabol and Moine thrusts in Scotland, and the Engadine window in the Alps may be similar structures.

  4. Regenerative sorption compressors for cryogenic refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven; Jones, Jack A.

    1990-01-01

    Dramatic efficiency improvements for sorption coolers appear possible with use of compressor heat regeneration techniques. The general theory of sorption compressor heat regeneration is discussed in this paper, and several design concepts are presented. These designs result in long-life, low-vibration cryocoolers that potentially have efficiencies comparable to Stirling refrigerators for 65 to 90 K spacecraft instrument cooling applications.

  5. High-density fuel combustion and cooling investigation. [kengine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labotz, R. J.; Rousar, D. C.; Valler, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of several engine configurations are discussed with respect to the combustion and heat transfer characteristics of LOX/RP-1 at chamber pressures between 6895 and 13790 kPa (1000 and 2000 psia). The different engine configurations discussed include: 8274 kPa and 13790 kPa (1200 psia and 2000 psia) chamber pressure injectors with like doublet and preatomized triplet elements; cooled and uncooled acoustic resonators; and graphite, regeneratively cooled and calorimetric chambers ranging in length from 27.9 to 37.5 cm (11 to 15 in.). A high pressure LOX/RP-1 spark igniter is also evaluated.

  6. Initial Thrust Measurements of Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Natalie R. S.; Scogin, Tyler; Liu, Thomas M.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Dankanich, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Electronegative ion thrusters are a variation of traditional gridded ion thruster technology differentiated by the production and acceleration of both positive and negative ions. Benefits of electronegative ion thrusters include the elimination of lifetime-limiting cathodes from the thruster architecture and the ability to generate appreciable thrust from both charge species. While much progress has been made in the development of electronegative ion thruster technology, direct thrust measurements are required to unambiguously demonstrate the efficacy of the concept and support continued development. In the present work, direct thrust measurements of the thrust produced by the MINT (Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster) are performed using an inverted-pendulum thrust stand in the High-Power Electric Propulsion Laboratory's Vacuum Test Facility-1 at the Georgia Institute of Technology with operating pressures ranging from 4.8 x 10(exp -5) and 5.7 x 10(exp -5) torr. Thrust is recorded while operating with a propellant volumetric mixture ratio of 5:1 argon to nitrogen with total volumetric flow rates of 6, 12, and 24 sccm (0.17, 0.34, and 0.68 mg/s). Plasma is generated using a helical antenna at 13.56 MHz and radio frequency (RF) power levels of 150 and 350 W. The acceleration grid assembly is operated using both sinusoidal and square waveform biases of +/-350 V at frequencies of 4, 10, 25, 125, and 225 kHz. Thrust is recorded for two separate thruster configurations: with and without the magnetic filter. No thrust is discernable during thruster operation without the magnetic filter for any volumetric flow rate, RF forward Power level, or acceleration grid biasing scheme. For the full thruster configuration, with the magnetic filter installed, a brief burst of thrust of approximately 3.75 mN +/- 3 mN of error is observed at the start of grid operation for a volumetric flow rate of 24 sccm at 350 W RF power using a sinusoidal waveform grid bias at 125 kHz and +/- 350 V

  7. Regenerative fuel cell combines high efficiency with low cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, H.; Frank, H.; Stephens, C. W.

    1965-01-01

    Hydrogen/oxygen regenerative fuel cell stores electrical energy efficiently and inexpensively. The fuel cell has a high energy-to-weight ratio, and is adapted for a large number of cycles with deep discharge.

  8. 3. INSIDE BATCH FURNACE BUILDING, VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT REGENERATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INSIDE BATCH FURNACE BUILDING, VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT REGENERATIVE BATCH FURNACES ON LEFT AND 5 TON CAPACITY CHARGING MACHINE ON RIGHT. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, 22-Inch Bar Mill, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  9. Advancing pig cloning technologies towards application in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, H; Matsunari, H; Nakano, K; Watanabe, M; Umeyama, K; Nagaya, M

    2012-08-01

    Regenerative medicine is expected to make a significant contribution by development of novel therapeutic treatments for intractable diseases and for improving the quality of life of patients. Many advances in regenerative medicine, including basic and translational research, have been developed and tested in experimental animals; pigs have played an important role in various aspects of this work. The value of pigs as a model species is being enhanced by the generation of specially designed animals through cloning and genetic modifications, enabling more sophisticated research to be performed and thus accelerating the clinical application of regenerative medicine. This article reviews the significant aspects of the creation and application of cloned and genetically modified pigs in regenerative medicine research and considers the possible future directions of the technology. We also discuss the importance of reproductive biology as an interface between basic science and clinical medicine.

  10. Science and Ethics: Bridge to the Future for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Patricio, Ventura-Juncá

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to reflect on the relationship between regenerative medicine and ethics, using as references the Aristotelian concept of what is ethical and that of Raessler Van Potter about bioethics. To do this, I will briefly describe the advances in regenerative medicine with stem cells, the strategies for producing pluripotential cells without destroying human embryos, and the great potential of stem cells to improve life for Humanity, noting that for this to be possible, it is necessary to locate the role of regenerative medicine in the context of human values and well being. In this way, this article has a real perspective of the role that regenerative medicine can play in benefitting human beings and engendering respect for human and natural environments. PMID:24298338

  11. Iron serves as diffusion barrier in thermally regenerative galvanic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouthamel, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Pure iron or iron-coated diaphragm provides a hydrogen diffusion electrode for a thermally regenerative galvanic cell. It allows the gas to diffuse through its interatomic spaces and resists the corrosive action of the cell environment.

  12. Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells (URFC) have recently been developed by several fuel cell manufacturers. These manufacturers have concentrated their efforts on the development of the cell stack technology itself, and have not up to this point devoted much effort to the design and development of the balance of plant. A fuel cell technology program at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) that has as its goal the definition and feasibility testing of the URFC system balance of plant. Besides testing the feasibility, the program also intends to minimize the system weight, volume, and parasitic power as its goal. The design concept currently being developed uses no pumps to circulate coolant or reactants, and minimizes the ancillary components to only the oxygen and hydrogen gas storage tanks, a water storage tank, a loop heat pipe to control the temperature and two pressure control devices to control the cell stack pressures during operation. The information contained in this paper describes the design and operational concepts employed in this concept. The paper also describes the NASA Glenn research program to develop this concept and test its feasibility.

  13. Introduction to stem cells and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kolios, George; Moodley, Yuben

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are a population of undifferentiated cells characterized by the ability to extensively proliferate (self-renewal), usually arise from a single cell (clonal), and differentiate into different types of cells and tissue (potent). There are several sources of stem cells with varying potencies. Pluripotent cells are embryonic stem cells derived from the inner cell mass of the embryo and induced pluripotent cells are formed following reprogramming of somatic cells. Pluripotent cells can differentiate into tissue from all 3 germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm). Multipotent stem cells may differentiate into tissue derived from a single germ layer such as mesenchymal stem cells which form adipose tissue, bone, and cartilage. Tissue-resident stem cells are oligopotent since they can form terminally differentiated cells of a specific tissue. Stem cells can be used in cellular therapy to replace damaged cells or to regenerate organs. In addition, stem cells have expanded our understanding of development as well as the pathogenesis of disease. Disease-specific cell lines can also be propagated and used in drug development. Despite the significant advances in stem cell biology, issues such as ethical controversies with embryonic stem cells, tumor formation, and rejection limit their utility. However, many of these limitations are being bypassed and this could lead to major advances in the management of disease. This review is an introduction to the world of stem cells and discusses their definition, origin, and classification, as well as applications of these cells in regenerative medicine.

  14. Recent advances in acellular regenerative tissue scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    The management of chronic wounds is a considerable challenge for foot and ankle surgeons. The well-established tenets of adequate vascular supply, debridement with eradication of infection, and offloading must be employed in the management of all extremity wounds. Regenerative scaffolds are a viable means of reestablishing a favorable wound environment. The matrix facilitates cell migration, chemoattraction, angiogenesis, wound bed granulation, and expedited wound closure. Although studies have demonstrated success with acellular matrices, a multimodal approach should always be employed to improve healing success. Negative pressure wound therapy, compression, offloading, and antibiotics are advocated to improve outcomes. Acellular graft selection requires a multifactorial analysis, taking into consideration the specific patient and wound characteristics as well as the differences between acellular matrices. Patient age, comorbidities, activity level, and ability to comply with protocol as well as wound etiology, duration, depth, surface area, exudate, bacterial burden, location, vascular status, ischemic status, and presentation are all critical components. To effectively choose a matrix, the clinician must have a comprehensive understanding of the products available and the data validating their use. The mechanisms by which the acellular matrix accelerates wound healing and increases the likelihood of wound healing continue to be investigated. However, it is clear that these acellular biologic tissue scaffolds are incorporating into the host tissue, with resultant revascularization and cellular repopulation. Moving forward, additional investigations examining the effectiveness of acellular biologic tissue scaffolds to improve healing in complex, nondiabetic wounds are warranted.

  15. REGENERATIVE MEDICINE AS APPLIED TO GENERAL SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Wood, Kathryn J; De Coppi, Paolo; Baptista, Pedro M; Binder, Kyle W; Bitar, Khalil N; Breuer, Christopher; Burnett, Luke; Christ, George; Farney, Alan; Figliuzzi, Marina; Holmes, James H; Koch, Kenneth; Macchiarini, Paolo; Sani, Sayed-Hadi Mirmalek; Opara, Emmanuel; Remuzzi, Andrea; Rogers, Jeffrey; Saul, Justin M; Seliktar, Dror; Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Smith, Tom; Solomon, Daniel; Van Dyke, Mark; Yoo, James J; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Atala, Anthony; Stratta, Robert J; Soker, Shay

    2012-01-01

    The present review illustrates the state of the art of regenerative medicine (RM) as applied to surgical diseases and demonstrates that this field has the potential to address some of the unmet needs in surgery. RM is a multidisciplinary field whose purpose is to regenerate in vivo or ex vivo human cells, tissues or organs in order to restore or establish normal function through exploitation of the potential to regenerate, which is intrinsic to human cells, tissues and organs. RM uses cells and/or specially designed biomaterials to reach its goals and RM-based therapies are already in use in several clinical trials in most fields of surgery. The main challenges for investigators are threefold: Creation of an appropriate microenvironment ex vivo that is able to sustain cell physiology and function in order to generate the desired cells or body parts; identification and appropriate manipulation of cells that have the potential to generate parenchymal, stromal and vascular components on demand, both in vivo and ex vivo; and production of smart materials that are able to drive cell fate. PMID:22330032

  16. Regenerative life support system research and concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Life support systems that involve recycling of atmospheres, water, food and waste are so complex that models incorporating all the interactions and relationships are vital to design, development, simulations, and ultimately to control of space qualified systems. During early modeling studies, FORTRAN and BASIC programs were used to obtain numerical comparisons of the performance of different regenerative concepts. Recently, models were made by combining existing capabilities with expert systems to establish an Intelligent Design Support Environment for simpliflying user interfaces and to address the need for the engineering aspects. Progress was also made toward modeling and evaluating the operational aspects of closed loop life support systems using Time-step and Dynamic simulations over a period of time. Example models are presented which show the status and potential of developed modeling techniques. For instance, closed loop systems involving algae systeMs for atmospheric purification and food supply augmentation, plus models employing high plants and solid waste electrolysis are described and results of initial evaluations are presented.

  17. Recent advancements in regenerative dentistry: A review.

    PubMed

    Amrollahi, Pouya; Shah, Brinda; Seifi, Amir; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-12-01

    Although human mouth benefits from remarkable mechanical properties, it is very susceptible to traumatic damages, exposure to microbial attacks, and congenital maladies. Since the human dentition plays a crucial role in mastication, phonation and esthetics, finding promising and more efficient strategies to reestablish its functionality in the event of disruption has been important. Dating back to antiquity, conventional dentistry has been offering evacuation, restoration, and replacement of the diseased dental tissue. However, due to the limited ability and short lifespan of traditional restorative solutions, scientists have taken advantage of current advancements in medicine to create better solutions for the oral health field and have coined it "regenerative dentistry." This new field takes advantage of the recent innovations in stem cell research, cellular and molecular biology, tissue engineering, and materials science etc. In this review, the recently known resources and approaches used for regeneration of dental and oral tissues were evaluated using the databases of Scopus and Web of Science. Scientists have used a wide range of biomaterials and scaffolds (artificial and natural), genes (with viral and non-viral vectors), stem cells (isolated from deciduous teeth, dental pulp, periodontal ligament, adipose tissue, salivary glands, and dental follicle) and growth factors (used for stimulating cell differentiation) in order to apply tissue engineering approaches to dentistry. Although they have been successful in preclinical and clinical partial regeneration of dental tissues, whole-tooth engineering still seems to be far-fetched, unless certain shortcomings are addressed. PMID:27612840

  18. Liver-Regenerative Transplantation: Regrow and Reset

    PubMed Central

    de l’Hortet, A. Collin; Takeishi, K.; Guzman-Lepe, J.; Handa, K.; Matsubara, K.; Fukumitsu, K.; Dorko, K.; Presnell, S. C.; Yagi, H.; Soto-Gutierrez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation, either a partial liver from a living or deceased donor or a whole liver from a deceased donor, is the only curative therapy for severe end-stage liver disease. Only one-third of those on the liver transplant waiting list will be transplanted, and the demand for livers is projected to increase 23% in the next 20 years. Consequently, organ availability is an absolute constraint on the number of liver transplants that can be performed. Regenerative therapies aim to enhance liver tissue repair and regeneration by any means available (cell repopulation, tissue engineering, biomaterials, proteins, small molecules, and genes). Recent experimental work suggests that liver repopulation and engineered liver tissue are best suited to the task if an unlimited availability of functional induced pluripotent stem (iPS)–derived liver cells can be achieved. The derivation of iPS cells by reprogramming cell fate has opened up new lines of investigation, for instance, the generation of iPS-derived xenogeneic organs or the possibility of simply inducing the liver to reprogram its own hepatocyte function after injury. We reviewed current knowledge about liver repopulation, generation of engineered livers and reprogramming of liver function. We also discussed the numerous barriers that have to be overcome for clinical implementation. PMID:26699680

  19. Translating Regenerative Biomaterials Into Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Stace, Edward T; Dakin, Stephanie G; Mouthuy, Pierre-Alexis; Carr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Globally health care spending is increasing unsustainably. This is especially true of the treatment of musculoskeletal (MSK) disease where in the United States the MSK disease burden has doubled over the last 15 years. With an aging and increasingly obese population, the surge in MSK related spending is only set to worsen. Despite increased funding, research and attention to this pressing health need, little progress has been made toward novel therapies. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) strategies could provide the solutions required to mitigate this mounting burden. Biomaterial-based treatments in particular present a promising field of potentially cost-effective therapies. However, the translation of a scientific development to a successful treatment is fraught with difficulties. These barriers have so far limited translation of TERM science into clinical treatments. It is crucial for primary researchers to be aware of the barriers currently restricting the progression of science to treatments. Researchers need to act prospectively to ensure the clinical, financial, and regulatory hurdles which seem so far removed from laboratory science do not stall or prevent the subsequent translation of their idea into a treatment. The aim of this review is to explore the development and translation of new treatments. Increasing the understanding of these complexities and barriers among primary researchers could enhance the efficiency of biomaterial translation.

  20. Recent advancements in regenerative dentistry: A review.

    PubMed

    Amrollahi, Pouya; Shah, Brinda; Seifi, Amir; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-12-01

    Although human mouth benefits from remarkable mechanical properties, it is very susceptible to traumatic damages, exposure to microbial attacks, and congenital maladies. Since the human dentition plays a crucial role in mastication, phonation and esthetics, finding promising and more efficient strategies to reestablish its functionality in the event of disruption has been important. Dating back to antiquity, conventional dentistry has been offering evacuation, restoration, and replacement of the diseased dental tissue. However, due to the limited ability and short lifespan of traditional restorative solutions, scientists have taken advantage of current advancements in medicine to create better solutions for the oral health field and have coined it "regenerative dentistry." This new field takes advantage of the recent innovations in stem cell research, cellular and molecular biology, tissue engineering, and materials science etc. In this review, the recently known resources and approaches used for regeneration of dental and oral tissues were evaluated using the databases of Scopus and Web of Science. Scientists have used a wide range of biomaterials and scaffolds (artificial and natural), genes (with viral and non-viral vectors), stem cells (isolated from deciduous teeth, dental pulp, periodontal ligament, adipose tissue, salivary glands, and dental follicle) and growth factors (used for stimulating cell differentiation) in order to apply tissue engineering approaches to dentistry. Although they have been successful in preclinical and clinical partial regeneration of dental tissues, whole-tooth engineering still seems to be far-fetched, unless certain shortcomings are addressed.

  1. New biomimetic directions in regenerative ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Green, David W; Watson, Gregory S; Watson, Jolanta; Abraham, Samuel J K

    2012-03-01

    One of the most complete and permanent ways of treating many causes of visual impairment and blindness is to replace the entire affected tissue with pre-cultured ocular tissues supported and maintained on biomaterial frameworks. One direction towards enhancing ocular tissue regeneration on biomaterials, in the laboratory is by applying biomimicry. Specifically to engineer biomaterials with important functional elements of the native extracellular matrices, such as topography, that support and organise cells into coherent tissues. Further problems in regenerative ophthalmology can be potentially solved through application of biomimicry. They include, more efficient ways of moving and transplanting cultivated tissues into correct therapeutic locations inside the eye and scar-less, non-destructive healing of surgical incisions and wounds, to repair structural integrity of tissues at the ocular surface. Two examples are given to show this potential for redeveloping an ocular epithelium onto a nanostructured insect wing surface and producing an origami membrane modelled on deployable structures in nature. Efforts to harness natural innovation will eventually provide unique designs and structures that cannot for now be made synthetically, for regeneration of clinically acceptable ocular tissues.

  2. Regenerative Capacity of Macrophages for Remyelination.

    PubMed

    Rawji, Khalil S; Mishra, Manoj K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-01-01

    White matter injury, consisting of loss of axons, myelin, and oligodendrocytes, is common in many neurological disorders and is believed to underlie several motor and sensory deficits. Remyelination is the process in which the insulative myelin sheath is restored to axons, thereby facilitating recovery from functional loss. Remyelination proceeds with oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) that differentiate into oligodendrocytes to synthesize the new myelin sheath after demyelination. This process is influenced by several factors, including trophic factors, inhibitory molecules in the lesion microenvironment, age of the subject, as well as the inflammatory response. Currently studied strategies that enhance remyelination consist of pharmacological approaches that directly induce OPC differentiation or using agents to neutralize the inhibitory microenvironment. Another strategy is to harness a reparative inflammatory response. This response, coordinated by central nervous system resident microglia and peripherally-derived infiltrating macrophages, has been shown to be important in the remyelination process. These innate immune cells perform important functions in remyelination, including the proteolysis and phagocytosis of inhibitory molecules present in the lesion microenvironment, the provision of trophic and metabolic factors to OPCs, in addition to iron handling capacity. Additionally, an initial pro-inflammatory phase followed by a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phase has been shown to be important for OPC proliferation and differentiation, respectively. This review will discuss the beneficial roles of macrophages/microglia in remyelination and discuss therapeutic strategies to obtain the optimal regenerative macrophage phenotype for enhanced remyelination. PMID:27243011

  3. Regenerative medicine as applied to general surgery.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Wood, Kathryn J; De Coppi, Paolo; Baptista, Pedro M; Binder, Kyle W; Bitar, Khalil N; Breuer, Christopher; Burnett, Luke; Christ, George; Farney, Alan; Figliuzzi, Marina; Holmes, James H; Koch, Kenneth; Macchiarini, Paolo; Mirmalek Sani, Sayed-Hadi; Opara, Emmanuel; Remuzzi, Andrea; Rogers, Jeffrey; Saul, Justin M; Seliktar, Dror; Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Smith, Tom; Solomon, Daniel; Van Dyke, Mark; Yoo, James J; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Atala, Anthony; Stratta, Robert J; Soker, Shay

    2012-05-01

    The present review illustrates the state of the art of regenerative medicine (RM) as applied to surgical diseases and demonstrates that this field has the potential to address some of the unmet needs in surgery. RM is a multidisciplinary field whose purpose is to regenerate in vivo or ex vivo human cells, tissues, or organs to restore or establish normal function through exploitation of the potential to regenerate, which is intrinsic to human cells, tissues, and organs. RM uses cells and/or specially designed biomaterials to reach its goals and RM-based therapies are already in use in several clinical trials in most fields of surgery. The main challenges for investigators are threefold: Creation of an appropriate microenvironment ex vivo that is able to sustain cell physiology and function in order to generate the desired cells or body parts; identification and appropriate manipulation of cells that have the potential to generate parenchymal, stromal and vascular components on demand, both in vivo and ex vivo; and production of smart materials that are able to drive cell fate.

  4. Regenerative treatment in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Mevci; Attar, Ayhan; Kuzu, Isinsu

    2012-09-01

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating, traumatic event, and experienced mainly among young people. Until the modern era, spinal cord injury was so rapidly fatal that no seriously injured persons would survive long enough for regeneration to occur. Treatment of spinal cord injury can be summarized as follows: prevent further cord injury, maintain blood flow, relieve spinal cord compression, and provide secure vertebral stabilization so as to allow mobilization and rehabilitation, none of which achieves functional recovery. Previous studies have focused on analyzing the pathogenesis of secondary injury that extends from the injury epicenter to the periphery, as well as the tissue damage and neural cell death associated with secondary injury. Now, there are hundreds of current experimental and clinical regenerative treatment studies. One of the most popular treatment method is cell transplantation in injured spinal cord. For this purpose bone marrow stromal cells, mononuclear stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, and olfactory ensheathing cells can be used. As a result, cell transplantation has become a promising therapeutic option for spinal cord injury patients. In this paper we discuss the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury.

  5. Regenerative Capacity of Macrophages for Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Rawji, Khalil S.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Yong, V. Wee

    2016-01-01

    White matter injury, consisting of loss of axons, myelin, and oligodendrocytes, is common in many neurological disorders and is believed to underlie several motor and sensory deficits. Remyelination is the process in which the insulative myelin sheath is restored to axons, thereby facilitating recovery from functional loss. Remyelination proceeds with oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) that differentiate into oligodendrocytes to synthesize the new myelin sheath after demyelination. This process is influenced by several factors, including trophic factors, inhibitory molecules in the lesion microenvironment, age of the subject, as well as the inflammatory response. Currently studied strategies that enhance remyelination consist of pharmacological approaches that directly induce OPC differentiation or using agents to neutralize the inhibitory microenvironment. Another strategy is to harness a reparative inflammatory response. This response, coordinated by central nervous system resident microglia and peripherally-derived infiltrating macrophages, has been shown to be important in the remyelination process. These innate immune cells perform important functions in remyelination, including the proteolysis and phagocytosis of inhibitory molecules present in the lesion microenvironment, the provision of trophic and metabolic factors to OPCs, in addition to iron handling capacity. Additionally, an initial pro-inflammatory phase followed by a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phase has been shown to be important for OPC proliferation and differentiation, respectively. This review will discuss the beneficial roles of macrophages/microglia in remyelination and discuss therapeutic strategies to obtain the optimal regenerative macrophage phenotype for enhanced remyelination. PMID:27243011

  6. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  7. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  8. Sandbox modelling of sequential thrusting in a mechanically two-layered system and its implications in fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Puspendu; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-10-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts display multi-storied thrust sequences, characterizing a composite architecture of the thrust wedges. Despite dramatic progress in sandbox modelling over the last three decades, our understanding of such composite thrust-wedge mechanics is limited and demands a re-visit to the problem of sequential thrusting in mechanically layered systems. This study offers a new approach to sandbox modelling, designed with a two-layered sandpack simulating a mechanically weak Coulomb layer, resting coherently upon a stronger Coulomb layer. Our experimental models reproduce strikingly similar styles of the multi-storied frontal thrust sequences observed in natural fold-and- thrust belts. The upper weak horizon undergoes sequential thrusting at a high spatial frequency, forming numerous, closely spaced frontal thrusts, whereas the lower strong horizon produces widely spaced thrusts with progressive horizontal shortening. This contrasting thrust progression behaviour gives rise to composite thrust architecture in the layered sandpack. We show the evolution of such composite thrust sequences as a function of frictional strength (μb) at the basal detachment and thickness ratio (Tr) between the weak and strong layers. For any given values of Tr and μb, the two thrust sequences progress at different rates; the closely-spaced, upper thrust sequence advances forelandward at a faster rate than the widely-spaced, lower thrust sequence. Basal friction (μb) has little effects on the vergence of thrusts in the upper weak layer; they verge always towards foreland, irrespective of Tr values. But, the lower strong layer develops back-vergent thrusts when μb is low (∼0.36). In our experiments, closely spaced thrusts in the upper sequence experience intense reactivation due to their interaction with widely spaced thrusts in the lower sequence. The interaction eventually affects the wedge topography, leading to two distinct parts: inner and outer wedges

  9. Citrate-Based Biomaterials and Their Applications in Regenerative Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Richard T.; Yang, Jian; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in biomaterials science and engineering are crucial to translating regenerative engineering, an emerging field that aims to recreate complex tissues, into clinical practice. In this regard, citrate-based biomaterials have become an important tool owing to their versatile material and biological characteristics including unique antioxidant, antimicrobial, adhesive, and fluorescent properties. This review discusses fundamental design considerations, strategies to incorporate unique functionality, and examples of how citrate-based biomaterials can be an enabling technology for regenerative engineering. PMID:27004046

  10. Physiological regeneration of skin appendages and implications for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Randall, Valerie A; Widelitz, Randall B.; Wu, Ping; Jiang, Ting-Xin

    2013-01-01

    The concept of regenerative medicine is relatively new, but animals are well known to remake their hair and feathers regularly by normal regenerative physiological processes. Here we focus on 1) how extra-follicular environments can regulate hair and feather stem cell activities and 2) how different configurations of stem cells can shape organ forms in different body regions to fulfil changing physiological needs. PMID:22505663

  11. Small molecule delivery through nanofibrous scaffolds for musculoskeletal regenerative engineering

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Erica J.; Jiang, Tao; Nelson, Clarke; Henry, Nicole; Lo, Kevin W.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal regenerative engineering approach using small bioactive molecules in conjunction with advanced materials has emerged as a highly promising strategy for musculoskeletal repair and regeneration. Advanced biomaterials technologies have revealed nanofiber-based scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering as vehicles for the controlled delivery of small molecule drugs. This review article highlights recent advances in nanofiber-based delivery of small molecules for musculoskeletal regenerative engineering. The article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions. PMID:24907464

  12. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  13. Multibeam study of the Flores Backarc Thrust Belt, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Eli A.; Breen, Nancy A.; Prasetyo, Hardi; Hussong, Donald M.

    1986-03-01

    Using the SeaMARC II seafloor mapping tool in conjunction with closely spaced seismic reflection profiles, we have mapped a segment of the Flores back arc thrust zone. Structural irregularities along the deformation front of the thrust zone result from changing stratigraphy and basement structure of the lower plate. NE trending faults cutting the outer slope of the Flores basin are easily mapped because they truncate dense drainage patterns obliquely. Mud diapirs, probably indicating elevated fluid pressures, have formed throughout the accretionary wedge but appear to be concentrated (as do back arc thrust earthquakes) at the ends of thrust faults. The overall orientation of the deformation front of the accretionary wedge is 100°, suggesting a NNE sense of thrust motion and supporting an origin of the thrust zone by collision of the arc with Australia rather than by magmatic forcing or gravitational sliding or spreading. Orientations of faults and folds close to the arc are not consistent with the trends of the frontal thrusts, however, and the difference may be due to either different initial orientations or to later rotations of structural features as the accretionary wedge grew.

  14. Thrust and propulsive efficiency from an instructive viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-09-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static pressures that act on engine surfaces. Such an alternative, but equivalent, method can offer insights into some special examples of jet engine thrust that contradict commonly held beliefs. One such example is provided by the engine bellmouth that is used for testing jet engines on the ground. The static pressure distribution clearly shows that the engine bellmouth actually experiences forward thrust. Another example is provided by the conic exhaust nozzle that is used at the end of some jet engines. The static pressure distribution shows that the conic nozzle does not experience any forward thrust (although the nozzle increases the overall thrust of an engine through higher pressures upstream of the nozzle). Following these examples, a basis for conceptualizing propulsive efficiency is discussed. This illustrates that it is more efficient to have a smaller acceleration of a large amount of air than a larger acceleration of a smaller amount of air.

  15. Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

  16. Structural style of the Marathon thrust belt, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Robert G.; Varga, Robert J.; Altany, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    The Marathon portion of the Ouachita thrust belt consists of a highly deformed allochthonous wedge of Cambrian-Pennsylvanian slope strata (Marathon facies) that was transported to the northwest and emplaced over Pennsylvanian foredeep sediments. The foredeep strata in turn overlie early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments which are deformed by late Paleozoic basement-involved reverse faults. The Dugout Creek thrust is the basal thrust of the allochthon. Shortening in this sheet and overlying sheets is ˜80%. Steep imbricate faults link the Dugout Creek thrust to upper level detachments forming complex duplex zones. Progressive thrusting and shortening within the allochthon folded the upper level detachments and associated thrust sheets. The Caballos Novaculite is the most competent unit within the Marathon facies and controlled development of prominent detachment folds. Deeper imbricate sheets composed of the Late Pennsylvanian foredeep strata, and possibly early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments developed concurrently with emplacement of the Marathon allochthon and folded the overlying allochthon. Following termination of thrusting in the earliest Permian, subsidence and deposition shifted northward to the Delaware, Midland and Val Verde foreland basins.

  17. Turning back the cardiac regenerative clock: lessons from the neonate.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I; Porrello, Enzo R

    2012-07-01

    The adult mammalian heart has an extremely limited capacity for regeneration. As a consequence, ischemic heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the developed world, and the heart continues to be a major focal point for regenerative medicine. Understanding innate mechanisms of heart regeneration is important and may provide a blueprint for clinical translation. For example, urodele amphibians and teleost fish can mount an endogenous regenerative response following multiple forms of cardiac injury, and this regenerative response appears to be mediated through proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes. How and why mammals have lost the capacity for heart regeneration since the divergence from teleost fish more than 450 million years ago has been a major unresolved question in the field. Recent studies in mice indicate that the mammalian heart possesses significant regenerative potential during embryonic and neonatal life, but this regenerative capacity is lost rapidly after birth. This review focuses on mechanisms of heart regeneration in neonatal mice, with a particular emphasis on similarities and differences with the zebrafish model. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of postnatal heart maturation and regenerative arrest are also highlighted. The possibility of recapitulating ontogenetically and phylogenetically ancient mechanisms of cardiac regeneration in the adult human heart represents an exciting new frontier in cardiology.

  18. Manufacturing road map for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Joshua; Harrysson, Ola; Shirwaiker, Rohan; Starly, Binil; Wysk, Richard; Cohen, Paul; Allickson, Julie; Yoo, James; Atala, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    The Regenerative Medicine Foundation Annual Conference held on May 6 and 7, 2014, had a vision of assisting with translating tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM)-based technologies closer to the clinic. This vision was achieved by assembling leaders in the field to cover critical areas. Some of these critical areas included regulatory pathways for regenerative medicine therapies, strategic partnerships, coordination of resources, developing standards for the field, government support, priorities for industry, biobanking, and new technologies. The final day of this conference featured focused sessions on manufacturing, during which expert speakers were invited from industry, government, and academia. The speakers identified and accessed roadblocks plaguing the field where improvements in advanced manufacturing offered many solutions. The manufacturing sessions included (a) product development toward commercialization in regenerative medicine, (b) process challenges to scale up manufacturing in regenerative medicine, and (c) infrastructure needs for manufacturing in regenerative medicine. Subsequent to this, industry was invited to participate in a survey to further elucidate the challenges to translation and scale-up. This perspective article will cover the lessons learned from these manufacturing sessions and early results from the survey. We also outline a road map for developing the manufacturing infrastructure, resources, standards, capabilities, education, training, and workforce development to realize the promise of TERM.

  19. The regenerative medicine coalition. Interview with Frank-Roman Lauter.

    PubMed

    Lauter, Frank-Roman

    2012-11-01

    Frank-Roman Lauter, Secretary General of the recently launched Regenerative Medicine Coalition, explains how the coalition was formed and what they hope to achieve. Frank-Roman Lauter has served as Secretary General of the Regenerative Medicine Coalition since 2012, and as Head of Business Development at Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies since 2007. Frank-Roman Lauter's interest is the organization of academic infrastructures to promote efficient translation of research findings into new therapies. He co-organizes joined strategy development for regenerative medicine clusters from seven European countries (FP7-EU Project) and has initiated cooperation between the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the German Federal Ministry for Education & Research, resulting in a joined funding program. Recently, he cofounded the international consortium of Regenerative Medicine translational centers (RMC; www.the-rmc.org ). Trained as a molecular biologist at the Max-Planck Institute in Berlin-Dahlem and at Stanford, he has 16 years of experience as an entrepreneur and life science manager in Germany and the USA. PMID:23210813

  20. Manufacturing Road Map for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Joshua; Harrysson, Ola; Shirwaiker, Rohan; Starly, Binil; Wysk, Richard; Cohen, Paul; Allickson, Julie; Yoo, James

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Regenerative Medicine Foundation Annual Conference held on May 6 and 7, 2014, had a vision of assisting with translating tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM)-based technologies closer to the clinic. This vision was achieved by assembling leaders in the field to cover critical areas. Some of these critical areas included regulatory pathways for regenerative medicine therapies, strategic partnerships, coordination of resources, developing standards for the field, government support, priorities for industry, biobanking, and new technologies. The final day of this conference featured focused sessions on manufacturing, during which expert speakers were invited from industry, government, and academia. The speakers identified and accessed roadblocks plaguing the field where improvements in advanced manufacturing offered many solutions. The manufacturing sessions included (a) product development toward commercialization in regenerative medicine, (b) process challenges to scale up manufacturing in regenerative medicine, and (c) infrastructure needs for manufacturing in regenerative medicine. Subsequent to this, industry was invited to participate in a survey to further elucidate the challenges to translation and scale-up. This perspective article will cover the lessons learned from these manufacturing sessions and early results from the survey. We also outline a road map for developing the manufacturing infrastructure, resources, standards, capabilities, education, training, and workforce development to realize the promise of TERM. PMID:25575525

  1. Interseismic coupling on the main Himalayan thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, V. L.; Avouac, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    We determine the slip rate and pattern of interseismic coupling on the Main Himalayan Thrust along the entire Himalayan arc based on a compilation of geodetic, interferometric synthetic aperture radar, and microseismicity data. We show that convergence is perpendicular to the arc and increases eastwards from 13.3 ± 1.7 mm/yr to 21.2 ± 2.0 mm/yr. These rates are comparable to geological and geomorphic estimates, indicating an essentially elastic geodetic surface strain. The interseismic uplift rate predicted from the coupling model closely mimics the topography, suggesting that a small percentage of the interseismic strain is permanent. We find that the fault is fully locked along its complete length over about 100 km width. We don't find any resolvable aseismic barrier that could affect the seismic segmentation of the arc and limit the along-strike propagation of seismic ruptures. The moment deficit builds up at a rate of 15.1 ± 1 × 1019 N m/yr for the entire length of the Himalaya.

  2. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

  3. Electronegative Gas Thruster - Direct Thrust Measurement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John (Principal Investigator); Aanesland, Ane; Polzin, Kurt; Walker, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This effort is an international collaboration and academic partnership to mature an innovative electric propulsion (EP) thruster concept to TRL 3 through direct thrust measurement. The initial target application is for Small Satellites, but can be extended to higher power. The Plasma propulsion with Electronegative GASES (PEGASES) concept simplifies ion thruster operation, eliminates a neutralizer requirement and should yield longer life capabilities and lower cost implementation over conventional gridded ion engines. The basic proof-of concept has been demonstrated and matured to TRL 2 over the past several years by researchers at the Laboratoire de Physique des Plasma in France. Due to the low maturity of the innovation, there are currently no domestic investments in electronegative gas thrusters anywhere within NASA, industry or academia. The end product of this Center Innovation Fund (CIF) project will be a validation of the proof-of-concept, maturation to TRL 3 and technology assessment report to summarize the potential for the PEGASES concept to supplant the incumbent technology. Information exchange with the foreign national will be one-way with the exception of the test results. Those test results will first go through a standard public release ITAR/export control review, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum.

  4. Propeller thrust analysis using Prandtl's lifting line theory, a comparison between the experimental thrust and the thrust predicted by Prandtl's lifting line theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Steven R.

    The lifting line theory was first developed by Prandtl and was used primarily on analysis of airplane wings. Though the theory is about one hundred years old, it is still used in the initial calculations to find the lift of a wing. The question that guided this thesis was, "How close does Prandtl's lifting line theory predict the thrust of a propeller?" In order to answer this question, an experiment was designed that measured the thrust of a propeller for different speeds. The measured thrust was compared to what the theory predicted. In order to do this experiment and analysis, a propeller needed to be used. A walnut wood ultralight propeller was chosen that had a 1.30 meter (51 inches) length from tip to tip. In this thesis, Prandtl's lifting line theory was modified to account for the different incoming velocity depending on the radial position of the airfoil. A modified equation was used to reflect these differences. A working code was developed based on this modified equation. A testing rig was built that allowed the propeller to be rotated at high speeds while measuring the thrust. During testing, the rotational speed of the propeller ranged from 13-43 rotations per second. The thrust from the propeller was measured at different speeds and ranged from 16-33 Newton's. The test data were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the lifting line code. A plot in Chapter 5 (the results section) shows the theoretical vs. actual thrust for different rotational speeds. The theory over predicted the actual thrust of the propeller. Depending on the rotational speed, the error was: at low speeds 36%, at low to moderate speeds 84%, and at high speeds the error increased to 195%. Different reasons for these errors are discussed.

  5. Electric sail control mode for amplified transverse thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, P.; Janhunen, P.; Envall, J.

    2015-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail produces thrust by centrifugally spanned high voltage tethers interacting with the solar wind protons. The sail attitude can be controlled and attitude maneuvers are possible by tether voltage modulation synchronous with the sail rotation. Especially, the sail can be inclined with respect to the solar wind direction to obtain transverse thrust to change the osculating orbit angular momentum. Such an inclination has to be maintained by a continual control voltage modulation. Consequently, the tether voltage available for the thrust is less than the maximum voltage provided by the power system. Using a spherical pendulum as a model for a single rotating tether, we derive analytical estimations for the control efficiency for two separate sail control modes. One is a continuous control modulation that corresponds to strictly planar tether tip motion. The other is an on-off modulation with the tether tip moving along a closed loop on a saddle surface. The novel on-off mode is introduced here to both amplify the transverse thrust and reduce the power consumption. During the rotation cycle, the maximum voltage is applied to the tether only over two thrusting arcs when most of the transverse thrust is produced. In addition to the transverse thrust, we obtain the thrusting angle and electric power consumption for the two control modes. It is concluded that while the thrusting angle is about half of the sail inclination for the continuous modulation it approximately equals to the inclination angle for the on-off modulation. The efficiency of the on-off mode is emphasized when power consumption is considered, and the on-off mode can be used to improve the propulsive acceleration through the reduced power system mass.

  6. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  7. Thrust measurement in a 2-D scramjet nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Sean

    1995-01-01

    The two-dimensional thrust nozzle presents a challenging problem. The loading is not axisymmetric as in the case of a cone and the internal flow presents some design difficulties. A two-sting system has been chosen to accomodate the internal flow and achieve some symmetry. The situation is complicated by the fact that with the small ramp angle and the internal pressure on the nozzle walls, loading is predominantly transverse. Yet it is the axial thrust which is to be measured (i.e., the tensile waves propagating in the stings). Although bending stress waves travel at most at only 60% of the speed of the axial stress waves, the system needs to be stiffened against bending. The second sting was originally only used to preserve symmetry. However, the pressures on each thrust surface may be quite different at some conditions, so at this stage the signals from both stings are being averaged as a first order approximation of the net thrust. The expected axial thrust from this nozzle is not large so thin stings are required. In addition, the contact area between nozzle and sting needs to be maximized. The result was that it was decided to twist the stings through 90 deg, without distorting their cross-sectional shape, just aft of the nozzle. Finite element analysis showed that this would not significantly alter the propagation of the axial stress wave in the sting, while the rigidity of the system is greatly increased. A Mach 4 contoured nozzle is used in the experiments. The thrust calculated by integrating the static pressure measurements on the thrust surfaces is compared with the deconvolved strain measurement of the net thrust for the cases of air only and hydrogen fuel injected into air at approximately 9 MJ/kg nozzle supply enthalpy. The gain in thrust due to combustion is visible in this result.

  8. Role of detachments and thrust kinematics in Structural evolution of Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belt in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Humaad; Zeilinger, Gerold; Sobel, Edward; Heidarzadeh, Ghasem

    2016-04-01

    The Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belts in Pakistan represent the outermost external zone of the Himalayan fold and thrust system. The Main Boundary thrust marks their northern extent, showing that they are genetically linked; however, both exhibit a distinct contrast between the structural style at the surface and subsurface. This contrast becomes more conspicuous at the leading edge of the thrust belt where the Potwar allochothon extends further south, linked to Kohat in the north via an active strike-slip fault. Previous workers explained the structural evolution of the two belts separately, disregarding the influence of similar fold and thrusts developed in both belts. This research focuses on the preparation of a 3D structural model at the boundary of the two thrust belts to understand similarities and differences in their structural style and evolution. The model is constrained by integrating field, seismic and well data for better subsurface interpretation. Cross sections show that Potwar evolved on thrust faults originating from a basal detachment in Precambrian (pC) salt and terminating in Miocene Molasse forming duplexes of pre Himalayan strata. To the south, the Potwar allochothon is glided over a salt detachment with rare internal deformation toward its leading edge, forming fault bend fold thrust structure known as Salt range. The structural evolution towards the west in Kohat results from deformation on multiple detachment horizons at the pC salt, Eocene evaporites and Miocene Molasse. Disharmonic folding over Eocene evaporites is evident from their presence in the cores of outcropping folds. In the subsurface, closely spaced thrusts cut up section from basal detachment terminates in Eocene evaporites forming duplex in northern part of area. In south change of lithological facies from evaporites to limestone shift detachment level upward in to molasse strata which resemble structural style in northern Potwar. Thrusts at the surface evolved from the

  9. Performance calculations and research direction for a water enhanced regenerative gas turbine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, L. H.; Archer, D. H.

    A cycle has been conceived that combines compressor cooling, humidification, and regenerative air heating with the added enhancement of direct injection of water into the air flow. In this cycle it is proposed that a fine mist of water be injected into the compressor air stream and a spray or film of water into the regenerator air stream. Water injection into the compressor air flow realizes several benefits: it cools the air flow, reducing the power required for compression and increasing the potential for exhaust heat recovery; it adds mass to the air stream, increasing the power produced by expansion; and it reduces the amount of cooling bleed air required by increasing the specific heat and decreasing the temperature of the cooling air stream. The greatest benefit would be derived from spraying a fine mist of water directly into the existing air flow into or before the compressor so that cooling and compression would occur simultaneously. This may be accomplished by entraining the water droplets in the inlet air flow or by introducing the water in stages during compression. An alternative and less technically challenging approach is to extract the air stream to a saturation chamber and then reintroduce the air stream into the compressor. This approach is not as desirable because it would increase the equipment cost and add a significant pressure drop penalty. The second use of water in this cycle is in water-assisted regeneration. The heat capacity of the hot stream in regenerators is greater than the heat capacity of the cool stream because of the increased mass flow and specific heat of the combustion products. This imbalance leads to a less than ideal exhaust heat recovery since the cool air stream is unable to absorb all of the available heat. If water is injected into the cool stream in the regenerator, some of the available heat is used to vaporize the water, allowing additional heat recovery and also adding mass to the air flow. Also, the effectiveness

  10. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates.

    PubMed

    Madaghiele, Marta; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair), which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  11. Managing Momentum on the Dawn Low Thrust Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brett A.; Vanelli, Charles A.; Swenka, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Dawn is low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft enroute to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres in an effort to better understand the early creation of the solar system. After launch in September 2007, the spacecraft will flyby Mars in February 2009 before arriving at Vesta in summer of 2011 and Ceres in early 2015. Three solar electric ion-propulsion engines are used to provide the primary thrust for the Dawn spacecraft. Ion engines produce a very small but very efficient force, and therefore must be thrusting almost continuously to realize the necessary change in velocity to reach Vesta and Ceres.

  12. Multiphysics Thrust Chamber Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. A two-pronged approach is employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of heat transfer on thrust performance. Preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  13. Dual-action gas thrust bearing for improving load capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    The principle of utilizing hydrodynamic effects in diverging films to improve the load carrying capacity in gas thrust bearings is discussed. A new concept of a dual action bearing based on that principle is described and analyzed. The potential of the new bearing is demonstrated both analytically for an infinitely long slider and by numerical solution for a flat sector shaped thrust bearing. It is shown that the dual action bearing can extend substantially the range of load carrying capacity in gas lubricated thrust bearings and can improve their efficiency.

  14. Locations of Major Thrust Faults on Mercury Point to a Formation Mechanism Associated with Crustal Thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Watters, T. R.; James, P. B.; Phillips, R. J.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Large thrust faults on Mercury are the expression of horizontal contraction that resulted from cooling of the planet; their uneven distribution may indicate that other stress fields contributed to their formation and development. We explore the relationship in the northern hemisphere between locations of lobate scarps and high-relief ridges >50 km in length and inferred crustal thickness to understand whether mechanisms that result in crustal thickening and thinning may have also influenced the locations of large thrust faults. These landforms are concentrated in areas with >53 km crustal thickness (at the 99% confidence level, on the basis of a two-sided single proportion test), an extreme end of the normal distribution (with a mean of 40 km) of modeled crustal thickness values. One possible mechanism for thickening crust and concentrating prominent thrust faults is mantle flow; a broad pattern of mantle upwelling and downwelling is compatible with Mercury's gravity anomaly and topography fields at long (>1000 km) horizontal wavelengths. On Earth (e.g., central Australia), midplate mantle downwelling has been invoked as a mechanism to thicken overlying continental crust and increase compressional stresses in the rigid upper portion of the lithosphere. Downwelling in some areas requires upwelling in others; horizontal divergence could decrease levels of compressive stresses over upwelling regions and might account for the deficiency of large thrust faults in areas of thinnest crust (<27 km, significant at the 95% confidence level). We tested the possibility that this deficiency instead corresponds to burial by thick volcanic flows within areas of smooth plains by excluding the northern plains and Caloris interior plains (the two largest expanses of smooth plains), but there was no significant change from the result for the full hemisphere. If mantle flow contributed to the current patterns of crustal thickness and large thrust fault locations, an implication is

  15. Cyclic fatigue analysis of rocket thrust chambers. Volume 1: OFHC copper chamber low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element elasto-plastic strain analysis was performed for the throat section of a regeneratively cooled rocket combustion chamber. The analysis employed the RETSCP finite element computer program. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the chamber operating cycle. The analysis was performed for chamber configuration and operating conditions corresponding to a hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber which was fatigue tested to failure. The computed strain range at typical chamber operating conditions was used in conjunction with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OHFC) copper isothermal fatigue test data to predict chamber low-cycle fatigue life.

  16. Characteristics of thrust fault imbrication near the frontal edge of the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, Buffalo Mountain, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Duddy, M.M.; Woodward, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Buffalo Mountain thrust sheet, located along the western margin of the Blue Ridge in northeastern Tennessee, provides an excellent opportunity to examine transitional structural styles and deformation mechanisms between the Valley and Ridge and Blue Ridge. Previous interpretation suggests that, because of pre-fault tilting, thrust faults within the Buffalo Mountain complex cut down stratigraphic section. Geometric data from the present study indicate, however, that the thrust faults cut up section with stratigraphic separations of up to 16,500'. Footwall and hanging wall bedding orientations reveal a stair-step thrust geometry; the Unicoi Fm. (basal Chilhowee Gp. quartzite) is a hanging wall flat, and the Knox Gp. (Cambro-Ordovician carbonate) is a footwall ramp. Ductile and brittle deformation mechanisms are represented by mesofabric elements. Important deformation mechanisms and elements include: flexural slip and flexural flow folding styles, pressure solution cleavage, extensional and contractional fractures, quartz filled tensional fractures and cataclastic fault zones. Although previous workers have determined that thrusting within the Blue Ridge occurs in an out-of-sequence pattern, the Buffalo Mountain thrust complex provides an example of in-sequence thrusting. Thus, based on this example, deformation styles and mechanisms within the Blue Ridge appear to be similar to Valley and Ridge deformation styles and mechanisms.

  17. Interplay of thrust, back-thrust, strike-slip and salt tectonics in a fold and thrust belt system: an example from Zakynthos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelilidis, A.; Papatheodorou, G.; Maravelis, A. G.; Christodoulou, D.; Tserolas, P.; Fakiris, E.; Dimas, X.; Georgiou, N.; Ferentinos, G.

    2016-10-01

    The southwestern flank of the Hellenic fold and thrust belt, situated along the southern edge of the Dinarides-Albanides-Hellenides continental convergent zone, was examined for reconstructing the tectonic deformation. This investigation presents an integrated study of onshore sedimentological and structural analyses, as well as offshore seismic lines, across the Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary succession in Zakynthos Island. Back-thrust faults, using the Triassic evaporites as decollement surface, during the Pliocene, and coeval diapiric intrusions formed three sub-basins on the hangingwall of the Kalamaki back-thrust fault. This interaction is responsible for the growth of the Skopos Mountain and the soft sediment deformation that formed synclines and slumps, respectively. Back-thrust and strike-slip faults were active during the early Pleistocene, and diapiric intrusions modified the bathymetry on the sea floor, giving rise to slumps and recumbent folds. At least five events of synsedimentary diapiric intrusions have been recognized and are marked by five slump horizons. During the Holocene, the diapiric intrusions between the Kalamaki back-thrust and the Vrachionas anticline could be either related to normal faults or gravitationally driven.

  18. New application of plate-fin heat exchanger with regenerative cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Gwak, Kyung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    A design idea is newly proposed and investigated for the application of plate-fin heat exchanger (PFHX) with regenerative cryocoolers. The role of this heat exchanger is to effectively absorb heat from the stream of coolant and deliver it to the cold-head of a cryocooler. While various types of tubular HX's have been developed so far, a small PFHX could be more useful for this purpose by taking advantage of compactness and design flexibility. In order to confirm the feasibility and effectiveness, a prototype of aluminum-brazed PFHX is designed, fabricated, and tested with a single-stage GM cryocooler in experiments for subcooling liquid nitrogen from 78 K to 65-70 K. The results show that the PFHX is 30-50% more effective in cooling rate than the tubular HX's. Several potential applications of PFHX are presented and discussed with specific design concepts.

  19. Cirrhosis of the liver. A regenerative process.

    PubMed

    Callea, F; Brisigotti, M; Fabbretti, G; Sciot, R; Van Eyken, P; Favret, M

    1991-09-01

    The ancient story of Prometheus, chained to a rock for defying Zeus by stealing fire from Mount Olympus and subjected to daily tearing at his liver by an eagle, attests to the early recognition of the extraordinary regenerative capacity of the human liver. This process had remained an intriguing mystery over the millennia. In the last 20 years, following the pioneering work of Bucher (1) and Moolten et al (2), there has been an explosion of research that has clarified some of the mechanisms underlying the process of hepatic regeneration. Regeneration implies proliferation and regeneration. After the fetal and postnatal growth of the liver is completed, hepatocytes no longer proliferate actively, but they can proliferate in response to cell death or loss (3). Hepatocyte growth responses are of particular research interest because they occur in vivo and involve cells that are normally quiescent. Hepatic regeneration constitutes a highly regulated process that is best shown by the arrest of liver growth following a partial hepatectomy precisely at the moment the hepatic mass reaches the mass of the original intact liver (3). This suggests that hepatic regeneration after a partial hepatectomy is a strictly regulated nonautonomous growth process that is controlled by the same factors that are responsible for the determination and maintenance of hepatic mass in a normal individual. In response to a partial hepatectomy, hepatocytes enter the cell cycle and progress to DNA synthesis and replication but only in numbers sufficient to restore the hepatic mass. The regeneration response is both synchronized and universal in that it affects all intrahepatic cell lines, including nonparenchymal cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.